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Sample records for related intestinal disease

  1. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Maria C.; Ortega-Rocha, Elizabeth M.; Coronado-Arrázola, Irenice; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Boudin, Helene; Neunlist, Michel; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; Riedel, Claudia A.

    2018-01-01

    The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases. PMID:29593681

  2. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Opazo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases.

  3. Intestinal tract diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Roentgenoanatomy and physiology of the small intestine are described. Indications for radiological examinations and their possibilities in the diagnosis of the small intestine diseases are considered.Congenital anomalies and failures in the small intestine development, clinical indications and diagnosis methods for the detection of different aetiology enteritis are described. Characteristics of primary malabsorption due to congenital or acquired inferiority of the small intestine, is provided. Radiological picture of intestinal allergies is described. Clinical, morphological, radiological pictures of Crohn's disease are considered in detail. Special attention is paid to the frequency of primary and secondary tuberculosis of intestinal tract. The description of clinical indications and frequency of benign and malignant tumours of the small intestine, methods for their diagnosis are given. Radiological pictures of parasitogenic and rare diseases of the small intestine are presented. Changes in the small intestine as a result of its reaction to pathological processes, developing in other organs and systems of the organism, are described

  4. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R. M.; Uil, J. J.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  5. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  6. Intestinal permeability of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in patients with Crohn's disease and their healthy relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, M.; Eriksen, J.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Muckadell, O.B.S. de

    1989-01-01

    An increased intestinal permeability has been proposed as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. The 24-h urinary excretion of 100 μCi 51 Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to test the permeability in 15 patients with Crohn's disease and in 20 healthy first-degree relatives, who were known to have a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-eight healthy persons not related to patients with inflammatory bowel disease served as control material. The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion of the relatives was not significantly higher than that of the controls, whereas patients with Crohn's disease had a significantly higher excretion than both the relatives and the controls. Among patients the increased excretion was found only if the small intestine was involved. It is concluded that 1) as a group, patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine have an increased intestinal permeability, in contrast to their healthy relatives, who have a normal permeability; 2) a considerable overlap of the results of the 51 Cr-EDTA test was found between the groups studied, and the test is not suitable for evaluating individual patients; 3) the results do not support the hypothesis of an increase in intestinal permeability as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. 29 refs

  7. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth in Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    Silvia M. Ferolla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. It is a progressive disorder involving a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, which may be followed by lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species and consequent inflammation. Recent studies suggest that the characteristics of the gut microbiota are altered in NAFLD, and also, that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO contributes to the pathogenesis of this condition. This review presents the chief findings from all the controlled studies that evaluated SIBO, gut permeability and endotoxemia in human NAFLD. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involving SIBO, lipid accumulation and development of NASH. The understanding of these mechanisms may allow the development of new targets for NASH treatment in the future.

  8. Hirschsprung's disease - Postsurgical intestinal dysmotility

    OpenAIRE

    Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das Neves; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim Murray; de Carvalho, Rita Barbosa; Lomazi, Elizete Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the case of an infant with Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis, which, after surgical resection of the aganglionic segment persisted with irreversible functional intestinal obstruction; discuss the difficulties in managing this form of congenital aganglionosis and discuss a plausible pathogenetic mechanism for this case. Case description: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis was establi...

  9. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... + CDCA for 14 days, and responses were assessed by serum markers, histology, and levels of key regulatory peptides. Cholestasis and steatosis were demonstrated in the TPN group relative to EN controls by elevated levels of serum total and direct bilirubin and also bile acids and liver triglyceride (TG...

  10. INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA IN DIGESTIVE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Friche PASSOS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND In recent years, especially after the development of sophisticated metagenomic studies, research on the intestinal microbiota has increased, radically transforming our knowledge about the microbiome and its association with health maintenance and disease development in humans. Increasing evidence has shown that a permanent alteration in microbiota composition or function (dysbiosis can alter immune responses, metabolism, intestinal permeability, and digestive motility, thereby promoting a proinflammatory state. Such alterations can mainly impair the host’s immune and metabolic functions, thus favoring the onset of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, digestive, neurological, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. This comprehensive review is a compilation of the available literature on the formation of the complex intestinal ecosystem and its impact on the incidence of diseases such as obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and digestive neoplasms. CONCLUSION: Alterations in the composition and function of the gastrointestinal microbiota (dysbiosis have a direct impact on human health and seem to have an important role in the pathogenesis of several gastrointestinal diseases, whether inflammatory, metabolic, or neoplastic ones.

  11. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignes, Stéphane; Bellanger, Jérôme

    2008-02-22

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool alpha1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum) or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other inconsistently effective

  12. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellanger Jérôme

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other

  13. [Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignes, S; Bellanger, J

    2017-08-31

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), Waldmann's disease, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals leading to lymph leakage into the small-bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. The main symptom is bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe including pleural effusion, pericarditis or ascites. Protein-losing enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance and diagnosis by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of biopsies. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Several B-cell lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A long-term strictly low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride and liposoluble vitamin supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. Octreotide, a somatostatin analog, have been proposed with an inconsistent efficacy in association with diet. Surgical small-bowel resection is useful in the rare cases with segmental and localized intestinal lymphangiectasia. A prolonged clinical and biological follow-up is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Anca; Man, A; Toma, Felicia; Székely, Edit; Lôrinczi, Lilla; Sipoş, Anca

    2007-01-01

    To compare the incidence of intestinal parasitosis between children with residence in urban and rural areas: to compare the efficacy of parasitologic diagnostic methods. In our study we included two lots of children. The first lot consisted in 74 children from rural areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces and 55 samples for the "Scotch tape" test. The second lot consisted in 214 children from urban areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces. We examined each sample of feces by three different methods. The study was performed between April to June 2006. The incidence of intestinal parasitosis increases in children from urban areas towards rural areas, and in children between 5 and 10 years. Ascariasis is the most frequent disease in both urban and rural areas. By examination of each fecal sample by three different methods, the number of positive cases increased. The residence in rural areas and age between 5 to 10 years are risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. The "Scotch tape" test was more efficient in Enterobius vermicularis infection than the methods performed from feces. We recommend using at the same time three diagnostic methods for feces examination to improve the diagnostic sensibility.

  15. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  16. Radiodiagnosis of diseases of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenological image of diseases, development anomalies, various diseases of the small intestine is presented. Roentgenological semiotics of chronic enterocolotis, absorption failure syndrome, Crohn's disease, tuberculosis, abdominal actinomycosis, carcenoid, benign tumors, small intestine cancer, is given. To state final correct diagnosis a complex investigation, comprising angiography, computer tomography and ultrasound diagnosis, is necessary

  17. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Increase of faecal tryptic activity relates to changes in the intestinal microbiome: analysis of Crohn's disease with a multidisciplinary platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Midtvedt

    Full Text Available To investigate-by molecular, classical and functional methods-the microbiota in biopsies and faeces from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD and controls.The microbiota in biopsies was investigated utilizing a novel molecular method and classical cultivation technology. Faecal samples were investigated by classical technology and four functional methods, reflecting alterations in short chain fatty acids pattern, conversion of cholesterol and bilirubin and inactivation of trypsin.By molecular methods we found more than 92% similarity in the microbiota on the biopsies from the two groups. However, 4.6% of microbes found in controls were lacking in CD patients. Furthermore, NotI representation libraries demonstrate two different clusters representing CD patients and controls, respectively. Utilizing conventional technology, Bacteroides (alt. Parabacteroides was less frequently detected in the biopsies from CD patients than from controls. A similar reduction in the number of Bacteroides was found in faecal samples. Bacteroides is the only group of bacteria known to be able to inactivate pancreatic trypsin. Faecal tryptic activity was high in CD patients, and inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides.CD patients have compositional and functional alterations in their intestinal microbiota, in line with the global description hypothesis rather than the candidate microorganism theory. The most striking functional difference was high amount of faecal tryptic activity in CD patients, inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides in faeces.

  19. Human organoids: a model system for intestinal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegerinck, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    You are what you eat. A common saying that indicates that your physical or mental state can be influenced by your choice of food. Unfortunately, not all people have the luxury to choose what to eat; this can be related to place of birth, social, economic state, or the physical inability of the diseased intestine to take up certain food. A cell layer, the epithelium, covers the intestine, and harbors the main functions of the intestine: uptake, digestion of food, and a barrier against unwanted...

  20. The endemiology of helicobacter pylorus infection and gastro-intestinal disease in mine and related factory workers of Tongling city, Anhui

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiangyang; Jiang Zhonglin; Yang Shunqi; Mei Yanyan; Wen Qin; Cheng Yingzi; Wang Jianmiao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the endemiology of H. pylorus infection and related gastro-intestinal disease in mine and factory workers of Tong-Ling area. Methods: 14 C-urea breath test, serum IgG and cytotoxin-producing H. pylorus antibodies determinations were performed in 1076 randomly selected adults among the mine and related factory workers in Tong - Ling area. Gastroscopy was done in 156 subjects (cytotoxin-producing H. pylorus antibody CagA-HP positive 108 and Cag-HP negative 48). Results: Seven hundred and twenty-one subjects of the 1076 (67.0%) examined were positive with the 14 C-urea breath and serological tests, among which 350 (48.5% of the 721 ) were Cag-HP positive. Factors affecting positiveness of HP infection were in the order of: working environment, gastro-intestinal symptoms, past history, vocation, age, history of previous contact, sex and non- hygiene life-style. Conclusion: The HP infection rate in Tong-Ling area was slightly higher than nationwide but with a lower CagA - HP positive rate. HP infection was mostly related to the working environment and life-style. (authors)

  1. Lynch syndrome-related small intestinal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sun-Young; Lee, Eui-Jin; Kim, Mi-Ju; Chun, Sung Min; Bae, Young Kyung; Hong, Soon Uk; Choi, Jene; Kim, Joon Mee; Jang, Kee-Taek; Kim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Gwang Il; Jung, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ghilsuk; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2017-03-28

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder caused by defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is associated with increased risk of malignancies in multiple organs. Small-intestinal adenocarcinomas are common initial manifestations of Lynch syndrome. To define the incidence and characteristics of Lynch syndrome-related small-intestinal adenocarcinomas, meticulous familial and clinical histories were obtained from 195 patients with small-intestinal adenocarcinoma, and MMR protein immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability, MLH1 methylation, and germline mutational analyses were performed. Lynch syndrome was confirmed in eight patients (4%), all of whom had synchronous/metachronous malignancies without noticeable familial histories. Small-intestinal adenocarcinomas were the first clinical manifestation in 37% (3/8) of Lynch syndrome patients, and second malignancies developed within 5 years in 63% (5/8). The patients with accompanying Lynch syndrome were younger (≤50 years; P=0.04) and more likely to have mucinous adenocarcinomas (P=0.003), and tended to survive longer (P=0.11) than those with sporadic cases. A meticulous patient history taking, MMR protein immunolabeling, and germline MMR gene mutational analysis are important for the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome-related small-intestinal adenocarcinomas. Identifying Lynch syndrome in patients with small-intestinal adenocarcinoma can be beneficial for the early detection and treatment of additional Lynch syndrome-related cancers, especially in patients who are young or have mucinous adenocarcinomas.

  2. Diaphragm disease of the small intestine: an interesting case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sana; Ajab, Shereen; Rao, Rajashekhar; Raghunathan, Girish; DaCosta, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Diaphragm disease of small intestine usually presents with nonspecific clinical features. Radiological investigations often fail to differentiate it from small intestinal tumors and inflammatory bowel disease. It is therefore diagnosed on final histology after surgical resection. We hereby report an interesting case of a suspected small bowel tumor later diagnosed as diaphragm disease on histology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Jalanka-Tuovinen

    Full Text Available While our knowledge of the intestinal microbiota during disease is accumulating, basic information of the microbiota in healthy subjects is still scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults and specifically address its temporal stability, core microbiota and relation with intestinal symptoms. We carried out a longitudinal study by following a set of 15 healthy Finnish subjects for seven weeks and regularly assessed their intestinal bacteria and archaea with the Human Intestinal Tract (HIT Chip, a phylogenetic microarray, in conjunction with qPCR analyses. The health perception and occurrence of intestinal symptoms was recorded by questionnaire at each sampling point.A high overall temporal stability of the microbiota was observed. Five subjects showed transient microbiota destabilization, which correlated not only with the intake of antibiotics but also with overseas travelling and temporary illness, expanding the hitherto known factors affecting the intestinal microbiota. We identified significant correlations between the microbiota and common intestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain and bloating. The most striking finding was the inverse correlation between Bifidobacteria and abdominal pain: subjects who experienced pain had over five-fold less Bifidobacteria compared to those without pain. Finally, a novel computational approach was used to define the common core microbiota, highlighting the role of the analysis depth in finding the phylogenetic core and estimating its size. The in-depth analysis suggested that we share a substantial number of our intestinal phylotypes but as they represent highly variable proportions of the total community, many of them often remain undetected.A global and high-resolution microbiota analysis was carried out to determine the temporal stability, the associations with intestinal symptoms, and the individual and common core microbiota in healthy adults. The

  4. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression of antim......Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression...... of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  5. Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation and intestinal permeability are elevated in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiertz, Andreas; Spiegel, Jörg; Dillmann, Ulrich; Grundmann, David; Bürmann, Jan; Faßbender, Klaus; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Unger, Marcus M

    2018-02-12

    Intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability (both possibly fueled by dysbiosis) have been suggested to be implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of the current study was to investigate whether fecal markers of inflammation and impaired intestinal barrier function corroborate this pathogenic aspect of PD. In a case-control study, we quantitatively analyzed established fecal markers of intestinal inflammation (calprotectin and lactoferrin) and fecal markers of intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) in PD patients (n = 34) and controls (n = 28, group-matched for age) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study design controlled for potential confounding factors. Calprotectin, a fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, and two fecal markers of increased intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) were significantly elevated in PD patients compared to age-matched controls. Lactoferrin, as a second fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, showed a non-significant trend towards elevated concentrations in PD patients. None of the four fecal markers correlated with disease severity, PD subtype, dopaminergic therapy, or presence of constipation. Fecal markers reflecting intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability have been primarily investigated in inflammatory bowel disease so far. Our data indicate that calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin could be useful non-invasive markers in PD as well. Even though these markers are not disease-specific, they corroborate the hypothesis of an intestinal inflammation as contributing factor in the pathogenesis of PD. Further investigations are needed to determine whether calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin can be used to define PD subgroups and to monitor the effect of interventions in PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The intestinal complement system in inflammatory bowel disease: Shaping intestinal barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Christian; Kemper, Claudia; Derer, Stefanie

    2018-06-01

    The complement system is part of innate sensor and effector systems such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). It recognizes and quickly systemically and/or locally respond to microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) with a tailored defense reaction. MAMP recognition by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and appropriate immune responses are of major importance for the maintenance of intestinal barrier function. Enterocytes highly express various complement components that are suggested to be pivotal for proper IEC function. Appropriate activation of the intestinal complement system seems to play an important role in the resolution of chronic intestinal inflammation, while over-activation and/or dysregulation may worsen intestinal inflammation. Mice deficient for single complement components suffer from enhanced intestinal inflammation mimicking the phenotype of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the mechanisms leading to complement expression in IECs seem to differ markedly between UC and CD patients. Hence, how IECs, intestinal bacteria and epithelial cell expressed complement components interact in the course of IBD still remains to be mostly elucidated to define potential unique patterns contributing to the distinct subtypes of intestinal inflammation observed in CD and UC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, S.C.; Barbara, G.; Buurman, W.; Ockhuizen, T.; Schulzke, J.D.; Serino, M.; Tilg, H.; Watson, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are accumulating that emphasize the important role of the intestinal barrier and intestinal permeability for health and disease. However, these terms are poorly defined, their assessment is a matter of debate, and their clinical significance is not clearly established. In the present review,

  8. Spectrum of diseases in acute intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Khan, A.; Gondal, Z.I.; Adil, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the etiological spectrum of acute intestinal obstruction in our clinical setup Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from Jul 2012 to Jul 2013, over a period of about 1 year. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients with acute mechanical intestinal obstruction who underwent laparotomy were included in our study while those with non-mechanical intestinal obstruction like history of trauma and paralytic ileus were excluded from the study. All the patients were selected by non-probability purposive sampling technique. Emergency laparotomy was done and operative findings were recorded. Results: A total of 120 patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction were included in this study out of which 93 (69.17%) were female and remaining 27 (30.83%) were males. Male to female ratio was 1:2.24. Age range of patients was 22-85 years. Out of 120 patients operated for acute intestinal obstruction post-op adhesions were found in 37 (30.83%) patients followed by intestinal tuberculosis in 23 (19.17%) patients, obstructed inguinal hernias in 13 (10.83%), gut malignancies in 15 (12.5%) , Meckel's diverticulum with bands in 7 (5.83%), volvulus in 7 (5.83%), perforated appendix in 6 (5%), intussusception in 2 (1.7%), inflammatory bands in 5 (4.17%), trichobezoar and faecal impaction in 2 (1.7%) while in 3 (2.5%) patients no definite cause was found. Conclusion: Post-op adhesions are the commonest cause of mechanical intestinal obstruction in our setup followed by intestinal tuberculosis as second most common clinical pattern of presentation. (author)

  9. Determination of Intestine Inflammation Markers in Diagnostic Search in Children with Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pavlenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prevalence of bowel diseases in children is the second, trailing only the diseases of gastroduodenal zone and growing in recent years. Actual one is the problem of differential diagnosis of functional and inflammatory intestinal diseases using non-invasive methods on the prehospital stage and as a screening. Objective. Comparative analysis of fecal markers of the bowel inflammation (lactoferrine and calprotectine with endoscopy and morphology of intestinal mucosa in children. Matherials and methods. 49 children aged 6–18 years were examined. All patients underwent endoscopic and morphological study of the intestine, coprotest, determination of fecal markers of bowel inflammation (lactoferrin and calprotectine. Results. It is shown that in young children, the intestinal mucosa mainly hadn’t endoscopic changes, coprotest and morphological examination didn’t reveal the signs of inflammation, fecal intestinal inflammation markers were negative (p < 0.05. In the group of older children, moderate or marked catarrhal changes were found endoscopically, coprotest results were typical of inflammation in the intestines, it was morphologically proved the presence of chronic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the colon with signs of atrophy, the results of lactoferrin and calprotectine determination were positive (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the evaluation of calprotectine and lactoferrin can be used in pediatric patients because of its non-invasiveness as diagnostic screening for the selection of patients for the further endoscopic examination and diagnostic search.

  10. Complication related to colostomy orifice: intestinal evisceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemir José Alegre Salles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal evisceration at the site of a stoma is a rare event, with high morbimortality. Its clinical manifestation often occurs between the sixth and seventh days after surgery. The risk factors most frequently related to evisceration are: increased intra-abdominal pressure, digestive tract cancer surgery, emergency surgery and stomas in the surgical incision. The authors report the case of a male patient, aged 62, suffering from adenocarcinoma of the rectum with obstructive acute abdomen, who underwent loop transversotomy for decompression. On the fourth day after surgery, he had a bronchospasm crisis, with evisceration of ileum and colon through the colostomic hole. The association of some triggering factors, such as emergency surgery, colorectal malignant neoplasm, increased intra-abdominal pressure and technical failure of colostomy were decisive in the development of this rare peri-colostomy complication.A evisceração intestinal desenvolvida no sítio de um estoma é um evento raro, tendo elevada morbimortalidade. Sua manifestação clínica ocorre frequentemente entre o sexto e o sétimo dias de pós-operatório. Os fatores de risco mais frequentemente relacionados à evisceração são: aumento da pressão intra-abdominal, câncer do aparelho digestório, cirurgia de urgência e estomias na incisão cirúrgica. Os autores relatam o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, com 62 anos, portador de adenocarcinoma do reto médio com abdômen agudo obstrutivo, sendo submetido à transversostomia em alça, com finalidade descompressiva. No quarto dia de pós-operatório com crise de broncoespasmo, apresentou evisceração do cólon e íleo pelo orifício abdominal colostômico. A associação de alguns fatores desencadeantes, como a cirurgia de urgência, a doença neoplásica colorretal maligna, o aumento da pressão intra-abdominal e a falha técnica na confecção da colostomia, foram determinantes para o desenvolvimento desta rara

  11. The Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues in the Small Intestine, Not the Large Intestine, Play a Major Role in Oral Prion Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David S.; Else, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulations of abnormally folded cellular prion protein in affected tissues. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally, and following exposure, the early replication of some prion isolates upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) within gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for the efficient spread of disease to the brain (neuroinvasion). Prion detection within large intestinal GALT biopsy specimens has been used to estimate human and animal disease prevalence. However, the relative contributions of the small and large intestinal GALT to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. To address this issue, we created mice that specifically lacked FDC-containing GALT only in the small intestine. Our data show that oral prion disease susceptibility was dramatically reduced in mice lacking small intestinal GALT. Although these mice had FDC-containing GALT throughout their large intestines, these tissues were not early sites of prion accumulation or neuroinvasion. We also determined whether pathology specifically within the large intestine might influence prion pathogenesis. Congruent infection with the nematode parasite Trichuris muris in the large intestine around the time of oral prion exposure did not affect disease pathogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that the small intestinal GALT are the major early sites of prion accumulation and neuroinvasion after oral exposure. This has important implications for our understanding of the factors that influence the risk of infection and the preclinical diagnosis of disease. IMPORTANCE Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally. After exposure, the accumulation of some prion diseases in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for efficient spread of disease to the brain. However, the relative contributions of GALT in the small and large intestines to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. We show that the

  12. The Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues in the Small Intestine, Not the Large Intestine, Play a Major Role in Oral Prion Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David S; Else, Kathryn J; Mabbott, Neil A

    2015-09-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulations of abnormally folded cellular prion protein in affected tissues. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally, and following exposure, the early replication of some prion isolates upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) within gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for the efficient spread of disease to the brain (neuroinvasion). Prion detection within large intestinal GALT biopsy specimens has been used to estimate human and animal disease prevalence. However, the relative contributions of the small and large intestinal GALT to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. To address this issue, we created mice that specifically lacked FDC-containing GALT only in the small intestine. Our data show that oral prion disease susceptibility was dramatically reduced in mice lacking small intestinal GALT. Although these mice had FDC-containing GALT throughout their large intestines, these tissues were not early sites of prion accumulation or neuroinvasion. We also determined whether pathology specifically within the large intestine might influence prion pathogenesis. Congruent infection with the nematode parasite Trichuris muris in the large intestine around the time of oral prion exposure did not affect disease pathogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that the small intestinal GALT are the major early sites of prion accumulation and neuroinvasion after oral exposure. This has important implications for our understanding of the factors that influence the risk of infection and the preclinical diagnosis of disease. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally. After exposure, the accumulation of some prion diseases in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for efficient spread of disease to the brain. However, the relative contributions of GALT in the small and large intestines to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. We show that the small intestinal

  13. Radiological aspects of Crohn's disease in small intestine: iconographic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Nestor de; Juliano, Adriana G.; Polizini, Jose M.R.; Rejtman, Debora; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Rocha, Manoel de Souza

    1999-01-01

    The authors present the radiological features of Crohn's disease in small intestine as ways of differential diagnosis of others diseases of duodenum and adjacent organs. In this differentiation or confirmation of Crohn's disease the US and TC have proven to be clinically efficacious in the identification of lesions

  14. Autophagy and tight junction proteins in the intestine and intestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-An A. Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium (IE forms an indispensible barrier and interface between the intestinal interstitium and the luminal environment. The IE regulates water, ion and nutrient transport while providing a barrier against toxins, pathogens (bacteria, fungi and virus and antigens. The apical intercellular tight junctions (TJ are responsible for the paracellular barrier function and regulate trans-epithelial flux of ions and solutes between adjacent cells. Increased intestinal permeability caused by defects in the IE TJ barrier is considered an important pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, diarrhea and malnutrition in humans and animals. In fact, defects in the IE TJ barrier allow increased antigenic penetration, resulting in an amplified inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, necrotizing enterocolitis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, the beneficial enhancement of the intestinal TJ barrier has been shown to resolve intestinal inflammation and apoptosis in both animal models of IBD and human IBD. Autophagy (self-eating mechanism is an intracellular lysosome-dependent degradation and recycling pathway essential for cell survival and homeostasis. Dysregulated autophagy has been shown to be directly associated with many pathological processes, including IBD. Importantly, the crosstalk between IE TJ and autophagy has been revealed recently. We showed that autophagy enhanced IE TJ barrier function by increasing transepithelial resistance and reducing the paracellular permeability of small solutes and ions, which is, in part, by targeting claudin-2, a cation-selective, pore-forming, transmembrane TJ protein, for lysosome (autophagy-mediated degradation. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that the inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with active IBD has increased claudin-2 expression. In addition, inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6

  15. Liver Disease Secondary to Intestinal Failure

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    Bassam Abu-Wasel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IFALD is a common and potentially life-threatening condition for patients with SBS requiring long-term PN. There exists the potential for decreasing its incidence by optimizing the composition and the rate of infusion of parenteral solutions, by advocating a multidisciplinary approach, and by early referral for intestinal-liver transplantation to ensure long-term survival of patients with SBS.

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus related intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomba, Claudia; Giuffrè, Mario; La Placa, Simona; Cascio, Antonio; Trizzino, Marcello; De Grazia, Simona; Corsello, Giovanni

    2016-12-07

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of congenital infection in the developed countries. Gastrointestinal involvement has been extensively described in both adult and paediatric immunocompromised patients but it is infrequent in congenital or perinatal CMV infection. We report on a case of coexistent congenital Cytomegalovirus infection with intestinal malrotation and positive intestinal Cytomegalovirus biopsy. At birth the neonate showed clinical and radiological evidence of intestinal obstruction. Meconium passed only after evacuative nursing procedures; stooling pattern was irregular; gastric residuals were bile-stained. Laparatomy revealed a complete intestinal malrotation and contextually gastrointestinal biopsy samples of the appendix confirmed the diagnosis of CMV gastrointestinal disease. Intravenous ganciclovir was initiated for 2 weeks, followed by oral valgancyclovir for 6 month. CMV-induced proinflammatory process may be responsible of the interruption of the normal development of the gut or could in turn lead to a disruption in the normal development of the gut potentiating the mechanism causing malrotation. We suggest the hypothesis that an inflammatory process induced by CMV congenital infection may be responsible, in the early gestation, of the intestinal end-organ disease, as the intestinal malrotation. CMV infection should always be excluded in full-term infants presenting with colonic stricture or malrotation.

  17. Whole-Blood Taurine Concentrations in Cats With Intestinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrani, A; Fascetti, A J; Larsen, J A; Maunder, C; Hall, E J

    2017-07-01

    Increased delivery of taurine-conjugated bile acids to the distal bowel can lead to dysbiosis resulting in colitis in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease. A similar situation also could occur in cats with intestinal disease and might therefore result in decreased whole-body taurine concentration. To determine whether whole-blood taurine concentrations are decreased at the time of diagnosis in cats with intestinal disease and to correlate concentrations with clinical and laboratory variables. Twenty-one cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy and 7 cats with intestinal neoplasia from the University of Bristol. Cats that had undergone a thorough investigation consisting of a CBC, serum biochemistry, serum cobalamin and folate concentrations, transabdominal ultrasound examination and histopathology of intestinal biopsy specimens, as well as additional testing if indicated, were included. Whole-blood from these cats collected at the time of histologic diagnosis and stored in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was retrospectively analyzed for taurine with an automated high-performance liquid chromatography amino acid analyzer. Although whole-blood taurine concentrations remained within the reference range, those cats with predominantly large intestinal clinical signs had significantly lower concentrations than did cats with small intestinal and mixed bowel clinical signs (P = 0.033) and this difference also was significant when assessed only in cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (P = 0.019). Additional studies are needed to determine whether large intestinal signs in cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy are caused by alterations in the microbiota arising as a consequence of increased delivery of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Deficient UDP-glucuronosyltransferase detoxification enzyme activity in the small intestinal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerres, M.S.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small intestinal malignancies in humans are rare; however, patients with coeliac disease have a relatively high risk for such tumours. Intestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases are phase II drug metabolism enzymes also involved in the detoxification of ingested toxins and carcinogens. As

  19. The intestinal microflora of childhood patients with indicated celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Frühauf, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 214-216 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * intestinal microflora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  20. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  1. Waldmann's Disease (Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia) with Atrial Septal Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Shrikiran; Mundkur, Suneel; Kanaparthi, Shravan; Kumar, Sandeep

    2017-04-01

    Waldmann's disease or Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder of gastrointestinal tract characterized by dilated lymphatics and widened villi causing leakage of lymph into intestinal lumen. Loss of lymph leads to hypoalbuminemia, hyogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary lymphangiectasia occurs secondary to an elevated lymphatic pressure as in lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus, constrictive pericarditis, cardiac surgeries (Fontan's procedure), inflammatory bowel disease and malignancies. We, hereby present a five-year-old male child who presented with abdominal distension and poor weight gain. He had hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed normal gastric mucosa and punctate white lesions in duodenal mucosa with biopsy confirming intestinal lymphangiectasia. Secondary causes of intestinal lymphangiectasia were ruled out. Echocardiography revealed atrial septal defect which is an uncommon association with Waldmann's disease. He was started on low fat, high protein diet and medium chain triglyceride supplementation following which he improved symptomatically. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis and appropriate dietary treatment are necessary to alleviate symptoms as well as to achieve a sustainable growth and development in these children.

  2. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Salvo-Romero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism.

  3. Differentiating Crohn's disease from intestinal tuberculosis at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with non-caseating granulomas, as these suggest a very real possibility of ITB. ... There were no significant differences in smoking status, symptom duration or perianal disease. ..... CD, requires a degree of immune competence. This is ...

  4. Role of damage control enterostomy in management of children with peritonitis from acute intestinal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel A Ameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal anastomosis in severely ill children with peritonitis from intestinal perforation, intestinal gangrene or anastomotic dehiscence (acute intestinal disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Enterostomy as a damage control measure may be an option to minimize the high morbidity and mortality. This report evaluates the role of damage control enterostomy in the treatment of these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 52 children with acute intestinal disease who had enterostomy as a damage control measure in 12 years. Results: There were 34 (65.4% boys and 18 (34.6% girls aged 3 days-13 years (median 9 months, comprising 27 (51.9% neonates and infants and 25 (48.1% older children. The primary indication for enterostomy in neonates and infants was intestinal gangrene 25 (92.6% and perforated typhoid ileitis 22 (88% in older children. Enterostomy was performed as the initial surgery in 33 (63.5% patients and as a salvage procedure following anastomotic dehiscence in 19 (36.5% patients. Enterostomy-related complications occurred in 19 (36.5% patients, including 11 (21.2% patients with skin excoriations and eight (15.4% with hypokalaemia. There were four (7.7% deaths (aged 19 days, 3 months, 3½ years and 10 years, respectively directly related to the enterostomy, from hypokalaemia at 4, 12, 20 and 28 days postoperatively, respectively. Twenty other patients died shortly after surgery from their primary disease. Twenty of 28 surviving patients have had their enterostomy closed without complications, while eight are awaiting enterostomy closure. Conclusion: Damage-control enterostomy is useful in management of severely ill children with intestinal perforation or gangrene. Careful and meticulous attention to fluid and electrolyte balance, and stoma care, especially in the first several days following surgery, are important in preventing morbidity and mortality.

  5. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-01-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.)

  6. Trust your gut: galvanizing nutritional interest in intestinal cholesterol metabolism for protection against cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Casey J; Kim, Bohkyung; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-01-16

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the intestine is a key target organ for overall health and longevity. Complementing these studies is the discovery of the trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux pathway and the emerging role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport. The surfacing dynamics of the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the intestine provides an attractive platform for intestine-specific nutritional intervention strategies to lower blood cholesterol levels for protection against cardiovascular diseases. Notably, there is mounting evidence that stimulation of pathways associated with calorie restriction may have a large effect on the regulation of cholesterol removal by the intestine. However, intestinal energy metabolism, specifically the idiosyncrasies surrounding intestinal responses to energy deprivation, is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to review recent insights into cholesterol regulation by the intestine and to discuss the potential for positive regulation of intestine-driven cholesterol removal through the nutritional induction of pathways associated with calorie restriction.

  7. Trust Your Gut: Galvanizing Nutritional Interest in Intestinal Cholesterol Metabolism for Protection Against Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the intestine is a key target organ for overall health and longevity. Complementing these studies is the discovery of the trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux pathway and the emerging role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport. The surfacing dynamics of the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the intestine provides an attractive platform for intestine-specific nutritional intervention strategies to lower blood cholesterol levels for protection against cardiovascular diseases. Notably, there is mounting evidence that stimulation of pathways associated with calorie restriction may have a large effect on the regulation of cholesterol removal by the intestine. However, intestinal energy metabolism, specifically the idiosyncrasies surrounding intestinal responses to energy deprivation, is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to review recent insights into cholesterol regulation by the intestine and to discuss the potential for positive regulation of intestine-driven cholesterol removal through the nutritional induction of pathways associated with calorie restriction.

  8. Protective effect of quercetin on high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice is mediated by modulating intestinal microbiota imbalance and related gut-liver axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, David; Nistal, Esther; Martínez-Flórez, Susana; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; Olcoz, José Luis; Jover, Ramiro; González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, María Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Gut microbiota is involved in obesity, metabolic syndrome and the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It has been recently suggested that the flavonoid quercetin may have the ability to modulate the intestinal microbiota composition, suggesting a prebiotic capacity which highlights a great therapeutic potential in NAFLD. The present study aims to investigate benefits of experimental treatment with quercetin on gut microbial balance and related gut-liver axis activation in a nutritional animal model of NAFLD associated to obesity. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with high fat diet (HFD) supplemented or not with quercetin for 16 weeks. HFD induced obesity, metabolic syndrome and the development of hepatic steatosis as main hepatic histological finding. Increased accumulation of intrahepatic lipids was associated with altered gene expression related to lipid metabolism, as a result of deregulation of their major modulators. Quercetin supplementation decreased insulin resistance and NAFLD activity score, by reducing the intrahepatic lipid accumulation through its ability to modulate lipid metabolism gene expression, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)-dependent lipoperoxidation and related lipotoxicity. Microbiota composition was determined via 16S ribosomal RNA Illumina next-generation sequencing. Metagenomic studies revealed HFD-dependent differences at phylum, class and genus levels leading to dysbiosis, characterized by an increase in Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and in Gram-negative bacteria, and a dramatically increased detection of Helicobacter genus. Dysbiosis was accompanied by endotoxemia, intestinal barrier dysfunction and gut-liver axis alteration and subsequent inflammatory gene overexpression. Dysbiosis-mediated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-NF-κB signaling pathway activation was associated with inflammasome initiation response and reticulum stress pathway induction. Quercetin reverted gut microbiota imbalance and related endotoxemia

  9. Oral Crohn′s disease without intestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gingisetty Harikishan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn′s disease is a granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease and was described in 1932 as a chronic granulomatous disorder of the terminal ileum and is now considered a distinct member of the inflammatory bowel disease family. It may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral Crohn′s disease has been reported frequently in the last three decades with or without intestinal manifestations. In the latter case, it is considered as one of the orofacial granulomatosis. There has been much doubt whether intestinal manifestations of Crohn′s disease will eventually develop in the orofacial granulomatosis. We present a female patient aged 22 years with prominent clinical findings such as persistent swelling of lower and upper lip with fissuring and angular cheilitis, granulomatous gingival enlargement, and cobblestone or corrugated appearance of labial mucosa, which are suggestive of Crohn′s disease, but with no evidence of other gastrointestinal involvement. The patient underwent surgical treatment with external gingivectomy procedure. A 6-month follow-up showed minimal recurrence.

  10. Intestinal granulomatous disease: what is the first call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Alex; Kori, Michal; Herskovitz, Pearl; Zimhony, Oren

    2018-04-19

    A 15-year-old girl presented with erythema nodosum and mild abdominal complaints. Her intestinal granulomatous disease was erroneously diagnosed as Crohn's disease despite the fact that the possibility of tuberculosis was considered. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made only when an anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy resulted in further deterioration. The patient was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol, with slow and steady clinical improvement until complete recovery was achieved. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Atypical Kawasaki Disease Presenting as Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Meng Tiao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in atypical Kawasaki disease (KD is rare. A boy aged 2 years and 6 months presented with a 7-day history of fever, coffee-ground vomit, and abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography and ultrasound showed a dilated duodenum. Peeling of the skin on his fingers and toes developed on hospitalization day 9. Echocardiogram revealed right and left coronary artery dilatation compatible with KD. He was treated with 2 g/kg intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, with rapid resolution of fever and relief of abdominal pain. Follow-up abdominal radiography and ultrasound showed improvement of bowel dilatation. This case illustrates that atypical KD can present with intestinal pseudo-obstruction. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis, and prompt treatment with IVIG is recommended.

  12. Basis for the Age-related Decline in Intestinal Mucosal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Schmucker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are characterized by mucosal immunosenescence and high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases of the intestinal tract. Little is known about how the differentiation of immunoglobulin A (IgA plasma cells in Peyer's patches (PPs and their subsequent homing to the small intestinal lamina propria (LP is affected by aging. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the number of IgA+ cells in the PPs, coupled with significant declines in the numbers of IgA+ and antibody-positive cells in the intestinal LP of senescent rats compared to young adult animals. These data suggest that aging diminishes the emigration of IgA immunoblasts from these lymphoid aggregates, as well as their migration to the intestinal LP. Flow cytometry and lymphocyte adoptive transfer studies showed 3- to 4-fold age-related declines in the homing of antibody-containing cells and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes to the small intestines of rhesus macaques and rats, respectively. The number of peripheral blood IgA immunoblasts expressing the homing molecule α4β7 declined 30% in senescent rats. This was accompanied by a >17% decrease in the areal density of LP blood vessels staining positive for the cell adhesion molecule MAdCAM-1. Cumulatively, declines in expression of these homing molecules constitute a substantial age-related diminution of IgA immunoblast homing potential. In vitro antibody secretion by LP plasma cells, i.e. antibody secreted per antibody-positive cell, remains unchanged as a function of donor age. Intestinal mucosal immunosenescence is a consequence of reduced homing of IgA plasma cells to the intestinal LP as a result of declines in homing molecule expression.

  13. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-01-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn’s disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  14. Immune Development and Intestinal Microbiota in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Pozo-Rubio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The etiology of this disorder is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is represented by HLA-DQ genes, which account for approximately 40% of the genetic risk; however, only a small percentage of carriers develop the disease. Gluten is the main environmental factor responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that environmental factors other than gluten might play a role in disease development, including early feeding practices (e.g., breast milk versus formula and duration of breastfeeding, infections, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. Herein, we review what is known about the influence of dietary factors, exposure to infectious agents, and intestinal microbiota composition, particularly in early life, on the risk of developing CD, as well as the possible dietary strategies to induce or increase gluten tolerance.

  15. Intestinal microbiota pathogenesis and fecal microbiota transplantation for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Kai; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Chen, Ye; Yuan, Jing; Sun, Gang; Peng, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of IBD involves inappropriate ongoing activation of the mucosal immune system driven by abnormal intestinal microbiota in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there are still no definitive microbial pathogens linked to the onset of IBD. The composition and function of the intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are indeed disturbed in IBD patients. The special alterations of gut microbiota associated with IBD remain to be evaluated. The microbial interactions and host-microbe immune interactions are still not clarified. Limitations of present probiotic products in IBD are mainly due to modest clinical efficacy, few available strains and no standardized administration. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may restore intestinal microbial homeostasis, and preliminary data have shown the clinical efficacy of FMT on refractory IBD or IBD combined with Clostridium difficile infection. Additionally, synthetic microbiota transplantation with the defined composition of fecal microbiota is also a promising therapeutic approach for IBD. However, FMT-related barriers, including the mechanism of restoring gut microbiota, standardized donor screening, fecal material preparation and administration, and long-term safety should be resolved. The role of intestinal microbiota and FMT in IBD should be further investigated by metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses combined with germ-free/human flora-associated animals and chemostat gut models. PMID:25356041

  16. Diet-Induced Dysbiosis of the Intestinal Microbiota and the Effects on Immunity and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna L. Gibson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI microbiota is the collection of microbes which reside in the GI tract and represents the largest source of non-self antigens in the human body. The GI tract functions as a major immunological organ as it must maintain tolerance to commensal and dietary antigens while remaining responsive to pathogenic stimuli. If this balance is disrupted, inappropriate inflammatory processes can result, leading to host cell damage and/or autoimmunity. Evidence suggests that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can influence susceptibility to chronic disease of the intestinal tract including ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, a considerable shift in diet has coincided with increased incidence of many of these inflammatory diseases. It was originally believed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota was relatively stable from early childhood; however, recent evidence suggests that diet can cause dysbiosis, an alteration in the composition of the microbiota, which could lead to aberrant immune responses. The role of the microbiota and the potential for diet-induced dysbiosis in inflammatory conditions of the GI tract and systemic diseases will be discussed.

  17. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, A; Not, T; Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Berti, I; Tommasini, A; Goldblum, S E

    2000-04-29

    We identified zonulin, a novel human protein analogue to the Vibrio cholerae derived Zonula occludens toxin, which induces tight junction disassembly and a subsequent increase in intestinal permeability in non-human primate intestinal epithelia. Zonulin expression was raised in intestinal tissues during the acute phase of coeliac disease, a clinical condition in which tight junctions are opened and permeability is increased.

  18. Is the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Possible Without Intestinal Biopsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Shomaf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coeliac disease is defined as a state of immune-mediated hyper-responsiveness to dietary gluten from wheat, barley, or rye in genetically predisposed individuals that results in tissue damage. The diagnosis is made by microscopic examination of a small intestinal biopsy, although serological testing for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide can be of great advantage. It has been suggested that duodenal biopsy can be avoided in patients with high levels of the tissue transglutaminase antibody, since a relationship has been found to be present between tissue transglutaminase antibody titres and coeliac disease. Aims: To study the correlation between tissue transglutaminase titre and small intestinal biopsy findings in patients with coeliac disease. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: Ninety-five cases of patients diagnosed with coeliac disease and with positive serum tissue transglutaminase titres were retrieved from the Jordan University Hospital archives between December 2014 and December 2015. All the cases were classified according to the Marsh classification. Results: Ninety-five cases with a positive titre for the antibody were included in this study, 73 (76.8% of them were females and 22 cases (23.2% were males. The age of the patients ranged between 4 and 75 years with a mean age ± standard deviation of 32.3±14.7. The sensitivity was the highest in Marsh IIIC and lowest in Marsh IIIA (95% versus 68% respectively. The specificity was moderate (76% for all subtypes of Marsh III. Conclusion: This study showed a positive correlation between the tissue transglutaminase titre and the degree of duodenal damage (Marsh IIIC in patients with coeliac disease. In the presence of high tissue transglutaminase levels, duodenal biopsy might not be always necessary for diagnosis, particularly in symptomatic patients

  19. Constitutive STAT3 activation in intestinal T cells from patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Paola; Brender, Christine; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Via cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways, cytokines induce a variety of biological responses and modulate the outcome of inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Perturbation of the intestinal cytokine homeostasis is ...

  20. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  1. Pathogenic aspects and therapeutic avenues of intestinal fibrosis in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Francesca; Calabrese, Emma; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    In Crohn's disease, one of the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases in human beings, persistent and chronic inflammation promotes fibrotic processes thereby facilitating formation of strictures, the most common indication for surgical intervention in this disorder. The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease-associated fibrosis is not fully understood, but variants of genes involved in the recognition of microbial components/products [e.g. CARD15 (caspase-activating recruitment domain 15) and ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1)] are associated with this phenotype, and experimental evidence suggests that intestinal fibrosis results from an altered balance between deposition of ECM (extracellular matrix) and degradation of ECM by proteases. Studies have also contributed to identify the main phenotypic and functional alterations of cells involved in the fibrogenic process, as well as molecules that stimulate such cells to produce elevated amounts of collagen and other ECM-related proteins. In the present review, we assess the current knowledge about cellular and molecular mediators of intestinal fibrosis and describe results of recent studies aimed at testing the preventive/therapeutic effect of compounds in experimental models of intestinal fibrosis. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Double-balloon enteroscope for the diagnosis of small intestine diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Garces, Hector Ruben; Ruenes Domech, Caridad; Hano Garcia, Olga Marina

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted to assess the accuracy, effectiveness and extent of the double balloon enteroscope screening in the diagnosis of small intestine diseases in children. Eight patients were studied by means of physical examination and negative complementary ones of small intestine disease, seen between November, 2008 and October, 2009. In three patients there was the clinical and radiological suspicion of Crohn's disease; in other three the suspicion of small intestine tumor and remainder were seen due to hidden bleeding of intestinal origin

  4. Tolerance exists towards resident intestinal flora but is broken in active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchmann, R; Kaiser, I; Hermann, E; Mayet, W; Ewe, K; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1995-12-01

    Hyporesponsiveness to a universe of bacterial and dietary antigens from the gut lumen is a hallmark of the intestinal immune system. Since hyperresponsiveness against these antigens might be associated with inflammation, we studied the immune response to the indigenous intestinal microflora in peripheral blood, inflamed and non-inflamed human intestine. Lamina propria monocuclear cells (LPMC) isolated from inflamed intestine but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of IBD patients with active inflammatory disease strongly proliferated after co-culture with sonicates of bacteria from autologous intestine (BsA). Proliferation was inhibitable by anti-MHC class II MoAb, suggesting that it was driven by antigen. LPMC from adjacent non-inflamed intestinal areas of the same IBD patients and PBMC or LPMC isolated from non-inflamed intestine of controls and patients with IBD in remission, in contrast, did not proliferate. PBMC or LPMC which had been tolerant to bacteria from autologous intestine, however, strongly proliferated after co-culture with bacterial sonicates from heterologous intestine (BsH). This proliferation was associated with an expansion of CD8+ T cells, increased expression of activation markers on both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets, and production of IL-12, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and IL-10 protein. These results show that tolerance selectively exists to intestinal flora from autologous but not heterologous intestine, and that tolerance is broken in intestinal inflammation. This may be an important mechanism for the perpetuation of chronic IBD.

  5. The Intestinal Microbiome in Infectious Diseases: The Clinical Relevance of a Rapidly Emerging Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Vanessa C.; Haak, Bastiaan W.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michaël; Wiersinga, Willem J.

    2017-01-01

    The field of infectious disease is undergoing a paradigm shift as the intestinal microbiome is becoming understood. The aim of this review is to inform infectious disease physicians of the potential relevance of the intestinal microbiome to their practice. We searched Medline using both index and

  6. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  7. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases. CT findings in nontumoral bowel diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo

    1987-03-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.).

  8. Role of intestinal mucosal barrier in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yuanyuan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been increasing year by year in China. Intestinal mucosa is the largest organ for bacterial storage, and intestinal mucosal barrier includes biological barrier, mechanical barrier, immunological barrier, and chemical barrier. This article investigates the important role of intestinal mucosal barrier function in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. As for the intestinal biological barrier, abnormalities in gut microbiota occur earlier than obesity and other metabolic disorders; small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may affect energy metabolism, promote insulin resistance, and get involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD; regulation of gut microbiota has a certain clinical effect in the treatment of NAFLD. Intestinal mechanical barrier impairment increases the mucosal permeability and is associated with intestinal dysbacteriosis. The changes in intestinal immunological barrier may be associated with obesity, metabolic disorders, and liver inflammation. The changes in intestinal chemical barrier can inhibit the synthesis and secretion of very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein in hepatocytes and may result in triglyceride deposition in the liver. It is pointed out that the research on intestinal mucosal barrier function provides promising prospects for the prevention and treatment of NAFLD.

  9. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Crohn Disease Additional Content Medical News Intestinal Lymphangiectasia (Idiopathic Hypoproteinemia) By Atenodoro R. Ruiz, Jr., MD, ... Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal ... Intolerance Short Bowel Syndrome Tropical Sprue Whipple ...

  10. Related radiation effects on the intestine and their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardychev, M.S.; Kurpeshcheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Late radiation injuries of the intestine are frequent after radiation therapy of malignant tumours of female genitalia and some other tumours due to which the intestine gets into the irradiation field. On the basis of the analysis of 80 patients with late radiation injuries of intestine which developed at remote terms after radiation therapy of cervix uteri cancer and corpus uteri (65 patients) and other tumours, peculiarities of the clinical course and treatment of radiation enterocolitis, rectosigmoidites and rectites are discussed. In 39 patients these injuries were concomitant with late radiation injuries of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissues. The clinical course of radiation unjuries of the intestine was defined by the character of the pathological process in the intestine and was more sharply marked in patients suffering from radiation enterocolites. It was established that one of the pathogenetic mechanisms of late radiation injuries of the intestine was a disorder of the absorption function of the intestine. Local treatment of radiation injuries of the intestine should be combined with a general one the important component of which is a parenteral diet

  11. Intestinal permeability to [51Cr]EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-01-01

    [ 51 Cr]EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) 51 Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of [ 51 Cr]EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to [ 51 Cr]EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The [ 51 Cr]EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology

  12. Role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, Erika; Usai, Paolo

    2017-06-14

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread worldwide thanks to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects. However, even more attention is placed upon the recurrence of digestive system complications in the course of their use. Recent data suggests that the complications of the lower gastro-intestinal tract may be as frequent and severe as those of the upper tract. NSAIDs enteropathy is due to enterohepatic recycling of the drugs resulting in a prolonged and repeated exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the compound and its metabolites. Thus leading to so-called topical effects, which, in turn, lead to an impairment of the intestinal barrier. This process determines bacterial translocation and toxic substances of intestinal origin in the portal circulation, leading to an endotoxaemia. This condition could determine a liver inflammatory response and might promote the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, mostly in patients with risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and a high fat diet, which may induce a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis. This alteration of gut microbiota may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its related disorders in two ways: firstly causing a malfunction of the tight junctions that play a critical role in the increase of intestinal permeability, and then secondly leading to the development of insulin resistance, body weight gain, lipogenesis, fibrogenesis and hepatic oxidative stress.

  13. [Microbiocenosis of subgingival biofilm and intestinal content in chronic periodontal disease in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhina, N B; Zorina, O A; Shikh, E V; Kartysheva, E V

    The aim of the study was to assess correlations of subgingival biofilm and intestinal microbiota in patients with chronic periodontal disease (CPD) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The study included 80 patients divided in 2 groups: 40 healthy individuals with no signs of periodontal disease and 40 patients with CPD and MS. Oral and intestinal microbial consortia compositions were revealed using deep sequencing libraries of 16S rDNA. The study showed than the qualitative composition of the intestinal microbiome in patients with CPD differ significantly from the microbiome of controls. Real-time PCR of subgingival microflora in CPD patients revealed high content of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola, while in intestinal microbiome dominated representatives of Enterobacteriaceae and Eubacteriaceae families with signs of intestinal dysbiosis mostly associated with the decrease of protective species.

  14. Behçet disease and protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muguruza, Samantha; Caballero, Noemí; Horneros, Judith; Domenech, Eugeni; Mateo, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a patient with Behçet's disease that developed protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the

  16. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: safe alternative to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajlouni, Yousef; Iser, John H; Gibson, Peter R

    2007-04-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD), a non-surgical treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, appears to be applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early recurrence. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EBD by a single endoscopist using a defined technique. The records of all patients with Crohn's disease in whom EBD was attempted over a 12-year period were examined to determine the rate of technical success, complications and outcome. A stricture was defined as that which prevented passage of the 14 mm diameter colonoscope. Technical success was defined as the ability to traverse the stricture postdilatation. Patients were selected on the colonoscopic appearance of the stricture and dilatation was performed using through-the-endoscope balloons. Antibiotics were given during and for 7 days postdilatation. EBD was attempted on 83 strictures (31 anastomotic and 52 primary) in 37 patients (15 males) and was successful in 75 (90%) of 31 patients. A single dilatation only was required in 21 patients who had a median follow-up of 20 months (range 6-122 months). Recurrent symptomatic stricture requiring dilatation (eight patients) or surgery (two patients) occurred 8 (1-112) months after the initial dilatation. The only complication occurred in one patient where an intra-abdominal fistula and abscess were probably related to the dilatation. EBD of intestinal strictures associated with Crohn's disease has a low complication rate and leads to prolonged clinical benefit. It should be considered as a real alternative to surgery.

  17. Wireless capsule endoscopy for diagnosis of acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Susanne; Schoppmeyer, Konrad; Lange, Thoralf; Wiedmann, Marcus; Golsong, Johannes; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mossner, Joachim; Niederwieser, Dietger; Caca, Karel

    2007-03-01

    The small intestine is the most common location of intestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). EGD with duodenal biopsies yields the highest diagnostic sensitivity, but the jejunum and ileum are not accessible by regular endoscopy. In contrast, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a noninvasive imaging procedure offering complete evaluation of the small intestine. The objective was to compare the diagnostic value of EGD, including biopsies, with the results of WCE in patients with acute intestinal symptoms who received allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation and to analyze the appearance and distribution of acute intestinal GVHD lesions in these patients. An investigator-blinded, single-center prospective study. Patients with acute intestinal symptoms after allogeneic stem cell transplantation underwent both EGD and WCE within 24 hours. Clinical data were recorded during 2 months of follow-up. Fourteen consecutive patients with clinical symptoms of acute intestinal GVHD were recruited. In 1 patient, the capsule remained in the stomach and was removed endoscopically. In 7 of 13 patients who could be evaluated, acute intestinal GVHD was diagnosed by EGD with biopsies, but 3 of these would have been missed by EGD alone. In all 7 patients with histologically confirmed acute intestinal GVHD, WCE revealed typical signs of GVHD. Lesions were scattered throughout the small intestine, but were most accentuated in the ileum. This study had a small number of patients. WCE, which is less invasive than EGD with biopsies, showed a comparable sensitivity and a high negative predictive value for diagnosing acute intestinal GVHD. It may be helpful to avoid repeated endoscopic procedures in patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation.

  18. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; Erp, S.J. van; Valk, M.E. van der; Mangen, M.J.; Fidder, H.H.; Have, M. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Jong, D.J. de; Woude, C.J. van der; Romberg-Camps, M.J.; Clemens, C.H.; Jansen, J.M.; Meeberg, P.C. van de; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Pierik, M.J.; Siersema, P.D.; Leenders, M.; Meulen-Jong, A.E. van der; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We cross-sectionally explored the

  19. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; van Erp, S. J. H.; van der Valk, M. E.; Mangen, M. J. J.; Fidder, H. H.; van der Have, M.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; de Jong, D. J.; van der Woude, C. J.; Romberg-Camps, M. J. L.; Clemens, C. H. M.; Jansen, J. M.; van de Meeberg, P. C.; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J. R.; Pierik, M. J.; Siersema, P. D.; Leenders, M.; van der Meulen-de Jong, A. E.; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We cross-sectionally explored the association between smoking and

  20. Epstein-Barr virus in inflammatory bowel disease: the spectrum of intestinal lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Loes H C; Nagtegaal, Iris D; de Jong, Dirk J; Kievit, Wietske; Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Groenen, Patricia J T A; van Krieken, J Han J M; Hoentjen, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients on thiopurine therapy are at increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphomas. This virus is frequently detected in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients and may cause a wide spectrum of lymphoproliferations similar to post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). We aimed to assess whether histological aberrations aid in predicting EBV presence and to correlate histological assessment and EBV load with disease outcome in IBD. We included all IBD patients from our centre who underwent EBV testing of intestinal biopsies between January 2004 and October 2013. All biopsies were classified according to the WHO PTLD classification and the EBV load was scored per high-power field (HPF). Clinical data were collected from patient charts. Reported clinical outcomes included colectomy, need for chemotherapy and mortality. Our cohort included 58 patients: 28 were EBV-positive and 30 EBV-negative. An atypical infiltrate was seen more frequently in EBV-positive than in EBV-negative patients (57.1 versus 3.3%; p < 0.001). A high EBV load occurred more frequently in EBV-positive patients undergoing colectomy than in EBV-positive patients without colectomy (50.0 versus 10.0%; p = 0.048). Monomorphic lymphoproliferative disorders, including two overt lymphomas, were present in 10 patients. Reduction of immunosuppression resulted in histological normalization and loss of EBV expression in seven of eight non-lymphoma patients. The presence of atypical infiltrate in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients warrants EBV testing. Reduction of immunosuppression is an effective strategy to achieve morphological normalization and loss of EBV. Lymphoproliferation related to IBD appears to have less aggressive clinical behaviour than PTLDs. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Maintaining Intestinal Health: The Genetics and Immunology of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Kelsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD younger than 5 years of age represent a unique form of disease, termed very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD, which is phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression, and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal inflammation and promote tissue repair. Here, we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Keywords: Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Whole Exome Sequencing, Mucosal Immunology

  2. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. N. Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection.

  3. Diagnosing norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease using viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Clarence C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is the main method for laboratory diagnosis of norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease (IID. However, up to 16% of healthy individuals in the community, with no recent history of IID, may be RT-PCR positive; so it is unclear whether norovirus is actually the cause of illness in an IID case when they are RT-PCR positive. It is important to identify the pathogen causing illness in sporadic IID cases, for clinical management and for community based incidence studies. The aim of this study was to investigate how faecal viral load can be used to determine when norovirus is the most likely cause of illness in an IID case. Methods Real-time RT-PCR was used to determine the viral load in faecal specimens collected from 589 IID cases and 159 healthy controls, who were infected with genogroup II noroviruses. Cycle threshold (Ct values from the real-time RT-PCR were used as a proxy measure of viral load. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to identify a cut-off in viral load for attributing illness to norovirus in IID cases. Results One hundred and sixty-nine IID cases and 159 controls met the inclusion criteria for the ROC analysis. The optimal Ct value cut-off for attributing IID to norovirus was 31. The same cut-off was selected when using healthy controls, or IID cases who were positive by culture for bacterial pathogens, as the reference negative group. This alternative reference negative group can be identified amongst specimens routinely received in clinical virology laboratories. Conclusion We demonstrated that ROC analysis can be used to select a cut-off for a norovirus real time RT-PCR assay, to aid clinical interpretation and diagnose when norovirus is the cause of IID. Specimens routinely received for diagnosis in clinical virology laboratories can be used to select an appropriate cut-off. Individual laboratories can use this method to

  4. Diet and the intestinal microbiome: associations, functions, and implications for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenberg, Lindsey G; Wu, Gary D

    2014-05-01

    The mutual relationship between the intestinal microbiota and its mammalian host is influenced by diet. Consumption of various nutrients affects the structure of the microbial community and provides substrates for microbial metabolism. The microbiota can produce small molecules that are absorbed by the host and affect many important physiological processes. Age-dependent and societal differences in the intestinal microbiota could result from differences in diet. Examples include differences in the intestinal microbiota of breastfed vs formula-fed infants or differences in microbial richness in people who consume an agrarian plant-based vs a Western diet, which is high in meat and fat. We review how diet affects the structure and metabolome of the human intestinal microbiome and may contribute to health or the pathogenesis of disorders such as coronary vascular disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Limb lymphedema as a first manifestation of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, V; Vignes, S

    2004-05-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is characterized by protein-losing enteropathy occurring more frequently in childhood. Chronic diarrhea and diffuse edema are the main clinical manifestations. Peripheral lymphedema may also be associated. Lymphedema is usually present at the time of diagnosis or appears later in the course of the disease. We report the observation of a 31-year-old man suffering from an upper, lower limb and genital lymphedema many years before diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was established. Lower limb lymphoscintigraphy confirmed lymphedema and duodenal biopsies lymphangiectasia. Hypoproteinemia, lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia were also noted. Treatment of lymphedema included low stretch bandaging and elastic stocking. No dietary management with a low-fat diet was added. Search for primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with biological parameters would be useful when primary lymphedema is present. Especially since primary intestinal lymphangiectasia may be complicated by occurrence of B cell lymphoma.

  6. Maintaining intestinal health: the genetics and immunology of very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD occurring before the age of 5 represent a unique form of disease, termed Very Early Onset (VEO)-IBD, which is phenotypically- and genetically-distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies, and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal disease. Here we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation.

  7. Reversal of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian; Kodjabashia, Kamelia; Nixon, Emma

    2016-01-01

    in an adult patient with IF secondary to severe Crohn's disease and multiple small bowel resections. The patient developed liver dysfunction and pathology consistent with IFALD. Multiple causal factors were implicated, including nutrition-related factors, catheter sepsis and the use of hepatotoxic medications....... Multidisciplinary treatment in a tertiary IF referral centre included aggressive sepsis management, discontinuation of hepatotoxic medications and a reduction of parenteral nutrition dependency through optimisation of enteral nutrition via distal enteral tube feeding. Upon this, liver function tests normalised....

  8. intestinal helminthes infestation in relation to some haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-09

    Jul 9, 2015 ... Worldwide anemia is an important reproductive health problem because of its association with adverse pregnancy outcome such as increase of rate of maternal and perinatal mortality, premature delivery, low birth weight etc (Dim and Onah, 2007). Intestinal parasitic infections have a worldwide distribution ...

  9. Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    for immune cells associated with the intestine and their interactions with the normal microbial contents of the gut . 2. KEYWORDS Radiation, microbiome ...focal RT on bact/fung microbiota (COMPLETED) ☑Analysis: microbiome changes in irradiated guts + DSS (COMPLETED) CY17 Goal – RT-induced changes in gut ...sensitivity qAnalysis of microbiome changes in irradiated guts in other colitis models and infectious organisms (In Progress) qAnalysis of effects of

  10. Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Hornef, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium—which constitutes the interface between the enteric microbiota and host tissues—actively contributes to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis and defends against pathogenic microbes. The recognition of conserved microbial products by cytosolic or transmembrane pattern recognition receptors in epithelial cells initiates signal transduction and influences effector cell function. However, the signalling pathways, effector molecules and regulatory mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood, and the functional outcome is poorly defined. This review analyses the complex and dynamic role of intestinal epithelial innate immune recognition and signalling, on the basis of results in intestinal epithelial cell-specific transgene or gene-deficient animals. This approach identifies specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelium in innate immunity during homeostasis and disease. PMID:22801555

  11. What Is the Risk of Anastomotic Leak After Repeat Intestinal Resection in Patients With Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W Forrest; Stafford, Caitlin; Francone, Todd D; Read, Thomas E; Marcello, Peter W; Roberts, Patricia L; Ricciardi, Rocco

    2017-12-01

    Approximately half of Crohn's patients require intestinal resection, and many need repeat resections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the increased risk of clinical anastomotic leak in patients with a history of previous intestinal resection undergoing repeat resection with anastomosis for Crohn's disease. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected departmental data with 100% capture. The study was conducted at the department of colorectal surgery in a tertiary care teaching hospital between July 2007 and March 2016. A cohort of consecutive patients with Crohn's disease who were treated with intestinal resection and anastomosis, excluding patients with proximal fecal diversion, were included. The cohort was divided into 2 groups, those with no previous resection compared with those with previous resection. Clinical anastomotic leak within 30 days of surgery was measured. Of the 206 patients who met criteria, 83 patients had previous intestinal resection (40%). The 2 groups were similar in terms of patient factors, immune-suppressing medication use, and procedural factors. Overall, 20 clinical anastomotic leaks were identified (10% leak rate). There were 6 leaks (5%) detected in patients with no previous intestinal resection and 14 leaks (17%) detected in patients with a history of previous intestinal resection (p leak in patients with Crohn's disease with previous resection compared with no previous resection was 3.5 (95% CI, 1.3-9.4). Patients with 1 previous resection (n = 53) had a leak rate of 13%, whereas patients with ≥2 previous resections (n = 30) had a leak rate of 23%. The number of previous resections correlated with increasing risk for clinical anastomotic leak (correlation coefficient = 0.998). This was a retrospective study with limited data to perform a multivariate analysis. Repeat intestinal resection in patients with Crohn's disease is associated with an increased rate of anastomotic leakage when compared with initial

  12. Non-IPSID small intestinal lymphoma: Evidence for disseminated disease at presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovic, N.; Jelic, S.; Kovcin, V.; Opric, M.; Marinkovic, M.; Jovanovic, V.

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1984-1989 the authors have observed 20 patients with non-immuno-proliferative small intestinal disease (non-IPSID) small intestinal lymphomas, 11 males and 9 females. In 11 patients the first symptoms were abdominal cramps requiring laparotomy, in 4 ills, and in 5 perforation with peritonitis. Resection of the involved part of the intestine was performed in 17 patients. Lymphoma tissue was present in 4 of 5 retrogradely examined resection lines on macroscopically normal small intestine. According to Working Formulation, 3 patients had low grade, 3 intermediate grade and 14 high grade histology. Affection of extra intestinal/mesenteric structures was found in 18 of 20 patients, with a total of other lymphoma localizations. 8 of 20 affection of the nasopharynx and/or Waldeyer's ring. According to Crowther's classification 55 % patients were in Stage IV, 35 % in Stage III and 10 % in stage Ib. All patients were treated with chemotherapy, 13 with ProMACE regimen and 7 with CHOP-type regimens. Ten of twenty patients are alive and in complete remission for over 5 years (7 of 11 of Stage IV and 3 of 9 of Stage Ib/III; 8 of 14 with high grade and 2 of 6 with intermediate/low grade histology). Our results point to the fact that in non-IPSID lymphoma of the small intestine, lymphoma involvement of the intestinal wall might be present beyond obvious lymphoma lesions. Most patients with apparently primary small intestinal lymphoma have a widespread disease. Thus, local forms of treatment such as surgery and/or radiotherapy can not be expected to be curative in the majority of patients. Data from this study suggest that following initial surgery the chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for these patients. (author)

  13. Branched-chain Amino Acids are Beneficial to Maintain Growth Performance and Intestinal Immune-related Function in Weaned Piglets Fed Protein Restricted Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M; Zhang, S H; Zeng, X F; Liu, H; Qiao, S Y

    2015-12-01

    As a novel approach for disease control and prevention, nutritional modulation of the intestinal health has been proved. However, It is still unknown whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) is needed to maintain intestinal immune-related function. The objective of this study was to determine whether BCAA supplementation in protein restricted diet affects growth performance, intestinal barrier function and modulates post-weaning gut disorders. One hundred and eight weaned piglets (7.96±0.26 kg) were randomly fed one of the three diets including a control diet (21% crude protein [CP], CON), a protein restricted diet (17% CP, PR) and a BCAA diet (BCAA supplementation in the PR diet) for 14 d. The growth performance, plasma amino acid concentrations, small intestinal morphology and intestinal immunoglobulins were tested. First, average daily gain (ADG) (pBCAA group improved ADG (pBCAA groups was not different (p>0.05). The PR and BCAA treatments had a higher (pBCAA supplementation significantly increased BCAA concentrations (pBCAA supplementation increased villous height in the duodenum (pBCAA supplementation increased levels of jejunal and ileal immunoglobulin mentioned above. In conclusion, BCAA supplementation to protein restricted diet improved intestinal immune defense function by protecting villous morphology and by increasing levels of intestinal immunoglobulins in weaned piglets. Our finding has the important implication that BCAA may be used to reduce the negative effects of a protein restricted diet on growth performance and intestinal immunity in weaned piglets.

  14. Relationship between socio-demographic and clinical variables, and health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease Relación entre variables sociodemográficas y clínicas y calidad de vida relacionada con la salud en pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. López Blanco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the principal aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of socio-demographic and clinical variables on health-related quality of life (HRQL in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Patients and method: this was a cross-sectional study. health-related quality of life was measured with the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ. A total of 120 patients, 60 with ulcerative colitis and 60 with Crohn's disease, participated in the study. Results: no significant differences were observed between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients in IBDQ dimensions. However, a multivariate analysis revealed that sex, type of treatment, extraintestinal symptoms, number of relapses in previous year, satisfaction with surgery, and need for psychological support were related to HRQL. Conclusions: the identification of these variables associated with HRQL in patients with inflammatory bowel disease shows them to be basically non-disease factors. Knowledge of such elements can turn out to be very useful in order to guide future research and modify specific factors in further interventions.Objetivo: el objetivo principal del presente trabajo consiste en evaluar la influencia de las variables sociodemográficas y clínicas en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud de los pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal. Pacientes y método: se trata de un estudio transversal. La calidad de vida relacionada con la salud se investigó utilizando el "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire" (IBDQ. Un total de 120 pacientes, 60 con colitis ulcerosa y 60 con enfermedad de Crohn participaron en el estudio. Resultados: no se apreciaron diferencias significativas en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud en las dimensiones del IBDQ en función de la enfermedad, sin embargo, tras el análisis multivariante, el sexo, el tipo de tratamiento, las manifestaciones extradigestivas, el número de recaídas anual, la satisfacción con

  15. Compartmentalised expression of meprin in small intestinal mucosa: enhanced expression in lamina propria in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottaz, Daniel; Buri, Caroline; Monteleone, Giovanni; Rösmann, Sandra; Macdonald, Thomas T; Sanderson, Ian R; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2007-03-01

    Epithelial cells in the human small intestine express meprin, an astacin-like metalloprotease, which accumulates normally at the brush border membrane and in the gut lumen. Therefore, meprin is targeted towards luminal components. In coeliac disease patients, peptides from ingested cereals trigger mucosal inflammation in the small intestine, disrupting epithelial cell differentiation and function. Using in situ hybridisation on duodenal tissue sections, we observed a marked shift of meprin mRNA expression from epithelial cells, the predominant expression site in normal mucosa, to lamina propria leukocytes in coeliac disease. Meprin thereby gains access to the substrate repertoire present beneath the epithelium.

  16. Curcumin and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD: Major Mode of Action through Stimulating Endogenous Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha S. Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa, has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, an inflammatory disease, can lead to end stage renal disease resulting in dialysis and transplant. Furthermore, it is frequently associated with other inflammatory disease such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review will focus on the clinically relevant inflammatory molecules that play a role in CKD and associated diseases. Various enzymes, transcription factors, growth factors modulate production and action of inflammatory molecules; curcumin can blunt the generation and action of these inflammatory molecules and ameliorate CKD as well as associated inflammatory disorders. Recent studies have shown that increased intestinal permeability results in the leakage of pro-inflammatory molecules (cytokines and lipopolysaccharides from gut into the circulation in diseases such as CKD, diabetes and atherosclerosis. This change in intestinal permeability is due to decreased expression of tight junction proteins and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP. Curcumin increases the expression of IAP and tight junction proteins and corrects gut permeability. This action reduces the levels of circulatory inflammatory biomolecules. This effect of curcumin on intestine can explain why, despite poor bioavailability, curcumin has potential anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and beneficial effects on CKD.

  17. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  18. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  19. Usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine: comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Sohn, Min Jae; Shin, Byung Suck; Lee, Young Suk; Chung, Soo Yoon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine, emphasizing a comparison with CT. Thirty-four patients who underwent both CT and MR imaging using FLASH 2D and HASTE sequences were analyzed. All patients had various small bowel diseases with variable association of peritoneal lesions. We compared the detectabilities of CT and MR imaging using different MR pulse sequences. The capability for analyzing the characteristics of small intestinal disease was also compared. MR imaging was nearly equal to CT for detecting intraluminal or peritoneal masses, lesions in the bowel and mesentery, and small bowel obstruction, but was definitely inferior for detecting omental lesions. The most successful MR imaging sequence was HASTE for demonstrating bowel wall thickening, coronal FLASH 2D for mesenteric lesions, and axial FLASH 2D for omental lesions. MR imaging yielded greater information than CT in six of 12 inflammatory bowel diseases, while it was equal to CT in six of seven neoplasms and inferior in five of seven mesenteric ischemia. In determining the primary causes of 15 intestinal obstructions, MR imaging was correct in 11 (73%) and CT in nine (60%) patients. MR imaging can serve as an alternative diagnostic tool for patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal neoplasm or obstruction.

  20. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carmen Cenit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD, compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant’s gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc. could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis.

  1. Intestinal Behçet and Crohn's disease: two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Simona; Gallizzi, Romina; De Vivo, Dominique; Romano, Claudio

    2017-04-20

    Behçet's disease (BD) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic immune-mediated, inflammatory disorders affecting many different systems (joints, skin, eyes, gastrointestinal and biliary tracts). Both disorders have fluctuating courses and when gastrointestinal symptoms are prevalent, differential diagnosis can be difficult. BD involves the gastrointestinal tract in 10-15% of cases with localized lesions in the ileocecal region. The clinical picture is heterogeneous with various clusters of disease expression. CD is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which can affect any part of the intestinal tract, as well as extra-intestinal tissue. Factors that contribute towards the pathogenesis of both disease include the host's genetic profile, and immune system, and environmental factors such as the gut microbiota. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a narrative review of clinical features of BD and CD, highlighting the importance of differential diagnosis and therapeutic approach, especially in the presence of gastrointestinal involvement. A comprehensive search of published literature using the Pubmed ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ) database was carried out to identify all articles published in English from 1999 to October 2016, using 4 key terms: "Behçet Disease", "Intestinal Behçet's Disease", "Crohn's Disease" and" Inflammatory Bowel Disease".

  2. Castleman's disease associated with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Chul Jin; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Seung; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Kong, Doo-Sik; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Choe, Yon Ho

    2010-11-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It is characterized by enlarged hyperplastic lymph nodes, usually presenting as a localized mass. Although an intracranial location is very uncommon, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a chordoid meningioma. We describe a pediatric case of CD with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  3. Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's Disease) Presenting with Chylous Effusions in a 15-Year-Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampalli, Vijay; Ramaswamy, Srinath; Surendran, Deepanjali; Bammigatti, Chanaveerappa; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai

    2017-08-01

    Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disease of unknown aetiology which presents in the paediatric age group with anasarca, diarrhoea, hypoproteinaemia, lymphoedema and chylous effusions. Tuberculosis, filariasis, chest trauma, malignancies and haematological disorders usually contribute to most cases of secondary lymphangiectasia and chylous effusions. We hereby describe a case of PIL presenting with chylous effusions which remained undiagnosed for eight years.

  4. Transcutaneous port for levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel administration in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, T.; Nyholm, D.; Nyman, R.

    Objective - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of the T-Port (R) for intestinal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa gel in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods - This prospective study was carried out in 24 patients with PD (15 males, mean age 61.8 years, mean duration PD 18.7

  5. The intestinal stem cell signature identifies colorectal cancer stem cells and predicts disease relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Jung, P.; Iglesias, M.; Cespedes, M.V.; Rossell, D.; Sevillano, M.; Hernando-Momblona, X.; da Silva-Diz, V.; Munoz, P.; Clevers, H.; Sancho, E.; Mangues, R.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    A frequent complication in colorectal cancer (CRC) is regeneration of the tumor after therapy. Here, we report that a gene signature specific for adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) predicts disease relapse in CRC patients. ISCs are marked by high expression of the EphB2 receptor, which becomes

  6. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  7. Influence of intestinal microbiota in celiac disease pathogenesis and risk

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVARES SEVILLA, MARTA

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by cereal gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. The etiology is strongly associated with the genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) encoding the DQ2/DQ8 molecules. Most CD patients carry this genotype but this is also present in the 40% of the general population and only a small percentage develops the disease. Thus, the HLA-DQ genotype is necessary but not solely responsible for the disease development. Gluten ...

  8. Intestinal Permeability: The Basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvar Bjarnason

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review some of the more fundamental principles underlying the noninvasive assessment of intestinal permeability in humans, the choice of test markers and their analyses, and the practical aspects of test dose composition and how these can be changed to allow the specific assessment of regional permeability changes and other intestinal functions. The implications of increased intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of human disease is discussed in relation to findings in patients with Crohn’s disease. A common feature of increased intestinal permeability is the development of a low grade enteropathy, and while quantitatively similar changes may be found in Crohn’s disease these seem to predict relapse of disease. Moreover, factors associated with relapse of Crohn’s disease have in common an action to increase intestinal permeability. While increased intestinal permeability does not seem to be important in the etiology of Crohn’s disease it may be a central mechanism in the clinical relapse of disease.

  9. Crohn's disease intestinal CD4+ T cells have impaired interleukin-10 productionwhich is not restored by probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian L; Kelsen, Jens; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Crohn's disease (CD) has been associated with low mucosal interleukin (IL)-10 production, but the mechanism behind this deficiency remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-gamma production in intestinal CD4+ T cells from CD patients and healthy...... volunteers (HV) and to examine how this was affected by bacterial products and the presence or absence of autologous dendritic cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We cultured intestinal CD4+ T cells from CD patients (n=9) and HV (n=6) and differentiated dendritic cells from their peripheral monocytes. Intestinal T...... this imbalance in CD, but tended to do so in HV. When there were no dendritic cells, CD intestinal T cells responded to autologous bacteria with an increased IFN-gamma production (2.3+/-1.3 ng/ml) compared with HV intestinal T cells (0.3+/-0.2 ng/ml). CONCLUSIONS: Crohn's disease intestinal CD4+ T cells display...

  10. [An analysis of the DNA fingerprinting of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-mei; Han, Ying; Wang, Ji-heng; Wang, Zhi-hong

    2007-02-01

    DNA fingerprinting for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and healthy subjects was carried out to compare the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups. DNA fingerprinting for IBD patients and healthy persons was set up with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR) technology and the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups compared. DNA fingerprinting of the IBD patients and healthy subjects was identified and a significant difference was noticed between them. There were lots of bands in the DNA fingerprinting of the healthy subjects but few in that of the IBD patients. Strikingly, same distribution of the principal band of DNA fingerprinting was noticed in IBD patients. The variety of intestinal flora in healthy subjects is more apparent than that in IBD patients. An unique principal band might be the sequence of the presence of specific etiopathogenetic bacterium, or it might be the combined sequence of mixed bacterial flora.

  11. Intestinal inflammation in TNBS sensitized rats as a model of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selve

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An enteritis, based on a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, was induced in TNBS (2,4,4-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid sensitized rats by multiple intrajejunal challenge with TNBS via an implanted catheter. This treatment induced chronic inflammation of the distal small intestine characterized by intense hyperaemia, oedema and gut wall thickening as assessed by macroscopic scoring and weighing a defined part of the dissected intestine. Histologically, the inflammatory response included mucosal and submucosal cell infiltration by lymphocytes and histiocytes, transmural granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated cells and activated mesenteric lymph nodes. Ex vivo stimulated release of the inflammatory mediator LTB4 in the dissected part of the intestine was increased following TNBS treatment. Drug treatment with sulphasalazine or 5-aminosalicylic acid improved the enteritis score and attenuated TNBS induced oedema formation and LTB4 production. The applicability and relevance of this new model are discussed with respect to drug development and basic research of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  12. Omitting duodenal biopsy in children with suspected celiac disease and extra-intestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzola, Mauro; Meazza, Cristina; Gertosio, Chiara; Pagani, Sara; Larizza, Daniela; Calcaterra, Valeria; Luinetti, Ombretta; Farello, Giovanni; Tinelli, Carmine; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2017-07-15

    The aim of our study is to evaluate if in children with highly positive serology and HLA-DQ2/DQ8 (triple test, TT) and only extra-intestinal symptoms, it is possible to omit performing an intestinal biopsy for celiac disease (CD) diagnosis, as suggested by the new European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition ESPGHAN guidelines. In this retrospective study a total of 105 patients, suspected of having CD because of extra-intestinal symptoms and showing serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG) and anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) measurements and HLA genotyping, were considered for the final analysis (33 boys and 72 girls; age range 1.5-17.6 years). Histological findings confirmed diagnosis of CD in 97 (92.4%) patients. Forty-one patients (39%) showed anti-tTG >10 times normal values, positive EMA and positive HLA-DQ2/DQ8 (positive TT). All of them had a diagnosis of CD, therefore there were no false positive cases. Sixty-four patients were negative for the TT. In eight cases, CD was ruled out and these were considered true negative cases. In the remaining 56 negative TT patients, intestinal biopsy confirmed CD diagnosis and they were considered false negatives. Based on these results, specificity for the TT was 100% and sensitivity was 42.3%. On the basis of the present study, diagnosis of CD can be reliably performed without a duodenal biopsy in children with only extra-intestinal symptoms.

  13. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

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    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. The Neuromodulation of the Intestinal Immune System and Its Relevance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Verheijden, Simon; Bosmans, Goele; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    One of the main tasks of the immune system is to discriminate and appropriately react to "danger" or "non-danger" signals. This is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract, where the immune system is confronted with a myriad of food antigens and symbiotic microflora that are in constant contact with the mucosa, in addition to any potential pathogens. This large number of antigens and commensal microflora, which are essential for providing vital nutrients, must be tolerated by the intestinal immune system to prevent aberrant inflammation. Hence, the balance between immune activation versus tolerance should be tightly regulated to maintain intestinal homeostasis and to prevent immune activation indiscriminately against all luminal antigens. Loss of this delicate equilibrium can lead to chronic activation of the intestinal immune response resulting in intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In order to maintain homeostasis, the immune system has evolved diverse regulatory strategies including additional non-immunological actors able to control the immune response. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates a bidirectional link between the two systems in which the brain modulates the immune response via the detection of circulating cytokines and via direct afferent input from sensory fibers and from enteric neurons. In the current review, we will highlight the most recent findings regarding the cross-talk between the nervous system and the mucosal immune system and will discuss the potential use of these neuronal circuits and neuromediators as novel therapeutic tools to reestablish immune tolerance and treat intestinal chronic inflammation.

  15. The Intestinal Microbiome in Early Life: Health and Disease

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    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human microbial colonization begins at birth and continues to develop and modulate in species abundance for about three years, until the microbiota becomes adult-like. During the same time period, children experience significant developmental changes that influence their current health status as well as their immune system. An ever-expanding number of articles associate several diseases with early life imbalances of the gut microbiota, also referred to as gut microbial dysbiosis. Whether early life dysbiosis precedes and plays a role in disease pathogenesis, or simply originates from the disease process itself is a question that is beginning to be answered in a few diseases, including IBD, obesity and asthma. This review describes the gut microbiome structure and function during the formative first years of life, as well as the environmental factors that determine its composition. It also aims to discuss the recent advances in understanding the role of the early life gut microbiota in the development of immune-mediated, metabolic, and neurological diseases. A greater understanding of how the early life gut microbiota impacts our immune development could potentially lead to novel microbial-derived therapies that target disease prevention at an early age.

  16. Infectious Intestinal Diseases and Residential Water Services in Mexico: a Spatial Analysis

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    Nicholas P. Sisto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious intestinal diseases (IID represent a widespread public health problem in Mexico. The country also faces major challenges with respect to the provision of residential water services (piped water and sewer—an essential input for hygiene and cleanliness in homes. This paper analyzes morbidity rates from several IID associated with unsanitary living conditions along with a series of residential water services indicators for Mexico’s 2,456 municipalities. With data obtained through a special request to the federal epidemiological authority as well as official census data for 2010, we find stark regional contrasts and identify interesting spatial structures for both IID morbidity and residential water services indicators. In particular, municipalities tend to present values similar to neighboring municipalities, forming clusters of relatively high-value (or low-value municipalities. Moreover we find that municipalities with a relatively high level of access to residential water services tend to present relatively low IID morbidity rates. These results have multiple public policy implications. In order to reduce the incidence of IID effectively and efficiently, interventions should explicitly consider the spatial structure of morbidity and target problem spots—which typically spill over state, municipal and other administrative boundaries. Moreover, improvements in the quality of access to piped water (for example, increasing the frequency of supply may be as important for reducing morbidity as the expansion of basic access to this service.

  17. The extent of intestinal failure-associated liver disease in patients referred for intestinal rehabilitation is associated with increased mortality: an analysis of the pediatric intestinal failure consortium database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Patrick J; Oron, Assaf P; Duggan, Christopher; Squires, Robert H; Horslen, Simon P

    2017-09-05

    The advent of regional multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation programs has been associated with improved survival in pediatric intestinal failure. Yet, the optimal timing of referral for intestinal rehabilitation remains unknown. We hypothesized that the degree of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) at initiation of intestinal rehabilitation would be associated with overall outcome. The multicenter, retrospective Pediatric Intestinal Failure Consortium (PIFCon) database was used to identify all subjects with baseline bilirubin data. Conjugated bilirubin (CBili) was used as a marker for IFALD, and we stratified baseline bilirubin values as CBili4 mg/dL. The association between baseline CBili and mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazards regression. Of 272 subjects in the database, 191 (70%) children had baseline bilirubin data collected. 38% and 28% of patients had CBili >4 mg/dL and CBili 4 mg/dL, prematurity, race, and small bowel atresia. On regression analysis controlling for age, prematurity, and diagnosis, the risk of mortality was increased by 3-fold for baseline CBili 2-4 mg/dL (HR 3.25 [1.07-9.92], p=0.04) and 4-fold for baseline CBili >4 mg/dL (HR 4.24 [1.51-11.92], p=0.006). On secondary analysis, CBili >4 mg/dL at baseline was associated with a lower chance of attaining enteral autonomy. In children with intestinal failure treated at intestinal rehabilitation programs, more advanced IFALD at referral is associated with increased mortality and decreased prospect of attaining enteral autonomy. Early referral of children with intestinal failure to intestinal rehabilitation programs should be strongly encouraged. Treatment Study, Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Extra-intestinal findings on magnetic resonance enterography in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheybani, E.F.; Sheikh, N.; Chavhan, G.B.; Greer, M.-L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine the occurrence of extra-intestinal findings on magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) in a large cohort of children with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease, characterise those findings, determine the technique and frequency of follow-up imaging, and associated costs. Materials and methods: Imaging reports from 757 MRE examinations in 671 children with known or suspected IBD from 2011 through 2012 were analysed retrospectively. Reported extra-intestinal findings were categorised by two radiologists in consensus as normal, normal variants or commonly seen findings without clinical significance, or abnormal. Prior imaging reports of the patients with abnormal findings were reviewed to identify which findings were new or substantially changed. Subsequent imaging examinations, their associated costs, and additional work-up of extra-intestinal findings were recorded in each group. Results: A total of 403 extra-intestinal findings were reported in 290 MRE (38.3%) examinations performed in 269 children (40.1%). Of these, 189 (46.9%) findings were abnormal and new or significantly changed from prior imaging, 88 (21.8%) were abnormal and stable, 50 (12.4%) were normal variants or commonly seen findings with no clinical significance, and 76 (18.9%) were normal. Abnormal findings included 34.7% associated with IBD and 65.3% considered unrelated. Follow-up imaging was performed for 69 (17.1%) mostly abnormal findings in 94 patients (8.3%). Magnetic resonance imaging (51%) and ultrasound (28%) were the most commonly utilised imaging methods. Conclusion: MRE identifies a large number of previously unknown extra-intestinal abnormalities in children with known or suspected IBD, most unrelated to IBD. Although <10% of children having MRE undergo subsequent imaging of extra-intestinal abnormalities, given the rapid uptake of MRE in the paediatric population, emphasis should be given to avoiding techniques utilising ionising radiation at follow

  19. Reversibility of increased intestinal permeability to 51Cr-EDTA in patients with gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.T.; Jones, D.B.; Goodacre, R.L.; Collins, S.M.; Coates, G.; Hunt, R.H.; Bienenstock, J.

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in adults with inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases was investigated by measuring the 24-h urinary excretion of orally administered 51 Cr-EDTA. Eighty controls along with 100 patients with Crohn's disease, 46 patients with ulcerative colitis, 20 patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and 18 patients with other diseases were studied. In controls, the median 24-h excretion was 1.34%/24 h of the oral dose. Patients with Crohn's disease (median 2.96%/24 h), ulcerative colitis (median 2.12%/24 h), and untreated gluten-sensitive enteropathy (median 3.56%/24 h) had significantly elevated urinary excretion of the probe compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). Increased 24-h urinary excretion of 51 Cr-EDTA had a high association with intestinal inflammation (p less than 0.0001). Test specificity and sensitivity were 96% and 57%, respectively. A positive test has a 96% probability of correctly diagnosing the presence of intestinal inflammation, whereas a negative test has a 50% probability of predicting the absence of disease

  20. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Evaluating Intestinal Involvement of Behçet’s Disease

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    Burak Özşeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the regions of involvement of Behçet’s disease (BD, a systematic inflammatory vasculitis with unknown etiology, is the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, and capsule endoscopy are frequently used methods to diagnose the intestinal involvement of BD. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin (FC in the evaluation of intestinal involvement in BD. Material and Method. A total of 30 patients who were diagnosed with BD and had no GI symptoms and 25 individuals in the control group were included in this study. Results. Levels of FC were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared to the control group (p<0.001. The correlation analysis performed including FC and markers of disease activity revealed a positive and statistically significant correlation between FC level and CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r: 0.255, p<0.049, and r: 0.404, p<0.001, resp.. FC levels in patients who were detected to have ulcers in the terminal ileum and colon in the colonoscopic examination were statistically significantly higher compared to the patients with BD without intestinal involvement (p=0.01. Conclusion. The measurement of FC levels, in patients with BD who are asymptomatic for GI involvement, may be helpful to detect the possible underlying intestinal involvement.

  1. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas

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    Marilaine Martins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  2. Gene expression related to oxidative stress in the heart of mice after intestinal ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somaio Neto, Frederico; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Chaves, José Carlos Bertoletto; Teruya, Roberto; Fagundes, Djalma José; Taha, Murched Omar

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion is a frequent clinical event associated to injury in distant organs, especially the heart. To investigate the gene expression of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the heart of inbred mice subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR). Twelve mice (C57BL / 6) were assigned to: IR Group (GIR) with 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion; Control Group (CG) which underwent anesthesia and laparotomy without IR procedure and was observed for 120 minutes. Intestine and heart samples were processed using the RT-qPCR / Reverse transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method for the gene expression of 84 genes related to oxidative stress and oxidative defense (Student's 't' test, p < 0.05). The intestinal tissue (GIR) was noted to have an up-regulation of 65 genes (74.71%) in comparison to normal tissue (CG), and 37 genes (44.04%) were hyper-expressed (greater than three times the threshold allowed by the algorithm). Regarding the remote effects of intestinal I/R in cardiac tissue an up-regulation of 28 genes (33.33%) was seen, but only eight genes (9.52%) were hyper-expressed three times above threshold. Four (7.14%) of these eight genes were expressed in both intestinal and cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes with smaller and pyknotic nuclei, rich in heterochromatin with rare nucleoli, indicating cardiac distress, were observed in the GIR. Intestinal I/R caused a statistically significant over expression of 8 genes associated with oxidative stress in remote myocardial tissue

  3. Gene expression related to oxidative stress in the heart of mice after intestinal ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaio Neto, Frederico; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Chaves, José Carlos Bertoletto; Teruya, Roberto; Fagundes, Djalma José; Taha, Murched Omar

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion is a frequent clinical event associated to injury in distant organs, especially the heart. Objective To investigate the gene expression of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the heart of inbred mice subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR). Methods Twelve mice (C57BL / 6) were assigned to: IR Group (GIR) with 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion; Control Group (CG) which underwent anesthesia and laparotomy without IR procedure and was observed for 120 minutes. Intestine and heart samples were processed using the RT-qPCR / Reverse transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method for the gene expression of 84 genes related to oxidative stress and oxidative defense (Student's "t" test, p < 0.05). Results The intestinal tissue (GIR) was noted to have an up-regulation of 65 genes (74.71%) in comparison to normal tissue (CG), and 37 genes (44.04%) were hyper-expressed (greater than three times the threshold allowed by the algorithm). Regarding the remote effects of intestinal I/R in cardiac tissue an up-regulation of 28 genes (33.33%) was seen, but only eight genes (9.52%) were hyper-expressed three times above threshold. Four (7.14%) of these eight genes were expressed in both intestinal and cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes with smaller and pyknotic nuclei, rich in heterochromatin with rare nucleoli, indicating cardiac distress, were observed in the GIR. Conclusion Intestinal I/R caused a statistically significant over expression of 8 genes associated with oxidative stress in remote myocardial tissue. PMID:24346830

  4. Gene expression related to oxidative stress in the heart of mice after intestinal ischemia

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    Somaio Neto, Frederico; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Chaves, José Carlos Bertoletto [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados - UFGD, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Teruya, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul - UFMS, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Fagundes, Djalma José, E-mail: fsomaio@cardiol.br; Taha, Murched Omar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion is a frequent clinical event associated to injury in distant organs, especially the heart. To investigate the gene expression of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the heart of inbred mice subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR). Twelve mice (C57BL / 6) were assigned to: IR Group (GIR) with 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion; Control Group (CG) which underwent anesthesia and laparotomy without IR procedure and was observed for 120 minutes. Intestine and heart samples were processed using the RT-qPCR / Reverse transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method for the gene expression of 84 genes related to oxidative stress and oxidative defense (Student's 't' test, p < 0.05). The intestinal tissue (GIR) was noted to have an up-regulation of 65 genes (74.71%) in comparison to normal tissue (CG), and 37 genes (44.04%) were hyper-expressed (greater than three times the threshold allowed by the algorithm). Regarding the remote effects of intestinal I/R in cardiac tissue an up-regulation of 28 genes (33.33%) was seen, but only eight genes (9.52%) were hyper-expressed three times above threshold. Four (7.14%) of these eight genes were expressed in both intestinal and cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes with smaller and pyknotic nuclei, rich in heterochromatin with rare nucleoli, indicating cardiac distress, were observed in the GIR. Intestinal I/R caused a statistically significant over expression of 8 genes associated with oxidative stress in remote myocardial tissue.

  5. Antibiotic-Induced Changes in the Intestinal Microbiota and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Simone; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a key player in many physiological and pathological processes occurring in humans. Recent investigations suggest that the efficacy of some clinical approaches depends on the action of commensal bacteria. Antibiotics are invaluable weapons to fight infectious diseases. However, by altering the composition and functions of the microbiota, they can also produce long-lasting deleterious effects for the host. The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens raises concerns about the common, and at times inappropriate, use of antimicrobial agents. Here we review the most recently discovered connections between host pathophysiology, microbiota, and antibiotics highlighting technological platforms, mechanistic insights, and clinical strategies to enhance resistance to diseases by preserving the beneficial functions of the microbiota. PMID:27178527

  6. Antibiotic-Induced Changes in the Intestinal Microbiota and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Simone; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiota is a key player in many physiological and pathological processes occurring in humans. Recent investigations suggest that the efficacy of some clinical approaches depends on the action of commensal bacteria. Antibiotics are invaluable weapons to fight infectious diseases. However, by altering the composition and functions of the microbiota, they can also produce long-lasting deleterious effects for the host. The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens raises concerns about the common, and at times inappropriate, use of antimicrobial agents. Here we review the most recently discovered connections between host pathophysiology, microbiota, and antibiotics highlighting technological platforms, mechanistic insights, and clinical strategies to enhance resistance to diseases by preserving the beneficial functions of the microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of elemental diet on intestinal permeability and inflammation in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teahon, K.; Smethurst, P.; Pearson, M.; Levi, A.J.; Bjarnason, I.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines whether treatment of acute Crohn's disease with an elemental diet improves intestinal integrity and inflammation as assessed by a 51Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetatic acid (EDTA) permeability test and the fecal excretion of 111In-labeled autologous leukocytes, respectively. Thirty-four patients with active Crohn's disease completed a 4-week treatment course with an elemental diet. Active disease was characterized by increased intestinal permeability [24-hour urine excretion of orally administered 51Cr-EDTA, 6.4% ± 0.6% (mean ± SE); normal, less than 3.0%] and by high fecal excretion of 111In-labeled leukocytes (14.2% ± 1.1%; normal, less than 1.0%). Twenty-seven (80%) went into clinical remission, usually within a week of starting treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment, there was a significant decrease in both the urine excretion of 51Cr-EDTA (to 3.4% ± 0.5%; P less than 0.01) and the fecal excretion of 111In (to 5.7% ± 1.0%; P less than 0.001), indicating that such treatment is not just symptomatic. A framework for the mechanism by which elemental diet works, centering around the importance of the integrity of the intestinal barrier function, is proposed, and also appears to provide a logical explanation for some relapses of the disease

  8. Treatment of Cushing's disease in juveniles with intestinal pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Nine juvenile patients (five boys and four girls aged 10-18) with Cushing's disease were treated with pituitary implantation of 198 Au and/or 90 Y. No patient had any surgical complication from this procedure. At the latest assessment. 3 months to 17 years after operation, Cushing's disease was in remission in all the patients; the response time following operation was a few days to 3 months. Radiology of the pituitary fossa at time of pituitary implantation was normal in all patients and remains so. The final height in six patients is 149-172 cm (59-67.5 inches) and three patients who continue to grow have increased by 13.6 and 3 cm since implantation. Only one patient required full pituitary hormone replacement therapy, and he had been previously treated by external irradiation, and one other patient failed to complete puberty. In all the other seven sexual maturation is normal and one has fathered two children. It is concluded that pituitary implantation with interstitial irradiation is a satisfactory form of treatment for Cushing's disease in juveniles. (author)

  9. Roles of amino acids in preventing and treating intestinal diseases: recent studies with pig models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulan; Wang, Xiuying; Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong; Qiu, Yinsheng; Wu, Guoyao; Hu, Chien-An Andy

    2017-08-01

    Animal models are needed to study and understand a human complex disease. Because of their similarities in anatomy, structure, physiology, and pathophysiology, the pig has proven its usefulness in studying human gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diarrhea, and cancer. To understand the pathogenesis of these diseases, a number of experimental models generated in pigs are available, for example, through surgical manipulation, chemical induction, microbial infection, and genetic engineering. Our interests have been using amino acids as therapeutics in pig and human disease models. Amino acids not only play an important role in protein biosynthesis, but also exert significant physiological effects in regulating immunity, anti-oxidation, redox regulation, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and animal behavior. Recent studies in pigs have shown that specific dietary amino acids can improve intestinal integrity and function under normal and pathological conditions that protect the host from different diseases. In this review, we summarize several pig models in intestinal diseases and how amino acids can be used as therapeutics in treating pig and human diseases.

  10. Use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry for evaluation of microcirculation in the small and large intestines of horses without gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christof; Kästner, Sabine B R; Hopster, Klaus; Rohn, Karl; Rötting, Anna K

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the use of a micro-lightguide tissue spectrophotometer for measurement of tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the small and large intestines of horses under anesthesia. 13 adult horses without gastrointestinal disease. Horses were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency. Ventral midline laparotomy was performed. Intestinal segments were exteriorized to obtain measurements. Spectrophotometric measurements of tissue oxygenation and regional blood flow of the jejunum and pelvic flexure were obtained under various conditions that were considered to have a potential effect on measurement accuracy. In addition, arterial oxygen saturation at the measuring sites was determined by use of pulse oximetry. 12,791 single measurements of oxygen saturation, relative amount of hemoglobin, and blood flow were obtained. Errors occurred in 381 of 12,791 (2.98%) measurements. Most measurement errors occurred when surgical lights were directed at the measuring site; covering the probe with the surgeon's hand did not eliminate this error source. No measurement errors were observed when the probe was positioned on the intestinal wall with room light, at the mesenteric side, or between the mesenteric and antimesenteric side. Values for blood flow had higher variability, and this was most likely caused by motion artifacts of the intestines. The micro-lightguide spectrophotometry system was easy to use on the small and large intestines of horses and provided rapid evaluation of the microcirculation. Results indicated that measurements should be performed with room light only and intestinal motion should be minimized.

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in celiac disease patients is similar in healthy subjects and lower in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Zubiaurre, I; Fanjul, I; Olivera, P; Soifer, L

    2015-01-01

    Untreated celiac disease has traditionally been linked to a greater risk for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but the existing evidence is inconclusive. To compare the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in subjects with celiac disease compared with control subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study included 15 untreated celiac disease patients, 15 subjects with irritable bowel syndrome, and 15 healthy controls. All enrolled patients underwent a lactulose breath test measuring hydrogen and methane. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was defined according to previously published criteria. No differences were found in relation to age or sex. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was similar between the celiac disease patients and the controls (20 vs. 13.33%, P=NS), whereas it was higher in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (66.66%, Pintestinal bacterial overgrowth between the untreated celiac disease patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Human organoids: a model system for intestinal diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    You are what you eat. A common saying that indicates that your physical or mental state can be influenced by your choice of food. Unfortunately, not all people have the luxury to choose what to eat; this can be related to place of birth, social, economic state, or the physical inability of the

  13. Characterization of Intestinal Microbiomes of Hirschsprung's Disease Patients with or without Enterocolitis Using Illumina-MiSeq High-Throughput Sequencing.

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    Yuqing Li

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis (HAEC is a life-threatening complication of Hirschsprung's disease (HD. Although the pathological mechanisms are still unclear, studies have shown that HAEC has a close relationship with the disturbance of intestinal microbiota. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of the intestinal microbiome of HD patients with or without enterocolitis. During routine or emergency surgery, we collected 35 intestinal content samples from five patients with HAEC and eight HD patients, including three HD patients with a history of enterocolitis who were in a HAEC remission (HAEC-R phase. Using Illumina-MiSeq high-throughput sequencing, we sequenced the V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA, and operational taxonomic units (OTUs were defined by 97% sequence similarity. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA of weighted UniFrac distances was performed to evaluate the diversity of each intestinal microbiome sample. The microbiota differed significantly between the HD patients (characterized by the prevalence of Bacteroidetes and HAEC patients (characterized by the prevalence of Proteobacteria, while the microbiota of the HAEC-R patients was more similar to that of the HAEC patients. We also observed that the specimens from different intestinal sites of each HD patient differed significantly, while the specimens from different intestinal sites of each HAEC and HAEC-R patient were more similar. In conclusion, the microbiome pattern of the HAEC-R patients was more similar to that of the HAEC patients than to that of the HD patients. The HD patients had a relatively distinct, more stable community than the HAEC and HAEC-R patients, suggesting that enterocolitis may either be caused by or result in a disruption of the patient's uniquely adapted intestinal flora. The intestinal microbiota associated with enterocolitis may persist following symptom resolution and can be implicated in the symptom recurrence.

  14. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with Penicillium chrysogenum

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    Herchline Thomas E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. Case presentation A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. Pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for Penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin B lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. Discussion Penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. Diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. Prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin B. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.

  15. Imbalance in the intestinal microbiota as a risk factor of cardiometabolic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review shows the role of the intestinal microflora in the development of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, overweight / obesity and diabetes. It is well known that consumption of foods rich in saturated fats and cholesterol (meat, egg yolk and milk products with high fat content is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, new studies show that the atherogenic properties of these products are also due to the high content of L-carnitine and its structural analog choline, which, after entering the body is metabolized by intestinal bacteria up to trimethylamine (TMA, and then converted in the liver to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO having direct atherogenic action. It was found that elevated levels of TMAO increases the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac failure and death, including the common causes. In the center of international attention is also the question of the role of the intestinal microbiota imbalance in the development of insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, increase of the adhesive properties of macrophages, the appearance of dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, overweight. Attention of the doctors is focused on the extremely importance of maintaining a normal balance of the intestinal microbiota to prevent cardiometabolic diseases apart from implementation of already well-known and generally accepted preventive measures.

  16. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  17. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  18. Review article: the many potential roles of intestinal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) signalling in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, M D; Tekin, I; Vrana, K E; Mawe, G M

    2017-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important mediator of every major gut-related function. Recent investigations also suggest that 5-HT can influence the development and severity of inflammation within the gut, particularly in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To review the roles that the intestinal serotonin signalling system plays in gut function, with a specific focus on IBD. We reviewed manuscripts from 1952 to 2017 that investigated and discussed roles for 5-HT signalling in gastrointestinal function and IBD, as well as the influence of inflammation on 5-HT signalling elements within the gut. Inflammation appears to affect every major element of intestinal 5-HT signalling, including 5-HT synthesis, release, receptor expression and reuptake capacity. Importantly, many studies (most utilising animal models) also demonstrate that modulation of selective serotonergic receptors (via agonism of 5-HT 4 R and antagonism of 5-HT 3 R) or 5-HT signal termination (via serotonin reuptake inhibitors) can alter the likelihood and severity of intestinal inflammation and/or its complicating symptoms. However, there are few human studies that have studied these relationships in a targeted manner. Insights discussed in this review have strong potential to lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic tools to improve the management of IBD and other related disorders. Specifically, strategies that focus on modifying the activity of selective serotonin receptors and reuptake transporters in the gut could be effective for controlling disease activity and/or its associated symptoms. Further studies in humans are required, however, to more completely understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the roles of 5-HT in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    models suggests that intestinal stem cell transplantation could constitute a novel treatment strategy to re-establish mucosal barrier function in patients with severe disease. Intestinal stem cells can be grownin vitroin organoid structures, though only a fraction of the cells contained are stem cells...... with regenerative capabilities. Hence, techniques to enrich stem cell populations are being pursued through the development of multiple two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture protocols, as well as co-culture techniques and multiple growth medium compositions. Moreover, research in support matrices allowing...... for efficient clinical application is in progress.In vitroculture is accomplished by modulating the signaling pathways fundamental for the stem cell niche with a suitable culture matrix to provide additional contact-dependent stimuli and structural support. The aim of this review was to discuss medium...

  20. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients with Increased Intestinal Gas (Flatulence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Mokhtare, Marjan; Agah, Shahram; Sina, Mohammad; Soltani-Kermanshahi, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Excessive flatulence which impairs social performance in patients is one of the common reasons for referrals to gastroenterology clinics. Celiac Disease is a rare but important cause of increased intestinal gas (bloating) and if not diagnosed, patients face complications such as malabsorption, anemia, osteoporosis and even intestinal lymphoma. This study aimed to determine the frequency of Celiac Disease in patients with excessive flatulence. One hundred and fifty patients with a chief complaint of experiencing flatulence more than 15 times a day and lasting for three months were referred to the gastroenterology clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Teaching Hospital. Serological tests for Celiac Disease, Anti TTG Ab (IgA-IgG) were requested and the patients with positive tests underwent upper GI endoscopy. Biopsies of the second part of the duodenum were then sent to the laboratory. From one hundred and thirty patients who completed the study, 92 (70.7%) were female. Mean age of the patients was 32 ± 13 years. Anti TTG Ab was found in 5 patients (3.85%). Only 2 patients (1.5%) had a documented positive pathology for Celiac Disease. According to the results of this study and other studies, we conclude that Celiac Disease is an uncommon etiology for excessive flatulence but it is of importance to investigate it in excessive flatulence patients. PMID:26755470

  1. The magnitude and risk factors of intestinal parasitic infection in relation to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection and immune status, at ALERT Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Biruhalem; Desta, Kassu; Ejigu, Selamawit; Dori, Geme Urge

    2014-06-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and intestinal parasitic infections are among the main health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Particularly, co-infections of these diseases would worsen the progression of HIV to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and risk factors for intestinal parasites in relation to HIV infection and immune status. The study was conducted in (1) HIV positive on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) ART naïve HIV positive patients, and (3) HIV-negative individuals, at All African Leprosy and Tuberculosis (TB) Eradication and Rehabilitation Training Center (ALERT) hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Study participants were interviewed using structured questionnaires to obtain socio-demographic characteristics and assess risk factors associated with intestinal parasitic infection. Intestinal parasites were identified from fecal samples by direct wet mount, formol ether concentration, and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. The immune status was assessed by measuring whole blood CD4 T-cell count. The overall magnitude of intestinal parasite was 35.08%. This proportion was different among study groups with 39.2% (69/176), 38.83% (40/103) and 27.14% (38/140) in ART naïve HIV positives patients, in HIV negatives, and in HIV positive on ART patients respectively. HIV positive patients on ART had significantly lower magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection compared to HIV negative individuals. Intestinal helminths were significantly lower in HIV positive on ART and ART naïve patients than HIV negatives. Low monthly income, and being married, divorced or widowed were among the socio-demographic characteristics associated with intestinal parasitic infection. No association was observed between the magnitude of intestinal parasites and CD4 T-cell count. However, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Isospora belli were exclusively identified in individuals with CD4 T

  2. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  3. Distinctive genomic signature of neural and intestinal organoids from familial Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, M-Y; Sim, H; Son, Y S; Jung, K B; Lee, M-O; Oh, J-H; Chung, S-K; Jung, C-R; Kim, J

    2017-12-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S mutation is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). There is compelling evidence that PD is not only a brain disease but also a gastrointestinal disorder; nonetheless, its pathogenesis remains unclear. We aimed to develop human neural and intestinal tissue models of PD patients harbouring an LRRK2 mutation to understand the link between LRRK2 and PD pathology by investigating the gene expression signature. We generated PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carrying an LRRK2 G2019S mutation (LK2GS) and then differentiated into three-dimensional (3D) human neuroectodermal spheres (hNESs) and human intestinal organoids (hIOs). To unravel the gene and signalling networks associated with LK2GS, we analysed differentially expressed genes in the microarray data by functional clustering, gene ontology (GO) and pathway analyses. The expression profiles of LK2GS were distinct from those of wild-type controls in hNESs and hIOs. The most represented GO biological process in hNESs and hIOs was synaptic transmission, specifically synaptic vesicle trafficking, some defects of which are known to be related to PD. The results were further validated in four independent PD-specific hNESs and hIOs by microarray and qRT-PCR analysis. We provide the first evidence that LK2GS also causes significant changes in gene expression in the intestinal cells. These hNES and hIO models from the same genetic background of PD patients could be invaluable resources for understanding PD pathophysiology and for advancing the complexity of in vitro models with 3D expandable organoids. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  4. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  5. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  6. Intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Hamid M

    2011-08-01

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms and regulation of intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins under normal physiological conditions, and of the factors/conditions that affect and interfere with theses processes has been significantly expanded in recent years as a result of the availability of a host of valuable molecular/cellular tools. Although structurally and functionally unrelated, the water-soluble vitamins share the feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development, and that their deficiency leads to a variety of clinical abnormalities that range from anaemia to growth retardation and neurological disorders. Humans cannot synthesize water-soluble vitamins (with the exception of some endogenous synthesis of niacin) and must obtain these micronutrients from exogenous sources. Thus body homoeostasis of these micronutrients depends on their normal absorption in the intestine. Interference with absorption, which occurs in a variety of conditions (e.g. congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive system, intestinal disease/resection, drug interaction and chronic alcohol use), leads to the development of deficiency (and sub-optimal status) and results in clinical abnormalities. It is well established now that intestinal absorption of the water-soluble vitamins ascorbate, biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamin is via specific carrier-mediated processes. These processes are regulated by a variety of factors and conditions, and the regulation involves transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanisms. Also well recognized now is the fact that the large intestine possesses specific and efficient uptake systems to absorb a number of water-soluble vitamins that are synthesized by the normal microflora. This source may contribute to total body vitamin nutrition, and especially towards the cellular nutrition and health of the local colonocytes. The present review aims to outline our current

  7. Significance of X-ray examinations of patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal-tract resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulke, H.; Hoerl, M.; Kasper, H.; Auer, I.O.

    1988-12-01

    After intestinal tract resection, the status of the intestinal tract of patients with Crohn's disease who had recurrent anastomoses versus those that did not analyzed using standardized procedures of stomach X-ray with small bowel follow through, barium enema and fistulography. The intestinal tract resections included ileostomy, transverse ileostomy, rectal ileostomy, and atypical procedures. The anstomoses and surrounding tissue were evaluated. The results were discussed and the X-ray characteristics of the current anastomosis and the existing changes in its environment were analyzed.

  8. The significance of X-ray examinations of patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal-tract resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, H.; Hoerl, M.; Kasper, H.; Auer, I.O.

    1988-01-01

    After intestinal tract resection, the status of the intestinal tract of patients with Crohn's disease who had recurrent anastomoses versus those that did not analyzed using standardized procedures of stomach X-ray with small bowel follow through, barium enema and fistulography. The intestinal tract resections included ileostomy, transverse ileostomy, rectal ileostomy, and atypical procedures. The anstomoses and surrounding tissue were evaluated. The results were discussed and the X-ray characteristics of the current anastomosis and the existing changes in its environment were analyzed. (orig.) [de

  9. Pilot study of lithium to restore intestinal barrier function in severe graft-versus-host disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Steinbach

    Full Text Available Severe intestinal graft-vs-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT causes mucosal ulceration and induces innate and adaptive immune responses that amplify and perpetuate GVHD and the associated barrier dysfunction. Pharmacological agents to target mucosal barrier dysfunction in GVHD are needed. We hypothesized that induction of Wnt signaling by lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3, would potentiate intestinal crypt proliferation and mucosal repair and that inhibition of GSK3 in inflammatory cells would attenuate the deregulated inflammatory response to mucosal injury. We conducted an observational pilot study to provide data for the potential design of a randomized study of lithium. Twenty patients with steroid refractory intestinal GVHD meeting enrollment criteria were given oral lithium carbonate. GVHD was otherwise treated per current practice, including 2 mg/kg per day of prednisone equivalent. Seventeen patients had extensive mucosal denudation (extreme endoscopic grade 3 in the duodenum or colon. We observed that 8 of 12 patients (67% had a complete remission (CR of GVHD and survived more than 1 year (median 5 years when lithium administration was started promptly within 3 days of endoscopic diagnosis of denuded mucosa. When lithium was started promptly and less than 7 days from salvage therapy for refractory GVHD, 8 of 10 patients (80% had a CR and survived more than 1 year. In perspective, a review of 1447 consecutive adult HCT patients in the preceding 6 years at our cancer center showed 0% one-year survival in 27 patients with stage 3-4 intestinal GVHD and grade 3 endoscopic appearance in the duodenum or colon. Toxicities included fatigue, somnolence, confusion or blunted affect in 50% of the patients. The favorable outcomes in patients who received prompt lithium therapy appear to support the future conduct of a randomized study of lithium for management of severe GVHD with

  10. Altered intestinal microbiota and blood T cell phenotype are shared by patients with Crohn's disease and their unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Charlotte R; McCarthy, Neil E; Louis, Petra; Farquharson, Freda M; McCartney, Sara; Taylor, Kirstin; Prescott, Natalie J; Murrells, Trevor; Stagg, Andrew J; Whelan, Kevin; Lindsay, James O

    2014-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis, altered blood T cell populations, elevated faecal calprotectin (FC) and increased intestinal permeability (IP). CD-associated features present in siblings (increased risk of CD) but not in healthy controls, provide insight into early CD pathogenesis. We aimed to (1) Delineate the genetic, immune and microbiological profile of patients with CD, their siblings and controls and (2) Determine which factors discriminate between groups. Faecal microbiology was analysed by quantitative PCR targeting 16S ribosomal RNA, FC by ELISA, blood T cell phenotype by flow cytometry and IP by differential lactulose-rhamnose absorption in 22 patients with inactive CD, 21 of their healthy siblings and 25 controls. Subject's genotype relative risk was determined by Illumina Immuno BeadChip. Strikingly, siblings shared aspects of intestinal dysbiosis with patients with CD (lower concentrations of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (p=0.048), Clostridia cluster IV (p=0.003) and Roseburia spp. (p=0.09) compared with controls). As in CD, siblings demonstrated a predominance of memory T cells (p=0.002) and elevated naïve CD4 T cell β7 integrin expression (p=0.01) compared with controls. FC was elevated (>50 μg/g) in 8/21 (38%) siblings compared with 2/25 (8%) controls (p=0.028); whereas IP did not differ between siblings and controls. Discriminant function analysis determined that combinations of these factors significantly discriminated between groups (χ(2)=80.4, df=20, pmicrobiological variables. Healthy siblings of patients with CD manifest immune and microbiological abnormalities associated with CD distinct from their genotype-related risk and provide an excellent model in which to investigate early CD pathogenesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. [X-ray diagnostic of partial intestinal obstruction in small intestine diseases: a glance on the problem of radiologist-gastroenterologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, S V; Kotovshchikova, A A; Orlova, N V

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to special features of X-ray examining of patients suffering from acute abdomen pain and X-ray paradigma of some intestine diseases as a cause of partial bowel obstruction. Own clinical data are presented. Long-term experience of our X-ray department is summarized. The possibilities of X-ray examining of abdomen with and without contrast in patients with partial bowel obstruction are described.

  12. Small intestinal submucosa for patch grafting after plaque incision in the treatment of Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene W. Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Report the results using porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS as a graft material in the surgical management of Peyronie's disease (PD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of men with PD who underwent surgical correction of the curvature by plaque “H” incision and patch grafting with 4-ply SIS (Cook, Bloomington, IN by a single surgeon at our institution. Degree and direction of curvature, sexual function, and co-morbidities were assessed pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS: Thirteen patients were identified. Mean age was 57 ± 8, range 42-70 years. Median follow-up was 14 months, range 3-89 months. At presentation, all reported penile curvature. Also reported were difficulty with vaginal penetration (determined by question number 2 of the sexual encounter profile questionnaire - SEP2, palpable plaque, hourglass deformity, difficulty with firmness, and difficulty with sustaining erection (determined by SEP3 in77%, 69%, 77%, 62%, and 46% of patients, respectively. Mean and median degrees of curvature of the primary deformity were 71 and 67.5 degrees, respectively. Three patients had secondary curves of less than 30 degrees in a different direction. Mean and median plaque size were 3.5 and 2.7 cm², respectively. Seven patients had one graft and six patients had two grafts placed with a mean size of 15 ± 0 cm². CONCLUSIONS: For the patient with PD, SIS grafting can achieve a functionally straight erection with durable results yet with relatively high rates of erectile dysfunction. SIS is a viable graft material for use in the surgical treatment of PD.

  13. Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with person to person spread in hotels and restaurants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R J

    1995-09-15

    Twenty-eight outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, reported as being transmitted mainly by the person to person route, were identified in association with retail catering premises, such as hotels, restaurants, and public houses, in England and Wales between 1992 and 1994. Five thousand and forty-eight people were at risk in these outbreaks and 1234 were affected. Most of the outbreaks (over 90%) occurred in hotels. Small round structured viruses were the most commonly detected pathogens. Diarrhoea and vomiting were common symptoms and most of the outbreaks occurred in the summer months. Control measures to contain infectious individuals and improved hygiene measures are necessary to contain such outbreaks.

  14. Innovative Disease Model: Zebrafish as an In Vivo Platform for Intestinal Disorder and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world’s most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, causing more than 50,000 estimated deaths each year. Several risk factors are highly associated with CRC, including being overweight, eating a diet high in red meat and over-processed meat, having a history of inflammatory bowel disease, and smoking. Previous zebrafish studies have demonstrated that multiple oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can be regulated through genetic or epigenetic alterations. Zebrafish research has also revealed that the activation of carcinogenesis-associated signal pathways plays an important role in CRC. The biology of cancer, intestinal disorders caused by carcinogens, and the morphological patterns of tumors have been found to be highly similar between zebrafish and humans. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an important animal model for translational medical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to elucidate the characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases. This review article focuses on zebrafish models that have been used to study human intestinal disorders and tumors, including models involving mutant and transgenic fish. We also report on xenograft models and chemically-induced enterocolitis. This review demonstrates that excellent zebrafish models can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and help facilitate the evaluation of novel anti-tumor drugs.

  15. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ayesha; Shanahan, Erin; Macdonald, Graeme A; Fletcher, Linda; Ghasemi, Pegah; Morrison, Mark; Jones, Mike; Holtmann, Gerald

    2017-11-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis of the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and controls. Using the search terms "small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)" and "chronic liver disease (CLD)" or "cirrhosis," 19 case-control studies were identified. Utilizing breath tests, the prevalence of SIBO in CLD was 35.80% (95% CI, 32.60-39.10) compared with 8.0% (95% CI, 5.70-11.00) in controls. Using culture techniques, the prevalence was 68.31% (95% CI, 59.62-76.00) in CLD patients as compared with 7.94% (95% CI, 3.44-12.73) in controls. No difference between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients was found. SIBO is significantly more frequent in CLD patients as compared with controls. The association of SIBO and CLD was not confined to patients with advanced CLD, suggesting that SIBO is not a consequence of advanced liver disease but may play a role in the progression of CLD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. The real-world effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Orlando, Rosalba; Fries, Walter; Scolaro, Mariangela; Magnano, Antonio; Pluchino, Dario; Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Siringo, Sebastiano; Privitera, Antonino Carlo; Ferracane, Concetta; Belluardo, Nunzio; Alberghina, Nadia; Ventimiglia, Marco; Rizzuto, Giulia; Renna, Sara; Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio

    2018-03-01

    The effectiveness of vedolizumab in real-world practice is under evaluation, while its role in inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis is still unclear. To report real-world data about the effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular symptoms after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. Web-based data from the cohort of the Sicilian Network for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SN-IBD) were extracted to perform a prospective multicentre observational study. 163 patients (84 with Crohn's disease and 79 with ulcerative colitis) were included. At week 10, a steroid-free remission was achieved in 71 patients (43.6%), while at week 22 a steroid-free remission was obtained in 40.8% of patients. A response on articular symptoms was reported after 10 weeks of treatment in 17 out of 43 (39.5%) patients with active spondyloarthritis at baseline, and in 10 out of 22 (45.4%) patients at week 22. The only factor associated with articular response was the coexistence of clinical benefit on intestinal symptoms (at week 10: OR 8.471, p = 0.05; at week 22: OR 5.600, p = 0.08). Vedolizumab showed good effectiveness after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. A subset of patients reported improvement also on articular symptoms, probably as a consequence of the concomitant control of gut inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intestinal APCs of the endogenous nanomineral pathway fail to express PD-L1 in Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jack; Haas, Carolin T.; Pele, Laetitia C.; Monie, Tom P.; Charalambos, Charles; Parkes, Miles; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory condition most commonly affecting the ileum and colon. The aetiology of Crohn’s disease is complex and may include defects in peptidoglycan recognition, and/or failures in the establishment of intestinal tolerance. We have recently described a novel constitutive endogenous delivery system for the translocation of nanomineral-antigen-peptidoglycan (NAP) conjugates to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in intestinal lymphoid patches. In mice NAP conjugate delivery to APCs results in high surface expression of the immuno-modulatory molecule programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1). Here we report that NAP conjugate positive APCs in human ileal tissues from individuals with ulcerative colitis and intestinal carcinomas, also have high expression of PD-L1. However, NAP-conjugate positive APCs in intestinal tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease show selective failure in PD-L1 expression. Therefore, in Crohn’s disease intestinal antigen taken up by lymphoid patch APCs will be presented without PD-L1 induced tolerogenic signalling, perhaps initiating disease. PMID:27226337

  18. Intestinal APCs of the endogenous nanomineral pathway fail to express PD-L1 in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jack; Haas, Carolin T; Pele, Laetitia C; Monie, Tom P; Charalambos, Charles; Parkes, Miles; Hewitt, Rachel E; Powell, Jonathan J

    2016-05-26

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition most commonly affecting the ileum and colon. The aetiology of Crohn's disease is complex and may include defects in peptidoglycan recognition, and/or failures in the establishment of intestinal tolerance. We have recently described a novel constitutive endogenous delivery system for the translocation of nanomineral-antigen-peptidoglycan (NAP) conjugates to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in intestinal lymphoid patches. In mice NAP conjugate delivery to APCs results in high surface expression of the immuno-modulatory molecule programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1). Here we report that NAP conjugate positive APCs in human ileal tissues from individuals with ulcerative colitis and intestinal carcinomas, also have high expression of PD-L1. However, NAP-conjugate positive APCs in intestinal tissue from patients with Crohn's disease show selective failure in PD-L1 expression. Therefore, in Crohn's disease intestinal antigen taken up by lymphoid patch APCs will be presented without PD-L1 induced tolerogenic signalling, perhaps initiating disease.

  19. Osteopontin attenuates acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease by preventing apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kentaro; Minami, Naoki; Matsuura, Minoru; Iida, Tomoya; Toyonaga, Takahiko; Nagaishi, Kanna; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uede, Toshimitsu; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which often targets gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important physiological role in the efficient development of Th1 immune responses and cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. The role of OPN in acute GI-GVHD is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of OPN in donor T cells in the pathogenicity of acute GI-GVHD. Methods: OPN knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were used as donors, and (C57BL/6 × DBA/2) F1 (BDF1) mice were used as allograft recipients. Mice with acute GI-GVHD were divided into three groups: the control group (BDF1→BDF1), B6 group (B6→BDF1), and OPN-KO group (OPN-KO→BDF1). Bone marrow cells and spleen cells from donors were transplanted to lethally irradiated recipients. Clinical GVHD scores were assessed daily. Recipients were euthanized on day 7 after transplantation, and colons and small intestines were collected for various analyses. Results: The clinical GVHD score in the OPN-KO group was significantly increased compared with the B6 and control groups. We observed a difference in the severity of colonic GVHD between the OPN-KO group and B6 group, but not small intestinal-GVHD between these groups. Interferon-γ, Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-17A, and Interleukin-18 gene expression in the OPN-KO group was differed between the colon and small intestine. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of splenic and colonic CD8 T cells expressing Fas Ligand was increased in the OPN-KO group compared with the B6 group. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the importance of OPN in T cells in the onset of acute GI-GVHD involves regulating apoptosis of the intestinal cell via the Fas-Fas Ligand pathway. - Highlights: • A lack of osteopontin in donor cells exacerbated clinical gastrointestinal GVHD. • Donor cells lacking

  20. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Reactive T-cells from Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestine. The etiology is still unknown. One hypothesis is that CD is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in genetically predisposed individuals. MAP causes a similar disease in ruminants,...

  1. Manifestaciones reumatológicas de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Rheumatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

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    Octavio Germán Muñoz Maya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII se caracteriza por la activación inapropiada del sistema inmune de la mucosa intestinal y sus dos formas de presentación son: la colitis ulcerativa y la enfermedad de Crohn. Las manifestaciones extraintestinales se presentan hasta en el 36% de los pacientes y pueden comprometer cualquier órgano o sistema. La disfunción inmune se caracteriza por el desequilibrio entre los mediadores proinflamatorios y los antinflamatorios y se expresa como una enfermedad sistémica. Las manifestaciones reumatológicas asociadas a la EII son de tres tipos: la artritis periférica, la espondiloartropatía y una tercera categoría que incluye lesiones dérmicas, oftálmicas y del metabolismo óseo, entre otras. El manejo de estas manifestaciones se basa en la terapia sistémica para el control de la actividad inflamatoria local utilizando esteroides, derivados de la 5-ASA, inmunomoduladores y, en los últimos años, terapia anti-TNF. The main feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is the continuous activation of the mucosa-associated immune system; the disease has two major forms of presentation: ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. The extraintestinal manifestations are present in 36% of patients, and any organ can be affected. There is an imbalance between proinflammatory and antinflammatory cytokines leading to a systemic disease. The rheumatologic manifestations of the IBD are: Peripheral arthritis, spondyloarthropathy and a third category that includes dermic and ocular lesions as well as metabolic bone disease. Control of the extraintestinal manifestations is based on systemic therapy with steroids, 5-ASA derivatives and biological anti-TNF therapy.

  2. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of small intestinal biopsies in adults suspected of celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, R.; Jamal, S.; Zafar, A.; Saadia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis of small intestinal biopsies in adults suspected of celiac disease. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from November 2014 to December 2015. Methodology: Fifty cases of small intestinal mucosal biopsies (duodenal and jejunal) were analysed in adult patients aged above 14 years suspected of celiac disease. Their histomorphological data was recorded using Modified Marsh Criteria. Type of intraepithelial lymphocytes was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were counted both by H and E stain and immunostain CD3 and CD20. Results: Thirty-four percent patients were aged between 21 - 30 years and 22% patients aged between 41 - 50 years. There were 84% (n=42) males. Thirteen (26%) cases showed focal villous atrophy, 32 (64%) cases showed partial villous atrophy and 5 (10%) cases showed complete villous atrophy. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 21 (42%) cases. CD3 immunomarker was positive for intraepithelial lymphocytes in all 50 cases while CD20 immunomarker showed focal positivity in areas with lymphoid follicle formation. The count of intraepithelial lymphocytes was found to be almost equal (with a difference of 3 - 4 lymphocytes) on both H and E stain and immunostain CD3 and CD20. Conclusion: Males aged 21 - 30 years were the most commonly affected group. The most frequent change in histology was partial villous atrophy along with lymphocytic enteritis. All the intraepithelial lymphocytes were present in crescendo-pattern of distribution. (author)

  3. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

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    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  4. Intestinal microbiota in health and disease: Role of bifidobacteria in gut homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Rafael; Suárez, Adolfo; Clemente, Marta G; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. The colon is the most densely populated organ in the human body, although other parts, such as the skin, vaginal mucosa, or respiratory tract, also harbour specific microbiota. This microbial community regulates some important metabolic and physiological functions of the host, and drives the maturation of the immune system in early life, contributing to its homeostasis during life. Alterations of the intestinal microbiota can occur by changes in composition (dysbiosis), function, or microbiota-host interactions and they can be directly correlated with several diseases. The only disease in which a clear causal role of a dysbiotic microbiota has been demonstrated is the case of Clostridium difficile infections. Nonetheless, alterations in composition and function of the microbiota have been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, or irritable bowel syndrome), as well as extra-intestinal pathologies, such as those affecting the liver, or the respiratory tract (e.g., allergy, bronchial asthma, and cystic fibrosis), among others. Species of Bifidobacterium genus are the normal inhabitants of a healthy human gut and alterations in number and composition of their populations is one of the most frequent features present in these diseases. The use of probiotics, including bifidobacteria strains, in preventive medicine to maintain a healthy intestinal function is well documented. Probiotics are also proposed as therapeutic agents for gastrointestinal disorders and other pathologies. The World Gastroenterology Organization recently published potential clinical applications for several probiotic formulations, in which species of lactobacilli are predominant. This review is focused on probiotic preparations containing Bifidobacterium strains, alone or in combination with other bacteria, which have been

  5. The State of Pancreatobiliary System and Intestinal Microflora in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    N.Yu. Zavgorodnya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD combines with a variety of liver pathologies, including hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis, and acts as hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Not only the liver is a target organ in the formation of metabolic syndrome: also exist a possibility of gallbladder, pancreas and biliary tract steatosis. Fatty infiltration of the pancreatobiliary system associates with disturbance of digestive processes that promotes dysbiotic changes and intestinal disorders. Changes in intestinal microbiota, in turn, may induce systemic inflammatory response and promote NAFLD development and progression. Objective: to explore the structural and functional state of the pancreatobiliary system and changes of the enteric microflora in children with NAFLD. Methods. In 34 children with disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, we have determined controlled attenuation parameter by means of FibroScan. Assessment of functional status of biliary tract was performed using an ultrasound examination of the abdominal organs with test meal in order to determine gallbladder contractility and the sphincter of Oddi function. To characterize the state of the enteric microbiota, there was carried out a hydrogen breath test with glucose or lactose loading. Children were divided into groups according to the the transient elastography of the liver (FibroScan: the control group was represented by 21 patients without liver steatosis, the main group — 13 patients with liver steatosis. Results. Children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease had signs of not only liver pathology, but also of the bile ducts and the pancreas. Biliary tract dysfunction in patients with NAFLD more often manifested as hypotension of the sphincter of Oddi and the gallbladder hypokinesia. Lesions of the pancreas function in children with NAFLD can be explained by the sphincter of Oddi disorders and manifestations of pancreatic

  6. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-11-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the 'multibiome' to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine. Furthermore, we discuss new insights into multibiome-host interactions in the context of host-protective immunity and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we provide reasons to account for the multibiome in experimental design, analysis and in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Disease severity in patients with visceral leishmaniasis is not altered by co-infection with intestinal parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adem, Emebet; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Mulualem; Fikre, Helina; Raynes, John; Tamiru, Aschalew; Mulugeta, Zemenay; Diro, Ermias; Toulza, Frederic; Shkedy, Ziv; Ayele, Tadesse; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease that affects the poorest communities and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by the presence of Leishmania parasites in the spleen, liver and bone marrow, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, prolonged fever, systemic inflammation and low body mass index (BMI). The factors impacting on the severity of VL are poorly characterized. Here we performed a cross-sectional study to assess whether co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites influences disease severity, assessed with clinical and haematological data, inflammation, cytokine profiles and BMI. Data from VL patients was similar to VL patients co-infected with intestinal parasites, suggesting that co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites does not alter disease severity. PMID:28732017

  8. Disease severity in patients with visceral leishmaniasis is not altered by co-infection with intestinal parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajebe, Fitsumbrhan; Getahun, Mulusew; Adem, Emebet; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Mulualem; Fikre, Helina; Raynes, John; Tamiru, Aschalew; Mulugeta, Zemenay; Diro, Ermias; Toulza, Frederic; Shkedy, Ziv; Ayele, Tadesse; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew; Kropf, Pascale

    2017-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease that affects the poorest communities and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by the presence of Leishmania parasites in the spleen, liver and bone marrow, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, prolonged fever, systemic inflammation and low body mass index (BMI). The factors impacting on the severity of VL are poorly characterized. Here we performed a cross-sectional study to assess whether co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites influences disease severity, assessed with clinical and haematological data, inflammation, cytokine profiles and BMI. Data from VL patients was similar to VL patients co-infected with intestinal parasites, suggesting that co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites does not alter disease severity.

  9. Sarcopenia is a predictive factor for intestinal resection in admitted patients with Crohn's disease.

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    Shigeki Bamba

    Full Text Available The relationship between skeletal muscle volume and the prognosis of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD remains undetermined. We conducted a retrospective study of 72 IBD patients who were admitted to the hospital due to disease exacerbation. We enrolled IBD patients who had undergone abdominal computed tomography and assessed the nutritional indices, such as the Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (O-PNI and the controlling nutritional status (CONUT index. The L3 skeletal muscle index (SMI, which is the ratio of the cross-sectional area of skeletal muscles at the level of the third lumbar (L3 vertebra to the height squared, was used to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia, defined as a low SMI, was observed in 42% of all IBD patients (37% with Crohn's disease (CD and 48% with ulcerative colitis (UC. In UC patients, the O-PNI and CONUT values, height, and albumin levels were significantly lower than in CD patients. The SMI strongly correlated with sex, body weight, albumin level, and O-PNI in IBD patients. Multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model demonstrated that the presence of sarcopenia (P = 0.015 and disease type (CD or UC (P = 0.007 were significant factors predicting intestinal resection. The cumulative operation-free survival rate was significantly lower for sarcopenic patients than in all IBD patients (P = 0.003 and a stratified analysis of CD patients (P = 0.001 using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The L3 skeletal muscle area is a prognostic factor for intestinal resection in patients with CD.

  10. Intestinal protozoa infections among patients with ulcerative colitis: prevalence and impact on clinical disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Torijano-Carrera, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and microbiologic studies suggest that enteropathogenic microorganisms play a substantial role in the clinical initiation and relapses of inflammatory bowel disease. To explore the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and its impact on clinical disease course. A total of 215 patients with definitive diagnosis of UC were studied. Fresh feces samples taken from all UC patients were examined immediately using trichrome-staining methods. A total of 103 female and 112 male UC patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 30.5 +/- 10.8 years. The prevalence of overall parasitic infections was 24% and distributed as follows: Blastocystis hominis in 22 patients (10%), Endolimax nana in 19 cases (9%), and Entamoebahistolytica in 11 cases (5%). A significantly increased frequency of protozoa infection was found in those patients with persistent activity and intermittent activity as compared to active than inactive group (p = 1 x 10(-7), OR 13.05, 95% CI 4.28-42.56, and p = 0.003, OR 1.42-14.47, respectively). Interestingly, this association remained significant when we compared the persistent activity group versus intermittent activity group (p = 0.003, OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.35-6.59). Subgroup analysis showed no association between protozoa infection (E. histolytica, B. hominis, and E. nana) and other clinical variables such as gender, extent of disease, extraintestinal complications, medical treatment and grade of disease activity. The prevalence of intestinal protozoa infections in Mexican UC patients was 24% and these microorganisms could be a contributing cause of persistent activity despite medical treatment in our population. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Should WOC nurses measure health-related quality of life in patients undergoing intestinal ostomy surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joyce; Kozell, Kathryn; Gray, Mikel

    2009-01-01

    Ostomy surgery requires significant reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in uncontrolled passage of fecal effluent from a stoma in the abdominal wall. Concerns about creation of an ostomy often supersede all other concerns. Ostomy-related concerns include impaired body image; fear of incontinence; fear of odor; limitations affecting social, travel-related, and leisure activities; and impaired sexual function. Because the creation of an ostomy affects multiple domains within the construct of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), it is not surprising that quality of life is a frequent outcome measure in ostomy-related research. We reviewed existing research in order to identify the influence of intestinal ostomy surgery on HRQOL. We sought to identify clinical evidence documenting the influence of nursing interventions on HRQOL in patients with an intestinal ostomy. In addition, we systematically reviewed the literature to evaluate the validity and reliability of condition-specific instruments for measuring HRQOL in this patient population. We completed an integrative review using the key terms "quality of life" and "ostomy" in order to identify sufficient evidence to determine the influence of intestinal ostomy surgery on HRQOL. A systematic review using the key terms "ostomy" and "nursing" was completed to identify the effect of specific nursing interventions on HRQOL in patients with intestinal ostomies. Only randomized clinical trials were included in this review. A systematic review using the key terms "quality of life" and "ostomy" was used to review and identify condition-specific HRQOL instruments and evidence of their validity and reliability. MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were used to address all 3 aims of this Evidence-Based Report Card. Searches were limited to studies published between 1980 and January 2009. Hand searches of the ancestry of studies and review articles were completed to identify additional studies. An integrative

  12. Branched-chain Amino Acids are Beneficial to Maintain Growth Performance and Intestinal Immune-related Function in Weaned Piglets Fed Protein Restricted Diet

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    M. Ren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a novel approach for disease control and prevention, nutritional modulation of the intestinal health has been proved. However, It is still unknown whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA is needed to maintain intestinal immune-related function. The objective of this study was to determine whether BCAA supplementation in protein restricted diet affects growth performance, intestinal barrier function and modulates post-weaning gut disorders. One hundred and eight weaned piglets (7.96±0.26 kg were randomly fed one of the three diets including a control diet (21% crude protein [CP], CON, a protein restricted diet (17% CP, PR and a BCAA diet (BCAA supplementation in the PR diet for 14 d. The growth performance, plasma amino acid concentrations, small intestinal morphology and intestinal immunoglobulins were tested. First, average daily gain (ADG (p0.05. The PR and BCAA treatments had a higher (p<0.05 plasma concentration of methionine and threonine than the CON treatment. The level of some essential and functional amino acids (such as arginine, phenylalanine, histidine, glutamine etc. in plasma of the PR group was lower (p<0.05 than that of the CON group. Compared with CON group, BCAA supplementation significantly increased BCAA concentrations (p<0.01 and decreased urea concentration (p<0.01 in pig plasma indicating that the efficiency of dietary nitrogen utilization was increased. Compared with CON group, the small intestine of piglets fed PR diet showed villous atrophy, increasing of intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs number (p<0.05 and declining of the immunoglobulin concentration, including jejunal immunoglobulin A (IgA (p = 0.04, secreted IgA (sIgA (p = 0.03 and immunoglobulin M (p = 0.08, and ileal IgA (p = 0.01 and immunoglobulin G (p = 0.08. The BCAA supplementation increased villous height in the duodenum (p<0.01, reversed the trend of an increasing IELs number. Notably, BCAA supplementation increased levels of jejunal and ileal

  13. Targeted restoration of the intestinal microbiota with a simple, defined bacteriotherapy resolves relapsing Clostridium difficile disease in mice.

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    Trevor D Lawley

    Full Text Available Relapsing C. difficile disease in humans is linked to a pathological imbalance within the intestinal microbiota, termed dysbiosis, which remains poorly understood. We show that mice infected with epidemic C. difficile (genotype 027/BI develop highly contagious, chronic intestinal disease and persistent dysbiosis characterized by a distinct, simplified microbiota containing opportunistic pathogens and altered metabolite production. Chronic C. difficile 027/BI infection was refractory to vancomycin treatment leading to relapsing disease. In contrast, treatment of C. difficile 027/BI infected mice with feces from healthy mice rapidly restored a diverse, healthy microbiota and resolved C. difficile disease and contagiousness. We used this model to identify a simple mixture of six phylogenetically diverse intestinal bacteria, including novel species, which can re-establish a health-associated microbiota and clear C. difficile 027/BI infection from mice. Thus, targeting a dysbiotic microbiota with a defined mixture of phylogenetically diverse bacteria can trigger major shifts in the microbial community structure that displaces C. difficile and, as a result, resolves disease and contagiousness. Further, we demonstrate a rational approach to harness the therapeutic potential of health-associated microbial communities to treat C. difficile disease and potentially other forms of intestinal dysbiosis.

  14. Frequent occurrence of stomach and intestinal diseases in cattle caused by iron containing flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henneman, J

    1931-01-01

    Farmers near the magnesium factory in Veitsch, Styria, Austria, complained about stomach and intestinal troubles of their cattle accompanied by a lower milk production. While the disease spread up to 4 or 5 km along the valley in the direction of the wind, it did not occur beyond 500 to 800 m from the factory in the opposite direction of the wind. Moreover, the disease worsened in dry weather and improved in rainy weather. The cattle recovered rapidly after the operation of the kiln was halted for some time. One farmer claimed that the quality of the milk also changed, while four other farmers could not confirm this observation. Veterinary examinations determined that in all cases heavy diarrhea occurred. The mucous tissue in the mouth was rather dry. Except for one case no fever was measured. The cow most seriously affected by the disease showed an enlargement of the liver. The respiratory organs of all examined cases showed no abnormality. Samples of the fodder and the excreta as well as of the mucous tissue of the stomach were sent to a chemical laboratory for examination. Substantial amounts of iron were found in all these samples. In the fodder it was found in the form of rust particles. An examination of the flue gas from the magnesium factory confirmed the assumption that it discharged the iron. The disease was found to afflict the digestive tract only, no respiratory diseases, tuberculosis, or osteomalacia was observed.

  15. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-06-29

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples.

  16. The interplay between the gut immune system and microbiota in health and disease: nutraceutical intervention for restoring intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Gut immune system is daily exposed to a plethora of antigens contained in the environment as well as in food. Both secondary lymphoid tissue, such as Peyer's patches, and lymphoid follicles (tertiary lymphoid tissue) are able to respond to antigenic stimuli releasing cytokines or producing antibodies (secretory IgA). Intestinal epithelial cells are in close cooperation with intraepithelial lymphocytes and possess Toll-like receptors on their surface and Nod-like receptors (NLRs) which sense pathogens or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Intestinal microbiota, mainly composed of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, generates tolerogenic response acting on gut dendritic cells and inhibiting the T helper (h)-17 cell anti-inflammatory pathway. This is the case of Bacteroides fragilis which leads to the production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, from both T regulatory cells and lamina propria macrophages. Conversely, segmented filamentous bacteria rather induce Th17 cells, thus promoting intestinal inflammation. Intestinal microbiota and its toxic components have been shown to act on both Nod1 and Nod2 receptors and their defective signaling accounts for the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In IBD a loss of normal tolerance to intestinal microbiota seems to be the main trigger of mucosal damage. In addition, intestinal microbiota thanks to its regulatory function of gut immune response can prevent or retard neoplastic growth. In fact, chronic exposure to environmental microorganisms seems to be associated with low frequency of cancer risk. Major nutraceuticals or functional foods employed in the modulation of intestinal microbiota are represented by prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids, amino acids and polyphenols. The cellular and molecular effects performed by these natural products in terms of modulation of the intestinal microbiota and mostly attenuation of the inflammatory pathway are described.

  17. Age- and gender-related hemorheological alterations in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Anita; Magyar, Zsuzsanna; Molnar, Akos; Somogyi, Viktoria; Tanczos, Bence; Peto, Katalin; Nemeth, Norbert

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a life-threatening clinical disorder. During I/R, the microrheological parameters of blood (red blood cell deformability and aggregation) worsen, which may contribute to microcirculatory deterioration. Age and gender also have a great influence on hemorheological parameters. We aimed to investigate the gender and age-related microrheological alterations during intestinal I/R. After the cannulation of the left femoral artery, median laparotomy was performed in Crl:WI rats under general anesthesia. In the young control animals there were no other interventions (female n = 7; male n = 7). In the young (female n = 7; male n = 7) and older I/R groups (female n = 6; male n = 6), the superior mesenteric artery was clipped for 30 min, and a 120-min reperfusion period was observed afterward. Blood samples were taken before and at the 30-min ischemia, in the 30th, 60th, and 120th min of the reperfusion. Hematological parameters, erythrocyte deformability, and aggregation were determined. Hematocrit increased significantly in the younger female I/R group. Red blood cell count was higher in male and older animals. In case of white blood cell count, male animals had higher values compared with females. Platelet count elevated in the younger male and older female I/R animals. Red blood cell deformability worsened, mainly in the male and older I/R groups. Enhanced erythrocyte aggregation was seen in all groups, being more expressed in the female I/R groups. Microrheological parameters show gender and age-related differences during intestinal I/R. These observations have importance in the planning and evaluation of experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Amiloidosis secundaria en la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Secondary amyloidosis in Chrohn's disease

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    S. Seijo Ríos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La amiloidosis es una entidad clínica que se produce a consecuencia del depósito a nivel extracelular de un material proteico amorfo, causando una desorganización de la arquitectura normal de múltiples órganos y tejidos y, por tanto, una alteración funcional de los mismos. La amiloidosis secundaria es una complicación infrecuente pero muy grave que aparece en el contexto de neoplasias, enfermedades infecciosas e inflamatorias de curso crónico, como es el caso de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, principalmente enfermedad de Crohn, ensombreciendo el pronóstico de estos pacientes. A continuación presentamos dos casos clínicos correspondientes a dos pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn que desarrollaron amiloidosis secundaria.Amyloidosis is a clinical entity that results from the deposition of an extracellular protein material that causes disruption in the normal architecture of multiple organs and tissues, and impairs their function. Secondary amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication that may worsen the prognosis of patients with cancer, infection or chronic inflammatory disease, including inflammatory bowel disease, particularly Crohn's disease. We report two cases of Crohn's disease associated with secondary amyloidosis.

  19. Dietary administration of the probiotic SpPdp11: Effects on the intestinal microbiota and immune-related gene expression of farmed Solea senegalensis treated with oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Paniagua, S T; Vidal, S; Lobo, C; García de la Banda, I; Esteban, M A; Balebona, M C; Moriñigo, M A

    2015-10-01

    Few antimicrobials are currently authorised in the aquaculture industry to treat infectious diseases. Among them, oxytetracycline (OTC) is one of the first-choice drugs for nearly all bacterial diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dietary administration of OTC both alone and jointly with the probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 (SpPdp11) on the intestinal microbiota and hepatic expression of genes related to immunity in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles. The results demonstrated that the richness and diversity of the intestinal microbiota of fish treated with OTC decreased compared with those of the control group but that these effects were lessened by the simultaneous administration of SpPdp11. In addition, specimens that received OTC and SpPdp11 jointly showed a decreased intensity of the Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) bands related to Vibrio genus and the presence of DGGE bands related to Lactobacillus and Shewanella genera. The relationship among the intestinal microbiota of fish fed with control and OTC diets and the expression of the NADPH oxidase and CASPASE-6 genes was demonstrated by a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) carried out in this study. In contrast, a close relationship between the transcription of genes, such as NKEF, IGF-β, HSP70 and GP96, and the DGGE bands of fish treated jointly with OTC and SpPdp11 was observed in the PCA study. In summary, the results obtained in this study demonstrate that the administration of OTC results in the up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis but that the joint administration of OTC and S. putrefaciens Pdp11 increases the transcription of genes related to antiapoptotic effects and oxidative stress regulation. Further, a clear relationship between these changes and those detected in the intestinal microbiota is established. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography vs computed tomography enteroclysis for assessing ileal Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onali, Sara; Calabrese, Emma; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Zorzi, Francesca; Sica, Giuseppe; Fiori, Roberto; Ascolani, Marta; Lolli, Elisabetta; Condino, Giovanna; Palmieri, Giampiero; Simonetti, Giovanni; Pallone, Francesco; Biancone, Livia

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE) vs small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) for assessing small bowel lesions in Crohn's disease (CD), when using surgical pathology as gold standard. METHODS: From January 2007 to July 2008, 15 eligible patients undergoing elective resection of the distal ileum and coecum (or right colon) were prospectively enrolled. All patients were under follow-up. The study population included 6 males and 9 females, with a median age of 44 years (range: 18-80 years). Inclusion criteria: (1) certain diagnosis of small bowel requiring elective ileo-colonic resection; (2) age between 18-80 years; (3) elective surgery in our Surgical Unit; and (4) written informed consent. SICUS and CTE were performed ≤ 3 mo before surgery, followed by surgical pathology. The following small bowel lesions were blindly reported by one sonologist, radiologist, surgeon and histolopathologist: disease site, extent, strictures, abscesses, fistulae, small bowel dilation. Comparison between findings at SICUS, CTE, surgical specimens and histological examination was made by assessing the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each technique, when using surgical findings as gold standard. RESULTS: Among the 15 patients enrolled, CTE was not feasible in 2 patients, due to urgent surgery in one patients and to low compliance in the second patient, refusing to perform CTE due to the discomfort related to the naso-jejunal tube. The analysis for comparing CTE vs SICUS findings was therefore performed in 13 out of the 15 CD patients enrolled. Differently from CTE, SICUS was feasible in all the 15 patients enrolled. No complications were observed when using SICUS or CTE. Surgical pathology findings in the tested population included: small bowel stricture in 13 patients, small bowel dilation above ileal stricture in 10 patients, abdominal abscesses in 2 patients, enteric fistulae in 5 patients, lymphnodes enlargement (> 1 cm) in 7 patients and

  1. Analysis of the RET, GDNF, EDN3, and EDNRB genes in patients with intestinal neuronal dysplasia and Hirschsprung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gath, R; Goessling, A; Keller, KM; Koletzko, S; Coerdt, W; Muntefering, H; Wirth, S; Hofstra, RMW; Mulligan, L; Eng, C; von Deimling, A

    Background-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital disorder with an incidence of 1 in 5000 live births, characterised by the absence of parasympathetic intramural ganglion cells in the hindgut resulting in intestinal obstruction in neonates and severe constipation in infants and adults.

  2. Intestinal health and disease prevention: a story of wheat and oats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Timmer, R.D.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the prevalence of nutrition-related chronic diseases, such as diabetes type 2, obesity, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and food allergies and intolerances (such as celiac disease), as well as some types of cancer, has been gradually increasing, with a growing impact

  3. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increasing along with the expansion of industrial food processing and food additive consumption. The intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junction, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self-antigens. As a result, particular attention is being placed on the role of tight junction dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. Tight junction leakage is enhanced by many luminal components, commonly used industrial food additives being some of them. Glucose, salt, emulsifiers, organic solvents, gluten, microbial transglutaminase, and nanoparticles are extensively and increasingly used by the food industry, claim the manufacturers, to improve the qualities of food. However, all of the aforementioned additives increase intestinal permeability by breaching the integrity of tight junction paracellular transfer. In fact, tight junction dysfunction is common in multiple autoimmune diseases and the central part played by the tight junction in autoimmune diseases pathogenesis is extensively described. It is hypothesized that commonly used industrial food additives abrogate human epithelial barrier function, thus, increasing intestinal permeability through the opened tight junction, resulting in entry of foreign immunogenic antigens and activation of the autoimmune cascade. Future research on food additives exposure-intestinal permeability-autoimmunity interplay will enhance our knowledge of the common mechanisms associated with autoimmune progression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Cryptosporidium and other intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in southern Ethiopia: significance of improved HIV-related care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimelis, Techalew; Tassachew, Yayehyirad; Lambiyo, Tariku

    2016-05-10

    Intestinal parasitic infections are known to cause gastroenteritis, leading to higher morbidity and mortality, particularly in people living with HIV/AIDS. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and other intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients receiving care at a hospital in Ethiopia where previous available baseline data helps assess if improved HIV-related care has reduced infection rates. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Hawassa University Hospital in southern Ethiopia from May, 2013 to March, 2014. A consecutive sample of 491 HIV- infected patients with diarrhea or a CD4 T cell count intestinal parasites. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University. Physicians managed participants found to be infected with any pathogenic intestinal parasite. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the study population was 35.8 %. The most prevalent parasites were Cryptosporidium (13.2 %), followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (10.2 %), and Giardia lamblia (7.9 %). The rate of single and multiple infections were 25.5 and 10.3 %, respectively. Patients with a CD4 T cell count intestinal parasitic infection or cryptosporidiosis compared to those with counts ≥ 200 cells/μl, but with some type of diarrhea. The study shows high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in the study population. However, the results in the current report are significantly lower compared to previous findings in the same hospital. The observed lower infection rate is encouraging and supports the need to strengthen and sustain the existing intervention measures in order to further reduce intestinal parasitic infections in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  5. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-01-01

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber

  6. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gang [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Xu, Zhenjiang [Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tian, Xiangli, E-mail: xianglitian@ouc.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Dong, Shuanglin [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Peng, Mo [School of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University (China)

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  7. Estimating the Incidence of Acute Infectious Intestinal Disease in the Community in the UK: A Retrospective Telephone Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Viviani

    Full Text Available To estimate the burden of intestinal infectious disease (IID in the UK and determine whether disease burden estimations using a retrospective study design differ from those using a prospective study design.A retrospective telephone survey undertaken in each of the four countries comprising the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly asked about illness either in the past 7 or 28 days.14,813 individuals for all of whom we had a legible recording of their agreement to participate.Self-reported IID, defined as loose stools or clinically significant vomiting lasting less than two weeks, in the absence of a known non-infectious cause.The rate of self-reported IID varied substantially depending on whether asked for illness in the previous 7 or 28 days. After standardising for age and sex, and adjusting for the number of interviews completed each month and the relative size of each UK country, the estimated rate of IID in the 7-day recall group was 1,530 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 1135-2113, while in the 28-day recall group it was 533 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 377-778. There was no significant variation in rates between the four countries. Rates in this study were also higher than in a related prospective study undertaken at the same time.The estimated burden of disease from IID varied dramatically depending on study design. Retrospective studies of IID give higher estimates of disease burden than prospective studies. Of retrospective studies longer recall periods give lower estimated rates than studies with short recall periods. Caution needs to be exercised when comparing studies of self-reported IID as small changes in study design or case definition can markedly affect estimated rates.

  8. Comparison between Two Decades of Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Diseases and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Urban Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Alves de Oliveira Serra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study’s objective was to compare the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors in children in urban communities, in the Brazilian Northeast, between two decades. Methods. This quantitative transversal study consisted of a comparative analysis of two different samples: the first viewing the years 1992–1996 and the other through a coproepidemiological data survey undertaken in 2010-2011. Results. It was evidenced that there was a reduction of intestinal parasites and that there were improvements in the socioenvironmental conditions between the two decades evaluated. It was observed that, in the period 1992–1996, playing out in the streets was associated with a higher risk for acquiring intestinal parasites. Over the 2010-2011 period, the characteristics of more than five residents per household, houses with dirt floors, children who live in homes without piped water, and children who play out in the streets were associated with a higher risk of intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion. The study showed a reduction of intestinal parasitic diseases to 23.8% in 2010-2011 from 81.3% in 1992–1996 and improvement of the social-sanitary conditions of the population between the decades analyzed.

  9. Fecal Microbiota in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Its Relation to Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Korpela, Katri; Jaakkola, Tytti; Pichai, Madharasi V A; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to result from interplay between host and intestinal microbiota. While IBD in adults has shown to be associated with marked changes in the intestinal microbiota, there are only a few studies in children, and particularly studies focusing on therapeutic responses are lacking. Hence, this prospective study addressed the intestinal microbiota in pediatric IBD especially related to the level of inflammation. In total, 68 pediatric patients with IBD and 26 controls provided stool and blood samples in a tertiary care hospital and 32 received anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α). Blood inflammatory markers and fecal calprotectin levels were determined. The intestinal microbiota was characterized by phylogenetic microarray and qPCR analysis. The microbiota varied along a gradient of increasing intestinal inflammation (indicated by calprotectin levels), which was associated with reduced microbial richness, abundance of butyrate producers, and relative abundance of Gram-positive bacteria (especially Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa). A significant association between microbiota composition and inflammation was indicated by a set of bacterial groups predicting the calprotectin levels (area under curve (AUC) of 0.85). During the induction of anti-TNF-α, the microbial diversity and similarity to the microbiota of controls increased in the responder group by week 6, but not in the non-responders (PEubacterium rectale and Bifidobacterium spp. predicted the response to anti-TNF-α medication. Intestinal microbiota represents a potential biomarker for correlating the level of inflammation and therapeutic responses to be further validated.

  10. /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeability test. Clinical use in screening for coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotherby, K.J.; Wraight, E.P.; Neale, G.

    1988-01-01

    An intestinal permeability test with a combination of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and /sup 14/C-mannitol was performed under routine conditions on 176 occasions in 161 adult patients. Of these patients, 116 were under investigation for possible coeliac disease, 33 were known to have coeliac disease, and 12 had inflammatory bowel disease. Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 61 patients. Expressing the results as the ratio of the 6-h urinary recoveries of the two probes was as sensitive as 95%, but more specific for histological mucosal abnormality (62% versus 46%) than measuring the urinary recovery of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA alone. All but two of the patients with active inflammatory bowel disease, whether Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, had an abnormal ratio. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeablity test with a 6-h urine collection is a rapid and simple test of small-intestinal function suitable for routine use. 19 refs.

  11. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  12. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase in the colonic mucosa of children with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Kriszta; Vannay, Ádám; Szebeni, Beáta; Bánki, Nóra Fanni; Sziksz, Erna; Cseh, Áron; Győrffy, Hajnalka; Lakatos, Péter László; Papp, Mária; Arató, András; Veres, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate intestinal alkaline phosphatase (iAP) in the intestinal mucosa of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: Colonic biopsy samples were taken from 15 newly diagnosed IBD patients and from 10 healthy controls. In IBD patients, specimens were obtained both from inflamed and non-inflamed areas. The iAP mRNA and protein expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis, respectively. Tissue localization of iAP and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 was investigated by immunofluorescent staining. RESULTS: The iAP protein level in the inflamed mucosa of children with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) was significantly decreased when compared with controls (both P < 0.05). Similarly, we found a significantly decreased level of iAP protein in the inflamed mucosa in CD compared with non-inflamed mucosa in CD (P < 0.05). In addition, the iAP protein level in inflamed colonic mucosa in patients with UC was decreased compared with non-inflamed mucosa in patients with CD (P < 0.05). iAP protein levels in the non-inflamed mucosa of patients with CD were similar to controls. iAP mRNA expression in inflamed colonic mucosa of children with CD and UC was not significantly different from that in non-inflamed colonic mucosa with CD. Expression of iAP mRNA in patients with non-inflamed mucosa and in controls were similar. Co-localization of iAP with TLR4 showed intense staining with a dotted-like pattern. iAP was present in the inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of patients with CD, UC, and in control biopsy specimens, irrespective of whether it was present in the terminal ileum or in the colon. However, the fluorescent signal of TLR4 was more pronounced in the colon compared with the terminal ileum in all groups studied. CONCLUSION: Lower than normal iAP protein levels in inflamed mucosa of IBD patients may indicate a role for iAP in inflammatory lesions in IBD. Based on our results

  13. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...... mechanisms, some estrogen-related disease processes might work in similar manners and result in association between the diseases. Indeed, the association between diseases need not be due only to estrogen-related factors, but due to similar disease processes from a variety of mechanisms....

  14. Continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in Spain: Subanalysis by autonomous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-García, D; Catalán, M J; Puente, V; Valldeoriola, F; Regidor, I; Mir, P; Matías-Arbelo, J; Parra, J C; Grandas, F

    2018-01-12

    To compare the characteristics of patients undergoing treatment with continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa (CIILC) for advanced Parkinson's disease and the data on the effectiveness and safety of CIILC in the different autonomous communities (AC) of Spain. A retrospective, longitudinal, observational study was carried out into 177 patients from 11 CAs who underwent CIILC between January 2006 and December 2011. We analysed data on patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, variables related to effectiveness (changes in off time/on time with or without disabling dyskinesia; changes in Hoehn and Yahr scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores; non-motor symptoms; and Clinical Global Impression scale scores) and safety (adverse events), and the rate of CIILC discontinuation. Significant differences were observed between CAs for several baseline variables: duration of disease progression prior to CIILC onset, off time (34.9-59.7%) and on time (2.6-48.0%; with or without disabling dyskinesia), Hoehn and Yahr score during on time, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III score during both on and off time, presence of≥ 4 motor symptoms, and CIILC dose. Significant differences were observed during follow-up (> 24 months in 9 of the 11 CAs studied) for the percentage of off time and on time without disabling dyskinesia, adverse events frequency, and Clinical Global Impression scores. The rate of CIILC discontinuation was between 20-40% in 9 CAs (78 and 80% in remaining 2 CAs). This study reveals a marked variability between CAs in terms of patient selection and CIILC safety and effectiveness. These results may have been influenced by patients' baseline characteristics, the availability of multidisciplinary teams, and clinical experience. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Typhoid fever complicated by intestinal perforation: a persisting fatal disease requiring surgical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, T.; Knight, J.; Nath, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Roy, S. K.; Azad, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In Bangladesh, clinical records of 323 patients with typhoid fever were reviewed to study the incidence, fatality, and optimal therapy of the complication of intestinal perforation. Fifteen patients (4.6%) developed intestinal perforation. Case-fatality rates were six of nine patients treated

  16. Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biatriz Araújo Cardoso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We carried out a cross-sectional study from January to December 2015 on 1,425 inhabitants from a floating population in the Brazilian Amazon (Murinin district, Pará State to describe the population-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB from 2011 to 2014, recent TB contacts (rCts latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI , the coverage of the local health network, socio-environmental factors, and frequency of intestinal parasitic infection (IPI. We found that the sanitary structure was inadequate, with latrines being shared with other rooms within the same accommodation; well water was the main source of water, and 48% of families had low incomes. The average rate of TB was 105/100, 000 inhabitants per year; one third of TB patients had been household contacts of infected individuals in the past, and 23% of rCts were LTBI. More than half (65% of 44% of the stools examined (representing 76% of the housing had IPIs; the highest prevalence was of fecal-oral transmitted protozoa (40%, Giardia intestinalis , followed by soil-transmitted helminths (23%. TB transmission may be related to insufficient disease control of rCts, frequent relocation, and underreporting. Education, adopting hygienic habits, improving sanitation, provision of a treated water supply and efficient sewage system, further comprehensive epidemiological surveillance of those who enter and leave the community and resources for basic treatment of IPIs are crucial in combating the transmission of these neglected diseases.

  17. Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Biatriz Araújo; Fonseca, Fabio de Oliveira; Moraes, Antonio Henrique Almeida de; Martins, Ana Caroline Guedes Souza; Oliveira, Nissa Vilhena da Silva; Lima, Luana Nepomuceno Gondim Costa; Dias, George Alberto da Silva; Saad, Maria Helena Féres

    2017-08-07

    We carried out a cross-sectional study from January to December 2015 on 1,425 inhabitants from a floating population in the Brazilian Amazon (Murinin district, Pará State) to describe the population-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) from 2011 to 2014, recent TB contacts (rCts) latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI) , the coverage of the local health network, socio-environmental factors, and frequency of intestinal parasitic infection (IPI). We found that the sanitary structure was inadequate, with latrines being shared with other rooms within the same accommodation; well water was the main source of water, and 48% of families had low incomes. The average rate of TB was 105/100, 000 inhabitants per year; one third of TB patients had been household contacts of infected individuals in the past, and 23% of rCts were LTBI. More than half (65%) of 44% of the stools examined (representing 76% of the housing) had IPIs; the highest prevalence was of fecal-oral transmitted protozoa (40%, Giardia intestinalis ), followed by soil-transmitted helminths (23%). TB transmission may be related to insufficient disease control of rCts, frequent relocation, and underreporting. Education, adopting hygienic habits, improving sanitation, provision of a treated water supply and efficient sewage system, further comprehensive epidemiological surveillance of those who enter and leave the community and resources for basic treatment of IPIs are crucial in combating the transmission of these neglected diseases.

  18. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients preventing diet-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florowska, A; Krygier, K; Florowski, T; Dłużewska, E

    2016-05-18

    This paper reviews the potential of prebiotic-containing foods in the prevention or postponement of certain diet-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases with hypercholesterolemia, osteoporosis, diabetes, gastrointestinal infections and gut inflammation. Also the data on prebiotics as food ingredients and their impact on food product quality are presented. Prebiotics are short chain carbohydrates that are resistant to the digestion process in the upper part of the digestive system, are not absorbed in any segment of the gastrointestinal system, and finally are selectively fermented by specific genera of colonic bacteria. The mechanisms of the beneficial impacts of prebiotics on human health are very difficult to specify directly, because their health-promoting functions are related to fermentation by intestinal microflora. The impact of prebiotics on diet-related diseases in many ways also depends on the products of their fermentation. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients also have an impact on the quality of food products, due to their textural and gelling properties. Prebiotics as food additives can be very valuable in the creation of functional food aimed at preventing or postponing many diet-related diseases. They additionally have beneficial technological properties which improve the quality of food products.

  19. Intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic diseases Parasitosis intestinales, cisticercosis e hidatidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Botero

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper offers an up to date review of the intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic disease found In Colombia. Their main epidemiological, clinical, preventive and therapeutic features are presented, to provide the reader with a current view of their public health Importance, prevalence and impact on morbidity and mortality.

    Se presenta una revisión actualizada sobre las parasitosis intestinales, la cisticercosis y la hidatidosis en Colombia, con una breve descripción de la prevalencia, las características epidemiológicas, los efectos sobre la salud y algunos aspectos de control y tratamiento. Con esta revisión se busca tener información resumida sobre las parasitosis que se encuentran en Colombia y su mayor o menor Importancia en salud pública. TambIén se pretende ofrecer una Idea del nivel de gravedad de estas entidades como causas de morbilidad y mortalidad en este país. 

  20. Research of Correlation between Intestinal Bacteria and Digestive System Diseases%肠道微生物与消化系统疾病的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翠婷

    2015-01-01

    肠道细菌被称为人类的长寿细菌,是一种混合的微生物在肠道内与宿主共生,在不同的身体部位、不同的个体、不同的环境因素以及随着时间变化具有差异. 这些细菌参与到机体的生理、代谢、营养、免疫等,然而肠道细菌失调和受损与某些疾病也有一定的关系,如炎症性肠病、肠易激综合征、肠道肿瘤、肥胖等. 因此,肠道细菌对于人类身体健康是极其重要的. 该文就肠道微生物与消化系统疾病的相关性研究予以综述.%The intestinal microbiota,known as the human longevity bacteria,is a group of microorganisms in intestinal symbiosis with the host.The composition of intestinal bacteria varies in different parts of the body,in different individuals,under different environmental factors and at different times.They are involved in body's physiological and metabolic,nutrition,immune process,etc.However,disorder and damage of intes-tinal bacteria also have certain relations with some diseases,such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome,intestinal cancer,obesity, etc.Therefore,the intestinal bacteria is extremely important for human health.Here is to make a review of the relationship between intestinal bacteria and digestive system diseases.

  1. Interplay among gut microbiota, intestinal mucosal barrier and enteric neuro-immune system: a common path to neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Carolina; Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2018-05-24

    Neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and multiple sclerosis, are often associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. These gastrointestinal disturbances may occur at all stages of the neurodegenerative diseases, to such an extent that they are now considered an integral part of their clinical picture. Several lines of evidence support the contention that, in central neurodegenerative diseases, changes in gut microbiota and enteric neuro-immune system alterations could contribute to gastrointesinal dysfunctions as well as initiation and upward spreading of the neurologic disorder. The present review has been intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the available knowledge on the role played by enteric microbiota, mucosal immune system and enteric nervous system, considered as an integrated network, in the pathophysiology of the main neurological diseases known to be associated with intestinal disturbances. In addition, based on current human and pre-clinical evidence, our intent was to critically discuss whether changes in the dynamic interplay between gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial barrier and enteric neuro-immune system are a consequence of the central neurodegeneration or might represent the starting point of the neurodegenerative process. Special attention has been paid also to discuss whether alterations of the enteric bacterial-neuro-immune network could represent a common path driving the onset of the main neurodegenerative diseases, even though each disease displays its own distinct clinical features.

  2. Deoxynivalenol as a new factor in the persistence of intestinal inflammatory diseases: an emerging hypothesis through possible modulation of Th17-mediated response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Cano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species which is commonly found in temperate regions worldwide as a natural contaminant of cereals. It is of great concern not only in terms of economic losses but also in terms of animal and public health. The digestive tract is the first and main target of this food contaminant and it represents a major site of immune tolerance. A finely tuned cross-talk between the innate and the adaptive immune systems ensures the homeostatic equilibrium between the mucosal immune system and commensal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of DON on the intestinal immune response. METHODOLOGY: Non-transformed intestinal porcine epithelial cells IPEC-1 and porcine jejunal explants were used to investigate the effect of DON on the intestinal immune response and the modulation of naive T cells differentiation. Transcriptomic proteomic and flow cytometry analysis were performed. RESULTS: DON induced a pro-inflammatory response with a significant increase of expression of mRNA encoding for IL-8, IL-1α and IL-1β, TNF-α in all used models. Additionally, DON significantly induced the expression of genes involved in the differentiation of Th17 cells (STAT3, IL-17A, IL-6, IL-1β at the expenses of the pathway of regulatory T cells (Treg (FoxP3, RALDH1. DON also induced genes related to the pathogenic Th17 cells subset such as IL-23A, IL-22 and IL-21 and not genes related to the regulatory Th17 cells (rTh17 such as TGF-β and IL-10. CONCLUSION: DON triggered multiple immune modulatory effects which could be associated with an increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  3. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4(+) T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4(+) T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4(+) T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl.

  4. Rifaximin-extended intestinal release induces remission in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantera, Cosimo; Lochs, Herbert; Grimaldi, Maria; Danese, Silvio; Scribano, Maria Lia; Gionchetti, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria might be involved in the development and persistence of inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and antibiotics could be used in therapy. We performed a clinical phase 2 trial to determine whether a gastroresistant formulation of rifaximin (extended intestinal release [EIR]) induced remission in patients with moderately active CD. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of the efficacy and safety of 400, 800, and 1200 mg rifaximin-EIR, given twice daily to 402 patients with moderately active CD for 12 weeks. Data from patients given rifaximin-EIR were compared with those from individuals given placebo, and collected during a 12-week follow-up period. The primary end point was remission (Crohn's Disease Activity Index <150) at the end of the treatment period. At the end of the 12-week treatment period, 62% of patients who received the 800-mg dosage of rifaximin-EIR (61 of 98) were in remission, compared with 43% of patients who received placebo (43 of 101) (P = .005). A difference was maintained throughout the 12-week follow-up period (45% [40 of 89] vs 29% [28 of 98]; P = .02). Remission was achieved by 54% (56 of 104) and 47% (47 of 99) of the patients given the 400-mg and 1200-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR, respectively; these rates did not differ from those of placebo. Patients given the 400-mg and 800-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR had low rates of withdrawal from the study because of adverse events; rates were significantly higher among patients given the 1200-mg dosage (16% [16 of 99]). Administration of 800 mg rifaximin-EIR twice daily for 12 weeks induced remission with few adverse events in patients with moderately active CD. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F.; Petersen, Anne H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution, taurol...

  6. Symptoms of Functional Intestinal Disorders Are Common in Patients with Celiac Disease Following Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Graff, Lesley A; Rigaux, Lisa; Bernstein, Charles N; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Walker, John R; Duerksen, Donald R

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease and functional intestinal disorders may overlap, yet the natural history of functional symptoms in patients with celiac disease is unknown. To investigate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and functional bloating (FB) symptoms among patients with celiac disease at diagnosis and during the first year of a gluten-free diet. Adults with a new diagnosis of celiac disease were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year using standardized measures for intestinal symptoms [Rome III diagnostic questionnaire and celiac symptom index (CSI)] and gluten-free diet adherence [gluten-free eating assessment tool (GF-EAT) and celiac diet adherence test]. At diagnosis, two-thirds fulfilled Rome III diagnostic questionnaire symptom criteria for IBS (52%), functional dyspepsia (27%), and/or functional bloating (9%). One year post-diagnosis, there was high adherence to a gluten-free diet as 93% reported gluten exposure less than once per month on the GF-EAT and only 8% had ongoing celiac disease symptoms (CSI score >45). The rates of those meeting IBS (22%) and functional dyspepsia (8%) symptom criteria both decreased significantly on a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of functional symptoms (any of IBS, FD or FB) at 1 year was 47%. Long-term follow-up of patients with celiac disease is necessary because many patients with celiac disease who are adherent to a gluten-free diet have persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

  7. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were cha...

  8. The Oslo definitions for coeliac disease and related terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Leffler, Daniel A; Bai, Julio; Biagi, Federico; Fasano, Alessio; Green, Peter HR; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelly, Ciaran; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E; Murray, Joseph A; Sanders, David S; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background The literature suggests a lack of consensus on the use of terms related to coeliac disease (CD) and gluten. Methods A multi-disciplinary task force of 16 physicians from 7 countries used the electronic database PubMed to review the literature with regards to CD-related terms up to January 2011. Teams of physicians then suggested a definition for each term, followed by feedback of these definitions through a web survey on definitions, discussions during a meeting in Oslo, and phone conferences. We evaluated the following terms (in alphabetical order): Coeliac disease and the following descriptors of CD: asymptomatic, atypical, classical, latent, non-classical, overt, paediatric classical, potential, refractory, silent, subclinical, symptomatic, typical, CD serology, CD autoimmunity, genetically at risk of CD, dermatitis herpetiformis, gluten, gluten ataxia, gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity, and gliadin-specific antibodies. Results CD was defined as “a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals”. Classical CD was defined as “CD presenting with signs and symptoms of malabsorption. Diarrhoea, steatorrhoea, weight loss or growth failure is required.” We suggest that “gluten-related disorders” is the umbrella term for all diseases triggered by gluten and that the term gluten intolerance is not to be used. Other definitions are presented in the paper. Conclusion This paper presents the Oslo definitions for CD-related terms. PMID:22345659

  9. Regional-dependent intestinal permeability and BCS classification: elucidation of pH-related complexity in rats using pseudoephedrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairstein, Moran; Swissa, Rotem; Dahan, Arik

    2013-04-01

    Based on its lower Log P value relative to metoprolol, a marker for the low/high-permeability (P(eff)) class boundary, pseudoephedrine was provisionally classified as BCS low-permeability compound. On the other hand, following oral administration, pseudoephedrine fraction dose absorbed (F(abs)) and systemic bioavailability approaches 100%. This represents a challenge to the generally recognized P(eff)-F(abs) correlation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind the confusion in pseudoephedrine's BCS classification. Pseudoephedrine's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Pseudoephedrine was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. All of the permeability studies revealed similar phenomenon; at any given intestinal segment/pH, the permeability of metoprolol was higher than that of pseudoephedrine, however, as the intestinal region becomes progressively distal, and the pH gradually increases, pseudoephedrine's permeability rises above that of metoprolol in the former segment. This unique permeability pattern likely explains pseudoephedrine's complete absorption. In conclusion, pseudoephedrine is a BCS Class I compound; no discrepancy between P(eff) and F(abs) is involved in its absorption. Rather, it reflects the complexity behind P(eff) when considering the whole of the intestine. We propose to allow high-permeability classification to drugs with P(eff) that matches/exceeds the low/high class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract and not restricted necessarily to the jejunum.

  10. [Protective effect of Saccharomyces boulardii against intestinal mucosal barrier injury in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y T; Li, Y Q; Wang, Y Z

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of Saccharomyces boulardii against intestinal mucosal barrier injury in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods: A total of 36 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats with a mean body weight of 180±20 g were randomly divided into control group, model group, and treatment group, with 12 rats in each group, after adaptive feeding for 1 week. The rats in the control group were given basic feed, and those in the model group and treatment group were given high-fat feed. After 12 weeks of feeding, the treatment group was given Saccharomyces boulardii (75×10 8 CFU/kg/d) by gavage, and those in the control group and model group were given isotonic saline by gavage. At the 20th week, blood samples were taken from the abdominal aorta to measure the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and endotoxins. The liver pathological changes, intestinal histopathological changes, and expression of occludin in the intestinal mucosa were observed. Fecal samples were collected to measure the changes in Escherichia coli and Bacteroides. A one-way analysis of variance and the SNK test were used for comparison between multiple groups, and the rank sum test was used as the non-parametric test. Results: Compared with the control group, the model group had significantly higher body weight, liver mass, and liver index ( P 0.05). Compared with the control group, the model group had significant increases in the levels of endotoxin, TNF-α, and IFABP ( P Saccharomyces boulardii can reduce body weight and improve hepatocyte steatosis. Saccharomyces boulardii can reduce endotoxemia in NAFLD rats and thus alleviate inflammatory response. Saccharomyces boulardii can also adjust the proportion of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides in the intestine of NAFLD rats.

  11. Validation of morphometric analyses of small-intestinal biopsy readouts in celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Taavela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessment of the gluten-induced small-intestinal mucosal injury remains the cornerstone of celiac disease diagnosis. Usually the injury is evaluated using grouped classifications (e.g. Marsh groups, but this is often too imprecise and ignores minor but significant changes in the mucosa. Consequently, there is a need for validated continuous variables in everyday practice and in academic and pharmacological research. METHODS: We studied the performance of our standard operating procedure (SOP on 93 selected biopsy specimens from adult celiac disease patients and non-celiac disease controls. The specimens, which comprised different grades of gluten-induced mucosal injury, were evaluated by morphometric measurements. Specimens with tangential cutting resulting from poorly oriented biopsies were included. Two accredited evaluators performed the measurements in blinded fashion. The intraobserver and interobserver variations for villus height and crypt depth ratio (VH:CrD and densities of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs were analyzed by the Bland-Altman method and intraclass correlation. RESULTS: Unevaluable biopsies according to our SOP were correctly identified. The intraobserver analysis of VH:CrD showed a mean difference of 0.087 with limits of agreement from -0.398 to 0.224; the standard deviation (SD was 0.159. The mean difference in interobserver analysis was 0.070, limits of agreement -0.516 to 0.375, and SD 0.227. The intraclass correlation coefficient in intraobserver variation was 0.983 and that in interobserver variation 0.978. CD3(+ IEL density countings in the paraffin-embedded and frozen biopsies showed SDs of 17.1% and 16.5%; the intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.961 and 0.956, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using our SOP, quantitative, reliable and reproducible morphometric results can be obtained on duodenal biopsy specimens with different grades of gluten-induced injury. Clinically significant changes were

  12. Intestinal parasitic infections among children under five years of age presenting with diarrhoeal diseases to two public health facilities in Hawassa, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulatu, Getamesay; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zemene, Endalew; Debalke, Serkadis; Beyene, Getenet

    2015-11-04

    Diarrhoea is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age in developing countries, including Ethiopia. It is caused by a wide range of pathogens, including parasites, bacteria and viruses. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infection with intestinal parasites (IPs) (and types) among children under 5 years of age with diarrhoeal diseases. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Adare Hospital and Millennium Health Centre, both located in Hawassa, South Ethiopia, from June 6 to October 28, 2011. Children under 5 years of age with diarrhoea who visited these health facilities during the study period were included in the study. Data relating to demography and risk factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) were gathered using a structured questionnaire. Single, fresh stool specimens were examined for IPs using the direct wet mount examination, followed by Ziehl-Neelsen staining of formol-ether concentrated samples, as per standard procedures. Data were analysed using SPSS Statistics 20 software. A total of 158 children (51.3 % male and 48.7 % female) participated in the study. Overall, the prevalence of IPs was 26.6 % (42/158). Two species of IPs were detected in six children (3.8 %). Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii was the predominant parasite identified (11.4 %), followed by Giardia duodenalis (7.0 %). The multivariable analysis revealed that the age group ≥24 months was significantly associated (AOR = 0.221, 95 %CI: 0.085-0.576) with prevalence of IPIs. This study found that intestinal parasites are common among children with diarrheal diseases. The most frequently detected species was E. histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii. Health information about how to prevent diarrheal diseases in general and IPIs in particular should be provided to parents of young children.

  13. Intestinal microbiology in Crohn's disease: a study of Escherichia coli as a potential etiologic agent

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Medina, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disorder of unknown aetiology. Genetic and immunologic features that confer susceptibility on the host, together with external or environmental factors such as microorganisms and lifestyle, are thought to be involved. The main purpose of this work was to describe the bacterial populations particularly related with Crohn's disease patients in order to identify putative etiologic agents. The results are in agreement with previous research on the ...

  14. Markers of Intestinal Damage and their Relation to Cytokine Levels in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habes, Q.L.M.; Linssen, V.; Nooijen, S.; Kiers, D.; Gerretsen, J.; Pickkers, P.; Scheffer, G.J.; Kox, M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, both extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and intraoperative mesenterial hypoperfusion may account for increased cytokine levels and lead to postoperative gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. METHODS: We investigated levels of the intestinal damage markers

  15. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  16. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Enacts Wnt Signaling in Intestinal Homeostasis and Contributes to the Instigation of Stemness in Diseases Entailing Epithelial Hyperplasia or Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oittinen, Mikko; Popp, Alina; Kurppa, Kalle; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Viiri, Keijo

    2017-02-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium by controlling the balance between intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation but epigenetic mechanisms enacting the process are not known. We hypothesized that epigenetic regulator, Polycomb Repressive Complex-2 (PRC2), is involved in Wnt-mediated epithelial homeostasis on the crypt-villus axis and aberrancies therein are implicated both in celiac disease and in intestinal malignancies. We found that PRC2 establishes repressive crypt and villus specific trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) signature on genes responsible for, for example, nutrient transport and cell killing in crypts and, for example, proliferation and differentiation in mature villi, suggesting that PRC2 facilitates the Wnt-governed intestinal homeostasis. When celiac patients are on gluten-containing diet PRC2 is out-of-bounds active and consequently its target genes were found affected in intestinal epithelium. Significant set of effective intestinal PRC2 targets are also differentially expressed in colorectal adenoma and carcinomas. Our results suggest that PRC2 gives rise and maintains polar crypt and villus specific H3K27me3 signatures. As H3K27me3 is a mark enriched in developmentally important genes, identified intestinal PRC2 targets are possibly imperative drivers for enterocyte differentiation and intestinal stem cell maintenance downstream to Wnt-signaling. Our work also elucidates the mechanism sustaining the crypt hyperplasia in celiac disease and suggest that PRC2-dependent fostering of epithelial stemness is a common attribute in intestinal diseases in which epithelial hyperplasia or neoplasia prevails. Finally, this work demonstrates that in intestine PRC2 represses genes having both pro-stemness and pro-differentiation functions, fact need to be considered when designing epigenetic therapies including PRC2 as a drug target. Stem Cells 2017;35:445-457. © 2016 Alpha

  17. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  18. Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts results in elevated genome instability with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Ma, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Chao; Wang, Yupei; He, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts is well documented, but its potential tumorigenic effects remain elusive. Here we aim to determine the genomic surveillance process during crypt hyperproliferation, and its consequential outcome after ionizing radiation. Crypt regeneration in the intestine was induced by a single dose of 12Gy abdominal irradiation. γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and DNA-PKcs were used as DNA repair surrogates to investigate the inherent ability of intestinal crypt cells to recognize and repair double-strand breaks. Ki67 staining and the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay were used to study patterns of cell proliferation in regenerating crypts. Staining for ATM, p53, Chk1 and Chk2 was performed to study checkpoint activation and release. Apoptosis was evaluated through H&E staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick-end labeling. The ATM-p53 pathway was immediately activated after irradiation. A second wave of DSBs in crypt cells was observed in regenerating crypts, accompanied with significantly increased chromosomal bridges. The p53-related genomic surveillance pathway was not active during the regeneration phase despite DSBs and chromosomal bridges in the cells of regenerating crypts. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSBs repair was involved in the DSBs repair process, as indicated by p-DNA-PKcs staining. Intestinal crypt cells retained hyperproliferation with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance system. NHEJ was involved in the resultant genomic instability during hyperproliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Early-Life Exposure to Antibiotics, Alterations in the Intestinal Microbiome, and Risk of Metabolic Disease in Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapragada, Sushmita G; Nash, Colleen B; Robinson, Daniel T

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a complex ecosystem of microorganisms that colonize the human gastrointestinal tract. The microbiome evolves rapidly in early life with contributions from diet, genetics and immunomodulatory factors. Changes in composition of the microbiota due to antibiotics may lead to negative long-term effects including obesity and diabetes mellitus, as evidenced by both animal and large human studies. Inappropriate exposures to antibiotics occur frequently in early childhood. Therefore, an evidence-based system of antimicrobial use should be employed by all providers, especially those who care for pediatric patients. This article explores the natural evolution of the intestinal microbiome from the perinatal period into early childhood, the effect of antibiotics on the microbial ecology, and the implications for future health and disease. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  1. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: experience with Rifaximin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-06-07

    To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a "breath test". Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO.

  2. Hepatic diseases related to triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Álvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Hernández-Godinez, Daniel; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplastic cells. One of the main medical concerns vis-a-vis hepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis.

  3. Background Intestinal 18F-FDG Uptake Is Related to Serum Lipid Profile and Obesity in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jeon Yoon

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between background intestinal uptake on 18F-FDG PET and cardio-metabolic risk (CMR factors.A total of 326 female patients that underwent 18F-FDG PET to determine the initial stage of breast cancer were enrolled. None of the patients had history of diabetes or hypertension. The background intestinal uptake on PET was visually graded (low vs. high uptake group and quantitatively measured using the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax. SUVmax of 7 bowel segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, hepatic flexure, splenic flexure, and descending colon-sigmoid junction were averaged for the total bowel (TB SUVmax. Age, body mass index (BMI, fasting blood glucose level (BST, triglyceride (TG, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, and low density lipoprotein (LDL were the considered CMR factors. The relationships between background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET and diverse CMR factors were analyzed.The visual grades based on background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake classified 100 (30.7% patients into the low uptake group, while 226 (69.3% were classified into the high uptake group. Among CMR factors, age (p = 0.004, BMI (p<0.001, and TG (p<0.001 were significantly different according to visual grade of background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake. Quantitative TB SUVmax showed significant positive correlation with age (r = 0.203, p<0.001, BMI (r = 0.373, p<0.001, TG (r = 0.338, p<0.001, cholesterol (r = 0.148, p = 0.008, and LDL (r = 0.143, p = 0.024 and significant negative correlation with HDL (r = -0.147, p = 0.022. Multivariate analysis indicated that BMI and TG were independent factors in both visually graded background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake (p = 0.027 and p = 0.023, respectively and quantitatively measured TB SUVmax (p = 0.006 and p = 0.004, respectively.Increased background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET may suggest alteration of lipid metabolism and risk of cardio-metabolic disease in non

  4. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT". © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Specific and Nonspecific B-Cell Function in the Small Intestines of Patients with Whipple's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhaar, Anika; Moos, Verena; Schinnerling, Katina; Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Fenollar, Florence; LaScola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a chronic multisystemic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei that is characterized by arthritis, weight loss, and diarrhea. The immunological defects in the duodenal mucosa, the site of major replication of the agent underlying the pathogenesis of Whipple's disease, are poorly understood. Mucosal immunoglobulins are essential for the defense against intestinal pathogens; therefore, we analyzed the B-cell response in duodenal specimens and sera of Whipple's disease patients. Whereas systemic immunoglobulin production was affected only marginally, duodenal biopsy specimens of Whipple's disease patients contained reduced numbers of immunoglobulin-positive plasma cells and secreted less immunoglobulin compared to healthy controls but showed a weak secretory IgA response toward T. whipplei. This T. whipplei-specific intestinal immune response was not observed in controls. Thus, we were able to demonstrate that general mucosal immunoglobulin production in Whipple's disease patients is impaired. However, this deficiency does not completely abolish T. whipplei-specific secretory IgA production that nonetheless does not protect from chronic infection. PMID:20696822

  6. Malaria and related outcomes in patients with intestinal helminths: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degarege Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of helminth co-infection on malaria in humans remain uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the nature of association of intestinal helminths with prevalence and clinical outcomes of Plasmodium infection. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 1,065 malaria suspected febrile patients was conducted at Dore Bafeno Health Center, Southern Ethiopia, from December 2010 to February 2011. Plasmodium and intestinal helminth infections were diagnosed using Giemsa-stained blood films and Kato-Katz technique, respectively. Haemoglobin level was determined using a haemocue machine. Results Among 1,065 malaria suspected febrile patients, 28.8% were positive for Plasmodium parasites (P. falciparum =13.0%, P. vivax =14.5%, P. falciparum and P. vivax =1.3%. Among 702 patients who provided stool samples, 53.8%, 31.6% and 19.4% were infected with intestinal helminths, Plasmodium alone and with both Plasmodium and intestinal helminths, respectively. The prevalence of infections with Ascaris lumbricoides (A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura (T. trichiura, Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni and hookworm (9.8% were 35.9%, 15.8%, 11.7% and 9.8%, respectively. Out of the 222 (31.6% Plasmodium infected cases, 9 (4.1% had severe malaria. P. falciparum infection was more common in febrile patients infected with A. lumbricoides alone (21.3%, T. trichiura alone (23.1% and S. mansoni alone (23.1% compared to those without intestinal helminth infections (9.3% (pP. falciparum malaria were 2.6, 2.8 and 3.3 times higher in individuals infected with A. lumbricoides alone, T. trichiura alone and S. mansoni alone, respectively, compared to intestinal helminth-free individuals (pP. falciparum increased with the number of intestinal helminth species (pPlasmodium density among intestinal helminth infected individuals was significantly increased with the number of intestinal helminths species (p=0.027. Individuals who were co-infected with different

  7. The relation between Blastocystis and the intestinal microbiota in Swedish travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Joakim; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Angelin, Martin; Johansson, Anders; Evengård, Birgitta; Granlund, Margareta

    2017-12-11

    Blastocystis sp. is a unicellular eukaryote that is commonly found in the human intestine. Its ability to cause disease is debated and a subject for ongoing research. In this study, faecal samples from 35 Swedish university students were examined through shotgun metagenomics before and after travel to the Indian peninsula or Central Africa. We aimed at assessing the impact of travel on Blastocystis carriage and seek associations between Blastocystis and the bacterial microbiota. We found a prevalence of Blastocystis of 16/35 (46%) before travel and 15/35 (43%) after travel. The two most commonly Blastocystis subtypes (STs) found were ST3 and ST4, accounting for 20 of the 31 samples positive for Blastocystis. No mixed subtype carriage was detected. All ten individuals with a typable ST before and after travel maintained their initial ST. The composition of the gut bacterial community was not significantly different between Blastocystis-carriers and non-carriers. Interestingly, the presence of Blastocystis was accompanied with higher abundances of the bacterial genera Sporolactobacillus and Candidatus Carsonella. Blastocystis carriage was positively associated with high bacterial genus richness, and negatively correlated to the Bacteroides-driven enterotype. These associations were both largely dependent on ST4 - a subtype commonly described from Europe - while the globally prevalent ST3 did not show such significant relationships. The high rate of Blastocystis subtype persistence found during travel indicates that long-term carriage of Blastocystis is common. The associations between Blastocystis and the bacterial microbiota found in this study could imply a link between Blastocystis and a healthy microbiota as well as with diets high in vegetables. Whether the associations between Blastocystis and the microbiota are resulting from the presence of Blastocystis, or are a prerequisite for colonization with Blastocystis, are interesting questions for further studies.

  8. Radiographic diagnosis of mechanical obstruction in dogs based on relative small intestinal external diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Cyrielle; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Alexander, Kate; Specchi, Swan; Beauchamp, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical obstruction is a frequent cause of acute vomiting in dogs requiring prompt diagnosis to improve patient management and prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare small intestinal radiographic characteristics in dogs with versus without mechanical intestinal obstruction. Fifty dogs with gastrointestinal clinical signs and abdominal radiographs were recruited from hospital record archives and assigned to groups (group 1, obstructive, n = 25; group 2, nonobstructive n = 25). Abdominal radiographs were randomized and independently interpreted by three examiners who were unaware of group status. Intestinal dilation was subjectively scored based on distribution (segmental, regional or diffuse), and severity (absent, mild, moderate or severe). Small intestinal maximal diameter (SImax), L5 vertebral body height, small intestinal minimal diameter (SImin), and an estimated average of small intestinal diameters (SIave) were measured and three ratios were calculated: SImax/L5, SImax/SImin, and SImax/SIave. Segmental dilation was more prevalent in obstructed dogs for all examiners (P ≤ 0.03) and most nonobstructed dogs had no dilation (P ≤ 0.05). All ratios were higher in obstructed dogs (P dogs with SImax/L5 ≤ 1.4, SImax/SImin ≤ 2, and SImax/SIave ≤ 1.3 values are very unlikely to be mechanically obstructed; dogs with SImax/L5 ≥ 2.4, SImax/SImin ≥ 3.4 and SImax/SIave ≥ 1.9 are very likely obstructed, particularly if segmental dilation (less than 25% of the small intestine) is present. Dogs with ratios falling between these thresholds may need further testing unless other signs justify surgical exploration or endoscopy. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Radiological aspects of Crohn's disease in small intestine: iconographic assay; Aspectos radiologicos da doenca de Crohn no intestino delgado: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Nestor de; Juliano, Adriana G.; Polizini, Jose M.R.; Rejtman, Debora; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Rocha, Manoel de Souza [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    1999-12-01

    The authors present the radiological features of Crohn's disease in small intestine as ways of differential diagnosis of others diseases of duodenum and adjacent organs. In this differentiation or confirmation of Crohn's disease the US and TC have proven to be clinically efficacious in the identification of lesions.

  10. Malaria and related outcomes in patients with intestinal helminths: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degarege, Abraham; Legesse, Mengistu; Medhin, Girmay; Animut, Abebe; Erko, Berhanu

    2012-11-09

    The effects of helminth co-infection on malaria in humans remain uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the nature of association of intestinal helminths with prevalence and clinical outcomes of Plasmodium infection. A cross-sectional study involving 1,065 malaria suspected febrile patients was conducted at Dore Bafeno Health Center, Southern Ethiopia, from December 2010 to February 2011. Plasmodium and intestinal helminth infections were diagnosed using Giemsa-stained blood films and Kato-Katz technique, respectively. Haemoglobin level was determined using a haemocue machine. Among 1,065 malaria suspected febrile patients, 28.8% were positive for Plasmodium parasites (P. falciparum =13.0%, P. vivax =14.5%, P. falciparum and P. vivax =1.3%). Among 702 patients who provided stool samples, 53.8%, 31.6% and 19.4% were infected with intestinal helminths, Plasmodium alone and with both Plasmodium and intestinal helminths, respectively. The prevalence of infections with Ascaris lumbricoides (A. lumbricoides), Trichuris trichiura (T. trichiura), Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) and hookworm (9.8%) were 35.9%, 15.8%, 11.7% and 9.8%, respectively. Out of the 222 (31.6%) Plasmodium infected cases, 9 (4.1%) had severe malaria. P. falciparum infection was more common in febrile patients infected with A. lumbricoides alone (21.3%), T. trichiura alone (23.1%) and S. mansoni alone (23.1%) compared to those without intestinal helminth infections (9.3%) (phelminths than in those who were not infected with intestinal helminths (adjusted OR=1.58, 95% CI=1.13-2.22). The chance of developing non-severe P. falciparum malaria were 2.6, 2.8 and 3.3 times higher in individuals infected with A. lumbricoides alone, T. trichiura alone and S. mansoni alone, respectively, compared to intestinal helminth-free individuals (phelminth species (phelminth infected individuals was significantly increased with the number of intestinal helminths species (p=0.027). Individuals who were co-infected with

  11. The relation between molecular properties of drugs and their transport across the intestinal membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakeri-Milani P.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the intestinal absorption of structurally diverse model drugs across the rat intestinal mucosa and their molecular properties. Permeability coefficients for 13 compounds were determined in anaesthetized rats. Drug solution in phosphate buffered saline (PBS was perfused through the intestinal segment with flow rate of 0.21 ml/min and samples were taken from outlet tubing at different time points up to 90 min. The permeability values ranged from 1.6×10-5 to 2 ×10-4 cm/sec for atenolol and ibuprofen respectively. Molecular properties of drugs including the number of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, log P, logD, topological polar surface area and number of rotatable bonds were considered. The results indicated that compounds which meet 10 or fewer number of rotatable bonds and topological surface area equal to or less than 140 A◦ have a high probability of good intestinal permeability and fraction of dose which is absorbed in human. Moreover the results indicated that lower number of hydrogen bond counts and higher logD and logP values are associated with higher permeability and bioavailabilty of drugs. Therefore the experimental and computational methods could be used for the prediction of intestinal drug permeability.

  12. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  13. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Dugan D j; Spuran, Milan; Alempijević, Tamara; Krstić, Miodrag; Djuranović, Srdjan; Kovacević, Nada; Damnjanović, Svetozar; Micev, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  14. Similar Responses of Intestinal T Cells From Untreated Children and Adults With Celiac Disease to Deamidated Gluten Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráki, Melinda; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Yu, Hao; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Gyimesi, Judit; Castillejo, Gemma; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder mediated by an immune response to gluten peptides in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is often diagnosed in early childhood, but some patients receive a diagnosis late in life. It is uncertain whether pediatric celiac disease is distinct from adult celiac disease. It has been proposed that gluten-reactive T cells in children recognize deamidated and native gluten epitopes, whereas T cells from adults only recognize deamidated gluten peptides. We studied the repertoire of gluten epitopes recognized by T cells from children and adults. We examined T-cell responses against gluten by generating T-cell lines and T-cell clones from intestinal biopsies of adults and children and tested proliferative response to various gluten peptides. We analyzed T cells from 14 children (2-5 years old) at high risk for celiac disease who were followed for celiac disease development. We also analyzed T cells from 6 adults (26-55 years old) with untreated celiac disease. All children and adults were positive for HLA-DQ2.5. Biopsies were incubated with gluten digested with chymotrypsin (modified or unmodified by the enzyme transglutaminase 2) or the peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin (in native and deamidated forms) before T-cell collection. Levels of T-cell responses were higher to deamidated gluten than to native gluten in children and adults. T cells from children and adults each reacted to multiple gluten epitopes. Several T-cell clones were cross-reactive, especially clones that recognized epitopes from γ-and ω-gliadin. About half of the generated T-cell clones from children and adults reacted to unknown epitopes. T-cell responses to different gluten peptides appear to be similar between adults and children at the time of diagnosis of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effective Treatment of Intestinal Behçet's Disease with Long-Term, Low-Dose Clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiya Hakozaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old man was referred for body weight loss and lower right abdominal pain. Total colonoscopy revealed discrete and round ulceration at the ileocecal valve, and he was diagnosed with intestinal Behçet's disease (BD. By treatment with glucocorticoid, colchicine and salazosulfapyridine, the symptoms and ulceration were improved, but cessation of glucocorticoid resulted in relapse of ulceration at the terminal ileum. Long-term, low-dose treatment with clarithromycin (CAM was implemented for chronic respiratory infections. Furthermore, we expected that this CAM treatment would also be effective in BD. During this long-term, low-dose treatment with CAM, discrete ulceration at the terminal ileum was never revealed by follow-up total colonoscopy once or twice per year for 7 years. No reports have described the effectiveness of this treatment in patients with intestinal BD; however, we confirm that long-term treatment with low-dose CAM might have clinical benefits for patients with intestinal BD.

  16. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  17. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  18. Role of dietary fibers on health of the gastro-intestinal system and related types of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fibers are classified into water soluble or insoluble, and most plant foods include in their composition variable amounts of a mixture of soluble and insoluble fibers. This soluble or insoluble nature of fiber is related to its physiological effects. Insoluble fibers are characterized by high porosity, low density and the ability to increase fecal bulk, and act by facilitating intestinal transit, thus reducing the exposure to carcinogens in the colon and therefore acting as protectors...

  19. Deficiency of the intestinal growth factor, glucagon-like peptide 2, in the colon of SCID mice with inflammatory bowel disease induced by transplantation of CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Hartmann, B; Bregenholt, S

    2000-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is produced in endocrine L-cells of the intestinal mucosa. Recently, GLP-2 was found to stimulate intestinal mucosal growth. Our objective was to study the content of GLP-2 in the large intestine in a murine model of T-cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease....

  20. The Use of Fish Oil Lipid Emulsion in the Treatment of Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease (IFALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa I. Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2004, fish oil based lipid emulsions have been used in the treatment of intestinal failure associated liver disease, with a noticeable impact on decreasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality of this often fatal condition. With this new therapy, however, different approaches have emerged as well as concerns about potential risks with using fish oil as a monotherapy. This review will discuss the experience to date with this lipid emulsion along with the rational for its use, controversies and concerns.

  1. Small intestinal absorption in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by cor pulmonale - A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sara Korsgaard; Hardis, Anne L S; Tupper, Oliver Djurhuus

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cor pulmonale is a common complication to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and may result in increased pressure in the inferior caval vein and stasis of the liver. The chronic pulmonary hypertension may lead to stasis in the veins from the small intestine and thereby...... compromise absorption of nutrients. AIM: To investigate whether patients with pulmonary hypertension have reduced absorption capacity compared to COPD patients without cor pulmonale. METHODS: Absorption of d-xylose (25 g) and zinc (132 mg), administered as a single dose, was tested in 14 COPD patients, seven...

  2. Liver disease associated with intestinal failure in the small bowel syndrome Doença hepática associada à falência intestinal na síndrome do intestino curto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Kemp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN has given rise to a new hope in the treatment of intestinal failure (LF associated with the Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS. However, together with the TPN and the increase of survival of these patients, new problems and questions have emerged, as well as new therapeutical procedures. Taking into consideration this emerging reality, this paper has the purpose to undertake a review of current concepts and available treatments for patients with IF associated-liver disease. Although TPN provides an increase of survival of patients with intestinal failure, it is a potential source of complication such as: septicemia, hyperglycemia, venous thrombosis and liver disease. There are several hypothesis conceived to explain the liver disease associated to intestinal failure, however the only definite treatment as a potential to reverse the non-cirrhotic liver disease is the small intestine transplantation. Despite indications for intestine transplantation are not entirely defined in literature, the trend is its early indication in high-risk patients, preserving the liver integrity and preventing the eventual need of both liver and intestine transplantations altogether.A introdução da Nutrição Parenteral Total (NPT despertou uma nova esperança para o tratamento da falência intestina (FI associada a Síndrome do Intestino Curto (SIC. No entanto, junto com a NPT e o aumento da sobrevida destes pacientes, novos problemas e perguntas emergiram, assim como novas terapêuticas. Tendo em vista esta realidade emergente, o intuito deste artigo é realizar uma revisão dos conceitos atuais e dos tratamentos disponíveis para pacientes com doença hepática associada a FI. A NPT apesar de proporcionar aumento da sobrevida nos pacientes com falência intestinal é fonte potencial de complicações, como: septicemia, hiperglicemia, trombose venosa e doença hepática. Diversas são as hipóteses aventadas para

  3. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  4. Relation between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis of the rat small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, S [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Research Inst.; Matsuzawa, T

    1975-06-01

    This study was undertaken to make clear the relationships between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis in the rat small intestine. The abdomens of Wistar rats were irradiated locally with 1000 to 2000 rads. Approximately 2 months following irradiation, visible nodules were found in the intestines of the groups receiving irradiation. Nodule incidence was 80 to 100% in groups that received 1750 or 2000 rads, 50% in the 1500-rad groups, and 3% in the 1000-rad groups, respectively. The histology of the nodules within 70 days postirradiation, revealed adenomatous hyperplasia, including invasion of submucosa, muscle layers, and serosa of the small intestine accompanied by an area of fibrous tissue resulting from desmoplastic reaction by irradiation injury. The nodule within 140 to 300 days postirradiation induced advanced tissue injuried, that is, a polypoid lesion in histology and intestinal nodular adhesion in macroscopic anatomy. Running parallel with the advance of the above mentioned tissue injuries, the nodules in 3 out of 18 rat during 200 to 300 days postirradiation showed mucoid adenocarcinoma.

  5. 10 Prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4 counts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal ... include the strain and number of the parasites, the size and site, metabolic processes of the ..... nutritional supplement on viral load and haematological parameters in HIV- ... Omoregie, R., Egbeobauwaye, A., Ogefere, H., Omokaro, E.U. & Ehen, C.C. ...

  6. Effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide on heart rate in relation to vagal cardioacceleration in conscious dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roossien, A; Brunstig, J.R; Nijmeijer, A; Zaagsma, Hans; Zijlstra, W.G

    Objective: The vagal cardiac accelerator (VCA) system takes part in the nervous control of the heart rate. In the present study we tried to adduce evidence that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VLP) contributes to vagally induced cardioacceleration. Methods: The effect of VIP on heart rate and

  7. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaozhao; Bai, Danna; Liu, Xiangwei; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Guodong

    2017-03-31

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in wildtype mice, while not in Hotair knockout mice. Mechanistically, squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces exosomal Hotair secretion mainly by transcriptional upregulation of Hotair via NFκB. And increased exosomal Hotair in turn circulates in the blood and is partially endocytosed by the intestine, finally promoting the stemness and proliferation of intestinal stem/progenitor cells via Wnt activation. Clinically, obese subjects with sedentary lifestyle have much higher exosomal HOTAIR expression in the serum. These findings establish that sedentary lifestyle promotes exosomal Hotair release from the gluteal-femoral fat, which in turn facilitates intestinal stem and/or progenitor proliferation, raising a possible link between sedentary lifestyle with colorectal tumorigenesis.

  8. Relation between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis of the rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubouchi, Susumu; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1975-01-01

    This study was undertaken to make clear the relationships between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis in the rat small intestine. The abdomens of Wistar rats were irradiated locally with 1000 to 2000 rads. Approximately 2 months following irradiation, visible nodules were found in the intestines of the groups receiving irradiation. Nodule incidence was 80 to 100% in groups that received 1750 or 2000 rads, 50% in the 1500-rad groups, and 3% in the 1000-rad groups, respectively. The histology of the nodules within 70 days postirradiation, revealed adenomatous hyperplasia, including invasion of submucosa, muscle layers, and serosa of the small intestine accompanied by an area of fibrous tissue resulting from desmoplastic reaction by irradiation injury. The nodule within 140-300 days postirradiation induced advanced tissue injuried, that is, a polypoid lesion in histology and intestinal nodular adhesion in macroscopic anatomy. Running parallel with the advance of the above mentioned tissue injuries, the nodules in 3 out of 18 rat during 200-300 days postirradiation showed mucoid adenocarcinoma. (author)

  9. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.

  10. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  11. [Sleep disorder and lifestyle-related disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Rei; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorder is associated with the lifestyle-related diseases including obesity, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ by producing bioactive secretory proteins, also known as adipokines, that can directly act on nearby or remote organs. Recently, the associations between these adipokines and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea have been reported. In this review, we focus on the relationship between sleep disorder and lifestyle-related diseases.

  12. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  13. Age-Related Variations in Intestinal Microflora of Free-Range and Caged Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yizhe; Wang, Qiuju; Liu, Shengjun; Sun, Rui; Zhou, Yaqiang; Li, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Free range feeding pattern puts the chicken in a mixture of growth materials and enteric bacteria excreted by nature, while it is typically unique condition materials and enteric bacteria in commercial caged hens production. Thus, the gastrointestinal microflora in two feeding patterns could be various. However, it remains poorly understood how feeding patterns affect development and composition of layer hens' intestinal microflora. In this study, the effect of feeding patterns on the bacteria community in layer hens' gut was investigated using free range and caged feeding form. Samples of whole small intestines and cecal digesta were collected from young hens (8-weeks) and mature laying hens (30-weeks). Based on analysis using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA gene amplicons, the microflora of all intestinal contents were affected by both feeding patterns and age of hens. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the main components. Additionally, uncultured environmental samples were found too. There were large differences between young hens and adult laying hens, the latter had more Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and bacterial community is more abundant in 30-weeks laying hens of all six phyla than 8-weeks young hens of only two phyla. In addition, the differences were also observed between free range and caged hens. Free range hens had richer Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Most of strains found were detected more abundant in small intestines than in cecum. Also the selected Lactic acid bacteria from hens gut were applied in feed and they had beneficial effects on growth performance and jejunal villus growth of young broilers. This study suggested that feeding patterns have an importance effect on the microflora composition of hens, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health.

  14. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study12

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Sara J; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; van Rheenen, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. Objective: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their associations with mortality in children with SAM. Design: Intestinal pathogens (n = 15), cytokines (n = 29), fecal calprotectin, and the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) butyrate and propionate were determined in children aged 6–59 mo (n = 79) hospitalized in Malawi for complicated SAM. The relation between variables, diarrhea, and death was assessed with partial least squares (PLS) path modeling. Results: Fatal subjects (n = 14; 18%) were younger (mean ± SD age: 17 ± 11 compared with 25 ± 11 mo; P = 0.01) with higher prevalence of diarrhea (46% compared with 18%, P = 0.03). Intestinal pathogens Shigella (36%), Giardia (33%), and Campylobacter (30%) predominated, but their presence was not associated with death or diarrhea. Calprotectin was significantly higher in children who died [median (IQR): 1360 mg/kg feces (2443–535 mg/kg feces) compared with 698 mg/kg feces (1438–244 mg/kg feces), P = 0.03]. Butyrate [median (IQR): 31 ng/mL (112–22 ng/mL) compared with 2036 ng/mL (5800–149 ng/mL), P = 0.02] and propionate [median (IQR): 167 ng/mL (831–131 ng/mL) compared with 3174 ng/mL (5819–357 ng/mL), P = 0.04] were lower in those who died. Mortality was directly related to high systemic inflammation (path coefficient = 0.49), whereas diarrhea, high calprotectin, and low SCFA production related to death indirectly via their more direct association with systemic inflammation. Conclusions: Diarrhea, high intestinal inflammation, low concentrations of fecal SCFAs, and high systemic inflammation are significantly related to mortality in SAM. However, these relations were not mediated by the presence of intestinal pathogens. These findings offer an important understanding of

  15. Parasitosis intestinal, su relación con factores ambientales en niños del sector "Altos de Milagro", Maracaibo Intestinal parasitosis, its relation to environmental factors in children from the "Altos de Milagro", Maracaibo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Espinosa Morales

    2011-09-01

    Republic of Venezuela including the predominance of children and adolescents due the poor hygienic health condition in the neighborhoods. OBJECTIVE: To determine the presence of some environmental factors present in parasitized children from the "Altos de Milgro Norte" Maracaibo, Zulia state, from December, 2008 to December, 2009. METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted to determine the behavior of the intestinal parasitosis in children from that sector and its relation to some environmental factors using a survey carried out the author. RESULTS: Fifty six patients were cared, the 51.7 % was of male sex, this latter was the more parasitized with a 42.7 %, there was predominance of ages from 1 to 4 years with a 39.2 %, the inappropriate disposition of excretes was present in a 86.6 %, as well as the presence of vectors in a 94.6 % and 26 patients drank non-prepared water (57.8 %. CONCLUSIONS: There was high presence of disease where the male sex was the more involved; however, there was not significant differences with the female one and predominance of age group from 1 to 4 years. The high percentage obtained in study environmental factors showed that it was important in appearance, transmission and widespread of the parasitosis. Authors recommended designing programs of community interventions to avoid or to limit the appearance of these diseases.

  16. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  17. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated With Histological Liver Steatosis in Pediatric-Onset Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Mutanen, Annika; Salonen, Anne; Savilahti, Erkki; de Vos, Willem M; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD) is the major cause of mortality in IF. The link between intestinal microbiota and IFALD is unclear. We compared intestinal microbiota of patients with IF (n = 23) with healthy controls (n = 58) using culture-independent phylogenetic microarray analysis. The microbiota was related to histological liver injury, fecal markers of intestinal inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calprotectin, and disease characteristics. Overabundance of Lactobacilli, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria was observed in IF, whereas bacteria related to Clostridium clusters III, IV, and XIVa along with overall diversity and richness were reduced. Patients were segregated into 3 subgroups based on dominating bacteria: Clostridium cluster XIVa, Proteobacteria, and bacteria related to Lactobacillus plantarum. In addition to liver steatosis and fibrosis, Proteobacteria were associated with prolonged current parenteral nutrition (PN) as well as liver and intestinal inflammation. Lactobacilli were related to advanced steatosis and fibrosis mostly after weaning off PN without associated inflammation. In multivariate permutational analysis of variance, liver steatosis, bowel length, PN calories, and antibiotic treatment best explained the microbiota variation among patients with IF. Intestinal microbiota composition was associated with liver steatosis in IF and better predicted steatosis than duration of PN or length of the remaining intestine. Our results may be explained by a model in which steatosis is initiated during PN in response to proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides produced by Proteobacteria and progresses after weaning off PN, as the L plantarum group Lactobacilli becomes dominant and affects lipid metabolism by altering bile acid signaling.

  18. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, M.A. (Saint Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Medical Physiology Unit)

    1992-10-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.).

  19. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamm, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.)

  20. Intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Hamid M.

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms and regulation of intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins under normal physiological conditions, and of the factors/conditions that affect and interfere with theses processes has been significantly expanded in recent years as a result of the availability of a host of valuable molecular/cellular tools. Although structurally and functionally unrelated, the water-soluble vitamins share the feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth an...

  1. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the ‘multibiome’ to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine...

  2. Metaplasia intestinal especializada de esôfago distal na doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: prevalência e aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos Specialized intestinal metaplasia of distal esophagus in the gastroesophageal reflux disease: prevalence and clinical-demographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiber C. Caum

    2003-12-01

    , esofagite mais intensa e sem associação com tabaco ou álcool.BACKGROUND: Specialized intestinal metaplasia can be categorized according endoscopic and histological findings in long segment Barrett, short segment Barrett and specialized intestinal metaplasia of cardia. Barrett's esophagus is an acquired disease that is found in about 10%-13% of patients undergoing endoscopy for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and it is well established as predisposing to esophageal adenocarcinoma. The columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal squamous epithelium. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of specialized intestinal metaplasia of distal esophagus in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: From April to October 2002, 402 patients referred to upper endoscopy due gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated through of a symptom questionnaire about clinical and demographic features and submitted to upper endoscopy with four-quadrant biopsies 1 cm below escamocolumnar junction. RESULTS: Eighteen point four percent of patients had specialized intestinal metaplasia, 0.5% long segment Barrett esophagus, 3.2% short segment Barrett's esophagus and 14.7% specialized intestinal metaplasia of cardia. Patients with Barrett's esophagus showed a tendency to be male and specialized metaplasia of cardia to be female. All patients with Barrett's esophagus were white. There was not association between symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and specialized intestinal metaplasia, but patients with Barrett's esophagus showed a tendency to have symptoms over 5 years and had more hiatal hernia and esophagitis. The use of alcohol and tobacco was not related to the presence of specialized intestinal metaplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Barrett's esophagus was more related to the male gender, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms for 5 years or longer, more intense esophagitis and hiatal hernia, but was not related to the use of

  3. Exploration of Serum Proteomic Profiling and Diagnostic Model That Differentiate Crohn's Disease and Intestinal Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenming Zhang

    Full Text Available To explore the diagnostic models of Crohn's disease (CD, Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB and the differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB by analyzing serum proteome profiles.Serum proteome profiles from 30 CD patients, 21 ITB patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs were analyzed by using weak cationic magnetic beads combined with MALDI-TOF-MS technique to detect the differentially expressed proteins of serum samples. Three groups were made and compared accordingly: group of CD patients and HCs, group of ITB patients and HCs, group of CD patients and ITB patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to screen the ten most differentiated protein peaks (P < 0.05. Genetic algorithm combining with support vector machine (SVM was utilized to establish the optimal diagnostic models for CD, ITB and the optimal differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB. The predictive effects of these models were evaluated by Leave one out (LOO cross validation method.There were 236 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and HCs, 305 protein peaks differently expressed between group of ITB patients and HCs, 332 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and ITB patients. Ten most differentially expressed peaks were screened out between three groups respectively (P < 0.05 to establish diagnostic models and differential diagnostic model. A diagnostic model comprising of four protein peaks (M/Z 4964, 3029, 2833, 2900 can well distinguish CD patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 96.7% and 96.7% respectively. A diagnostic model comprising four protein peaks (M/Z 3030, 2105, 2545, 4210 can well distinguish ITB patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 93.3% and 95.2% respectively. A differential diagnostic model comprising three potential biomarkers protein peaks (M/Z 4267, 4223, 1541 can well distinguish CD patients and ITB patients, with a specificity and sensitivity of 76.2% and 80

  4. Effect of yogurt containing deep sea water on health-related serum parameters and intestinal microbiota in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun Moon; Jhoo, Jin Woo; Pak, Jae In; Kwon, Ill Kyoung; Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Gur Yoo

    2015-09-01

    Deep sea water (DSW) has health benefits and is widely used as food supplement; however, its effect in fermented products has not been explored. Here, we investigated the effect of DSW-containing yogurt on health-related serum parameters and intestinal microbiota in mice. Animals were assigned to 3 feeding groups, which received water (control), normal yogurt (N-yogurt), or DSW-containing yogurt (DSW-yogurt) with a basal diet. Mice were killed at wk 4 or 8 of feeding and analyzed for serum parameters and microbial population in the small intestine. Both yogurt groups demonstrated increased populations of intestinal lactic acid bacteria compared with the control group. The activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase was markedly decreased in the DSW-yogurt and N-yogurt groups, and triglyceride level tended to be lower in the DSW-yogurt group compared with that in the control mice. Furthermore, the DSW-yogurt group showed a more significant decrease in the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol than did the N-yogurt group. These findings suggest that DSW supplementation of yogurt can increase its beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistent intestinal bleeding due to severe CMV-related thrombocytopenia in a preterm newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Alberto; Spaggiari, Eugenio; Cattelani, Chiara; Roversi, Maria Federica; Pecorari, Monica; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2018-05-01

    The optimal threshold for neonatal platelet transfusions in sick newborns is still uncertain. We report a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a premature neonate with severe thrombocytopenia who subsequently presented with necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal bleeding. The baby recovered after platelet transfusions were discontinued and the therapy was switched from intravenous ganciclovir to oral valganciclovir. We discuss both measures, speculating on the key role of platelet transfusions.

  6. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaozhao Lu; Danna Bai; Xiangwei Liu; Chen Zhou; Guodong Yang

    2017-01-01

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in...

  7. Gastro-jejunostomy tube related intestinal perforation in an infant presenting incidentally with a splenic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Bell

    2018-07-01

    Conclusion: While complications from GJTs are well described, this case uniquely highlights the risk of intestinal perforation from GJT, with a delayed and subtle presentation. We suggest that patients, specifically those under 12 months of age and weighing under 10 kg, be monitored closely for complications post-operatively, and the use of modified GJTs with jejunal limbs employing smaller/thinner feeding tubes that are placed well beyond LOT be strongly considered.

  8. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, N; Ganesh, R; Sankar, Janani; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi

    2009-10-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disease of intestinal lymphatics presenting with hypoproteinemia, bilateral lower limb edema, ascites, and protein losing enteropathy. We report a series of 4 children from Chennai, India presenting with anasarca, recurrent diarrhea, hypoproteinemia and confirmatory features of PIL on endoscopy and histopathology.

  9. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  10. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker

    2013-01-01

    [± SD] age 15.3 ± 1.3 years) and 10 controls (10.3 ± 1.6 years) were studied. In patients with active disease, fasting levels of GLP-2 remained stable but postprandial levels were reduced. Patients with active disease exhibited reduced glucose absorption and increased lactulose⁄mannitol recovery; all......  BACKGROUND⁄/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release...... of the small intestine) with a disease activity index >150. Fasting and postprandial GLP-2 levels and quantitative urinary recovery of orally administered 3-O-methyl-glucose (active transport) and lactulose⁄mannitol (passive) were quantified during the acute and remission phases. RESULTS: Seven patients (mean...

  11. Increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules and endotoxemia in patients with chronic alcohol abuse in different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Schütz, Tanja

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: No information is yet available about the influence of alcohol abuse on the translocation of larger molecules (Mr>1200) through the intestinal mucosa in man. The present study aimed to determine the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in patients with chronic alcohol abuse...... and mild to more advanced stages of liver disease, and to measure the concentration of endotoxins in the plasma, as these compounds derive from the intestinal flora and are suspected to contribute to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: The permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400......, Mr 1500, Mr 4000, and Mr 10,000 and endotoxin plasma concentrations were measured in 54 patients with alcoholic liver disease, 19 of them with cirrhosis, and in 30 non-alcoholic healthy controls. RESULTS: Permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400 was found to be unchanged in patients with ALD...

  12. Relationship between intestinal permeability to [51Cr]EDTA and inflammatory activity in asymptomatic patients with Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pironi, L.; Miglioli, M.; Ruggeri, E.; Levorato, M.; Dallasta, M.A.; Corbelli, C.; Nibali, M.G.; Barbara, L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between intestinal permeability to an oral dose (100 mu Ci) of [51CR]EDTA and the inflammatory activity of Crohn's disease was studied in 63 adult patients (32 unresected and 31 resected) who underwent 162 evaluations. The results of the [51CR]EDTA test were compared with the serum levels of the acute-phase reactant proteins (APRP) and with the result of the [111In]leukocyte scanning, respectively, as an indirect and direct method to assess intestinal inflammation. In a group of healthy adult controls, the upper normal value for the 24-hr urinary [51CR]EDTA excretion was 3.61 (97.5% percentile) and the mean coefficient of variation was 21%. Sensitivity and specificity of the [51CR]EDTA test in identifying active inflammation expressed by increased serum levels of APRP were, respectively, 97% and 54% in the unresected group and 68% and 52% in the resected group of patients. The low specificity of the test was due to the presence of increased [51CR]EDTA urinary excretion in about half the cases with normal serum levels of APRP. The [111In]leukocyte scanning was performed in a subgroup of 11 patients (three unresected and eight resected) with normal serum levels of APRP, six with increased and five with normal [51CR]EDTA urinary excretion. All six patients with increased intestinal permeability had a positive 111In image of mild to moderate degree of activity. A positive 111In scan was present in two of the five patients with normal permeability; these were two resected patients

  13. IgG4-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Klöppel, Günter

    2018-01-01

    disease (IgG4-RD). The histologic key findings are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells combined with storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis. Among the organs mainly affected by IgG4-RD are the pancreas and the extrahepatic bile ducts. The pancreatic and biliary...... alterations have been described under the terms autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. These diseases are currently more precisely called IgG4-related pancreatitis (or type 1 AIP to distinguish it from type 2 AIP that is unrelated to IgG4-RD) and IgG4-related sclerosing...... cholangitis (IgG4-related SC). Clinically and grossly, both diseases commonly imitate pancreatic and biliary adenocarcinoma, tumors that are well known for their dismal prognosis. As IgG4-RD responds to steroid treatment, making a resection of a suspected tumor unnecessary, a biopsy is often required...

  14. Asbestos-related pleuropulmonary diseases: iconographic essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavo de Souza Portes Meirelles; Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares; Nery, Luiz Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the main imaging findings of asbestos-related diseases. Pleural and pulmonary asbestos-related diseases range from benign conditions, like pleural effusion and pleural plaques, to some neoplasias, such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. Pleural effusion is the earliest finding after asbestos exposure, but the imaging findings are not specific. Diffuse pleural thickening involves the visceral pleura and pleural plaques are considered to be hallmarks of exposure. Asbestosis is the pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos. Rounded atelectasis is a peripheral lung collapse in these individuals, generally related to pleural disease. Some neoplasias, like lung carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma, are more prevalent in asbestos-exposed subjects. (author)

  15. Measurement of intestinal permeability using mannitol and lactulose in children with diarrheal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Barboza Jr.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The excretion ratio of lactulose/mannitol in urine has been used to assess the extension of malabsorption and impairment of intestinal permeability. The recovery of lactulose and mannitol in urine was employed to evaluate intestinal permeability in children with and without diarrhea. Lactulose and mannitol probes were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPLC-PAD. Two groups of solutions containing 60 µM sugars were prepared. Group I consisted of glucosamine, mannitol, melibiose and lactulose, and group II of inositol, sorbitol, glucose and lactose. In the study of intra-experiment variation, a sample of 50 µl from each group was submitted to 4 successive determinations. The recovered amounts and retention times of each sugar showed a variation 97%. In the study of inter-experiment variation, we prepared 4 independent samples from groups I and II at the following concentrations: 1.0, 0.3, 0.1, 0.03 and 0.01 mM. The amounts of the sugars recovered varied by 99%. Retention (k', selectivity (a and efficiency (N were used to assess the chromatographic conditions. All three parameters were in the normal range. Children with diarrhea presented a greater lactulose/mannitol ratio compared to children without diarrhea.

  16. The Effect of Gluten-free Diet on Clinical Symptoms and the Intestinal Mucosa of Patients With Potential Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandile, Roberta; Discepolo, Valentina; Scapaticci, Serena; Del Vecchio, Maria Rosaria; Maglio, Maria Antonia; Greco, Luigi; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Renata

    2018-04-01

    In this prospective study, we evaluated the effect of gluten-free diet (GFD) in a cohort of 65 children with potential celiac disease. Patients received GFD for signs/symptoms (N = 47) or parents' choice (N = 18). Most frequent signs/symptoms were low body mass index (36%), recurrent abdominal pain (34%), and diarrhea (19%). Of the 35/47 patients followed-up on GFD, only 54% (19/35) showed a complete clinical response. In 9 of 65 patients an intestinal biopsy was also performed after at least 1 year of GFD. No significant differences were observed in terms of Marsh grade (P = 0.33), lamina propria CD25+ cells (P = 0.80), CD3+ (P = 0.9), and γδ+ (P = 0.59) intraepithelial lymphocytes density and intestinal anti-TG2 deposits (P = 0.60). In conclusion, caution is necessary before attributing all symptoms to gluten in this condition.

  17. Regulation of growth, intestinal microbiota, non-specific immune response and disease resistance of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) in biofloc systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinghua; Ren, Yichao; Li, Yuquan; Xia, Bin

    2018-06-01

    Bioflocs are not only a source of supplemental nutrition but also provide substantial probiotic bacteria and bioactive compounds, which play an important role in improving physiological health of aquatic organisms. A 60-day experiment was conducted to investigate the growth, intestinal microbiota, non-specific immune response and disease resistance of sea cucumber in biofloc systems with different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose and starch). Control (no biofloc) and three biofloc systems were set up, and each group has three replicates. The results showed that biofloc volume (BFV) and total suspended solids (TSS) increased in the sequences of glucose > sucrose > starch and green sea cucumber > white sea cucumber during the experiment. The highest specific growth rates (SGRs) were observed in biofloc system with glucose as carbon source, which also had relatively lower glucose, lactate and cortisol levels in coelomic fluid and higher glycogen content in muscle compared to other groups. There were significant increased Bacillus and Lactobacillus counts of sea cucumber intestine in biofloc systems, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) also showed obvious ascending trends. Significant increases in total coelomocytes counts (TCC), phagocytosis, respiratory burst, complement C3 content and lysozyme (LSZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities of sea cucumber were all found in biofloc system (glucose). The expression patterns of most immune-related genes (i.e. Hsp90, Hsp70, c-type lectin (CL), toll-like receptor (TLR)) were up-regulated, suggesting the promotion of pathogen recognition ability and immune signaling pathways activation by biofloc. Furthermore, green and white sea cucumber had significantly higher survival rates in biofloc systems during the 14-day challenge test. In conclusion, biofloc technology could improve growth and physiological health of A. japonicus, by optimizing intestinal

  18. [Renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) are related to a number of rare autosomal-dominant disorders which has been known as May-Hegglin disease, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome. Their common clinical features are congenital macrothrombocytopaenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies, in addition to a variable risk of developing proteinuria, chronic kidney disease progressing toward end stage, sensorineural deafness and presenile cataracts. The term MYH9 related disease (MYH9-RD) describes the variable expression of a single illness encompassing all previously mentioned hereditary disorders. Renal involvement in MYH9- RD has been observed in 30% of patients. Mutant MYH9 protein, expressed in podocytes, mesangial and tubular cells, plays a main role in foot process effacement and in development of nephropathy. Interestingly, the MYH9 gene is currently under investigation also for his possible contribution to many other non-hereditary glomerulopathies such as focal global glomerulosclerosis (hypertensive nephrosclerosis), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C1q nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy. In this review we are aimed to describe renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders, from the hereditary disease to the acquired disorders, in which MYH9-gene acts as a "renal failure susceptibility gene". Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  19. Anaesthetic management of a patient with microvillus inclusion disease for intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Luis J; Santamaría, Manuel López; Gámez, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    We report the anaesthetic management of a 3-year-old-child with microvillus inclusion disease undergoing isolated small bowel transplantation. He required long-term total parenteral nutrition which was complicated with numerous episodes of catheter related sepsis. This resulted in thrombosis of the major blood vessels which critically restricted vascular access available for intravenous nutrition, becoming a life-threatening condition for the patient. Haemodynamic, respiratory parameters and urinary output were well preserved throughout the procedure. Besides a transitory increase in potassium following graft revascularization, biochemical changes were small. Anaesthetic management included comprehensive preoperative assessment, central venous angiography to depict accessibility of central and peripheral veins, assurance of additional vascular access through the intraoperative catheterization of the left renal vein, perioperative epidural analgesia and preservation of splanchnic perfusion to ensure implant viability.

  20. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  1. Gut bacteria in health and disease: a survey on the interface between intestinal microbiology and colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tjalsma, H.

    2012-01-01

    A healthy human body contains at least tenfold more bacterial cells than human cells and the most abundant and diverse microbial community resides in the intestinal tract. Intestinal health is not only maintained by the human intestine itself and by dietary factors, but is also largely supported by

  2. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD.

  3. Application of genomic densitometry for calculating the relative population of Escherichia Coli in the intestine of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Seidavi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the densitometry technique for calculating of the relative population of Escherichia coli in various segments of the intestine of broiler chicks was evaluated. Following preparation of the intestinal contents, the process of extraction and purification of DNA from the contents of duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum was undertaken. A specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR using two pairs of primers was employed to detect Escherichia coli and total bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tract of the chicks. Specific bands of E.coli were obtained using densitometry and Gel Proc Analyzer software based on linear regression with extrapolation. E.coli populations at different ages were also determined in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract of the chicks. The Results of this experiment indicated that 0.000004%, 0.07%, 0.64% and 2.51% of total bacteria present in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum respectively consisted of E.coli. Also, E.coli constitutes 1.76, 0.01 and 0.80% of the total intestinal bacteria of chicks at 4, 14 and 30 days of age respectively. Furthermore, it was shown that at 4 days of age, 0.30, 2.05 and 3.97% of the total bacteria present in the jejunum, ileum and cecum respectively were from E.coli species and this bacteria was absent in the duodenum. At 14 days of age these figures were 0.000009%, 0.00011% and 0.08% respectively while at 30 days of age 0.00011%, 0.009% and 2.40% of all bacteria in the duodenum, ileum and cecum were E.coli species and this bacteria was absent in the jejunum. In conclusion, the densitometry method based on PCR results can be regarded as a useful tool for densitometry the relative population E.coli in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry.

  4. Translocation of Candida albicans is related to the blood flow of individual intestinal villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, L; Alexander, J W; Fukushima, R; Childress, C P

    1993-08-01

    Splanchnic ischemia is associated with increased bacterial translocation, but previous observations showed that translocation of Candida albicans did not occur uniformly among individual intestinal villi. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the degree of Candida translocation and the microcirculation of individual villi. Thiry-Vella intestinal loops were created in eight guinea pigs. One week later, the distal aorta and right carotid artery were cannulated, and systemic blood pressure was recorded throughout the entire experiment. C. albicans (1 x 10(10)) was introduced into the Thiry-Vella loop, and the animals underwent a 40% full-thickness burn. Systolic hypotension was observed in the first 75 minutes postburn; then the systemic blood pressure returned to a normal range. Four hours after burn, 8 x 10(7) microspheres (10 microns) were injected into the aorta. The animals were sacrificed, and the Thiry-Vella loops were harvested and processed for light microscopy. At the microscopic level, within each villus, both the number of beads trapped in the arterioles and the number of Candida translocated into the enterocytes were counted. An inverse linear correlation between number of beads and number of translocated yeast per individual villus was found (r = -0.78; P flow is an important determinant of the magnitude of microbial translocation, even within individual villi.

  5. Dysbiosis of Intestinal Microbiota and Decreased Antimicrobial Peptide Level in Paneth Cells during Hypertriglyceridemia-Related Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlan Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG aggravates the course of acute pancreatitis (AP. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of AP during which dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota contributes to the dysfunction in intestinal barrier. However, few studies focus on the changes in intestine during HTG-related acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Here, we investigated the changes in intestinal microbiota and Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in HTG-related ANP (HANP in rats. Rats fed a high-fat diet to induce HTG and ANP was induced by retrograde injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct. Rats were sacrificed at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Pancreatic and ileal injuries were evaluated by histological scores. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by plasma diamine oxidase activity and D-lactate level. Systemic and intestinal inflammation was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-17A expression. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing was used to investigate changes in intestinal microbiota diversity and structure. AMPs (α-defensin5 and lysozyme expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunofluorescence. The results showed that compared with those of normal-lipid ANP (NANP groups, the HANP groups had more severe histopathological injuries in pancreas and distal ileum, aggravated intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-17A expression in plasma and distal ileum. Principal component analysis showed structural segregation between the HANP and NANP group. α-Diversity estimators in the HANP group revealed decreased microbiota diversity compared with that in NANP group. Taxonomic analysis showed dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota structure. In the HANP group, at phyla level, Candidatus_Saccharibacteria and Tenericutes decreased significantly, whereas Actinobacteria increased. At genus level, Allobaculum, Bifidobacterium

  6. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  7. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  8. Distinct Histopathologic and Molecular Alterations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Associated Intestinal Adenocarcinoma: c-MYC Amplification is Common and Associated with Mucinous/Signet Ring Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Douglas J; Binion, David G; Regueiro, Miguel D; Miller, Caitlyn; Herbst, Cameron; Pai, Reetesh K

    2018-05-17

    Chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of intestinal adenocarcinoma. The underlying molecular alterations in IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma remain largely unknown. We compared the clinicopathologic and molecular features of 35 patients with 47 IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinomas with a consecutive series of 451 patients with sporadic colorectal carcinoma identified at our institution and published data on sporadic colorectal carcinoma. c-MYC amplification was the most frequent molecular alteration identified in 33% of IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma that is a significantly higher frequency than in sporadic colorectal carcinoma (8%) (P = 0.0001). Compared to sporadic colorectal carcinoma, IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinomas more frequently demonstrated mucinous differentiation (60% vs 25%, P < 0.001) and signet ring cell differentiation (28% vs 4%, P < 0.001). Mucinous and signet ring cell differentiation were significantly associated with the presence of c-MYC amplification (both with P < 0.05). HER2 positivity (11%), KRAS exon 2 or 3 mutation (10%), and IDH1 mutation (7%) were less commonly observed in IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma. There was an association between poor survival and HER2 status with 3 of 4 patients having HER2-positive adenocarcinoma dead of disease at last clinical follow-up; however, no statistically significant survival effect was identified for any of the molecular alterations identified. We demonstrate that IBD-associated intestinal adenocarcinomas have a high frequency of c-MYC amplification that is associated with mucinous and signet ring cell differentiation. Many of the identified molecular alterations have potential therapeutic relevance, including HER2 amplification, IDH1 mutation, and low frequency KRAS mutation.

  9. Histopathological and electron microscopic studies of lymphangiectasia of the small intestine in Behçet's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hitoshi; Morita, Akira; Morishita, Tetsuo; Tsuchiya, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yoonosuke; Enomoto, Yasuhiro

    1973-01-01

    The gastrointestinal involvement and immunological findings in 16 patients with Behçet's disease are described. Four of 15 biopsy specimens of jejunal mucosa showed marked lymphangiectasia in the lamina propria similar to the appearance which was thought to be a characteristic finding in protein-losing enteropathy. None of the patients had hypoproteinaemia. Increases in serum immunoglobulin IgA were proved in six of 15 cases; in IgM, five of 15; and in IgG, one of 15. Electron microscopic studies showed that there were thousands of precipitated lymph protein bodies in the extracellular spaces of the lamina propria. Ulcers and healed ulcers of the large intestine were studied by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4700433

  10. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyse the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in a population of automobile mechanics. The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos-related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers; who in the case of disagreement discussed until they reached agreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Pleural plaques were observed in five cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in one case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers.

  11. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyze the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on HRCT in a population of automobile mechanics. Methods The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos–related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers, with further consensus in the case of disagreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Results Pleural plaques were observed in 5 cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in 1 case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. Conclusions The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers. PMID:21965465

  12. Metabolic, endocrine, and related bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Bone is living tissue, and old bone is constantly removed and replaced with new bone. Normally this exchange is in balance, and the mineral content remains relatively constant. This balance may be disturbed as a result of certain metabolic and endocrinologic disorders. The term dystrophy, referring to a disturbance of nutrition, is applied to metabolic and endocrine bone diseases and should be distinguished from the term dysplasia, referring to a disturbance of bone growth. The two terms are easily confused but are not interchangeable. Metabolic bone disease is caused by endocrine imbalance, vitamin deficiency or excess, and other disturbances in bone metabolism leading to osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  13. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody is not useful to differentiate between Crohn′s disease and intestinal tuberculosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoshal U

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological parameters of intestinal tuberculosis (IT and Crohn′s disease (CD are so similar that differentiation between these two diseases, which require different treatment, is difficult. Anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA, which is often present in the sera of patients with CD, may be potentially useful to differentiate CD from IT. Aim : To evaluate the role of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for ASCA in serum in differentiating CD from intestinal tuberculosis. Settings and Design : Prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with IT, 16 CD, 36 UC diagnosed using standard parameters and 12 controls (11 healthy subjects and one with colonic carcinoma were tested for IgG ASCA in serum. Statistical Analysis Used : Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi-square test with Yates′ correction, as applicable. Continuous variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results : Eight of 16 (50% patients with IT, 10 of 16 with CD (62%, nine of 35 with UC (26% and one of 12 controls tested positive for ASCA in serum. Though the frequency of ASCA in serum was comparable among patients with IT and CD (8/16 vs. 10/16, P = ns, IT and UC (8/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, CD and UC (10/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, its frequency in CD or IT but not in UC was higher than healthy controls ( P < 0.01. Conclusions : Serum ASCA is unlikely to be useful to differentiate between CD and IT in India.

  14. Smoking is associated with extra-intestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Severs; S.J.H. van Erp; M.E. van der Valk (Mirthe); M.J.J. Mangen; M. Fidder (Melissa); M. van der Have (Mike); A.A. van Bodegraven (Ad); D.J. de Jong; C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M. Romberg-Camps (Mariëlle); P.R. Clemens (Paula ); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); P.C. van de Meeberg (Paul); N. Mahmmod (Nofel); C.Y. Ponsioen (Cyril); C. Bolwerkm; J.R. Vermeijden (J. Reinoud); M. Pierik (Marieke); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M. Leenders (Max); A.E. van der Meulen-de Jong (Andrea); G. Dijkstra (Gerard); B. Oldenburg (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aims: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: We cross-sectionally

  15. Bariumexaminations of the small intestine and the colon in inflammatory bowel disease; Konventionelle Duenn- und Dickdarmdiagnostik bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antes, G. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Klinikum Kempten-Oberallgaeu g, GmbH, Kempten (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the possibilities of conventional radiography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine and colon.Material and methods For more than 25 years we examine the small bowel employing enteroclysis with barium and methylcellulose and the colon with the usual double-contrast method. In the last 152 months 1560 small bowel enemas were performed. In the last 40 months 410 examinations of the colon were performed. There is a thirty percent decrease in enteroclysis examinations within the past 5 years,however, the rate of examinations with positive results increased from 46 to 57%.The proportion of the inflammatory small intestinal diseases (not only Crohn's disease) remained constant with 18%.Concerning the examinations of the colon for inflammatory disease we confirmed the diagnosis in seven cases.The radiation exposure for the enteroclysis in inflammatory diseases was 7mSv, for colon examinations 14 mSv. Barium examinations, especially of the stomach and colon are decreasing in frequency.Therefore the art of performance and interpretation might get lost.Enteroclysis, however, is still the method of reference for the other imaging methods.The advantages compared to the other imaging methods are the excellent presentation of the details of the mucosal surface and the observation of functional disorders. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll die Moeglichkeiten der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik an Duenndarm und Kolon bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen aufzeigen.Material und Methoden Seit mehr als 25 Jahren untersuchen wir den Duenndarm mit dem Enteroklysma mit Barium und Methylzellulose und das Kolon mit der ueblichen Doppelkontrastmethode. In den letzten 152 Monaten wurden 1560 Duenndarmuntersuchungen durchgefuehrt. In den letzten 40 Monaten erfolgten 410 Kolonuntersuchungen.Ergebnisse Bei den Duenndarmuntersuchungen wurde in den letzten 5 Jahren ein Rueckgang um 30% beobachtet

  16. Changes in Intestinal Gene Expression of Zebrafish (Danio rerio Related to Sterol Uptake and Excretion upon β-Sitosterol Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Takase

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of fishmeal with plant ingredients will introduce not only plant oil and protein but also phytosterol to the fish diet. Mammals strictly restrict the uptake of phytosterol at intestinal epithelial cells by regulating the gene expressions of sterol uptake and excretion proteins; however, phytosterol is found in the fish muscle and other organs. In order to assess the ability of phytosterol uptake by the intestinal epithelial cells of fish, no-sterol diet, cholesterol-, and β-sitosterol-containing diet was separately administered to zebrafish, and the relative mRNA expressions related to sterol uptake and excretion were evaluated. Gene expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like protein 1 in the sitosterol-fed group was significantly higher than that of the cholesterol-fed group (p < 0.05. The expression of apolipoprotein A-I gene was also higher in the sitosterol-fed group than that in the no-sterol and cholesterol-fed groups. The expressions of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G, member 5 and 8, were significantly higher in the sitosterol-fed group, compared to the no-sterol group. Regarding the gene expression of ATP-binding cassette sub-family A, member 1, the sitosterol-fed group showed higher expression level compared to the other groups (p < 0.01. These results suggest that fish should be tolerant to phytosterols in contrast to mammals.

  17. A Pilot Study on the Noninvasive Evaluation of Intestinal Damage in Celiac Disease Using I-FABP and L-FABP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; Vreugdenhil, Atita C. E.; Van den Neucker, Anita M.; Grootjans, Joep; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Damoiseaux, Jan G. M. C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.

    Background and Goals: In the clinical management of celiac disease, new noninvasive tools for evaluation of intestinal damage are needed for diagnosis and for follow-up of diet effects. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are potentially useful for this purpose as these arc small cytosolic proteins

  18. IgG4-Related Perineural Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Inoue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To elucidate characteristics of IgG4-related disease involving the peripheral nervous system. Methods. Retrospective review of 106 patients with IgG4-related disease identified 21 peripheral nerve lesions in 7 patients. Clinicopathological and radiological features were examined. Results. Peripheral nerve lesions were commonly identified in orbital or paravertebral area, involving orbital (=9, optic (=4, spinal (=7, and great auricular nerves (=1. The predominant radiological feature was a distinct perineural soft tissue mass, ranging 8 to 30 mm in diameter. Histologically, the epineurium was preferentially involved by massive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4+ plasma cells. All lesions were neurologically asymptomatic and steroid-responsive at the first presentation, but one recurrent lesion around the optic nerve caused failing vision. Conclusion. IgG4-related disease of the peripheral nervous system is characterized by orbital or paravertebral localization, perineural mass formation, and rare neurologic symptoms. The term “IgG4-related perineural disease” seems appropriate to describe this entity.

  19. A Disease-Associated Microbial and Metabolomics State in Relatives of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Goudarzi, Maryam; Singh, Namita; Tong, Maomeng; McHardy, Ian H; Ruegger, Paul; Asadourian, Miro; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Ayson, Allyson; Borneman, James; McGovern, Dermot P B; Fornace, Albert J; Braun, Jonathan; Dubinsky, Marla

    2016-11-01

    Microbes may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by producing bioactive metabolites that affect immune activity and epithelial function. We undertook a family based study to identify microbial and metabolic features of IBD that may represent a predisease risk state when found in healthy first-degree relatives. Twenty-one families with pediatric IBD were recruited, comprising 26 Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission, 10 ulcerative colitis patients in clinical remission, and 54 healthy siblings/parents. Fecal samples were collected for 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics, and calprotectin measurement. Individuals were grouped into microbial and metabolomics states using Dirichlet multinomial models. Multivariate models were used to identify microbes and metabolites associated with these states. Individuals were classified into 2 microbial community types. One was associated with IBD but irrespective of disease status, had lower microbial diversity, and characteristic shifts in microbial composition including increased Enterobacteriaceae, consistent with dysbiosis. This microbial community type was associated similarly with IBD and reduced microbial diversity in an independent pediatric cohort. Individuals also clustered bioinformatically into 2 subsets with shared fecal metabolomics signatures. One metabotype was associated with IBD and was characterized by increased bile acids, taurine, and tryptophan. The IBD-associated microbial and metabolomics states were highly correlated, suggesting that they represented an integrated ecosystem. Healthy relatives with the IBD-associated microbial community type had an increased incidence of elevated fecal calprotectin. Healthy first-degree relatives can have dysbiosis associated with an altered intestinal metabolome that may signify a predisease microbial susceptibility state or subclinical inflammation. Longitudinal prospective

  20. IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzalla Cassione, Emanuele; Stone, John H

    2017-05-01

    Remarkable insights have been gleaned recently with regard to the pathophysiology of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). These findings have direct implications for the development of targeted strategies for the treatment of this condition. Oligoclonal expansions of cells of both the B and T lymphocyte lineages are present in the blood of patients with IgG4-RD. Oligoclonal expansions of plasmablasts are a good biomarker for disease activity. An oligoclonally expanded population of CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes is found not only in the peripheral blood but also at tissue sites of active disease. This cell elaborates cytokines that may drive the fibrosis characteristic of IgG4-RD. T follicular helper cells (Tfhc), particularly the Tfhc2 subset, appear to play a major role in driving the class switch to IgG4 that typifies this disease. The relationship between malignancy and IgG4-RD remains an area of interest. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of IgG4-RD have proceeded swiftly, leading to the identification of a number of potential targeted treatment strategies. The completion of classification criteria for IgG4-RD, an effort supported jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism, will further facilitate studies on this disease.

  1. Amebiasis intestinal Intestinal amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIO CÉSAR GÓMEZ

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica es el patógeno intestinal más frecuente en nuestro medio -después de Giardia lamblia-, una de las principales causas de diarrea en menores de cinco años y la cuarta causa de muerte en el mundo debida a infección por protozoarios. Posee mecanismos patogénicos complejos que le permiten invadir la mucosa intestinal y causar colitis amebiana. El examen microscópico es el método más usado para su identificación pero la existencia de dos especies morfológicamente iguales, una patógena ( E. histolytica y una no patógena ( Entamoeba dispar, ha llevado al desarrollo de otros métodos de diagnóstico. El acceso al agua potable y los servicios sanitarios adecuados, un tratamiento médico oportuno y el desarrollo de una vacuna, son los ejes para disminuir la incidencia y mortalidad de esta entidad.Entamoeba histolytica is the most frequent intestinal pathogen seen in our country, after Giardia lamblia, being one of the main causes of diarrhea in children younger than five years of age, and the fourth leading cause of death due to infection for protozoa in the world. It possesses complex pathogenic mechanisms that allow it to invade the intestinal mucosa, causing amoebic colitis. Microscopy is the most used method for its identification, but the existence of two species morphologically identical, the pathogen one ( E. histolytica, and the non pathogen one ( E. dispar, have taken to the development of other methods of diagnosis. The access to drinkable water and appropriate sanitary services, an opportune medical treatment, and the development of a vaccine are the axes to diminish the incidence and mortality of this entity.

  2. Differences in the location and activity of intestinal Crohn's disease lesions between adult and paediatric patients detected with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccioni, Francesca; Carrozzo, Federica; Pino, Anna Rosaria; Staltari, Ilaria; Ansari, Najwa Al; Marini, Mario; Viola, Franca; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Vestri, Annarita; Signore, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively compare paediatric patients (PP) and adult patients (AP) affected by Crohn's disease (CD) in terms of the location and activity of intestinal lesions. Forty-three children (mean age 15 years) and 43 adults (mean age 48 years) with proven CD underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to localise lesions and detect their activity in 9 segments of the small and large bowel. The results were analysed on a per patient and per segment basis. Ileo-colonoscopy was performed in all patients. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Involvement of terminal ileum was significantly different in the two groups: observed in 100 % of AP (43/43) versus 58 % (23/43) of PP (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the colon was diseased in 84 % of PP versus 64 % of AP. In particular, left colonic segments were significantly more involved in PP (descending colon 53 % versus 21 %, P < 0.01; rectum 67 % versus 23 %, P < 0.0001; sigmoid colon 56 % versus 37 %, not significant), whereas caecal involvement was equal in both groups. In children the maximal disease activity was found in left colonic segments, whereas in adults it was in the terminal ileum. MRE detected significant differences between the two populations, showing a more extensive and severe involvement of the left colon in children but the distal ileum in adults. (orig.)

  3. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD is an increasingly recognized immune-mediated condition comprised of a collection of disorders that share specific pathological, serological, and clinical features. IgG4-RD is a fibroinflammatory condition with a tendency to form tumors with inflammatory infiltrate with IgG4 rich plasma cells and elevation of serum IgG4, which may affect virtually every organ and tissue. IgG4-related ophthalmic disease may present as dacryoadenitis, myositis, or involvement of other orbital tissue. Hypophysitis or pachymeningitis may manifest as cranial neuropathies. The diagnosis of IgG4-RD is based on a typical clinical scenario, supportive laboratory test, expected radiological characteristics, and distinct histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressives form the mainline treatment.

  4. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Takano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  5. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  6. Human intestinal parasites in crusader Acre: Evidence for migration with disease in the medieval period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Piers D; Anastasiou, Evilena; Syon, Danny

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this research is to highlight the role of ancient parasites as evidence for human migration in past populations. The material analysed was soil sediment from the excavation of a medieval cesspool in the city of Acre, in Israel. Archaeological stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of a fragment of animal bone from the cesspool confirm its use in the 13th century CE, during the crusader period. At that time Acre was located in the Frankish Kingdom of Jerusalem. Soil samples from the cesspool were analysed and eggs of the roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) and fish tapeworm (Diphyllobothrium latum) were identified. The fish tapeworm has only been found in the mainland Near East once before, in a latrine of the crusader Order of St. John (Knights Hospitaller). It has been absent in all earlier cesspools, latrines and coprolites so far studied in the region. In contrast to its rarity in the Levant, the fish tapeworm was common in northern Europe during the medieval period. The presence of fish tapeworm eggs in a crusader period cesspool in Acre suggests its use by crusaders or pilgrims from northern Europe who travelled to the Levant carrying these parasites in their intestines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  8. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colostomy ) is required to relieve an obstruction. Understanding Colostomy In a colostomy, the large intestine (colon) is cut. The part ... 1 What Causes Intestinal Strangulation? Figure 2 Understanding Colostomy Gastrointestinal Emergencies Overview of Gastrointestinal Emergencies Abdominal Abscesses ...

  9. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn’s disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut.To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated,...

  10. Oedema disease is associated with metabolic acidosis and small intestinal acidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Weijgert, van de E.; Grootendorst, A.F.; Niewold, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of oedema disease (OD). Oedema disease is caused by specific enterotoxemic Escherichia coli (SLTIIv-toxin producing) strains; however, the same strains are also found in non-afflicted pigs. Furthermore, it is unclear how the

  11. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune

  12. Prebiotic Supplementation has Only Minimal Effects on Growth Efficiency, Intestinal Health and Disease Resistance of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi Fed 30% Soybean Meal

    OpenAIRE

    Sealey, Wendy M.; Conley, Zachariah B.; Bensley, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Prebiotics have successfully been used to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture and there is an increasing amount of literature that suggests that these products can also improve alternative protein utilization and digestion. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether prebiotic supplementation increased the growth efficiency, intestinal health, and disease resistance of cutthroat trout fed a high level of dietary soybean meal. To achieve this objective, juvenile Westsl...

  13. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S; Medland, Julia E; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-12-15

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S.; Medland, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. PMID:26451004

  15. Endometriose intestinal: uma doença benigna? Bowel endometriosis: a benign disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Bassi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A despeito do caráter benigno da endometriose, estima-se que 1% dos casos esteja relacionado com câncer, especialmente quando ambas as condições ocorrem nos ovários. Lesões extra-ovarianas encontradas no septo retovaginal, cólon, bexiga, vagina e peritônio da região pélvica também já foram associadas com neoplasias malignas. Várias características do tecido endometrial ectópico o aproximam do fenótipo neoplásico, e a própria endometriose possui comportamento tipicamente neoplásico com capacidade de invasão do estroma adjacente e associação com lesões à distância. Esta revisão atualiza conhecimentos diagnósticos, clínicos e terapêuticos dos implantes intestinais de tecido endometriótico, bem como sua relação com processos neoplásicos para melhor compreensão de seu caráter benigno ou de seu eventual potencial para malignidade.Endometriosis is generally assumed to be a benign disease, but it is estimated that 1% of cases are associated with cancer, especially when both conditions are present in the ovary. Extra-ovarian lesions in the rectovaginal septum, colon, bladder, vagina and peritoneum were already associated with malign neoplasia. Several characteristics of endometrial tissue are very similar to the neoplasia phenotype. Endometriosis itself typically behaves as a neoplasia process, spreading over adjacent stroma and being associated with distant lesions. This is an update on the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic knowledge of, management of bowel implants of endometrial tissue, as well as the relation with neoplastic processes to better understand its benign nature or eventual potential for malignancy.

  16. How patients experience the surroundings in relation to patient participation: a qualitative study of inpatients with intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyssen GD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gunvor Dichmann Thyssen, Anne BeckDepartment of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkIntroduction: Patient participation is known to improve patients' motivation, compliance, treatment results, and satisfaction with the received care. It is well known that the physical environment is of great importance in supporting patient involvement. A systematic literature search has shown a lack of articles on the subject of “surroundings” in relation to patient participation, for all patient groups.Aim: We aimed to investigate how patients with intestinal failure experience their hospital surroundings in relation to patient participation.Methods: The study included eight patients admitted for at least 2 weeks at the Intestinal Failure Unit, H8, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Included patients had a good level of consciousness with no confusion. The included patients participated in a semistructured interview. The interviews were analyzed using Malterud's principles of systematic text condensation.Results: The patients described that the surroundings enabled them to participate in their treatment and care. The surroundings made it possible for them and encouraged them to participate through: the possibility to seek and get information and the possibility to participate in daily activities. This led to a feeling of independence, reassurance, normality, control, responsibility, and confidence.Conclusion: The findings in this study indicate that the hospital surroundings are essential for the patients with respect to their ability to participate in their own care and treatment. The surroundings, in relation to patient participation, should be considered when planning and organizing nursing care. Further research is needed to increase the understanding of the surroundings in relation to patient participation - this research could, for eg, include the nurse's perspective

  17. Steroid-responsive IgG4-related disease with isolated prostatic involvement: An unusual presentation with elevated serum PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune prostatitis is known to occur as a part of multisystem fibro-inflammatory disorder known as IgG4 related disease (IgG4 RD. The usual presentation is with symptoms of gastro-intestinal disease with prostatic involvement presenting as lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease responds to corticosteroids. We report an asymptomatic young man who was diagnosed to have IgG4 related prostatitis on TRUS-guided prostate biopsy done for elevated serum PSA, in the absence of any other systemic involvement. The treatment with steroid resulted in normalization of S PSA levels.

  18. Is tremor related to celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameghino, Lucia; Rossi, Malco Damian; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2017-06-14

    Neurological features in celiac disease (CD) are not rare (5%-36%), but tremor is scarcely described. Subjects with CD and healthy controls completed an online survey using WHIGET tremor rating scale. One thousand five hundred and twelve subjects completed the survey, finally 674 CD patients and 290 healthy subjects were included. A higher prevalence of tremor in CD patients was observed in comparison to controls (28% vs 14%, P tremor in CD patients with and without tremor was 25% and 20% ( P = 0.2), while in the control group it was 41% and 10% ( P tremor showed a higher frequency of family history of tremor when compared to CD patients with tremor (41.5% vs 24.6%, P = 0.03). The results suggested that tremor in CD might be more frequent and possibly related to the disease itself and not due to associated essential tremor.

  19. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P

    2012-01-01

    -up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic...... and associated diseases (rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis) in order to have a uniform definition of severity, control and risk, usable in most situations. It is based on the appropriate diagnosis, availability and accessibility of treatments, treatment responsiveness...... and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies....

  20. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, G. H.; Stone, H. B.; Bernheim, B. M.

    1913-01-01

    formed in no other way than by the activity of the intestinal mucosa and the growth of the intestinal bacteria. This material after dilution, autolysis, sterilization, and filtration produces a characteristic effect when introduced intravenously. When in toxic doses it causes a profound drop in blood pressure, general collapse, drop in temperature, salivation, vomiting, and profuse diarrhea, which is often blood-stained. Splanchnic congestion is the conspicuous feature at autopsy and shows especially in the villi of the duodenal and jejunal mucosæ. Adrenalin, during this period of low blood pressure and splanchnic congestion, will cause the usual reaction when given intravenously, but applied locally or given intravenously it causes no bleaching of the engorged intestinal mucosa. Secretin is not found in the duodenal loop fluid, and the loop material does not influence the pancreatic secretion. Intraportal injection of the toxic material gives a reaction similar to intravenous injection. Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections produce a relatively slow reaction which closely resembles the picture seen in the closed duodenal loop dog. In both cases there is a relatively slow absorption, but the splanchnic congestion and other findings, though less intense, are present in both groups. There seems, therefore, to be no escape from the conclusion that a poisonous substance is formed in this closed duodenal loop which is absorbed from it and causes intoxication and death. Injection of this toxic substance into a normal dog gives intoxication and a reaction more intense but similar to that developing in a closed-loop dog. PMID:19867644

  1. Like will to like: abundances of closely related species can predict susceptibility to intestinal colonization by pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Bärbel; Chaffron, Samuel; Käppeli, Rina; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Freedrich, Susanne; Weber, Thomas C; Kirundi, Jorum; Suar, Mrutyunjay; McCoy, Kathy D; von Mering, Christian; Macpherson, Andrew J; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is formed by a complex, yet highly characteristic microbial community. The parameters defining whether this community permits invasion of a new bacterial species are unclear. In particular, inhibition of enteropathogen infection by the gut microbiota ( = colonization resistance) is poorly understood. To analyze the mechanisms of microbiota-mediated protection from Salmonella enterica induced enterocolitis, we used a mouse infection model and large scale high-throughput pyrosequencing. In contrast to conventional mice (CON), mice with a gut microbiota of low complexity (LCM) were highly susceptible to S. enterica induced colonization and enterocolitis. Colonization resistance was partially restored in LCM-animals by co-housing with conventional mice for 21 days (LCM(con21)). 16S rRNA sequence analysis comparing LCM, LCM(con21) and CON gut microbiota revealed that gut microbiota complexity increased upon conventionalization and correlated with increased resistance to S. enterica infection. Comparative microbiota analysis of mice with varying degrees of colonization resistance allowed us to identify intestinal ecosystem characteristics associated with susceptibility to S. enterica infection. Moreover, this system enabled us to gain further insights into the general principles of gut ecosystem invasion by non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. Mice harboring high commensal E. coli densities were more susceptible to S. enterica induced gut inflammation. Similarly, mice with high titers of Lactobacilli were more efficiently colonized by a commensal Lactobacillus reuteri(RR) strain after oral inoculation. Upon examination of 16S rRNA sequence data from 9 CON mice we found that closely related phylotypes generally display significantly correlated abundances (co-occurrence), more so than distantly related phylotypes. Thus, in essence, the presence of closely related species can increase the chance of invasion of newly incoming species into the gut

  2. A mixed-methods evaluation of health-related quality of life for male veterans with and without intestinal stomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouse, Robert S; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher S; Mohler, M Jane; Rawl, Susan M; Baldwin, Carol M; Coons, Stephen Joel; McCorkle, Ruth; Ko, Clifford Y; Schmidt, C Max

    2007-12-01

    Intestinal stomas have a major impact on Cases' lives. It is essential to better understand the areas in which interventions may help to minimize the negative consequences. This was a case-control survey study using validated instruments (City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy and Short Form 36 for Veterans). Cases were accrued from Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Tucson, Indianapolis, and Los Angeles. Eligibility included a major intra-abdominal surgical procedure that led to an ostomy (cases), or a similar procedure that did not mandate a stoma (controls). Analysis included quantitative and qualitative responses. The response rate was 48 percent (511/1,063). Cases and controls had relatively similar demographic characteristics. Because of low numbers of female respondents (13 cases and 11 controls), only results for males are reported. Based on both the City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy and Short Form 36 for Veterans, cases reported significantly poorer scores on scales/domains reflecting psychologic and social functioning and well being. Additionally, cases reported poorer scores on Short Form 36 for Veterans scales reflecting physical functioning and significantly lower scores on multiple items in the social domain of the City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy compared with controls. Two-thirds of cases replied to an open-ended question on their "greatest challenge" related to their ostomy, which led to further clarification of major issues. Multiple health-related quality of life problems were reported by male veterans with intestinal stomas. The greatest differences between cases and controls were observed in the social and psychologic domains/scales. Findings from this study provide a greater understanding of the challenges faced by ostomates and will inform the development and evaluation of urgently needed intervention strategies.

  3. Clinical Factors and Disease Course Related to Diagnostic Delay in Korean Crohn's Disease Patients: Results from the CONNECT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Mo Moon

    Full Text Available Diagnostic delay frequently occurs in Crohn's disease (CD patients because of diagnostic limitations. However, diagnostic delay and its related factors remain poorly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors associated with diagnostic delay and to evaluate the impact of diagnostic delay on clinical course in a Korean CD patient cohort. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 1,047 CD patients registered in the Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort study in Korea. The mean interval of diagnostic delay was 16.0 ± 33.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at diagnosis (≥40 years (p = 0.014, concomitant upper gastrointestinal (UGI disease (p = 0.012 and penetrating disease behavior at diagnosis (p = 0.001 were positively associated with long diagnostic delay (≥18 months. During the longitudinal follow-up, long diagnostic delay was independently predictive of further development of intestinal stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.93; p = 0.017, internal fistulas (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.33; p = 0.011, and perianal fistulas (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.80; p = 0.016. However, as for the risk of abscess formation, bowel perforation, and CD-related abdominal surgery, no significant association with diagnostic delay was observed. Older age at diagnosis, UGI involvement, and penetrating behavior are associated with long diagnostic delay in Korean CD patients. Moreover, diagnostic delay is associated with an increased risk of CD-related complications such as intestinal stenosis, internal fistulas, and perianal fistulas.

  4. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn's disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut. To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated......, the AIEC-prototype strain LF82 was evaluated for its ability to adhere to ileal and colonic biopsies from CD and healthy controls (HC). Moreover, the efficacy of the non-pathogenic E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) in averting LF82 adhesion to ileal mucosa was assessed. Similar numbers of LF82 adhered to biopsies...

  5. Small bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal immunoglobulin G4-related disease mimicking carcinomators: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, Bruno; Montfort, Luc; Pierard, Frederic [Clinique St. Luc, Bouge (Belgium); Beniuga, Gabrique; Gielen, Lsabelle [Institute of Pathology and Genetics, Gosselies (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    We hereby report a case of diffuse pelvic peritoneal involvement by immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Numerous pelvic masses and nodules showing delayed enhancement on enhanced abdominal CT were found to congregate in the pelvic organs of a 57-year-old female presenting with intestinal subocclusion. The differentiation between peritoneal IgG4-RD and pelvic peritoneal carcinomatosis was only made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry performed after surgical resection. Autoimmune pancreatitis represents the historical prototype of IgG4-RD, but the spectrum of manifestations involving various organs has expanded during the last decade. In this report, we shortly review this clinical entity.

  6. Small bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal immunoglobulin G4-related disease mimicking carcinomators: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, Bruno; Montfort, Luc; Pierard, Frederic; Beniuga, Gabrique; Gielen, Lsabelle

    2014-01-01

    We hereby report a case of diffuse pelvic peritoneal involvement by immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Numerous pelvic masses and nodules showing delayed enhancement on enhanced abdominal CT were found to congregate in the pelvic organs of a 57-year-old female presenting with intestinal subocclusion. The differentiation between peritoneal IgG4-RD and pelvic peritoneal carcinomatosis was only made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry performed after surgical resection. Autoimmune pancreatitis represents the historical prototype of IgG4-RD, but the spectrum of manifestations involving various organs has expanded during the last decade. In this report, we shortly review this clinical entity.

  7. The mechanobiology of obesity and related diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Benayahu, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the state-of-knowledge in the study of the relationships between mechanical loading states in tissues and common pathophysiologies related to increase in mass of adipose tissues and/or hyperglycemia which eventually lead to obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, metabolic inflammations, certain types of cancer and other related diseases. There appears to be an interaction between the loading states in tissues and cells and these chronic conditions, as well as with factors such as age, gender and genetics of the individual. Bioengineering has made key contributions to this research field in providing technologies for cell biomechanics experimentation, microscopy and image processing, tissue engineering and multi-scale, multi-physics computational modeling. Topics at the frontier of this field of study include: the continuous monitoring of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation in response to mechanical factors such as stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and...

  8. The volatile metabolome and microbiome in pulmonary and gastro-intestinal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, M.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Omics-technologies allow detailed characterization of biochemical molecular families enabling data-driven and hypothesis-generating research. In this thesis we explore potential merits and pitfalls of such an approach by studying the volatile metabolome and microbiome in disease diagnosis,

  9. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    Both the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally; in the industrialized world up to 0.5% of the population are affected and around 4.2 million individuals suffer from IBD in Europe and North America combined. Successful engraftment in experimental colit...

  10. Dysfunction of the Intestinal Microbiome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria [4,5]. Many studies have observed imbalances or dysbioses in the GI micro- biomes of IBD patients [6-13]; in both CD and UC patients...aprote obacte ria Proteobacteri a O doribacter B acteroidetes Actinobacteria Fusobacteria Genera Families Orders Classes Phyla Crohn’s disease and

  11. Primary intestinal hodgkin′s lymphoma: An uncommon presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary intestinal lymphoma is a rare lymphoproliferative neoplasm of the small intestine. The primary nature is established on the basis of lack of evidence of lymphoma on chest X-ray, computerized tomographic scan, peripheral blood or bone marrow puncture. Tumor involvement is limited to the gastrointestinal tract, the criteria for inclusion are that the symptoms related to the small intestine are predominant or the only symptoms at the time of laparotomy. Hodgkin′s lymphoma (HL primarily in the small intestine is a rare entity and an uncommon presentation of the disease. Ileum is the more common site of infliction than the jejunum because of its abundant lymphoid follicles. Here, we present a case of primary intestinal HL, in a 30-year-old male.

  12. Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on daily life: an online survey by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Lee, Kang-Moon; Park, Soo Jung; Kim, Tae Oh; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyun Gun; Moon, Won; Moon, Chang Mo; Song, Hye Kyoung; Na, Soo-Young; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2017-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorder that diminishes the quality of life of the affected individuals. Limited data are available regarding the impact of IBD on the daily life of Koreans. Self-administered, computer-aided, internet-based questionnaires were distributed to members of a Korean patient organization for IBD from March to April 2013, by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. A total of 599 patients with IBD (387 with Crohn's disease [CD] and 212 with ulcerative colitis [UC]) were enrolled. The majority of patients (81%) expressed feelings of fatigue, weakness, and being worn out in their daily lives during times of flare; this percentage was reduced to 61% during remission. Respondents were absent from work or school for an average period of 18 days because of illness, within the first 6 months; the majority of respondents (64%) felt stressed about their absence. Forty-six percent of the respondents reported having received unfair comments at work, or having suffered discrimination. Forty-seven percent of the respondents felt that IBD had negatively affected their income and earnings. Compared with patients with UC, those with CD reported a more frequent negative impact of IBD on work, or more economic burden. More than half of the respondents (61%) reported that IBD had prevented them from making or keeping friends. IBD significantly impacts daily life, including work, education, and social relationships. Treatment that addresses the full spectrum of life of a patient would be more effective.

  13. Intestinal permeability to chromium-51 ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid in children with chronic obstructive respiratory disease: relationship with clinical and duodenal biopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyoux, C.; Forget, P.P.; Borlee-Hermans, G.; Geubelle, F.

    1988-01-01

    Intestinal permeability (IP) to 51 Cr ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid was investigated in 47 children with chronic obstructive respiratory disease (CORD). Endoscopic duodenal biopsies were performed in 22 of these patients. IP was significantly increased in CORD patients when compared to either control children or adults (P less than 0.001). Mean +/- 1 SD were 4.3 +/- 1.71%, 2.5 +/- 0.78%, and 2.3 +/- 0.77% in the three groups, respectively. IP was not related to the presence of atopy. Significant differences in IP results were found between CORD children with abdominal pain (4.5 +/- 1.4%) and both control children and CORD patients without abdominal pain (2.5 +/- 0.78% and 3.2 +/- 1.49%, respectively). A significant correlation was found between small bowel injury on the one hand and IP on the other hand (P less than 0.02). Furthermore, small bowel injury was significantly related to the presence of abdominal pain (P less than 0.05). We speculate that in CORD patients with abdominal pain, a factor exists that causes small bowel injury responsible for both abdominal pain and increased small bowel permeability. Food intolerance could, presumably, play a role in the mucosal damage-linked IP increase found in the subset of CORD patients who complain of abdominal pain

  14. The murine lung microbiome in relation to the intestinal and vaginal bacterial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Roggenbuck, Michael; Hansen, Lars H.

    2013-01-01

    Background This work provides the first description of the bacterial population of the lung microbiota in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the lung microbiome in mice, the most used animal model for inflammatory lung diseases such as COPD, cystic fibrosis and asthma.......Background This work provides the first description of the bacterial population of the lung microbiota in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the lung microbiome in mice, the most used animal model for inflammatory lung diseases such as COPD, cystic fibrosis and asthma....

  15. Spontaneous in vitro IL-6 production in various intestinal segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drastich, P.; Frolová-Břízová, Lenka; Zanvit, P.; Špičák, J.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2011), 185-190 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA ČR GA305/08/0535; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA MŠk 2B06155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA * ULCERATIVE-COLITIS * CROHNS-DISEASE Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  16. Kidney disease and aging: A reciprocal relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are overrepresented in elderly patients. This provides specific challenges for the treatment, as the start of dialysis in vulnerable elderly patients may be associated with a rapid decline in functional performance. However, prognosis in elderly patients with ESRD is quite variable and related to the presence of comorbidity and geriatric impairments. The decision to start dialysis in elderly patients should always be based on shared decision making, which may be aided by the use of prediction models which should however not be used to withhold dialysis treatment. The treatment of ESRD in elderly patients should be based on a multidimensional treatment plan with a role for active rehabilitation. Moreover, there also appears to be a reciprocal relationship between aging and CKD, as the presence of geriatric complications is also high in younger patients with ESRD. This has led to the hypothesis of a premature aging process associated with CKD, resulting in different phenotypes such as premature vascular aging, muscle wasting, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and frailty. Prevention and treatment of this phenotype is based on optimal treatment of CKD, associated comorbidities, and lifestyle factors by established treatments. For the future, interventions, which are developed to combat the aging process in general, might also have relevance for the treatment of patients with CKD, but their role should always be investigated in adequately powered clinical trials, as results obtained in experimental trials may not be directly translatable to the clinical situation of elderly patients. In the meantime, physical exercise is a very important intervention, by improving both physical capacity and functional performance, as well as by a direct effect on the aging process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Health-related quality of life and occurrence of intestinal side effects after pelvic radiotherapy - evaluation of long-term effects of diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, A.; Trope, C.; Loge, J.H.; Hjermstad, M.; Kaasa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and occurrence of late intestinal side effects were assessed 3-4 years after pelvic radiotherapy for carcinoma of the endometrium and cervix. During 1988-1990, 143 women were included in a clinical trial to evaluate the effect of a low fat, low lactose diet on radiation-induced diarrhoea. Of 94 survivors, 79 (84%) answered the request. HRQOL was assessed by the EORTC QLQ-C36 and compared with population-based norms. The women scored lower than the general population on role functioning (81.5 versus 90.6 (p < 0.01)) and higher on diarrhoea (23.8 versus 9.5 (p < 0.01)). Compared with pre-treatment conditions, an increase in cases with pain in the lower back, hips and thighs was seen. Substantial pain and diarrhoea were associated with deterioration in HRQOL. In conclusion, few treatment and/or disease-related effects were detected 3-4 years after radiotherapy, with the exception of increased bowel frequency and pain in the lower back, hips and thighs

  18. Practical Considerations and the Intestinal Microbiome in Disease: Antibiotics for IBD Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard N; Ismond, Kathleen P

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, have been treated with a range of antibiotics for inducing and maintaining remission, as well as the prevention of post-operative symptoms. To date, many studies have been performed assessing the efficacy of antibiotics when used alone, in combination with other antibiotics, or as an adjunctive therapy to other pharmaceutical treatments. Literature evidence supporting the use of antibiotics in IBD can be ambiguous, especially when considering the potential role of dysbiosis in the gastrointestinal tract. The review considers the systemic effect of antibiotics and the evidence base for their efficacy in the treatment of IBD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Targeting S1P in Inflammatory bowel disease: new avenues for modulating intestinal leukocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Silvio; Furfaro, Federica; Vetrano, Stefania

    2017-07-28

    Sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid mediator involved in the regulation of several cellular processes though the activation of a G protein-coupled receptor family known as the S1P receptors (S1PRs). Advances in the understanding of the biological activities mediated by S1PRs have sparked great interest in the S1P/S1PRs axes as new therapeutic targets for the modulation of several cellular processes. In particular, S1P/ S1PR1 axis has been identified as key regulator for the lymphocyte migration from lymph nodes. The blockade of this axis is emerging as a new therapeutic approach to control the aberrant leukocytes migration into the mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This review briefly summarizes the current evidence coming from clinical studies and discusses the future prospects of S1P inhibitors for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Variability of resting energy expenditure in infants and young children with intestinal failure-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Debora; Mitchell, Paul D; Mehta, Nilesh M; Bechard, Lori J; Yu, Yong-Ming; Jaksic, Tom; Duggan, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine, in a cohort of young children with intestinal failure (IF), whether the estimates of basal metabolic rate (BMR) by standard equations can approximate measured resting energy expenditure (REE) by indirect calorimetry (IC). IC was performed using the dilutional canopy technique. REE measurements were compared with standard, age-based estimation equations (World Health Organization) for BMR. Subjects were classified as hypermetabolic (REE > 110% BMR), hypometabolic (REE BMR), or normal (REE = 90%-110% BMR). Twenty-eight IF patients (11 girls, 17 boys) had an underlying diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 10) or a congenital gastrointestinal defect (n = 18). Median age was 5.3 months. Median interquartile range (IQR) REE was 46 (42-58) kcal · kg · day. Median (IQR) total energy intake provided 209% (172%-257%) of REE, with parenteral nutrition providing 76% (23%) of total energy intake. REE was variable, with 39% (n = 11) of measurements hypermetabolic, 39% (n = 11) hypometabolic, and the remaining 21% (n = 6) normal. Although REE was well correlated with estimated BMR (r = 0.82, P BMR was not consistently an adequate predictor of REE. BMR over- or underestimated REE by >10 kcal · kg · day in 15 of 28 (54%) patients. REE was not significantly correlated with severity of liver disease, nutritional status, total energy intake, or gestational age. Energy expenditure is variable among children with IF and IF-associated liver disease, with approximately 80% of our cohort exhibiting either hypo- or hypermetabolism. Standard estimation equations frequently do not correctly predict individual REE. Longitudinal studies of energy expenditure and body composition may be needed to guide provision of nutrition regimens.

  1. Alert for bone alterations and low serum concentrations of vitamin D in patients with intestinal inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorete Maria da Silva Kotze

    Full Text Available Summary Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that can reduce the absorption of nutrients such as vitamin D and calcium. Objective: To investigate bone alterations and serum levels of vitamin D in patients with IBD. Method: This was a cross-sectional study based on a review of medical records of patients from a private office in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Serum levels of vitamin D and bone densitometry were measured at diagnosis of IBD. A total of 105 patients were included; 38 (58.4% with CD; 27 (41.6% with UC and 40 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS as comparison group. Results: When compared to patients with UC, CD patients showed a higher prevalence of bone alterations, being 15.8% with osteoporosis and 36.8% with osteopenia. In UC, bone alterations occurred in 29.6% of cases, 3.7% with osteoporosis and 25.9% with osteopenia. As for vitamin D levels, among CD patients, 10.5% had vitamin deficiency, 65.8% insufficiency and 23.7% were sufficient. In UC, 7.4% of cases had deficiency, 74.1% insufficiency and 18.5% had sufficient serum levels of vitamin D. In the group with IBS, deficiency was observed in 17.5% of cases, insufficiency in 55% and sufficiency in 27.5% of them. There was no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: IBD patients have a high prevalence of bone changes, especially those with CD. Serum levels of vitamin D are below the recommended in all the evaluated groups.

  2. Sensitization to epithelial antigens in chronic mucosal inflammatory disease. Characterization of human intestinal mucosa-derived mononuclear cells reactive with purified epithelial cell-associated components in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, J K; Fiocchi, C; Youngman, K

    1985-01-01

    To explore the auto-reactive potential of cells infiltrating the gut mucosa in idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated, characterized morphologically and phenotypically, and evaluated for antigen-specific reactivity. The last was assessed by quantitating LPMC cytotoxic capabilities against purified, aqueous-soluble, organ-specific epithelial cell-associated components (ECAC) characterized previously. Enzyme-isolated infla...

  3. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease associated E. coli with ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Schjørring, Susanne; Gerstrøm, Sarah Choi

    2011-01-01

    E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA......) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine....

  4. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have

  5. Intestinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of exogenous lipase supplementation on growth, intestinal function, mucosal immune and physical barrier, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zeng, Yun-Yun; Xu, Shu-De; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of exogenous lipase supplementation on the growth performance, intestinal growth and function, immune response and physical barrier function, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 450 grass carp (255.02 ± 0.34 g) were fed five diets for 60 days. There were 5 dietary treatments that included a normal protein and lipid diet containing 30% crude protein (CP) with 5% ether extract (EE), and the low-protein and high-lipid diets (28% CP, 6% EE) supplemented with graded levels of exogenous lipase supplementation activity at 0, 1193, 2560 and 3730 U/kg diet. The results indicated that compared with a normal protein and lipid diet (30% CP, 5% EE), a low-protein and high-lipid diet (28% CP, 6% EE) (un-supplemented lipase) improved lysozyme activities and complement component 3 contents in the distal intestine (DI), interleukin 10 mRNA expression in the proximal intestine (PI), and glutathione S-transferases activity and glutathione content in the intestine of young grass carp. In addition, in low-protein and high-lipid diets, optimal exogenous lipase supplementation significantly increased acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and complement component 3 (C3) contents (P exogenous lipase supplementation significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) contents (P exogenous lipase supplementation significantly elevated the mRNA levels of tight junction proteins (Occludin, zonula occludens 1, Claudin b, Claudin c and Claudin 3) (P exogenous lipase supplementation improved growth, intestinal growth and function, intestinal immunity, physical barrier, and regulated the mRNA expression of related signal molecules of fish. The optimal level of exogenous lipase supplementation in young grass carp (255-771 g) was estimated to be 1193 U kg(-1) diet. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Di-tri-octahedral smectite for the prevention of post-operative diarrhea in equids with surgical disease of the large intestine: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Diana M; Smith, Phoebe A; Nieto, Jorge E; Beldomenico, Pablo; Spier, Sharon J

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a commercially available di-tri-octahedral (DTO) smectite product on clinical signs and prevalence of post-operative diarrhea in horses with colic associated with disease of the large intestine. Sixty-seven horses with surgical disease of the large intestine were randomly assigned to be treated with DTO smectite (n=37; 0.5 kg via nasogastric intubation every 24 h for 3 days post-operatively) or a placebo (n=30). The effect of treatment on fecal scores and clinical and hematological parameters, including heart rate, mucous membrane color, temperature, total white blood cell count, total neutrophil count and total plasma protein values, were determined. Horses treated with DTO smectite had a significant reduction in the prevalence of post-operative diarrhea (10.8%), compared with controls (41.4%). A significant improvement in mucous membrane color was observed 72 h post-operatively in horses receiving treatment, compared with placebo. Administration of DTO smectite to colic patients with disease of the large intestine reduced the occurrence of diarrhea in the early post-operative period.

  8. Cosilencing Intestinal Transglutaminase-2 and Interleukin-15 Using Gelatin-Based Nanoparticles in an in Vitro Model of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarwala, Husain; Clausen, Valerie; Chaturvedi, Prasoon; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2017-09-05

    In this study, we have developed a type B gelatin nanoparticle based siRNA delivery system for silencing of intestinal transglutaminase-2 (TG2) and interleukin-15 (IL-15) genes in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) and murine alveolar macrophage cells (J774A.1). Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the TG2 or IL-15 gene was encapsulated within gelatin nanoparticles using ethanol-water solvent displacement method. Size, charge, and morphology of gelatin nanoparticles were evaluated using a Zetasizer instrument and transmission electron microscopy. siRNA encapsulation efficiency was determined using an siRNA specific stem-loop quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. Cellular uptake of siRNA-containing gelatin nanoparticles was determined using fluorescent microscopy and stem-loop qPCR assay. siRNA loading in the RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) was determined by immunoprecipitation of argonaute 2 (AGO2) protein followed by stem-loop qPCR for siRNA quantification. Gene expression analysis of TG2, IL-15, and the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ), was performed using qPCR assays. Efficacy of silencing TG2 and IL-15 knockdown was evaluated in an in vitro model of celiac disease by utilizing immunogenic α-gliadin peptide p31-43 in cultured J774A.1 cells. siRNA-containing gelatin nanoparticles were spherical in shape with mean particle size and charge of 217 ± 8.39 nm and -6.2 ± 0.95 mV, respectively. siRNA loading efficiency within gelatin nanoparticles was found to be 89.3 ± 3.05%. Evaluations of cellular uptake using fluorescent microscopy showed rapid internalization of gelatin nanoparticles within 2 h of dosing, with cytosolic localization of delivered siRNA in Caco-2 cells. Gelatin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular siRNA exposure with a longer half-life, when compared to Lipofectamine-mediated siRNA delivery. Approximately 0.1% of total intracellular si

  9. UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING IN THE YOUNG - GASTRIC GIST TUMOR OR PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Atolagbe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available GIST tumors is very unusual in the young and middle aged and a high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis in young patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate imaging such as a Computed tomographic scan (CT scan may identify this tumor which may easily be misdiagnosed as a bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease in the young. We present a case of a healthy 38 year old man with no alcohol use who presented with epigastric pain and melena and subsequent torrential bleeding uncontrolled during endoscopy necessitating an emergency exploratory laparotomy by the general surgery team. The bleeding intraluminal component of the tumor with gross splenic and pancreatic involvement was identified and surgical management consisted of a wedge resection of the greater curvature of the stomach incorporating the tumor and the spleen with successful dissection of the tumor off the tail of the pancreas. Histology was positive for C-KIT and DOG-1 markers. Postoperative course was uneventful and he is presently on Imatinib Mesylate.

  10. Age-related P-glycoprotein expression in the intestine and affecting the pharmacokinetics of orally administered enrofloxacin in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengjie; Bughio, Shamsuddin; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg • ml(-1), P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg • ml(-1) • h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h(-1), P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2 ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of broilers for effective therapy.

  11. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Complications after intestinal resection in Crohn's disease: laparoscopic versus conventional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: significant advances in medical therapy for Crohn's disease (CD occurred in the last 12 years, mainly due to the introduction of anti-TNF therapy. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery represented the most important advance on surgical treatment in the management of CD, as it also had developed in the treatment of other conditions. There is a tendency for lower complication rates after laparoscopic bowel resections as compared to open surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the complication rates after bowel resections for CD between the two approaches in a Brazilian case series. Methods: this was a retrospective longitudinal study, including CD patients submitted to bowel resections from a single Brazilian Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD referral center, treated between January 2008 and June 2012 with laparoscopic approach (LA or conventional approach (CA. Variables analyzed: age at surgery, gender, Montreal classification, smoking, concomitant medication, type of surgery, surgical approach, presence and type of complication up to 30 days after the procedures. Readmission and reoperation rates, as well as mortality, were also analyzed. Patients were allocated in two groups regarding the type of procedure (LA or CA, and complication rates and characteristics were compared. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney test (quantitative variables and chi-square test (qualitative variables, with p < 0.05 considered significant. Results: a total of 46 patients (25 men were included (16 submitted to LA, with mean age of 38.1 (± 12.7 years. The groups were considered homogeneous according to age, gender, CD location, perianal disease and concomitant medications. There were more patients with fistulizing CD on the CA group (p = 0.029. The most common procedure performed was ileocolic resection on both groups (56.7% of the CA and 75% of the LA patients – p = 0.566. Overall, total complications (surgical and medical

  13. Stapled side-to-side anastomosis might be benefit in intestinal resection for Crohn's disease: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Li, Jin-Yu; Yang, Zheng; Chen, Xiu-Yan; Mo, Jia-Jie; Li, Shang-Hai

    2018-04-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is an essential step in the intestinal resection in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Anastomotic configuration such as handsewn end-to-end anastomosis (HEEA), stapled side-to-side anastomosis (SSSA) and so on may be a predictor of prognosis for postoperative CD patients. However, the association between anastomotic types and surgical outcomes are controversial. The aim of this review is to identify the optimal anastomosis for intestinal resection in patients with CD. Clinical trials comparing anastomosis after intestinal resection in patients with CD were searched in the database of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Outcomes such as postoperative hospital stay, complications, mortality, recurrence, and reoperation were evaluated. Pairwise treatment effects were estimated through a random-effects network meta-analysis based on the frequency framework by using the STATA software and reported as the estimated summary effect for each comparison between the 2 treatments in the network with a 95% credible interval. A total of 1113 patients in 11 trials were included. In pair-wise comparisons between groups, for overall postoperative complications, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA; for complications other than anastomotic leak, anastomotic leak, wound infection, postoperative hospital stay and mortality, there were no significant difference between groups; for clinical recurrence, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA; for reoperation, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA. The number of eligible randomized controlled trails (RCTs) was small, and more than half of the included trials were retrospective studies; selection bias may lead to a less power in this assessment; follow-up time between different groups was different, which may possibly have affected the interpretation of the analysis of long-term outcome. By comprehensive analyzing all the postoperative outcomes, SSSA appeared

  14. Identification of Autophagy-Related Genes and Their Regulatory miRNAs Associated with Celiac Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Comincini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a severe genetic autoimmune disorder, affecting about one in 100 people, where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. Diagnosing CD is quite complex and requires blood tests and intestinal biopsy examinations. Controversy exists regarding making the diagnosis without biopsy, due to the large spectrum of manifesting symptoms; furthermore, small-intestinal gastroscopy examinations have a relatively complex management in the pediatric population. To identify novel molecular markers useful to increase the sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of pediatric CD patients, the expression levels of two key autophagy executor genes (ATG7 and BECN1 and their regulatory validated miRNAs (miR-17 and miR-30a, respectively were analyzed by relative quantitative real-time-PCR on a cohort of confirmed CD patients compared to age-related controls. Among the investigated targets, the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test and ROC analysis indicated the highest significant association of BECN1 with CD status in the blood, while in intestinal biopsies, all of the investigated sequences were positively associated with CD diagnosis. Nomogram-based analysis showed nearly opposite expression trends in blood compared to intestine tissue, while hierarchical clustering dendrograms enabled identifying CD and control subgroups based on specific genes and miRNA expression signatures. Next, using an established in vitro approach, through digested gliadin administration in Caco-2 cells, we also highlighted that the modulation of miR-17 endogenous levels using enriched exosomes increased the intracellular autophagosome content, thereby altering the autophagic status. Altogether, these results highlighted novel molecular markers that might be useful to increase the accuracy in CD diagnosis and in molecular-based stratification of the patients, further reinforcing the functional involvement of the regulation of the autophagy

  15. Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on daily life: an online survey by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases

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    Young Sun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorder that diminishes the quality of life of the affected individuals. Limited data are available regarding the impact of IBD on the daily life of Koreans.Methods: Self-administered, computer-aided, internet-based questionnaires were distributed to members of a Korean patient organization for IBD from March to April 2013, by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases.Results: A total of 599 patients with IBD (387 with Crohn's disease [CD] and 212 with ulcerative colitis [UC] were enrolled. The majority of patients (81% expressed feelings of fatigue, weakness, and being worn out in their daily lives during times of flare; this percentage was reduced to 61% during remission. Respondents were absent from work or school for an average period of 18 days because of illness, within the first 6 months; the majority of respondents (64% felt stressed about their absence. Forty-six percent of the respondents reported having received unfair comments at work, or having suffered discrimination. Forty-seven percent of the respondents felt that IBD had negatively affected their income and earnings. Compared with patients with UC, those with CD reported a more frequent negative impact of IBD on work, or more economic burden. More than half of the respondents (61% reported that IBD had prevented them from making or keeping friends.Conclusions: IBD significantly impacts daily life, including work, education, and social relationships. Treatment that addresses the full spectrum of life of a patient would be more effective.

  16. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Minireview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Sachin B; Hinge (Ingle), Chitra R

    2014-01-01

    Primary idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia is an unusual disease featured by the presence of dilated lymphatic channels which are located in the mucosa, submucosa or subserosa leading to protein loosing enteropathy.Most often affected were children and generally diagnosed before third year of life but may be rarely seen in adults too. Bilateral pitting oedema of lower limb is the main clinical manifestation mimicking the systemic disease and posing a real diagnostic dilemma to the clinicians to differentiate it from other common systemic diseases like Congestive cardiac failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Protein Energy Malnutrition, etc. Diagnosis can be made on capsule endoscopy which can localise the lesion but unable to take biopsy samples. Thus, recently double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy in combination can be used as an effective diagnostic tool to hit the correct diagnosis. Patients respond dramatically to diet constituting low long chain triglycerides and high protein content with supplements of medium chain triglyceride. So early diagnosis is important to prevent untoward complications related to disease or treatment for the sake of accurate pathological diagnosis. PMID:25325063

  17. Haemorrhage and intestinal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilia M. Pizzini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of coeliac disease is around 1% in general population but this is often unrecognised. The classical presentation of adult coeliac disease is characterized by diarrhoea and malabsorption syndrome, but atypical presentations are probably more common and are characterized by iron deficiency anaemia, weight loss, fatigue, infertility, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathy and osteoporosis. Unusual are the coagulation disorders (prevalence 20% and these are due to vitamin K malabsorption (prolonged prothrombin time. Clinical case: A 64-year-old man was admitted to our Department for an extensive spontaneous haematoma of the right leg. He had a history of a small bowel resection for T-cell lymphoma, with a negative follow-up and he didn’t report any personal or familiar history of bleeding. Laboratory tests showed markedly prolonged prothrombin (PT and partial-thromboplastin time (PTT, corrected by mixing studies, and whereas platelet count and liver tests was normal. A single dose (10 mg of intravenous vitamin K normalized the PT. Several days before the patient had been exposed to a superwarfarin pesticide, but diagnostic tests for brodifacoum, bromadiolone or difenacoum were negative. Diagnosis of multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulationfactor deficiencies (II, VII, IX, X due to intestinal malabsorption was made and coeliac disease was detected. Therefore the previous lymphoma diagnosis might be closely related to coeliac disease. Conclusions: A gluten free diet improves quality of life and restores normal nutritional and biochemical status and protects against these complications.

  18. Relation between reflux of bile acids into the stomach and gastric mucosal atrophy, intestinal metaplasia in biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Tsukui, Taku

    2012-05-01

    During endoscopic examinations we collected fluid in the stomach that included reflux fluid from the duodenum, and assessed the effect of quantitatively determined bile acids on glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia using biopsy specimens. A total of 294 outpatients were enrolled in this study. Total bile acid concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia scores were graded according to the Updated Sydney System. An effect of refluxed bile acids on atrophy and intestinal metaplasia was shown in the high-concentration reflux group in comparison with the control group. However, when the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated according to whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was present, no significant associations were shown between reflux bile acids and atrophy in either the H. pylori-positive cases or -negative cases. The same was true for intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cases, whereas intestinal metaplasia was more pronounced in the high-concentration reflux group in the H. pylori-negative cases (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1-5.6). We could not clarify the effect of the reflux of bile acids into the stomach in the progression of atrophy. High-concentration bile acids had an effect on the progression of intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-negative cases.

  19. Long-term safety and efficacy of adalimumab for intestinal Behçet's disease in the open label study following a phase 3 clinical trial

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    Nagamu Inoue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Intestinal Behçet's disease (BD is an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder. We followed up the patients and evaluated safety profile and effectiveness of adalimumab for the treatment of intestinal BD through 100 weeks rolled over from the 52 week clinical trial (NCT01243671.Methods: Patients initiated adalimumab therapy at 160 mg at week 0, followed by 80 mg at week 2, followed by 40 mg every other week until the end of the study. Long-term safety and all adverse events (AEs were examined. The efficacy was assessed on the basis of marked improvement (MI and complete remission (CR using a composite efficacy index, which combined global gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic assessments.Results: Twenty patients were enrolled in this study; 15 patients received adalimumab treatment until study completion. The incidence of AEs through week 100 was 544.4 events/100 person-years, which was comparable to the incidence through week 52 (560.4 events/100 person-years. No unexpected trend was observed and adalimumab was well tolerated. At weeks 52 and 100, 60.0% and 40.0% of patients showed MI, respectively, and 20.0% and 15.0% of patients showed CR, respectively.Conclusions: This report demonstrates 2 years safety and effectiveness of adalimumab in intestinal BD patients. Patients with intestinal BD refractory to conventional treatment receiving up to 2 years of adalimumab treatment demonstrated safety outcomes consistent with the known profile of adalimumab, and the treatment led to sustained reduction of clinical and endoscopic disease activity.

  20. CT studies of mesentery and related vascular findings in strangulating intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenhua; Cao Qingxuan; Yang Shifeng; Li Jianhai; Lu Shenglin; Zhang Qiang; Wu Tian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance of mesentery and related vascular (MRV) findings in strangulating obstruction (SO) and evaluate the value of CT examination for diagnosing SO. Methods: Thirty patients with SO were included in the investigation. The diagnosis was confirmed by operation in 26 cases and 4 cases by clinic. The cause of SO included adhesion in 9 cases, volvulus in 8 cases, intussusception in 6 cases, infarction of mesenteric vesseles in 4 cases, and internal hernia in 3 cases, respectively. All patients was examined with CT and 20 of them with enhanced CT. Results: Eleven items of CT findings were revealed in these patients. The findings could be divided into 3 types: (1) direct signs: including embolism of mesenteric vasculature in 2 cases and mesenteric edema and related vascular enlargement in 19 cases. (2)indirect signs: including bowel wall edema and thickenning in 24 cases, abnormal enhancement of the wall in 6 cases, massive fluid in the bowel in 13 cases, abnormal form of loops in 10 cases, and hemorrhage of bowel wall and mesentery in 1 case each. (3) complicated signs: including intramural gas in 3 cases, intrahepatic portal veins gas in 1 case, gas in mesentery in 1 case, and ascites and pneumoperitoneum in 11 cases. Conclusion: The CT findings of mesenteric edema, ischemia and infarction are reliable and characteristic signs for diagnosing SO. The diagnosis of SO can be correctly made before operation if these signs are recognized, at the same time, CT may demonstrate some complications which can not be revealed by traditional X-ray examinations. (authors)

  1. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-κB signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-κB inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  2. Celiac disease in children from Madeira island and its prevalence in first degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana Raquel Henriques; Cabral, António Jorge; Ferreira, Elena; Capelinha, Filipa; Spínola, Hélder; Gonçalves, Rute

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that celiac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder highly prevalent among relatives of celiac patients. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of first degree relatives of celiac children, and to access the frequency of human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 in celiac disease patients and their affected relatives. A survey was conducted of 39 children with celiac disease with follow-up in the Pediatric outpatient's clinic of Dr. Nélio Mendonça Hospital, in Madeira Island, Portugal. Were invited 110 first degree relatives to undergo serological screen for celiac disease with IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGG) quantification. In all seropositive relatives, small intestinal biopsy and HLA typing was recommended. HLA- typing was performed in 38 celiac patients, 28/74% DQ2 positive, 1/2% DQ8 positive and 9/24% incomplete DQ2. Positive IgA-TGG was found in five out of the 95 relatives, and CD was diagnosed in three of them. Three relatives had the presence of HLA-DQ2, two were DQ2 incomplete (DQB1*02). The prevalence of celiac disease among first degree celiac patients´ relatives was 3.1%, 4.5 times higher than the general Portuguese population (0,7%) witch reinforces the need of extensive diagnostic screening in this specific group. HLA-DQ2 typing may be a tool in the diagnostic approach.

  3. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-03-14

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  4. Postprandial gallbladder emptying is related to intestinal motility at the time of meal ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oster-Jørgensen, E; Qvist, N; Pedersen, S A

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of meal-induced gallbladder emptying in healthy individuals are subject to wide variation. We hypothesized that some of the observed variation might relate to ingestion of the meal during different phases of the migrating motor complex (MMC). Recording of gastrointestinal...... pressure was combined with scintigraphic recording of bile kinetics during infusion of 99mTc-HIDA. The material consisted of 12 healthy men. Group 1 (n = 6) had a fat-rich meal in phase I, and group 2 (n = 6) had the meal in a phase II. With the end of the meal ingestion as zero, the following results...... emerged. The subjects in group 1 had a median (range) lag period before beginning of gallbladder emptying of 13.5 (9.0-22.5) min. In group 2 gallbladder emptying began during the meal ingestion in four subjects, and the median lag period was 0 min (minimum, -9.0; maximum, 13.5 (p = 0.02)). The median...

  5. Cardiovascular Disease in Relation to Placental Abruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ananth, Cande V.; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Williams, Michelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular (CVD) complications stemming from vascular dysfunction have been widely explored in the setting of preeclampsia. However, the impact of abruption, a strong indicator of microvascular disturbance, on the risk of CVD mortality and morbidity remains poorly characterised...... person-years, respectively (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4, 1.8). The increased risks were evident for ischaemic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, hypertensive heart disease, non-rheumatic valvular disease, and congestive heart failure. Conclusions: This study shows increased hazards of CVD morbidity...

  6. Current clinical research of immunoglobulin G4-related orbital disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease(IgG4-related diseasehas received lots of attention in medical community as a recently recognized fibro-inflammatory condition. It is characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and concentration of elevated serum IgG4. IgG4-related disease shows organ enlargement or nodular/hyperplastic lesions in various organs including the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and orbit, which is called IgG4-related orbital disease. The diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related orbital disease has recently been established, which is based on clinical, imaging and histopathologic features of the orbital lesions. Besides, attention should be drawn to the differentiation from other diseases. The treatment is empirical including corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, radiotherapy, and rituximab. This article reviews clinical progression of IgG4-related orbital disease.

  7. Neuroimmune interactions at different intestinal sites are related to abdominal pain symptoms in children with IBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, G; Barbara, G; Cucchiara, S; Cremon, C; Shulman, R J; Isoldi, S; Zecchi, L; Drago, L; Oliva, S; Saulle, R; Barbaro, M R; Stronati, L

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimmune interactions and inflammation have been proposed as factors involved in sensory-motor dysfunction and symptom generation in adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. In children with IBS and healthy controls, we measured ileocolonic mast cell infiltration and fecal calprotectin and evaluated the relationships between these parameters and abdominal pain symptoms and stooling pattern. Irritable bowel syndrome patients diagnosed according to Pediatric Rome III criteria and healthy controls kept a 2-week pain/stooling diary. Ileocolonic mucosal mast cells (MC) and MC in close proximity to nerve fibers (MC-NF) were identified immunohistochemically and quantified. Fecal calprotectin concentration was measured. 21 IBS patients and 10 controls were enrolled. The MC-NF count was significantly higher in the ileum (p = 0.01), right colon (p = 0.04), and left colon (p Abdominal pain intensity score correlated with ileal MC count (r(s) = 0.47, p = 0.030) and right colon MC-NF count (r(s) = 0.52, p = 0.015). In addition, children with IBS with >3 abdominal pain episodes/week had greater ileal (p = 0.002) and right colonic (p = 0.01) MC counts and greater ileal (p = 0.05) and right colonic (p = 0.016) MC-NF counts than children with less frequent pain. No relationship was found between MC and MC-NF and fecal calprotectin or stooling pattern. Mast cells-nerve fibers counts are increased in the ileocolonic mucosa of children with IBS. Mast cells and MC-NF counts are related to the intensity and frequency of abdominal pain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  9. Influence of milk-feeding type and genetic risk of developing coeliac disease on intestinal microbiota of infants: the PROFICEL study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada De Palma

    Full Text Available Interactions between environmental factors and predisposing genes could be involved in the development of coeliac disease (CD. This study has assessed whether milk-feeding type and HLA-genotype influence the intestinal microbiota composition of infants with a family history of CD. The study included 164 healthy newborns, with at least one first-degree relative with CD, classified according to their HLA-DQ genotype by PCR-SSP DQB1 and DQA1 typing. Faecal microbiota was analysed by quantitative PCR at 7 days, and at 1 and 4 months of age. Significant interactions between milk-feeding type and HLA-DQ genotype on bacterial numbers were not detected by applying a linear mixed-model analysis for repeated measures. In the whole population, breast-feeding promoted colonization of C. leptum group, B. longum and B. breve, while formula-feeding promoted that of Bacteroides fragilis group, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, E. coli and B. lactis. Moreover, increased numbers of B. fragilis group and Staphylococcus spp., and reduced numbers of Bifidobacterium spp. and B. longum were detected in infants with increased genetic risk of developing CD. Analyses within subgroups of either breast-fed or formula-fed infants indicated that in both cases increased risk of CD was associated with lower numbers of B. longum and/or Bifidobacterium spp. In addition, in breast-fed infants the increased genetic risk of developing CD was associated with increased C. leptum group numbers, while in formula-fed infants it was associated with increased Staphylococcus and B. fragilis group numbers. Overall, milk-feeding type in conjunction with HLA-DQ genotype play a role in establishing infants' gut microbiota; moreover, breast-feeding reduced the genotype-related differences in microbiota composition, which could partly explain the protective role attributed to breast milk in this disorder.

  10. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asbestosis include: Fibrotic lung disease Pneumoconiosis (NOO-mo-ko-ne-O-sis) Interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) ... tissue samples. One way is through bronchoscopy (bron-KOS-ko-pee). For this procedure, your doctor will ...

  11. The mucosal firewalls against commensal intestinal microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Slack, Emma; Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D

    2009-07-01

    Mammals coexist with an extremely dense microbiota in the lower intestine. Despite the constant challenge of small numbers of microbes penetrating the intestinal surface epithelium, it is very unusual for these organisms to cause disease. In this review article, we present the different mucosal firewalls that contain and allow mutualism with the intestinal microbiota.

  12. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often found when a person has an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy or colonoscopy for another reason. Rarely, these tumors can cause bleeding, blockage or rupture of the intestines If this ...

  13. The effect of Artemisia annua on broiler performance, on intestinal microbiota and on the course of a Clostridium perfringens infection applying a necrotic enteritis disease model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Ricarda M; Grevsen, Kai; Ivarsen, Elise

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of the plant Artemisia annua contain essential oils having antimicrobial properties against Clostridium perfringens Type A, the causal agent for necrotic enteritis in broilers. In two experiments, the influence of increasing dietary concentrations of dried A. annua leaves (0, 5, 10...... and 20 g/kg) and n-hexane extract from fresh A. annua leaves (0, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) on broiler performance was investigated. Dried plant material decreased feed intake and body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and 10 and 20 g/kg diet tended to improve the feed conversion ratio. The n...... the effect of the dietary addition of dried A. annua leaves (10 g/kg on top) or n-hexane extract of A. annua (250 mg/kg) on the severity of the disease in broilers. The addition of n-hexane extract reduced the intestinal C. perfringens numbers and the severity of the disease-related small intestinal lesions...

  14. Nutritional status variation and intestinal and extra intestinal symptomatology in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity given specialized dietary advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vaz de Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the nutritional status variation and symptomatology of patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity after specialized dietary advice Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Clinical, metabolic, and nutritional variables were collected from medical records, and the symptomatology was investigated by the Metabolic Screening Questionnaire. The variables were assessed on two occasions (T1 - before dietary advice and T2 - after dietary advice with an interval of three months between T1 and T2 Results: The median age was 42 years. The prevalences of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity were 66.2% and 33.8%, respectively. Normal weight prevailed at T1 (58.8% and T2 (56.3%, but 30.0% of the patients at T1 and 34.9% of the patients at T2 had excess weight. The two conditions had similar symptomatology. The most frequent signs and symptoms on both occasions involved the gastrointestinal tract, followed by energy/activity and emotions. All symptoms decreased significantly after the introduction of a proper diet Conclusion: The patients were normal weight on both study occasions (T1 and T2, and the symptoms improved after dietary advice. Thus, we reinforce the importance of proper dietary management in both clinical conditions to make dietary adjustments that improve these individuals' symptomatology.

  15. Shapes related to longitudinal studies of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark

    investigated four different proximity markers which lead to significantly improved marker values between NC and AD after correction for whole brain and hippocampus volume. Based on the different proximity markers we have chosen the surface connectivity marker that gave the best separation to investigate......This dissertation investigates novel markers for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both CVD and AD are among the large diseases counted in morbidity and mortality in the western world, which makes them huge and increasing problems. By investigating and learning....... The first part of this dissertation studies the growth patterns of atherosclerotic calcified deposits in the lumbar aorta based on x-ray images over an 8-year time period. We have been able to find simple growth patterns that explain how the calcifications evolve. The calcifications grew on average 41 % (p...

  16. Imaging diagnosis of bronchial asthma and related diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Fumikazu; Fujimura, Mikihiko; Kimura, Fumiko; Fujimura, Kaori; Hayano, Toshio; Nishii, Noriko; Machida, Haruhiko; Toda, Jo; Saito, Naoko

    2002-01-01

    We describe imaging features of bronchial asthma and related diseases. The practical roles of imaging diagnosis are the evaluation of severity and complications of bronchial asthma and differential diagnosis of diseases showing asthmatic symptoms other than bronchial asthma. (author)

  17. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens

    2016-01-01

    human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed...

  18. Lipo sarcoma in small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Iglesias, J.; Pineyro Gutierrez, A.; Taroco Medeiros, L.; Fein Kolodny, C.; Navarrete Pedocchi, H.

    1987-01-01

    A case is presented by primitive liposarcoma in small intestine , an extensive bibliographical review foreigner and national in this case. It detach the exceptional of the intestinal topography of the liposarcomas; and making stress in the relative value of the computerized tomography and ultrasonography in the diagnose of the small intestine tumors . As well as in the sarcomas of another topography, chemo and radiotherapy associated to the exeresis surgery, it can be of benefit [es

  19. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea: its relation to sanitary conditions and socioeconomic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roka, Margarita; Goñi, Pilar; Rubio, Encarnación; Clavel, Antonio

    2012-08-15

    The prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases and their associated factors has been investigated in HIV populations from the Island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. The feces of 310 participants from the island of Bioko (260 HIV-positive and 50 HIV-negative) were analyzed by microscopic observation. Immunochromatography was also used to diagnose Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium spp. In addition, patients were asked for sociodemographic, economic and academic status, and CD4+ T cell counts were recorded. For HIV-positive patients, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 81.5% (212/260), 83.8% (218/260) by pathogenic helminths and 55.4% (168/260) by pathogenic protozoa (E. histolytica/dispar and Giardia duodenalis). Gender association was found between the infection by Ascaris and Schistosoma, a higher proportion being found in women; and between Entamoeba and the place of residence, a higher proportion being observed in the urban belt. Strongyloides stercoralis and Chilomastix mesnili appeared only in the people of this group, all the cases of Chilomastix being in females. For HIV-negative participants, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 74.0% (37/50), 90.0% (45/50) by pathogenic helminths and 66.0% (43/50) by pathogenic protozoa. Gender, educational level and low hygiene were associated with intestinal parasitic infection. When comparing the two groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative), statistical association between HIV co-infection and infection by Giardia and Entamoeba was found. Diarrhea was also associated with intestinal parasitic infection in the HIV-positive group. Not only do our findings reflect high rates of intestinal parasitic infections in HIV-positive people, but also in the HIV-negative group, suggesting a closer relationship between sanitary status and living conditions than with immune status, and thus they highlight the need to carry out health education policies in the population. In addition

  20. Travel related diseases and optimizing preventive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    With the figure of 1 billion annual travellers continuously increasing, travel is becoming more and more common. The binding element of this thesis is the aim to contribute to the improvement of pre-travel healthcare. The diseases studied either carry a high mortality (rabies, malaria, yellow fever)

  1. Trace elements in relation to cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masironi, R [World Health Organization, Cardiovascular Diseases Unit, Geneva (Switzerland); Parr, R M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Medical Applications Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1973-07-01

    For the past four years the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy-Agency have been jointly coordinating investigations at an international level on the role possibly played by stable trace elements in the aetiology of cardiovascular diseases, and the use of nuclear techniques in studying these elements. (author)

  2. Nutritional-related diseases and management: newspaper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that many people are ignorant of the importance of eating a balanced diet and eating right to prevent nutritional diseases. This is why the newspapers topics or health tips on diet and nutrition had the highest percentage frequency, because of its importance the needed emphasis it requires. Therefore, it is ...

  3. The Acquired Immunedeficiency Syndrome and related diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HTLV-III are helpful but are not available. Other investigations may be required depending on clinical findings to exclude other diseases and confirm opportunistic infection. •. Treatment. There is no specific treatment for AIDS at present. Infections detected in such patie~ts, eg oral candidiasis or T.B., should be treated m the.

  4. Giardia co-infection promotes the secretion of antimicrobial peptides beta-defensin 2 and trefoil factor 3 and attenuates attaching and effacing bacteria-induced intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, Anna; Motta, Jean-Paul; Cotton, James A; Feener, Troy; Oyeyemi, Ayodele; Vallance, Bruce A; Wallace, John L; Buret, Andre G

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of polymicrobial gastrointestinal infections and their effects on host biology remains incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is an ubiquitous intestinal protozoan parasite infecting animals and humans. Concomitant infections with Giardia and other gastrointestinal pathogens commonly occur. In countries with poor sanitation, Giardia infection has been associated with decreased incidence of diarrheal disease and fever, and reduced serum inflammatory markers release, via mechanisms that remain obscure. This study analyzed Giardia spp. co-infections with attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens, and assessed whether and how the presence of Giardia modulates host responses to A/E enteropathogens, and alters intestinal disease outcome. In mice infected with the A/E pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, co-infection with Giardia muris significantly attenuated weight loss, macro- and microscopic signs of colitis, bacterial colonization and translocation, while concurrently enhancing the production and secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mouse β-defensin 3 and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). Co-infection of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) monolayers with G. duodenalis trophozoites and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) enhanced the production of the AMPs human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) and TFF3; this effect was inhibited with treatment of G. duodenalis with cysteine protease inhibitors. Collectively, these results suggest that Giardia infections are capable of reducing enteropathogen-induced colitis while increasing production of host AMPs. Additional studies also demonstrated that Giardia was able to directly inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. These results reveal novel mechanisms whereby Giardia may protect against gastrointestinal disease induced by a co-infecting A/E enteropathogen. Our findings shed new light on how microbial-microbial interactions in the gut may protect a host during concomitant infections.

  5. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein as a marker for intra-abdominal pressure-related complications in patients admitted to the intensive care unit; study protocol for a prospective cohort study (I-Fabulous study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Steven G; Van Waes, Oscar J F; Van der Hoven, Ben; Ali, Samir; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Pickkers, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2015-01-16

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have detrimental effects on all organ systems and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Intra-bladder measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is currently the gold standard. However, IAH is not always indicative of intestinal ischemia, which is an early and rapidly developing complication. Sensitive biomarkers for intestinal ischemia are needed to be able to intervene before damage becomes irreversible. Gut wall integrity loss, including epithelial cell disruption and tight junctions breakdown, is an early event in intestinal damage. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP) is excreted in urine and blood specifically from damaged intestinal epithelial cells. Claudin-3 is a specific protein which is excreted in urine following disruption of intercellular tight junctions. This study aims to investigate if I-FABP and Claudin-3 can be used as a diagnostic tool for identifying patients at risk for IAP-related complications. In a multicenter, prospective cohort study 200 adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit with at least two risk factors for IAH as defined by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS) will be included. Patients in whom an intra-bladder IAP measurement is contra-indicated or impossible and patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that may affect I-FABP levels will be excluded. The IAP will be measured using an intra-bladder technique. During the subsequent 72 hours, the IAP measurement will be repeated every six hours. At these time points, a urine and serum sample will be collected for measurement of I-FABP and Claudin-3 levels. Clinical outcome of patients during their stay at the intensive care unit will be monitored using the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Successful completion of this trial will provide evidence on the eventual

  6. Intestinal barrier: A gentlemen's agreement between microbiota and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Castoldi, Angela; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-02-15

    Our body is colonized by more than a hundred trillion commensals, represented by viruses, bacteria and fungi. This complex interaction has shown that the microbiome system contributes to the host's adaptation to its environment, providing genes and functionality that give flexibility of diet and modulate the immune system in order not to reject these symbionts. In the intestine, specifically, the microbiota helps developing organ structures, participates of the metabolism of nutrients and induces immunity. Certain components of the microbiota have been shown to trigger inflammatory responses, whereas others, anti-inflammatory responses. The diversity and the composition of the microbiota, thus, play a key role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and explain partially the link between intestinal microbiota changes and gut-related disorders in humans. Tight junction proteins are key molecules for determination of the paracellular permeability. In the context of intestinal inflammatory diseases, the intestinal barrier is compromised, and decreased expression and differential distribution of tight junction proteins is observed. It is still unclear what is the nature of the luminal or mucosal factors that affect the tight junction proteins function, but the modulation of the immune cells found in the intestinal lamina propria is hypothesized as having a role in this modulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the interaction of the gut microbiota with the immune system in the development and maintenance of the intestinal barrier.

  7. Functions and Signaling Pathways of Amino Acids in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestine is always exposed to external environment and intestinal microorganism; thus it is more sensitive to dysfunction and dysbiosis, leading to intestinal inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, and diarrhea. An increasing number of studies indicate that dietary amino acids play significant roles in preventing and treating intestinal inflammation. The review aims to summarize the functions and signaling mechanisms of amino acids in intestinal inflammation. Amino acids, including essential amino acids (EAAs, conditionally essential amino acids (CEAAs, and nonessential amino acids (NEAAs, improve the functions of intestinal barrier and expressions of anti-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction proteins but decrease oxidative stress and the apoptosis of enterocytes as well as the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines in the intestinal inflammation. The functions of amino acids are associated with various signaling pathways, including mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR, nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2, general controlled nonrepressed kinase 2 (GCN2, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2.

  8. Intestinal Ostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Peter C; Kurz, Nadja Rebecca; Nitschke, Claudia; Odeh, Siad F; Möslein, Gabriela; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2018-03-16

    About 100 000 ostomy carriers are estimated to live in Germany today. The creation of an ostomy represents a major life event that can be associated with impaired quality of life. Optimal ostomy creation and proper ostomy care are crucially important determinants of the success of treatment and of the patients' quality of life. This article is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search in PubMed, GoogleScholar, and Scopus, and on the authors' experience. Intestinal stomata can be created using either the small or the large bowel. More than 75% of all stomata are placed as part of the treatment of colorectal cancer. The incidence of stoma-related complications is reported to be 10-70%. Skin irritation, erosion, and ulceration are the most common early complications, with a combined incidence of 25-34%, while stoma prolapse is the most common late complication, with an incidence of 8-75%. Most early complications can be managed conservatively, while most late complications require surgical revision. In 19% of cases, an ostomy that was initially planned to be temporary becomes permanent. Inappropriate stoma location and inadequate ostomy care are the most common causes of early complications. Both surgical and patient-related factors influence late complications. Every step from the planning of a stoma to its postoperative care should be discussed with the patient in detail. Preoperative marking is essential for an optimal stoma site. Optimal patient management with the involvement of an ostomy nurse increases ostomy acceptance, reduces ostomy-related complications, and improves the quality of life of ostomy carriers.

  9. Intestinal actinomycosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, C.M.; Labrunie, E.; Pannaim, V.L.N.; Santos, A.A.S. dos; Pereira, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Intestinal actinomycosis: a case report. The authors describe a case of intestinal actinomycosis, which was manisfestated by abdominal mass and suggested, clinical and radiologically, a bowel carcinoma. They discuss the pathogenesis, and the clinical and radiological manisfestations of this disease, and its differential diagnosis. This is an infrequent disease which must be considered whenever suggestive clinical aspects are associated with a radiological ''malignant pattern'' of a bowel lesion. (author) [pt

  10. Digital clubbing in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Christian J; Kob, Michael; Benvenuti, Stefano; Carella, Rodolfo; Lucchin, Lucio; Piazzi, Lucia; Chilovi, Fausto; Mazzoleni, Guido

    2010-08-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. The symptoms usually start in early infancy. We report a case of secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteopenia, monoclonal gammopathy and digital clubbing in a 57-year-old patient with a 12-year history of discontinuous diarrhea. Malabsorption with inability to gain weight, and finally weight loss and formation of leg edema were associated with protein-losing enteropathy. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation was clinically effective as medical management in reducing diarrhea and leg edema, and promoting weight gain. Double-balloon enteroscopy and small bowel biopsy histopathology confirmed dilated intestinal lacteals. Digital clubbing associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia which may causally be related to chronic platelet excess has not been reported before.

  11. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  12. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebeer, S.; Claes, I.J.; Tytgat, H.L.P.; Verhoeven, T.L.A.; Marien, E.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Keersmaecker, de S.C.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a

  13. Conditioning and learning in relation to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Guy, W

    1985-12-01

    Of the two generally recognized processes through which learning occurs--imprinting and conditioning--only the latter with its two paradigms, classical and operant, has both practical and heuristic implications for disease. From the classical conditioning experiments of Pavlov's laboratory over 100 years ago to the later work in operant conditioning by Skinner and others in the past four decades has evolved much of the basis of modern learning theory and its applications to disease in the form of behavior therapy. Variants of behavior therapy have been employed in the treatment of wide variety of medical and psychiatric illnesses. Recent developments in the study of brain function and biochemistry have led to renewed interest in the conditioning paradigm and its value as tool in these areas of research.

  14. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC{sup 1638N/+} Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Shay, Jerry W. [Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC{sup 1638N/+} mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, or {sup 56}Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after {sup 28}Si, followed by {sup 56}Fe and {sup 12}C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after {sup 28}Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with {sup 28}Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  15. Expression and distribution patterns of Mas-related gene receptor subtypes A-H in the mouse intestine: inflammation-induced changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Leela Rani; Buckinx, Roeland; Favoreel, Herman; Cox, Eric; Adriaensen, Dirk; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors that are implicated in nociception, and are as such considered potential targets for pain therapies. Furthermore, some Mrgs have been suggested to play roles in the regulation of inflammatory responses to non-immunological activation of mast cells and in mast cell-neuron communication. Except for MrgD, E and F, whose changed expression has been revealed during inflammation in the mouse intestine in our earlier studies, information concerning the remaining cloned mouse Mrg subtypes in the gastrointestinal tract during (patho) physiological conditions is lacking. Therefore, the present study aimed at identifying the presence and putative function of these remaining cloned Mrg subtypes (n = 19) in the (inflamed) mouse intestine. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, quantitative-PCR and multiple immunofluorescence staining with commercial and newly custom-developed antibodies, we compared the ileum and the related dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of non-inflamed mice with those of two models of intestinal inflammation, i.e., intestinal schistosomiasis and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced ileitis. In the non-inflamed ileum and DRG, the majority of the Mrg subtypes examined were sparsely expressed, showing a neuron-specific expression pattern. However, significant changes in the expression patterns of multiple Mrg subtypes were observed in the inflamed ileum; for instance, MrgA4, MrgB2and MrgB8 were expressed in a clearly increased number of enteric sensory neurons and in nerve fibers in the lamina propria, while de novo expression of MrgB10 was observed in enteric sensory neurons and in newly recruited mucosal mast cells (MMCs). The MrgB10 expressing MMCs were found to be in close contact with nerve fibers in the lamina propria. This is the first report on the expression of all cloned Mrg receptor subtypes in the (inflamed) mouse intestine. The observed changes in the expression and

  16. Small intestine diverticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Risov, A.

    1991-01-01

    The routine method of contrast matter passage applied to 850 patients with different gastrointestinal diseases proved inefficient to detect any small-intestinal diverticuli. The following modiffications of the method have been tested in order to improve the diagnostic possibilities of the X-ray: study at short intervals, assisted passage, enteroclysm, pharmacodynamic impact, retrograde filling of the ileum by irrigoscopy. Twelve diverticuli of the small-intestinal loops were identified: 5 Meckel's diverticuli, 2 solitary of which one of the therminal ileum, 2 double diverticuli and 1 multiple diverticulosis of the jejunum. The results show that the short interval X-ray examination of the small intestines is the method of choice for identifying local changes in them. The solitary diverticuli are not casuistic scarcity, its occurrence is about 0.5% at purposeful X-ray investigation. The assisted passage method is proposed as a method of choice for detection of the Meckel's diverticulum. 5 figs., 3 tabs. 18 refs

  17. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  18. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  19. Bile components and lecithin supplemented to plant based diets do not diminish diet related intestinal inflammation in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael H; Bjӧrkhem, Ingemar; Måsøval, Kjell; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2016-09-07

    The present study was undertaken to gain knowledge on the role of bile components and lecithin on development of aberrations in digestive functions which seemingly have increased in Atlantic salmon in parallel with the increased use of plant ingredients in fish feed. Post smolt Atlantic salmon were fed for 77 days one of three basal diets: a high fish meal diet (HFM), a low fishmeal diet (LFM), or a diet with high protein soybean meal (HPS). Five additional diets were made from the LFM diet by supplementing with: purified taurocholate (1.8 %), bovine bile salt (1.8 %), taurine (0.4 %), lecithin (1.5 %), or a mix of supplements (suppl mix) containing taurocholate (1.8 %), cholesterol (1.5 %) and lecithin (0.4 %). Two additional diets were made from the HPS diet by supplementing with: bovine bile salt (1.8 %) or the suppl mix. Body and intestinal weights were recorded, and blood, bile, intestinal tissues and digesta were sampled for evaluation of growth, nutrient metabolism and intestinal structure and function. In comparison with fish fed the HFM diet fish fed the LFM and HPS diets grew less and showed reduced plasma bile salt and cholesterol levels. Histological examination of the distal intestine showed signs of enteritis in both LFM and HPS diet groups, though more pronounced in the HPS diet group. The HPS diet reduced digesta dry matter and capacity of leucine amino peptidase in the distal intestine. None of the dietary supplements improved endpoints regarding fish performance, gut function or inflammation in the distal intestine. Some endpoints rather indicated negative effects. Dietary supplementation with bile components or lecithin in general did not improve endpoints regarding performance or gut health in Atlantic salmon, in clear contrast to what has been previously reported for rainbow trout. Follow-up studies are needed to clarify if lower levels of bile salts and cholesterol may give different and beneficial effects, or if other supplements

  20. A Disease-Associated Microbial and Metabolomics State in Relatives of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease PatientsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Jacobs

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Microbes may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by producing bioactive metabolites that affect immune activity and epithelial function. We undertook a family based study to identify microbial and metabolic features of IBD that may represent a predisease risk state when found in healthy first-degree relatives. Methods: Twenty-one families with pediatric IBD were recruited, comprising 26 Crohn’s disease patients in clinical remission, 10 ulcerative colitis patients in clinical remission, and 54 healthy siblings/parents. Fecal samples were collected for 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry metabolomics, and calprotectin measurement. Individuals were grouped into microbial and metabolomics states using Dirichlet multinomial models. Multivariate models were used to identify microbes and metabolites associated with these states. Results: Individuals were classified into 2 microbial community types. One was associated with IBD but irrespective of disease status, had lower microbial diversity, and characteristic shifts in microbial composition including increased Enterobacteriaceae, consistent with dysbiosis. This microbial community type was associated similarly with IBD and reduced microbial diversity in an independent pediatric cohort. Individuals also clustered bioinformatically into 2 subsets with shared fecal metabolomics signatures. One metabotype was associated with IBD and was characterized by increased bile acids, taurine, and tryptophan. The IBD-associated microbial and metabolomics states were highly correlated, suggesting that they represented an integrated ecosystem. Healthy relatives with the IBD-associated microbial community type had an increased incidence of elevated fecal calprotectin. Conclusions: Healthy first-degree relatives can have dysbiosis associated with an altered intestinal metabolome that may signify a predisease microbial

  1. Effect of alkaloids derived from jellyfish (Aeginura sp.) on the intestinal histopathology and relative percentage survival (RPS) of tiger grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) infected by Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andayani, S.; Fajar, M.; Rahman, M. F.

    2018-04-01

    The purposes of this research were to determine the effect of alkaloid jellyfish compounds on intestinal histopathology of tiger grouper and to determine the best doses to the relative percent survival (RPS) of tiger grouper. The method of this research was descriptive with completely randomized design. The treatment of active alkaloid compound on feed was investigated for 28 days. The fish were then challenged with Vibrio harveyi at 105 CFU/cell for 7 days. Alkaloids were added to the feed with the doses (g alkaloid/kg feed) of 0 (control); A = 0.5; B = 0.75; C = 1.0; and D = 1.25. The intestinal histopathology and RPS were observed. The best RPS was found at a treatment of C with the value of 100 %.

  2. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  3. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  4. Intestinal bacterial signatures of white feces syndrome in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dongwei; Huang, Zhijian; Zeng, Shenzheng; Liu, Jian; Wei, Dongdong; Deng, Xisha; Weng, Shaoping; Yan, Qingyun; He, Jianguo

    2018-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the intestinal microbiota is closely correlated with the host's health status. Thus, a serious disturbance that disrupts the stability of the intestinal microecosystem could cause host disease. Shrimps are one of the most important products among fishery trading commodities. However, digestive system diseases, such as white feces syndrome (WFS), frequently occur in shrimp culture and have led to enormous economic losses across the world. The WFS occurrences are unclear. Here, we compared intestinal bacterial communities of WFS shrimp and healthy shrimp. Intestinal bacterial communities of WFS shrimp exhibited less diversity but were more heterogeneous than those of healthy shrimp. The intestinal bacterial communities were significantly different between WFS shrimp and healthy shrimp; compared with healthy shrimp, in WFS shrimp, Candidatus Bacilloplasma and Phascolarctobacterium were overrepresented, whereas Paracoccus and Lactococcus were underrepresented. PICRUSt functional predictions indicated that the relative abundances of genes involved in energy metabolism and genetic information processing were significantly greater in WFS shrimp. Collectively, we found that the composition and predicted functions of the intestinal bacterial community were markedly shifted by WFS. Significant increases in Candidatus Bacilloplasma and Phascolarctobacterium and decreases in Paracoccus and Lactococcus may contribute to WFS in shrimp.

  5. Prebiotic Supplementation Has Only Minimal Effects on Growth Efficiency, Intestinal Health and Disease Resistance of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi Fed 30% Soybean Meal

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    Wendy M. Sealey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotics have successfully been used to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture and there is an increasing amount of literature that suggests that these products can also improve alternative protein utilization and digestion. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether prebiotic supplementation increased the growth efficiency, intestinal health and disease resistance of cutthroat trout fed a high level of dietary soybean meal. To achieve this objective, juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi were fed a practical type formulation with 0 or 30% dietary soybean meal with or without the commercial prebiotic (Grobiotic-A prior to experimental exposure to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (initial weight 7.8 g/fish ± standard deviation of 0.5 g were stocked at 30 fish/tank in 75 L tanks with six replicate tanks per diet and fed their respective diets for 20 weeks. Final weights of Westslope cutthroat trout were affected by neither dietary soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.9582 nor prebiotic inclusion (P=0.9348 and no interaction was observed (P=0.1242. Feed conversion ratios were similarly not affected by soybean meal level (P=0.4895, prebiotic inclusion (P=0.3258 or their interaction (P=0.1478. Histological examination of the distal intestine of Westslope cutthroat trout demonstrated increases in inflammation due to both increased soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.0038 and prebiotic inclusion (P=0.0327 without significant interaction (P=0.3370. Feeding dietary soybean meal level at 30% increased mortality of F.psychrophilum cohabitation challenged Westslope cutthroat trout (P=0.0345 while prebiotic inclusion tended to decrease mortality (P=0.0671. These results indicate that subclinical alterations in intestinal inflammation levels due to high dietary inclusion levels of soybean meal could predispose Westslope cutthroat trout to F.psychrophilum infection.

  6. An Ontology to Improve Transparency in Case Definition and Increase Case Finding of Infectious Intestinal Disease: Database Study in English General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Shinneman, Stacy; Yonova, Ivelina; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Elliot, Alex J; Bolton, Frederick; Smith, Gillian E; O'Brien, Sarah

    2017-09-28

    Infectious intestinal disease (IID) has considerable health impact; there are 2 billion cases worldwide resulting in 1 million deaths and 78.7 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Reported IID incidence rates vary and this is partly because terms such as "diarrheal disease" and "acute infectious gastroenteritis" are used interchangeably. Ontologies provide a method of transparently comparing case definitions and disease incidence rates. This study sought to show how differences in case definition in part account for variation in incidence estimates for IID and how an ontological approach provides greater transparency to IID case finding. We compared three IID case definitions: (1) Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) definition based on mapping to the Ninth International Classification of Disease (ICD-9), (2) newer ICD-10 definition, and (3) ontological case definition. We calculated incidence rates and examined the contribution of four supporting concepts related to IID: symptoms, investigations, process of care (eg, notification to public health authorities), and therapies. We created a formal ontology using ontology Web language. The ontological approach identified 5712 more cases of IID than the ICD-10 definition and 4482 more than the RCGP RSC definition from an initial cohort of 1,120,490. Weekly incidence using the ontological definition was 17.93/100,000 (95% CI 15.63-20.41), whereas for the ICD-10 definition the rate was 8.13/100,000 (95% CI 6.70-9.87), and for the RSC definition the rate was 10.24/100,000 (95% CI 8.55-12.12). Codes from the four supporting concepts were generally consistent across our three IID case definitions: 37.38% (3905/10,448) (95% CI 36.16-38.5) for the ontological definition, 38.33% (2287/5966) (95% CI 36.79-39.93) for the RSC definition, and 40.82% (1933/4736) (95% CI 39.03-42.66) for the ICD-10 definition. The proportion of laboratory results associated with a positive test

  7. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: a rare disease with an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Hadley, Terrance; Kesler, Melissa; Gul, Zartash

    2016-07-01

    IgG4-RD can also present in the skeletal muscle, mimicking several other diseases. It is unusual for this relatively new classification of diseases to present in the muscles and can be mistakenly diagnosed as other autoimmune diseases rendering a delay in the appropriate management and progression of the disease.

  8. Evaluation of Multiple Diagnostic Indicators in Comparison to the Intestinal Biopsy as the Golden Standard in Diagnosing Celiac Disease in Children

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    Elisabet Hollén

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic small intestinal enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The susceptibility is strongly associated with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA-genes, but efforts are being made in trying to find non-HLA genes that are predictive for the disease. The criteria for diagnosing CD were previously based primarily on histologic evaluation of small intestinal biopsies, but nowadays are often based only on blood tests and symptoms. In this context, we elucidated the accuracy of three diagnostic indicators for CD, alone or in combination. Genetic analyses of HLA-type and nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs known to be associated with CD were performed in 177 children previously investigated for the suspicion of CD. CD was confirmed in 109 children, while 68 were considered non-celiacs. The antibodies and urinary nitrite/nitrate concentrations of all of them were measured. The combinations of all the variables used in the study would classify 93% of the study population in the correct diagnostic group. The single best predictors were antibodies (i.e., anti-endomysium immunoglobulin A (IgA (EMA and transglutaminase IgA (TGA, followed by HLA-type and nitric oxide (NO-metabolites. The nine SNPs used did not contribute to the right diagnoses. Although our control group consisted of children with mostly gastrointestinal symptoms, the presented methodology predicted a correct classification in more than 90% of the cases.

  9. Extrapancreatic findings of IgG4-related disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.J.; Ng, Y.L.; Tan, D.; Fong, W.S.; Low, A.S.C.

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic fibro-inflammatory condition, which includes autoimmune pancreatitis as part of the disease spectrum. Imaging has been demonstrated to play a major role in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Recognizing the wide spectrum of extrapancreatic manifestations of IgG4-related disease coupled with a high clinical index of suspicion will allow for an accurate and timely diagnosis to be made, thus avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures and ensuring that early effective corticosteroid therapy is commenced. This review aims to serve as a concise reference tool for both clinicians and radiologists in the diagnosis of extrapancreatic IgG4-related disease

  10. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac

  11. Gut Microbiota Richness and Composition and Dietary Intake of Overweight Pregnant Women Are Related to Serum Zonulin Concentration, a Marker for Intestinal Permeability.

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    Mokkala, Kati; Röytiö, Henna; Munukka, Eveliina; Pietilä, Sami; Ekblad, Ulla; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Eerola, Erkki; Laiho, Asta; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2016-09-01

    Increased intestinal permeability may precede adverse metabolic conditions. The extent to which the composition of the gut microbiota and diet contribute to intestinal permeability during pregnancy is unknown. The aim was to investigate whether the gut microbiota and diet differ according to serum zonulin concentration, a marker of intestinal permeability, in overweight pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 100 overweight women [mean age: 29 y; median body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 30] in early pregnancy (zonulin (primary outcome) was determined by using ELISA, gut microbiota by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and dietary intake of macro- and micronutrients from 3-d food diaries. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparisons and linear regression and Spearman's nonparametric correlations for relations between serum zonulin and other outcome variables. Women were divided into "low" (zonulin groups on the basis of the median concentration of zonulin (46.4 ng/mL). The richness of the gut microbiota (Chao 1, observed species and phylogenetic diversity) was higher in the low zonulin group than in the high zonulin group (P = 0.01). The abundances of Bacteroidaceae and Veillonellaceae, Bacteroides and Blautia, and Blautia sp. were lower and of Faecalibacterium and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii higher (P zonulin group than in the high zonulin group. Dietary quantitative intakes of n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), fiber, and a range of vitamins and minerals were higher (P zonulin group than those in the high zonulin group. The richness and composition of the gut microbiota and the intake of n-3 PUFAs, fiber, and a range of vitamins and minerals in overweight pregnant women are associated with serum zonulin concentration. Modification of the gut microbiota and diet may beneficially affect intestinal permeability, leading to improved metabolic health of both the mother and fetus. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  12. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

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    Jerzy Kaleczyc

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15, and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5 and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM, substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be

  13. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated With Histological Liver Steatosis in Pediatric-Onset Intestinal Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpela, K.; Mutanen, A.; Salonen, A.; Savilahti, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Pakarinen, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD) is the major cause of mortality in IF. The link between intestinal microbiota and IFALD is unclear. METHODS: We compared intestinal microbiota of patients with IF (n = 23) with healthy controls (n = 58) using culture-independent

  14. RELATION BETWEEN GLUCOLIPID PROFILE AND SMALL INTESTINE HISTOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN DIABETIC RATS EXPOSED TO AN INTERMITTENT DIETARY RESTRICTION

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    Noriyuki Hisano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an intermittent and prolonged dietary restriction on biochemical variables and histological small intestinal patterns in 12-month-old male eSMT rats are examined. These spontaneously diabetic animals were separated in two groups after weaning: 10 rats fed ad libitum with standard rat chow and 10 rats fed a restricted diet by deprivation of the same food for 24 hours every 72. At 12 months of age, animals were weighed and euthanized after tail vein bleeding for plasma analysis (glycemia- both fasting and 120 minutes after an oral glucose challenge-, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia. Small intestines were removed, weighed and measured in length.Intestinal specimens were fixed, embedded in paraffin, semi serially cut at 6 µm and stained with PAS-Hematoxilyn and Hematoxilyn-Eosin. Histometry was performed through a linear devise attached to ocular lens and lectin histochemistry was accomplished employing Canavalis ensiformis, Dolichos biflorus, Arachis hypogea, Ulex europaeus-I, Triticum vulgaris, Ricinus communis and Soy Bean (Glicine Max Agglutinin. Essentially, eSMT rats, a suitable animal model for studying diabetes and/or its complications, revealed at 12 months of age after undergoing the dietary restriction: 1.- An expected improvement in body weight and determined biochemical variables (fasting and after glucose overload glycemias, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia without reaching euglycemic values. 2.- Changes in most of the analyzed histometric patterns with no relevant reflection on morphometric ones, and 3.- No modifications in lectinhistochemical patterns.

  15. Elevated Basal Pre-infection CXCL10 in Plasma and in the Small Intestine after Infection Are Associated with More Rapid HIV/SIV Disease Onset.

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    Mickaël J Ploquin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated blood CXCL10/IP-10 levels during primary HIV-1 infection (PHI were described as an independent marker of rapid disease onset, more robust than peak viremia or CD4 cell nadir. IP-10 enhances the recruitment of CXCR3+ cells, which include major HIV-target cells, raising the question if it promotes the establishment of viral reservoirs. We analyzed data from four cohorts of HIV+ patients, allowing us to study IP-10 levels before infection (Amsterdam cohort, as well as during controlled and uncontrolled viremia (ANRS cohorts. We also addressed IP-10 expression levels with regards to lymphoid tissues (LT and blood viral reservoirs in patients and non-human primates. Pre-existing elevated IP-10 levels but not sCD63 associated with rapid CD4 T-cell loss upon HIV-1 infection. During PHI, IP-10 levels and to a lesser level IL-18 correlated with cell-associated HIV DNA, while 26 other inflammatory soluble markers did not. IP-10 levels tended to differ between HIV controllers with detectable and undetectable viremia. IP-10 was increased in SIV-exposed aviremic macaques with detectable SIV DNA in tissues. IP-10 mRNA was produced at higher levels in the small intestine than in colon or rectum. Jejunal IP-10+ cells corresponded to numerous small and round CD68neg cells as well as to macrophages. Blood IP-10 response negatively correlated with RORC (Th17 marker gene expression in the small intestine. CXCR3 expression was higher on memory CD4+ T cells than any other immune cells. CD4 T cells from chronically infected animals expressed extremely high levels of intra-cellular CXCR3 suggesting internalization after ligand recognition. Elevated systemic IP-10 levels before infection associated with rapid disease progression. Systemic IP-10 during PHI correlated with HIV DNA. IP-10 production was regionalized in the intestine during early SIV infection and CD68+ and CD68neg haematopoietic cells in the small intestine appeared to be the major source of IP-10.

  16. Differences in gluten metabolism among healthy volunteers, coeliac disease patients and first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Nistal, Esther; Herrán, Alexandra R; Pérez-Andrés, Jénifer; Ferrero, Miguel A; Vaquero Ayala, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José M G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-28

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy resulting from exposure to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten proteins are partially digested by human proteases generating immunogenic peptides that cause inflammation in patients carrying HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genes. Although intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with patients with CD, bacterial metabolism of gluten has not been studied in depth thus far. The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of intestinal bacteria associated with gluten intake in healthy individuals, CD patients and first-degree relatives of CD patients. Faecal samples belonging to twenty-two untreated CD patients, twenty treated CD patients, sixteen healthy volunteers on normal diet, eleven healthy volunteers on gluten-free diet (GFD), seventy-one relatives of CD patients on normal diet and sixty-nine relatives on GFD were tested for several proteolytic activities, cultivable bacteria involved in gluten metabolism, SCFA and the amount of gluten in faeces. We detected faecal peptidasic activity against the gluten-derived peptide 33-mer. CD patients showed differences in faecal glutenasic activity (FGA), faecal tryptic activity (FTA), SCFA and faecal gluten content with respect to healthy volunteers. Alterations in specific bacterial groups metabolising gluten such as Clostridium or Lactobacillus were reported in CD patients. Relatives showed similar parameters to CD patients (SCFA) and healthy volunteers (FTA and FGA). Our data support the fact that commensal microbial activity is an important factor in the metabolism of gluten proteins and that this activity is altered in CD patients.

  17. Intestinal transplantation: The anesthesia perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation is a complex and challenging surgery. It is very effective for treating intestinal failure, especially for those patients who cannot tolerate parenteral nutrition nor have extensive abdominal disease. Chronic parental nutrition can induce intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). According to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data, children with intestinal failure affected by liver disease secondary to parenteral nutrition have the highest mortality on a waiting list when compared with all candidates for solid organ transplantation. Intestinal transplant grafts can be isolated or combined with the liver/duodenum/pancreas. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) has defined intestinal donor criteria. Living donor intestinal transplant (LDIT) has the advantages of optimal timing, short ischemia time and good human leukocyte antigen matching contributing to lower postoperative complications in the recipient. Thoracic epidurals provide excellent analgesia for the donors, as well as recipients. Recipient management can be challenging. Thrombosis and obstruction of venous access maybe common due to prolonged parenteral nutrition and/or hypercoaguability. Thromboelastography (TEG) is helpful for managing intraoperative product therapy or thrombosis. Large fluid shifts and electrolyte disturbances may occur due to massive blood loss, dehydration, third spacing etc. Intestinal grafts are susceptible to warm and cold ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Post-reperfusion syndrome is common. Cardiac or pulmonary clots can be monitored with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Vasopressors maybe used to ensure stable hemodynamics. Post-intestinal transplant patients may need anesthesia for procedures such as biopsies for surveillance of rejection, bronchoscopy, endoscopy, postoperative hemorrhage, anastomotic leaks, thrombosis of grafts etc. Asepsis

  18. Intestinal/Peritoneal Tuberculosis in Children: An Analysis of Autopsy Cases

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    Cecilia Ridaura-Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Mycobacterium bovis is not infrequently identified in Mexico. Its relation to nonpasteurized milk products ingestion is well recognized with primary infection usually in the intestinal tract. The term “abdominal tuberculosis” includes peritoneal as well as primary and secondary intestinal tuberculosis. The clinical differentiation of these conditions is difficult. In this work, we reviewed the clinical and pathological features of 24 cases of children dying with tuberculosis in whom autopsy revealed abdominal disease in a referral hospital in Mexico City. We identified 8 cases of primary intestinal tuberculosis, with documentation of M. bovis in 6 of them, and 9 cases of secondary intestinal tuberculosis (primary pulmonary disease, all negative to M. bovis. Seven patients had peritoneal tuberculosis without intestinal lesions and with active pulmonary disease in 4 of them, and of the remaining three, two had mesenteric lymph node involvement suggesting healed intestinal disease. In this approach to abdominal tuberculosis, postmortem analysis was able to differentiate primary from secondary intestinal tuberculosis and to define the nature of peritoneal involvement. This discrimination gives rise to different diagnostic approaches and epidemiological and preventive actions, particularly in countries where tuberculosis is endemic and infection by M. bovis continues to be identified.

  19. IgG4-related Disease and the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Deshpande, Vikram

    2017-06-01

    Pathologists are likely to encounter IgG4-related disease in several organ systems. This article focuses on helping pathologists diagnose IgG4-related disease in the hepatobiliary system. Missing the diagnosis can result in unnecessary organ damage and/or unnecessary surgical and cancer therapy. In the liver, tumefactive lesion(s) involving the bile ducts with storiform fibrosis and an IgG4-enriched lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate are highly concerning for IgG4-related disease. The recent identification of oligoclonal populations of T cells and B cells in IgG4-related disease may lead to molecular tests, new therapeutics, and a greater mechanistic understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-Term Intravenous Ketamine for Analgesia in a Child with Severe Chronic Intestinal Graft versus Host Disease

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    Jennifer Busse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is reported to be an effective adjuvant to opioids in the treatment of refractory cancer pain; however, the use of high doses of ketamine for extended periods in pediatric patients has not been described. We present a five-year-old male with grade IV intestinal GVHD whose abdominal pain required both hydromorphone and ketamine for a period of over four months. There was no evidence of hepatotoxicity, hemorrhagic cystitis, or other adverse effects. Possible withdrawal symptoms were mild and were readily mitigated by gradually weaning ketamine.

  1. Role of Smooth Muscle in Intestinal Inflammation

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    Stephen M Collins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion that smooth muscle function is altered in inflammation is prompted by clinical observations of altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. While altered motility may reflect inflammation-induced changes in intrinsic or extrinsic nerves to the gut, changes in gut hormone release and changes in muscle function, recent studies have provided in vitro evidence of altered muscle contractility in muscle resected from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In addition, the observation that smooth muscle cells are more numerous and prominent in the strictured bowel of IBD patients compared with controls suggests that inflammation may alter the growth of intestinal smooth muscle. Thus, inflammation is associated with changes in smooth muscle growth and contractility that, in turn, contribute to important symptoms of IBD including diarrhea (from altered motility and pain (via either altered motility or stricture formation. The involvement of smooth muscle in this context may be as an innocent bystander, where cells and products of the inflammatory process induce alterations in muscle contractility and growth. However, it is likely that intestinal muscle cells play a more active role in the inflammatory process via the elaboration of mediators and trophic factors, including cytokines, and via the production of collagen. The concept of muscle cells as active participants in the intestinal inflammatory process is a new concept that is under intense study. This report summarizes current knowledge as it relates to these two aspects of altered muscle function (growth and contractility in the inflamed intestine, and will focus on mechanisms underlying these changes, based on data obtained from animal models of intestinal inflammation.

  2. Effects of pig genotype (Iberian v. Landrace × Large White) on nutrient digestibility, relative organ weight and small intestine structure at two stages of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barea, R; Nieto, R; Vitari, F; Domeneghini, C; Aguilera, J F

    2011-02-01

    Although the effects of pig genotype on total-tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) have been widely reported in the literature, there is controversial information on the digestive capacity of indigenous breeds compared with lean-type pigs. The strategy of this study was to test the effects of pig genotype and crude protein (CP) supply on performance, digestive utilization of nutrients, relative organ weight and morphometric analysis of the small intestine. Thirty-eight Iberian (IB) and Landrace × Large White (LD) pigs were used. Three pigs per genotype were slaughtered at approximately 15 kg BW. The remaining pigs were fed one of two diets differing in CP content (13% or 17% as fed) using a pair-fed procedure. Feeding level was restricted at 0.8 × ad libitum of IB pigs. Nutrient digestibility and nitrogen (N) balance trials were performed at 30 and 80 kg BW. Four pigs per dietary treatment and genotype were slaughtered at approximately 50 and 115 kg BW. The gastrointestinal tract and the rest of the visceral organs were weighed and samples of the small intestine were taken to carry out histological and histometrical studies. Daily gain and gain-to-feed ratio were higher in LD than in IB pigs during the fattening and growing-fattening periods (P LD pigs at 30 kg BW (P LD pigs at 30 and 80 kg BW (30% as mean value). The proportional weight of the small intestine was greater in LD than in IB pigs at 50 and 115 kg BW. Histometry showed that IB presented a lower muscle layer thickness than LD pigs in ileum, irrespective of the BW (P LD pigs showed approximately 10% higher ileal villi length and villi-to-crypt ratio than IB pigs at 115 kg BW. CP supply affected to a larger extent the small intestinal micro-anatomical structure of LD pigs at 50 kg BW. In conclusion, our results suggests that although the higher growth rate, NR and efficiency of NR observed in LD pigs might be associated with presumably more efficient structural aspects of the small intestine, the main

  3. PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA LAMBLIA AND OTHER INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN AND ITS RELATION TO RESIDENCE PLACE, SEX AND BLOOD GROUP IN ILAM COUNTY OF IRAN

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    Pourbabak

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available 1711' object of this study was to determine the prevalence oj asymptomatic infestation with Giardia lamblia lind other intestinal parasites in children of urban anti rural communities oj /lam county and its relation with dwelling place, sex and blood grollp!.. 77w study designed as (l five-month pUTasitoulgica! .m,..£!' oj fecal ami blood specimens from humans anti performed in 10 urban hcalih-trcatmcru clinics of llam city, two urban health treatment clinics of Eyvun city, two rural health-treatment clinics oj Chavar and Sartaf villages, llam province west of fran, 17,e examined population was preschool {, to 7 year-old children without any 'gastrointestinal compliarus. Prevalence oj infestation in subject grOllp W(l."' 32.54% (n=3100. Among intestinal parasites' G. lambliu with 85.43o/c (27.8% oj all, n=JO(JI prevalence rate was the most common. Infestation with 11. nnrm with 1'/.93% and E. coli with 3.07';, were in the second and third ranks, respectively, Infestation shows a distinct relationship with gender (P<0.05 and dwelling place, but it lacks a significant relation with blood groups. This study ."lIOWS that the prevalence of intestinal infestation in 6 to 7 year old child oj llam county hi equivalent to the top oj tile line oj the statistical percentage all over the world. 17,e relation between the severity oj infestation and residence place may arouse the suspicion oj sever contamination oj imbibing water.

  4. Pretreatment with remifentanil protects against the reduced-intestinal contractility related to the ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat

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    Hale Sayan-Ozacmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Serious functional and structural alterations of gastrointestinal tract are observed in failure of blood supply, leading to gastrointestinal dismotility. Activation of opioid receptors provides cardioprotective effect against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not remifentanil could reduce I/R injury of small intestine. METHODS: Male Wistar Albino rats were subjected to mesenteric ischemia (30 min followed by reperfusion (3 h. Four groups were designed: sham control; remifentanil alone; I/R control; and remifentanil + I/R. Animals in remifentanil + I/R group were subjected to infusion of remifentanil (2 ug kg-1 min-1 for 60 min, half of which started before inducing ischemia. Collecting the ileum tissues, evaluation of damage was based on contractile responses to carbachol, levels of lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and observation of histopathological features in intestinal tissue. RESULTS: Following reperfusion, a significant decrease in carbachol-induced contractile response, a remarkable increase in both lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and a significant injury in mucosa were observed. An average contractile response of remifentanil + I/R group was significantly different from that of the I/R group. Lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration were also significantly suppressed by the treatment. The tissue samples of the I/R group were grade 4 in histopathological evaluation. In remifentanil + I/R group, on the other hand, the mucosal damage was moderate, staging as grade 1. CONCLUSIONS: The pretreatment with remifentanil can attenuate the intestinal I/R injury at a remarkable degree possibly by lowering lipid peroxidation and leukocyte infiltration.

  5. IgG4-RELATED DISEASE. CLINICAL NOTES

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    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related diseases are a new nosological entity that encompasses a few previously known diseases. IgG4-related systemic disease is diagnosed if two or more affected organs are detected. This group of diseases has two similar signs: serological (elevated serum IgG4 subclass concentrations and histological (organ and tissue infiltration from plasmo-cytes secreting IgG4, and eosinophils, and the development of fibrosclerosis and phlebitis obliterans. The paper describes two cases. In one case, a multisystemic disease was observed virtually at its onset whereas in the other this lesion was diagnosed several years after the natural course of the disease.

  6. Overview of IgG4 - Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opriţă, R; Opriţă, B; Berceanu, D; Diaconescu, I B

    2017-01-01

    Rationale (hypothesis): IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a pathological entity recently recognized by the medical world that can affect any organ or system. However, there is insufficient data about this disease in medical literature. Aim (objective): A more extensive clarification of the IgG4 molecule, the diversified aspects of IgG4-related disease, and the response of this disease to treatment, will provide a crucial understanding of the immune system and other diseases now known to be associated with IgG4. The MEDLINE online medical database was used, and, after a comprehensive review of medical articles regarding IgG4-RD, published after 2003, using the search words "IgG4- related disease" and "IgG4 molecule", we have described the clinical, pathological and therapeutic features of IgG4-RD, as well as the presence of the IgG4 molecule in the evolution, diagnosis and management of this syndrome. We characterized the potential disease mechanisms and discussed early observations related to treatment. Given the response to immunosuppressive therapy, it is hypothesized that IgG4-related disease is most likely an autoimmune disease. Therefore, IgG4-related disease is a fibro-inflammatory condition that can affect any organ and can lead to the formation of pseudotumoral lesions requiring differential diagnosis with various malignancies. Positive diagnostic criteria are histopathological and require at least two features out of the following three: dense limphoplasmocitary infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis.

  7. HIV related renal disease in Africans | Elangovan | IMTU Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal disease is becoming an increasingly prevalent entity in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV)–infected patients, first diagnosed in AIDS patients in 1984. The HIV-related renal disease represents a spectrum of clinical and histological conditions presenting as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, glomerulopathies, ...

  8. The emerging mysteries of IgG4-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Wouter; Barnes, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is increasingly recognised in Western societies as a multi-system, inflammatory, fibrosing disease of unknown aetiology that typically, though not exclusively, presents in older men. The clinical manifestations are diverse and almost any organ may be affected. The

  9. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  10. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  11. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum.

  12. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid. PMID:22020518

  13. Wildlife-related Zoonotic Diseases among Pastoralists in Uganda ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While risk of zoonotic disease is related to wildlife-livestock-human ... public health, food security, wildlife protection and business (tourism, value chains). Using an Ecohealth approach, researchers will conduct a serological survey to ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: REN-related kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (5 links) Encyclopedia: Hyperkalemia Encyclopedia: Renin Health Topic: Anemia Health Topic: Gout Health Topic: Kidney Diseases Additional NIH Resources (2 ...

  15. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  16. IgG4-related disease in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Annick A J M; Seidl, Maximilian; Drendel, Vanessa; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Voll, Reinhard E; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Warnatz, Klaus; Kollert, Florian

    2017-07-01

    A patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) developed IgG4-related disease. In retrospect, he had high levels of serum IgG4 for several years prior to presenting with IgG4-related pancreatitis. These high IgG4 levels were masked by hypergammaglobulinemia, a common feature of ALPS. We next screened 18 ALPS patients; four of them displayed increased levels of IgG4. Hence, IgG4-related disease should be considered in ALPS patients, especially in those manifesting lymphocytic organ infiltration or excessive hypergammaglobulinaemia. Screening of IgG4-related disease patients for ALPS-associated mutations would provide further information on whether this disease could be a late-onset atypical presentation of ALPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in sporadic and celiac disease-related small bowel adenocarcinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosdado, B.; Buffart, T.E.; Watkins, R.; Carvalho, B.; Ylstra, B.; Tijssen, M.; Bolijn, A.S.; Lewis, F.; Maude, K.; Verbeke, C.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Grabsch, H.; Mulder, C.J.; Quirke, P.; Howdle, P.; Meijer, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The molecular pathogenesis of small intestinal adenocarcinomas is not well understood. Understanding the molecular characteristics of small bowel adenocarcinoma may lead to more effective patient treatment. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Forty-eight small bowel adenocarcinomas (33 non-celiac disease

  18. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Increased risk of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease: A meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Gamborg, Michael; Matzen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    the inclusion criteria and reported SIRs of colorectal cancer (CRC) in CD varying from 0.9 to 2.2. The pooled SIR for CRC was significantly increased (SIR, 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5), as was the risk for colon cancer separately (SIR, 2.5; 95% CI 1.7-3.5). Regarding small bowel cancer, five studies reported SIRs...... ranging from 3.4 to 66.7, and the overall pooled estimate was 27.1 (95% CI 14.9-49.2). CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis of intestinal cancer risk in CD, based on population-based studies only, revealed an overall increased risk of both CRC and small bowel cancer among patients with CD. However, some...

  20. Pathomorphological characteristic of IgG4-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Dyadyk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related diseases are a relatively new group of diseases of unknown etiology which are characterized by the development of fibrosis of organs with the presence of big amounts of IgG4-positive plasma-cells in the area of the lesions and increased levels of IgG4 in serum. The organs that may be affected are pancreas, salivary gland, and others, clinical cases of kidney damage are described as well. Renal involvement in IgG4-related diseases most often occurs on the type of tubulointerstitial nephritis, with the further development of acute or chronic kidney injury. The clinic may be represented by the pseudotumor of kidney, renal tissue heterogeneity on the results of CT-studies; acute or chronic renal disease; combination with other organ damage (autoimmune pancreatitis, sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing lymphoplasmacytic cholecystitis, colitis, sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, etc.. Laboratory findings include an increased level of IgG4 in the blood serum, hypocomplementemia, eosinophilia. Histologically, there is interstitial inflammation with many plasma cells, interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy, thickening of the tubular basement membrane, some cases are a type of membranous glomerulonephritis. The aim of the study is to identify the patients with IgG4-related diseases with renal impairment and widening the pathological database of such patients with renal impairment to determine the classification criteria of this pathological condition. Materials and methods will include the deceased kidney screening, screening of patients with autoimmune and allergic diseases, nephrological patients screening with the lifetime biopsy (in some cases – repeat biopsy with chronic or acute kidney impairment. There will be clinical and pathological comparison in kidney damage and other diseases with the development of criteria for the classification of lesions in the presence of IgG4-positive substrates and further development of practical

  1. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  2. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Xu, Jin; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-17

    Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  3. Climate change-related migration and infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change will have significant impacts on both human migration and population health, including infectious disease. It will amplify and alter migration pathways, and will contribute to the changing ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious disease. However there has been limited consideration of the intersections between migration and health in the context of a changing climate. This article argues that climate-change related migration - in conjunction with other drivers of migration - will contribute to changing profiles of infectious disease. It considers infectious disease risks for different climate-related migration pathways, including: forced displacement, slow-onset migration particularly to urban-poor areas, planned resettlement, and labor migration associated with climate change adaptation initiatives. Migration can reduce vulnerability to climate change, but it is critical to better understand and respond to health impacts - including infectious diseases - for migrant populations and host communities.

  4. Prebiotic Supplementation has Only Minimal Effects on Growth Efficiency, Intestinal Health and Disease Resistance of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi Fed 30% Soybean Meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Wendy M; Conley, Zachariah B; Bensley, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Prebiotics have successfully been used to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture and there is an increasing amount of literature that suggests that these products can also improve alternative protein utilization and digestion. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether prebiotic supplementation increased the growth efficiency, intestinal health, and disease resistance of cutthroat trout fed a high level of dietary soybean meal. To achieve this objective, juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) were fed a practical type formulation with 0 or 30% dietary soybean meal with or without the commercial prebiotic (Grobiotic-A) prior to experimental exposure to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (initial weight 7.8 g/fish ±SD of 0.5 g) were stocked at 30 fish/tank in 75 L tanks with six replicate tanks per diet and fed their respective diets for 20 weeks. Final weights of Westslope cutthroat trout were affected by neither dietary soybean meal inclusion level (P = 0.9582) nor prebiotic inclusion (P = 0.9348) and no interaction was observed (P = 0.1242). Feed conversion ratios were similarly not affected by soybean meal level (P = 0.4895), prebiotic inclusion (P = 0.3258) or their interaction (P = 0.1478). Histological examination of the distal intestine of Westslope cutthroat trout demonstrated increases in inflammation due to both increased soybean meal inclusion level (P = 0.0038) and prebiotic inclusion (P = 0.0327) without significant interaction (P = 0.3370). Feeding dietary soybean meal level at 30% increased mortality of F. psychrophilum cohabitation challenged Westslope cutthroat trout (P = 0.0345) while prebiotic inclusion tended to decrease mortality (P = 0.0671). These results indicate that subclinical alterations in intestinal inflammation levels due to high dietary inclusion levels of soybean meal could predispose Westslope cutthroat

  5. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  6. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Prevalence of celiac disease among first-degree relatives of Indian celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asha; Prakash, Shyam; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Ahuja, Vineet; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Makharia, Govind K

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease, once thought to be uncommon in Asia, is now recognized in Asian nations as well. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients followed in our centre. First-degree relatives were screened prospectively for celiac disease using questionnaire-based interview and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Serology positive first-degree relatives underwent duodenal biopsies. Diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on positive serology and villous abnormality Marsh grade 2 or higher. Human leucocyte antigen DQ2/-DQ8 was also assessed in 127 first-degree relatives. 434 first-degree relatives of 176 celiac disease patients were prospectively recruited; 282 were symptomatic (64.9%), 58 were positive for serology (13.3%). Seroprevalence was higher in female than in males (19% vs 8.5%; p=0.001) and highest in siblings (16.9%) than parents (13.6%) and children (5.9%) of celiac patients (p=0.055); 87.4% first-degree relatives were human leucocyte antigen-DQ2/-DQ8 positive. Overall prevalence of celiac disease was 10.9% amongst first-degree relatives. The prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients was 10.9% in our cohort, and 87% had human leucocyte antigen-DQ2 or -DQ8 haplotype. All first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients should be screen for celiac disease even if asymptomatic or with atypical manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors influencing the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Morten

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Light-to-moderate alcohol intake is known to have cardioprotective properties in some subsets of the population. This review focuses on factors that modify the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several large American studies have shown...... to a binge - intake of alcohol have benefits with regard to cardiovascular disease. Prospective studies from the UK, Sweden and Denmark have further suggested that wine drinkers have a lower mortality than beer and spirits drinkers. SUMMARY: The J-shaped relation between alcohol intake and cardiovascular...... that the J-shaped relation is influenced by age and coronary heart disease risk-factor status since only middle-aged and elderly and those already at risk of developing coronary heart disease seem protected by drinking alcohol. It has also been suggested that only those who have a steady - in contrast...

  9. Perception of schizophrenic’s relatives about the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmille Morais Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the perception of schizophrenic’s relatives about the disease. Methods: This is a descriptive, qualitative study performed with ten family members of people with medical diagnosis of schizophrenia treated by the Center for Psychosocial Care (CAPS in a municipality of Ceará. Unstructured interview was used as a strategy to collect data. Data analysis was based on the method of content analysis proposed by Bardin (1997. Results: The identified categories were: identification of disease; treatment of schizophrenia; difficulties experienced by relatives; search for quality of life by people with schizophrenia. Conclusion: In the speech of schizophrenic’s relatives, gaps are perceived in knowledge concerning the diagnosis of the disease, which point at the importance of this aspect being clarified during the meetings between professionals, users and family members. However, other aspects of the disease, such as behavioral disorders and types of treatments, were mentioned by the study participants.

  10. The Histopathology of IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avincsal, Mehmet Ozgur; Zen, Yoh

    2017-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a multi-organ immune-mediated chronic fibroinflammatory condition characterized by elevated serum IgG4 concentrations, tumefaction, and tissue infiltration by IgG4-positive plasma cells. The exact etiology of IgG4-related disease remains unclear with no known role of the IgG4 molecule itself being identified. Although the pancreas and salivary glands are the main organs affected, the involvement of other organs has also been reported. This multi-organ disease mimics a large number of malignant, infectious, and inflammatory disorders; therefore, a prompt differential diagnosis is important for selecting the right therapeutic strategy. Early steroid therapy assists in preventing tissue fibrosis, parenchymal extinction, and severe functional impairments in the affected organs. The definitive and prompt diagnosis of IgG4-related disease requires both histopathological confirmation and clinicopathological correlations. A histopathological examination is mandatory to exclude neoplastic or inflammatory conditions that mimic IgG4-related disease. The histological changes that occur are basically similar in any organ manifestation, with several site-specific findings being recognized. This chapter summarizes general rules for the pathological examination of IgG4-related disease, as well as the histopathological features and differential diagnoses of major organ manifestations.

  11. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Bacterial Translocation from Intestine: Microbiological, Immunological and Pathophysiological Aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoprigora, G I; Kafarskaya, L I; Bainov, N A; Shkoporov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is both pathology and physiology phenomenon. In healthy newborns it accompanies the process of establishing the autochthonous intestinal microbiota and the host microbiome. In immunodeficiency it can be an aethio-pathogenetic link and a manifestation of infection or septic complications. The host colonization resistance to exogenous microbic colonizers is provided by gastrointestinal microbiota in concert with complex constitutional and adaptive defense mechanisms. BT may be result of barrier dysfunction and self-purification mechanisms involving the host myeloid cell phagocytic system and opsonins. Dynamic cell humoral response to microbial molecular patterns that occurs on the mucous membranes initiates receptorsignalingpathways and cascade ofreactions. Their vector and results are largely determined by cross-reactivity between microbiome and the host genome. Enterocyte barriers interacting with microbiota play leading role in providing adaptive, homeostatic and stress host reactivity. Microcirculatory ischemic tissue alterations and inflammatory reactions increase the intestinal barrier permeability and BT These processes a well as mechanisms for apoptotic cells and bacteria clearance are justified to be of prospective research interest. The inflammatory and related diseases caused by alteration and dysfunction of the intestinal barrier are reasonably considered as diseases of single origin. Maternal microbiota affects theformation of the innate immune system and the microbiota of the newborn, including intestinal commensal translocation during lactation. Deeper understanding of intestinal barrier mechanisms needs complex microbiological, immunological, pathophysiological, etc. investigations using adequate biomodels, including gnotobiotic animals.

  13. IgA anti-Actin antibodies in children with celiac disease: comparison of immunofluorescence with Elisa assay in predicting severe intestinal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of serum IgA antibodies against actin filaments (AAA in patients with celiac disease (CD is strongly associated with mucosal damage and severe degrees of villous atrophy. The aims of the present study were (1 to verify the effectiveness of IgA-AAA in newly diagnosed CD patients in a clinical setting (2 to compare the immunofluorescence assay with ELISA assay; (3 to compare the correlation of our IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab class with mucosal intestinal lesions. Methods 90 patients underwent endoscopy and multiple biopsies for suspected CD on the basis of symptoms, in presence of positive tTG-Ab tests. Twenty biopsied and 25 not-biopsied subjects with negative tTG-Ab were tested as control groups. IgA-AAA assays were performed by indirect immunofluorescence using rat epithelial intestinal cells, and by ELISA with a commercial kit. tTG-Ab assay was a radio-binding assay. Intestinal specimens were collected by upper endoscopy and the histological study was done according to the Marsh's classification modified by Oberhuber (M/O. Auto-antibodies assays and histological evaluation have been performed blindly by skilled operators. Results CD diagnosis was confirmed in 82 patients (type I M/O in 2 patients, IIIA in 18 patients, IIIB in 29 patients and IIIC in 33 patients. Two patients with type 1 lesion in presence of positive tTG-Ab and abdominal complaints, started a gluten free diet. The rate of IgA-AAA positivity (sensitivity by IFI and ELISA in histologically proven celiac disease patients, were 5.5% and 25% patients in IIIA, 27.5% and 34.4% patients in IIIB, 78.8% and 75% in IIIC patients, respectively. Patients with normal or nearly normal mucosa, regardless of tTG-Ab status, presented negative IgA-AAA IFI assay. On the other hand, 1 patient with normal mucosa but positive tTG-Ab, also presented positive IgA-AAA ELISA. All healthy non biopsied

  14. Bovine Ephemeral Fever As A Disease Related To Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Ephemeral Fever (BEF is one of arbovirus diseases infecting in ruminants especially cattle and buffaloes, which is transmitted by mosquito vectors. In general, vector borne disease is also related to climate change, that mosquito as a vector will significantly increase when the environment temperature increases. The disease was found in many countries in Asia, Africa and Australia. The clinical sign of the disease such as fever to paralysis causes economical impact to the farmer, eventhough the mortality is very low. This review will discuss the disease in relation to climate change, which affects vector population that spread the disease. The more population of vector is the higher chance of animal to be infected. This condition describes that the spread of BEF will depend on some factors included the increase of vectors, the availability of susceptible host and vector media facilities, climate condition and supportive ecology. This paper will discuss the feature of BEF, mode of transmission, the impact of environment and climate change, disease prevention and control, and other aspects to prevent further economical impact. It will also discuss how to the transmission, prevention and control of disease BEF. The information can be taken as an input for policy makers to prevent BEF infection in Indonesia.

  15. Obesity-Related Diseases Dietary Modulation of the Gut Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Lena Kirchner

    strategies to reduce obesity-related morbidity and mortality are essential. It has been hypothesized that the microbes in the human gut are involved in the development of obesity-related diseases and that intake of nutrients affecting the gut microbial community in specific ways, can be a new strategy...

  16. NAD+ Deficits in Age-Related Diseases and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Amanda; Djouder, Nabil

    2017-08-01

    The phenomenon of aging has gained widespread attention in recent times. Although significant advances have been made to better understand aging and its related pathologies including cancer, there is not yet a clear mechanism explaining why diseases and cancer are inherent parts of the aging process. Finding a unifying equation that could bridge aging and its related diseases would allow therapeutic development and solve an immense human health problem to live longer and better. In this review, we discuss NAD + reduction as the central mechanism that may connect aging to its related pathologies and cancer. NAD + boosters would ensure and ameliorate health quality during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in the location and activity of intestinal Crohn's disease lesions between adult and paediatric patients detected with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccioni, Francesca; Carrozzo, Federica; Pino, Anna Rosaria; Staltari, Ilaria; Ansari, Najwa Al; Marini, Mario [Rome University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Viola, Franca; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore [Rome University, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Vestri, Annarita [Rome University, Department of Statistical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Roma (Italy); Signore, Alberto [Rome University, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Faculty Medicine and Psychology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare paediatric patients (PP) and adult patients (AP) affected by Crohn's disease (CD) in terms of the location and activity of intestinal lesions. Forty-three children (mean age 15 years) and 43 adults (mean age 48 years) with proven CD underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to localise lesions and detect their activity in 9 segments of the small and large bowel. The results were analysed on a per patient and per segment basis. Ileo-colonoscopy was performed in all patients. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Involvement of terminal ileum was significantly different in the two groups: observed in 100 % of AP (43/43) versus 58 % (23/43) of PP (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the colon was diseased in 84 % of PP versus 64 % of AP. In particular, left colonic segments were significantly more involved in PP (descending colon 53 % versus 21 %, P < 0.01; rectum 67 % versus 23 %, P < 0.0001; sigmoid colon 56 % versus 37 %, not significant), whereas caecal involvement was equal in both groups. In children the maximal disease activity was found in left colonic segments, whereas in adults it was in the terminal ileum. MRE detected significant differences between the two populations, showing a more extensive and severe involvement of the left colon in children but the distal ileum in adults. (orig.)

  18. Conflict and diarrheal and related diseases: a global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Khan, Maria R; Rehm, Jürgen; Sapkota, Amir

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between deaths owing to terrorism, civil war and one-sided violence from 1994-2000 and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to diarrheal and related diseases, schistosomiasis, trachoma and the nematode infections (DSTN diseases) in 2002 among World Health Organization Member States. Deaths resulting from terrorism, civil war and one-sided violence were significantly related to DSTN DALYs across the majority of sex-age subgroups of the populace, after controlling for baseline levels of improved water/sanitation and a variety of economic measures: overall, a 1.0% increase in deaths owing to terrorism and related violence was associated with an increase of 0.16% in DALYs lost to DSTN diseases. Associations were greatest among 0-to-4-year olds. The results of the present study suggest that DSTN disease control efforts should target conflict-affected populations with particular attention to young children who suffer disproportionately from DSTN diseases in these settings. In view of the evidence that terrorism and related violence may influence DSTN DALYs in the longer term, control strategies should move beyond immediate responses to decrease the incidence and severity of DSTN diseases to seek solutions through bolstering health systems infrastructure development among conflict-affected populations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The role of Haptoglobin and its related protein, Zonulin, in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Vermeire, Séverine; Cleynen, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), collectively called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are immune-mediated conditions characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gut. Their precise etiology is unknown, although an increased intestinal permeability has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal epithelium provides the largest interface between the external environment and the host, and is thus a crucial regulation site of innate and adaptive immunity. Zonulin is one of the few known physiological mediators of paracellular intestinal permeability. It was found upregulated in different immune diseases like Celiac disease and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Recently, human zonulin was identified as prehaptoglobin-2 (pre-HP2) which before only had been regarded as the inactive precursor for HP2. Haptoglobin (HP) is a hemoglobin-binding protein with immunomodulatory properties. Its gene harbors a common polymorphism with 2 different alleles: HP1 and HP2. Allele HP2 and genotype HP22 has been shown to be overrepresented in different immune diseases like Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and T1D, and has also been found to be more frequent in patients with IBD (UC and CD) than in healthy controls.   In order to get some clues about the mechanism of action of HP(2) in IBD pathogenesis, we here review the current state of knowledge about zonulin and haptoglobin structure and function, and their plausible role in immune mediated diseases with an emphasis on IBD.

  20. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on stability following simulated gastro-intestinal digestion of microcapsules of Bordo grape skin phenolic extract produced with different carrier agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Luiza Siede; Wesolowski, Júlia Lerina; Noreña, Caciano Pelayo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    The stability of microparticles of Bordo grape skin aqueous extract, produced by spray-drying and freeze-drying using polydextrose (5%) and partially hydrolyzed guar gum (5%), was evaluated under accelerated conditions (75 and 90% relative humidity, at 35, 45, and 55°C for 35days) and simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The temperature had a significant effect on the reduction of phenolics content, with retentions varying from 82.5 to 93.5%. The retention of total monomer anthocyanins were in the range of 3.9-42.3%. The antioxidant activity had a final retention of 38.5-59.5%. In the simulated gastrointestinal digestion, a maximum release was observed for the phenolic compounds in the intestinal phase (90.6% for the spray-dried powder and 94.9% for the freeze-dried powder), as well as the antioxidant activity (69.4% for the spray-dried powder and 67.8% for the freeze-dried powder). However, a reduction of monomeric anthocyanins was observed in the intestinal phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Disease-related malnutrition: influence on body composition and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pirlich, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is a frequent clincal problem with severe medical and economic impact. This work summarizes studies on body composition analysis, risk factors, prevalence and prognostic impact of malnutrition. The diagnosis of malnutrition in patients with chronic liver disease is hampered by hyperhydration and requires body composition analysis. Using four different methods for body composition analysis (total body potassium counting, anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance analy...

  2. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  3. Intestinal myiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udgaonkar, U S; Dharamsi, R; Kulkarni, S A; Shah, S R; Patil, S S; Bhosale, A L; Gadgil, S A; Mohite, R S

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar). This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  4. Molecular basis of structural makeup of hulless barley in relation to rumen degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiran, D; Yu, P

    2011-10-01

    To date, no study has been done of molecular structures in relation to nutrient degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to (1) reveal molecular structures of hulless barley affected by structural alteration using molecular spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) as a novel approach, and (2) quantify structure features on a molecular basis in relation to digestive kinetics and nutritive value in the rumen and intestine in cattle. The modeled feeds in this study were 4 types of hulless barley (HB) cultivars modified in starch traits: (a) normal starch cultivar, (b) zero-amylose waxy, (c) waxy, and (d) high-amylose. The molecular structural features were determined using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (ca. 4,000-800 cm(-1)) of the electromagnetic spectrum. The items assessed included infrared intensity attributed to protein amide I (ca. 1,715-1,575 cm(-1)), amide II (ca. 1,575-1,490 cm(-1)), α-helix (ca. 1,648-1,660 cm(-1)), β-sheet (ca. 1,625-1,640 cm(-1)), and their ratio, β-glucan (ca. 1,445-1,400 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO; ca. 1,188-820 cm(-1)) and their 3 major peaks, structural carbohydrates (ca. 1,277-1,190 cm(-1)), and ratios of amide I to II and amide I to CHO. The results show that (1) the zero-amylose waxy was the greatest in amide I and II peak areas, as well as in the ratio of protein amide I to CHO among HB; (2) α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio differed among HB: the high-amylose was the greatest, the zero-amylose waxy and waxy were the intermediate, and the normal starch was the lowest; (3) HB were similar in β-glucan and CHO molecular structural makeup; (4) altered starch HB cultivars were similar to each other, but were different from the normal starch cultivar in protein molecular makeup; and (5) the rate and extent of rumen degradation of starch and protein were highly related to the molecular structural

  5. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  6. Old friends in new places: exploring the role of extraintestinal E.coli in intestinal disease and foodborne illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of new antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli pathotypes associated with human disease has led to an investigation in terms of the origins of these pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unspecified agents are responsible for 38.4 million out of the 48 m...

  7. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  8. Intestinal disease of scattered mirror carp Cyprinus carpio caused by Thelohanellus kitauei and notes on the morphology and phylogeny of the myxosporean from Sichuan Province, southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingtong; Lu, Mingmiao; Quan, Keyan; Li, Wenxiang; Zou, Hong; Wu, Shangong; Wang, Jiangyong; Wang, Guitang

    2017-05-01

    The mass mortality of pond-reared scattered mirror carp, Cyprinus carpio, caused by Thelohanellus kitauei, occurred at fish farms in Sichuan Province, southwest China. Morphological and molecular analyses were supplemented with histological evaluation of infected tissues to better understand the route of infection and the pathological effects of T. kitauei on the fish host. The intestine of the diseased host was full of large cysts of the myxosporean. The cysts range from 2 cm to 3.6 cm in diameter. Histopathology indicated that T. kitaue i first invaded the submucosa of the host intestine and then moved into the mucosa layers with the development of their spores, finally entering into the enteric cavity of the hosts after the disruption of mucosa layers. The pyriform spores of T. kitauei were surrounded by the transparent spore sheath, measuring 25.98 μm±0.95 μm in body length, 8.72 μm±0.51 μm in body width, and 7.86 μm±0.26 μm in body thickness. The single polar capsule was pyriform, measuring 14.73 μm±0.92 μm in length and 6.82 μm±0.45 μm in width, with eight to 10 turns of filament coils winding inside. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences indicated that minimal genetic differences were present between T. kitauei samples from South Korea and from China. Close affinity was found between the genus Thelohanellus and Myxobolus. Additionally, two polar capsule nuclei were found at the anterior end of the single polar capsule in spores of T. kitauei stained with hematoxylin and eosin, which suggested the separation of the genus Thelohanellus from Myxobolus.

  9. Effects of Clostridium perfringens iota toxin in the small intestine of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Leandro M; Redondo, Enzo A; Dailoff, Gabriela C; Leiva, Carlos L; Díaz-Carrasco, Juan M; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2017-12-01

    Iota toxin is a binary toxin solely produced by Clostridium perfringens type E strains, and is structurally related to CDT from C. difficile and CST from C. spiroforme. As type E causes hemorrhagic enteritis in cattle, it is usually assumed that associated diseases are mediated by iota toxin, although evidence in this regard has not been provided. In the present report, iota toxin intestinal effects were evaluated in vivo using a mouse model. Histological damage was observed in ileal loops treated with purified iota toxin after 4 h of incubation. Luminal iota toxin induced fluid accumulation in the small intestine in a dose dependent manner, as determined by the enteropooling and the intestinal loop assays. None of these changes were observed in the large intestine. These results suggest that C. perfringens iota toxin alters intestinal permeability, predominantly by inducing necrosis and degenerative changes in the mucosal epithelium of the small intestine, as well as changes in intestinal motility. The obtained results suggest a central role for iota toxin in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E hemorrhagic enteritis, and contribute to remark the importance of clostridial binary toxins in digestive diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and plasma membrane polarity of intestinal epithelial cells: Presence of a brush border antigen in the distal large intestine that is immunologically related to beta subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marxer, A.; Stieger, B.; Quaroni, A.; Kashgarian, M.; Hauri, H.P. (Univ. of Basel (Switzerland))

    1989-09-01

    The previously produced monoclonal antibody IEC 1/48 against cultured rat intestinal crypt cells was extensively characterized and found to be directed against the beta subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase as assessed by immunological and enzymatic criteria. Under nondenaturing conditions the antibody precipitated the alpha-beta enzyme complex (98,000 and 48,000 Mr). This probe, together with the monoclonal antibody C 62.4 against the alpha subunit was used to localize (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in epithelial cells along the rat intestinal tract by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Both antibodies exclusively labeled the basolateral membrane of small intestine and proximal colon epithelial cells. However, in the distal colon, IEC 1/48, but not C 62.4, also labeled the brush border membrane. The cross-reacting beta-subunit-like antigen on the apical cell pole was tightly associated with isolated brush borders but was apparently devoid of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity. Subcellular fractionation of colonocytes in conjunction with limited proteolysis and surface radioiodination of intestinal segments suggested that the cross-reacting antigen in the brush border may be very similar to the beta subunit. The results support the notion that in the small intestine and proximal colon the enzyme subunits are exclusively targeted to the basolateral membrane while in the distal colon nonassembled beta subunit or a beta-subunit-like protein is also transported to the apical cell pole.

  11. Technetium-99m-HMPAO labeled leukocyte single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) for assessing Crohn's disease extent and intestinal infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, L; Schillaci, O; Capoccetti, F; Bozzi, R M; Fina, D; Petruzziello, C; Geremia, A; Simonetti, G; Pallone, F

    2005-02-01

    Scintigraphy using radiolabeled leukocytes is a useful technique for assessing intestinal infiltration in Crohn's disease (CD). However, limits of planar images include overlapping activity in other organs and low specificity. To investigate the usefulness of (99m)Tc-HMPAO (hexametyl propylene amine oxime) labeled leukocyte single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) for assessing CD lesions, in comparison with planar images. Twenty-two inflammatory bowel disease patients (19 CD; 2 ulcerative colitis, UC; 1 ileal pouch) assessed by conventional endoscopy or radiology were enrolled. Leukocytes were labeled with (99m)Tc-HMPAO. SPECT images were acquired at 2 h and planar images at 30 min and 2 h. Bowel uptake was quantitated in nine regions (score 0-3). Both SPECT and planar images detected a negative scintigraphy (score 0) in the UC patient with no pouchitis and a positive scintigraphy (score 1-3) in the 21 patients showing active inflammation by conventional techniques. SPECT showed a higher global score than planar images (0.71 +/- 0.09 vs 0.30 +/- 0.05; p < 0.001), and in particular in the right iliac fossa (p= 0.003), right and left flank (p < 0.001; p= 0.02), hypogastrium (p= 0.002), and mesogastrium (p < 0.001). SPECT provided a better visualization and a higher uptake than planar images in patients with ileal and ileocolonic CD (6.45 +/- 0.82 vs 2.8 +/- 0.55, p < 0.001; 5.5 +/- 1.6 vs 2.6 +/- 0.7, p= 0.03), and with perianal CD (6.6 +/- 1.6 vs 3.4 +/- 1.2; p= 0.03). (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled leukocyte SPECT provides a more detailed visualization of CD lesions than planar images. This technique may better discriminate between intestinal and bone marrow uptake, thus being useful for assessing CD lesions within the pelvis, including perianal disease.

  12. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Parkinson's Disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni

    2016-01-01

    -related air pollution and Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a case-control study of 1,696 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients identified from Danish hospital registries and diagnosed 1996-2009 and 1,800 population controls matched by gender and year of birth we assessed long-term traffic-related air pollutant...... exposures (NO2) from a dispersion model, using residential addresses from 1971 to the date of diagnosis or first cardinal symptom for cases and the corresponding index date for their matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with logistic regression adjusting...

  13. Mental disease-related emergency admissions attributable to hot temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suji; Lee, Hwanhee; Myung, Woojae; Kim, E Jin; Kim, Ho

    2018-03-01

    The association between high temperature and mental disease has been the focus of several studies worldwide. However, no studies have focused on the mental disease burden attributable to hot temperature. Here, we aim to quantify the risk attributed to hot temperatures based on the exposure-lag-response relationship between temperature and mental diseases. From data on daily temperature and emergency admissions (EA) for mental diseases collected from 6 major cities (Seoul, Incheon, Daejeon, Daegu, Busan, and Gwangju in South Korea) over a period of 11years (2003-2013), we estimated temperature-disease associations using a distributed lag non-linear model, and we pooled the data by city through multivariate meta-analysis. Cumulative relative risk and attributable risks were calculated for extreme hot temperatures, defined as the 99th percentile relative to the 50th percentile of temperatures. The strongest association between mental disease and high temperature was seen within a period of 0-4days of high temperature exposure. Our results reveal that 14.6% of EA for mental disease were due to extreme hot temperatures, and the elderly were more susceptible (19.1%). Specific mental diseases, including anxiety, dementia, schizophrenia, and depression, also showed significant risk attributed to hot temperatures. Of all EA for anxiety, 31.6% were attributed to extremely hot temperatures. High temperature was responsible for an attributable risk for mental disease, and the burden was higher in the elderly. This finding has important implications for designing appropriate public health policies to minimize the impact of high temperature on mental health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of a multispecies probiotic supplement on quantity of irritable bowel syndrome-related intestinal microbial phylotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyra Anna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics can alleviate the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, possibly by stabilizing the intestinal microbiota. Our aim was to determine whether IBS-associated bacterial alterations were reduced during multispecies probiotic intervention consisting of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus Lc705, Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and Bifidobacterium breve Bb99. The intervention has previously been shown to successfully alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms of IBS. Methods The faecal microbiotas of 42 IBS subjects participating in a placebo-controlled double-blind multispecies probiotic intervention were analysed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Eight bacterial targets within the gastrointestinal microbiota with a putative IBS association were measured. Results A phylotype with 94% similarity to Ruminococcus torques remained abundant in the placebo group, but was decreased in the probiotic group during the intervention (P = 0.02 at 6 months. In addition, the clostridial phylotype, Clostridium thermosuccinogenes 85%, was stably elevated during the intervention (P = 0.00 and P = 0.02 at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The bacterial alterations detected were in accordance with previously discovered alleviation of symptoms. Conclusions The probiotic supplement was thus shown to exert specific alterations in the IBS-associated microbiota towards the bacterial 16S rDNA phylotype quantities described previously for subjects free of IBS. These changes may have value as non-invasive biomarkers in probiotic intervention studies.

  15. Chemical-induced disease relation extraction with various linguistic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinghang; Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relations between chemicals and diseases is crucial in various biomedical tasks such as new drug discoveries and new therapy developments. While manually mining these relations from the biomedical literature is costly and time-consuming, such a procedure is often difficult to keep up-to-date. To address these issues, the BioCreative-V community proposed a challenging task of automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease (CID) relations in order to benefit biocuration. This article describes our work on the CID relation extraction task on the BioCreative-V tasks. We built a machine learning based system that utilized simple yet effective linguistic features to extract relations with maximum entropy models. In addition to leveraging various features, the hypernym relations between entity concepts derived from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-controlled vocabulary were also employed during both training and testing stages to obtain more accurate classification models and better extraction performance, respectively. We demoted relation extraction between entities in documents to relation extraction between entity mentions. In our system, pairs of chemical and disease mentions at both intra- and inter-sentence levels were first constructed as relation instances for training and testing, then two classification models at both levels were trained from the training examples and applied to the testing examples. Finally, we merged the classification results from mention level to document level to acquire final relations between chemicals and diseases. Our system achieved promisingF-scores of 60.4% on the development dataset and 58.3% on the test dataset using gold-standard entity annotations, respectively. Database URL:https://github.com/JHnlp/BC5CIDTask. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactobacillus frumenti Facilitates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function Maintenance in Early-Weaned Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Chen, Lingli; Zheng, Wenyong; Shi, Min; Liu, Liu; Xie, Chunlin; Wang, Xinkai; Niu, Yaorong; Hou, Qiliang; Xu, Xiaofan; Xu, Baoyang; Tang, Yimei; Zhou, Shuyi; Yan, Yiqin; Yang, Tao; Ma, Libao; Yan, Xianghua

    2018-01-01

    Increased intestinal epithelial barrier function damages caused by early weaning stress have adverse effects on swine health and feed utilization efficiency. Probiotics have emerged as the promising antibiotic alternatives used for intestinal barrier function damage prevention. Our previous data showed that Lactobacillus frumenti was identified as a predominant Lactobacillus in the intestinal microbiota of weaned piglets. However, whether the intestinal epithelial barrier function in piglets was regulated by L. frumenti is still unclear. Here, piglets received a PBS vehicle or PBS suspension (2 ml, 108 CFU/ml) containing the L. frumenti by oral gavage once a day during the period of 6–20 days of age prior to early weaning. Our data demonstrated that oral administration of L. frumenti significantly improved the intestinal mucosal integrity and decreased the serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid levels in early-weaned piglets (26 days of age). The intestinal tight junction proteins (including ZO-1, Occludin, and Claudin-1) were significantly up-regulated by L. frumenti administration. The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were significantly increased by L. frumenti administration. Furthermore, our data revealed that oral administration of L. frumenti significantly increased the relative abundances of health-promoting microbes (including L. frumenti, Lactobacillus gasseri LA39, Parabacteroides distasonis, and Kazachstania telluris) and decreased the relative abundances of opportunistic pathogens (including Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Candida humilis). Functional alteration of the intestinal bacterial community by L. frumenti administration was characterized by the significantly increased fatty acids and protein metabolism and decreased diseases-associated metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that L. frumenti facilitates intestinal epithelial barrier function maintenance

  18. Infectious Diseases - Diseases Related to Service in Gulf War, Iraq, and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... qualify for VA health care . Diseases related to Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan service VA presumes that the ... Southwest Asia theater of military operations during the Gulf War August 2, 1990 to present and in Afghanistan ...

  19. Intestinal absorption of /sup 47/Ca in elderly patients with osteoporosis, Paget's disease, and osteomalacia. Effects of calcitonin, oestrogen, and vitamin D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lender, M.; Verner, E.; Stankiewicz, H.; Menczel, J.

    1977-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of /sup 47/Ca was studied in elderly patients. A standard dose of 10 ..mu..Ci of /sup 47/Ca was given orally. The radioactivity was measured in the plasma, and expressed as percentage of the administered dose per litre plasma. As a control group served 12 patients aged 60--80 years, hospitalized for observation for various reasons, receiving no medical treatment and not suffering from any known metabolic bone diseases or other metabolic pathological conditions. Results of kinetic curves demonstrate in elderly patients a decreased absorption with maximum specific activity in plasma reached at 120 min, when compared to data from the literature referring to a group of young people with a mean age of 35 years. Oestrogen treatment, given as ethinyl oestradiol 10 ..mu..g once daily per os for 10 days proved to increase /sup 47/Ca absorption as was demonstrated in 2 patients with osteoporosis. The effect of calcitonin (160 MRC units given 45 min before the test) on calcium absorption, in 5 patients with Paget's disease or osteoporosis appears as biphasic: in the first hour depressing calcium absorption and then in the second and third hours increasing the absorption, suggesting a hyperparathyroid state secondary to the calcitonin effect. The vitamin D2 treatment proved to increase calcium absorption.

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia mimicking primary peritoneal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steines, Jennifer C; Larson, Joshua H; Wilkinson, Neal; Kirby, Patricia; Goodheart, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is an obstruction of the lymphatic system. We report on a patient with mesenteric adenopathy and an elevated CA125 level, which were suspicious for peritoneal carcinoma. Further evaluation and bowel resection identified intestinal lymphangiectasia. This disease should be considered in patients with mesenteric adenopathy and a small bowel mass. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.