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Sample records for related bone diseases

  1. Metabolic, endocrine, and related bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Bone is living tissue, and old bone is constantly removed and replaced with new bone. Normally this exchange is in balance, and the mineral content remains relatively constant. This balance may be disturbed as a result of certain metabolic and endocrinologic disorders. The term dystrophy, referring to a disturbance of nutrition, is applied to metabolic and endocrine bone diseases and should be distinguished from the term dysplasia, referring to a disturbance of bone growth. The two terms are easily confused but are not interchangeable. Metabolic bone disease is caused by endocrine imbalance, vitamin deficiency or excess, and other disturbances in bone metabolism leading to osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  2. IgG4-Related Disease of Bilateral Temporal Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lilun; Ward, Bryan; Cocks, Margaret; Kheradmand, Amir; Francis, Howard W

    2017-03-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an idiopathic inflammatory condition that causes pseudotumor formation in single or multiple organs, including those of the head and neck. Temporal bone involvement is rare, with only 3 cases of unilateral temporal bone IgG4-RD described in the literature. We report the first known case of IgG4-RD of bilateral temporal bones and describe its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The patient was a 52-year-old man with latent tuberculosis (TB) who presented with a 10-year history of bilateral profound hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bilateral labyrinthine destruction with invasion of the posterior fossa. Immunoglobulin level testing showed elevated total serum IgG levels with normal IgG4 levels. Bilateral mastoidectomies were performed, with biopsy samples demonstrating IgG4 staining with IgG4-positive plasma cells up to 40/HPF (high power field) on the right and 20/HPF on the left, consistent with bilateral IgG4-RD. IgG4-RD of bilateral temporal bones presents with chronic and progressive bilateral hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Clinical presentation and radiologic findings are nonspecific, and definitive diagnosis must be made with histopathology and immunostaining. Corticosteroids are therapeutic, but surgical resection may be necessary for temporal bone IgG4-RD to improve long-term remission.

  3. Celiac Disease in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis-Related Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Putman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cystic fibrosis (CF and celiac disease can cause low bone mineral density (BMD and fractures. Celiac disease may occur at a higher frequency in patients with CF than the general population, and symptoms of these conditions may overlap. We report on two patients presenting with CF-related bone disease in the past year who were subsequently found to have concurrent celiac disease. Because adherence to a gluten-free diet may improve BMD in patients with celiac disease, this could have important implications for treatment. Clinicians should consider screening for celiac disease in patients with CF who have low BMD, worsening BMD in the absence of other risk factors, and/or difficult to treat vitamin D deficiency.

  4. Genetic Expression in Cystic Fibrosis Related Bone Disease. An Observational, Transversal, Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuca, Ioana M; Pop, Liviu L; Rogobete, Alexandru F; Onet, Dan I; Guta-Almajan, Bogdan; Popa, Zoran; Horhat, Florin G

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent monogenic genetic disease with autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by important clinical polymorphism and significant lethal prospective. CF related bone disease occurs frequently in adults with CF. Childhood is the period of bone formation, and therefore, children are more susceptible to low bone density. Several factors like pancreatic insufficiency, hormone imbalance, and physical inactivity contribute to CF bone disease development. Revealing this would be important for prophylactic treatment against bone disease occurrence. The study was observational, transversal, with a cross-sectional design. The study included 68 children with cystic fibrosis, genotyped and monitored in the National CF Centre. At the annual assessment, besides clinical examination, biochemical evaluation for pancreatic insufficiency, and diabetes, they were evaluated for bone mineral density using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Twenty-six patients, aged over 10 years were diagnosed with CF bone disease, without significant gender gap. Bone disease was frequent in patients aged over 10 years with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, carriers of severe mutations, and CF liver disease. CF carriers of a severe genotype which associates pancreatic insufficiency and CF liver disease, are more likely predisposed to low bone mineral density. Further studies should discover other significant influences in order to prevent the development of CF bone disease and an improved quality of life in cystic fibrosis children.

  5. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  6. Paget's Disease of Bone and Osteoarthritis: Different Yet Related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a condition that causes changes in cartilage, the elastic tissue that cushions the joints. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another, while absorbing energy from the shock of physical movement. In osteoarthritis, the surface layer ...

  7. Oral health- related quality of life in patients with rare inherited diseases affecting bone and teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Haubek, Dorte

    Background X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by insufficient bone mineralization. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is another rare inherited disease characterized by fragile bones because of defective collagen synthesis. Both diseases may have impact on teeth...

  8. Quality of life and relation to disease in patients with bone sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchelkova O.Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the basic aspects of quality of life and relation to disease in patients with malignant or premalignant bone tumors. Study participants (N=82 were aged 18 to 67 years (average age 34 ± 2 years. They were separated into three groups depending on diagnosis: patients with osteosarcoma, patients with giant cell tumor and patients with chondrosarcoma. The SF-36 Health Status Survey and the Quality of Life Questionnaire - Core 30 with Bone Metastasis (BM22 Module were used to assess patient quality of life. The type of relation to disease method (TOBOL was used to determine the relation to disease of the patients. According to the results of the quality of life study, patients with giant cell tumor exhibited the highest degree of limiting physical activity and reduced social functioning, the greatest financial difficulties and more pain sites than either patients with osteosarcoma or patients with chondrosarcoma. The study of relation to disease revealed that all studied groups of patients were susceptible to ergopathic and sensitive types of relation to disease. Moreover, patients with giant cell tumor experienced increased levels of tension and irritability with respect to relation to disease and treatment, while patients with chondrosarcoma were more susceptible to anxiety and hypochondria with respect to relation to disease. Patients with different types of bone tumors have different experiences with respect to their physical and mental health, their social functioning and their general health. The results of the study may be useful in developing individualized psychological aid programs for patients with malignant and premalignant bone tumors.

  9. Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Leptin Levels in Lymphoproliferative Diseases - Relation to the Bone Marrow Fat and Infiltration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaja, A.; Churý, Z.; Pecen, Ladislav; Fraňková, H.; Jandáková, H.; Hejlová, N.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2000), s. 307-312 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : leptin * bone marrow fat * bone marrow infiltration * lymphoproliferative disease Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2000

  10. Duodenal histopathology and laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthumus, Lotte; Al-Toma, Abdul

    2017-08-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated small intestine enteropathy precipitated by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Adult presentation is often atypical and malabsorption of vitamins and minerals is common, with a consequent disturbance of bone metabolism. We aim to evaluate laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism and the relationship between severity of histological damage and degree of bone mass loss at diagnosis of CD. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 176 adult coeliac patients was carried out. All patients fulfilled the histopathological criteria for CD. Biochemical data were analysed (calcium/phosphate/alkaline-phosphatase/vitamin D/parathormone). Duodenal histology was classified according to the Marsh classification. Bone mass density (BMD) at the lumbar and femoral regions measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. No correlation was found between the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the Marsh histopathological stage (P>0.05). Vitamin D deficiency was most common (44.5%), whereas only 5.7% had hypocalcaemia. Calcium was lower (Pcoeliac patients older than 30 years, evaluation of bone biomarkers and dual X-ray absorptiometry examination should be considered.

  11. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  12. New genetic associations in thiopurine-related bone marrow toxicity among inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, William; Cruz, Raquel; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Chaparro, María; Panes, Julián; Echarri, Ana; Esteve, Maria; Carpio, Daniel; Andreu, Montserrat; García-Planella, Esther; Domenech, Eugeni; Carracedo, Angel; Gisbert, Javier P; Barros, Francisco

    2013-04-01

    The toxicity related to thiopurine drug therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) varies widely among patients. Almost 15-30% of patients with IBD develop side effects during treatment, often bone marrow suppression. Several factors have been implicated in determining this toxicity, mainly individual genetic variation related to formation of active thiopurine metabolites. The aim was to identify genes involved in thiopurine-related myelosuppression. A two-stage investigation of 19,217 coding SNPs (cSNPs) was performed in a Spanish (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Group of Galicia [EIGA]) cohort of 173 IBD patients, 15 with bone marrow suppression. The top 20 cSNPs identified in the first stage with p ENEIDA) cohort (87 patients, 29 with bone marrow suppression). Several cSNPs showed a significant p-value in the allelic joint analysis (p-Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test ≤2.55 × 10(-3)) despite no cSNP passing correction for multiple testing in the first cohort. Of note is rs3729961 in the gene IL6ST, a transducer signal chain shared by many cytokines including IL6 (p-value combined = 2.36 × 10(-4), odds ratio [95% CI]: 3.41 [1.71-6.78]). In addition, we detected association with rs3749598 in the FSTL5 gene that appears to interact with metalloproteases at the extracellular matrix level (p-value combined = 4.89 × 10(-4)), odds ratio (95% CI): 3.67 (1.68-8.01). We have identified IL6ST and FSLT5 as new bone marrow suppression susceptibility candidate genes after thiopurine treatment in IBD patients. This is the first report of variants associated with thiopurine-related myelosuppression that was identified by a genome-wide association study. Its validation awaits functional analyses and replication in additional studies. Original submitted 14 September 2012; Revision submitted 13 February 2013.

  13. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  14. B-vitamin status in relation to bone mineral density in treated celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michelle; Ward, Mary; Dickey, William; Hoey, Leane; Molloy, Anne M; Waldron, Lisa; Varghese, Abraham; McCann, Adrian; Blayney, Jaine K; McNulty, Helene

    2015-08-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of osteoporosis and compromised B-vitamin status. Emerging evidence supports a beneficial role of folate and the metabolically related B-vitamins in bone health in generally healthy adults, but no previous study has investigated this in CD patients. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship of folate, vitamins B12, B6 and B2 (riboflavin), and the related metabolite homocysteine, with bone mineral density (BMD) in CD patients. Of the 400 treated adult CD patients invited to participate, 110 responded and met the eligibility criteria for study participation. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning at the lumbar spine (L1-L4), femoral neck, and total hip sites. Biomarker status of the relevant B-vitamins and homocysteine, and dietary B-vitamin intakes, were measured. The significant predictors of low BMD were increasing age (B = 0.080, p B = 0.072, p = 0.004), whereas no significant relationship with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (B = 0.093, p = 0.928) was observed. Following adjustment for these predictors, serum vitamin B12 (but no other B-vitamin biomarker) was found to be a significant determinant of BMD at the femoral neck (β = 0.416, p = 0.011) and total hip (β = 0.327, p = 0.049) in men only. No significant relationships were found between any of the B-vitamin biomarkers investigated and BMD (at any measured site) in women. These findings add to current evidence suggesting a potential role of vitamin B12 in BMD, particularly in men, and show such a relationship for the first time in CD patients.

  15. Caisson disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P J; Walder, D N

    1986-09-01

    Caisson disease of bone, which may affect compressed air workers and divers, is characterized by regions of bone and marrow necrosis that may lead to secondary osteoarthrosis of the hip and shoulder joints. A review of the pathologic, radiologic, and clinical aspects demonstrated uncertainties in the exact etiology. Early diagnosis is often not possible because of the delayed appearance of radiologic abnormalities. Research into these two aspects of this condition was carried out by the Medical Research Council Decompression Sickness Research Team in Newcastle upon Tyne over a ten-year period (1972 to 1982). Because no suitable animal model exists for the study of this condition, bone and marrow necrosis was produced by embolism of bone blood vessels with glass microspheres. With this model, it was shown that the presence of bone and marrow necrosis could be detected by bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-MDP and by measuring changes in serum ferritin concentration at a much earlier stage than was possible by radiography. However, only the former method has proved useful in clinical practice. Investigations into the etiology of caisson disease of bone have shown evidence for an increase in marrow fat cell size resulting from hyperoxia. This phenomenon may play a role in the production and localization of gas bubble emboli, which are thought to be the cause of the bone and marrow necrosis.

  16. Bone Disease in Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mechelen, Margot; Gulino, Giulia Rossana; de Vlam, Kurt; Lories, Rik

    2018-05-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis is a chronic inflammatory skeletal disorder with an important burden of disease, affecting the spine and sacroiliac joints and typically presenting in young adults. Ankylosing spondylitis, diagnosed by the presence of structural changes to the skeleton, is the prototype of this disease group. Bone disease in axial spondyloarthritis is a complex phenomenon with the coexistence of bone loss and new bone formation, both contributing to the morbidity of the disease, in addition to pain caused by inflammation. The skeletal structural changes respectively lead to increased fracture risk and to permanent disability caused by ankylosis of the sacroiliac joints and the spine. The mechanism of this new bone formation leading to ankylosis is insufficiently known. The process appears to originate from entheses, specialized structures that provide a transition zone in which tendon and ligaments insert into the underlying bone. Growth factor signaling pathways such as bone morphogenetic proteins, Wnts, and Hedgehogs have been identified as molecular drivers of new bone formation, but the relationship between inflammation and activation of these pathways remains debated. Long-standing control of inflammation appears necessary to avoid ankylosis. Recent evidence and concepts suggest an important role for biomechanical factors in both the onset and progression of the disease. With regard to new bone formation, these processes can be understood as ectopic repair responses secondary to inflammation-induced bone loss and instability. In this review, we discuss the clinical implications of the skeletal changes as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms, the relation between inflammation and new bone formation, and the potential role of biomechanical stress.

  17. Effects of single-agent bortezomib as post-transplant consolidation therapy on multiple myeloma-related bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sezer, Orhan; Beksac, Meral; Hajek, Roman

    2017-01-01

    This phase II study explored the effects of bortezomib consolidation versus observation on myeloma-related bone disease in patients who had a partial response or better after frontline high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. Patients were randomized to receive four 35-day cycles...... from baseline to end of treatment in bone mineral density (BMD). End-of-treatment rates (bortezomib versus observation) of complete response/stringent complete response were 22% vs. 11% (P = 0·19), very good partial response or better of 80% vs. 68% (P = 0·17), and progressive disease of 8% vs. 23% (P...... with observation, bortezomib appeared to have little impact on bone metabolism/health, but was associated with trends for improved myeloma response and survival....

  18. Osteoblast CFTR inactivation reduces differentiation and osteoprotegerin expression in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis-related bone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Stalvey

    Full Text Available Low bone mass and increased fracture risk are recognized complications of cystic fibrosis (CF. CF-related bone disease (CFBD is characterized by uncoupled bone turnover--impaired osteoblastic bone formation and enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Intestinal malabsorption, vitamin D deficiency and inflammatory cytokines contribute to CFBD. However, epidemiological investigations and animal models also support a direct causal link between inactivation of skeletal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR, the gene that when mutated causes CF, and CFBD. The objective of this study was to examine the direct actions of CFTR on bone. Expression analyses revealed that CFTR mRNA and protein were expressed in murine osteoblasts, but not in osteoclasts. Functional studies were then performed to investigate the direct actions of CFTR on osteoblasts using a CFTR knockout (Cftr-/- mouse model. In the murine calvarial organ culture assay, Cftr-/- calvariae displayed significantly less bone formation and osteoblast numbers than calvariae harvested from wildtype (Cftr+/+ littermates. CFTR inactivation also reduced alkaline phosphatase expression in cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts. Although CFTR was not expressed in murine osteoclasts, significantly more osteoclasts formed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ bone marrow cultures. Indirect regulation of osteoclastogenesis by the osteoblast through RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling was next examined. Although no difference in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (Rankl mRNA was detected, significantly less osteoprotegerin (Opg was expressed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ osteoblasts. Together, the Rankl:Opg ratio was significantly higher in Cftr-/- murine calvarial osteoblasts contributing to a higher osteoclastogenesis potential. The combined findings of reduced osteoblast differentiation and lower Opg expression suggested a possible defect in canonical Wnt signaling. In fact, Wnt3a and PTH-stimulated canonical Wnt

  19. Bone Health and Impact of Tenofovir Treatment in Men with Hepatitis-B Related Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajith, Kattiparambil G; Kapoor, Nitin; Shetty, Sahana; Goel, Ashish; Zachariah, Uday; Eapen, Chundamannil E; Paul, Thomas V

    2018-03-01

    Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) has been shown to have an adverse impact on bone health. Hepatitis-B related CLD and its treatment with tenofovir may have additional effects on skeleton. To study the impact of HBV related CLD and its treatment with Tenofovir on bone health in Indian subjects. This cross sectional study included men (18-60 years) and comprised of three groups: Group-1 was treatment naïve HBV related CLD ( n  = 79), Group-2 those with HBV related CLD on tenofovir for at least 1 year ( n  = 136), Group-3 age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI) matched healthy controls ( n  = 58). Bone biochemistry and Bone Mineral Density (BMD) at spine, Femoral Neck (FN) and forearm were studied. Independent t -test or ANOVA was used to compare the means of continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the factors causing Low Bone Mass (LBM) at FN. A significantly greater proportion ( P  CLD (group 1 and group 2) had vitamin D deficiency (CLD than controls. The prevalence of LBM was higher in group 1 at the spine (31%) and forearm (18.4%) when compared to controls (8.1% and 7.8% respectively) ( P  10,000 IU/ml) emerged as significant risk factors for LBM at FN. The impact of hepatitis-B related CLD as well as its treatment on bone health is significant. Bone health need to be periodically evaluated in these subjects especially in older men who are lean and have a higher viral load.

  20. Evolutionary medicine and bone loss in chronic inflammatory diseases--A theory of inflammation-related osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Cutolo, Maurizio; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Bone loss is typical in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, and others. It is also typical in transplantation-related inflammation and during the process of aging. While we recognized that bone loss is tightly linked to immune system activation or inflamm-aging in the form of acute, chronic active, or chronic smoldering inflammation, bone loss is typically discussed to be an "accident of inflammation." Extensive literature search in PubMed central. Using elements of evolutionary medicine, energy regulation, and neuroendocrine regulation of homeostasis and immune function, we work out that bone waste is an adaptive, evolutionarily positively selected program that is absolutely necessary during acute inflammation. However, when acute inflammation enters a chronic state due to the inability to terminate inflammation (e.g., in autoimmunity or in continuous immunity against microbes), the acute program of bone loss is a misguided adaptive program. The article highlights the complexity of interwoven pathways of osteopenia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrated disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishwani, A.H.; Ahmed, M.; Anwar, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    A case of primary hydatid disease of the right femur is reported that presented with pathological fracture and was diagnosed at the time of exploration for biopsy. The patient was treated by removal of all cysts, irrigation with colloidal solution, bone grafting and immobilization of the fracture followed by four cycles of oral Albendazole. Eosinophilia and serological tests reverted to normal but the patient died due to acute myocardial infarction six months later. This uncommon condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pathological fractures, bone pain or osteolytic lesions, especially in patients of rural and farmer background.(author)

  2. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases.

  3. HIV and bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin; Dockrell, David; Bowman, Christine; McCloskey, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    Advances in management have resulted in a dramatic decline in mortality for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This decrease in mortality, initially the result of improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections but later mediated by the use of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to the need to consider long-term complications of the disease itself, or its treatment. Bone disease is increasingly recognised as a concern. The prevalence of reduced BMD and possibly also fracture incidence are increased in HIV-positive individuals compared with HIV-negative controls. There are many potential explanations for this - an increased prevalence of established osteoporosis risk factors in the HIV-positive population, a likely direct effect of HIV infection itself and a possible contributory role of ARV therapy. At present, the assessment of bone disease and fracture risk remains patchy, with little or no guidance on identifying those at increased risk of reduced BMD or fragility fracture. Preventative and therapeutic strategies with bone specific treatments need to be developed. Limited data suggest bisphosphonates may be beneficial in conjunction with vitamin D and calcium supplementation in the treatment of reduced BMD in HIV-infected patients but larger studies of longer duration are needed. The safety and cost-effectiveness of these and other treatments needs to be evaluated. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Investigation of the collagen-mineral-relation in bone with special respect to bone diseases with collagen defects by small-angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, S. A.

    1996-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to study the structure of the collagen/mineral composite of bone in the nanometer range. The most important results were: - In horse radius, the angular distribution of mineral crystals as measured by SAXS agreed well with previous measurements of collagen orientation using circularly polarized light microscopy. This shows that the crystals are parallel to the collagen fibrils. - The effect of sodium fluoride, which stimulates bone formation, and bisphosphonates, which reduce bone resorption, were analyzed. A slight increase in the average thickness of the mineral crystals as well as changes in the structure of the mineral/collagen composite were found in the case of fluoride treated animals. No differences were found between alendronate treated animals and controls. The changes with NaF correlate with bone weakening found in an earlier study with the same animals. - In cortical bone from 9 patients with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) the mean thickness of the mineral crystals was found approximately constant around 2.4 nm, while in control bones it constantly increased with age up to about 3.5 nm. In addition, the parallel alignment of the mineral crystals was less in OI-bone than in normal controls. Hence, despite the great variability of this genetic collagen defect, smaller and less well aligned mineral crystals seem to characterize the collagen/mineral composite in OI-bone. (author)

  5. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs accumulation in skin: relations with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Almeida França

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, main causes related with cardiovascular disease (CVD and bone mineral disorder (CKD-BMD. Uremic toxins, as advanced glycation end products (AGEs, are non-traditional cardiovascular risk factor and play a role on development of CKD-BMD in CKD. The measurement of skin autofluorescence (sAF is a noninvasive method to assess the level of AGEs in tissue, validated in CKD patients. Objective: The aim of this study is analyze AGEs measured by sAF levels (AGEs-sAF and its relations with CVD and BMD parameters in HD patients. Methods: Twenty prevalent HD patients (HD group and healthy subjects (Control group, n = 24, performed biochemical tests and measurements of anthropometric parameters and AGEs-sAF. In addition, HD group performed measurement of intact parathormone (iPTH, transthoracic echocardiogram and radiographies of pelvis and hands for vascular calcification score. Results: AGEs-sAF levels are elevated both in HD and control subjects ranged according to the age, although higher at HD than control group. Single high-flux HD session does not affect AGEs-sAF levels. AGEs-sAF levels were not related to ventricular mass, interventricular septum or vascular calcification in HD group. AGEs-sAF levels were negatively associated with serum iPTH levels. Conclusion: Our study detected a negative correlation of AGEs-sAF with serum iPTH, suggesting a role of AGEs on the pathophysiology of bone disease in HD prevalent patients. The nature of this relation and the clinical application of this non-invasive methodology for evaluation AGEs deposition must be confirmed and clarified in future studies.

  6. Java project on periodontal diseases: periodontal bone loss in relation to environmental and systemic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaliya, A.; Laine, M.L.; Delanghe, J.R.; Loos, B.G.; van Wijk, A.J.; van der Velden, U.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess in a population deprived from regular dental care the relationship between alveolar bone loss (ABL) and environmental/systemic conditions. Material & Methods The study population consisted of subjects from the Purbasari tea estate on West Java, Indonesia. A full set of dental

  7. Profile of chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in newly diagnosed advanced predialysis diabetic kidney disease patients: A hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S; Beatrice, A M; Ghosh, A; Pramanik, S; Bhattacharjee, R; Ghosh, S; Raychaudhury, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Chowdhury, S

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD population. There are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in diabetic CKD patients. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out the profile of mineral bone disorders in T2DM patients with pre-dialysis CKD. In this cross-sectional design, diabetic patients with newly-diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD were evaluated. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25 hydroxy vitamin D and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in all patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 72 eligible patients participated (44 males, 28 females; age 54.2±11.7). Patients with CKD Stage 5 had a lower level of corrected serum calcium and significantly higher level of inorganic phosphorus, total ALP and iPTH as compared to stage 4 patients. Overall, 38.5% were hypocalcemic, 31.43% were hyperphosphatemic. 24.2% of CKD subjects were vitamin D deficient (110pg/ml) was detected in nearly 43% of patients. In stage 5, only 32% patients was found to have hyperparathyroidism (iPTH>300pg/ml). There was a good correlation between iPTH and total ALP (r=0.5, p=0.0001) in this cohort. 25 (OH) vitamin D was inversely correlated with ALP (r=-0.39, P=0.001) and showed negative correlation with urine ACR (r=-0.37, P=0.002). As a group, the osteoporotic CKD subjects exhibited higher iPTH (220.1±153.8 vs. 119±108pg/ml, p<0.05) as compared to those who were osteopenic or had normal bone density. There was significant correlation between BMD and iPTH (adjusted r=-0.436; P=0.001). In the multivariate regression model, we found intact PTH to predict BMD even after adjustment of all the confounders. The current study showed that adynamic bone disease is prevalent even in pre-dialysis CKD population. High bone turnover disease may not be the most prevalent type in diabetic CKD. However, it

  8. Bone disease in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Francisco; Cusano, Natalie E.; Silva, Barbara C.; Cassibba, Sara; Almeida, Clarissa Beatriz; Machado, Vanessa Caroline Costa; Bilezikian, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease in severe primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is described classically as osteitis fibrosa cystica (OFC). Bone pain, skeletal deformities and pathological fractures are features of OFC. Bone mineral density is usually extremely low in OFC, but it is reversible after surgical cure. The signs and symptoms of severe bone disease include bone pain, pathologic fractures, proximal muscle weakness with hyperreflexia. Bone involvement is typically characterized as salt-and-pepper appearance in the skull, bone erosions and bone resorption of the phalanges, brown tumors and cysts. In the radiography, diffuse demineralization is observed, along with pathological fractures, particularly in the long bones of the extremities. In severe, symptomatic PHPT, marked elevation of the serum calcium and PTH concentrations are seen and renal involvement is manifested by nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. A new technology, recently approved for clinical use in the United States and Europe, is likely to become more widely available because it is an adaptation of the lumbar spine DXA image. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a gray-level textural analysis that provides an indirect index of trabecular microarchitecture. Newer technologies, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have provided further understanding of the microstructural skeletal features in PHPT. PMID:25166047

  9. Bone and motor organ diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    1992-01-01

    Osteosarcoma arising from X-ray radiation therapy has first been reported in the 1920s. The 1950-1965 ABCC-RERF Life Span Study using the sample population of approximately 76,000 persons have revealed no evidence of correlation between osteosarcoma and A-bomb radiation. There is a relative paucity of data supporting the statistical correlation between A-bomb radiation and osseous cancer. This paper deals with the correlation between A-bomb exposure and bone and motor organ diseases. In prenatally exposed children using the Nagasaki's sample (n=74) and the Hiroshima's sample (n=219), there was no difference in skeletal abnormalities between the exposed and control groups in both cities. In the ABCC-study using 264 A-bomb survivors, the incidence of osteoporosis was found to be high in women aged 50 years or older at the time of A-bombing who were exposed at 2,000 m or less from the hypocenter. The RERF Adult Health Study using approximately 14,000 persons have revealed no evidence of correlation between the incidence of lumbar vertebral bone fractures and radiation doses. There was no correlation between the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and distance from the hypocenter in A-bomb survivors. Continuing studies are expected to confirm the delayed effects of A-bomb radiation on the bone and motor organs with aging in A-bomb survivors. (N.K.)

  10. Myeloid differentiation factor 88-deficient bone marrow cells improve Alzheimer's disease-related symptoms and pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, W.; Liu, Y.; Liu, S.; Walter, S.; Grimm, M.O.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Penke, B.; Hartmann, T.; Rube, C.E.; Menger, M.D.; Fassbender, K.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid beta peptide in the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that amyloid beta peptide injures neurons both directly and indirectly by triggering neurotoxic innate immune responses. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 is the key

  11. Investigations of Diabetic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jakob Starup

    measures in patients with diabetes. This PhD thesis reports the results of two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis, a state-of-the-art intervention study, a clinical cross-sectional study and a registry-based study all examining the relationship between diabetes, glucose, and bone. Patients with type 2......Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fracture with and current fracture predictors underestimate fracture risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Thus, further understanding of the underlying causes of diabetic bone disease may lead to better fracture predictors and preventive...... diabetes had lower bone turnover markers compared to patients with type 1 diabetes and bone mineral density and tissue stiffness were increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. The bone turnover markers were inversely associated with blood glucose in patients with diabetes and both an oral glucose...

  12. Management of adynamic bone disease in chronic kidney disease: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K. Sista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO work group released recommendations in 2006 to define the bone-related pathology associated with chronic kidney disease as renal osteodystrophy. In 2009, KDIGO released revised clinical practice guidelines which redefined systemic disorders of bone and mineral metabolism due to chronic kidney disease as chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Conditions under this overarching term include osteitis fibrosa cystica, osteomalacia, and adynamic bone disease. We aim to provide a brief review of the histopathology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and diagnostic features of adynamic bone disease, focusing on current trends in the management of this complex bone disorder.

  13. The assessment of cortical and spongy bone mineral content with quantitative computed tomography; A comparison of measurement sites in relation to certain diseases with metabolic bone disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Kiyoko; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Aritomi, Hiroshi; Iwanami, Shigeru; Kusano, Shouichi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine); Marumo, Fumiaki

    1991-12-01

    The CT numbers of cortex at the level of 20 cm (CT20) and spongiosa in the lateral condyle at the level of 2 cm (CT02) proximal from the distal end of the femur, and the bone mineral density of spongiosa in the L3 body (BMD), were obtained by QCT. The study included 43 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 71 female patients with primary osteoporosis (OP), 20 female nondialyzed patients with chronic renal failure (CRF: nonHD), 37 hemodialyzed patients (CRF: HD),including 13 parathyroidectomized patients (CRF: HD, PTX), and 10 healthy volunteers. CT20 correlated closely with age in RA. CT02 and BMD correlated closely with age in RA and OP. CT20 and CT02 correlated closely with the duration of hemodialysis in CRF:HD, but not with the duration of disease in RA. The values of CT20 and CT02 in the CRF: HD. PTX group was significantly lower than those in the other CRF groups. BMD in the RA group was not different from that of healthy volunteers. The CT20 values of the one-third of RA patients older than 60 years were extremely low compared with those of the other two-thirds. The results indicated that BMD was useful in assessing bone mineral content in OP, but not in RA. CT02 and CT20 were useful in assessing bone mineral content in these three diseases, CT20 was especially useful for patients in the CRF: HD group and those with RA older than 60 years, but it was not useful in the CRF: nonHD group. (author).

  14. Bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Giuffrida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone complications occur frequently in Gaucher disease (GD and reduce the quality of life of these patients. Skeletal involvement is an important indication for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible and debilitating disease. Bone biomarkers have been used to assess disease status and the response to therapy in a number of bone disorders. Here, we examine the literature for evidence of abnormalities in bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 GD to assess whether they might be useful for the assessment of bone involvement in GD. We have found that bone biomarkers in GD show highly variable results which do not currently support their routine use for clinical assessment of bone status, as an indication for therapy initiation, or for monitoring the response to therapy. A greater understanding of bone markers and their relation to the bone manifestations of GD is required.

  15. Posttranslational heterogeneity of bone alkaline phosphatase in metabolic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, M R; Delanghe, J R; Kaufman, J M; De Buyzere, M L; Van Hoecke, M J; Leroux-Roels, G G

    1994-09-01

    Bone alkaline phosphatase is a marker of osteoblast activity. In order to study the posttranscriptional modification (glycosylation) of bone alkaline phosphatase in bone disease, we investigated the relationship between mass and catalytic activity of bone alkaline phosphatase in patients with osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. Serum bone alkaline phosphatase activity was measured after lectin precipitation using the Iso-ALP test kit. Mass concentration of bone alkaline phosphatase was determined with an immunoradiometric assay (Tandem-R Ostase). In general, serum bone alkaline phosphatase mass and activity concentration correlated well. The activity : mass ratio of bone alkaline phosphatase was low in hyperthyroidism. Activation energy of the reaction catalysed by bone alkaline phosphatase was high in osteoporosis and in hyperthyroidism. Experiments with neuraminidase digestion further demonstrated that the thermodynamic heterogeneity of bone alkaline phosphatase can be explained by a different glycosylation of the enzyme.

  16. Vitamin D and Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Christodoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is important for normal development and maintenance of the skeleton. Hypovitaminosis D adversely affects calcium metabolism, osteoblastic activity, matrix ossification, bone remodeling and bone density. It is well known that Vit. D deficiency in the developing skeleton is related to rickets, while in adults is related to osteomalacia. The causes of rickets include conditions that lead to hypocalcemia and/or hypophosphatemia, either isolated or secondary to vitamin D deficiency. In osteomalacia, Vit. D deficiency leads to impairment of the mineralisation phase of bone remodeling and thus an increasing amount of the skeleton being replaced by unmineralized osteoid. The relationship between Vit. D and bone mineral density and osteoporosis are still controversial while new evidence suggests that Vit. D may play a role in other bone conditions such as osteoarthritis and stress fractures. In order to maintain a “good bone health” guidelines concerning the recommended dietary intakes should be followed and screening for Vit. D deficiency in individuals at risk for deficiency is required, followed by the appropriate action.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Paget disease of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is most common in people of western European heritage. Early-onset Paget disease of bone is much rarer. This form of the disorder has been reported in only a few families. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ...

  18. Bone hydatid disease refractory to nitazoxanide treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Hans G.; Simsek, Suat; van Agtmael, Michiel A.; van Lienden, Krijn P.

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with bone hydatid disease that was refractory to both long-term daily treatment with albendazole, combined with cimetidine or administered as monotherapy ( approximately 15 years) and a relatively short course of nitazoxanide combined with albendazole (3 months). Despite

  19. Radioisotopic studies of bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ell, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    Consideration is given to the study of bone diseases. The most used radionuclides in the skeletal investigation are analysed and a table of radiopharmaceuticals of localization in the skeleton is showed. Emphasis is given to the use of Strontium 85 and 87m, fluorine 18 and technetium 99m. The phosphate compounds labelled with Technetium 99m are studied in detail and the structures of these organic and inorganic compounds are given. A table with values of the blood clearance of those compounds is presented. The skeletal distribution of the phosphate compounds-sup(99m)Tc, as well as the abnormal scintigraphy of skeleton by means of them, are analysed. Referring to bone diseases, the benign and malignant ones are studied: a table is given of bone diseases with positive imaging to the skeleton scintigraphy in the former case and the main applications of this scintigraphy in the latter one. Emphasis is given, in all the cases, to the clinical applications of the method, with recommendations in each one. Scintigraphic imagings are presented referring to each item studied [pt

  20. Clinical research of bone scan characteristics for metabolic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ruisen; Luo Qiong; Lu Haikui; Chen Libo; Luo Quanyong

    2009-01-01

    Characteristic images of 99m Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy in patients with metabolic bone diseases (MBD) were analyzed and compared, in an attempt to improve the capability of differential diagnosis in this aspect. A total of 142 cases, clinically confirmed as (MBD), were categorized into six groups: hyperparathyroidism (117), renal osteodystrophy (4), Paget's disease (16), hypophosphatemic osteomalacia (2), Albers-Schonberg disease (2), and Brittle bone disease (1). They were diagnosed clinically or pathologically, and scanned with 99m Tc-MDP bone scintegraphy, from which the 142 MBD cases were classified into 4 types. The cases of Type I had increased amount of 99m Tc-MDP uptake in whole body bones, including hyperparathyroidism, Albers-Schonberg disease, brittle bone disease and renal osteodystrophy. The cases of Type II had high uptake of 99m Tc-MDP in local region of bones, including paget's disease, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia and hyperparathyroidism. A Type I case with pathological fracture or secondary osteopathy was classified as Type III. Type IV cases were in early stage of hyperparathyroidism, with normal bone scan image. Analysis of the characteristics of 99m Tc-MDP bone scintigraphic findings (locations, morphology and intensities) in patients with MBD may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of MBD, in association with the patient's history and X-ray data altogether. (authors)

  1. Bone disease in haemoglobin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersi Voskaridou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with thalassaemia and other haemoglobin disorders. The delay in sexual maturation, the presence of diabetes and hypothyroidism, the parathyroid gland dysfunction, the haemolytic anaemia, the progressive marrow expansion, the iron toxicity on osteoblasts, the iron chelators, and the deficiency of growth hormone or insulin growth factors have been identified as major causes of osteoporosis in thalassaemia. Adequate hormonal replacement, effective iron chelation, improvement of hemoglobin levels, calcium and vitamin D administration, physical activity, and smoking cessation are the main to-date measures for the management of the disease. During the last decade, novel pathogenetic data suggest that the reduced osteoblastic activity, which is believed to be the basic mechanism of bone loss in thalassemia, is accompanied by a comparable or even greater increase in bone resorption. Therefore, potent inhibitors of osteoclast activation, such as the aminobisphosphonates, arise as key drugs for the management of osteoporosis in thalassaemia patients and other haemoglobin disorders.

  2. Denosumab for bone diseases: translating bone biology into targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rachner, Tilman D; Rauner, Martina; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Signalling of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) through RANK is a critical pathway to regulate the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts and, hence, a master regulator of bone resorption. Increased RANKL activity has been demonstrated in diseases characterised by excessive bone loss such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteolytic bone metastases. The development and approval of denosumab, a fully MAB against RANKL, has heralded a new era in the treatment of bone diseases by providing a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. This article summarises the molecular and cellular biology of the RANKL/RANK system and critically reviews preclinical and clinical studies that have established denosumab as a promising novel therapy for metabolic and malignant bone diseases. We will discuss the potential indications for denosumab along with a critical review of safety and analyse its potential within the concert of established therapies.

  3. Bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy in Gaucher disease type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; Zitter, F.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Lind, P.; Wuertz, F.; Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Scintigraphy is a method for imaging metabolism and should be viewed as complimentary to morphological imaging. Bone and bone marrow scintigraphy can particularly contribute to the detection of focal disease in Gaucher disease. In bone crises it can discriminate within three days after pain onset between local infection and aseptic necrosis. A further advantage of bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy is the visualization of the whole skeleton within one setting. Whole body imaging for focal lesions might thus be an objective in GD, in particular in patients complaining of several painful sites. Direct imaging of bone marrow deposits in GD by MIBI scintigraphy might be of special interest in children in whom bone marrow undergoes a developmental conversion from red to yellow marrow in the ap-pendicular skeleton. MRI interpretation in young GD patients is thus difficult in order to estimate the exact amount and extent of bone marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy with its direct visualization of lipid storage could thus add interesting additional information not shown with other methods including MRI. Although MRI is the most accepted imaging modality in assessing the skeletal status in GD, a selective use of scintigraphy for imaging bone and bone marrow may add information in the evaluation of patients with Gaucher disease

  4. Progress in the clinical imaging research of bone diseases on ankle and foot sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhong; Shi, Lenian; Liu, Taiyun; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles are research focuses of foot and ankle surgery. Pains of the foot and ankle are related to sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles. The specific anatomical and functional relationship of sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles can cause such bone diseases as the dislocation of sesamoid bones and accessory bones, infection, inflammation and necrosis of sesamoid bones, cartilage softening, tenosynovitis of sesamoid bones and the sesamoid bone syndrome. However, these bone diseases are often misdiagnosed or mistreated. In patients with trauma history, relevant diseases of sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles as above mentioned are highly probable to be misdiagnosed as avulsion fractures. In such cases, radiographic findings may provide a basis for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25343083

  5. Paget's disease of bone resembling bone metastasis from gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Shimoda, Yoko; Ishihara, Shingo; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tetsuro; Mochiki, Erito; Sano, Takaaki; Hirato, Junko; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-08-01

    A 74-year-old man had an endoscopic type 0'-IIc tumor in the upper gastric body on the greater curvature and biopsy showed the tumor to be a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (Group 5). He was referred to us for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Endoscopy revealed fold convergency, fold swelling, and fusion of the fold, indicating tumor invasion into the submucosa, which was outside the indications for ESD. In addition, there was an increase of serum bone-type alkaline phosphatase (ALP-III and ALP-IV) and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (a bone metabolism marker), while (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the left pelvis and Th10, suggesting bone metastases. We first diagnosed gastric cancer with bone metastases; however, the symptoms suggested pathological bone fracture and no bone pain. Therefore, a computed tomography-guided aspiration bone biopsy was performed to exclude the possibility of Paget's disease of bone. Biopsy specimens revealed no tumor and a mosaic pattern. No increased uptake of (18)F-FAMT (L-[3-(18)F] α-methyltyrosine) supported a diagnosis of no bone metastases from gastric cancer. We finally diagnosed gastric cancer accompanied by Paget's disease of bone and performed a laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy. The pathological diagnosis was U less 0-IIb, and U post 0-IIc ypT1a (M) N0H0P0M0 yp stage IA. In gastric cancer patients with suspected bone metastasis, we also need to consider Paget's disease of bone.

  6. Fracture, aging and disease in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    From a public health perspective, developing a detailed mechanistic understanding of the well-known increase in fracture risk of human bone with age is essential. This also represents a challenge from materials science and fracture mechanics viewpoints. Bone has a complex, hierarchical structure with characteristic features ranging from nanometer to macroscopic dimensions; it is therefore significantly more complex than most engineering materials. Nevertheless, by examining the micro-/nano-structural changes accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them to fracture mechanics data, it is possible to obtain a quantitative picture of how bone resists fracture. As human cortical bone exhibits rising ex vivo crack-growth resistance with crack extension, its fracture toughness must be evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior. While the crack initiation toughness declines with age, the more striking finding is that the crack-growth toughness declines even more significantly and is essentially absent in bone from donors exceeding 85 years in age. To explain such an age-induced deterioration in the toughness of bone, we evaluate its fracture properties at multiple length scales, specifically at the molecular and nanodimensions using pico-force atomic-force microscopy, nanoindentation and vibrational spectroscopies, at the microscale using electron microscopy and hard/soft x-ray computed tomography, and at the macroscale using R-curve measurements. We show that the reduction in crack-growth toughness is associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging, and that this occurs at relatively coarse size-scales in the range of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Finally, we briefly describe how specific clinical treatments, e.g., with steroid hormones to treat various inflammatory conditions, can prematurely damage bone, thereby reducing its

  7. Maintaining bone health in prostate cancer throughout the disease continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Eastham, James

    2010-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most prevalent malignancy in men, with 604,506 new cases diagnosed yearly worldwide. Maintaining bone health is important during all stages of PC, including patients who experience bone loss from androgen-deprivation therapy and patients who develop bone metastases. Patients with bone metastases often experience severe bone pain and are at increased risk for potentially debilitating skeletal-related events. Bisphosphonates are a well-established treatment option for patients with bone metastases from solid tumors and bone lesions from multiple myeloma. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is the only bisphosphonate (BP) that has been extensively studied in patients with castration-recurrent PC and is indicated for treating patients with bone metastases from PC in conjunction with standard antineoplastic therapy. This review will examine the breadth of evidence supporting a role for ZOL and emerging therapies in managing patients with PC throughout the disease continuum. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that the loss of alveolar bone mineral density leaves bone more susceptible to periodontal bacteria, increasing the ... bone density will have a favorable impact on dental health. Bisphosphonates, a group of medications available for the treatment of osteoporosis, have been linked to the development ...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Increases the Incidence of Hospitalization Due to Fall-related Bone Fracture in Elderly Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: On the basis of our findings, we conclude that AD may increase the incidence of hospitalization due to falls and bone fracture. We also found that AD has no effect on fracture location, but larger studies are needed to confirm this finding. Physicians and family members should emphasize the possibility of falls and bone fracture in patients with AD. Our findings suggest that preventing falls in AD patients may reduce the number of hospitalized AD patients.

  10. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  11. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  12. Evaluation of bone diseases using dynamic bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Machiko; Tamura, Kenji; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Kajita, Akiyoshi

    1983-12-01

    Dynamic bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-EHDP was performed on 96 patients with various bone diseases. The dynamic scintigrams obtained were then used to aid in the differential diagnosis of malignant (49 cases) and benign (8 cases) diseases. Short-term local deposition of the tracer in all cases of malignant bone diseases was observed in vascular (10-40 sec. after injection), and blood pool (1-3 min. after injection) phases. In the cases of malignant bone tumors where osteosclerotic lesions were present, tracer accumulation appeared in the blood pool phase. If osteolytic lesions were present, accumulation appeared in the vascular phase, and when the lesion was larger than 2 cm, accumulation was frequently found in the arterial phase. Scintigraphic differentiation of early primary and metastatic bone tumors from other lesions was facilitated by performing the dynamic scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-EHDP. Dynamic bone scintigraphy also allowed early diagnosis of avascular necrosis (14 cases) prior to the appearance of minimally abnormal X-ray findings, especially in cases of corticosteroid-induced necrosis.

  13. [Impact of thyroid diseases on bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourdi, E; Lademann, F; Siggelkow, H

    2018-05-09

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of skeletal development in childhood and bone homeostasis in adulthood, and thyroid diseases have been associated with increased osteoporotic fractures. Hypothyroidism in children leads to an impaired skeletal maturation and mineralization, but an adequate and timely substitution with thyroid hormones stimulates bone growth. Conversely, hyperthyroidism at a young age accelerates skeletal development, but may also cause short stature because of a premature fusion of the growth plates. Hypothyroidism in adults causes an increase in the duration of the remodeling cycle and, thus, leads to low bone turnover and enhanced mineralization, but an association with a higher fracture risk is less well established. In adults, a surplus of thyroid hormones enhances bone turnover, mostly due to an increased bone resorption driven by osteoclasts. Thus, hyperthyroidism is a well-recognized cause of high-bone turnover secondary osteoporosis, resulting in an increased susceptibility to fragility fractures. Subclinical hyperthyroidism, especially resulting from endogenous disease, also has an adverse effect on bone mineral density and is associated with fractures. In most patients with overt or subclinical hyperthyroidism restoration of the euthyroid status reverses bone loss. In postmenopausal women who receive thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy because of thyroid cancer, antiresorptive treatments may be indicated. Overall, extensive data support the importance of a euthyroid status for bone mineral accrual and growth in childhood as well as maintenance of bone health in adulthood.

  14. Skeletal scintigraphy and quantitative tracer studies in metabolic bone disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelman, Ignac

    Bone scan imaging with the current bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals, the technetium-99m labelled diphosphonates, has dramatically improved our ability to evaluate skeletal pathology. In this thesis, chapter 1 presents a review of the history of bone scanning, summarises present concepts as to the mechanism of uptake of bone seeking agents and briefly illustrates the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. In chapter 2 the applications of bone scan imaging and quantitative tracer techniques derived from the bone scan in the detection of metabolic bone disease are discussed. Since skeletal uptake of Tc-99m diphosphonate depends upon skeletal metabolism one might expect that the bone scan would be of considerable value in the assessment of metabolic bone disease. However in these disorders the whole skeleton is often diffusely involved by the metabolic process and simple visual inspection of the scan image may not reveal the uniformly increased uptake of tracer. Certain patterns of bone scan abnormality have, however, been reported in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteo-dystrophy; the present studies extend these observations and introduce the concept of "metabolic features" which are often recognisable in conditions with generalised increased bone turnover. As an aid to systematic recognition of these features on a given bone scan image a semi-quantitative scoring system, the metabolic index, was introduced. The metabolic index allowed differentiation between various groups of patients with metabolic disorders and a control population. In addition, in a bone scan study of patients with acromegaly, it was found that the metabolic index correlated well with disease activity as measured by serum growth hormone levels. The metabolic index was, however, found to be a relatively insensitive means of identifying disease in individual patients. Patients with increased bone turnover will have an absolute increase in skeletal uptake of tracer. As a

  15. Histologic diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases: bone histomorphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dalle Carbonare

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Histomorphometry or quantitative histology is the analysis on histologic sections of bone resorption parameters, formation and structure. It is the only technique that allows a dynamic evaluation of the activity of bone modelling after labelling with tetracycline. Moreover, the new measurement procedures through the use of the computer allow an assessment of bone microarchitecture too. Histomorphometric bone biopsy is a reliable and well-tolerated procedure. Complications are reported only in 1% of the subjects (hematoma, pain, transient neuralgia. Histomorphometry is used to exclude or confirm the diagnosis of osteomalacia. It is employed in the evaluation of bone damage associated with particular treatments (for example, anticonvulsants or in case of rare bone diseases (osteogenesis imperfecta, systemic mastocytosis. It is also an essential approach when clinical, biochemical and other diagnostic data are not consistent. Finally, it is a useful method to understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of drugs. The bone sample is taken at the level of iliac crest under local anesthesia. It is then put into methyl-metacrilate resin where the sections are prepared for the microscopic analysis of the various histomorphometric parameters.

  16. Improvement of adynamic bone disease after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, K A; Jorgetti, V; Pereira, R C; Reis, L M dos; Pereira, L M; Corrêa, P H S; Borelli, A; Ianhez, L E; Moysés, R M A; David-Neto, E

    2006-01-01

    Low bone remodeling and relatively low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels characterize adynamic bone disease (ABD). The impact of renal transplantation (RT) on the course of ABD is unknown. We studied prospectively 13 patients with biopsy-proven ABD after RT. Bone histomorphometry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed in the 1st and 12th months after RT. Serum PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and osteocalcin were measured regularly throughout the study. Serum PTH levels were slightly elevated at transplantation, normalized at the end of the third month and remained stable thereafter. Bone biopsies performed in the first month after RT revealed low bone turnover in all patients, with positive bone aluminum staining in 5. In the 12th month, second biopsies were performed on 12 patients. Bone histomorphometric dynamic parameters improved in 9 and were completely normalized in 6, whereas no bone mineralization was detected in 3 of these 12 patients. At 12 months post-RT, no bone aluminum was detected in any patient. We also found a decrease in lumbar BMD and an increase in femoral BMD. Patients suffering from ABD, even those with a reduction in PTH levels, may present partial or complete recovery of bone turnover after successful renal transplantation. However, it is not possible to positively identify the mechanisms responsible for the improvement. Identifying these mechanisms should lead to a better understanding of the physiopathology of ABD and to the development of more effective treatments.

  17. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Chronic pancreatitis, metabolic bone disease, osteomalacia, osteopenia ... with malabsorption, and endocrine dysfunction results in diabetes .... of insufficiency and deficiency were not assessed separately due ...

  18. Role of bone scan in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases can be categorized by pathology into several specific types of musculoskeletal problems, including synovitis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), enthesopathy (e.g. ankylosing spondylitis) and cartilage degeneration (e.g. osteoarthritis). Skeletal radiographs have contributed to the diagnosis of these articular diseases, and some disease entities need typical radiographic changes as a factor of the diagnostic criteria. However, they sometimes show normal radiographic findings in the early stage of disease, when there is demineralization of less than 30-50%. Bone scans have also been used in arthritis, but not widely because the findings are nonspecific and it is thought that bone scans do not add significant information to routine radiography. Bone scans do however play a different role than simple radiography, and it is a complementary imaging method in the course of management of arthritis. The image quality of bone scans can be improved by obtaining regional views and images under al pin-hole collimator, and through a variety of scintigraphic techniques including the three phase bone scan and bone SPECT. Therefore, bone scans could improve the diagnostic value, and answer multiple clinical questions, based on the pathophysiology of various forms of arthritis

  19. Heterogeneous pattern of bone disease in adult type 1 Gaucher disease: clinical and pathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dussen, L; Lips, P; van Essen, H W; Hollak, C E M; Bravenboer, N

    2014-09-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in macrophages, so-called Gaucher cells, as a result of a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Bone complications are an important cause of morbidity of GD and are thought to result from imbalance in bone remodeling. Bone manifestations among GD patients demonstrate a large variation including increased osteoclastic bone resorption, low bone formation and osteonecrosis. The purpose of the current case series is to describe the histological features observed in undecalcified bone samples, obtained from three GD patients, and evaluate the relationship with clinical features in these patients. Bone fragments were obtained from three adult type 1 GD patients with variable degrees of bone disease during orthopedic surgery. Specimens were embedded without prior decalcification in methylmethacrylate and prepared for histology according to standardized laboratory procedures. Histology revealed a heterogeneous pattern of bone involvement. High cellularity of bone marrow, abundant presence of Gaucher cells (GCs) and high turnover were observed in a patient with a history of multiple bone complications, while minimal bone turnover and few GCs were detected in the mildest affected patient in this series. An intermediate picture with relatively low bone turnover and a substantial amount of Gaucher cells was demonstrated in the third, moderately affected patient. No gross abnormalities in three biochemical markers of bone turnover (osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen and type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide) were noted. Plastic embedding and subsequent Goldner and TRAP staining offered a unique possibility to study bone histological findings in GD. Our data show that bone manifestations in GD may vary both clinically as well as histologically and bone disease in GD will likely require a personalized approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  20. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellese A. Cannonier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung, directly invade into bone (head and neck or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  1. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  2. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors

  3. Bone marrow stroma in idiopathic myelofibrosis and other haematological diseases. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I; Hasselbalch, H; Junker, P

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 patients with haematological diseases, mainly idiopathic myelofibrosis (n = 8) and related chronic myeloproliferative disorders (n = 14). The bone marrow from patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis and some CML patients showed marked...

  4. Extrinsic Mechanisms Involved in Age-Related Defective Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Context: Age-related bone loss is associated with progressive changes in bone remodeling characterized by decreased bone formation relative to bone resorption. Both trabecular and periosteal bone formation decline with age in both sexes, which contributes to bone fragility and increased risk of f...

  5. vanishing bone disease in a tertiary teaching hospital in uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prior to the above presentation and review of systems were unremarkable. General examination revealed a ... syndrome or disease, massive osteolysis, disappearing bone disease, vanishing bone disease, idiopathic ... patient symptoms and anatomic location. Medical treatment involves, radiation therapy, anti-osteoclastic.

  6. Glucocorticoid-related bone changes from endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Amy H; Saag, Kenneth G

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Here, recent findings regarding glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, bone changes in patients with endogenous glucocorticoid derangements, and treatment of steroid-induced bone disease are reviewed. Although the majority of our understanding arises from the outcomes of patients treated with exogenous steroids, endogenous overproduction appears to be similarly destructive to bone, but these effects are reversible with cure of the underlying disease process. Additionally, there are bone changes that occur in diseases that interrupt adrenal glucocorticoid production, both in response to our inability to perfectly match glucocorticoid replacement and also related to the underlying disease process. More investigation is required to understand which patients with endogenous overproduction or underproduction of glucocorticoid would benefit from osteoporosis treatment. Better understood is the benefit that can be achieved with currently approved treatments for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis from exogenous steroids. With growing concern of long-term use of bisphosphonates, however, further investigation into the duration of use and use in certain populations, such as children and premenopausal women, is essential. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is a complex disease that is becoming better understood through advances in the study of exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoid exposure. Further advancement of proper treatment and prevention is on the horizon.

  7. Radiopharmacons for bone diseases diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajan, G.

    1989-05-01

    Some essential pharmacological and physical characteristics of several osteospecific radiopharmaceuticals are discussed. It is shown that among the osteotrophyc isotope products tested and partly already marketed in Hungary, 99m Tc-HEDSPA and 99m Tc-pyrophosphate have the most advantageous characteristics. Both are suitable for the detection of pathologic processes causing reactive bone proliferation or increased turnover. Their excellent detectability is only matched by 153 Sm-EDTA, which is inferior in other respects. Owing to their low radiation doses they can be used for the examination of young patients too. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  8. Osteopontin: Relation between Adipose Tissue and Bone Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina De Fusco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein mainly associated with bone metabolism and remodeling. Besides its physiological functions, OPN is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states, such as obesity and osteoporosis. Importantly, during the last decades obesity and osteoporosis have become among the main threats to health worldwide. Because OPN is a protein principally expressed in cells with multifaceted effects on bone morphogenesis and remodeling and because it seems to be one of the most overexpressed genes in the adipose tissue of the obese contributing to osteoporosis, this mini review will highlight recent insights about relation between adipose tissue and bone homeostasis.

  9. Osteopontin: Relation between Adipose Tissue and Bone Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fusco, Carolina; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Emanuela; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Sergio, Chieffi; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein mainly associated with bone metabolism and remodeling. Besides its physiological functions, OPN is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states, such as obesity and osteoporosis. Importantly, during the last decades obesity and osteoporosis have become among the main threats to health worldwide. Because OPN is a protein principally expressed in cells with multifaceted effects on bone morphogenesis and remodeling and because it seems to be one of the most overexpressed genes in the adipose tissue of the obese contributing to osteoporosis, this mini review will highlight recent insights about relation between adipose tissue and bone homeostasis.

  10. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley DA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Denise A Yardley1,2 1Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Tennessee Oncology, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, bone metastases, hormone receptor-positive, bone-related complications, interventions, management and management strategies, estrogen receptor-positive

  11. Detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and related bone marrow diseases, with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls and caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sa A; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Stachurski, Dariusz; Anderson, Mary; Raza, Azra; Woda, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in the setting of aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, the status of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in various categories of myelodysplastic syndrome and in other bone marrow disorders is not well-studied. By using multiparameter flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis with antibodies specific for four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (CD55, CD59, CD16, CD66b) and performing an aerolysin lysis confirmatory test in representative cases, we assessed the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes in 110 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 15 with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease, 5 with idiopathic myelofibrosis and 6 with acute myeloid leukemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes were detected in nine patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndrome who showed clinicopathological features of bone marrow failure, similar to aplastic anemia. All paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-positive cases demonstrated loss of the four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, with CD16(-)CD66b(-) clones being larger than those of CD55(-)CD59(-) (p<0.05). Altered glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expression secondary to granulocytic hypogranulation, immaturity, and/or immunophenotypic abnormalities was present in a substantial number of cases and diagnostically challenging. These results show that routine screening for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with an intrinsic bone marrow disease who show no clinical evidence of hemolysis has an appreciable yield in patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndromes. The recognition of diagnostic caveats and pitfalls associated with the underlying intrinsic bone marrow disease is essential in interpreting paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria testing correctly. In our experience, the CD

  12. Bone marrow transplantation for correction of enzyme deficiency disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, C.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Matas, A.J.; Najarian, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Mutant acatalasemic mice provide a prototype of congenital enzyme deficiency disease. Normal blood catalase levels were achieved permanently in congenitally acatalasemic mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congeneic normal catalasemic mice using relatively small numbers of cells following whole body irradiation. The increase in blood catalase activity was physiologically effective as demonstrated by the protection of the previously acatalasemic mice against the otherwise lethal effects of hydrogen peroxide injections. Bone marrow transplantation has the potential to provide a continuous source of some enzymes and may be applicable as treatment for certain congenital enzyme deficiency diseases

  13. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Bariatric Surgery Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proven to be a life-saving measure for some, but for others it has precipitated a plethora of metabolic complications ranging from mild to life-threatening, sometimes to the point of requiring surgical revision. Obesity was previously thought to be bone protective, but this is indeed not the case. Morbidly obese individuals are at risk for metabolic bone disease (MBD due to chronic vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, chronic dieting, underlying chronic diseases, and the use of certain medications used to treat those diseases. After bariatric surgery, the risk for bone-related problems is even greater, owing to severely restricted intake, malabsorption, poor compliance with prescribed supplements, and dramatic weight loss. Patients presenting for bariatric surgery should be evaluated for MBD and receive appropriate presurgical interventions. Furthermore, every patient who has undergone bariatric surgery should receive meticulous lifetime monitoring, as the risk for developing MBD remains ever present.

  14. Evolution of bone disease after kidney transplantation: A prospective histomorphometric analysis of trabecular and cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Catarina; Magalhães, Juliana; Pereira, Luciano; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Castro-Ferreira, Inês; Frazão, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant bone disease results from multiple factors, including previous bone and mineral metabolism disturbances and effects from transplant-related medications. Bone biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool. We aimed to prospectively evaluate trabecular and cortical bone by histomorphometry after kidney transplantation. Seven patients, willing to perform follow-up bone biopsy, were included in the study. Dual-X-ray absorptiometry and trans-iliac bone biopsy were performed within the first 2 months after renal transplantation and repeated after 2-5 years of follow-up. Follow-up biopsy revealed a significant decrease in osteoblast surface/bone surface (0.91 ± 0.81 to 0.47 ± 0.12%, P = 0.036), osteoblasts number/bone surface (0.45 (0.23, 0.94) to 0.00/mm(2) , P = 0.018) and erosion surface/bone surface (3.75 ± 2.02 to 2.22 ± 1.38%, P = 0.044). A decrease in trabecular number (3.55 (1.81, 2.89) to 1.55/mm (1.24, 2.06), P = 0.018) and increase in trabecular separation (351.65 ± 135.04 to 541.79 ± 151.91 μm, P = 0.024) in follow-up biopsy suggest loss in bone quantity. We found no significant differences in cortical analysis, except a reduction in external cortical osteonal eroded surface (5.76 (2.94, 13.97) to 3.29% (0.00, 6.67), P = 0.043). Correlations between bone histomorphometric and dual-X-ray absorptiometry parameters gave inconsistent results. The results show a reduction in bone activity, suggesting increased risk of adynamic bone and loss of bone volume. Cortical bone seems less affected by post-transplant biological changes in the first years after kidney transplantation. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. Imaging The Complications Of Paget's Disease Of Bones In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The skull and chest radiographs, CT scan and echocardiography with their findings are highlighted so as to increase awareness and index of suspicion in physicians to this relatively rare bone disease. Classical features were illustrated on plain skull radiograph and CT Scan. Echocardiography revealed left ventricular ...

  16. A case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinugawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Fumihiko; Sai, Yoshikazu; Amakata, Yoshikuni; Yoshitake, Kazusada [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1991-07-01

    We experienced a case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease. The patient received radiation therapy to head and neck area against the same disease. Bone tissue which received radiation therapy had developed malnutrition as side effect of radiation, and osteomyelitis was induced by infection from the teeth. Even in the benign soft tissue disease like Kimura's disease, especially after radiation therapy, pathologic fracture of bone may happen due to bone damage caused by radiation. (author).

  17. Bone quality changes associated with aging and disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, Adele L; Imbert, Laurianne

    2017-12-01

    Bone quality encompasses all the characteristics of bone that, in addition to density, contribute to its resistance to fracture. In this review, we consider changes in architecture, porosity, and composition, including collagen structure, mineral composition, and crystal size. These factors all are known to vary with tissue and animal ages, and health status. Bone morphology and presence of microcracks, which also contribute to bone quality, will not be discussed in this review. Correlations with mechanical performance for collagen cross-linking, crystallinity, and carbonate content are contrasted with mineral content. Age-dependent changes in humans and rodents are discussed in relation to rodent models of disease. Examples are osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), and osteopetrosis in both humans and animal models. Each of these conditions, along with aging, is associated with increased fracture risk for distinct reasons. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Bone scintigraphy in systemic and metabolic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, H.J.; Schmidt, H.A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy is a very sensitive method to identify pathological processes affecting the bone. Its specificity is, however, considerably lower than its sensitivity, particularly in systemic diseases. We therefore investigated the possibilities of differential diagnosis based on typical sites or patterns of distribution. The Paget syndrome with characteristic manifestation in the pelvic region, including crutch-shaped accumulation in the proximal femur, may be diagnosed by scintigraphy alone. If these typical sites are absent, however, differential diagnosis is difficult. Differential diagnosis for multiple myeloma, fibrous dysplasia, enchondromatosis, hyperparathyroidism, osteopathies, osteomalacia, inflammatory rheumatic diseases is also required and should be based on further examinations, taking into consideration the history, clinical signs and course. In this connexion scintigraphy is relevant both for early assessment and documentation of the spread of pathological processes and for the follow-up. (orig.) [de

  19. An insight in to Paget′s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Sabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paget′s disease of bone (PDB is a common disorder which may affect one or many bones. Although many patients are asymptomatic, a variety of symptoms and complications may occur. PDB is a focal disorder of bone turnover characterized by excessive bone resorption coupled with bone formation. PDB begins with a period of increased osteoclastic activity and bone resorption, followed by increased osteoblast production of woven bone that is poorly mineralized. In the final phase of the disease process, dense cortical and trabecular bone deposition predominates, but the bone is sclerotic and poorly organized and lacks the structural integrity and strength of normal bone. This article briefly reviews the etiopathogenesis, clinical radiographic and histological features of Paget′s disease.

  20. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán López-Larramona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD. These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  1. GORHAM-STOUT SYNDROME: PHANTOM BONE DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kouba, Gabriel; de Araújo Santos, Romilton; Pilluski, Paulo César; Severo, Antonio; Lech, Osvandré

    2010-01-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a disease that presents idiopathic osteolysis of a bone or closely contiguous area. The etiology is unknown. It is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose, and its treatment is controversial. It affects individuals irrespective of age or sex. In this study, we conducted a bibliographic review of the disease, specifically focusing on the differential diagnosis, and we demonstrated the follow-up on a patient with this syndrome from the time of its diagnosis, through treatment, to its current state of evolution.

  2. GORHAM-STOUT SYNDROME: PHANTOM BONE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kouba, Gabriel; de Araújo Santos, Romilton; Pilluski, Paulo César; Severo, Antonio; Lech, Osvandré

    2015-01-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a disease that presents idiopathic osteolysis of a bone or closely contiguous area. The etiology is unknown. It is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose, and its treatment is controversial. It affects individuals irrespective of age or sex. In this study, we conducted a bibliographic review of the disease, specifically focusing on the differential diagnosis, and we demonstrated the follow-up on a patient with this syndrome from the time of its diagnosis, through treatment, to its current state of evolution. PMID:27026974

  3. A murine model of human myeloma bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, I.R.; Dallas, S.; Radl, J.; Mundy, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Myeloma causes a devastating and unique form of osteolytic bone disease. Although osteoclast activation is responsible for bone destruction, the precise mechanisms by which myeloma cells increase osteoclast activity have not been defined. An animal model of human myeloma bone disease mould help in

  4. A fish bone-related hepatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Jarry

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of pyogenic, hepatic abscess caused by fish bone penetration of the duodenum in a 68-year-old woman. The fish bone had migrated into the liver through the duodenal wall. The patient was initially admitted to our emergency room with abdominal pain, fever, and asthenia. A contrastenhanced abdominal coputed tomography (CT scan showed a hepatic abscess in relation with a straight, foreign body, which had entered through the duodenal wall. Surgery was necessary to remove the foreign body, which was identified as a fish bone. The patient’s recovery was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 10. This case is discussed together with the data collected by a medline-based extensive review of the literature.

  5. Relative 238Pu content of bone and bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClanahan, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Selected bones from a dog that inhaled 238 PuO 2 were subjected to ultrasonic cell disruption to separate the marrow elements from bone, in order to determine the plutonium content of the two components of the skeleton

  6. Semi-quantitative interpretation of the bone scan in metabolic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelman, I; Turner, J G; Hay, I D; Boyle, I T [Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (UK). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Citrin, D L [Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA). Dept. of Human Oncology; Bessent, G R

    1979-01-01

    Certain easily recognisable features are commonly seen in the bone scans of patients with metabolic bone disorders. Seven such features have been numerically graded by three independent observers in the scans of 100 patients with metabolic bone disease and of 50 control subjects. The total score for each patient is defined as the metabolic index. The mean metabolic index for each group of patients with metabolic bone disease is significantly greater than that for the control group (P < 0.001). (orig.).

  7. Cytokines in Gaucher disease: Role in the pathogenesis of bone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    2015-03-03

    Mar 3, 2015 ... The impact of therapy on bone manifestations of Gaucher disease . ... types: classical or alternative, depending on the predominant cytokine in the .... avascular necrosis, bone infarcts and localised cortical thin- ning may be ...

  8. Bone mineral density in adult coeliac disease: An updated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: coeliac disease (CD affects around 1-2 % of the world population. Most patients are now diagnosed when adults, suffering the consequences of an impaired bone mineralization. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the relationship between low bone mineral density (BMD, osteopenia and osteoporosis, and CD. Methods: a PubMed search restricted to the last 15 years was conducted. Sources cited in the results were also reviewed to identify potential sources of information. Results: low BMD affects up to 75 % of celiac patients, and can be found at any age, independently of positive serological markers and presence of digestive symptoms. The prevalence of CD among osteoporotic patients is also significantly increased. Two theories try to explain this origin of low BMD: Micronutrients malabsorption (including calcium and vitamin D determined by villous atrophy has been related to secondary hyperparathyroidism and incapacity to achieve the potential bone mass peak; chronic inflammation was also related with RANKL secretion, osteoclasts activation and increased bone resorption. As a consequence, celiac patients have a risk for bone fractures that exceed 40 % that of matched non-affected population. Treatment of low BMD in CD comprises gluten-free diet, calcium and vitamin D supplementation, and biphosphonates, although its effects on CD have not been specifically assessed. Conclusions: up to 75 % of celiac patients and 40 % of that diagnosed in adulthood present a low BMD and a variable increase in the risk of bone fractures. Epidemiological changes in CD make bone density scans more relevant for adult coeliacs.

  9. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  10. Zoledronic acid in metastatic bone disease: an audit based discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, R.A.; Gosh, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Metastatic bone disease is a common problem in patients with advanced cancer causing significant morbidity and poor quality of life. Effective and less toxic treatments, like bisphophonates, can reduce morbidity in such cases. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine whether Zoledronic acid was administered in accordance with current recommendations for its prescribing and to produce protocols for improved patient outcomes. Methods: The study was a retrospective audit of 39 consecutive patients with metastatic bone disease secondary to solid tumours who were treated with Zoledronic acid. The records were analysed to establish the administered dose of Zoledronic acid relative to creatinine clearance. The standards for Zoledronic acid therapy were defined from best practice guidelines. Results: The commonest diagnosis in patients receiving Zoledronic acid was carcinoma prostate 19/39 (49%) followed by carcinoma breast 11/39 (28%), gastrointestinal malignancies 4/39 (10%) and renal cell carcinoma 3/39 (8%). Indications for therapy were metastatic bone disease alone 31 (79%), hypercalcaemia alone 0/39 (0%), metastatic bone disease with hypercalcaemia 5/39 (13%), and prevention of chemotherapy induced bone loss 1/39 (3%). The dose of Zoledronic acid was appropriate to the creatinine clearance in 25/39 (6 4%), inappropriate in 5/39 (13%) and unclear from the notes in 9/39 (23%). Conclusions: Majority of patients received Zoledronic acid for the appropriate indications. The dose of Zoledronic acid was appropriate to serum creatinine clearance in a majority of patients. Poor documentation of data pertaining to Zoledronic acid treatment is observed which can potentially lead to major errors in prescribing. We recommend using a standard form to document each episode of therapy with Zoledronic acid. (author)

  11. Natural history of malignant bone disease in hepatocellular carcinoma: final results of a multicenter bone metastasis survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Santini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone is an uncommon site of metastasis in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Therefore, there are few studies concerning the natural history of bone metastasis in patients with HCC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs, and bone-directed therapies for 211 deceased HCC patients with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: The median age was 70 years; 172 patients were male (81.5%. The median overall survival was 19 months. The median time to the onset of bone metastasis was 13 months (22.2% at HCC diagnosis; 64.9% patients had multiple bone metastases. Spine was the most common site of bone metastasis (59.7%. Most of these lesions were osteolytic (82.4%; 88.5% of them were treated with zoledronic acid. At multivariate analysis, only the Child Score was significantly correlated with a shorter time to diagnosis of bone metastases (p = 0.001, HR = 1.819. The median survival from bone metastasis was 7 months. At multivariate analysis, HCC etiology (p = 0.005, ECOG performance status (p = 0.002 and treatment with bisphosphonate (p = 0.024 were associated with shorter survival after bone disease occurrence. The site of bone metastasis but not the number of bone lesions was associated with the survival from first skeletal related event (SRE (p = 0.021 and OS (p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a significant improvement in the understanding the natural history of skeletal disease in HCC patients. An early and appropriate management of these patients is dramatically needed in order to avoid subsequent worsening of their quality of life.

  12. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (sHLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis. In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up.

  13. Re-evaluation of bone pain in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease suggests that bone crises occur in small bones as well as long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Weisz Hubshman, Monika; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kornreich, Liora; Shkalim Zemer, Vered; Cohen, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Bone crises in type 1 Gaucher disease are reported in long bones and occasionally in weight bearing bones and other bones, but rarely in small bones of the hands and feet. We retrospectively examined the incidence of bone pain in patients followed at the Rabin Medical Center, Israel, before and following the initiation of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and evaluated them for bone crises. Of 100 type I Gaucher disease patients, 30 (30%) experienced one or more bone crises. Small bone crises represented 31.5% of all bone crises and were always preceded by crises in other bones. While the incidence of long bone crises reduced after the initiation of ERT, small bone crises increased. Almost 60% of patients with bone crises were of the N370S/84GG genotype suggesting a greater susceptibility of N370S/84GG patients to severe bone complications. These patients also underwent the greatest number of splenectomies (70.6% of splenectomised patients). Splenectomised patients showed a trend towards increased long and small bone crises after surgery. Active investigation of acute pain in the hands and feet in patients in our cohort has revealed a high incidence of small bone crises. Physicians should consider imaging studies to investigate unexplained pain in these areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Current options for the treatment of Paget’s disease of the bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Merlotti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Merlotti, Luigi Gennari, Giuseppe Martini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a chronic bone remodeling disorder characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increases in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone at affected skeletal sites. This disease is most often asymptomatic but can be associated with bone pain or deformity, fractures, secondary arthritis, neurological complications, deafness, contributing to substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Neoplastic degeneration of pagetic bone is a relatively rare event, occurring with an incidence of less than 1%, but has a grave prognosis. Specific therapy for PDB is aimed at decreasing the abnormal bone turnover and bisphosphonates are currently considered the treatment of choice. These treatments are associated with a reduction in plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and an improvement in radiological and scintigraphic appearance and with a reduction in bone pain and bone deformity, Recently, the availability of newer, more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates has improved treatment outcomes, allowing a more effective and convenient management of this debilitating disorder.Keywords: Paget’s disease of bone, bisphosphonates, aminobisphosphonates, bone remodeling

  15. Paget's disease of the bone in Chinese woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H'ng, M.W.C.; Ho, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Paget's disease, otherwise known as osteitis deformans, is an unusual condition in the Oriental population. We report a case of Paget's disease in a Chinese woman, incidentally diagnosed on a bone scan. This was confirmed by clinical history, biochemistry and imaging findings using other modalities. Although bone scans are commonly performed to diagnose traumatic occult fractures and bone metastases, they can also be used to diagnose metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporotic fractures, and to evaluate Paget's disease. It can also diagnose acute fractures secondary to renal osteodystrophy and osteomalacia Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  16. Orthopantomographic study of the alveolar bone level on periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Sik; You, Dong Soo [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-11-15

    The author had measured the alveolar bone level of periodontal disease on 50 cases of orthopantomogram to detect the degree of alveolar bone resorption of both sexes of Korean. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Alveolar bone resorption of mesial and distal portion was similar in same patient. 2. The order of alveolar bone resorption was mandibular anterior region, posterior region, canine and premolar region of both jaws. 3. The degree of alveolar bone destruction was severe in shorter root length than longer one. 4. The degree of alveolar bone resorption was severe in fourth decades.

  17. Orthopantomographic study of the alveolar bone level on periodontal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Sik; You, Dong Soo

    1972-01-01

    The author had measured the alveolar bone level of periodontal disease on 50 cases of orthopantomogram to detect the degree of alveolar bone resorption of both sexes of Korean. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Alveolar bone resorption of mesial and distal portion was similar in same patient. 2. The order of alveolar bone resorption was mandibular anterior region, posterior region, canine and premolar region of both jaws. 3. The degree of alveolar bone destruction was severe in shorter root length than longer one. 4. The degree of alveolar bone resorption was severe in fourth decades.

  18. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically.

  19. A simple method of screening for metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, R.B.K.; Evans, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to find a simple method -to be used as an adjunct to the conventional bone scintigram- that could differentiate between decreased bone metabolism or mass, i.e., osteoporosis -normal bone- and the group of conditions of increased bone metabolism or mass namely, osteomalacia, renal osteodystrophy, hyperparathyroidism and Paget's disease. The Fogelman's method using the bone to soft tissue ratios from region of interest analysis at 4 hours post injection, was adopted. An initial experience in measuring a value for the count rate density in lumbar vertebrae at 1 hr post injection during conventional bone scintigraphy appears to give a clear indication of the overall rate of bone metabolism. The advantage over whole body retention methods is that the scan performed at the end of the metabolic study will reveal localized bone disease that may otherwise not be anticipated

  20. The use of bone turnover markers in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cherie

    2017-03-01

    Bone turnover markers assist in fracture risk prediction, management and monitoring of osteoporosis in patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD). The use in CKD-mineral bone disorder (MBD) has been limited as many of these markers and breakdown products are renally excreted, including the most commonly used and well standardized procollagen type I N propeptide and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen. Of the markers unaffected by renal function, bone specific alkaline phosphatase is associated with mortality and fracture rate in CKD subjects and is now available on several automated analysers. When used in combination with PTH, bone specific alkaline phosphatase as a bone formation marker correlated well with bone biopsy histomorphometry in predicting adynamic bone disease. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b is a resorption marker that is under development for automation. Both high and low bone turnover in CKD-MBD patients are associated with increased fracture and mortality risk. Bone biopsy as the gold standard to differentiate between adynamic bone disease and osteitis fibrosa is limited by availability and cost. Appropriate use of bone turnover markers is vital in the decision to commence anti-resorptive agents, and to monitor efficacy in order to avoid over suppression of bone turnover, which may lead to stress fractures. Further efforts are required to develop markers unaffected by renal function with standardized cut-off values and fracture as well as vascular calcification end-points. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  1. Bone scan and SPECT/CT findings in marble bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Jiten; Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram [Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Woril (India)

    2012-03-15

    Marble bone disease or osteopetrosis, is a rare inborn disorder characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone. Overall incidence of the disease is estimated to be 1 case in 100,000-500,000 population. Whereas the radiographic features of the disease are well known, information on bone scan imaging is sparse in the literature. We present technitium 99m methylene diphosphonate ({sup 99m}Tc MDP) bone scan features of osteopetrosis, along with single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography(SPECT/CT) correlation in a young male.

  2. Bone scan and SPECT/CT findings in marble bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, Jiten; Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    Marble bone disease or osteopetrosis, is a rare inborn disorder characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone. Overall incidence of the disease is estimated to be 1 case in 100,000-500,000 population. Whereas the radiographic features of the disease are well known, information on bone scan imaging is sparse in the literature. We present technitium 99m methylene diphosphonate ( 99m Tc MDP) bone scan features of osteopetrosis, along with single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography(SPECT/CT) correlation in a young male.

  3. Bone scintigraphy in a case of Ollier's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Nobuaki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Morita, Rikushi [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    1983-11-01

    Bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-MDP was performed on a case with a Ollier's disease. Compared with Bone X-ray examinations, increased activity is noted in the ribs, hands (esp. left), left humerus, left tibia and left foot. Tumor scintigraphy with /sup 67/Ga-citrate shows slightly increased accumulation in comparison with sup(99m)Tc-MDP findings. However, apparent change was not noted compared with the previous scans. So, malignant change was negative. Malignant bone tumors usually show high activity, but some benign tumors also show high uptake. So, a differential diagnosis of bone disease using sup(99m)Tc-phosphorous compounds is occasionally difficult. In case of Ollier's disease, a follow-up bone scintigraphy is useful for evaluation of tumor growth, because malignant changes were accompanied by intensive uptake of sup(99m)Tc-MDP. Also, /sup 67/Ga-study is necessary for the differentiation of bone disease.

  4. Paget's disease of the bone after treatment with Denosumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Rasmussen, Anne Qvist; Kvist, Torben M

    2012-01-01

    Bone affection in Paget's disease is characterized by increased bone turnover localised at one or more sites of the skeleton. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice when treating the increased bone turnover in Paget's disease. However, in cases of decreased kidney function only less effective tr...... treatments that are available as bisphosphonates are contraindicated in these patients. We present a case of a male patient aged 86 years with GFR of 11 mL/min and Paget's disease successfully treated by Denosumab. The bone turnover and pain decreased upon treatment....

  5. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wenyi Gu,1,2 Chengtie Wu,3 Jiezhong Chen,1 Yin Xiao1 1Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. Keywords: nanoparticles, nanostructured scaffold, cancer bone metastasis, bone diseases, target drug delivery, bone regeneration

  6. [Bone ultrasonography in kidney disease: applications and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucella, Filippo; Gesuete, Antonio; Cicchella, Antonio; Granata, Antonio; Fiorini, Fulvio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the bone is a technique that is generating great interest among bone structure researchers because of its intrinsic features. Its safety and low cost make it an ideal technique for repeated measurements over time such as in chronic disease or when it is necessary to monitor the effects of prescribed therapies. The method was developed for the study of osteoporosis and the sites of measurement are all peripheral, including the distal diaphyses and metaphyses of the phalanges, calcaneus, radius and tibia. QUS parameters, however, cannot be used directly for the diagnosis of osteoporosis according to the WHO criteria, although many authors have shown that ultrasound parameters, particularly those of calcaneal QUS, can predict the risk of osteoporotic fractures independently of MBD. Very promising results with the use of QUS have been obtained in corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Cushing's syndrome, cystic fibrosis, osteomalacia, thalassemia and osteopenia related to parenteral nutrition. QUS can also monitor the effectiveness of therapy in various pathological conditions. In nephrology the combined use of phalangeal QUS and biochemical markers of bone turnover allows adequate follow-up of patients on dialysis and renal transplant recipients with alterations or disorders of the bone.

  7. Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis. Influence of disease activity, duration of the disease, functional capacity, and corticosteroid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Florescu, A; Stoltenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Axial and appendicular bone mass were studied in 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aims were to quantify bone mineral density (BMD) and to evaluate the importance of disease activity, duration of disease, functional capacity, and corticosteroid treatment for bone loss in patients...... after the start of the disease. The overall functional capacity in terms of physical activity increased BMD in the axial skeleton. The local functional capacity in terms of grip strength was positively related to BMD in the appendicular skeleton. Patients with severe functional impairment had the lowest...

  8. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by mea...... that are of importance for the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as arthrosis....

  9. A comparison of bone scanning and radiology in the evaluation of patients with metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelman, I.; Carr, D.

    1980-01-01

    Bone scan and radiographs were evaluated in 80 patients with metabolic bone disease (27 with osteoporosis, 14 with primary hyperparathyroidism, 24 with renal osteodystrophy and 15 with osteomalacia). The bone scan did not suggest a metabolic bone disorder in any of 27 patients with histologically proven osteoporosis. In 22 (81%) patients radiographs were reported as showing osteoporosis. In 19 (70%) vertebral fractures were seen on X-ray while these were noted in 11 (41%) patients on the bone scan. Vertebral fractures were usually visualised on the bone scan when these had occurred less than one year previously. In primary hyperparathyroidism the bone scan was suggestive of a metabolic bone disorder in 7 of 14 (50%) patients, while radiographs were reported as showing evidence of hyperparathyrodism in three (21%) cases. The bone scan suggested the presence of a metabolic bone disorder in all 24 patients with renal osteodystrophy and 15 patients with osteomalacia while the correct diagnosis was obtained in 14 (58%) and nine (60%) of these patients on X-ray. It is concluded that the bone scan is the more sensitive investigation in patients with osteomalacia, primary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. For osteoporosis radiology is the investigation of choice but the bone scan may be of value in assessing the duration of vertebral collapse. (author)

  10. Measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content using dual photon absorptiometry. Usefulness in metabolic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, P.D.; Duboeuf, F.; Braillon, P.; Meunier, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of bone density using an accurate, non-invasive method is a crucial step in the clinical investigation of metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Among the recently available techniques, measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content (BMC) using dual photon absorptiometry appears as the primary method because it is simple, inexpensive, and involves low levels of radiation exposure. In this study, we measured the BMC in 168 normal adults and 95 patients. Results confirmed the good reproducibility and sensitivity of this technique for quantifying bone loss in males and females with osteoporosis. Significant bone loss was found in most females with primary hyperparathyroidism. Dual photon absorptiometry can also be used for quantifying increases in bone mass in Paget disease of bone and diffuse osteosclerosis. Osteomalacia is responsible for a dramatic fall in BMC reflecting lack of mineralization of a significant portion of the bone matrix, a characteristic feature in this disease. Furthermore, in addition to being useful for diagnostic purposes and for evaluation of the vertebral fracture risk, lumbar spine absorptiometry can be used for monitoring the effectiveness of bone-specific treatments [fr

  11. Measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content using dual photon absorptiometry. Usefulness in metabolic bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, P.D.; Duboeuf, F.; Braillon, P.; Meunier, P.J.

    1988-06-02

    Measurement of bone density using an accurate, non-invasive method is a crucial step in the clinical investigation of metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Among the recently available techniques, measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content (BMC) using dual photon absorptiometry appears as the primary method because it is simple, inexpensive, and involves low levels of radiation exposure. In this study, we measured the BMC in 168 normal adults and 95 patients. Results confirmed the good reproducibility and sensitivity of this technique for quantifying bone loss in males and females with osteoporosis. Significant bone loss was found in most females with primary hyperparathyroidism. Dual photon absorptiometry can also be used for quantifying increases in bone mass in Paget disease of bone and diffuse osteosclerosis. Osteomalacia is responsible for a dramatic fall in BMC reflecting lack of mineralization of a significant portion of the bone matrix, a characteristic feature in this disease. Furthermore, in addition to being useful for diagnostic purposes and for evaluation of the vertebral fracture risk, lumbar spine absorptiometry can be used for monitoring the effectiveness of bone-specific treatments.

  12. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  13. Osteopenia (metabolic bone disease) of prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteopenia is defined as postnatal bone mineralization that is inadequate to fully mineralize bones. Osteopenia occurs commonly in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Prior to the use of high-mineral containing diets for premature infants, which is the current practice, significant radiographic ch...

  14. Animal models for bone tissue engineering and modelling disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue engineering and its clinical application, regenerative medicine, are instructing multiple approaches to aid in replacing bone loss after defects caused by trauma or cancer. In such cases, bone formation can be guided by engineered biodegradable and nonbiodegradable scaffolds with clearly defined architectural and mechanical properties informed by evidence-based research. With the ever-increasing expansion of bone tissue engineering and the pioneering research conducted to date, preclinical models are becoming a necessity to allow the engineered products to be translated to the clinic. In addition to creating smart bone scaffolds to mitigate bone loss, the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is exploring methods to treat primary and secondary bone malignancies by creating models that mimic the clinical disease manifestation. This Review gives an overview of the preclinical testing in animal models used to evaluate bone regeneration concepts. Immunosuppressed rodent models have shown to be successful in mimicking bone malignancy via the implantation of human-derived cancer cells, whereas large animal models, including pigs, sheep and goats, are being used to provide an insight into bone formation and the effectiveness of scaffolds in induced tibial or femoral defects, providing clinically relevant similarity to human cases. Despite the recent progress, the successful translation of bone regeneration concepts from the bench to the bedside is rooted in the efforts of different research groups to standardise and validate the preclinical models for bone tissue engineering approaches. PMID:29685995

  15. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases. Thi...

  16. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone.

  17. Bone Allografts: What Is the Risk of Disease Transmission with Bone Allografts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV virus in freeze-dried bone allografts. Pract Periodontics Aesthet Dent 1995;7:13–22. Mellonig JT, ... source: Division of Oral Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Follow CDC Email ...

  18. [Bone metabolism, biochemical markers of bone resorption and formation processes and interleukine 6 cytokin level during coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih, Monia; Sahli, Hela; Ben Mustapha, Nadia; Mestiri, Imen; Fekih, Moncef; Boubaker, Jalel; Kaabachi, Naziha; Sellami, Mohamed; Kallel, Lamia; Filali, Azza

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by a malabsorption syndrom. The bone anomalies are one of the principal complications of this disease. The osteoporosis frequency is high: 3.4% among patients having with CD versus 0.2% in the general population. To study the bone mineral density during the CD, to compare it to a control group and to determine the anomalies of biochemical markers of bone turn over and level of interleukin 6 cytokin (IL6) in these patients. All patients with CD have a measurement of bone mineral density by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a biological exam with dosing calcemia, vitamin D, parathormone (PTH), the osteoblastic bone formation markers (serum osteocalcin, ALP phosphates alkaline), bone osteoclastic activity (C Télopeptide: CTX) and of the IL6. 42 patients were included, with a median age of 33.6 years. 52. 8% of the patients had a low level of D vitamine associated to a high level of PTH. An osteoporosis was noted in 21.5% of patients. No case of osteoporosis was detected in the control group. The mean level of the CTX, ostéocalcine and the IL6 was higher among patients having an osteoporosis or ostéopenia compared to patients with normal bone (p = 0,017). The factors associated with an bone loss (osteopenia or osteoporosis) were: an age > 30 years, a weight 90 UI/ml, an hypo albuminemia < 40 g/l and a level of CTX higher than 1.2. Our study confirms the impact of the CD on the bone mineral statute. The relative risk to have an osteopenia or an osteoporosis was 5 in our series. The measurement of the osseous mineral density would be indicated among patients having a CD.

  19. The spectrum of bone disease in Jordanian hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, Nidal A.; Al-Mansour, M.; Sroujieh, Ahmad S.; Wahbeh, A.; Ailabouni, W.; Hamzah, Y.; Mahafzah, W.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of mineral abnormalities and bone disease (BD) in hemodialysis patients at Jordan University Hospital (JUH), Amman, Jordan. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 patients (38 males and 25 females), mean age 44.19 years (range 17-76 years), with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on regular hemodialysis at JUH between November 2004 and April 2005. All patients have undergone complete blood count, chemistry profile, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and plain x-rays. Bone disorders were identified in 45 patients on x-rays (70%). Osteopenia was found in 43 patients (68.3%), subperiosteal resorption in 24 patients (38.3%) and metastatic calcification in 22 patients (35%). Hypocalcemia was found in 28.6% and hypercalcemia in 7.9%. All patients were taking calcium carbonate, and 55.5% of patients were on vitamin D supplements. The calcium levels in 63.5% and the phosphorus levels in 50.8% of patients were within the recommended guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Serum i-PTH level was above 300 pg/ml high turnover bone disease in 24.6% of patients, 21.3% had iPTH of 150-300 pg/ml target, and 44.3% had i-PTH levels below 100 pg/mL suggesting a dynamic bone disease. Patients with severe bone disease had a statistically significant higher iPTH levels (p<0.005). Bone disease and mineral abnormalities are common in hemodialysis patients at JUH. Earlier detection of bone disease and better overall management strategy may reduce the frequency and severity of bone disease in CKD patients in Jordan. (author)

  20. Unusual radiological features in Paget's disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.; Kathol, M.H.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Walker, C.W.; Gendall, P.W.; Whitten, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone is usually straightforward because most cases conform to well-established classic descriptions. Diagnosis becomes more difficult, however, when radiological appearances are not typical or other disease processes mask or alter the behavior of Paget's disease. Examples are presented to illustrate four categories of unusual radiological presentation of Paget's disease; (1) unusual disease progression, (2) massive post-immobilization lysis, (3) metastatic spread to pagetic bone, and (4) vertebral end-plate destruction that mimics infection. (orig.)

  1. Mineral & Bone Disorder in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stages of CKD. Slowed bone growth leads to short stature, which may remain with a child into adulthood. ... and local anesthetic. The health care provider uses imaging techniques such as ultrasound or a computerized tomography ...

  2. Painful os styloideum: bone scintigraphy in carpe bossu disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Nunley, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The os styloideum (ninth carpal bone) is an anatomic variant that may occur as an accessory ossicle located dorsally between the capitate and trapezoid, and the bases of the second and third metacarpals. The association of dorsal wrist pain or fatigability with an os styloideum is known as carpe bossu disease. The authors describe a woman with dorsal wrist pain in whom the diagnosis of painful os styloideum (carpe bossu disease) was made using plain radiography, bone scintigraphy and tomography

  3. A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widhe, Torulf L. [Department of Orthopaedics, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden)

    2002-06-01

    A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease in two sisters and one female cousin is described. In infancy, the radiological findings were osteopenia, coxa vara, periosteal cloaking, bowing of the long bones, and flaring of the metaphyses. During growth, spinal pathology developed with compression of the vertebral bodies and scoliosis in one girl and kyphosis in another. All three children had genu valgum and two developed severe S-shaped bowing of the tibiae. Growth was stunted. Inheritance of this disorder is probably recessive. Type I and III collagen biosynthesis was normal. This condition is probably a hitherto undescribed form of osteogenesis imperfecta type III or a new bone disease. (orig.)

  4. A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widhe, Torulf L.

    2002-01-01

    A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease in two sisters and one female cousin is described. In infancy, the radiological findings were osteopenia, coxa vara, periosteal cloaking, bowing of the long bones, and flaring of the metaphyses. During growth, spinal pathology developed with compression of the vertebral bodies and scoliosis in one girl and kyphosis in another. All three children had genu valgum and two developed severe S-shaped bowing of the tibiae. Growth was stunted. Inheritance of this disorder is probably recessive. Type I and III collagen biosynthesis was normal. This condition is probably a hitherto undescribed form of osteogenesis imperfecta type III or a new bone disease. (orig.)

  5. Distribution of Type I Collagen Morphologies in Bone: Relation to Estrogen Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Joseph M.; Erickson, Blake; Les, Clifford M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2009-01-01

    Bone is an amazing material evolved by nature to elegantly balance structural and metabolic needs in the body. Bone health is an integral part of overall health, but our lack of understanding of the ultrastructure of healthy bone precludes us from knowing how disease may impact nanoscale properties in this biological material. Here, we show that quantitative assessments of a distribution of Type I collagen fibril morphologies can be made using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that normal bone contains a distribution of collagen fibril morphologies and that changes in this distribution can be directly related to disease state. Specifically, by monitoring changes in the collagen fibril distribution of sham-operated and estrogen-depleted sheep, we have shown the ability to detect estrogen-deficiency-induced changes in Type I collagen in bone. This discovery provides new insight into the ultrastructure of bone as a tissue and the role of material structure in bone disease. The observation offers the possibility of a much-needed in vitro procedure to complement the current methods used to diagnose osteoporosis and other bone disease. PMID:19932773

  6. Distinct characteristics of mandibular bone collagen relative to long bone collagen: relevance to clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Tokutomi, Kentaro; Sasaki, Michiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Mizumachi, Emiri; Sato, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  7. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  8. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  9. Pathogenesis of age-related bone loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-10-01

    Although data from rodent systems are extremely useful in providing insights into possible mechanisms of age-related bone loss, concepts evolving from animal models need to ultimately be tested in humans. This review provides an update on mechanisms of age-related bone loss in humans based on the author's knowledge of the field and focused literature reviews. Novel imaging, experimental models, biomarkers, and analytic techniques applied directly to human studies are providing new insights into the patterns of bone mass acquisition and loss as well as the role of sex steroids, in particular estrogen, on bone metabolism and bone loss with aging in women and men. These studies have identified the onset of trabecular bone loss at multiple sites that begins in young adulthood and remains unexplained, at least based on current paradigms of the mechanisms of bone loss. In addition, estrogen appears to be a major regulator of bone metabolism not only in women but also in men. Studies assessing mechanisms of estrogen action on bone in humans have identified effects of estrogen on RANKL expression by several different cell types in the bone microenvironment, a role for TNF-α and IL-1β in mediating effects of estrogen deficiency on bone, and possible regulation of the Wnt inhibitor, sclerostin, by estrogen. There have been considerable advances in our understanding of age-related bone loss in humans. However, there are also significant gaps in knowledge, particularly in defining cell autonomous changes in bone in human studies to test or validate concepts emerging from studies in rodents. Decision Editor: Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD.

  10. Prospective assessment of bone turnover and clinical bone diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Anna D; Porcher, Raphael; Herr, Andrée-Laure; Devergie, Agnès; Brentano, Thomas Funck; Ribaud, Patricia; Pinto, Fernando O; Rocha, Vanderson; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Orcel, Philippe; Socié, Gérard; Robin, Marie

    2010-06-15

    Bone complications after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) are relatively frequent. Evaluation of biomarkers of bone turnover and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) are not known in this context. We prospectively evaluated bone mineral density, biomarkers of bone turnover, and the cumulative incidence of bone complications after allogeneic HSCT. One hundred forty-six patients were included. Bone mineral density was measured by DEXA 2-month and 1-year post-HSCT. The markers of bone turnover were serum C-telopeptide (C-TP), 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (bone resorption), and osteocalcin (bone formation) determined pre-HSCT and 2 months and 1 year thereafter. Potential association between osteoporosis at 2 months, osteoporotic fracture or avascular necrosis and, individual patient's characteristics and biologic markers were tested. C-TP was high before and 2 months after transplant. At 2 months, DEXA detected osteoporosis in more than half the patients tested. Male sex, median age less than or equal to 15 years, and abnormal C-TP before HSCT were risk factors significantly associated with osteoporosis. Three-year cumulative incidences of fractures and avascular necrosis were 8% and 11%, respectively. Children were at higher risk of fracture, whereas corticosteroid treatment duration was a significant risk factor for developing a clinical bone complication post-HSCT. Bone complications and osteoporosis are frequent after HSCT. Bone biologic markers and DEXA showed that subclinical bone abnormalities appeared early post-HSCT. The risk factors, age, gender, and C-TP easily available at the time of transplantation were identified. Biphosphonates should probably be given to patients with those risk factors.

  11. The dental implications of bisphosphonates and bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A; Mavrokokki, A; Carter, G; Stein, B; Fazzalari, N L; Wilson, D F; Goss, A N

    2005-12-01

    In 2002/2003 a number of patients presented to the South Australian Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit with unusual non-healing extraction wounds of the jaws. All were middle-aged to elderly, medically compromised and on bisphosphonates for bone pathology. Review of the literature showed similar cases being reported in the North American oral and maxillofacial surgery literature. This paper reviews the role of bisphosphonates in the management of bone disease. There were 2.3 million prescriptions for bisphosphonates in Australia in 2003. This group of drugs is very useful in controlling bone pain and preventing pathologic fractures. However, in a small number of patients on bisphosphonates, intractable, painful, non-healing exposed bone occurs following dental extractions or denture irritation. Affected patients are usually, but not always, over 55 years, medically compromised and on the potent nitrogen containing bisphosphonates pamidronate (Aredia/Pamisol), alendronate (Fosamax) and zolendronate (Zometa) for non-osteoporotic bone disease. Currently, there is no simple, effective treatment and the painful exposed bone may persist for years. The main complications are marked weight loss from difficulty in eating and severe jaw and neck infections. Possible preventive and therapeutic strategies are presented although at this time there is no evidence of their effectiveness. Dentists must ask about bisphosphonate usage for bone disease when recording medical histories and take appropriate actions to avoid the development of this debilitating condition in their patients.

  12. Protocol for stage 2 of the GaP study (genetic testing acceptability for Paget's disease of bone: A questionnaire study to investigate whether relatives of people with Paget's disease would accept genetic testing and preventive treatment if they were available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Marilyn

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paget's disease of bone (PDB disrupts normal bone architecture and causes pain, deformity, deafness, osteoarthritis, and fractures. Genetic factors play a role in PDB and genetic tests are now conducted for research purposes. It is thus timely to investigate the potential for a clinical programme of genetic testing and preventative treatment for people who have a family history of PDB. This study examines the beliefs of relatives of people with PDB. It focuses particularly on illness and treatment representations as predictors of the acceptability and uptake of potential clinical programmes. Illness representations are examined using Leventhal's Common Sense Self-Regulation Model while cognitions about treatment behaviours (acceptance of testing and treatment uptake are conceptualised within the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Methods/Design A postal questionnaire of non-affected relatives of people with Paget's disease. The sample will include relatives of Paget's patients with a family history of Paget's disease and relatives of Paget's patients without a family history of Paget's disease. The questionnaire will explore whether a range of factors relate to acceptability of a programme of genetic testing and preventive treatment in relatives of Paget's disease sufferers. The questionnaire will include several measures: illness representations (as measured by the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire; treatment representations (as measured by Theory of Planned Behaviour-based question items, informed by a prior interview elicitation study; descriptive and demographic details; and questions exploring family environment and beliefs of other important people. Data will also be collected from family members who have been diagnosed with Paget's disease to describe the disease presentation and its distribution within a family. Discussion The answers to these measures will inform the feasibility of a programme of genetic testing and

  13. DIAGNOSTICS OF BONE METABOLISM DISORDERS IN ONCOLOGICAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Apolikhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is one of the most significant bone complications of cancer. About 1.5 million cancer patients worldwide have bone metastases. Patients with myeloma, breast cancer, prostate, thyroid, bladder and lung have very high risk of development of bone lesions and related complications. Currently, osteodensitometry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. In recent years we frequently use the innovative imaging techniques for bone metastases, such as CT, MRI, PET/CT. Unfortunately, the diagnostic value of these methods is that it is not always possible to identify abnormalities of bone metabolism in cancer, especially in the early stages. This review shows the world experience of usage of biochemical markers of bone resorption (calcium, hydroxyproline, NTX, CTX, PYD, DPD, TRAP-5b, bone sialoprotein - BSP and markers of bone synthesis (osteocalcin, CSF, ACF, Karlovy vary IFF, their advantages and disadvantages. The level of these markers is increased in most patients with osteoporosis and bone metastases, it is suggesting a potential role in early diagnosis of bone metastases.

  14. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  15. The impact of thyroid diseases on bone metabolism and fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, M; Giorgadze, E; Tsagareli, M; Nozadze, N; Jeiranashvili, N

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and a consequent increase in fracture risk. One of the leading causes of secondary osteoporosis are thyroid diseases; this fact carries special importance for Georgia because of thyroid disease prevalence in Georgian population. In the present article we discuss the mechanisms, by which thyroid hormones and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) act on bone. We also present the data of meta-analysis of large studies, which demonstrate the complex relationship between the thyroid diseases and bone mineral density as well as the fracture risk; namely by overt and subclinical thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and the treatment with the suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Beside that, we review the related data and the possible reasons, why different treatment regimens of Grave's disease: conservative, operative and radioiodine are related to different fracture risks. Finally, we discuss briefly the practical aspects of the treatment of secondary osteoporosis, related with thyroid diseases.

  16. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in diagnosis of myeloma bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Omer; Barista, Ibrahim; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karadag, Omer; Hascelik, Gulsen; Cila, Aysenur; Pinar, Asli; Celik, Ismail; Kars, Ayse; Tekuzman, Gulten

    2007-03-01

    This study was designed to explore the value of markers of bone turnover, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), and osteopontin (OPN) in the diagnosis of myeloma bone disease. Twenty-five patients with newly diagnosed and untreated multiple myeloma (MM), and 22 age-, sex-, and bone mineral density-matched control subjects were enrolled. Levels of MIP-1alpha, OPN, carboxy-terminal telopeptide of Type-1 collagen (C-telopeptide or Ctx), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), Type-1 collagen propeptide (T1Pro), and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) were assessed in both groups. Twenty-two of the patients had bone involvement documented by skeletal surveys and lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging. Levels of serum Ctx, OPN, MIP-1alpha, and urine DPD were significantly higher in MM patients with bone disease than in controls (P<0.01). Serum Ctx levels were elevated in 90.9% of patients with MM and 40.9% of controls (P<0.001). Urine DPD levels were elevated in 90.4% of the patients and 31.8% of the controls (P<0.001). The serum OPN and MIP-1alpha levels of the patients were significantly correlated with beta2-microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase levels (P<0.05). Our study indicates that Ctx and DPD are sensitive markers of bone disease in MM, and higher than normal values suggest presence of bone disease rather than benign osteoporosis in MM. The utility of OPN and MIP-1alpha needs to be further investigated. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Vanderburgh, Joseph P.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. Recent Findings 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. Summary 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes. PMID:28646444

  18. Bones and Crohn's: Estradiol deficiency in men with Crohn's disease is not associated with reduced bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm BO

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis are frequent in Crohn's disease (CD, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Deficiency of sex steroids, especially estradiol (E2, is an established risk factor in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Aim To assess if hormonal deficiencies in male CD patients are frequent we investigated both, sex steroids, bone density and bone metabolism markers. Methods 111 male CD patients underwent osteodensitometry (DXA of the spine (L1–L4. Disease related data were recorded. Disease activity was estimated using Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI. Testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, estradiol (E2, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, Osteocalcin and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptids (ICTP were measured in 111 patients and 99 age-matched controls. Results Patients had lower T, E2 and SHBG serum levels (p 10 g had lower BMD. 32 (28.8% patients showed osteoporosis, 55 (49.5% osteopenia and 24 (21.6% had normal BMD. Patients with normal or decreased BMD showed no significant difference in their hormonal status. No correlation between markers of bone turnover and sex steroids could be found. ICTP was increased in CD patients (p Conclusion We found an altered hormonal status – i.e. E2 and, to a lesser extent T deficiency – in male CD patients but failed to show an association to bone density or markers of bone turnover. The role of E2 in the negative skeletal balance in males with CD, analogous to E2 deficiency in postmenopausal females, deserves further attention.

  19. New aspects of radionuclide therapy of bone and joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Whereas in developing countries P-32 is widely used for radionuclide therapy of painful bone metastases, in Europe three radionuclides or radiopharmaceutical agents are available for pain palliation: Sr-89, Sm-153-EDTMP, and Re-186-HEDP. Radionuclide therapy for pain palliation is indicated for bone pain due to metastatic malignancy that has involved multiple skeletal sites and has evoked an osteoblastic response on bone scintigraphy. Response rates of about 70-80% in patients with breast or prostate cancer is reported in the literature, less in metastatic lesions of other primary malignancies. Sm-153-EDTMP may also be used for curative treatment of primary bone tumours or their metastases. Radiosynovectomy as therapeutic procedure or rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory joint diseases, persistent synovial perfusion, and other joint diseases is widely used. Using Y-90 for the knee joint, Re-186 for middle sized joints, and Er-169 for small joints an improvement of symptoms may be observed in about 70-80%. (author)

  20. Effects of anticonvulsants and inactivity on bone disease in epileptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Lilian E.; Bewsher, P. D.; Chesters, Marion; Gilbert, J.; Catto, G.; Law, Elizabeth; McKay, E.; Ross, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    No significant biochemical or radiological features of vitamin D deficiency were found in groups of juvenile and adult epileptics and control groups of non-epileptic patients in hospitals for the mentally retarded. There was evidence of hepatic enzyme induction in patients on anticonvulsants, in that urinary D-glucaric acid concentration and excretion were raised. No effect was found of prolonged anticonvulsant therapy on bone densitometry, but in children immobility was closely associated with decreased bone density. The evidence suggests that disuse osteoporosis is the major bone disease in these mentally retarded children. PMID:1161672

  1. Samarium-153 Oksabifor in the treatment of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodyannikova, O.; Voit, N.; Sukach, G.; Sagan, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim. Bone metastases (BM) are one of the most common complications of solid cancers. Frequency of metastatic bone breast cancer (BC) at different stages of the disease ranges from 47 to 85%, for prostate cancer (PC) - from 33 to 85%, for lung cancer - from 30 to 60%, kidneys - from 33 to 40%, thyroid cancer - from 28 to 60%. Initial stages of BM are often clinically asymptomatic, but later manifested with fractures and pain which greatly reduces patients' quality of life. In world practice for palliative treatment of BM are widely used isotopes 32 P, 89 Sr, 186 Re, 188 Re, 153 Sm, and 177 Lu. Materials and methods. The results of examination and treatment with 153 Sm of 25 BM patients were analyzed. Among them 5 men and 20 women, mean age 61.2 ± 7.9 (min - 51.1, max 73.0). In 4 patients PC was diagnosed, 2 - lung cancer, 17 - BC, 1 - kidney cancer, 1 - cervical cancer. All patients after preliminary survey (bone scan, blood count, blood biochemical analysis) have got administration of 153 Sm Oksabifor in doses of 1 mCi (37 MBq) per 1 kg of weight. To determine the dynamics of BM re-scan with 99m Tc Tehnefor carried out in 1.5 and 3 months after starting treatment. Results. Reduction of pain intensity appeared at 6 + 4.6 days (min 2, max-18). There was a decline consumption of analgetics. According to the assessment of bone pain scales and efficiency, we can say that the therapy was effective and 90% of patients have got pain relief for 3 months and only in 2 patients pain-free period lasted 70 days. Quality of life was assessed by Karnofsky scale and improved statistically significantly. Most patients return to normal life. Only one patient's quality of life did not change (remained at 50%) and one - has changed slightly (from 50% to 60% on the Karnofsky scale). However, this is due to progression of primary disease and not related to pain symptoms. According to our data, 10 patients had stabilization process, in 15

  2. Introduction to bone scintigraphy in malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermey, J.

    1981-01-01

    For several years it has been accepted that oncology is a separate medical speciality. A team of oncologists of various disciplines is needed to cope with the complications of diagnosis and the difficulties in deciding on the best treatment. A decision-making tree is presented and the role of bone scintigraphy is explained. It is emphasized that closer cooperation between nuclear medicine and oncological specialists is necessary to obtain optimal interpretation of scintigraphic images. (Auth.)

  3. Clinical relevance of changes in bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miheller, Pal; Lőrinczy, Katalin; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density is an established, frequent, but often neglected complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Data regarding the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of low bone mass in IBD has been partially extrapolated from postmenopausal osteoporosis; however, the pathophysiology of bone loss is altered in young patients with IBD. Fracture, a disabling complication, is the most important clinical outcome of low bone mass. Estimation of fracture risk in IBD is difficult. Numerous risk factors have to be considered, and these factors should be weighed properly to help in the identification of the appropriate patients for screening. In this editorial, the authors aim to highlight the most important clinical aspects of the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of IBD-related bone loss. PMID:21105186

  4. Osteopontin: Relation between Adipose Tissue and Bone Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    De Fusco, Carolina; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Emanuela; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Sergio, Chieffi; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein mainly associated with bone metabolism and remodeling. Besides its physiological functions, OPN is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states, such as obesity and osteoporosis. Importantly, during the last decades obesity and osteoporosis have become among the main threats to health worldwide. Because OPN is a protein principally expressed in cells with multifaceted effects on bone morphogenesis and remodeling and because it se...

  5. Temporary brittle bone disease: fractures in medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Colin R

    2009-12-01

    Temporary brittle bone disease is the name given to a syndrome first reported in 1990, in which fractures occur in infants in the first year of life. The fractures include rib fractures and metaphyseal fractures which are mostly asymptomatic. The radiological features of this disorder mimic those often ascribed to typical non-accidental injury. The subject has been controversial, some authors suggesting that the disorder does not exist. This study reports five infants with typical features of temporary brittle bone disease in whom all or most of the fractures took place while in hospital. A non-accidental cause can be eliminated with some confidence, and these cases provide evidence in support of the existence of temporary brittle bone disease.

  6. X-ray diagnoses of metabolic bone diseases in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, A.E.; Missouri Univ., Columbia

    1979-01-01

    In X-ray pictures of patients with metabolic bone diseases, there are some important differences between adults and children due to the fact that childrens' skeletons are still graving. Metabolically induced changes to be observed by the radiologist in osteoporosis, rickets, and other metabolic diseases are described. In many cases, specific treatment of these diseases is necessary and also possible. (orig./MG) [de

  7. The influence of genetic variability and proinflammatory status on the development of bone disease in patients with Gaucher disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gervas-Arruga

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Bone complications are the major cause of morbidity in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1. Genetic components strongly influence bone remodelling. In addition, chronic inflammation produced by Gaucher cells induces the production of several cytokines, which leads to direct changes in the bone remodelling process and can also affect the process indirectly through other immune cells. In this study, we analysed the association between bone mineral density (BMD, bone marrow burden score, and relevant genetic polymorphisms related to bone metabolism, as well as profiles of proinflammatory cytokines in a GD1 cohort. This study included 83 patients distributed according to bone status. BMD was measured with DXA and broadband ultrasound attenuation; bone marrow involvement was evaluated using MRI. We also analysed 26 SNPs located in 14 genes related to bone metabolism. To assess proinflammatory status, we analysed IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα in plasma samples from 71 control participants and GD1 patients. SNP genotype proportions and BMD differed significantly between ESRI c.453-397T>C and VDR c.1024+283G>A variants. We also observed significant associations between GD1 genotypes and bone affectation. When patients were stratified by spleen status, we observed significant correlations between non-/splenectomized groups and Spanish MRI (S-MRI score. Across genotype proportions of non-/splenectomized patients and S-MRI, we observed significant differences in ESRI c.453-397T>C, VDR c.-83-25988G>A, and TNFRSF11B c.9C>G polymorphisms. We observed different significant proinflammatory profiles between control participants, treatment-naïve patients, and patients on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT; between non-/splenectomized patients (between untreated and ERT-treated patients and among those with differing GBA

  8. How Is Paget's Disease of Bone Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paget’s disease. Sometimes the disease is found by accident when one of these tests is done for ... contains a higher-than-usual level of a chemical substance called serum alkaline ... that is in the process of healing. However, a SAP level greater than ...

  9. Bone Histology of Two Cases with Osteomalacia Related to Low-dose Adefovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Rikako; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Sawa, Naoki; Hasegawa, Eiko; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Sumida, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Takaichi, Kenmei

    We performed a bone histomorphometric analysis in two patients demonstrating Fanconi syndrome with hypophosphatemia, adefovir-related bone disease and chronic hepatitis B infection. Both patients had osteomalacia, but showed two different histological patterns. The osteoid volume of the patient without risedronate increased with [(osteoid volume/ bone volume)×100=18.6%]. However, the osteoid volume of the patient receiving risedronate without vitamin D analogue showed a greater increase of 53.8%. In both patients bone pain and hypophosphatemia subsided soon after the discontinuation of adefovir and the administration of phosphate derivative. These findings show that bisphosphonate may worsen this disease when this drug is administered without a vitamin D analogue.

  10. Bone scintigraphy in Erdheim-chester disease: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, V.L.; Soares, L.M.M.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, of unknown etiology, characterized by infiltration of foamy histiocytes. Clinically, patients usually present with bone pain, and various extraskeletal manifestations. ECD differs from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) by radiologic and immunohistochemistry features. Case report: A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of intense pain on her left hand, besides eyelid xanthelasmas and xanthoms on frontal area ten years ago. Four years late she presented with pain on hips, legs and feet. Xanthoms spread to perioral area, mento and neck. Radiographs of the hands showed osteolysis of carpal bones bilaterally, osteolysis of fifth left metacarpal bone, osteosclerosis of all metacarpal bones bilaterally, except the fifth, and osteosclerosis of the second and third proximal falanges bilaterally. The legs showed bilateral diaphyseal and metaphyseal osteosclerosis. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake on face bone (maxilla), and symmetric intense uptake on elbows, distal radii and ulnae, hands, distal area of femurs, tibias particularly on proximal and distal area, and feet. A tibia biopsy and a biopsy of neck lesion were made. The analysis of histology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with ECD. She has been treated with a-interferon for 1,5 year, and she reports delay in xanthoms progression and bone pain remission. Discussion: ECD is an adult multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltrative disease of unknown etiology. It may be confused with LCH, however ECD have distinctive immunohistochemistry and radiologic findings. LCH shows typically lytic bone lesions on axial skeleton, whereas symmetrical long-bone osteosclerosis is the radiologic sign for ECD. LCH stain positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, and the electron microscopy of cytoplasm discloses Biberck granules. ECD stain positive for CD68, negative for CD1a and S-100 protein, shows absent of

  11. Radiological diagnostic in cat stratch disease and bone lesions - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de

    1999-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is not a common disease in immunocompetent patients. Its association with bone lesions is rare. A patient with bone complain and radiologic alterations of bone lesion must be investigated for this disease. A simple story can make the differential diagnosis with more complex disease like Ewing sarcoma or eosinophilic granuloma. (author)

  12. Impact of primary metastatic bone disease in germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oing, C; Oechsle, K; Necchi, A

    2017-01-01

    (multivariate Cox regression; HR, 0.32; P=0.011) with respective 2-year PFS and OS rates of 68% and 75% compared with 24% and 36% for non-seminoma patients. Conclusions: Outcome of GCT patients with primary metastatic bone disease is particularly poor in non-seminoma patients, even worse than the expected...

  13. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis | Hari Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP. Materials and Methods: ...

  14. The spectrum of bone disease in 200 chronic hemodialysis patients: a correlation between clinical, biochemical and histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Leite Duarte

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Renal osteodystrophy includes the complete range of mineral metabolism disorders that affect the skeleton in patients with chronic renal failure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 200 patients with end-stage renal disease and on dialysis were investigated regarding the clinical, biochemical and histological findings of bone disease. RESULTS: The spectrum of renal osteodystrophy consisted mainly of high turnover bone lesions (74.5%, including osteitis fibrosa in 57.5%. Patients with mild bone disease were on dialysis for shorter periods of time and were mostly asymptomatic. Patients with aluminum-related bone disease (16.5% had the greatest aluminum exposure, either orally or parenterally, and together with patients with high turnover mixed disease, were the most symptomatic. Although on a non-regular basis, the vast majority of the patients (82.5% had been receiving vitamin D. The incidence of adynamic bone disease was high (n=8 among parathyroidectomized patients (n=12. Significantly higher serum levels of alkaline phosphatase were observed in osteitis fibrosa. CONCLUSIONS: The use of calcitriol and phosphate-binding agents on a non-regular basis seems to be the reason for the apparent reduced response to the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Alkaline phosphatase has been shown to be a fair marker for bone turnover in patients with osteitis fibrosa. The severity of the clinical manifestations of bone disease correlates with the histological features of bone lesion and to the time spent on dialysis.

  15. Critical assessment of bone scan quantitation (bone to soft tissue ratios) in the diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelman, I.; Gordon, D.; Bessent, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    Accurate quantitation from the bone scan image of skeletal uptake of radiopharmaceutical would be of value in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disease. Repeat measurements of bone to soft tissue (B/ST) ratios on the one set of images were made for 103 subjects, a) by the same observer using lumbar vertebra 2 for the area of bone; b) by the same observer using lumbar vertebra 2 then lumbar vertebra 4; c) by two observers both using lumbar vertebra 2. The median difference between repeat measurements by the same observer was well under 1% but the 5-95 percentile range was -13 to +14%. Between the two observers there was a median difference of 10.6% with a 5-95 percentile range of -11 to +44%. We also measured B/ST ratios in 150 control subjects and 139 patients with various metabolic bone disorders. While statistically significant differences for B/ST ratios were found between the osteomalacia, renal osteodystrophy, Paget's groups, and the control population (P < 0.001 in all cases), there was appreciable overlap between individual patient results and the control range. It is concluded, therefore, that measurement of B/ST ratios for the individual is of limited value in clinical practice.

  16. Essence of "Shen (Kidney) Controlling Bones": Conceptual Analysis Based on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Osteo-Related Cells Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao-Tao; Jin, Hong-Ting; Tong, Pei-Jian

    2018-04-12

    As a traditional concept of Chinese medicine (CM), the theory of "Shen (Kidney) controlling bones" has been gradually proven. And in modern allopathic medicine, the multiple mechanisms of bone growth, development and regeneration align with the theory. Shen defifi ciency as a pathological condition has a negative effect on the skeleton of body, specififi cally the disorder of bone homeostasis. Present studies indicate that Shen defifi ciency shares a common disorder characterized by dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis may be an important regulator of bone diseases with abnormal homeostasis. Therefore, we posit the existence of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-osteo-related cells axis: cells that comprise bone tissue (osteo-related cells) are targets under the regulation of HPA axis in disorder of bone homeostasis. Chinese herbs for nourishing Shen have potential in the development of treatments for disorder of bone homeostasis.

  17. How B cells influence bone biology in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Mark C; Fretz, Jackie A; Lorenzo, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    It is now well established that important regulatory interactions occur between the cells in the hematopoietic, immune and skeletal systems (osteoimmunology). B lymphocytes (B cells) are responsible for the generation and production of antibodies or immunoglobulins in the body. Together with T cells these lymphocytes comprise the adaptive immune system, which allows an individual to develop specific responses to an infection and retain memory of that infection, allowing for a faster and more robust response if that same infection occurs again. In addition to this immune function, B cells have a close and multifaceted relationship with bone cells. B cells differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in supportive niches found on endosteal bone surfaces. Cells in the osteoblast lineage support HSC and B cell differentiation in these niches. B cell differentiation is regulated, at least in part, by a series of transcription factors that function in a temporal manner. While these transcription factors are required for B cell differentiation, their loss causes profound changes in the bone phenotype. This is due, in part, to the close relationship between macrophage/osteoclast and B cell differentiation. Cross talk between B cells and bone cells is reciprocal with defects in the RANKL-RANK, OPG signaling axis resulting in altered bone phenotypes. While the role of B cells during normal bone remodeling appears minimal, activated B cells play an important role in many inflammatory diseases with associated bony changes. This review examines the relationship between B cells and bone cells and how that relationship affects the skeleton and hematopoiesis during health and disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-related changes in bone biochemical markers and their relationship with bone mineral density in normal Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Yin-Zhen; Wu, Xian-Ping; Liu, Shi-Ping; Luo, Xiang-Hang; Cao, Xing-Zhi; Xie, Hui; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of bone biochemical markers are increasingly being used to evaluate the state of bone turnover in the management of bone metabolic diseases, especially osteoporosis. However, changes in the bone turnover rate vary with age. The aim of this study was to establish the laboratory reference range of serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (sBAP), serum type I collagen cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide (sCTx), and urine CTx (uCTx), based on values from 665 healthy Chinese women aged 20-80 years. We measured the levels of sBAP, sCTx, serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP), and uCTx and evaluated the age-related changes and their relationship with bone mineral density (BMD) in the anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spine, hip, and left forearm. We found significant correlations between biochemical markers and age, with coefficients of determination (R (2)) of 0.358 for sBAP, 0.126 for sCTx, 0.125 for uCTx, and 0.336 for sALP. The net changes in different biochemical markers were inversely correlated with the rates of BMD loss in the AP lumbar spine. After correction for age, body weight, and height, the levels of the markers had significant negative correlations with the BMD of the AP lumbar spine, femoral neck, and ultradistal forearm. All four biochemical markers had the highest negative correlation with BMD of the AP lumbar spine (partial correlation coefficients of -0.366, -0.296, -0.290, and -0.258 for sBAP, sCTx, uCTx, and sALP, respectively). The mean and SD values of these markers in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with normal BMD values were used as the normal reference ranges. The reference ranges of sBAP, sCTx, and uCTx for pre- vs postmenopausal women were 17.3 +/- 6.23 vs 18.9 +/- 7.52 U/l, 3.18 +/- 1.49 vs 3.23 +/- 1.57 nmol/l, and 15.5 +/- 11.4 vs 16.2 +/- 12.4 nM bone collagen equivalents/mM urinary creatinine, respectively. Levels of the bone formation marker (sBAP) and bone resorption markers (sCTx, uCTx) increased rapidly in women with

  19. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Todd

    Full Text Available Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an

  20. Early detection of Freiberg's disease by radionuclide bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1993-01-01

    56 hallux valgus deformities of 28 patients were studied with radionuclide bone imaging (RNBI). Among them, 24 feet(42.85%) revealed increased uptake of radioactivity in second or third metatarsal. The ratio of radioactivity in lesion and contralateral normal site (D/N) was increased, the difference between the patient and normal groups was significant (P<0.01). The histologic study showed that there have been degenerative changes and bone cell necrosis in increased uptake area. It was concluded that RNBI was more sensitive than X ray and can be used for the early diagnosis of Freiberg's Disease

  1. Age-related changes in bone architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Franco, José Sérgio; Koch, Hilton Augusto; Labronici, Pedro José; Pires, Robinson Esteves S; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro DO

    2016-01-01

    : to evaluate the histologic and morphometric characteristics of bone biopsies of the anterior iliac crest of patients of different age groups. : we studied 30 bone samples from the iliac crest, using brightfield optical microscopy. We divided the samples by donors' age groups in three groups: Group 1 (n = 10), subjects aged between 25 and 39 years; Group 2 (n = 10), subjects aged between 40 and 64 years; Group 3 (n = 10), individuals aged 65 years and over. We randomly divided the samples into two sets with 15 specimens. In the first study segment (n = 15), we used histological to assess the osteogenic property of the graft, through the analysis of cell reserve in the periosteum, the number of osteocytes in the lacunae and the number of Haversian and Volkmann's canals. In the second study segment (n = 15), we investigated the morphology of osteoconductive property of the graft, through quantification of the trabecular meshwork (Vv) and trabecular area (Sv). : histologically, we observed degeneration of bone occurring with age, characterized by thinning of the periosteum, with gradual replacement of the steogenic layer by fibrous tissue, small amount of Haversian and Volkmann's canals, osteocyte lacunae voids and fine spongy bone trabeculae, allowing ample medullary space, usually occupied by fat cells and adipocytes. Morphologically, with respect to the quantification of the trabecular meshwork (Vv), we found statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 3 and between Groups 2 and 3, with reduction of the trabecular meshwork of about 45% in the elderly over 65 years old ; there was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2. There was also no statistical difference between the Groups regarding Sv. : the results of this experiment suggest that, in the elderly (over 65 years old), the osteogenic property of autologous bone graft decreases and the osteoconductive property is compromised. avaliar as características histológicas e

  2. Age-Related Changes in Trabecular and Cortical Bone Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population has substantially increased worldwide. Aging is a complex process, and the effects of aging are myriad and insidious, leading to progressive deterioration of various organs, including the skeleton. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis in the elderly population increase the risk for fractures and morbidity. Osteoporosis is one of the most common conditions associated with aging, and age is an independent risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. With the development of noninvasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT, micro-CT, and high resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT, imaging of the bone architecture provides important information about age-related changes in bone microstructure and estimates of bone strength. In the past two decades, studies of human specimens using imaging techniques have revealed decreased bone strength in older adults compared with younger adults. The present paper addresses recently studied age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure based primarily on HR-pQCT and micro-CT. We specifically focus on the three-dimensional microstructure of the vertebrae, femoral neck, and distal radius, which are common osteoporotic fracture sites.

  3. Age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayue; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2013-01-01

    The elderly population has substantially increased worldwide. Aging is a complex process, and the effects of aging are myriad and insidious, leading to progressive deterioration of various organs, including the skeleton. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis in the elderly population increase the risk for fractures and morbidity. Osteoporosis is one of the most common conditions associated with aging, and age is an independent risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. With the development of noninvasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), micro-CT, and high resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT), imaging of the bone architecture provides important information about age-related changes in bone microstructure and estimates of bone strength. In the past two decades, studies of human specimens using imaging techniques have revealed decreased bone strength in older adults compared with younger adults. The present paper addresses recently studied age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure based primarily on HR-pQCT and micro-CT. We specifically focus on the three-dimensional microstructure of the vertebrae, femoral neck, and distal radius, which are common osteoporotic fracture sites.

  4. Angiomatosis of bone and soft tissue: A spectrum of disease from diffuse lymphangiomatosis to vanishing bone disease in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviv, R.I.; McHugh, K.; Hunt, J.

    2001-01-01

    The application of cross-sectional imaging in the investigation of patients with angiomatosis reveals that lymphangiomatosis and vanishing bone disease should not be considered as separate entities, but rather as a spectrum of disease. We present a pictorial review of eight patients demonstrating the manifestations of soft tissue and bony involvement. We highlight a subgroup of patients with chyloid pleural effusions who have a poor prognosis. Aviv, R. I. et al. (2001)

  5. Bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy in patients with adult still's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanegae, Futoshi; Tada, Yoshifumi; Ohta, Akihide; Ushiyama, Osamu; Suzuki; Noriaki; Koarada, Syuichi; Haruta, Yoshio; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Nagasawa, Kohei [Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We investigated the features and the usefulness of gallium scintigraphy in the diagnosis and the assessment of Adult Still's disease (ASD) by retrospective case review. Gallium scintigraphy have been done for 11 cases of ASD (3 males and 8 females) and 4 females were positive. Among these, 67 Ga-citrate was accumulated to the bone marrow in all 4 cases and to the major joints in 2 cases. Positive cases were rather serious and administered more immunosuppressants than negative cases. In order to characterize gallium scintigraphy findings of ASD, i.e. bone marrow accumulation, we analyzed 130 cases of collagen vascular disease. Although 101 cases (77.7%) were positive, only 7 cases (5.4%) showed the accumulation of {sup 67}Ga-citrate to the bone marrow. These include 3 cases with ASD, and 1 case with systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, Wegener's granulomatosis and Sjogren's syndrome. We also accumulated 18 patients who exhibited bone marrow accumulation of {sup 69}Ga-citrate, and found that 7 patients had collagen vascular and their related diseases. In conclusion, bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy is a specific feature of collagen vascular diseases, especially ASD, and it is suggested that cases with positive gallium scintigraphy in ASD can be serious and resistant to treatment. (author)

  6. Bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy in patients with adult still's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanegae, Futoshi; Tada, Yoshifumi; Ohta, Akihide; Ushiyama, Osamu; Suzuki; Noriaki; Koarada, Syuichi; Haruta, Yoshio; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Nagasawa, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the features and the usefulness of gallium scintigraphy in the diagnosis and the assessment of Adult Still's disease (ASD) by retrospective case review. Gallium scintigraphy have been done for 11 cases of ASD (3 males and 8 females) and 4 females were positive. Among these, 67 Ga-citrate was accumulated to the bone marrow in all 4 cases and to the major joints in 2 cases. Positive cases were rather serious and administered more immunosuppressants than negative cases. In order to characterize gallium scintigraphy findings of ASD, i.e. bone marrow accumulation, we analyzed 130 cases of collagen vascular disease. Although 101 cases (77.7%) were positive, only 7 cases (5.4%) showed the accumulation of 67 Ga-citrate to the bone marrow. These include 3 cases with ASD, and 1 case with systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, Wegener's granulomatosis and Sjogren's syndrome. We also accumulated 18 patients who exhibited bone marrow accumulation of 69 Ga-citrate, and found that 7 patients had collagen vascular and their related diseases. In conclusion, bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy is a specific feature of collagen vascular diseases, especially ASD, and it is suggested that cases with positive gallium scintigraphy in ASD can be serious and resistant to treatment. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Klatte, E.C.; Baehner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Seven children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow: results showed that it is technically feasible to obtain good MR images of marrow in children. MR has detected abnormality in the bone marrow of a child who had metastatic neuroblastoma. The extent of abnormality in the femur correlated well with findings of a bone marrow isotope scan. In one child who had idiopathic aplastic anemia, diseased marrow could not be distinguished from normal marrow on MR images. MRI identified abnormality of the marrow in osteogenic sarcoma, and demonstrated change in response to chemotherapy. It displayed marrow spread of tumors as well as CT. MRI showed marrow abnormality in four children who had leukemia

  8. Different findings in bone scintigraphy between ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.K.; Lee, H.Y.; Lee, M.C.; Baik, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: There is an ethnic variance on the length of the ulnar and radius. In Caucasian the length of the radius is relatively longer than the ulnar, but in Oriental the length of the ulnar is longer. This difference results in the different ethnic prevalence of ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease, avascular necrosis of the lunate. It is important to differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease, because they show similar symptoms but need different treatment and different method of operation. Methods: Seventeen patients with the wrist pain were enrolled in this study (mean age: 45+/-13yrs M:F=12:5). Nine patients were diagnosed as Kienbock's disease and Eight patients were diagnosed as ulnar impaction. Three to four hours after injection of 20mCi of Tc-99m MDP, bone scintigraphy images of the both hands were obtained and analyzed visually. Results: In Kienbock's disease, 8 patients showed increased uptake in the lunate with or without other carpal bones. One patient showed photon defect in the lunate. Otherwise in all patients with ulnar impaction syndrome, increased uptakes were found in the lunate, with or without increase uptake in the triquetrum or the distal ulnar, which are related to triangular fibrocartilage complex. Pin hole scintigraphy and pin hole SPECT demonstrated more precise structure of the wrist. Conclusion: We could differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease in bone scan. We should carefully evaluate bone scintigraphic findings in patients with wrist pain

  9. Occupational diseases of skeleton and bone joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    The essence of roentgeno-morphological features of locomotor system occupational diseases lies in development of dystrophic, degenerative and necrotic processes. Pathological changes take place during vibration, recoil and strain as well as under the effect of unfavourable microclimate (high humidity, cold), vibration being the most important as compared to other harmful factors. Detailed sanitary-and-hygienic and labour characteristics of working conditions of personnel, subjected to the effect of those factors as well as roentgenological characteristics of locomotor system occupational changes are given [ru

  10. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-07

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  11. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of agi...

  12. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  13. Lumbar gibbus in storage diseases and bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Lachman, R.S. [International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Anyane-Yeboa, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Roye, D.P. Jr. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to review the problem of lumbar gibbus in children with storage diseases and bone dysplasias utilizing plain films and MR imaging. Materials and methods. Clinical histories and radiographic images in five patients with storage diseases [four mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and one mucolipidosis] and two with achondroplasia were reviewed. The International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (Los Angeles, Calif.), surveyed for all patients with lumbar gibbus and skeletal dysplasias, provided 12 additional cases. Results. All patients had localized gibbus of the upper lumbar spine, characterized by anterior wedging and posterior displacement of the vertebrae at the apex of the curve, producing a beaked appearance. The curve, exaggerated in the sitting or standing position, was most severe in the two patients with MPS-IV (one of whom died). Both developed severe neurologic signs and symptoms requiring surgical intervention. In four patients, MR images demonstrated the apex of the curve to be at or below the conus. Two patients demonstrated anterior herniation of the intervertebral discs at the apex of the curve, though the signal intensity of the intervertebral discs was normal. Conclusion. Lumbar gibbus has important neurologic and orthopedic implications, and is most severe in patients with MPS. The etiology of the gibbus with vertebral beaking is multifactorial and includes poor truncal muscle tone, weight-bearing forces, growth disturbance and anterior disc herniation. The curve is generally at or below the conus. Neurologic complications are unusual, although orthopedic problems can arise. Due to their longer survival, patients with achondroplasia or Morquio`s disease are more vulnerable to eventual gibbus-related musculoskeletal complications. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Lumbar gibbus in storage diseases and bone dysplasias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Berdon, W.E.; Lachman, R.S.; Anyane-Yeboa, K.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Roye, D.P. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to review the problem of lumbar gibbus in children with storage diseases and bone dysplasias utilizing plain films and MR imaging. Materials and methods. Clinical histories and radiographic images in five patients with storage diseases [four mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and one mucolipidosis[ and two with achondroplasia were reviewed. The International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (Los Angeles, Calif.), surveyed for all patients with lumbar gibbus and skeletal dysplasias, provided 12 additional cases. Results. All patients had localized gibbus of the upper lumbar spine, characterized by anterior wedging and posterior displacement of the vertebrae at the apex of the curve, producing a beaked appearance. The curve, exaggerated in the sitting or standing position, was most severe in the two patients with MPS-IV (one of whom died). Both developed severe neurologic signs and symptoms requiring surgical intervention. In four patients, MR images demonstrated the apex of the curve to be at or below the conus. Two patients demonstrated anterior herniation of the intervertebral discs at the apex of the curve, though the signal intensity of the intervertebral discs was normal. Conclusion. Lumbar gibbus has important neurologic and orthopedic implications, and is most severe in patients with MPS. The etiology of the gibbus with vertebral beaking is multifactorial and includes poor truncal muscle tone, weight-bearing forces, growth disturbance and anterior disc herniation. The curve is generally at or below the conus. Neurologic complications are unusual, although orthopedic problems can arise. Due to their longer survival, patients with achondroplasia or Morquio's disease are more vulnerable to eventual gibbus-related musculoskeletal complications. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Age- and sex-related bone uptake of Tc-99m-HDP measured by whole-body bone scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, W.; Sieweke, N.; Kampen, W.U.; Zuhayra, M.; Henze, E. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-08-01

    Aim of this study was to validate a recently introduced new and easy-to-perform method for quantifying bone uptake of Tc-99m-labelled diphosphonate in a routine clinical setting and to establish a normal data base for bone uptake depending on age and gender. Methods: In 49 women (14-79 years) and 47 men (6-89 years) with normal bone scans as well as in 49 women (33-81 years) and 37 men (27-88 years) with metastatic bone disease whole-body bone scans were acquired at 3 min and 3-4 hours p.i. to calculate bone uptake after correction for both urinary excretion and soft tissue retention. Results: Bone uptake values of various age-related subgroups showed no significant differences between men and women (p>0.05). Furthermore, no differences could be proven between age-matched subgroups of normals and patients with less than 10 metastatic bone lesions, while patients with wide-spread bone metastases revealed significantly increased uptake values. In both men and women highest bone uptake was obtained (p<0.05) in subjects younger than 20 years with active epiphyseal growth plates. In men, bone uptake slowly decreased with age up to 60 years and then showed a tendency towards increasing uptake values. In women, the mean uptake reached a minimum in the decade 20-29 years and then slowly increased with a positive linear correlation of age and uptake in subjects older than 55 years (r=0.57). Conclusion: Since the results proposed in this study are in good agreement with data from literature, the new method used for quantification could be validated in a large number of patients. Furthermore, age- and sex-related normal bone uptake values of Tc-99m-HDP covering a wide range of age could be presented for this method as a basis for further studies on bone uptake. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war die Validierung einer von uns neu entwickelten einfachen Methode zur Quantifizierung des Skelettuptake von Tc-99m-HDP im Rahmen der klinischen Routineanwendung und die Erstellung

  16. The Evolving World of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bellasi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in humans that support the use of these compounds are still scarce, mainly based on observational studies. Thus, a considerable number of doubts and questions still challenge clinicians dealing with CKD patients and mineral metabolism imbalances. We herein critically review clinical evidence that support the use of different drugs in CKD-MBD.

  17. RECENT ADVANCES IN PATHO-BIOLOGY OF MYELOMA BONE DISEASE: CLINICOPATHOLOGY AND LITERATURE OF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohit Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease is a hallmark of multiple myeloma, presenting as lytic lesions associated with bone pain, pathological fractures requiring surgery and/or radiation to bone, spinal cord compression and hypercalcaemia. Increased osteoclastic activity unaccompanied by a compensatory increase in osteoblast function, leading to enhanced bone resorption results in bone disease. The interaction of plasma cells with the bone marrow microenvironment has been shown to play a vital role. Also, interactions of myeloma cells with osteoclasts enhance myeloma growth and survival, and thereby create a vicious cycle leading to extensive bone destruction and myeloma cell expansion.

  18. Effects of carbocalcitonin treatment on PAGET's disease assessed by quantitative bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vattimo, A.; Di Maggio, G.; Burroni, L.

    1988-06-01

    Sixteen patients with PAGET's disease of bone underwent quantitative bone scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc-MDP before and after a long-term treatment with carbocalcitonin, a synthetic analogue of eel calcitonin. The radionuclide study consisted in the blood pool and bone uptake measurement and in the bone avidity calculation (bone uptake - blood pool ratio). In our patients, a significant decrease in bone uptake and bone avidity was found, whereas the blood pool remained statistically unchanged. This behaviour could be accounted for the shift of the compact bone to a lamellar pattern.

  19. Effects of carbocalcitonin treatment on PAGET's disease assessed by quantitative bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vattimo, A.; Di Maggio, G.; Burroni, L.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients with PAGET's disease of bone underwent quantitative bone scintigraphy with 99m Tc-MDP before and after a long-term treatment with carbocalcitonin, a synthetic analogue of eel calcitonin. The radionuclide study consisted in the blood pool and bone uptake measurement and in the bone avidity calculation (bone uptake - blood pool ratio). In our patients, a significant decrease in bone uptake and bone avidity was found, whereas the blood pool remained statistically unchanged. This behaviour could be accounted for the shift of the compact bone to a lamellar pattern. (orig.) [de

  20. Greater milk intake is associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and higher bone microarchitecture index in a population of elderly Japanese men with relatively low dietary calcium intake: Fujiwara-kyo Osteoporosis Risk in Men (FORMEN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Iki, M; Fujita, Y; Tamaki, J; Kouda, K; Yura, A; Moon, J-S; Winzenrieth, R; Iwaki, H; Ishizuka, R; Amano, N; Tomioka, K; Okamoto, N; Kurumatani, N

    2015-05-01

    The effects of milk intake on bone health are not clear in elderly Asian men with low dietary calcium intake. This study showed that greater milk intake is associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and higher bone microarchitecture index in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men. The consumption of milk or dairy products is widely recommended for maintaining bone health regardless of gender or age. However, little evidence exists on the beneficial effects of milk intake on bone health in elderly Japanese men characterized with relatively low dietary calcium intake. Here we examined whether or not greater milk intake was associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and stronger bone microarchitecture in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men. Interviews were conducted to obtain information on medical history and lifestyle, including the amount of habitual milk intake, nutrient intake calculations based on a 1-week food diary, and measurements of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), trabecular bone score (TBS) using DXA images at LS, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in sera. Participants with a history of diseases or medications that affect bone metabolism, or with missing data, were excluded from the analysis. The median intake of milk in the 1479 participants (mean age, 73.0 ± 5.1 years) was one glass of milk per day. Bone turnover markers showed a decreasing trend (p turnover, higher aBMD, and higher TBS in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men.

  1. Current perspectives on bisphosphonate treatment in Paget’s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wat WZM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Winnie Zee Man Wat Department of Medicine, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan, Hong Kong Abstract: Paget’s disease of bone is a chronic metabolic bone disease with focal increase in bone turnover. The exact etiology of the disease is uncertain, although genetic and environmental factors are believed to be important. Bisphosphonate is the main class of medication being used to control disease activity via its antiresorptive effect. This review discusses the controversies concerning the use of bisphosphonates in the treatment of Paget’s disease of bone, the efficacy of different bisphosphonates in controlling disease activity, and the possible rare side effects of bisphosphonates. Symptoms are the main indication for treatment in Paget’s disease of bone. As treatment benefits in asymptomatic individuals remain controversial and nonevidence based, the decision to treat these patients should be individualized to their risk and benefit profiles. There are several trials conducted to evaluate and compare the efficacy of different regimes of bisphosphonates for treating Paget’s disease of bone. Most trials used biochemical markers rather than clinical symptoms or outcomes as parameters for comparison. Zoledronate is an attractive option as it can achieve high rates of biochemical remission and sustain long duration of suppression by a single dose. Atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw are two rare and severe side effects reported, possibly related to the use of bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporosis and malignancy-induced hypercalcemia. As the regimes of bisphosphonates used for treating Paget’s disease of bone are different from those two diseases, the risks of developing these two possible side effects are expected to be very low, although this remains unknown. Vitamin D and calcium supplement should be given to patients at risk of vitamin D insufficiency when given zoledronate, as symptomatic

  2. Recommendations for evaluation and management of bone disease in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd T; Hoy, Jennifer; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Renjifo, Boris; Vescini, Fabio; Yin, Michael T; Powderly, William G

    2015-04-15

    Thirty-four human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) specialists from 16 countries contributed to this project, whose primary aim was to provide guidance on the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Four clinically important questions in bone disease management were identified, and recommendations, based on literature review and expert opinion, were agreed upon. Risk of fragility fracture should be assessed primarily using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), without dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in all HIV-infected men aged 40-49 years and HIV-infected premenopausal women aged ≥40 years. DXA should be performed in men aged ≥50 years, postmenopausal women, patients with a history of fragility fracture, patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid treatment, and patients at high risk of falls. In resource-limited settings, FRAX without bone mineral density can be substituted for DXA. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy should be followed; adjustment should avoid tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or boosted protease inhibitors in at-risk patients. Dietary and lifestyle management strategies for high-risk patients should be employed and antiosteoporosis treatment initiated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Prevalence of metabolic bone disease in children with celiac disease is independent of symptoms at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Justine; Pellerin, Genevieve; Mager, Diana

    2009-11-01

    : Given dietary gluten exposure, growing children with celiac disease may experience malabsorption of nutrients, negatively affecting bone health. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of low bone mass in children with celiac disease, according to the presence of symptoms at diagnosis. : A retrospective chart review of the Stollery Children's Hospital Celiac Clinic charts (April 1989-September 2007) was conducted. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Demographics, symptoms at presentation, and anthropometric and biochemical data relevant to bone health were recorded. : Seventy-four children (9.6 +/- 3.7 years; range 3.3-16.0 years) were included. Lumbar BMD z scores more than or equal to -1 were observed in 58 cases (65%), z scores below -1 but above -2 were observed in 14 cases (19%) and z scores less than or equal to -2 were observed in 12 cases (16%). There was no significant difference in mean lumbar BMD z scores between symptomatic and asymptomatic children (P = 0.34). When adjusted for bone age and bone surface area, BMD lumbar z score was inversely correlated with age at diagnosis (P celiac disease at diagnosis regardless of the presence of symptoms. Delayed diagnosis of children with celiac disease may increase the risk of adult osteoporosis. Appropriate screening of children at risk of celiac disease for the purpose of early diagnosis, as well as routine evaluation of bone mineral density in such children, are important to prevent long-term complications associated with poor bone health.

  4. Computer assisted analysis of sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate bone uptake in Paget's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayan, M.L.; Eisenberg, J.; Volpert, E.; Shai, F.; Mroczek, R.

    1982-01-01

    The present clinical study describes a method of evaluation of Paget's disease bone by computer assisted analysis of activity curves obtained over normal and pathological portions of the skeleton in the same patient. The data obtained lead to a differential diagnosis between Paget's and metastatic disease of the bone, as well as an evaluation of subsequent therapy. The results indicate a higher bone activity, (expressed by bone flow and bone uptake, of sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate) in Paget's than in metastatic disease of the bone, as well as a normalization of these parameters after prolonged therapy of Paget's patients with salmon calcitonin

  5. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun, E-mail: biochelab@yuhs.ac; Chung, Won-Yoon, E-mail: wychung@yuhs.ac

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  6. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  7. Development of a molecular test of Paget's disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay-Bélanger, Sabrina; Simonyan, David; Bureau, Alexandre; Gagnon, Edith; Albert, Caroline; Morissette, Jean; Siris, Ethel S; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-03-01

    Depending on populations, 15 to 40% of patients have a familial form of Paget's disease of bone (PDB), which is transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. To date, only SQSTM1 gene mutations have been linked to the disease. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations, but they have minor size effects. The current clinical practice guidelines still recommend to measure total serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP) for PDB screening. However, genetic or bone biomarkers alone may lack sensitivity to detect PDB. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a molecular test of PDB, combining genetic and bone biomarkers, in order to detect PDB, which is frequently asymptomatic. We genotyped 35 SNPs previously associated with PDB in 305 patients, and 292 healthy controls. In addition, serum levels of 14 bone biomarkers were assayed in 51 patients and 151 healthy controls. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models with adjustment for age and sex were fitted to search for a combination of SNPs and/or bone biomarkers that could best detect PDB in patient non-carriers of SQSTM1 mutations. First, a combination of five genetic markers gave rise to the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) with 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 0.731 [0.688; 0.773], which allowed us to detect 81.5% of patients with PDB. Second, a combination of two bone biomarkers had an AUC of 0.822 [0.726; 0.918], and was present in 81.5% of patients with PDB. Then, the combination of the five genetic markers and the two bone biomarkers increased the AUC up to 0.892 [0.833; 0.951], and detected 88.5% of patients with PDB. These results suggested that an algorithm integrating first a screen for SQSTM1 gene mutations, followed by either a genetic markers combination or a combined genetic and biochemical markers test in patients non-carrier of any SQSTM1 mutation, may detect the PDB

  8. Uremic bone diseases - Clinical laboratorial, scintigraphic and radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, W.C.F. da.

    1982-01-01

    This paper evaluated the uremic bone disease in 10 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 10 on hemodialysis and 10 submited to renal transplantation. According to biochemical evaluation we observed hypocalcemia in some patients on dialysis and hipercalcemia in a renal transplanted and in another on peritoneal dialysis. However, there was no significative difference in the serum calcium concentration between the groups and the control group. Hiperphosphatemia occured in 8 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 9 on hemodialysis and slight hiperphosphatemia occured in 2 renal transplanted patient. The product calcium X phosphorus was elevated in 2 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 2 on hemodialysis. The magnesium serum concentration were hight in all patients on dialysis and the alkaline phosphatase serum levels were hight in 3 patients dialysis peritoneal and 4 on hemodialysis. A skeleton curvey showed abnormalities in 3 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 5 on hemodialysis and of 5 renal transplanted patients. However there was no significant difference between these results. The bone scanning was abnormal in 6 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 9 patients on hemodialysis and in 8 renal transplanted. The positive results of bone scanning compared with X ray were statistically significative. Bone scanning was the most sensitive method used to detect early abnormalities. (author)

  9. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  10. The Japanese Medakafish (Oryzias latipes) as Animal Model for Space-related Bone Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, J.; Schaedel, M.; Elmasri, H.; Wagner, T.; Goerlich, R.; Furutani-Seiki, M.; Kondoh, H.; Schartl, M.; Winkler, C.

    Long-term space flight leads to bone loss due to reduced mechanical load. Animal models are needed to support the analysis of the underlying mechanisms at the molecular and cellular level that are presently largely unclear. For this, small laboratory fish offer many experimental advantages as in vivo models to study disease related processes. They produce large numbers of completely transparent embryos, are easy to keep under laboratory and space conditions and have relatively compact genomes. We are using the Japanese Medaka to characterize the genetic networks regulating bone formation and to study bone formation and remodeling under microgravity. We showed that despite the large evolutionary distance many known factors regulating bone formation are conserved between fish and humans. This includes osteoprotegerin (opg), a key regulator of bone resorption that is altered at the transcriptional level by simulated microgravity in mammals in vitro (Kanematsu et al., Bone 30, 2002). To monitor, how opg is regulated by altered gravity in vivo in fish and how fish react to microgravity, we isolated the Medaka opg regulatory region and produced transgenic fish that carry the green fluorescent protein reporter under the control of the Medaka opg promoter. This model will be useful to monitor gravity-induced changes at the molecular level in vivo. Fish also provide the opportunity to identify novel genes involved in bone formation by using large-scale mutagenesis screens. We have characterized several lines of mutant fish subjected to ENU mutagenesis that show morphological defects in the formation of the bone precursor cell compartment of the axial skeleton, the sclerotome. Using this genetic approach, the identification of the mutated genes is expected to reveal novel components of the genetic cascades that regulate bone formation. In an attempt to identify genes specifically expressed in the sclerotome in Medaka, we identified and characterized dmrt2, a gene that so far

  11. Hydatid disease of bone: a mimic of other skeletal pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, B.S.; Garg, A.; Chavhan, G.B.; Madiwale, C.V.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal hydatidosis results from the deposition of the larval form of the Echinococcus, a genus of tapeworm. The incidence of bone disease is extremely low as most larvae are trapped by the liver and lung upon release of the embryo into the portal blood stream. The interpretation of imaging studies can prove very confusing because bone changes evolve with time, and the non-specificity of these findings often leads to a mistaken diagnosis. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman with long-standing pain in the left hip joint in which the findings on CT were thought of as being either tuberculous or neoplastic in nature. The result of a CT-guided biopsy and another done following surgery concurred on an unexpected diagnosis of a hydatid cyst. This case illustrates that in the absence of a high index of suspicion for echinococcal infection, the semblance of imaging findings of hydatid disease in bone to those of other skeletal pathologies can lead to misinterpretation. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Expression of Wnt-Inhibitors and SDF-1 in Whole Bone Marrow Biopsies in Association to the Osteolytic Bone Disease of Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Christensen, Jacob Haaber; Lyng, Maria Bibi

    Expression of Wnt-Inhibitors and SDF-1 in Whole Bone Marrow Biopsies in Association to the Osteolytic Bone Disease of Multiple Myeloma......Expression of Wnt-Inhibitors and SDF-1 in Whole Bone Marrow Biopsies in Association to the Osteolytic Bone Disease of Multiple Myeloma...

  13. Msx-1 is suppressed in bisphosphonate-exposed jaw bone analysis of bone turnover-related cell signalling after bisphosphonate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrhan, F; Hyckel, P; Amann, K; Ries, J; Stockmann, P; Schlegel, Ka; Neukam, Fw; Nkenke, E

    2011-05-01

    Bone-destructive disease treatments include bisphosphonates and antibodies against receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (aRANKL). Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a side-effect. Aetiopathology models failed to explain their restriction to the jaw. The osteoproliferative transcription factor Msx-1 is expressed constitutively only in mature jaw bone. Msx-1 expression might be impaired in bisphosphonate-related ONJ. This study compared the expression of Msx-1, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)-2 and RANKL, in ONJ-affected and healthy jaw bone. An automated immunohistochemistry-based alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase method was used on ONJ-affected and healthy jaw bone samples (n = 20 each): cell-number ratio (labelling index, Bonferroni adjustment). Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantitatively compare Msx-1, BMP-2, RANKL and GAPDH mRNA levels. Labelling indices were significantly lower for Msx-1 (P Msx-1, 22-fold lower (P Msx-1, RANKL suppression and BMP-2 induction were consistent with the bisphosphonate-associated osteopetrosis and impaired bone remodelling in BP- and aRANKL-induced ONJ. Msx-1 suppression suggested a possible explanation of the exclusivity of ONJ in jaw bone. Functional analyses of Msx-1- RANKL interaction during bone remodelling should be performed in the future. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Differential diagnosis of metastatic bone disease and benign bone disease on spine SPECT in patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Cho, Suk Shin

    2001-01-01

    One or more abnormal vertebrae detected on bone scintigraphy is a common finding in clinical practice, and it could pose a diagnostic dilemma especially in cancer patients, as either metastasis or benign disease may cause scintigraphic abnormality. The purpose of this study was to determine whether additional spine SPECT has a role in differentiating malignant from benign lesions in patients with back pain. We reviewed spine SPECT studies obtained over a three-year period in 108 patients. Among them, forty-five patients with abnormal SPECT and clinically followed records were evaluated (20 cancer patients were included). Uptake patterns were classified as follows: 1. Body: diffusely increased uptake, linear increased uptake of end plate, segmental increased uptake, and cold defect, 2 Posterior element; posterior to body (pedicle), posterior to intervertebral disc space (facet joint), and spinous process. Lesions were correlated with radiological findings and with final diagnosis. Sixty-nine bone lesions were detected on SPECT images, including 18 metastases, 28 degenerative diseases and 21 compression fractures. Cold defect (6) and segmental increased uptake (5) were dominant findings in metastasis: linear increased uptake (12), and facet joint uptake (15) were in degenerative change; and diffuse increased uptake (9), and linear increased uptake (9) were in compression fracture. Cold defect and segmental increased uptake of body were characteristic findings of metastasis, but care should be taken because compression fracture also shows segmental increased uptake in some cases. Degenerative disease was easily diagnosed because of the typical finding of linear increased uptake of end plate and facet joint. Therefore, additional bone SPECT after planar bone scan would be helpful for differentiating metastasis from benign condition in cancer patients

  15. Systemic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation Prevents Functional Bone Loss in a Mouse Model of Age-Related Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Jeffrey; Hu, Sally; Grynpas, Marc D; Davies, John E; Stanford, William L

    2016-05-01

    Age-related osteoporosis is driven by defects in the tissue-resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a heterogeneous population of musculoskeletal progenitors that includes skeletal stem cells. MSC decline leads to reduced bone formation, causing loss of bone volume and the breakdown of bony microarchitecture crucial to trabecular strength. Furthermore, the low-turnover state precipitated by MSC loss leads to low-quality bone that is unable to perform remodeling-mediated maintenance--replacing old damaged bone with new healthy tissue. Using minimally expanded exogenous MSCs injected systemically into a mouse model of human age-related osteoporosis, we show long-term engraftment and markedly increased bone formation. This led to improved bone quality and turnover and, importantly, sustained microarchitectural competence. These data establish proof of concept that MSC transplantation may be used to prevent or treat human age-related osteoporosis. This study shows that a single dose of minimally expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) injected systemically into a mouse model of human age-related osteoporosis display long-term engraftment and prevent the decline in bone formation, bone quality, and microarchitectural competence. This work adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the decline of MSCs associated with age-related osteoporosis is a major transformative event in the progression of the disease. Furthermore, it establishes proof of concept that MSC transplantation may be a viable therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent human age-related osteoporosis. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Radiotherapy Results of Breast Cancer Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dirier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with bone metastasis who had admitted to Dicle University Department of Radiation Oncology for palliative radiation therapy between September 2001 and December 2003 were evaluated. There were 31 patients (26 female, 5 male. Median age was 43 years (range 23-79. Histopathological subtypes were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (88%, tubulolobuler carcinoma (6% and inflammatory carcinoma (6%. Loci of bone metastasis were vertebra only in twelve patients (39%, non-vertebral bones only in 8 patients (26% and both vertebral and nonvertebral bones in 11 patients (35%. Two patients had refused radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 3000 cGy with 10 fractions in 15 patients, 2000 cGy with 5 fractions in 6 patients and 800 cGy single fraction in eight patients. Complete palliation of pain was achieved in 18 patients (62% and partial palliation was achieved in 11 patients (38%. Treatment related toxicity was grade I-II dermatitis. In conclusion; same respons rates in terms of palliation can be achieved in the three radiotherapy schedules.

  17. Measurement of bone mineral content by dual photon absorptiometry in patients with metabolic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, Masami; Hino, Megumu; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    1991-01-01

    Dual photon absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral content in 225 patients with metabolic bone diseases (84 males and 102 females) and 186 healthy subjects (25 males and 200 females). Mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae tended to rapidly decrease after the age of 40 in healthy female subjects. For males, gradual decrease in mineral content was associated with aging. Bone mineral content showed a correlation with the severity of osteoporosis as shown on X-ray films. Mineral content tended to be decreased in the lumbar vertebrae in patients with vertebral compression fracture, and in the femur in patients with vertebral or femoral fracture. For hyperthyroidism, mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae was decreased in some females, but was within normal limit in males. Hyperparathyroidism and hypoparathyroidism tended to be associated with decrease and increase in mineral content, respectively. Two each patients with osteomalacia or Cushing syndrome had a decreased mineral content. In these patients, it was increased after the treatment. (N.K.)

  18. Measurement of bone mineral content by dual photon absorptiometry in patients with metabolic bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Masami; Hino, Megumu; Ikekubo, Katsuji (Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)) (and others)

    1991-12-01

    Dual photon absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral content in 225 patients with metabolic bone diseases (84 males and 102 females) and 186 healthy subjects (25 males and 200 females). Mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae tended to rapidly decrease after the age of 40 in healthy female subjects. For males, gradual decrease in mineral content was associated with aging. Bone mineral content showed a correlation with the severity of osteoporosis as shown on X-ray films. Mineral content tended to be decreased in the lumbar vertebrae in patients with vertebral compression fracture, and in the femur in patients with vertebral or femoral fracture. For hyperthyroidism, mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae was decreased in some females, but was within normal limit in males. Hyperparathyroidism and hypoparathyroidism tended to be associated with decrease and increase in mineral content, respectively. Two each patients with osteomalacia or Cushing syndrome had a decreased mineral content. In these patients, it was increased after the treatment. (N.K.).

  19. Bilateral orbital bone infarction in sickle-cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Roya H; Lee, Irene; Freitag, Suzanne K; Pira, Tony N

    2011-01-01

    This is a case of a 2-year-old boy with sickle cell disease who presented with bilateral eyelid swelling, limited extraocular motility, and lateral subperiosteal fluid collection associated with bilateral lateral orbital wall infarctions on MRI. The patient was managed medically with intravenous fluids, analgesics, broad-spectrum antibiotics, systemic steroids, and clinically improved. Patients with sickle cell disease are susceptible to infarction of the orbital bones during vaso-occlusive crises. Orbital wall infarction can lead to acute proptosis and restricted extraocular motility. Orbital wall infarction should be considered in sickle cell patients with orbital diseases so that appropriate treatment can be instituted promptly to prevent the serious sequelae of orbital compression syndrome.

  20. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  1. An intelligent medical system for diagnosis of bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatzilygeroudis, I.; Vassilakos, P.J.; Tsakalidis, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, aspects of the design of an intelligent medical system for diagnosis of bone diseases that can be detected by scintigraphic images are presented. The system comprises three major parts: a user interface (UI), a database management system (DBMS), and an expert system (ES). The DBMS is used for manipulation of various patient data. A number of patient cases are selected as prototype and stored in separate database. Diagnosis is performed via the ES, called XBONE, based on patient data. Knowledge is represented via an integrated formalism that combines production rules and a neural network. This results in better representation, and facilitates knowledge acquisition and maintenance. (authors)

  2. An intelligent medical system for diagnosis of bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzilygeroudis, I [University of Patras, School of Engineering, Department of Computer Engineering and Informatics, 26500 Patras, Greece (Greece); Vassilakos, P J [Regional University Hospital of Patras, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Patras Greece (Greece); Tsakalidis, A [Computer Technology Institute, P.O. Box 1122, 26110 Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, aspects of the design of an intelligent medical system for diagnosis of bone diseases that can be detected by scintigraphic images are presented. The system comprises three major parts: a user interface (UI), a database management system (DBMS), and an expert system (ES). The DBMS is used for manipulation of various patient data. A number of patient cases are selected as prototype and stored in separate database. Diagnosis is performed via the ES, called XBONE, based on patient data. Knowledge is represented via an integrated formalism that combines production rules and a neural network. This results in better representation, and facilitates knowledge acquisition and maintenance. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Genetic predisposition for adult lactose intolerance and relation to diet, bone density, and bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara M; Bonelli, Christine M; Walter, Daniela E; Kuhn, Regina J; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Berghold, Andrea; Goessler, Walter; Stepan, Vinzenz; Dobnig, Harald; Leb, Georg; Renner, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    Evidence that genetic disposition for adult lactose intolerance significantly affects calcium intake, bone density, and fractures in postmenopausal women is presented. PCR-based genotyping of lactase gene polymorphisms may complement diagnostic procedures to identify persons at risk for both lactose malabsorption and osteoporosis. Lactase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive condition resulting in decreased intestinal lactose degradation. A -13910 T/C dimorphism (LCT) near the lactase phlorizin hydrolase gene, reported to be strongly associated with adult lactase nonpersistence, may have an impact on calcium supply, bone density, and osteoporotic fractures in the elderly. We determined LCT genotypes TT, TC, and CC in 258 postmenopausal women using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Genotypes were related to milk intolerance, nutritional calcium intake, intestinal calcium absorption, bone mineral density (BMD), and nonvertebral fractures. Twenty-four percent of all women were found to have CC genotypes and genetic lactase deficiency. Age-adjusted BMD at the hip in CC genotypes and at the spine in CC and TC genotypes was reduced by -7% to -11% depending on the site measured (p = 0.04). LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphisms alone accounted for 2-4% of BMD in a multiple regression model. Bone fracture incidence was significantly associated with CC genotypes (p = 0.001). Milk calcium intake was significantly lower (-55%, p = 0.004) and aversion to milk consumption was significantly higher (+166%, p = 0.01) in women with the CC genotype, but there were no differences in overall dietary calcium intake or in intestinal calcium absorption test values. The LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphism is associated with subjective milk intolerance, reduced milk calcium intake, and reduced BMD at the hip and the lumbar spine and may predispose to bone fractures. Genetic testing for lactase deficiency may complement indirect methods in the detection of individuals at risk for both lactose

  4. [Bone and joint decade--"mile step" in diagnostics and treatment of movement system diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brongel, Leszek; Lorkowski, Jacek; Hładki, Waldemar; Trybus, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affect hundreds of millions of people across the world and are the most common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability. The impact from such disorders on the individual and on society let to propose by WHO for the Decade of the Bone and Joint from 2000 to 2010. The goal of the Decade is to improve the health-related quality of life for people with musculoskeletal disorders throughout the world and this could be achieved by raising awareness of the growing burden of bone and joint diseases on society, promoting prevention and treatment and advancing understanding of musculoskeletal disorders through research. The main fields of interest during the Decade are joint diseases, spinal disorders and low back pain, osteoporosis and severe trauma of the extremities. In our Department we study problems concerning on traumatology of old patients, multitrauma injury, biomechanics in spinal disorders, in degenerative joint disease and foot diseases. Apart from contemporary imaging methods like US or CT we use pedobarographic diagnostics and fotogrammetric examination. In this study we present strategic goals and the summary of our ongoing projects in our Department related to the goals of the Bone and Joint Decade.

  5. The diagnostic value of the alveolar lamina dura in generalised bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlencordt, J.; Kruse, H.P.; Franke, J.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in the alveolar lamina dura in 134 patients have been analysed. They included 32 cases with urolithiasis in whom generalised bone disease had been excluded, 37 cases of primary hyperparathyroidism, 31 cases of secondary hyperparathyroidism and 34 cases with primary osteoporosis. The state of the lamina dura was related to biochemical, radiological and histological findings in the various groups. The value of the lamina dura in the diagnosis of generalised skeletal abnormalities has been defined. (orig.) [de

  6. Whole body bone scintigraphy in tenofovir-related osteomalacia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Biagio Antonio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Viread® is the only nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of HIV. It is frequently prescribed not only for its efficacy but also for its decreased side effect profile compared with other nucleotide analogs. In addition, it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of acquired Fanconi's syndrome in individuals with HIV. Case presentation We describe a 48-year-old woman infected with HIV, with chronic renal insufficiency, who developed Fanconi's syndrome after inclusion of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in her antiretroviral therapy. A whole body bone scintigraphy was performed, revealing an abnormal distribution of radiotracer uptake, with characteristic changes compatible with osteomalacia. All symptoms disappeared after tenofovir discontinuation and mineral supplementation. No other explanation for the sudden and complete resolution of the bone disease was found. Conclusion The case highlights the role of whole body bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of tenofovir-related osteomalacia.

  7. Bone marrow transplantation in patients with storage diseases: a developing country experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Marcos C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is a therapeutic option for patients with genetic storage diseases. Between 1979 and 2002, eight patients, four females and four males (1 to 13 years old were submitted to this procedure in our center. Six patients had mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I in 3; MPS III in one and MPS VI in 2, one had adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and one had Gaucher disease. Five patients had related and three unrelated BMT donor. Three patients developed graft versus host disease (two MPS I and one MPS VI and died between 37 and 151 days after transplantation. Five patients survived 4 to 16 years after transplantation. Three patients improved (one MPS I; one MPS VI and the Gaucher disease patient, one patient had no disease progression (ALD and in one patient this procedure did not change the natural course of the disease (MPS III.

  8. Are levels of bone turnover related to lower bone mass of adolescents previously fed a macrobiotic diet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, T.J.; Dusseldorp, van M.; Seibel, M.J.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dutch adolescents who consumed a macrobiotic (vegan-type) diet in early life, demonstrate a lower relative bone mass than their omnivorous counterparts. We investigated whether subjects from the macrobiotic group showed signs of catching up with controls in terms of relative bone mass, reflected by

  9. Founders lecture 2007. Metabolic bone disease: what has changed in 30 years?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Diagnostic Radiology, MSK, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-09-15

    To provide an update on imaging of metabolic bone disease based on new developments, findings, and changing practices over the past 30 years. Literature review of osteoporosis, osteomalacia, renal osteodystrophy, Paget's disease, bisphosphonates, with an emphasis on imaging. Cited references and pertinent findings. Significant developments have occurred in the imaging of metabolic bone disease over the past 30 years. (orig.)

  10. Bone marrow in pediatric patients with Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fauzia Shafi; Hasan, Rabiya Fayyaz

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin's disease is a malignant process of lymphoreticular system that constitutes 6% of childhood cancers Accurate staging of lymphoma is the basis for rational therapeutic planning and assessment of the presence or absence of marrow involvement is a basic part of the staging evaluation. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of marrow infiltration in paediatric patients with Hodgkin's disease and to ascertain its morphological spectrum in the marrow. The study included 85 paediatric patients with diagnosed Hodgkin's disease seen at The Children's Hospital/Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from January 2010 to December 2011, referred to haematology department for bone marrow biopsies. Ages ranged between two years to fourteen years with an average age of seven years, the male female ratio being 13:1. Mixed cellularity was the commonest histological type present in 66 (78%) cases. The presenting feature common in all cases was superficial lymphadenopathy followed by hepatomegaly in 17 (20%) cases and splenomegaly in 16 (19%). All the marrow aspirates were negative for infiltration. Trephine biopsies revealed marrow infiltration in 9 (10.5%). Five (56%) cases had bilateral while 4 (44%) had unilateral involvement. Pattern of infiltration was diffuse in 8 (89%) and focal in one (11%) trephines. Increased marrow fibrosis was present in eight (89%) cases. Diagnostic Reed Sternberg cells were identified in only one case and the mononuclear variants were present in six cases and atypical cells were present in two cases in these immunohistochemistry for CD15 and CD30 was performed which was positive. Granulomas in one and lymphoid aggregates were present in two trephine biopsies otherwise negative for Hodgkin's infiltration. Bone marrow infiltration was present in 10.5% cases, immunohistochemistry was used to confirm infiltration in two cases, the pattern of infiltration being diffuse in majority (89%).

  11. Bioprinting and Organ-on-Chip Applications Towards Personalized Medicine for Bone Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Gilardi, Mara; Bersini, Simone; Candrian, Christian; Moretti, Matteo

    2017-06-01

    The skeleton supports and confers structure to the whole body but several pathological and traumatic conditions affect the bone tissue. Most of those pathological conditions are specific and different among different patients, such as bone defects due to traumatic injuries or bone remodeling alterations due to congenital diseases. In this context, the development of personalized therapies would be highly desirable. In recent years the advent of innovative techniques like bioprinting and microfluidic organ-on-chip raised hopes of achieving key tools helping the application of personalized therapies for bone diseases. In this review we will illustrate the latest progresses in the bioprinting of personalized bone grafts and generation of patient-specific bone-on-chip devices, describing current approaches and limitations and possible future improvements for more effective personalized bone grafts and disease models.

  12. The estrogen-related receptors (ERRs): potential targets against bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wong, Jiemin; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    Bone loss and the resulting skeletal fragility is induced by several pathological or natural conditions, the most prominent of which being aging as well as the decreased levels of circulating estrogens in post-menopause females. To date, most treatments against bone loss aim at preventing excess bone resorption. We here summarize data indicating that the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) α and γ prevent bone formation. Inhibiting these receptors may thus constitute an anabolic approach by increasing bone formation.

  13. The relation between bone mineral density and lifestyle in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Mu Sik; Bae, Suk Hwan; KIm, Yong Kwon [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study was performed in order to identify the relation between bone nineral density and life styles of some of Korean colleague students. A total of 121 college students were assessed through bone mineral density test on femoral neck and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA). The survey about their lifestyles with a self-rating questionnaire, was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. SPSS 18.0 Program was used for those research data analyses such as the frequency analysis, the cross analysis. The percentage of the osteoporisis, osteopenia and normal groups were 0.0%, 24.8% and 75.2%. BMI, Regular menstrual cycle, Walking and Regular exercise in adolescence were positively related with T-score. But Using time of electronic devices was negative related with T-score. It can be concluded that desirable life style in time of college students and adolescence is important for their bone health. The necessity of preparing guideline for preventing bone disease in old age connected with the school curriculum should be recognized to the public and educational authorities.

  14. The relation between bone mineral density and lifestyle in college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Mu Sik; Bae, Suk Hwan; KIm, Yong Kwon

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to identify the relation between bone nineral density and life styles of some of Korean colleague students. A total of 121 college students were assessed through bone mineral density test on femoral neck and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA). The survey about their lifestyles with a self-rating questionnaire, was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. SPSS 18.0 Program was used for those research data analyses such as the frequency analysis, the cross analysis. The percentage of the osteoporisis, osteopenia and normal groups were 0.0%, 24.8% and 75.2%. BMI, Regular menstrual cycle, Walking and Regular exercise in adolescence were positively related with T-score. But Using time of electronic devices was negative related with T-score. It can be concluded that desirable life style in time of college students and adolescence is important for their bone health. The necessity of preparing guideline for preventing bone disease in old age connected with the school curriculum should be recognized to the public and educational authorities

  15. Vitamin D and nutritional status are related to bone fractures in alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Reimers, Emilio; Alvisa-Negrín, Julio; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco; Candelaria Martín-González, M; Hernández-Betancor, Iván; Fernández-Rodríguez, Camino M; Viña-Rodríguez, J; González-Díaz, Antonieta

    2011-01-01

    Bone fractures are common in alcoholics. To analyse which factors (ethanol consumption; liver function impairment; bone densitometry; hormone changes; nutritional status, and disrupted social links and altered eating habits) are related to bone fractures in 90 alcoholic men admitted to our hospitalization unit because of organic problems. Bone homoeostasis-related hormones were measured in patients and age- and sex-matched controls. Whole-body densitometry was performed by a Hologic QDR-2000 (Waltham, MA, USA) densitometer, recording bone mineral density (BMD) and fat and lean mass; nutritional status and liver function were assessed. The presence of prevalent fractures was assessed by anamnesis and chest X-ray film. Forty-nine patients presented at least one fracture. We failed to find differences between patients with and without fractures regarding BMD parameters. Differences regarding fat mass were absent, but lean mass was lower among patients with bone fracture. The presence of fracture was significantly associated with impaired subjective nutritional evaluation (χ² = 5.79, P = 0.016), lower vitamin D levels (Z = 2.98, P = 0.003) and irregular eating habits (χ² = 5.32, P = 0.02). Reduced lean mass and fat mass, and altered eating habits were more prevalent among patients with only rib fractures (n = 36) than in patients with multiple fractures and/or fractures affecting other bones (n = 13). These last were more closely related to decompensated liver disease. Serum vitamin D levels showed a significant relationship with handgrip strength (ρ = 0.26, P = 0.023) and lean mass at different parts of the body, but not with fat mass. By logistic regression analysis, only vitamin D and subjective nutritional evaluation were significantly, independently related with fractures. Prevalent fractures are common among heavy alcoholics. Their presence is related more closely to nutritional status, lean mass and vitamin D levels than to BMD. Lean mass is more reduced

  16. Scintigraphy versus radiography in the early diagnosis of experimental bone necrosis with special reference to caisson disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, P.J.; Walder, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    The early diagnosis of caisson disease of bone is hindered by the long delay which must elapse before an abnormality becomes apparent on a radiograph. The possible use of bone scintigraphy for this purpose was investigated. Necrosis of the bone and marrow was produced in rabbits by glass microspheres to simulate persistent gas-bubble emboli and then serial radiographs and scintigrams using sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate were obtained. Regions of necrosis could be detected as 'hot spots' on the scintigrams as early as three weeks after the causative insult, which was many weeks before any abnormality could be detected on the radiographs. Histological examination of excised femora suggested that the scintigraphic abnormality might depend on the new bone formation established during a reactive or repair process. It is suggested that scintigraphy may have clinical value in caisson disease. (author)

  17. Scintigraphy versus radiography in the early diagnosis of experimental bone necrosis, with special reference to caisson disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P J; Walder, D N

    1980-05-01

    The early diagnosis of caisson disease of bone is hindered by the long delay which must elapse before an abnormality becomes apparent on a radiograph. The possible use of bone scintigraphy for this purpose was investigated. Necrosis of the bone and marrow was produced in rabbits by glass microspheres to simulate persistent gas-bubble emboli and then serial radiographs and scintigrams using 99mTc-diphosphonate were obtained. Regions of necrosis could be detected as "hot-spots" on the scintigrams as early as three weeks after the causative insult, which was many weeks before any abnormality could be detected on the radiographs. Histological examination of excised femora suggested that the scintigraphic abnormality might depend on the new bone formation during a reactive or repair process. It is suggested that scintigraphy may have clinical value in caisson disease.

  18. Bone scintigraphy and radiology in untreated Paget's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellenga, C.J.L.R.; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Bijvost, O.L.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study is based on 107 patients with untreated Paget's disease of bone. Scintigraphy was performed 3 hours after 20 mCi Tc-99m-Sn-EHDP, using a Toshiba 204 or 404 gamma camera. In each patient multiple spot films of the total skeleton were made and evaluated according to a six-point scale. Moreover, in 42 patients the ratio of uptake in a lesion over comparable normal bone was measured using an MDS Trinary computer. Radiographs were made only of affected parts and evaluated according to a three-point scale. In 59 (16%) of the 373 lesions found on the scintigam no radiographic abnormalities were found. These roentgen-negative lesions generally show rather low scintigraphic uptake and are mostly asymptomatic. There exists a clear correlation between scintigraphic uptake and radiological deformity: the scintigraphic scores 5 and 6 occur in only 24% of the ro-grade 1 lesions, but in 65% of the grade 3 lesions; after computer evaluation the mean ratio in grade 1 and 3 lesions is 3.0 and 6.5 resp. (p<0.01). There also appears to be a correlation between scint. uptake and symptomatology: typical Pagetic pain is present in 10% of scint. score 2 and 3 lesions, but in 40% of score 5 and 6 lesions; the mean computer measured scint. ratio is 4.0 for asymptomatic and 7.5 for painful lesions (p<0.001)

  19. Vanishing bone disease (Gorham′s disease - A rare occurrence of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old male patient presented with painful swelling around left elbow joint. Radiographic examination revealed osteolytic lesion with pathological fracture of lower end of humerus and upper radius. Upper end of ulna was completely absent along with bony erosion. Histopathology of the bony tissue revealed hemangioma-like lesion composed of vascular channels lined by benign endothelium replacing bone. The diagnosis of Gorham′s massive osteolysis was made. Gorham′s disease is a benign self-limiting condition affecting any age, may involve any part of the skeleton and is characterized by replacement of bone by hemangiomatous tissue resulting in formation of lesions exhibiting massive osteolysis, which may be to the extent of disappearance of the affected bone in radiograph. This nonhereditary case was not associated with nephropathy, which is often a coexistent condition. The case is being reported for its rarity.

  20. Low bone mineral density is related to atherosclerosis in postmenopausal Moroccan women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkaoui Mohammed

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have implicated several possible metabolic linkages between osteoporosis and vascular calcification, including estrogen deficiency, vitamin D excess, vitamin K deficiency and lipid oxidation products. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether osteoporosis and atherosclerosis are related to each other or are independent processes, both related to aging. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the correlation between arterial thickening and bone status in a sample of apparently healthy Moroccan women. Methods Seventy-two postmenopausal women were studied. All patients were without secondary causes that might affect bone density. Bone status was assessed by bone mineral density (BMD in lumbar spine and all femoral sites. Arterial wall thickening was assessed by intima-media thickness (IMT in carotid artery (CA and femoral artery (FA. Prevalent plaques were categorized into four groups ranging from low echogenicity to high echogenicity. Results The mean age was 59.2 ± 8.3 years. 84.7% had at least one plaque. By Spearman Rank correlation, CA IMT was negatively correlated to Femoral total BMD (r = -0.33, Femoral neck BMD (r = -0.23, Ward triangle BMD (r = -0.30 and Trochanter BMD (r = -0.28 while there was no association with lumbar BMD. In multiple regression analysis, CA IMT emerged as an independent factor significantly associated with all femoral sites BMD after adjusting of confounding factors. FA IMT failed to be significantly associated with both Femoral and Lumbar BMD. No significant differences between echogenic, predominantly echogenic, predominantly echolucent and echolucent plaques groups were found concerning lumbar BMD and all femoral sites BMD Conclusion Our results demonstrate a negative correlation between bone mineral density (BMD qnd carotid intima-media thickness (IMT in postmenopausal women, independently of confounding factors. We suggest that bone status should be evaluated in

  1. Radiological features of Paget disease of bone associated with VCP myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farpour, Farzin [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Queens Hospital Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Donkervoort, Sandra; Vanjara, Pari [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Charles [University of Kentucky, Department of Neurology and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Lexington, KY (United States); Martin, Barbara [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Osann, Kathryn [University of California, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimonis, Virginia E. [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene cause a unique disorder characterized by classic Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy, and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Our objective was to analyze the radiographic features of PDB associated with VCP mutations since there is a dearth of literature on the PDB component of VCP disease. Radiographic bone surveys were examined in 23 individuals with VCP mutation and compared with their unaffected relatives. Laboratory testing relevant for VCP disease was performed in all individuals. Of the 17 affected individuals with clinical manifestations of VCP disease, 16 of whom had myopathy, radiographic analysis revealed classic PDB in 11 individuals (65%). The mean age of diagnosis for myopathy was 43.8 years and for PDB was 38.1 years of age. Radiological evidence of PDB was seen in one individual (16%) amongst six clinically asymptomatic VCP mutation carriers. Alkaline phosphatase was a useful marker for diagnosing PDB in VCP disease. Radiographic findings of classic PDB are seen in 52% of individuals carrying VCP mutations at a significantly younger age than conventional PDB. Screening for PDB is warranted in at-risk individuals because of the benefit of early treatment with the new powerful bisphosphonates that hold the potential for prevention of disease. (orig.)

  2. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in the clinical development of drugs for osteoporosis and metastatic bone disease: potential uses and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Garnero, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover are used increasingly during the clinical development of drugs for the treatment of metabolic bone diseases such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and cancer that has metastasised to the bone. However, assessing the optimal value of these markers is often complicated, and such an assessment is an obvious prerequisite for rational use of the markers and, consequently, potential improvement of clinical drug development. Biochemical markers of bone turnover are substances in the blood or urine that are produced or released during bone remodelling. They provide semiquantitative information on bone remodelling, and are often the most adequate tool to describe the pharmacodynamics of the drug. Their use has increased considerably because of dose-effect relationships that have been seen with certain drugs, but also because they have proven relationships with clinical outcomes in several metabolic bone diseases. However, there is a lack of information on the kinetics of these markers, and the immunoassays that are frequently used in their monitoring often measure a mixture of fragments rather than a single molecular entity. For drug development it should also be realised that different markers, but also different assays for the same marker, may provide different results, considerably limiting the ability to compare results. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, relationships have been shown between several biochemical markers of bone turnover, and either fracture risk and/or the antifracture efficacy of drugs. Such relationships can be used for the development of drugs with similar mechanisms of action, but also for the development of these drugs for closely related indications, such as corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. In both of these instances, data on effects on biochemical markers of bone turnover are usually employed in combination with information about effects on bone mineral density. However, the relationships of these parameters

  3. Bone-related Circulating MicroRNAs miR-29b-3p, miR-550a-3p, and miR-324-3p and their Association to Bone Microstructure and Histomorphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Xaver; Muschitz, Christian; Heimel, Patrick; Baierl, Andreas; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Redl, Heinz; Resch, Heinrich; Geiger, Elisabeth; Skalicky, Susanna; Dormann, Rainer; Plachel, Fabian; Pietschmann, Peter; Grillari, Johannes; Hackl, Matthias; Kocijan, Roland

    2018-03-20

    The assessment of bone quality and the prediction of fracture risk in idiopathic osteoporosis (IOP) are complex prospects as bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTM) do not indicate fracture-risk. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are promising new biomarkers for bone diseases, but the current understanding of the biological information contained in the variability of miRNAs is limited. Here, we investigated the association between serum-levels of 19 miRNA biomarkers of idiopathic osteoporosis to bone microstructure and bone histomorphometry based upon bone biopsies and µCT (9.3 μm) scans from 36 patients. Four miRNAs were found to be correlated to bone microarchitecture and seven miRNAs to dynamic histomorphometry (p microstructure parameters. miR-29b-3p and miR-324-p were found to be reduced in patients undergoing anti-resorptive therapy. This is the first study to report that serum levels of bone-related miRNAs might be surrogates of dynamic histomorphometry and potentially reveal changes in bone microstructure. Although these findings enhance the potential value of circulating miRNAs as bone biomarkers, further experimental studies are required to qualify the clinical utility of miRNAs to reflect dynamic changes in bone formation and microstructure.

  4. Patient and implant survival following joint replacement because of metastatic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michala S; Gregersen, Kristine G; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from a pathological fracture or painful bony lesion because of metastatic bone disease often benefit from a total joint replacement. However, these are large operations in patients who are often weak. We examined the patient survival and complication rates after total joint...... replacement as the treatment for bone metastasis or hematological diseases of the extremities....

  5. Bone mineral density and nutritional status in children with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); J. Bouquet (Jan); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Osteoporosis has been reported in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AIMS: To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), nutritional status, and determinants of BMD in children with inflammatory bowel disease. PATIENTS: Fifty five patients

  6. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (Socs2 deletion protects bone health of mice with DSS-induced inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Dobie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD often present with poor bone health. The development of targeted therapies for this bone loss requires a fuller understanding of the underlying cellular mechanisms. Although bone loss in IBD is multifactorial, the altered sensitivity and secretion of growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 in IBD is understood to be a critical contributing mechanism. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2, a well-established negative regulator of GH signaling, is stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, it is likely that SOCS2 expression represents a critical mediator through which proinflammatory cytokines inhibit GH/IGF-1 signaling and decrease bone quality in IBD. Using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS model of colitis, we reveal that endogenously elevated GH function in the Socs2−/− mouse protects the skeleton from osteopenia. Micro-computed tomography assessment of DSS-treated wild-type (WT mice revealed a worsened trabecular architecture compared to control mice. Specifically, DSS-treated WT mice had significantly decreased bone volume, trabecular thickness and trabecular number, and a resulting increase in trabecular separation. In comparison, the trabecular bone of Socs2-deficient mice was partially protected from the adverse effects of DSS. The reduction in a number of parameters, including bone volume, was less, and no changes were observed in trabecular thickness or separation. This protected phenotype was unlikely to be a consequence of improved mucosal health in the DSS-treated Socs2−/− mice but rather a result of unregulated GH signaling directly on bone. These studies indicate that the absence of SOCS2 is protective against bone loss typical of IBD. This study also provides an improved understanding of the relative effects of GH/IGF-1 signaling on bone health in experimental colitis, information that is essential before these drugs are

  7. Impact of additional SPECT in bone scanning in tumor patients with suspected metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, I.; Goelcuek, E.; Buchert, R.; Brenner, W.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the additional value of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for patient staging compared to planar bone scanning in an unselected cohort of cancer patients. The study included 271 consecutive tumor patients in whom planar imaging and two-bed position SPECT of the spine and the pelvis had been performed. Retrospective image interpretation was performed independently for planar and SPECT scans. Findings were categorized as 'benign', 'equivocal', or malignant' on a lesion base, and as 'no metastatic disease', 'equivocal', or metastatic disease' on a patient base. Four hundred and forty seven lesions were detected by SPECT. Missing of lesions in planar images was rare (4.3% of all SPECT lesions). Planar findings differed from SPECT findings in 149 lesions (33.3%). Most of these 'inconsistent' lesions were rated as equivocal in the planar images but benign (14.5% of all lesions) or malignant (11.0%) by SPECT. On a patient base, 81.6% of patients with planar equivocal staging were classified as either benign (55.3%) or malignant (26.3%) by SPECT. Patients definitively staged as 'no metastatic disease' or 'metastatic disease' in planar images were staged differently by SPECT in only 3.7% of cases (up-staging in 2.6% and down-staging in 1.1%). Single-photon emission computed tomography changed a definite staging as based on planar images in less than 4% of the patients. In patients with planar equivocal staging, however, SPECT allowed a definite diagnosis in more than 80% of these cases, and, thus, should be performed routinely in patients with equivocal findings. (author)

  8. Bone fragility induced by X-ray irradiation in relation to cortical bone-mineral content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyaruba, M.M.; Yamamoto, I.; Morita, R.; Kimura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fractional irradiation on the biomechanical properties of bone in the rat in relation to the cortical bone-mineral content (BMC), and to compare these effects with those brought about by single-dose irradiation. Seventy-five veteran female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 was the control group. The left tibiae of the remaining rats were exposed to irradiation. Group 2 received one single dose of X-rays at 10-60 Gy. Groups 3 and 4 received fractional irradiation up to different cumulative doses (10-60 Gy): group 3 received 2.5 Gy once a day; group 4 received 1.25 Gy twice a day. Twenty-four weeks after irradiation, the rats were killed and the BMC in each tibial diaphysis was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The bones were then loaded to failure in a three-point bending test. The control group showed no difference (p>0.05) between left and right tibiae, neither in BMC nor in the maximum load at fracture. Single-dose irradiation caused a 16% (p=0.0366) decrease in the maximum load at 40 Gy, and a 19% (p=0.008) decrease at 60 Gy. The once-daily fractional dose of irradiation caused a 10% (p=0.0022) decrease in the maximum load of the irradiated tibiae at 60 Gy when compared to the intact contralateral tibiae. The twice-daily fractional dose of irradiation had no observable effect on the maximum load of the irradiated tibiae. Neither fractional irradiation modality had an effect on BMC. (orig./MG)

  9. MR analysis of sternal bone marrow using STIR in hematologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozawa, Eito [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity pattern of sternal bone marrow was examined in 21 normal volunteers and 10 patients with aplastic anemia (n=4), multiple myeloma (2), AML (2), gammaglobulinemia (1) and MDS (1) using a sagittal STIR sequence. Double Echo STIR images (TR/TI/TE/NEX=2000/180/20, 100/1) were obtained with a CP body array coil. Craniocaudal phase-encoding with a handmade positioning device effectively avoided overlapping artifacts due to cardiac pulsation. In the normal volunteers, age showed a significant inverse correlation with the calculated SIR (signal intensity ratio of bone marrow relative to subcutaneous fat) using STIR with short TE. The SIR in the sternal body was significantly higher than that in the manubrium (p<0.05). Knowledge of the sternal bone marrow distribution according to age is useful for evaluating hematologic diseases. The proposed method provided high spatial resolution and an excellent bone marrow signal, and may be useful for determining site for aspiration. (author)

  10. Women Build Long Bones With Less Cortical Mass Relative to Body Size and Bone Size Compared With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Karl J; Bigelow, Erin M R; Schlecht, Stephen H

    2015-08-01

    The twofold greater lifetime risk of fracturing a bone for white women compared with white men and black women has been attributed in part to differences in how the skeletal system accumulates bone mass during growth. On average, women build more slender long bones with less cortical area compared with men. Although slender bones are known to have a naturally lower cortical area compared with wider bones, it remains unclear whether the relatively lower cortical area of women is consistent with their increased slenderness or is reduced beyond that expected for the sex-specific differences in bone size and body size. Whether this sexual dimorphism is consistent with ethnic background and is recapitulated in the widely used mouse model also remains unclear. We asked (1) do black women build bones with reduced cortical area compared with black men; (2) do white women build bones with reduced cortical area compared with white men; and (3) do female mice build bones with reduced cortical area compared with male mice? Bone strength and cross-sectional morphology of adult human and mouse bone were calculated from quantitative CT images of the femoral midshaft. The data were tested for normality and regression analyses were used to test for differences in cortical area between men and women after adjusting for body size and bone size by general linear model (GLM). Linear regression analysis showed that the femurs of black women had 11% lower cortical area compared with those of black men after adjusting for body size and bone size (women: mean=357.7 mm2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 347.9-367.5 mm2; men: mean=400.1 mm2; 95% CI, 391.5-408.7 mm2; effect size=1.2; pbone size (women: mean=350.1 mm2; 95% CI, 340.4-359.8 mm2; men: mean=394.3 mm2; 95% CI, 386.5-402.1 mm2; effect size=1.3; pbone size (female: mean=0.73 mm2; 95% CI, 0.71-0.74 mm2; male: mean=0.70 mm2; 95% CI, 0.68-0.71 mm2; effect size=0.74; p=0.04, GLM). Female femurs are not simply a more slender version of male

  11. Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Bone: Radiological Pattern and the Potential Role of CBCT in Early Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Olutayo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To systematize the clinico-radiological symptoms and course of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone and to evaluate the diagnostic potential of various radiological techniques to detect mild osteonecrosis in each stage of the disease.Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 22 patients previously diagnosed with extraoral malignant disease. Diagnosis was based on a clinical examination in conjunction to digital panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Two dentomaxillofacial radiologists reviewed all images.Results: Twenty patients showed mandibular involvement clinically, while two others had a maxillary involvement. Four stages of the disease were proposed based on the clinico-radiological findings. Subclinical cortical and lamina dura thickening was detected with only three-dimensional CBCT and periapical images, while ulceration and cortical bone thickening was detected only by three-dimensional CBCT. Mixed sclerotic, lytic bone destruction involving alveolar and basal bone with or without encroachment on the mandibular canal, pathological mandibular fractures were detected by two-dimensional panoramic and three-dimensional CBCT images. Other findings are non healing extraction sockets, periapical radiolucencies, osteolysis, sequestra, oroantral fistula, and periosteal new bone formation.Conclusions: The present study showed that bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone occurs in four distinct clinico-radiological stages. For mild cases, panoramic image diagnosis was much less obvious, whereas cone beam computed tomography was able to fully characterise the bony lesions and describe their extent and involvement of neighbouring structures in all cases. Thus cone beam computed tomography might better contribute to the prevention of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone as well to the disease management.

  12. Age-related distribution of vertebral bone-marrow diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Jochen, E-mail: j.herrmann@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Pediatric Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Krstin, Nina, E-mail: ninakrstin@web.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Schoennagel, Bjoern P., E-mail: b.schoennagel@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Sornsakrin, Marjike, E-mail: m.sornsakrin@uke.de [Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Derlin, Thorsten, E-mail: t.derlin@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Busch, Jasmin D., E-mail: jd.busch@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Petersen, Kay Uwe, E-mail: Kay.Petersen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Psychiatry, University Clinic Tübingen, Calwerstraße 14 Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Graessner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.graessner@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare, Lindenplatz 2, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard, E-mail: g.adam@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Habermann, Christian R., E-mail: c.habermann@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistraße 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine age-related diffusivity changes of the lumbar bone marrow by measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Materials and methods: The local ethics committee approved this study and written informed consent was obtained. The study group comprised 88 individuals including 75 healthy volunteers and 13 patients (48 female, 40 male; mean age 36 years, range 0–84 years). The pediatric cases were recruited from patients. Echo-planar diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with b-values of 50, 400 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC-values were calculated and measured in the 1st and 2nd vertebral body of the lumbar spine. Correlation between age and ADC-values was analyzed with Spearman's rho test. Results: The ADC values of the vertebral bone marrow of the lumbar spine showed a significant negative correlation with age (rho = −0.398, p = 0.001). The mean ADC values (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) in the age groups 0–29 years (mean age 18.0 years, n = 42) and 30–88 years (mean age 51.6 years, n = 46) were 0.54 ± 0.07 and 0.47 ± 0.08, respectively (p < 0.001, T-test). No significant differences were found between children and young adults. Conclusion: Bone marrow ADC values of the lumbar spine show a linear decrease with growing age and thereby reflect the gradual changes of cell composition occurring during marrow conversion.

  13. Estrogen-Related Receptors and the control of bone cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnesecchi, Julie; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-05

    Bone loss is naturally occurring in aging males and females and exacerbated in the latter after menopause, altogether leading to cumulative skeleton fragility and increased fracture risk. Two types of therapeutic strategies can be envisioned to counteract age- or menopause-associated bone loss, aiming at either reducing bone resorption exerted by osteoclasts or, alternatively, promoting bone formation by osteoblasts. We here summarize data suggesting that inhibition of the Estrogen-Related Receptors α and/or γ could promote bone formation and compensate for bone loss induced by ageing or estrogen-deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemorrhage associated with 'bone crisis' in Gaucher's disease identified by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horev, G.; Kornreich, L.; Hadar, H.; Katz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Children suffering from Gaucher's disease were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a characteristic episode of 'bone crisis'. An unexpectedly high intramedullary as well as subperiosteal signal was observed on both the T1- and T2-weighted sequences in 5 patients, suggesting a subacute hemorrhage or hematoma. It is conceivable that such a painful hemorrhage is an important component of the 'bone crisis' phenomenon. Furthermore, in these cases this is a specific sign which may enable differentiation of bone crises from other types of bone pain associated with Gaucher's disease. (orig.)

  15. [Consensus statement: recommendations for the management of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Esteban; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Carpintero, Pedro; Casado, José Luis; Del Pino Montes, Javier; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Maalouf, Jorge; Negredo, Eugenia; Ocampo, Antonio; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To provide practical recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Members of scientific societies related to bone metabolism and HIV: Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GeSIDA), Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición (SEEN), Sociedad Española de Investigación Ósea y del Metabolismo Mineral (SEIOMM), and Sociedad Española de Fractura Osteoporótica (SEFRAOS). A systematic search was carried out in PubMed, and papers in English and Spanish with a publication date before 28 May 2013 were included. Recommendations were formulated according to GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) setting both their strength and the quality of supporting evidence. Working groups were established for each major part, and the final resulting document was later discussed in a face-to-face meeting. All the authors reviewed the final written document and agreed with its content. The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations on the detection and treatment of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of Paget's disease of bone in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Luigi; Di Stefano, Marco; Merlotti, Daniela; Giordano, Nicola; Martini, Giuseppe; Tamone, Cristina; Zatteri, Roberto; De Lucchi, Roberto; Baldi, Carlo; Vattimo, Angelo; Capoccia, Silvia; Burroni, Luca; Geraci, Simone; De Paola, Vincenzo; Calabrò, Anna; Avanzati, Annalisa; Isaia, Giancarlo; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2005-10-01

    We examined the prevalence of PDB in Italy from radiological, scintigraphic, and biochemical surveys in two Italian towns. Prevalence rates varied from 0.7% to 2.4%, were higher in males than in females, and slightly differed between the two towns. Unlike previous studies in populations of British descent, no secular trend for a decreasing prevalence emerged. Clinical, radiological, and necropsy data from different countries suggested pronounced geographical variations in the prevalence of Paget's disease of bone (PDB). Despite the impact of the disease on the population, there are limited data on the prevalence of PDB in Italy. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of PDB in the district of Siena (Central Italy) and Turin (Northern Italy) from radiological, biochemical, and scintigraphic surveys. We examined a sample of 1778 consecutive pelvic radiographs performed between 1999 and 2000 at the Hospital Radiology Unit in Siena and 6609 pelvic radiographs performed in 1986-1987, 1992-1993, and 1999-2002 from the Radiology Department of Molinette Hospital in Turin. In Siena, 7906 consecutive (99m)TC-MDP bone scans performed over a 4-year period (January 2000 to May 2004) were also screened for the presence of PDB, and the prevalence of elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels (>300 UI/liter) was estimated from 7449 computerized medical records over a 3-year period (January 2000 to February 2003). The finding of PDB on the pelvic radiograph and bone scan was based on standardized radiological criteria. At the end of the radiological surveys, 16/1778 pelvic PDB cases (8 males and 8 females) were observed in Siena and 41/6609 (27 males and 14 females) in Turin. The crude prevalence of the disease was 0.89% in Siena and 0.62% in Turin. Given that pelvic involvement is commonly described in 60-90% of PDB patients, the estimated overall prevalence of PDB ranged from 1.0% to 1.5% in Siena and from 0.7% to 1.0% in Turin. No decrease in the prevalence

  17. Kidney disease and aging: A reciprocal relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are overrepresented in elderly patients. This provides specific challenges for the treatment, as the start of dialysis in vulnerable elderly patients may be associated with a rapid decline in functional performance. However, prognosis in elderly patients with ESRD is quite variable and related to the presence of comorbidity and geriatric impairments. The decision to start dialysis in elderly patients should always be based on shared decision making, which may be aided by the use of prediction models which should however not be used to withhold dialysis treatment. The treatment of ESRD in elderly patients should be based on a multidimensional treatment plan with a role for active rehabilitation. Moreover, there also appears to be a reciprocal relationship between aging and CKD, as the presence of geriatric complications is also high in younger patients with ESRD. This has led to the hypothesis of a premature aging process associated with CKD, resulting in different phenotypes such as premature vascular aging, muscle wasting, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and frailty. Prevention and treatment of this phenotype is based on optimal treatment of CKD, associated comorbidities, and lifestyle factors by established treatments. For the future, interventions, which are developed to combat the aging process in general, might also have relevance for the treatment of patients with CKD, but their role should always be investigated in adequately powered clinical trials, as results obtained in experimental trials may not be directly translatable to the clinical situation of elderly patients. In the meantime, physical exercise is a very important intervention, by improving both physical capacity and functional performance, as well as by a direct effect on the aging process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Questions from the clinician to the radiologist regarding the diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.; Schmidt, M.

    1986-12-01

    Macromorphological X-ray findings in metabolic bone diseases can be established only in advanced stages. Micromorphological X-ray diagnostic procedures will support the diagnosis even in early stages. Mineralometric examinations are adjuvant methods for early diagnosis and survey of therapy in metabolic bone diseases. The synopsis of parameters of calcium phosphate metabolism, bone histology (histomorphometry) and radiological morphology enables the type and stage of osteopathy to be diagnosed. The supplementary diagnostic methods are helpful in distinguishing bone diseases with increased turnover, inpaired bone modelling and absorption, disturbed mineralization and ectopic calcification. Within the metabolic osteopathies, osteoporosis is gaining more and more importance as a socioeconomic problem; therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are of significant relevance. Hyper-, hypoparathyroidism and osteoidosis are diseases at can be cured if diagnosed early.

  19. Questions from the clinician to the radiologist regarding the diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.; Schmidt, M.; Klinikum Bamberg

    1986-01-01

    Macromorphological X-ray findings in metabolic bone diseases can be established only in advanced stages. Micromorphological X-ray diagnostic procedures will support the diagnosis even in early stages. Mineralometric examinations are adjuvant methods for early diagnosis and survey of therapy in metabolic bone diseases. The synopsis of parameters of calcium phosphate metabolism, bone histology (histomorphometry) and radiological morphology enables the type and stage of osteopathy to be diagnosed. The supplementary diagnostic methods are helpful in distinguishing bone diseases with increased turnover, inpaired bone modelling and absorption, disturbed mineralization and ectopic calcification. Within the metabolic osteopathies, osteoporosis is gaining more and more importance as a socioeconomic problem; therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are of significant relevance. Hyper-, hypoparathyroidism and osteoidosis are diseases at can be cured if diagnosed early. (orig.) [de

  20. DIAGNOSTIC ASPECTS OF PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Bashkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a chronic localized skeletal disease that belongs to a group of metabolic osteopathies and is characterized by impaired bone remodeling to form foci of increased bone resorption followed by replacement with an excessive amount of defective, less durable bone that is prone to deformities and pathologic fractures. The course of PDB shows three stages: rarefaction, compaction, and coarse-trabecular remodeling – each of which is characterized by certain clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. The majority of the clinical manifestations of the disease are associated with skeletal injury. The disease is characterized by the appearance of bone and joint pain in case of secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformities, pathological fractures, hearing loss due to damage to the skull bones, etc. In many patients, the disease is asymptomatic and detected incidentally after finding a high serum alkaline phosphatase activity or during bone X-ray for any pathological processes, but it can be diagnosed fairly late in the development of complications, as shown in the clinical examples. A combination of clinical, biochemical, morphological data and radiological findings allows for a diagnosis. The use of bisphosphonates is the method of choice for the treatment of PDB. 

  1. Effect of radiotherapy and splenectomy on the bone marrow status in patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajsogolov, G.D.; Pavlov, V.V.; Bogatyreva, T.I.; Khait, S.E.; Kuz'mina, E.G.; Khoptynskaya, S.K.; Kolesnikova, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the bone marrow status in unirradiated zones on 33 patients with stage 1-2 Hodgkin's disease in complete 9-12 year remission after therapeutic irradiation of the lymphatic collectors of the upper part of the trunk in combination with irradiation of the system (16 patients) or splenectomy (17 patients). The total count of myelokaryocytes, myelogram, a relative and absolute content of lymphoid cells, immature granulocytes and elements of the erythroid series were defined in the punctates of the upper portion of the ilium. T- and B-lymphocyte count, the number of granulocytomacrophage (CFU-C) and stromal (CFU-F) precursor cells were defined using morphocytochemical and immunological methods. At that time an increase in the relative and absolute content of C- ad B-lymphocytes was noted. The T-cell count and the total number of myelokaryocytes, on the one hand, and the content of immature granulocytes and erythronormoblasts, on the other had, showed correlation of various degree which was particularly noticeable in the group of unoperated patients. The total number of myelokaryocytes in 1 μl of the bone marrow of the patients after splenectomy, on an average, significantly exceeded that in the group of patients with the irradiated spleen. These changes were considered to be a result of the rearragement of T-differentiating lymphocytes with their raised accumulation in the bone marrow after irradiation of a considerable volume of the lymphoid tissue and spleen or after splenectomy

  2. Two Cases of Sternal 'Cold' Lesions on Bone Imaging in the Metastatic Skeletal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung Gun; Seo, Bong Kwan; Lee, Hoon Yong; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Noe Kyeong; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-09-15

    Traditionally, a positive bone scan shows single or multiple areas of increased uptake in them metastatic skeletal disease. The occurrence of 'cold' lytic-like or photon-deficient lesions in bone imaging is probably uncommon. Photon-deficient focus or cold lesion of the sternum was demonstrated on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone imaging in 2 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia and primary hepatoma, respectively.

  3. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuko Tokuriki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA. The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures.

  4. Infrared imaging microscopy of bone: illustrations from a mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, Adele L; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gomez, Santiago

    2006-07-01

    Bone is a complex tissue whose composition and properties vary with age, sex, diet, tissue type, health and disease. In this review, we demonstrate how infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopic imaging can be applied to the study of these variations. A specific example of mice with Fabry disease (a lipid storage disease) is presented in which it is demonstrated that the bones of these young animals, while showing typical spatial variation in mineral content, mineral crystal size, and collagen maturity, do not differ from the bones of age- and sex-matched wild type animals.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse malignant bone marrow diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, R.; Rehn, S.; Glimelius, B.; Hagberg, H.; Hemmingsson, A.; Jung, B.; Simonsson, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    Twenty-four patients with malignant bone marrow involvement or polycythemia vera, 8 patients with reactive bone marrow and 7 healthy individuals were examined with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 T and 0.5 T. Signs of an increased longitudinal relaxation time, T1, were found when normal bone marrow was replaced by malignant cells, polycythemia vera or reactive marrow. A shortened T1 was indicated in 4 patients in bone marrow regions treated by radiation therapy; the marrow was most likely hypocellular in these cases. The estimated T1 relaxation times were highly correlated to the cellularity of the bone marrow as assessed by histology. Among patients with close to 100% cellularity neither T1 nor T2 discriminated between the various malignancies or between malignant and reactive, non-malignant bone marrow. Characterization of tissues in terms of normalized image intensities was also attempted, the motive being to avoid approximations and uncertainties in the assessment of T1 and T2. The normalization was carried out with respect to the image of highest intensity, i.e. the proton density weighted image. The results were in agreement with those for T1 and T2. It was concluded that MRI is valuable for assessing bone marrow cellularity, but not for differentiating between various bone marrow disorders having a similar degree of cellularity.

  6. MRI ``road-map`` of normal age-related bone marrow. Pt. 1. Cranial bone and spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccone, A. [Radiology Dept., G. Gaslini Children`s Hospital, Genova (Italy); Oddone, M. [Radiology Dept., G. Gaslini Children`s Hospital, Genova (Italy); Occhi, M. [Radiology Dept., G. Gaslini Children`s Hospital, Genova (Italy); Dell`Acqua, A. [Radiology Dept., G. Gaslini Children`s Hospital, Genova (Italy); Ciccone, M.A. [Radiology Dept., G. Gaslini Children`s Hospital, Genova (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 733 cranial and 250 spinal T1-weighted MR images of patients younger than 24 years to evaluate the bone marrow changes. The signal intensity of the bone marrow on short-TR/TE images was compared with that of fat and normal muscles in the contiguous region and graded. The signal intensity of all anatomic segments was as low as that of muscle, or inferior, in all patients younger than 3 months because of hematopoietic tissue and probably greater amounts of trabecular bone. The first anatomic segments of cranial bone to become hyperintense were the zygomatic bone and mandibular symphysis, followed by the presphenoid bone, basisphenoid, basiocciput, calvaria, and the petrous apex. After 3 years of age, most patients demonstrated pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus. We describe the most interesting changes in the developing spine, which occur in the first 2 years of life. The morphology of the vertebral bodies was evaluated. The variability of the signal and the morphology of the disks were also evaluated. Regional patterns of bone marrow signal intensity and age-related differences should not be misinterpreted as a pathologic condition. (orig.). With 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. MRI ''road-map'' of normal age-related bone marrow. Pt. 1. Cranial bone and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taccone, A.; Oddone, M.; Occhi, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Ciccone, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 733 cranial and 250 spinal T1-weighted MR images of patients younger than 24 years to evaluate the bone marrow changes. The signal intensity of the bone marrow on short-TR/TE images was compared with that of fat and normal muscles in the contiguous region and graded. The signal intensity of all anatomic segments was as low as that of muscle, or inferior, in all patients younger than 3 months because of hematopoietic tissue and probably greater amounts of trabecular bone. The first anatomic segments of cranial bone to become hyperintense were the zygomatic bone and mandibular symphysis, followed by the presphenoid bone, basisphenoid, basiocciput, calvaria, and the petrous apex. After 3 years of age, most patients demonstrated pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus. We describe the most interesting changes in the developing spine, which occur in the first 2 years of life. The morphology of the vertebral bodies was evaluated. The variability of the signal and the morphology of the disks were also evaluated. Regional patterns of bone marrow signal intensity and age-related differences should not be misinterpreted as a pathologic condition. (orig.). With 14 figs., 2 tabs

  8. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fassio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself.

  9. Bone histomorphometric changes after liver transplantation for chronic cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, JD; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with advanced liver disease, especially chronic cholestasis, often have osteopenia, which worsens early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) before starting to recover. The changes in bone metabolism leading to this rapid loss of bone after OLT, and to its recovery,

  10. Improvement of Lumbar Bone Mass after Infliximab Therapy in Crohn’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Crohn’s disease (CD have a high risk of developing osteoporosis, but the mechanisms underlying bone mass loss are unclear. Elevated proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone resorption.

  11. Bone mineral density and vitamin D status in Parkinson's disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, F. van den; Speelman, A.D.; Nimwegen-Arrachart, M.L. van; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Backx, F.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.; Verhaar, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss is more common in Parkinson's disease (PD) than in the general population. Several factors may be involved in the development of bone loss, including malnutrition, immobilization, low body mass index, decreased muscle strength, vitamin D deficiency and medication use. This study

  12. Repair of rabbit radial bone defects using true bone ceramics combined with BMP-2-related peptide and type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingfeng; Lin Zhenyu; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Lan Shenghui; Liu Sunan; Yang Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    An ideal bone graft material is the one characterized with good biocompatibility, biodegradation, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. In this study, a novel synthetic BMP-2-related peptide (designated P24) corresponding to residues of the knuckle epitope of BMP-2 was introduced into a biomimetic scaffold based on sintered bovine bone or true bone ceramics (TBC) and type I collagen (TBC/collagen I) using a simulated body fluid (SBF). Hydroxylapatite crystal mineralization with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.63 was observed on the surface of P24/TBC/collagen I composite by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Cell adhesion rate evaluation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded on materials in vitro showed that the percentage of cells attached to P24/TBC/collagen I composite was significantly higher than that of the TBC/collagen I composite. A 10 mm unilateral segmental bone defect was created in the radius of New Zealand white rabbits and randomly implanted with three groups of biomaterials (Group A: P24/TBC/collagen I composite; Group B: TBC/collagen I composite and Group C: TBC alone). Based on radiographic evaluation and histological examination, the implants of P24/TBC/collagen I composite significantly stimulated bone growth, thereby confirming the enhanced rate of bone healing compared with that of TBC/collagen I composite and TBC alone. It was concluded that BMP-2-related peptide P24 could induce nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the surface of TBC/collagen I composite. The TBC/collagen I composite loaded with the synthetic BMP-2-related peptide is a promising scaffold biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  13. Omics analysis of human bone to identify genes and molecular networks regulating skeletal remodeling in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppe, Sjur; Datta, Harish K; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2017-08-01

    The skeleton is a metabolically active organ throughout life where specific bone cell activity and paracrine/endocrine factors regulate its morphogenesis and remodeling. In recent years, an increasing number of reports have used multi-omics technologies to characterize subsets of bone biological molecular networks. The skeleton is affected by primary and secondary disease, lifestyle and many drugs. Therefore, to obtain relevant and reliable data from well characterized patient and control cohorts are vital. Here we provide a brief overview of omics studies performed on human bone, of which our own studies performed on trans-iliacal bone biopsies from postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (OP) and healthy controls are among the first and largest. Most other studies have been performed on smaller groups of patients, undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis (OA) or fracture, and without healthy controls. The major findings emerging from the combined studies are: 1. Unstressed and stressed bone show profoundly different gene expression reflecting differences in bone turnover and remodeling and 2. Omics analyses comparing healthy/OP and control/OA cohorts reveal characteristic changes in transcriptomics, epigenomics (DNA methylation), proteomics and metabolomics. These studies, together with genome-wide association studies, in vitro observations and transgenic animal models have identified a number of genes and gene products that act via Wnt and other signaling systems and are highly associated to bone density and fracture. Future challenge is to understand the functional interactions between bone-related molecular networks and their significance in OP and OA pathogenesis, and also how the genomic architecture is affected in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlled release pharmaceutical composition useful for the treatment of diseases and conditions affecting metabolism and/or structural integrity of cartilage and/or bone in male comprises strontium salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    , hyperparathyroidism, periarticular erosions in rheumatoid arthritis, osteodystrophy, myositis ossificans, Bechterew's disease, osteolytic lesions produced by bone metastasis, bone pain due to bone metastasis, bone loss due to sex steroid hormone deficiency, bone abnormalities due to steroid hormone treatment, bone...

  15. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...... mechanisms, some estrogen-related disease processes might work in similar manners and result in association between the diseases. Indeed, the association between diseases need not be due only to estrogen-related factors, but due to similar disease processes from a variety of mechanisms....

  16. Adiposity and TV viewing are related to less bone accrual in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosje, Karen S; Khoury, Philip R; Claytor, Randal P; Copeland, Kristen A; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Daniels, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relation between baseline fat mass and gain in bone area and bone mass in preschoolers studied prospectively for 4 years, with a focus on the role of physical activity and TV viewing. Children were part of a longitudinal study in which measures of fat, lean and bone mass, height, weight, activity, and diet were taken every 4 months from ages 3 to 7 years. Activity was measured by accelerometer and TV viewing by parent checklist. We included 214 children with total body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic 4500A) scans at ages 3.5 and 7 years. Higher baseline fat mass was associated with smaller increases in bone area and bone mass over the next 3.5 years (P accounting for race, sex, and height. Activity by accelerometer was not associated with bone gains. Adiposity and TV viewing are related to less bone accrual in preschoolers.

  17. An expression relating breaking stress and density of trabecular bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajapakse, C.S.; Thomsen, J.S.; Ortiz, J.S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the principal diagnostic tool used in clinical settings to diagnose and monitor osteoporosis. Experimental studies on ex vivo bone samples from multiple skeletal locations have been used to propose that their breaking stress bears a power-law relationship to volumetric...

  18. Relative motion at the bone-prosthesis interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keja, M.; Wevers, H.W.; Siu, D.; Grootenboer, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    Bone ingrowth in porous surfaces of human joint implants is a desired condition for long-term fixation in patients who are physically active (such as in sport or work). It is generally recognized that little actual bone ingrowth occurs. The best clinical results report between 10 and 20% of the

  19. Elevated Levels of Peripheral Kynurenine Decrease Bone Strength in Rats with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlomiej Kalaska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD represent a clinical challenge. CKD leads to mineral and bone complications starting early in the course of renal failure. Recently, we have observed the positive relationship between intensified central kynurenine turnover and bone strength in rats with subtotal 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx-induced CKD. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between peripheral kynurenine pathway metabolites and bone strength in rats with 5/6 Nx-induced CKD. The animals were sacrificed 1 and 3 months after 5/6 Nx or sham operation. Nephrectomized rats presented higher concentrations of serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and parathyroid hormone both 1 and 3 months after nephrectomy. These animals revealed higher concentrations of kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine in the serum and higher gene expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR as a physiological receptor for kynurenine and AhR-dependent cytochrome in the bone tissue. Furthermore, nephrectomy significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in the bone without affecting their resorptive activity measured in serum. These changes were particularly evident in rats 1 month after 5/6 Nx. The main bone biomechanical parameters of the tibia were unchanged between nephrectomized and sham-operated rats but were significantly increased in older compared to younger animals. A similar trend was observed for geometrical parameters measured with calipers, bone mineral density based on Archimedes' method and image of bone microarchitecture obtained from micro-computed tomography analyses of tibial cortical bone. In nephrectomized animals, peripheral kynurenine levels correlated negatively with the main parameters of bone biomechanics, bone geometry, and bone mineral density values. In conclusion, our data suggest that CKD-induced elevated levels of peripheral kynurenine cause pathological changes in bone

  20. Doença óssea em Mieloma Múltiplo Bone disease in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania T. M. Hungria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available As principais manifestações clínicas do mieloma múltiplo estão relacionadas à destruição óssea. Esta doença óssea pode levar a fraturas patológicas, compressão da medula espinhal, hipercalcemia e dor, sendo uma das principais causas de morbidade e mortalidade. Estas complicações resultam do desequilíbrio da reabsorção e formação óssea, decorrente do aumento da atividade osteoclástica. Este aumento é mediado pela liberação de fatores ativadores dos osteoclastos, que são produzidos no microambiente da medula óssea por células tumorais e não tumorais. Os bisfosfonatos são inibidores específicos da atividade osteoclástica e são eficazes no tratamento da hipercalcemia associada às neoplasias malignas e podem reduzir o aparecimento de complicações esqueléticas. Estudos recentes identificaram novas moléculas como o receptor de ativação nuclear kappa B (RANK, seu ligante (RANKL, osteoprotegerina (OPG, e a proteína inflamatória dos macrófagos-1alfa, que estão envolvidas na ativação e diferenciação dos osteoclastos, enquanto que a proteína dikkopf-1 inibe a formação óssea osteoblástica. Estas novas moléculas parecem não só interferir na biologia da destruição óssea do mieloma, mas também com a sobrevida e crescimento tumoral, sendo novos alvos para o desenvolvimento de drogas antimieloma. Estudos recentes com anticorpo monoclonal anti-RANKL são promissores. O tratamento da doença óssea do mieloma múltiplo inclui principalmente o uso de bisfosfonatos, radioterapia e procedimentos cirúrgicos.The major clinical manifestation of multiple myeloma is related to osteolytic bone destruction. Bone disease can lead to pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hypercalcemia, and pain, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. These complications result from asynchronous bone turnover wherein increased osteoclastic bone resorption is not accompanied by a comparable increase in bone formation

  1. Age-related variations in the microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, M.; Odgaard, A.; Linde, F.

    2002-01-01

    -related changes in the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone. One hundred and sixty cylindrical cancellous bone specimens were produced from 40 normal proximal tibiae from 40 donors, aged 16-85 years. These specimens were micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanned......, and microstructural properties were determined. The specimens were then tested in compression to obtain Young's modulus. The degree of anisotropy, mean marrow space volume, and bone surface-to-volume ratio increased significantly with age. Bone volume fraction, mean trabecular volume, and bone surface density...

  2. Sacro-iliac joint disease in drug abusers: The role of bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Majano, V.; Miskew, D.B.W.; Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL

    1980-01-01

    Bone scintigrams demonstrated increased uptake in the sacroiliac joint in twenty drug addicts with low back pain and signs of localized sepsis. The localization of the disease was decisive for the orthopedist in the aspiration of the affected joint. (orig.)

  3. What is the optimal bone-preserving strategy for patients with Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul; Greenfield, Jerry R

    2015-08-01

    Addison's disease is associated with low bone mineral density and increased risk of hip fractures. Causes are multifactorial, contributed by underlying adrenocortical hormonal deficiency, associated autoimmune endocrinopathies, electrolyte disturbances and, in some patients, supraphysiologic glucocorticoid replacement. Recent realization of physiologic cortisol production rate has revised downwards glucocorticoid replacement dosages. Meanwhile, new research has emerged suggesting complex interplay between sodium and calcium homoeostasis under the influence of mineralocorticoid and parathyroid hormone that may impact bone health. As the prevalence of Addison's disease is rising, and osteoporosis and fractures are associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality, attention to bone preservation in Addison's disease is of clinical relevance and importance. We suggest an approach to bone health in Addison's disease integrating physiologic adrenocortical hormonal replacement with electrolyte and mineral homoeostasis optimization. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Influences of transplantation on metabolic bone diseases in dialysis patients. Measurement of bone density with multiple X-ray photodensitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Miho

    1994-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a grave complication in dialysis patients. In this study, we evaluated the effect of renal transplantation (Txp) on metabolic bone diseases in renal transplant recipients (RTR), by multiple scanning X-ray photodensitometry (MD/MS). In only about 10% of RTR, bone metabolism recovered following improvement of renal function 1-2 years after Txp. Most cases showed decreased ΣGS and μ' scores on the MD/MS 1-2 years after Txp. Then ΣGS and μ' gradually increased over a long period. In seven of ten RTR with long-term graft survival (10 years<), ΣGS and μ' scores were within normal limits and densitometry bone patterns were normal. In four of five cases that received ciclosporin and had undergone Txp more than five years before, densitometry bone patterns were normal. Treatment with high doses of steroids due to acute rejection caused a sharp decline of ΣGS and μ' scores. In FK506-medicated RTR, ΣGS and μ' scores 1-2 years after Txp were decreased. In a 21-year-old female patient who had undergone Txp as the age of 13-year-old, there was little bone growth and ΣGS and μ' scores were significantly decreased. (author)

  5. Association with replication between estrogen-related receptor gamma (ESRRgamma) polymorphisms and bone phenotypes in women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfassihi, Latifa; Giroux, Sylvie; Bureau, Alexandre; Laflamme, Nathalie; Cole, David Ec; Rousseau, François

    2010-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD), a highly heritable polygenic trait. Women are more prone than men to develop osteoporosis owing to a lower peak bone mass and accelerated bone loss at menopause. Lack of estrogen thus is a major risk factor for osteoporosis. In addition to having strong similarity to the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), the orphan nuclear estrogen-related receptor gamma (ESRRgamma) is widely expressed and shows overlap with ESR1 expression in tissues where estrogen has important physiologic functions. For these reasons, we have undertaken a study of ESRRgamma sequence variants in association with bone measurements [heel quantitative ultrasound (QUS) by measurements of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and stiffness index (SI) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS)]. A silent variant was found to be associated with multiple bone measurements (LS, BUA, SOS, and SI), the p values ranging from .006 to .04 in a sample of 5144 Quebec women. The region of this variant was analyzed using the HapMap database and the Gabriel method to define a block of 20 kb. Using the Tagger method, eight TagSNPs were identified and genotyped in a sample of 1335 women. Four of these SNPs capture the five major block haplotypes. One SNP (rs2818964) and one haplotype were significantly associated with multiple bone measures. All SNPs involved in the associations were analyzed in two other sample sets with significant results in the same direction. These results suggest involvement of ESRRgamma in the determination of bone density in women. Copyright 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Wnt and the Wnt signaling pathway in bone development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Yi-Ping; Paulson, Christie; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Xiaoling; Wu, Mengrui; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling affects both bone modeling, which occurs during development, and bone remodeling, which is a lifelong process involving tissue renewal. Wnt signals are especially known to affect the differentiation of osteoblasts. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, which is divided into two major branches: the canonical pathway and the noncanonical pathway. The canonical pathway is also called the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. There are two major noncanonical pathways: the Wnt-planar cell polarity pathway (Wnt-PCP pathway) and the Wnt-calcium pathway (Wnt-Ca2+ pathway). This review also discusses how Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists affect both the bone modeling and bone remodeling processes. We also review the role of Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists in bone as demonstrated in mouse models. Disrupted Wnt signaling is linked to several bone diseases, including osteoporosis, van Buchem disease, and sclerosteosis. Studying the mechanism of Wnt signaling and its interactions with other signaling pathways in bone will provide potential therapeutic targets to treat these bone diseases. PMID:24389191

  7. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Bone mineral density ( 125 I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups

  8. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  9. Surgery or radiotherapy for the treatment of bone hydatid disease: a retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengru Xie

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: This retrospective case series describes, for the first time, the clinical outcomes in a series of patients treated with radiotherapy for bone hydatid disease. Although no direct comparison between the treatment groups could be made due to methodological limitations of the study design, this study indicates that well-designed prospective randomized controlled clinical trials assessing radiotherapy may be warranted in patients with inoperable hydatid disease of the bones.

  10. Bone metabolism and RANKL/RANK/OPG trail in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czupkallo Lukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease of multifactorial etiology. In order for it to appear there must come to an imbalance between the effects of pathogens and host defense mechanisms. As a result of its course the destruction of structures supporting the teeth appears (periodontium, cement, bone, and consequently leads to teeth loosening and loss. In recent years, the participation of RANKL/RANK/OPG in bone remodeling process was highligted.

  11. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93 and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83 and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10. From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11. Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease.

  12. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease.

  13. Changes in Inflammatory and Bone Turnover Markers After Periodontal Disease Treatment in Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuora, Kenneth E; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Neubauer, Michael F; Gewelber, Civon L; Allenback, Gayle L; Shan, Guogen; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-06-01

    The underlying mechanisms for increased osteopenia and fracture rates in patients with diabetes are not well understood, but may relate to chronic systemic inflammation. We assessed the effect of treating periodontal disease (POD), a cause of chronic inflammation, on inflammatory and bone turnover markers in patients with diabetes. Using an investigator-administered questionnaire, we screened a cross-section of patients presenting for routine outpatient diabetes care. We recruited 22 subjects with POD. Inflammatory and bone turnover markers were measured at baseline and 3 months following POD treatment (scaling, root planing and subantimicrobial dose doxycycline). There were nonsignificant reductions in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (6.34-5.52mg/L, P = 0.626) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10.37-10.01pg/mL, P = 0.617). There were nonsignificant increases in urinary C-terminal telopeptide (85.50-90.23pg/mL, P = 0.684) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (7.45-8.79pg/mL, P = 0.074). Patients with >90% adherence with doxycycline were 6.4 times more likely to experience reduction in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P = 0.021) and 2.8 times more likely to experience reductions in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P = 0.133). Treatment of POD in patients with diabetes resulted in nonsignificant lowering of inflammatory markers and nonsignificant increase in bone turnover markers. However, adherence to doxycycline therapy resulted in better treatment effects. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endurance exercise and growth hormone improve bone formation in young and growth-retarded chronic kidney disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troib, Ariel; Guterman, Mayan; Rabkin, Ralph; Landau, Daniel; Segev, Yael

    2016-08-01

    Childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with both short stature and abnormal bone mineralization. Normal longitudinal growth depends on proper maturation of epiphyseal growth plate (EGP) chondrocytes, leading to the formation of trabecular bone in the primary ossification centre. We have recently shown that linear growth impairment in CKD is associated with impaired EGP growth hormone (GH) receptor signalling and that exercise improved insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signalling in CKD-related muscle atrophy. In this study, 20-day-old rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (CKD) or sham surgery (C) and were exercised with treadmill, with or without GH supplementation. CKD-related growth retardation was associated with a widened EGP hypertrophic zone. This was not fully corrected by exercise (except for tibial length). Exercise in CKD improved the expression of EGP key factors of endochondral ossification such as IGF-I, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteocalcin. Combining GH treatment with treadmill exercise for 2 weeks improved the decreased trabecular bone volume in CKD, as well as the expression of growth plate runt-related transcription factor 2, RANKL, metalloproteinase 13 and VEGF, while GH treatment alone could not do that. Treadmill exercise improves tibial bone linear growth, as well as growth plate local IGF-I. When combined with GH treatment, running exercise shows beneficial effects on trabecular bone formation, suggesting the potential benefit of this combination for CKD-related short stature and bone disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: SOST-related sclerosing bone dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... areas. Abnormal bone growth can pinch (compress) the cranial nerves , which emerge from the brain and extend to ... of the head and neck. Compression of the cranial nerves can lead to paralyzed facial muscles (facial nerve ...

  16. Pathogenesis of Bone Alterations in Gaucher Disease: The Role of Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Marcos Mucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher, the most prevalent lysosomal disorder, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to the accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage. Clinical alterations are visceral, hematological, and skeletal. Bone disorder in Gaucher disease produces defects on bone metabolism and structure and patients suffer from bone pain and crisis. Skeletal problems include osteopenia, osteoporosis, osteolytic lesions, and osteonecrosis. On the other hand a chronic stimulation of the immune system is a well-accepted hallmark in this disease. In this review we summarize the latest findings in the mechanisms leading to the bone pathology in Gaucher disease in relationship with the proinflammatory state.

  17. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjur Reppe

    Full Text Available Bone Mineral Density (BMD is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity.

  18. Randall Selitto pressure algometry for assessment of bone-related pain in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, S.; Ipsen, D. H.; Appel, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep pain is neglected compared with cutaneous sources. Pressure algometry has been validated in the clinic for assessment of bone-related pain in humans. In animal models of bone-related pain, we have validated the Randall Selitto behavioural test for assessment of acute and patholog...

  19. Vitamin K’s role in age-related bone loss: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protective role of vitamin K in age-related bone loss continues to be controversial. The results of observational analyses are inconsistent with respect to associations between vitamin K status and bone, which arguably may be related to the limitations of observational study designs and analyt...

  20. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  1. Age-related pattern of normal cranial bone marrow: MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Shinong; Li Qi; Li Wei; Chen Zhian; Wu Zhenhua; Guo Qiyong; Liu Yunhui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the age-related pattern of normal skull bone marrow with 3.0 T MR T 1 WI. Methods: Cranial MR T 1 WI images which were defined to be normal were retrospectively reviewed in 360 cases. Patients with known diffuse bone marrow disease, focal lesions, history of radiation treatment or steroid therapy were excluded, while patients whose cranial MRI and follow-up visits were all normal were included in this study. All the subjects were divided into 7 groups according to the age: 50 years group. Mid- and para- sagittal T 1 WI images were used to be analyzed and the type of cranial bone marrow was classified according to the thickness of diploe and the pattern of the signal characteristics. Statistical analysis was conducted to reveal the relationship between the age and the type. Results: The normal skull bone marrow could be divided into four types as follows: (1) Type-I: 115 cases, 47 of which appeared type- Ia and the mean thickness was (1.24±0.31) mm; 68 of which appeared type-Ib and the mean thickness was (1.76±0.37) mm. Type-II: 57 cases and the mean thickness was (2.78 ± 0.69) mm. Type-III: 148 cases, 18 of which appeared type-IIIa and the mean thickness was (2.33 ± 0.65) mm; 88 of which appeared type-IIIb and the mean thickness was (4.01± 0.86) mm; 42 of which appeared type-IIIc and the mean thickness was (4.31±0.73) mm. Type-IV: 40 cases, 25 of which appeared type-IVa and the mean thickness was (5.17±1.02) mm; 15 of which appeared type-IVb and the mean thickness was (5.85±1.45) mm. (2) 2 =266.36, P<0.01). Conclusion: There is characteristic in the distribution of normal skull bone marrow with age growing. And skull bone marrow transforms gradually from type-I to IV with aging. (authors)

  2. [Cathepsin K as a biomarker of bone involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobillo Lobato, Joaquín; Durán Parejo, Pilar; Núñez Vázquez, Ramiro J; Jiménez Jiménez, Luis M

    2015-10-05

    Gaucher disease is an inherited disorder caused by deficit of acid β-glucocerebrosidase, responsible for the degradation of glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Although the disorder is primarily hematologic, bone is the second most commonly affected structure. Cathepsin K (CATK) is an enzyme involved in bone remodelling process. It has been proposed that determination of its serum concentrations may provide additional information to other biomarkers. The study included 20 control subjects and 20 Gaucher type 1 patients from Andalusia and Extremadura regions. We analyzed the biomarkers of bone remodelling: the bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP), the N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), the β carboxyterminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx) and the CATK through electrochemiluminescence and immunoassay techniques. There is an increase in levels of CATK, CATK/P1NP and CATK/B-ALP ratios in type 1 Gaucher patients compared to the control group. Considering the existence of skeletal manifestations in the patient group, the CATK and CATK/P1NP ratio showed higher levels in patients with bone damage compared to those without it. Although imaging studies are the gold standard for monitoring bone disease in type 1 Gaucher patients, the utility of CATK should be considered as a possible indicator of bone damage in these patients. Furthermore, this parameter can be used in the monitoring of the treatment of bone pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Mota, J.; Alfonso, P.; Pocovi, M.; Giraldo, P.

    2007-01-01

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r 2 = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease

  4. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Mota, J. [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Medimagen, Barcelona (Spain); Alfonso, P. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Pocovi, M. [Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Zaragoza University (Spain); Giraldo, P. [Haematology Department, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: pgiraldo@salud.aragon.es

    2007-04-15

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r {sup 2} = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease.

  5. Osteomalacia in a patient with Paget's bone disease treated with long-term etidronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppé, E; Masson, C; Laffitte, A; Chappard, D; Audran, M

    2012-08-01

    A 93 year-old woman with Paget's disease of bone had been treated with etidronate without interruption during 20 years. The daily dose was usual (5mg/kg/day) but this prescription had never been stopped by her physicians. Two fractures had already occurred in pagetic (right tibia) and non pagetic bones (right fibula) within the last 2 years, and she presented rib fractures, another right tibia fracture and right femur fracture during hospitalization time. X-rays films showed major osteolysis of left ulna and right tibia. Blood samples and technetium bone scan brought no evidence for sarcoma or lytic evolution of the disease. A transiliac bone biopsy on non pagetic bone site confirmed the diagnosis of osteomalacia (increased osteoid parameters), with secondary hyperparathyroidism (hook resorption). In Paget's disease of bone, continuous treatment by etidronate may induce generalized osteomalacia, and increase the risk of fracture in both pagetic and non-pagetic bones. Whereas physicians and pharmaceutical industry try to improve the observance of those drugs, this striking observation also points out that a prescription always needs to be updated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Wei Zhang; Xian-Fu Sun; Ya-Ning He; Jun-Tao Li; Xu-Hui Guo; Hui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze breast cancer bone metastasis related gene-CXCR4. Methods: This research screened breast cancer bone metastasis related genes by high-flux gene chip. Results:It was found that the expressions of 396 genes were different including 165 up-regulations and 231 down-regulations. The expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was obviously up-regulated in the tissue with breast cancer bone metastasis. Compared with the tissue without bone metastasis, there was significant difference, which indicated that CXCR4 played a vital role in breast cancer bone metastasis. Conclusions: The bioinformatics analysis of CXCR4 can provide a certain basis for the occurrence and diagnosis of breast cancer bone metastasis, target gene therapy and evaluation of prognosis.

  7. An osteomalacia related to phosphate diabetes - bone scintigraphy with SPECT/CT contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyer, A.; Granier, P.; Mourad, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman, investigated for disabling pain of the left thigh, unrelated to any traumatic event. Interrogation had found diffuse pain of myalgia-type and arthralgia-type for approximately a year without local inflammatory signs and insufficiency fractures of both calcaneus two years before. The Technetium 99m -labeled hydroxy-methylene diphosphonate ( 99m Tc-H.D.P.) whole-body bone scintigraphy evidenced multiple hot spots on the higher third of left femur, rib cage, sternum, scapula, pelvis, right hip and both calcaneus. Moreover, a more diffuse and heterogeneous prominent uptake appeared on rib cage, spine and pelvis. These images suggested a diffuse metastatic disease of the skeleton. The single photon emission computerized tomography guided by computerized tomography (SPECT/CT), centered on lumbar spine, pelvis and the upper end of femurs showed that the multiple hot spots were in fact bone fractures. These findings pointed diagnosis to a metabolic disease. The clinical context was in favour of an osteomalacia. Further explorations showed an osteomalacia related to phosphate diabetes. A thorough work-up did not reveal any known aetiology. To date, idiopathic phosphate diabetes seems the most likely diagnosis. Nuclear medicine input in osteomalacia is discussed. (authors)

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuya, Tomoo; Inoue, Tomio; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Aoki, Jun; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    To clarify the contrast-enhancement pattern of the normal hematopoietic element by isolating the signal of the water fraction in vertebral bone marrow and to investigate whether this approach can be used to characterize bone marrow pathology in several diffuse bone marrow diseases. Two groups were examined: 30 normal healthy volunteers and 19 patients with primary diffuse bone marrow disease (aplastic anemia [n=8], myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) [n=5], chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML) [n=4], polycythemia vera [n=2]). Isolation of the signal of hematopoietic tissue was done by the chemical-shift misregistration effect. Twenty consecutive T1-weighted midsagittal lumber vertebral images were obtained immediately after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, and the pattern of the time-intensity curve, the peak contrast-enhancement (CE) ratio, and the washout rate (%/min) of bone marrow in normal volunteers were compared with those in patients suffering from primary diffuse bone marrow disease. The pattern of the time-intensity curve of patients with aplastic anemia showed a low peak value followed by a slow washout. However, the pattern of time-intensity curves in patients with MDS, CML, and polycythemia vera was similar to that of normal volunteers. The peak CE ratio of the water fraction in normal marrow ranged from 0.45 to 1.26 (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.87{+-}0.18). Patients with aplastic anemia showed an abnormally lower peak CE ratio of the water fraction (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.34{+-}0.19, p<0.0001). On the other hand, the peak CE ratio of the water fraction in patients with MDS was significantly higher than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D. 1.35{+-}0.39, p<0.05). In contrast, the peak CE ratio of patients with CML or polycythemia vera did not differ significantly from that of normal volunteers. The mean washout rate of patients with aplastic anemia was significantly lower than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D.: 3.50{+-}2.51 %/min

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuya, Tomoo; Inoue, Tomio; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Aoki, Jun; Endo, Keigo

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the contrast-enhancement pattern of the normal hematopoietic element by isolating the signal of the water fraction in vertebral bone marrow and to investigate whether this approach can be used to characterize bone marrow pathology in several diffuse bone marrow diseases. Two groups were examined: 30 normal healthy volunteers and 19 patients with primary diffuse bone marrow disease (aplastic anemia [n=8], myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) [n=5], chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML) [n=4], polycythemia vera [n=2]). Isolation of the signal of hematopoietic tissue was done by the chemical-shift misregistration effect. Twenty consecutive T1-weighted midsagittal lumber vertebral images were obtained immediately after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, and the pattern of the time-intensity curve, the peak contrast-enhancement (CE) ratio, and the washout rate (%/min) of bone marrow in normal volunteers were compared with those in patients suffering from primary diffuse bone marrow disease. The pattern of the time-intensity curve of patients with aplastic anemia showed a low peak value followed by a slow washout. However, the pattern of time-intensity curves in patients with MDS, CML, and polycythemia vera was similar to that of normal volunteers. The peak CE ratio of the water fraction in normal marrow ranged from 0.45 to 1.26 (mean ±S.D.: 0.87±0.18). Patients with aplastic anemia showed an abnormally lower peak CE ratio of the water fraction (mean ±S.D.: 0.34±0.19, p<0.0001). On the other hand, the peak CE ratio of the water fraction in patients with MDS was significantly higher than that of normal volunteers (mean ±S.D. 1.35±0.39, p<0.05). In contrast, the peak CE ratio of patients with CML or polycythemia vera did not differ significantly from that of normal volunteers. The mean washout rate of patients with aplastic anemia was significantly lower than that of normal volunteers (mean ±S.D.: 3.50±2.51 %/min vs. 7.13±1

  10. Low bone mass density is associated with hemolysis in brazilian patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Baldanzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether kidney disease and hemolysis are associated with bone mass density in a population of adult Brazilian patients with sickle cell disease. INTRODUCTION: Bone involvement is a frequent clinical manifestation of sickle cell disease, and it has multiple causes; however, there are few consistent clinical associations between bone involvement and sickle cell disease. METHODS: Patients over 20 years of age with sickle cell disease who were regularly followed at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Center of Campinas, Brazil, were sorted into three groups, including those with normal bone mass density, those with osteopenia, and those with osteoporosis, according to the World Health Organization criteria. The clinical data of the patients were compared using statistical analyses. RESULTS: In total, 65 patients were included in this study: 12 (18.5% with normal bone mass density, 37 (57% with osteopenia and 16 (24.5% with osteoporosis. Overall, 53 patients (81.5% had bone mass densities below normal standards. Osteopenia and osteoporosis patients had increased lactate dehydrogenase levels and reticulocyte counts compared to patients with normal bone mass density (p<0.05. Osteoporosis patients also had decreased hemoglobin levels (p<0.05. Hemolysis was significantly increased in patients with osteoporosis compared with patients with osteopenia, as indicated by increased lactate dehydrogenase levels and reticulocyte counts as well as decreased hemoglobin levels. Osteoporosis patients were older, with lower glomerular filtration rates than patients with osteopenia. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to gender, body mass index, serum creatinine levels, estimated creatinine clearance, or microalbuminuria. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of reduced bone mass density that was associated with hemolysis was found in this population, as indicated by the high lactate dehydrogenase levels, increased

  11. [Growth rate and bone maturation in celiac disease (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Sopena, M J; Calvo Romero, M C; Bedate Calderón, P; Alonso Franch, M; Sánchez Villares, E

    1978-05-01

    The growth and bone maturation of 43 celiac patients were analyzed. A significant correlation between gluten intake and growth rate was found. The authors suggest this is a good parameter to advise the best moment to make the control biopsie and the provocation test.

  12. A Case Report of Hydatid Disease in Long Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Fanian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst, caused by echinococcus granulosa, can produce tissue cyst everywhere in body. Skeletal cystic lesion is rare especially in long bones like tibia and because of its unusual presentation, its diagnosis may easily be missed, unless be kept in mind.

  13. Is there a role for scintigraphic imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease? A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; State Hospital Klagenfurt; Kohlfuerst, S.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Lind, P.; Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent inherited, lysosomal storage disease and is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase. Bone and bone marrow alterations are frequent in the most prevalent non-neuronopathic form of Gaucher disease. Imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease is performed by a variety of imaging methods, conventional X-ray and MRI as the most frequently and most important ones. However, different modalities of scintigraphic imaging have also been used. This article gives an overview on scintigraphic imaging with respect to bone manifestations in Gaucher disease discussing the advantages and limitations of scintigraphic imaging in comparison to other imaging methods. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of low bone mineral density in children and adolescents with celiac disease under treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Farias Almeida Motta

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Low bone mineral density may be a finding among children and adolescents with celiac disease, including those undergoing treatment with a gluten-free diet, but the data are contradictory. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bone mineral density abnormalities in patients on a gluten-free diet, considering age at diagnosis and duration of dietary treatment. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional prevalence study at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic of Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira. METHODS: Thirty-one patients over five years of age with celiac disease and on a gluten-free diet were enrolled. Bone mineral density (in g/cm² was measured in the lumbar spine and whole body using bone densitometry and categorized using the criteria of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry, i.e. low bone mineral density for chronological age < -2.0 Z-scores. Age at diagnosis and duration of dietary treatment were confirmed according to the date of starting the gluten-free diet. RESULTS: Low bone density for chronological age was present in 3/31 patients in the lumbar spine and 1/31 in the whole body (also with lumbar spine abnormality. At diagnosis, three patients with low bone mineral density for the chronological age were more than 7.6 years old. These patients had been on a gluten-free diet for six and seven months and 3.4 years. CONCLUSION: Pediatric patients with celiac disease on long-term treatment are at risk of low bone mineral density. Early diagnosis and long periods of gluten-free diet are directly implicated in bone density normalization.

  15. Alveolar bone loss and mineralization in the pig with experimental periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandee Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To address how experimental periodontal disease affects alveolar bone mass and mineral apposition in a young pig model. Materials and methods: Seven three-month-old pigs were periodically inoculated with 4 types of periodontal bacteria, along with a ligature around the last maxillary deciduous molar for 8 weeks to induce periodontal disease (PG. Eight same-aged pigs served as the control (CG. Segmentations of 3D cone-beam CT images were performed to quantify volumes of the total alveolar bone, alveolar ridge, and all roots of the target molar. Calcein and alizarin were administered for labeling mineral apposition before euthanasia. The harvested molar blocks were sectioned and examined under epifluorescence. The inter-label distance between the two vital markers at regional bone surfaces were measured and mineral apposition rate (MAR was calculated. Results: A significant reduction of total alveolar bone volume was seen in PG with the major loss at the alveolar ridge. MAR was significantly higher at the root furcation region than those at both buccal and palatal ridges in CG. Compared with CG, PG animals showed more interrupted labeled bands with significantly lower MAR at the furcation region. MARs were positively associated with both the volumes of total alveolar bone and ridge in CG, but only with the total alveolar bone in PG. Conclusions: In young growing pigs, mineral apposition is region specific. The experimental periodontal disease not only leads to alveolar bone loss, but also perturbs mineral apposition for new bone formation, thus impairing the homeostasis of alveolar bone remodeling. Keyword: Dentistry

  16. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  17. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  18. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  19. Positive Celiac Disease Serology and Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA testing is less specific.

  20. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis and Therapy of Bone and Joint Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    1999-01-01

    Concerning bone and joint diseases therapy of rheumatic synovitis (radiosynoviorthesis) was introduced in 1952 before clinically relevant diagnostic procedures were developed. Radionuclides of Sr and later on 99mTc phosphonates then started the wide use of bone scintigraphy since > 30 years. The diagnostic methods have an excellent sensitivity for detection of local abnormalities of bone metabolism, the specificity of such studies, however, is low. Modifications of the technique (3-phase-bone-scintigraphy, pinhole collimators, ROI-technique), increasing knowledge of pathological scan patterns and introduction of other radionuclide studies (67Ga, 201Tl, inflammation scans with 99mTc-leukocytes or 99mTc-HIG) as well as 18FDG-PET have increased the specificity significantly in recent years and improvements of imaging systems (SPECT) also increased the accuracy of diagnostic methods in diseases of bone and joints. Therapy of such diseases has made considerable progress: inflamed, swollen joints can effectively be treated with 90Y-, 186Re, 169Er-colloids or with 165Dy-particles by radiosynoviorthesis. Severe pain due to disseminated bone metastases of cancer or polyarthritis can be controlled by radionuclide therapy with 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re- or 188Re-HEDP and possibly 117mSn-DTPA with an acceptable risk of myelodepression. Possibilities, technical details and limitations of radionuclide applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes must be considered if optimal benefit for individual patients should be achieved. Overall Nuclear Medicine can become an essential element in management of bone and joint diseases. The relationship of Nuclear Medicine to bone and joint pathology is peculiar: In 1952 treatment of rheumatic synovitis by radiosynoviorthesis with 198Au Colloid was started by Fellinger and Schmid before diagnostic approaches to bone pathology existed. Bone scintigraphy was introduced only in 1961 using 85Sr but obviously the unfavourable radiation

  1. Echinococcal disease of the bone: An unusual cause of a pathological fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Goodier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is caused by the larva of the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multiloccularis and is endemic in many rural areas of Southern Africa. Echinococcosis of the bone is an unusual manifestation of echinococcal disease and a rare cause of a lytic lesion of bone. This report describes a 30-yr old female who presented with an Echinococcal cyst of the right radius complicated by a pathological fracture.

  2. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mikihito Kajiya; Gabriela Giro; Martin A. Taubman; Xiaozhe Han; Marcia P.A. Mayer; Toshihisa Kawai

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, ...

  3. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint

  4. Effect of celiac disease on growth and bone density.

    OpenAIRE

    Ondráčková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease of the small intestine caused by intolerance to gluten. The disease is characterized by impairment of intestinal mucosa, it is associated with malabsorption and maldigestion. The main symptoms are stomach pain, diarrhea, anemia, failure to thrive. Recently, the number of patients with atypical symptoms and a completely asymptomatic form of the disease increases. Prevalence of the disease in Europe is 1 %. The aim of this paper is to describe how ...

  5. Immediate Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection Accelerates Bone Loss Relative to Deferring Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoy, Jennifer F; Grund, Birgit; Roediger, Mollie P

    2017-01-01

    Both HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. Because the relative contributions of ART and untreated HIV to BMD loss are unclear, it is important to quantify the effect of ART on bone. We compared the effect ...

  6. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of radiation disease. Problems involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells still is one of the major means available for treatment of radiation injuries. The decisive indication is the diagnostic of irreversible damage to the hemopoietic stem cells, which becomes manifest about 5 or 6 days after exposure, by severe granulocytopenia and simultaneous, progressive thrombopenia. The radiation dose provoking such severe injury is estimated to be at least 9-10 Gy of homogeneous whole-body irradiation. Preparatory measures for transplantation include proof of tissue compatibility of donor and patient, sufficient immunosuppression prior to and/or after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. The donor's marrow should be free of T-cells. In spite of preparatory treatment, complications such as immunological reactions or disturbance of organ functions are to be very probable. These are treated according to therapy protocols. (orig./MG) [de

  7. An interesting case of peripheral vascular disease, vascular reperfusion, and subsequent development of pain due to Paget's disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwun, Sunna; Tucci, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    To present a case of Paget's disease of bone that was unmasked after vascular reperfusion. In this case study, we review the presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and management of a patient with Paget's disease and peripheral vascular disease. A 79-year-old-woman with a history of coronary artery heart disease and recent finding of a T5 compression fracture was hospitalized for evaluation of right lower extremity claudication. Angiography demonstrated a focal complete occlusion of the distal right femoral and popliteal arteries. A self-expanding stent was placed in the distal femoral and popliteal arteries. Approximately 48 hours after the procedure, the patient developed severe, right lower leg pain. On endocrine evaluation, the patient was found to have clinical signs suggesting Paget's disease of bone, which was subsequently confirmed by imaging. This patient's development of severe pain following reperfusion of distal femoral and popliteal arteries is in keeping with the known and aforementioned hypervascularity of pagetic bone. The finding of increased warmth over an area of skeletal deformation should always raise the possibility of Paget's disease of bone.

  8. [Advances in radiation oncology for metastatic bone disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Fric, Danièle; Kerr, Christine; Leysalle, Axel; Angellier, Gaelle; Dejean, Catherine; Tuillier, Titien; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Lagrange, Jean-Léon

    2013-11-01

    Irradiation of bone metastases primarily aims at alleviating pain, preventing fracture in the short term. The higher doses and more conformal dose distribution achievable while saving healthy tissue with new irradiation techniques have induced a paradigm shift in the management of bone metastases in a growing number of clinical situations. A search of the English and French literature was conducted using the keywords: bone metastases, radiotherapy, interventional radiology, vertebroplasty, radiofrequency, chemoembolization. RESULTS-DISCUSSION: Stereotactic irradiation yields pain relief rates greater than 90% in Phase I/II and retrospective studies. IMRT (static, rotational, helical) and stereotactic irradiation yield local control rates of 75-90% at 2 years. Some situations previously evaluated as palliative are currently treated more aggressively with optimized radiation sometimes combined modality interventional radiology. A recommendation can only be made for stereotactic irradiation in vertebral oligometastases or reirradiation. In the absence of a sufficient level of evidence, the increasing use of conformal irradiation techniques can only reflect the daily practice and the patient benefit while integrating economic logic care. The impact of these aggressive approaches on survival remains to be formally demonstrated by interventional prospective studies or observatories including quality of life items and minimal 2-year follow-up.

  9. Bone mass and vitamin D levels in Parkinson's disease: is there any difference between genders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Tonuk, Burak; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli; Tombak, Yasemin; Comoglu, Selcuk; Cakci, Aytul

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the bone mineral density, vitamin D level, and frequencies of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson's disease and to compare male and female patients with the controls separately. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred fifteen Parkinson's disease patients (47 males, 68 females; age range: 55-85 years) and 117 age- and gender-matched controls (47 males, 70 females) were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum D vitamin levels of each participant were recorded. [Results] The mean lumbar spine, femur neck, and total femur bone mineral density levels, T-scores, and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly lower in Parkinson's disease patients in both genders. Furthermore, osteoporosis rates were found be significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients compared with female controls. [Conclusion] Data from the present study revealed that while osteoporosis was significantly higher only in female Parkinson's disease patients, all Parkinson's disease patients had lower bone mineral density scores and vitamin D levels compared with the controls regardless of gender, suggesting that clinicians should pay attention to the osteoporosis risk in Parkinson's disease and that adequate preventive measures should be taken in order to limit the future risk due to osteoporotic fractures.

  10. A cognitive network for oracle bone characters related to animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, Andreas; Grünewald, Stefan; Zeng, Zhenbing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of oracle bone characters for animals from a “cognitive” point of view. After some general remarks on oracle-bone characters presented in Sec. 1 and a short outline of the paper in Sec. 2, we collect various oracle-bone characters for animals from published resources in Sec. 3. In the next section, we begin analyzing a group of 60 ancient animal characters from www.zdic.net, a highly acclaimed internet dictionary of Chinese characters that is strictly based on historical sources, and introduce five categories of specific features regarding their (graphical) structure that will be used in Sec. 5 to associate corresponding feature vectors to these characters. In Sec. 6, these feature vectors will be used to investigate their dissimilarity in terms of a family of parameterized distance measures. And in the last section, we apply the SplitsTree method as encoded in the NeighborNet algorithms to construct a corresponding family of dissimilarity-based networks with the intention of elucidating how the ancient Chinese might have perceived the “animal world” in the late bronze age and to demonstrate that these pictographs reflect an intuitive understanding of this world and its inherent structure that predates its classification in the oldest surviving Chinese encyclopedia from approximately the third century BC, the Er Ya, as well as similar classification systems in the West by one to two millennia. We also present an English dictionary of 70 oracle bone characters for animals in Appendix A. In Appendix B, we list various variants of animal characters that were published in the Jia Gu Wen Bian (cf. 甲骨文编, A Complete Collection of Oracle Bone Characters, edited by the Institute of Archaeology of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, published by the Zhonghua Book Company in 1965). We recall the frequencies of the 521 most frequent oracle bone characters in Appendix C as reported in [T. Chen, Yin-Shang Jiaguwen Zixing

  11. Femoral head vascularisation in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: comparison of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction MRI with bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamer, Sylvie; Dorgeret, Sophie; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Hassan, Max; Sebag, Guy H.; Khairouni, Abdeslam; Mazda, Keyvan; Bacheville, Eric; Pennecot, Georges F.; Bloch, Juliette

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. It has been reported that MRI using a dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction technique can allow the early identification of ischaemia and the pattern of revascularisation in Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease with increased spatial and contrast resolution. Therefore, dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction (DGS) MRI may be a possible non-ionising substitute for bone scintigraphy.Objective. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare DGS MRI and bone scintigraphy in the assessment of femoral head perfusion in LCP disease.Materials and methods. Twenty-six DGS MR images and bone scintigraphies of 25 hips in 23 children were obtained at different stages of LCP disease; three stage I, 12 stage II, six stage III and five stage IV (Waldenstroem classification). The extent of necrosis, epiphyseal revascularisation pathways (lateral pillar, medial pillar, and/or transphyseal perfusion) and metaphyseal changes were analysed.Results. Total agreement between both techniques was noted in the depiction of epiphyseal necrosis (kappa=1), and metaphyseal abnormalities (kappa=0.9). DGS MRI demonstrated better revascularisation in the lateral (kappa=0.62) and medial pillars (kappa=0.52). The presence of basal transphyseal reperfusion was more conspicuous with MRI.Conclusions. DGS MRI allows early detection of epiphyseal ischaemia and accurate analysis of the different revascularisation patterns. These changes are directly related to the prognosis of LCP disease and can aid therapeutic decision making. (orig.)

  12. A study of old lesions of caisson disease of bone by radiography and bone scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P J; Walder, D N

    1981-02-01

    A group of patients were studied 10 years after stopping work in a high-pressure environment. Radiographs of their long bones showed little change during the period, but only two of 12 scintigrams were normal. The 10 abnormal scintigrams contained 18 "hot-spots" which were not always associated with an abnormal radiographic appearance; the findings suggest that some lesions may never become visible on a radiograph. A reactive or repair process associated with these lesions may be prolonged and may not be beneficial, as structural failure of the joint may subsequently occur. Prognosis should therefore be guarded.

  13. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described.

  14. Diffuse bone marrow infiltration in neoplastic hematological disease. Comparison between MR imaging and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozawa, Eito; Sato, Youichi; Heshiki, Atsuko; Kayano, Shuuichi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between out-of-phase and in-phase imaging with pathologic data of patients with bone marrow invasion by tumor-like hematological disease. Twenty-three patients with hematological disease (malignant lymphoma [10], multiple myeloma [7], leukemia [2], myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS; 3], and myelofibrosis [1]) were studied. Fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequencing was performed to obtain out-of-phase and in-phase images with breath-holding at 110/2.3 and 4.7. Out-of-phase and in-phase imaging were measured over a region of interest (ROI) at spinal vertebra L3, and SIR (out of phase/in phase) was calculated. Results were confirmed by bone marrow aspiration or biopsy. Patients with hematological disease were divided into those with and without diffuse bone marrow infiltration. The statistical significance between these ratios in the two groups was assessed by unpaired t-test (p<0.01). The SIRs were 0.94±0.12 (mean±SD) for the group with diffuse bone marrow infiltration and 0.54±0.17 (mean±SD) for the group without (p<0.01). In-phase and out-of-phase imaging can be helpful in predicting the diffuse infiltration of bone marrow by hematological disease. (author)

  15. Long-term follow-up of children thought to have temporary brittle bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson CR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Colin R Paterson1, Elizabeth A Monk21Department of Medicine (retired, 2School of Accounting and Finance, University of Dundee, Dundee, ScotlandBackground: In addition to nonaccidental injury, a variety of bone disorders may underlie the finding of unexplained fractures in young children. One controversial postulated cause is temporary brittle bone disease, first described in 1990.Methods: Eighty-five patients with fractures showing clinical and radiological features of temporary brittle bone disease were the subject of judicial hearings to determine whether it was appropriate for them to return home. Sixty-three patients did, and follow-up information was available for 61 of these. The mean follow-up period was 6.9 years (range 1–17, median 6.Results: We found that none of the children had sustained any further injuries that were thought to represent nonaccidental injury; no child was re-removed from home. Three children had fractures. In each case there was general agreement that the fractures were accidental. Had the original fractures in these children been the result of nonaccidental injury, it would have been severe and repeated; the average number of fractures was 9.1.Conclusion: The fact that no subsequent suspicious injuries took place after return home is consistent with the view that the fractures were unlikely to have been caused by nonaccidental injury, and that temporary brittle bone disease is a distinctive and identifiable disorder.Keywords: fractures, osteogenesis imperfecta, temporary brittle bone disease, nonaccidental injury

  16. Bone strength estimates relative to vertical ground reaction force discriminates women runners with stress fracture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Kristin L; McDermott, William; Hughes, Julie M; Baxter, Stephanie A; Stovitz, Steven D; Petit, Moira A

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in bone geometry, estimates of bone strength, muscle size and bone strength relative to load, in women runners with and without a history of stress fracture. We recruited 32 competitive distance runners aged 18-35, with (SFX, n=16) or without (NSFX, n=16) a history of stress fracture for this case-control study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg/mm 3 ), total (ToA) and cortical (CtA) bone areas (mm 2 ), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index; BSI, mg/mm 4 ) at the distal tibia. ToA, CtA, cortical vBMD, and estimated strength (section modulus; Zp, mm 3 and strength strain index; SSIp, mm 3 ) were measured at six cortical sites along the tibia. Mean active peak vertical (pkZ) ground reaction forces (GRFs), assessed from a fatigue run on an instrumented treadmill, were used in conjunction with pQCT measurements to estimate bone strength relative to load (mm 2 /N∗kg -1 ) at all cortical sites. SSIp and Zp were 9-11% lower in the SFX group at mid-shaft of the tibia, while ToA and vBMD did not differ between groups at any measurement site. The SFX group had 11-17% lower bone strength relative to mean pkZ GRFs (phistory of stress fracture. Bone strength relative to load is also lower in this same region suggesting that strength deficits in the middle 1/3 of the tibia and altered gait biomechanics may predispose an individual to stress fracture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The relation between bone demineralization, physical activity and anthropometric standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Barbosa Camara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to verify the correlation between bone mineral density and the level of physical activity, as well as the food intake and the anthropometric parameters. It intended to analyse the bone mineral density (BMD of menopausal women through the bone densitometry test (DO in the lumbar region (L1 to L4, femoral neck and total femur, and also use Bouchard’s self-recall of daily activities; employing the food record from Buker and Stuart to dose and quantify the daily intake of calcium and vitamin D. The data were analysed via Kolmogorov-Smirnov’s test, and default value of α = 0.05 was set to compare the BMD averages. It was observed that one hundred percent of the assessed individuals had a BMD level below the average fixed by WHO: 14.4% with osteopenia and 85.6% with osteoporosis; a lower BMD in the femoral area (0.721g and the biggest loss among the sedentary ones (0.698g. It was noticed that there was a correlation between the physical activities and the BMD only when associated with anthropometric standards and the daily ingestion of vitamin D.

  18. Sporotrichosis with Bone Involvement: An Alert to an Occupational Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Carvalho Aguinaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic mycosis caused by a fungus of the genus Sporothrix, which is found in soil. It can be acquired by trauma to the skin. Bone and joint lesions are very rare. The city of Rio de Janeiro is undergoing an epidemic transmitted by cats, and this should be an alert for the risk to professionals in contact with these animals. The patient was a veterinarian who developed occupational sporotrichosis with osteoarticular involvement transmitted by a cat during a consultation.

  19. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  20. Key Triggers of Osteoclast-Related Diseases and Available Strategies for Targeted Therapies: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts, the only cells with bone resorption functions in vivo, maintain the balance of bone metabolism by cooperating with osteoblasts, which are responsible for bone formation. Excessive activity of osteoclasts causes many diseases such as osteoporosis, periprosthetic osteolysis, bone tumors, and Paget’s disease. In contrast, osteopetrosis results from osteoclast deficiency. Available strategies for combating over-activated osteoclasts and the subsequently induced diseases can be categorized into three approaches: facilitating osteoclast apoptosis, inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, and impairing bone resorption. Bisphosphonates are representative molecules that function by triggering osteoclast apoptosis. New drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL inhibitors (e.g., denosumab have been developed for targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B /RANKL/osteoprotegerin system or CSF-1/CSF-1R axis, which play critical roles in osteoclast formation. Furthermore, vacuolar (H+-ATPase inhibitors, cathepsin K inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide 2 impair different stages of the bone resorption process. Recently, significant achievements have been made in this field. The aim of this review is to provide an updated summary of the current progress in research involving osteoclast-related diseases and of the development of targeted inhibitors of osteoclast formation.

  1. Effect of antitumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy on bone turnover in patients with active Crohn's disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, B M; Russel, M G V M; Schurgers, L; Wichers, M; Sijbrandij, J; Stockbrugger, R W; Schoon, E

    2004-10-15

    Patients with Crohn's disease are at increased risk of osteoporosis. Disease activity and circulating proinflammatory cytokines are thought to play a role in this process. Infliximab, a chimaeric antitumour necrosis factor-alpha antibody is effective in the treatment of Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of treatment with infliximab on bone turnover in Crohn's disease patients. This was a prospective trial. Twenty-four patients with active Crohn's disease were treated with infliximab (5 mg/kg). Bone markers were assayed pre- and post-treatment. Bone formation was measured using serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and total osteocalcin and bone resorption using serum N-telopeptide cross-linked type 1 collagen. Infliximab therapy caused a significant increase in both markers of bone formation in patients with active Crohn's disease. No significant change in the bone resorption marker serum N-telopeptide cross-linked type 1 was found. Infliximab therapy had a significant beneficial effect on bone metabolism in patients with active Crohn's disease. These findings further support the theory that active ongoing inflammation and high levels of circulating cytokines play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bone loss in patients with Crohn's disease.

  2. A near infrared instrument to monitor relative hemoglobin concentrations of human bone tissue in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Khambatta, Faram; Vaithianathan, Tharshan; Thomas, John C.; Clark, Jillian M.; Marshall, Ruth

    2010-04-01

    A continuous wave near infrared instrument has been developed to monitor in vivo changes in the hemoglobin concentration of the trabecular compartment of human bone. The transmitter uses only two laser diodes of wavelengths 685 and 830 nm, and the receiver uses a single silicon photodiode operating in the photovoltaic mode. The functioning of the instrument and the depth of penetration of the near infrared signals was determined in vitro using tissue-equivalent phantoms. The instrument achieves a depth of penetration of approximately 2 cm for an optode separation of 4 cm and, therefore, has the capacity to interrogate the trabecular compartment of human bone. The functioning of the instrument was tested in vivo to evaluate the relative oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations of the proximal tibial bone of apparently healthy, normal weight, adult subjects in response to a 3 min on, 5 min off, vascular occlusion protocol. The traces of the relative Hb and HbO2 concentrations obtained were reproducible in controlled conditions. The instrument is relatively simple and flexible, and offers an inexpensive platform for further studies to obtain normative data for healthy cohorts, and to evaluate disease-specific performance characteristics for cohorts with vasculopathies of bone.

  3. Optimising diffusion weighted MRI for imaging metastatic and myeloma bone disease and assessing reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiou, C.; Collins, D.J.; Morgan, V.A.; DeSouza, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    To establish normal bone marrow values of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) over an age range, compare them with metastatic and myelomatous involvement, to establish reproducibility and to optimise b values. The ADCs of bone marrow in 7 volunteers (mean age 29.7 years), 34 volunteers (mean age 63.3 years) and 43 patients with metastatic and myelomatous involvement (mean age 65.5 years) were measured. In 9 volunteers diffusion weighted MRI was repeated within 7 days. b values were derived to optimise contrast between normal and pathological marrow. The mean ADC of bone marrow in younger volunteers was significantly higher than that of older volunteers. The coefficient of reproducibility was 14.8%. The ADC mean of metastatic and myeloma bone disease was 1054+/-456 x 10 -6 mm 2 s -1 . An ADC threshold of 655 x 10 -6 mm 2 s -1 separated normal and abnormal marrow with a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 93% respectively. Contrast between normal and abnormal marrow was optimal at b = 1389 smm -2 . The reproducibility of ADC measurements in bone is equivalent to published data for soft tissue with a high sensitivity and specificity for separating abnormal from age matched normal bone marrow. A b value of around 1,400 smm -2 is optimal for imaging bone marrow. (orig.)

  4. Optimising diffusion weighted MRI for imaging metastatic and myeloma bone disease and assessing reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiou, C. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden, NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden, NHS Foundation Trust, MRI Department, Surrey (United Kingdom); Collins, D.J.; Morgan, V.A.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden, NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    To establish normal bone marrow values of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) over an age range, compare them with metastatic and myelomatous involvement, to establish reproducibility and to optimise b values. The ADCs of bone marrow in 7 volunteers (mean age 29.7 years), 34 volunteers (mean age 63.3 years) and 43 patients with metastatic and myelomatous involvement (mean age 65.5 years) were measured. In 9 volunteers diffusion weighted MRI was repeated within 7 days. b values were derived to optimise contrast between normal and pathological marrow. The mean ADC of bone marrow in younger volunteers was significantly higher than that of older volunteers. The coefficient of reproducibility was 14.8%. The ADC mean of metastatic and myeloma bone disease was 1054+/-456 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}s{sup -1}. An ADC threshold of 655 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}s{sup -1} separated normal and abnormal marrow with a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 93% respectively. Contrast between normal and abnormal marrow was optimal at b = 1389 smm{sup -2}. The reproducibility of ADC measurements in bone is equivalent to published data for soft tissue with a high sensitivity and specificity for separating abnormal from age matched normal bone marrow. A b value of around 1,400 smm{sup -2} is optimal for imaging bone marrow. (orig.)

  5. Deconvolution analysis of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate kinetics in metabolic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knop, J.; Kroeger, E.; Stritzke, P.; Schneider, C.; Kruse, H.P.

    1981-02-01

    The kinetics of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) and /sup 47/Ca were studied in three patients with osteoporosis, three patients with hyperparathyroidism, and two patients with osteomalacia. The activities of sup(99m)Tc-MDP were recorded in the lumbar spine, paravertebral soft tissues, and in venous blood samples for 1 h after injection. The results were submitted to deconvolution analysis to determine regional bone accumulation rates. /sup 47/Ca kinetics were analysed by a linear two-compartment model quantitating short-term mineral exchange, exchangeable bone calcium, and calcium accretion. The sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation rates were small in osteoporosis, greater in hyperparathyroidism, and greatest in osteomalacia. No correlations were obtained between sup(99m)Tc-MDP bone accumulation rates and the results of /sup 47/Ca kinetics. However, there was a significant relationship between the level of serum alkaline phosphatase and bone accumulation rates (R = 0.71, P < 0.025). As a result deconvolution analysis of regional sup(99m)Tc-MDP kinetics in dynamic bone scans might be useful to quantitate osseous tracer accumulation in metabolic bone disease. The lack of correlation between the results of sup(99m)Tc-MDP kinetics and /sup 47/Ca kinetics might suggest a preferential binding of sup(99m)Tc-MDP to the organic matrix of the bone, as has been suggested by other authors on the basis of experimental and clinical investigations.

  6. Gaucher disease: MR evaluation of bone marrow features during treatment with enzyme replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Boerner, D.; Cohnen, M.; Jung, G.; Scherer, A.; Moedder, U.; Niederau, C.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) arrests and reverses the hematological and visceral symptoms of adult Gaucher disease, the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder. There are only a few studies available evaluating bone disease during ERT. The aim of this study was to investigate the features of bone marrow (bm) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients during ERT. Materials and Methods: MRI was performed prospectively in thirty adult type I Gaucher patients before and during ERT with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Spin-echo sequences (T 1 /T 2 ) of the lower extremities were obtained and the reconversion (response) or lack of reconversion (non-response) to fatty marrow during treatment was analyzed. The morphological features of bm involvement, a homogeneous or non-homogeneous distribution of bm changes and focal bone lesions surrounded by a rim of reduced signal intensity (SI), were analyzed. Results: Infiltration of bm by Gaucher cells is characterized by a reduction of Sl on both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted sequences. Bone marrow responses were seen in 19 patients (63%) during treatment. Focal bone lesions, surrounded by a rim of reduced Sl, did not respond to ERT and correlated with a non-homogenous distribution of bone involvement and splenectomy. (orig.) [de

  7. Kidney transplantation restored uncoupled bone turnover in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarazaki, Hiroo; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kido, Ryo; Nakajima, Ichiro; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Teraoka, Satoshi; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2012-07-01

    While kidney transplantation (KTx) reverses many disorders associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), patients who have received KTx often have chronic kidney disease and bone and mineral disorder (CKD-MBD). However, it is unknown how bone metabolism changes by KTx. Living donor-KTx recipients (n = 34) at Tokyo Women's Medical University were prospectively recruited and the levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and serum cross-linked N-telopeptides of Type 1 collagen (NTX) were measured before, 6 and 12 months after transplantation. Before KTx, serum BAP was within the reference range in more than half of patients while NTX was high in most patients. Serum NTX was higher in patients with longer dialysis durations compared to that with shorter durations before KTx. However, there was no difference in serum BAP between these patients. After KTx, BAP increased while NTX decreased along with the decline of PTH. In addition, the numbers of patients who showed high BAP and NTX were comparable after KTx. These results suggest that bone formation is suppressed and uncoupled with bone resorption in patients with ESRD and this uncoupling is restored by KTx. Further studies are necessary to clarify the mechanism of bone uncoupling in patients with ESRD.

  8. Upper airway obstruction and pulmonary abnormalities due to lymphoproliferative disease following bone marrow transplantation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, B.D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)]|[Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Heslop, H.E. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kaste, S.C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Bodner, S. [Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    1998-07-01

    We report three patients who developed severe supraglottic airway obstruction due to Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In addition to enlarged pharyngeal lymphoid tissue seen in all three patients, two had supraglottic airway narrowing and two developed pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease. They were treated with unmanipulated T cells or EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a radiologically detectable complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  9. [Synthetic human calcitonin in Paget's disease of bone and osteoporosis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, R; Vattimo, A

    1981-01-30

    Synthetic human calcitonin was used in the treatment of 26 patients over a period of 1-14 months. 17 patients had Paget's disease of the bone, 6 postmenopausal osteoporosis and 3 Sudeck's syndrome. Subjective improvement (reduction of pain, improvement of mobility) was found in 15 patients with Paget's disease, in 4 females with postmenopausal osteoporosis and in all 3 patients with Sudeck's syndrome. Radiographic improvement of bone changes developed only very slowly. These results were confirmed by diminution of the exchangeable calcium pool indicating reduction of rates of osseous degradation. Calcitonin tolerance was acceptable. Transitory nausea and occasional vomiting occurred in 3 patients.

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient......, with its associated increased fracture risk, vascular calcification, and accelerated mortality fracture risk. Peritoneal dialysis, however, bears a lower risk than hemodialysis (HD). The approach to CKD-MBD prophylaxis and treatment in the elderly PD patient is similar to other CKD patients, with some...

  11. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  12. Usefulness of bone marrow magnetic resonance imaging and indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy in patients with various hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Umekawa, Tsunekazu; Chikayama, Satoshi [Osaka General Hospital of West Japan Railway Compapy (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and indium-111 chloride (In-111) scintigraphy to assess bone marrow in various hematological lesions. The subjects were 7 with aplastic anemia (AA), 4 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 3 with polycythemia (PC), 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 2 with multiple myeloma (MM), 2 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 3 with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), one with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and one with secondary anemia due to chronic inflammation (SA). Bone marrow cellularity was assessed on MR images and both uptake and tissue distribution were assessed on In-111 scintigraphy. Hypo-cellularity was seen in all AA patients, but not seen in any other patient in each group. On the other hand, hyper-cellularity was seen in 3 MDS, one PC, all 3 ET, one ALL, and one SA patients. In the group of MM, the vertebral body was seen as heterogenous signal intensity on MR images. Bone marrow was seen as iso-intensity in one MDS, 2 PC, all 2 MGUS, and all 3 ITP patients. In-111 scintigraphy showed decrease or disappearance of tracer uptake and decreased tissue distribution in all 7 AA, one MDS, one PC, and one ALL patients. Increased tracer uptake and enlarged tissue distribution were seen in one MDS, one PC, and one SA patients. One MDS, one ET, all 2 MM, all 2 MGUS, all 3 ITP patients had tracer uptake and tissue distribution that were equal to those in the normal tissues. Since MR imaging and In-111 scintigraphy provided qualitatively different information, the combination of both modalities would contribute to the understanding of bone marrow condition in hematopoietic diseases. (N.K.).

  13. Assessment of Bone Health in Patients With Type 1 Gaucher Disease Using Impact Microindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sabina; Pérez-López, Jordi; Moltó-Abad, Marc; Güerri-Fernández, Roberto; Cabezudo, Elena; Novelli, Silvana; Esteve, Jordi; Hernández, Albert; Roig, Inmaculada; Solanich, Xavier; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Nogués, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2017-07-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), one of the most common lysosomal disorders (a global population incidence of 1:50,000), is characterized by beta-glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Some studies have demonstrated bone infiltration in up to 80% of patients, even if asymptomatic. Bone disorder remains the main cause of morbidity in these patients, along with osteoporosis, avascular necrosis, and bone infarcts. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been shown to improve these symptoms. This cross-sectional study included patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) selected from the Catalan Study Group on GD. Clinical data were collected and a general laboratory workup was performed. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the lumbar spine and hip using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Patients with bone infarcts or any other focal lesion in the area of indentation visible on imaging were excluded. Bone Material Strength index (BMSi) was measured by bone impact microindentation using an Osteoprobe instrument. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models were fitted to adjust for age, sex, weight, and height. Sixteen patients with GD1 and 29 age- and sex-matched controls were included. GD1 was associated with significantly lower BMSi (adjusted beta -9.30; 95% CI, -15.18 to -3.42; p = 0.004) and reduced lumbar BMD (adjusted beta -0.14; 95% CI, -0.22 to -0.06; p = 0.002) and total hip BMD (adjusted beta -0.09; 95% CI, -0.15 to -0.03; p = 0.006), compared to GD1-free controls. Chitotriosidase levels were negatively correlated with BMSi (linear R 2  = 51.6%, p = 0.004). Bone tissue mechanical characteristics were deteriorated in patients with GD1. BMSi was correlated with chitotriosidase, the marker of GD activity. Bone disorder requires special consideration in this group of patients, and microindentation could be an appropriate tool for assessing and managing their bone health. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone

  14. [Effects of the combined calcitonin and sodium etidronate therapy in Paget's disease of bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, R; Turchetti, V; Righi, G; Vattimo, A

    1982-03-03

    The therapy of Paget's bone disease is essentially based on the use of calcitonin and diphosphonates: both drugs, if used in large doses for long periods, have shown themselves able to provoke particular side-effects. It was, therefore, decided to study the therapeutic efficacy of combined low-dosage treatment using synthetic salmon calcitonin and sodium-etidronate on a group of patients with Paget's osteodystrophy. A clear evident diminution in plasma alkaline phosphatase, hydroxyprolinuria and whole body retention (WBR) of MDP-Tc99m was observed, demonstrating a reduction of metabolic turnover in the bone. No changes in the bone mass (BMC), evaluated by bone mineral detector, were observed at the end of treatment. With this treatment the plateau effect was shown to be appreciably less than normally occurs when either calcitonin or sodium etidronate are used alone.

  15. Compromised cortical bone compartment in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with microvascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram Vinod; Hansen, Stinus; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased fracture risk despite a normal or elevated bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this cross-sectional in vivo study was to assess parameters of peripheral bone microarchitecture, estimated bone strength and bone...... remodeling in T2D patients with and without diabetic microvascular disease (MVD+ and MVD- respectively) and to compare them with healthy controls. METHODS: Fifty-one T2D patients (MVD+ group: n=25) were recruited from Funen Diabetic Database and matched for age, sex and height with 51 healthy subjects. High...... deficits are not a characteristic of all T2D patients but of a subgroup characterized by the presence of microvascular complications. Whether this influences fracture rates in these patients needs further investigation....

  16. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  17. The use of bone scintigraphy to detect active Hansen's disease in mutilated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, F.J.H.N. [Seccao de Medicina Nuclear do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, USP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Instituto de Biociencias, UNESP, Botucato (Brazil); Foss, N.T.; Ferriolli, E. [Departamento de Clinica Medica da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, USP (Brazil); Pagnano, C. [Secretaria da Saude, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Miranda, J.R.A.; De Moraes, R. [Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Instituto de Biociencias, UNESP, Botucato (Brazil)

    1999-11-01

    Mutilation of extremities was very frequent in patients affected by leprosy in the past; although it is now much less common, it is still seen, mainly in patients with long-term disease. In general, mutilation of the nose and ears is caused by the bacillus and mutilation of the hands and feet a consequence of chronic trauma. Leprosy must be chronically treated and any decision to interrupt therapy is based on laboratory tests and biopsy. Scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure which could be of great value in to determining disease activity. We studied eight patients (five males and three females, aged 64-73 years) who presented with mutilation of the nose (2), ear (1), feet (3) or foot and hand (2). Conventional three-phase bone scintigraphy (750 MBq) and X-ray examinations of the affected areas were performed in all patients. Bone scintigraphy was abnormal in four patients (the presence of bacilli was confirmed by biopsy in two of them), and normal in the other four. In all patients except for the one with ear mutilation, radiography only showed the absence of bone. We conclude that bone scintigraphy is very useful to determine disease activity in cases of mutilation caused by leprosy. It seems to be superior to conventional radiography and may enable bone biopsies to be avoided. (orig.)

  18. The use of bone scintigraphy to detect active Hansen's disease in mutilated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, F.J.H.N.; Foss, N.T.; Ferriolli, E.; Pagnano, C.; Miranda, J.R.A.; De Moraes, R.

    1999-01-01

    Mutilation of extremities was very frequent in patients affected by leprosy in the past; although it is now much less common, it is still seen, mainly in patients with long-term disease. In general, mutilation of the nose and ears is caused by the bacillus and mutilation of the hands and feet a consequence of chronic trauma. Leprosy must be chronically treated and any decision to interrupt therapy is based on laboratory tests and biopsy. Scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure which could be of great value in to determining disease activity. We studied eight patients (five males and three females, aged 64-73 years) who presented with mutilation of the nose (2), ear (1), feet (3) or foot and hand (2). Conventional three-phase bone scintigraphy (750 MBq) and X-ray examinations of the affected areas were performed in all patients. Bone scintigraphy was abnormal in four patients (the presence of bacilli was confirmed by biopsy in two of them), and normal in the other four. In all patients except for the one with ear mutilation, radiography only showed the absence of bone. We conclude that bone scintigraphy is very useful to determine disease activity in cases of mutilation caused by leprosy. It seems to be superior to conventional radiography and may enable bone biopsies to be avoided. (orig.)

  19. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  20. [Sleep disorder and lifestyle-related disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Rei; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorder is associated with the lifestyle-related diseases including obesity, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ by producing bioactive secretory proteins, also known as adipokines, that can directly act on nearby or remote organs. Recently, the associations between these adipokines and sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea have been reported. In this review, we focus on the relationship between sleep disorder and lifestyle-related diseases.

  1. Normal cranial bone marrow MR imaging pattern with age-related ADC value distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Pan Shinong; Yin Yuming; Li Wei; Chen Zhian; Liu Yunhui; Wu Zhenhua; Guo Qiyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine MRI appearances of normal age-related cranial bone marrow and the relationship between MRI patterns and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Five hundred subjects were divided into seven groups based on ages. Cranial bone marrow MRI patterns were performed based on different thickness of the diploe and signal intensity distribution characteristics. ADC values of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal bones on DWI were measured and calculated. Correlations between ages and ADC values, between patterns and ADC values, as well as the distribution of ADC values were analyzed. Results: Normal cranial bone marrow was divided into four types and six subtypes, Type I, II, III and IV, which had positive correlation with age increasing (χ 2 = 266.36, P 0.05). In addition, there was significant negative correlation between the ADC values and MRI patterns in the normal parietal and occipital bones (r = -0.691 and -0.750, P < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of MRI features and ADC values changes in different cranial bones showed significant correlation with age increasing. Familiar with the MRI appearance of the normal bone marrow conversion pattern in different age group and their ADC value will aid the diagnosis and differential of the cranial bone pathology.

  2. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with low bone mass in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seong-Su; Lee, Young-Sil; Kim, Sung Woo

    2012-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease associated with insulin resistant states such as central obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also increased in such conditions. However, little is known about whether osteoporosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are etiologically related to each other or not. We examined whether bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with NAFLD in pre- and postmenopausal women. Four hundred eighty-one female subjects (216 premenopausal and 265 postmenopausal) were enrolled. Lumbar BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Liver ultrasonography was done to check the severity of fatty liver. We excluded subjects with a secondary cause of liver disease. Blood pressure, lipid profile, fasting plasma glucose, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, and body mass index were measured in every subject. Mean lumbar BMD was lower in subjects with NAFLD than those without NAFLD in postmenopausal women (0.98 ± 0.01 vs. 1.01 ± 0.02 g/cm², P = 0.046). Multiple correlation analysis revealed a significant association between mean lumbar BMD and NAFLD in postmenopausal subjects after adjusting for age, body mass index, ALT, smoking status, and alcohol consumption (β coefficient -0.066, 95% CI -0.105 to -0.027, P = 0.001). Even after adjusting the presence of metabolic syndrome, the significance was maintained (β coefficient -0.043, 95% CI -0.082 to -0.004, P = 0.031). Lumbar BMD is related with NAFLD in postmenopausal females. We suggest that postmenopausal women with NAFLD may have a higher risk of osteoporosis than those without.

  3. Suspected fetal skeletal malformations or bone diseases: how to explore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassart, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous and complex group of conditions that affect bone growth and development and result in various anomalies in shape and size of the skeleton. Although US has proved reliable for the prenatal detection of skeletal abnormalities, the precise diagnosis of a dysplasia is often difficult to make before birth (especially in the absence of a familial history) due to their various phenotypic presentations, the variability in the time at which they manifest and often, the lack of precise molecular diagnosis. In addition to the accuracy of the antenatal diagnosis, it is very important to establish a prognosis. This is a clinically relevant issue as skeletal dysplasias may be associated with severe disability and may even be lethal. We will therefore describe the respective role of two-dimensional (2-D) US, three-dimensional (3-D) US and CT in the antenatal assessment of skeletal malformations. (orig.)

  4. [The role of Smads and related transcription factors in the signal transduction of bone morphogenetic protein inducing bone formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Dai, Ke-rong; Tang, Ting-ting

    2003-09-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of the signal transduction of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) inducing bone formation and to provide theoretical basis for basic and applying research of BMPs. We looked up the literature of the role of Smads and related transcription factors in the signal transduction of BMPs inducing bone formation. The signal transduction processes of BMPs included: 1. BMPs combined with type II and type I receptors; 2. the type I receptor phosphorylated Smads; and 3. Smads entered the cell nucleus, interacted with transcription factors and influenced the transcription of related proteins. Smads could be divided into receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads: Smad1, Smad2, Smad3, Smad5, Smad8 and Smad9), common-mediator Smad (co-Smad: Smad4), and inhibitory Smads (I-Smads: Smad6 and Smad7). Smad1, Smad5, Smad8, and probable Smad9 were involved in the signal transduction of BMPs. Multiple kinases, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt serine/threonine kinase were related to Smads signal transduction. Smad1 and Smad5 related with transcription factors included core binding factor A1 (CBFA1), smad-interacting protein 1 (SIP1), ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (OAZ), activating protein-1 (AP-1), xenopus ventralizing homeobox protein-2 (Xvent-2), sandostatin (Ski), antiproliferative proteins (Tob), and homeodomain-containing transcriptian factor-8 (Hoxc-8), et al. CBFA1 could interact with Smad1, Smad2, Smad3, and Smad5, so it was involved in TGF-beta and BMP-2 signal transduction, and played an important role in the bone formation. Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) was thought to be caused by heterozygous mutations in CBFA1. The CBFA1 knockout mice showed no osteogenesis and had maturational disturbance of chondrocytes. Smads and related transcription factors, especially Smad1, Smad5, Smad8 and CBFA1, play an important role in the signal transduction of BMPs inducing bone

  5. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement

  6. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  7. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dussen, Laura; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dijkgraaf, Marcel Gw; Hollak, Carla Em

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on

  8. Bone marrow morphology and disease progression in congenital thrombocytopenia: a detailed clinicopathologic and genetic study of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hamilton C; Bussel, James B; Mathew, Susan; Liu, Yen-Chun; Imahiyerobo, Allison A; Orazi, Attilio; Geyer, Julia T

    2017-04-01

    Patients with congenital thrombocytopenia have an increased risk of developing myeloid neoplasms. In these cases, the morphologic distinction between disease at baseline and at progression is challenging. This report analyzes clinicopathologic features of congenital thrombocytopenia with long-term follow-up at one referral center. Records from the last 20 years were searched for cases of congenital thrombocytopenia with bone marrow biopsies and peripheral blood smears. The clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features were analyzed. Six adult and two pediatric patients were identified (six male, two female). Age range at first biopsy was 1-47 (median, 31) years. Underlying diseases included thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome, congenital thrombocytopenia with radial-ulnar synostosis, MYH9-related disorder, shortened telomere syndrome, congenital thrombocytopenia with ANKRD26 mutation, and familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. Four patients had myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm-like marrow changes such as hypercellularity, increased myeloid to erythroid ratio, numerous micromegakaryocytes (highlighted by CD42b), and marrow fibrosis. Two patients had marrow hypoplasia and two had unremarkable marrow morphology. Three patients-all in the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm-like group-developed disease progression characterized by erythroid and myeloid dysplasia, elevated bone marrow blasts, and new cytogenetic abnormalities. Unlike non-familial myeloid neoplasms, congenital thrombocytopenia patients in the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm-like group had a long and indolent clinical course (average age at disease progression, 47 years). In summary, three distinct morphologic types of congenital thrombocytopenia were identified: a hyperplastic myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm-like group, a hypoplastic bone marrow failure-like group, and a group with relatively normal marrow

  9. Hypercalcaemia due to immobilization of a patient with Paget's disease of bone.

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan, A. W.; Ludlam, H. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dandona, P.

    1982-01-01

    A man with Paget's disease of bone was admitted with a fractured neck of femur. On admission he was normocalcaemic, but with immobilization he rapidly became hypercalcaemic, despite a normal diet and no medication. The hypercalcaemia responded to calcitonin. Although hypercalcaemia is often quoted as complicating the immobilization of such patients, well documented uncomplicated cases have rarely been reported.

  10. Genetic sharing with cardiovascular disease risk factors and diabetes reveals novel bone mineral density loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Reppe (Sjur); Y. Wang (Yunpeng); W.K. Thompson (Wesley K.); L.K. McEvoy (Linda K.); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); V. Zuber (Verena); M. Leblanc (Marissa); F. Bettella (Francesco); I.G. Mills (Ian G.); R.S. Desikan (Rahul S.); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); K.M. Gautvik (Kaare); A.M. Dale (Anders); O.A. Andreassen (Ole); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Y.-H. Hsu (Yi-Hsiang); E.L. Duncan (Emma); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); L. Oei (Ling); O.M.E. Albagha (Omar M.); N. Amin (Najaf); J.P. Kemp (John); D.L. Koller (Daniel); G. Li (Guo); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); R.L. Minster (Ryan); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); D. Willner (Dana); S.-M. Xiao (Su-Mei); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); H.-F. Zheng (Hou-Feng); N. Alonso (Nerea); J. Eriksson (Joel); C.M. Kammerer (Candace); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); P.J. Leo (Paul); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.G. Wilson (Scott); J.F. Wilson (James F); V. Aalto (Ville); M. Alen (Markku); A.K. Aragaki (Aaron); T. Aspelund (Thor); J.R. Center (Jacqueline); Z. Dailiana (Zoe); C. Duggan; M. Garcia (Melissa); N. Garcia-Giralt (Natàlia); S. Giroux (Sylvie); G. Hallmans (Göran); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); L.B. Husted (Lise Bjerre); K. Jameson (Karen); R. Khusainova (Rita); G.S. Kim (Ghi Su); C. Kooperberg (Charles); T. Koromila (Theodora); M. Kruk (Marcin); M. Laaksonen (Marika); A.Z. Lacroix (Andrea Z.); S.H. Lee (Seung Hun); P.C. Leung (Ping C.); J.R. Lewis (Joshua); L. Masi (Laura); S. Mencej-Bedrac (Simona); T.V. Nguyen (Tuan); X. Nogues (Xavier); M.S. Patel (Millan); J. Prezelj (Janez); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Scollen (Serena); K. Siggeirsdottir (Kristin); G.D. Smith; O. Svensson (Olle); S. Trompet (Stella); O. Trummer (Olivia); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); J. Woo (Jean); K. Zhu (Kun); S. Balcells (Susana); M.L. Brandi; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Cheng (Sulin); C. Christiansen; C. Cooper (Charles); G.V. Dedoussis (George); I. Ford (Ian); M. Frost (Morten); D. Goltzman (David); J. González-Macías (Jesús); M. Kähönen (Mika); M. Karlsson (Magnus); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.-M. Koh (Jung-Min); P. Kollia (Panagoula); B.L. Langdahl (Bente); W.D. Leslie (William D.); P. Lips (Paul); O. Ljunggren (Östen); R. Lorenc (Roman); J. Marc (Janja); D. Mellström (Dan); B. Obermayer-Pietsch (Barbara); D. Olmos (David); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); D.M. Reid (David); J.A. Riancho (José); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); N.L.S. Tang (Nelson L.S.); R. Urreizti (Roser); W. Van Hul (Wim); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.T. Zarrabeitia (María); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); E. Grundberg (Elin); L. Herrera (Lizbeth); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Johannsdottir (Hrefna); T. Kwan (Tony); R. Li (Rui); R.N. Luben (Robert); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); S.T. Palsson (Stefan Th); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); D.J. Verlaan (Dominique); F.M. Williams (Frances); A.R. Wood (Andrew); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J.A. Cauley (Jane); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); G.R. Clark (Graeme); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); P. Danoy (Patrick); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); R. Eastell (Richard); J.A. Eisman (John); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); G. Jones (Graeme); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); K.T. Khaw; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Liu (YongMei); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); E. McCloskey (Eugene); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K. Nandakumar (Kannabiran); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); R.L. Prince (Richard); O. Raitakari (Olli); I.R. Reid (Ian); J. Robbins (John); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); P.C. Sham (Pak Chung); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); F.A. Tylavsky (Frances); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); M.J. Econs (Michael); D.M. Evans (David); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.W.C. Kung (Annie Wai Chee); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J. Reeve (Jonathan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Ohlsson (Claes); D. Karasik (David); J.B. Richards (Brent); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John P.A.); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown.

  11. Bone Marrow Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Bone Marrow Transplantation ... transplant - slideshow Graft-versus-host disease Related Health Topics Bone Marrow Diseases Stem Cells National Institutes of ...

  12. Unbiased Stereologic Estimation of the Spatial Distribution of Paget’s Disease in the Human Temporal Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2014-01-01

    remodeling around the inner ear space and to compare it with that of otosclerosis in a contemporary context of temporal bone dynamics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From the temporal bone collection of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 15 of 29 temporal bones with Paget's disease were selected to obtain...... an independent sample. All volume distributions were obtained along the normal axis of capsular bone remodeling activity by the use of vector-based stereology. RESULTS: Pagetic bone remodeling was distributed centrifugally around the inner ear space at the individual and the general level. This pattern...

  13. Acute bone crises in sickle cell disease: the T1 fat-saturated sequence in differentiation of acute bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.; Sawhney, S.; Rizvi, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To prove the hypothesis that acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells (RBCs) in bone marrow, and to evaluate the unenhanced T1 fat-saturated (fs) sequence in the differentiation of acute bone infarction from acute osteomyelitis in patients with sickle-cell disease. Materials and methods: Two studies were undertaken: an experimental study using in-vitro packed red blood cells and normal volunteers, and a retrospective clinical study of 86 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. For the experimental study containers of packed RBCs were placed between the knees of four healthy volunteers with a saline bag under the containers as an additional control, and were scanned with the pre-contrast T1-fs sequence. Signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained for packed RBCs:skeletal muscle and packed RBCs:saline. For the clinical study, the SIs of normal bone marrow, packed RBCs, bone and/or soft-tissue lesions, and normal skeletal muscle of 74 patients (86 MRI studies) were measured using unenhanced, T1 fat-saturated MRI. The ratios of the above SIs to normal skeletal muscle were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one of 86 MRI studies were included in the final analysis. The ratios of SIs for normal bone marrow, packed red cells, bone infarction, acute osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue lesions associated with bone infarct, compared with normal skeletal muscle were (mean ± SD) 0.9 ± 0.2, 2.1 ± 0.7, 1.7 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.3, and 2.2 ± 0.7, respectively. The difference in the ratio of SIs of bone infarcts and osteomyelitis was significant (p = 0.003). The final diagnoses were bone infarction (n = 50), acute osteomyelitis (n = 1), and co-existent bone infarction and osteomyelitis (n = 2). Seven patients who had suspected osteomyelitis underwent image-guided aspiration. Conclusion: Acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells in the bone marrow. The

  14. Age-related new bone formation following the use of cancellous bone-block allografts for reconstruction of atrophic alveolar ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Joseph; Kolerman, Roni; Chaushu, Liat; Vered, Marilena; Naishlos, Sarit; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2018-02-01

    An age-related decrease in the number of osteogenic progenitor cells may compromise bone augmentation. Histomorphometrical assessment of age-related new bone formation, following atrophic alveolar ridge reconstruction, using cancellous bone-block allografts. Ninety-three consecutive patients (58 females and 35 males) were referred for implant-supported restoration of 122 severe atrophic alveolar ridges. Alveolar ridge deficiency locations were classified as anterior maxilla (n = 58), posterior maxilla (n= 32), and posterior mandible (n = 32). A bony deficiency of at least 3 mm horizontally and up to 3 mm vertically according to computerized tomography (CT) in the posterior mandible and anterior maxilla, served as inclusion criteria. In the posterior maxilla, a residual alveolar ridge up to 4 mm vertically according to CT served as inclusion criteria. Augmentation was performed by the use of cancellous bone-block allografts. Bone biopsies (9-month posterior maxilla, 4 months anterior maxilla and posterior mandible) of young (≤40 years) versus older (>40 years) patients were histomorphometrically evaluated. In the posterior maxilla, no statistically significant histomorphometric differences were noted. While at the anterior maxilla and posterior mandible, statistically significant more newly formed bone was found in young versus older individuals, respectively (38.6% vs 19.8%, P = 0.04 and 69% vs 31%, P = .05). New bone formation following residual alveolar ridge bone grafting is age-related. Longer bone consolidation and healing time may be recommended for older individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD loss in endocrinopathies [Graves′ disease (GD, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH, hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO, andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126 were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (79.59% compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001. The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (59.26% compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67% and HypoH (54.55% compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting.

  16. Chemical and biomechanical characterization of hyperhomocysteinemic bone disease in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell David S

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS deficiency and characterized by distinctive alterations of bone growth and skeletal development. Skeletal changes include a reduction in bone density, making it a potentially attractive model for the study of idiopathic osteoporosis. Methods To investigate this aspect of hyperhomocysteinemia, we supplemented developing chicks (n = 8 with 0.6% dl-homocysteine (hCySH for the first 8 weeks of life in comparison to controls (n = 10, and studied biochemical, biomechanical and morphologic effects of this nutritional intervention. Results hCySH-fed animals grew faster and had longer tibiae at the end of the study. Plasma levels of hCySH, methionine, cystathionine, and inorganic sulfate were higher, but calcium, phosphate, and other indices of osteoblast metabolism were not different. Radiographs of the lower limbs showed generalized osteopenia and accelerated epiphyseal ossification with distinct metaphyseal and suprametaphyseal lucencies similar to those found in human homocystinurics. Although biomechanical testing of the tibiae, including maximal load to failure and bone stiffness, indicated stronger bone, strength was proportional to the increased length and cortical thickness in the hCySH-supplemented group. Bone ash weights and IR-spectroscopy of cortical bone showed no difference in mineral content, but there were higher Ca2+/PO43- and lower Ca2+/CO32- molar ratios than in controls. Mineral crystallization was unchanged. Conclusion In this chick model, hyperhomocysteinemia causes greater radial and longitudinal bone growth, despite normal indices of bone formation. Although there is also evidence for an abnormal matrix and altered bone composition, our finding of normal biomechanical bone strength, once corrected for altered morphometry, suggests that any increase in the risk of long bone fracture in human hyperhomocysteinemic

  17. Turner′s syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  18. Diets based on virgin olive oil or fish oil but not on sunflower oil prevent age-related alveolar bone resorption by mitochondrial-related mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Bullon

    Full Text Available Aging enhances frequency of chronic diseases like cardiovascular diseases or periodontitis. Here we reproduced an age-dependent model of the periodontium, a fully physiological approach to periodontal conditions, to evaluate the impact of dietary fat type on gingival tissue of young (6 months old and old (24 months old rats.Animals were fed life-long on diets based on monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA as virgin olive oil, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6PUFA, as sunflower oil, or n-3PUFA, as fish oil. Age-related alveolar bone loss was higher in n-6PUFA fed rats, probably as a consequence of the ablation of the cell capacity to adapt to aging. Gene expression analysis suggests that MUFA or n-3PUFA allowed mitochondria to maintain an adequate turnover through induction of biogenesis, autophagy and the antioxidant systems, and avoiding mitochondrial electron transport system alterations.The main finding is that the enhanced alveolar bone loss associated to age may be targeted by an appropriate dietary treatment. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are related with an ablation of the cell capacity to adapt to aging. Thus, MUFA or n-3PUFA might allow mitochondrial maintaining turnover through biogenesis or autophagy. They might also be able to induce the corresponding antioxidant systems to counteract age-related oxidative stress, and do not inhibit mitochondrial electron transport chain. From the nutritional and clinical point of view, it is noteworthy that the potential treatments to attenuate alveolar bone loss (a feature of periodontal disease associated to age could be similar to some of the proposed for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, a group of pathologies recently associated with age-related periodontitis.

  19. Established role of bisphosphonate therapy for prevention of skeletal complications from myeloma bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpos, Evangelos; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Berenson, James

    2011-02-01

    Patients with advanced multiple myeloma (MM) often have increased osteolytic activity of osteoclasts and impaired osteogenesis by osteoblasts, resulting in osteolytic bone lesions that increase the risk of skeletal-related events (SREs) including pathologic fracture, the need for radiotherapy or surgery to bone, and spinal cord compression. Such SREs are potentially life-limiting, and can reduce patients' functional independence and quality of life. Bisphosphonates (e.g., oral clodronate and intravenous pamidronate and zoledronic acid) can inhibit osteoclast-mediated osteolysis, thereby reducing the risk of SREs, ameliorating bone pain, and potentially prolonging survival in patients with MM. Extensive clinical experience demonstrates that bisphosphonates are generally well tolerated, and common adverse events are typically mild and manageable. Studies are ongoing to optimize the timing and duration of bisphosphonate therapy in patients with bone lesions from MM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Desferrioxamine-induced long bone changes in thalassaemic patients - Radiographic features, prevalence and relations with growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Y.L.; Li, C.K.; Pang, L.M.; Chik, K.W

    2000-08-01

    AIM: To study the radiographic findings of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia, its prevalence and relation to growth in thalassaemic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 35 thalassaemic patients on a hypertransfusion scheme and chelation therapy at a dose not exceeding 50 mg/kg/day. Radiographs of the left hand taken for bone age assessment in consecutive patients over the past 12 months were evaluated for signs of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia. The findings were correlated with data on growth, chelation and body iron content. RESULTS: Twelve of 35 patients had evidence of desferrioxamine-induced long bone dysplasia. There was no significant difference in the groups with and without radiographic evidence of bone dysplasia with respect to the height percentile at time of initiation of therapy, height percentile at time of radiography, skeletal age delay, age at starting chelation, chelation dose and duration, units of blood transfused, average chelation dose, and serum ferritin levels at time of radiography. Both groups showed a reduced percentile growth with a significantly greater reduction (P = 0.03) in the patients with dysplastic change. CONCLUSION: Desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia is associated with height reduction and can be seen in patients receiving desferrioxamine chelation therapy at doses of less than 50 mg/kg/day. Awareness of the diagnosis is of importance as reduction of the desferrioxamine dose may improve bone growth. Chan, Y. L. (2000)

  1. Age-related contrast enhancement study of normal bone marrow in lumbar spinal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young A; Ha, Doo Hoe

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement of normal bone marrow in L-spine relating to aging and to determine the range of contrast enhancement in normal bone marrow. We analyzed a total of 120 patients (20 per decade) who had undergone lumbar spinal MRI and who ranged in age from the 2nd decade to more than the 7th. Bone marrow revealed no abnormal pathology. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences were obtained before and after gadolinium administration. For each sequence, a region of interest was drawn within the L1 vertebral body from the midsagittal slice. Signal intensity (SI) values of each sequence were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. After contrast enhancement, lumbar MRI revealed no statistically significant in the percentage increase in SI of normal bone marrow in relation to aging. Most patients (99%) however showed an SI increase of between 10% and 49%. In only four, none of whom were aged over 40, was this increase above 50%. Lumbar MRI, revealed no statistically significant difference in percentage increase in SI in normal bone marrow relating to aging, but when the increase is above 50% in a patient aged over 40, bone marrow pathology should be further investigated

  2. Vitamin D and K status influences bone mineral density and bone accrual in children and adolescents with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, D R; Qiao, J; Turner, J

    2012-04-01

    Children with celiac disease (CD) are at risk for decreased bone mineral density (BMD) because of fat-soluble vitamin malabsorption, inflammation and/or under-nutrition. The study objective was to determine the interrelationships between vitamin K/D status and lifestyle variables on BMD in children and adolescents with CD at diagnosis and after 1 year on the gluten-free diet (GFD). Children and adolescents aged 3-17 years with biopsy proven CD at diagnosis and after 1 year on the GFD were studied. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Relevant variables included: anthropometrics, vitamin D/K status, diet, physical activity and sunlight exposure. Whole-body and lumbar-spine BMD-z scores were low (vitamin D (90.3±24.8 versus 70.5±19.8 nmol/l) were significantly lower in older children (>10 years) when compared with younger children (vitamin D status (25(OH)-vitamin D vitamin K status at diagnosis; all resolved after 1 year. Children and adolescents with CD are at risk for suboptimal bone health at time of diagnosis and after 1 year on GFD; likely due in part to suboptimal vitamin D/K status. Therapeutic strategies aimed at optimizing vitamin K/D intake may contribute to improved BMD in children with CD.

  3. MRI assessment of bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesoro Tess, J.D.; Balzarini, L.; Ceglia, E.; Petrillo, R.; Musumeci, R.

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possible role of MRI in detecting lymphomatous marrow involvement, a MRI examination was performed in newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and nonHodgkin lymphoma (NHL). From this the authors concluded that MRI should not be used as a replacement for bone marrow biopsies in HD and NHL, but rather as a complementary tool utilizing the panoramic view offered by MRI which permit to disclose focal areas of bone involvement different from the sacrum, thus not valuable with routine biopsies. (author). 4 refs.; 1 tab

  4. Unusual case of metabolic bone disease in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatt, J.M.; Sainsbury, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease was diagnosed in an 11-month-old female common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). It was depressed, reluctant to move, and was cachectic and small for its age. Laboratory findings included anaemia, azotaemia and an inverse calcium to phosphorus ratio. The radiological findings showed simultaneous signs of osteomalacia and soft-tissue calcification. There was decreased bone density with lytic areas in the pelvis and femur, and severe bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Postmortem examination revealed marked focal dystrophic calcification of the epi- and myocardium. Calcium and vitamin D3 deficiency (nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism) was the most likely cause of the osteomalacia

  5. IgG4-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Klöppel, Günter

    2018-01-01

    disease (IgG4-RD). The histologic key findings are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells combined with storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis. Among the organs mainly affected by IgG4-RD are the pancreas and the extrahepatic bile ducts. The pancreatic and biliary...... alterations have been described under the terms autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. These diseases are currently more precisely called IgG4-related pancreatitis (or type 1 AIP to distinguish it from type 2 AIP that is unrelated to IgG4-RD) and IgG4-related sclerosing...... cholangitis (IgG4-related SC). Clinically and grossly, both diseases commonly imitate pancreatic and biliary adenocarcinoma, tumors that are well known for their dismal prognosis. As IgG4-RD responds to steroid treatment, making a resection of a suspected tumor unnecessary, a biopsy is often required...

  6. Asbestos-related pleuropulmonary diseases: iconographic essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavo de Souza Portes Meirelles; Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares; Nery, Luiz Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the main imaging findings of asbestos-related diseases. Pleural and pulmonary asbestos-related diseases range from benign conditions, like pleural effusion and pleural plaques, to some neoplasias, such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. Pleural effusion is the earliest finding after asbestos exposure, but the imaging findings are not specific. Diffuse pleural thickening involves the visceral pleura and pleural plaques are considered to be hallmarks of exposure. Asbestosis is the pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos. Rounded atelectasis is a peripheral lung collapse in these individuals, generally related to pleural disease. Some neoplasias, like lung carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma, are more prevalent in asbestos-exposed subjects. (author)

  7. Bone Disease in HIV: Recommendations for Screening and Management in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Availability of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in markedly improved survival for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, as well as an aging HIV population. Increasing morbidity from age-related conditions has resulted in the need to understand the complex roles HIV and its treatment play in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Bone disease and fragility fractures are conditions that occur more frequently in HIV. It is therefore recommended that risk assessment for fragility fracture using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) algorithm, and low bone mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, be performed in all patients with HIV infection over the age of 50 years and in those with a history of fragility fracture, and should be repeated every 2-3 years. Because many HIV experts believe that HIV infection and its treatment is a secondary cause of osteoporosis, it should be included as such in the FRAX(®) assessment tool. Management of osteoporosis in HIV infection should follow the same guidelines as that in the general population. Attention to lifestyle factors, including vitamin D replacement, should be emphasized. Whether cessation of tenofovir- or protease inhibitor-based ART regimens should be considered prior to bisphosphonate treatment is currently unknown and should only occur in patients with active alternative ART regimens. The use of bisphosphonates has been shown to be safe and effective in HIV patients, and while there is limited data on second-line osteoporosis regimens, there is no reason to suggest they would not be effective in people with HIV.

  8. 99mTc-MDP bone imaging Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Jin; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Soon Yong [School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    The pathology of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease be can described as a vascular disturbance leading to necrosis and subsequent revascularization of the femoral epiphyseal ossification center. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the detection of areas with both decreased and increased vascular supply. The authors analyzed the scintigraphic findings of 14 cases of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease at Kyung Hee University Hospital from Mar. '81 to Oct. '82. The results were as follows: 1. Scintigraphy revealed area of absent radioactivity in 14 cases; lateral 2/3 portion of the femoral epiphyseal ossification center was involved in 9 cases among 14 cases, and also increased radioactivity in epiphyseal ossification center, epiphyseal plate, or proximal metaphysis of femur were associated in 7 cases. 2. Three cases had radiographically normal hip, whereas scintigraphy reviewed distinctly absent radioactivity in femoral epiphyseal ossification center. 3. Magnification of hip imaging using a pinhole collimator provided good definition of presence and extent of pathologic defect or uptake in epiphyseal ossification center, epiphyseal plate, and metaphysis. Bone imaging provided earlier and more accurate information concerning the extent of the necrotic and revascularization process of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease than the radiographys alone.

  9. The consequences of chronic kidney disease on bone metabolism and growth in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Justine; Harambat, Jérôme; Cochat, Pierre; Salusky, Isidro B; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2012-08-01

    Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD-MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD-MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management.

  10. The association of bone mineral density measures with incident cardiovascular disease in older men and women: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farhat, G.N.; Newman, A.B.; Sutton-Tyrell, K.; Matthews, K.A.; Boudreau, R.; Schwartz, A.; Harris, T.B.; Tylavsky, F.A.; Visser, M.; Cauley, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: The associations of volumetric and areal bone mineral density (BMD) measures with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied in a biracial cohort of 2,310 older adults. BMD measures were inversely related to CVD in women and white men, independent of age and shared risk factors for

  11. Iron storage in liver, bone marrow and splenic Gaucheroma reflects residual disease in type 1 Gaucher disease patients on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenboog, Martine; Bohte, Anneloes E; Akkerman, Erik M; Stoker, Jaap; Hollak, Carla E M

    2017-11-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the storage of glycosphingolipids in macrophages. Despite effective therapy, residual disease is present in varying degrees and may be associated with late complications, such as persistent bone or liver disease and increased cancer risk. Gaucher macrophages are capable of storing iron and locations of residual disease may thus be detectable with iron imaging. Forty type 1 GD (GD1) patients and 40 matched healthy controls were examined using a whole-body magnetic resonance imaging protocol consisting of standard sequences, allowing analysis of iron content per organ, expressed as R2* (Hz). Median R2* values were significantly elevated in GD1 patients as compared to healthy controls in liver [41 Hz (range 29-165) vs. 38 Hz (range 28-53), P Gaucher lesions known as Gaucheroma were found to have increased R2* values. R2* values of liver, spleen and vertebral bone marrow strongly correlated with serum ferritin levels. GD1 patients with persistent hyperferritinaemia demonstrate increased iron levels in liver and bone marrow, which may carry a risk for liver fibrosis and cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease in a carpal bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpalata Tripathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease (RDD of the scophoid in a 52-year old female. The patient presented with pain, swelling, and tenderness on deep palpation of the left wrist. Clinicoradiological diagnosis was osteomyelitis or tenosynovitis and curettage was performed on the lytic lesion over scaphoid to procure tissue. Diagnosis was made by histomorphology supported by immunostaining. The patient was managed conservatively with resolution of the lesion.

  13. [Dietary patterns in college freshmen and its relation to bone mineral density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sufang; Mu, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Shu, Long; Li, Qingyan; Li, Yingchun

    2012-07-01

    In order to investigate the bone density of freshmen, and to analyze the association between dietary pattern and bone mineral density (BMD). A questionnaire survey on the situation of dietary pattern was conducted in 1414 freshmen. Effective dietary survey questionnaires and bone mineral density measurements were completed for 1319 participants. Bone mass was assessed by using an Ultrasound Bone Densitometer on the right calcaneus (CM-200, Furuno Electric Corporation, Japan), and the speed of sound (SOS, m/s) was used as an indicator for bone density. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to identify the dietary patterns. After adjusting for confounders, covariance with Bonferroni's was used to further examine the associations between dietary patterns and bone mineral density (BMD). (1) Four major dietary patterns were noticed. Western food pattern (high consumption in hamburger, fried food, nuts, biscuit, chocolate, cola, coffee, sugars). Animal protein pattern (high consumption in pork, mutton, beef, poultry meat, animal liver). Calcium pattern (high consumption in fresh fruits, eggs, fish and shrimps, kelp laver and sea fish, milk and dairy products, beans and bean products). Traditional Chinese pattern (high consumption in rice and grain, fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, pork). (2) No association was observed between the western food pattern and bone mineral density. High animal protein pattern showed lower SOS value compared with low animal protein pattern. High calcium pattern showed higher SOS value compared with low calcium pattern. High traditional Chinese pattern showed higher SOS value compared with the low traditional Chinese pattern. Dietary patterns are closely related with bone mineral density (BMD) of freshmen.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Human Bone in Cryoprobe Freezing as Related to Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle E; Baldini, Todd; Lindeque, Bennie G

    2017-03-01

    Cryoprobes create localized cell destruction through freezing. Bone is resistant to temperature flow but is susceptible to freezing necrosis at warmer temperatures than tumor cells. Few studies have determined the thermal conductivity of human bone. No studies have examined conductivity as related to density. The study goal was to examine thermal conductivity in human bone while comparing differences between cancellous and cortical bone. An additional goal was to establish a relationship between bone density and thermal conductivity. Six knee joints from 5 cadavers were obtained. The epiphyseal region was sliced in half coronally prior to inserting an argon-circulating cryoprobe directed away from the joint line. Thermistor thermometers were placed perpendicularly at measured increments, and the freezing cycle was recorded until steady-state conditions were achieved. For 2 cortical samples, the probe was placed intramedullary in metaphyseal samples and measurements were performed radially from the central axis of each sample. Conductivity was calculated using Fournier's Law and then plotted against measured density of each sample. Across samples, density of cancellous bone ranged from 0.86 to 1.38 g/mL and average thermal conductivity ranged between 0.404 and 0.55 W/mK. Comparatively, cortical bone had a density of 1.70 to 1.86 g/mL and thermal conductivity of 0.0742 to 0.109 W/mK. A strong 2-degree polynomial correlation was seen (R 2 =0.8226, P<.001). Bone is highly resistant to temperature flow. This resistance varies and inversely correlates strongly with density. This information is clinically relevant to maximize tumor ablation while minimizing morbidity through unnecessary bone loss and damage to surrounding structures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):90-94.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Cunha, Sandro Torrentes da; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos de; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos

    2017-08-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice.

  16. Efficacy and safety of bisphosphonates in management of low bone density in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liwei; Wang, Haiqing; Dong, Wenwei; Liu, Zhenxin; Mao, Haijiao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to determine whether bisphosphonates are safe, as well as effective against bone mineral loss in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A computerized search of electronic databases from 1966 to 2016 was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this review to evaluate the role of bisphosphonates in the management of osteoporosis in IBD patients. A revised 7-point Jadad scale was used to evaluate the quality of each study. Overall, 13 RCTs and 923 patients met the inclusion criteria of this meta-analysis. The result showed that bisphosphonates decreased bone mass density (BMD) loss at the lumbar spine (P = 0.0002), reduced the risk of new fractures (P = 0.01), and retained the similar adverse events (P = 0.86). Bisphosphonates may provide protection and safety against bone mineral loss in IBD patients. PMID:28099343

  17. Relation between obesity and bone mineral density and vertebral fractures in Korean postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Chol; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Sei-Young; Im, Jee-Aee; Lee, Duk-Chul

    2010-11-01

    The traditional belief that obesity is protective against osteoporosis has been questioned. Recent epidemiologic studies show that body fat itself may be a risk factor for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Accumulating evidence suggests that metabolic syndrome and the individual components of metabolic syndrome such as hypertension, increased triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are also risk factors for low bone mineral density. Using a cross sectional study design, we evaluated the associations between obesity or metabolic syndrome and bone mineral density (BMD) or vertebral fracture. A total of 907 postmenopausal healthy female subjects, aged 60-79 years, were recruited from woman hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. BMD, vetebral fracture, bone markers, and body composition including body weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, and waist circumference were measured. After adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, total calcium intake, and total energy intake, waist circumference was negatively related to BMD of all sites (lumbar BMD p = 0.037, all sites of femur BMD p related to BMD of all sites (p related to femoral trochanter BMD (p = 0.0366) and was lower in the control group than the fracture group (p = 0.011). In contrast to the effect favorable body weight on bone mineral density, high percentage body fat and waist circumference are related to low BMD and a vertebral fracture. Some components of metabolic syndrome were related to BMD and a vertebral fracture.

  18. Differential Gene Expression in the Otic Capsule and the Middle Ear-An Annotation of Bone-Related Signaling Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michelle C.; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas; Friis, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis: A number of bone-related genes may be responsible for the unique suppression of perilabyrinthine bone remodeling. Background: Bone remodeling is highly inhibited around the inner ear space most likely because of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which is a well-known potent inhibitor of osteocla...

  19. The Bt-DUX: Development of a subjective measure of health-related quality of life in patients who underwent surgery for lower extremity malignant bone tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Bekkering (Peter); T.P.M. Vliet Vlieland (Theodora); H.M. Koopman (Hendrik); G.R. Schaap (Gerard); H.W.B. Schreuder; A. Beishuizen (Auke); W.J.E. Tissing (Wim); P.M. Hoogerbrugge (Peter); J.K. Anninga (Jacob); A.H.M. Taminiau (Antonie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the

  20. [Renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) are related to a number of rare autosomal-dominant disorders which has been known as May-Hegglin disease, Sebastian syndrome, Fechtner syndrome and Epstein syndrome. Their common clinical features are congenital macrothrombocytopaenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies, in addition to a variable risk of developing proteinuria, chronic kidney disease progressing toward end stage, sensorineural deafness and presenile cataracts. The term MYH9 related disease (MYH9-RD) describes the variable expression of a single illness encompassing all previously mentioned hereditary disorders. Renal involvement in MYH9- RD has been observed in 30% of patients. Mutant MYH9 protein, expressed in podocytes, mesangial and tubular cells, plays a main role in foot process effacement and in development of nephropathy. Interestingly, the MYH9 gene is currently under investigation also for his possible contribution to many other non-hereditary glomerulopathies such as focal global glomerulosclerosis (hypertensive nephrosclerosis), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C1q nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy. In this review we are aimed to describe renal diseases related to MYH9 disorders, from the hereditary disease to the acquired disorders, in which MYH9-gene acts as a "renal failure susceptibility gene". Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  1. Fragility Fracture Incidence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients Associates With Nanoporosity, Mineral/Matrix Ratio, and Pyridinoline Content at Actively Bone-Forming Trabecular Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Dempster, David; Jorgetti, Vanda; Borba, Victoria; Boguszewski, Cesar L; Klaushofer, Klaus; Moreira, Carolina A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and altered microstructure by bone histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography. Nevertheless, not all COPD patients sustain fragility fractures. In the present study, we used Raman microspectroscopic analysis to determine bone compositional properties at actively forming trabecular surfaces (based on double fluorescent labels) in iliac crest biopsies from 19 postmenopausal COPD patients (aged 62.1 ± 7.3 years). Additionally, we analyzed trabecular geometrical centers, representing tissue much older than the forming surfaces. Eight of the patients had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. None of the patients had taken oral glucocorticoids. The monitored parameters were mineral/matrix ratio (MM), nanoporosity, and relative glycosaminoglycan (GAG), lipid, and pyridinoline contents (PYD). There were no significant differences between the glucocorticoid-treated patients and those who did not receive any. On the other hand, COPD patients sustaining fragility fractures had significantly lower nanoporosity and higher MM and PYD values compared with COPD patients without fragility fractures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to discriminate between fracture and non-fracture COPD patients based on differences in the material properties of bone matrix. Given that these bone material compositional differences are evident close to the cement line (a major bone interface), they may contribute to the inferior bone toughness and coupled with the lower lumbar spine bone mineral density values result in the fragility fractures prevalent in these patients. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Bone and marrow imaging in sickle cell disease: diagnosis of infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzker, L.G.; Alavi, A.

    1976-01-01

    Sickling of erythrocytes in patients with S-hemoglobin causes marrow and bone infarction. The former can be demonstrated as a lack of /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid uptake on marrow imaging examination. These defects may resolve or persist long after the acute episode. If the bone is involved in the acute episode, imaging within the first few days of onset of symptoms can show lack of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate uptake, usually in a smaller area than that shown by marrow scanning. Follow-up bone imaging shows increased activity, particularly along the circumference of the bone where periosteal reaction can be demonstrated radiographically. Magnification by use of the pinhole collimator provides better definition of the uptake defect and the distribution of the increased reactive uptake. Timing of examination is important. If marrow imaging is performed in an asymptomatic period, the repeat examination during a painful crisis permits differentiation of old and acute marrow infarction. If /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate imaging is performed after about 2 days of symptoms, acute infarction can be differentiated from osteomyelitis, which it may mimic clinically. To assist in differentiating bone infection in a site of marrow infarction demonstrated by marrow imaging, serial bone imaging with magnification may be useful. The uptake defect, followed in several days to 2 weeks, by circumferential increased activity, is a different pattern than the homogeneously intense activity of osteomyelitis, but the peripheral distribution may not be apparent on routine imaging. It is hoped that the utilization of these techniques can decrease the emotional and economic costs of prolonged hospitalization for suspected infection and can also expand our knowledge of the complex pathophysiologic changes of sickle cell bone disease

  3. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  4. Observations on total-body calcium in humans with bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Ranicar, A.S.O.; Joplin, G.F.; Evans, I.M.A.; Vlotides, J.; Paolillo, M.

    1979-01-01

    Total-body calcium was measured in-vivo by neutron activation in a number of patients suffering from metabolic abnormalities which affect the skeleton. In general, less than 2% of total calcium resides in tissue other than bone allowing calcium mass to be directly related to skeletal mass. The conditions studied were (i) Paget's disease, treated with synthetic human calcitonin, (ii) osteoporosis, treated variously with calcium and phosphate supplements and 1,25 hydroxycholecalciferol, and (iii) Cushing's disease treated by pituitary implant of 198 Au or 90 Y seeds. The neutron beam used in these studies was produced by bombarding a beryllium target with deuterons accelerated in a cyclotron. The mean neutron energy was 7.5 MeV and patients received a total dose of 1 rem in about 30 s, a bilateral irradiation being employed. Measurements were made at approximately yearly intervals, the maximum period of study being about four and a half years. The precision of the method was estimated to be +-3% (SE) and a correction was applied for changes in body weight. In most patients, total calcium remained stable. However, in the Paget's patients, there was an indication of a slow upward trend while the osteoporotics (both treated and untreated) showed on average no change. Most of the patients with Cushing's disease showed no recovery of skeletal mass. Absolute calibration indicated that mean total body calcium in the Paget's patients was close to a predicted normal while that for the osteoporotic and Cushing's patients was 20-25% below this. (author)

  5. Lack of biochemical hypogonadism in elderly Arab males with low bone mineral density disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Attia, Haider M; Jaysundaram, Krishnasamy; Saraj, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to study the relationship between androgen levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly Arab males. Forty-five elderly Arab males underwent Dual X-ray absorptiometry for measurement of BMD. The outcomes were defined as per WHO description. Assays for testosterone (T), gonadotropins (LH and FSH) and estradiol (E2), in the serum were carried out. The ratio of T/LH was used as a surrogate for the cFT assay. We excluded patients receiving hormonal ablation for prostatic neoplasm and patients with chronic liver or renal disease and patients receiving corticosteroids. Twelve were osteoporotic (26.5%); 22 osteopenic (49%); and 11(24.5%) had normal outcome. Osteoporotic patients were significantly older (78.17 +/- 7.59 years) than the osteopenic (70.14 +/- 5.92, P Arab males had reduced bone density that appears to be independent of androgen levels. Osteoporotics were significantly older than those with osteopenia or normal bone density. Aging seemed to have overridden the effect of normal sex hormones on bone density in these patients. Before considering these results as a possible exception to the widely established role of the hypoandrogenemia in male osteoporosis, other potential factors impacting on bone density need to be considered.

  6. Bone aluminum measurements in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders and trace aluminum contamination of dialysate solution have led to increased body burden of this metal in patients with end-stage renal disease. Aluminum accumulates in bone and has been associated with the development of a renal osteodystrophy, called aluminum-induced osteomalacia. At present, bone biopsy is the method of diagnosis of this condition. When examined by quantitative histomorphometry, the aluminum accumulation was reported to correlate with the severity of the osteomalacia. This project was therefore undertaken to investigate the possibility of developing a non-invasive technique using neutron activation analysis for the direct in vivo assessment of bone aluminum levels. A bilateral exposure of the patient's hand is performed at the patient port of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. The induced activity is then counted for 5 min using four 4'' x 4'' x 16'' NaI(T1) detectors arranged in a quasi-4! geometry. In addition to Al, Ca is also detected and serves as each individual's internal standard for the volume of bone mass irradiated. The Al/Ca ratio provides an index of the amount of elevated aluminum per unit bone mass. When this ratio is multiplied by the total body calcium value, an estimate of total skeletal aluminum is obtained. These measurements will be presented for a pilot study of ten asymptomatic renal patients

  7. The interest of radiographical investigations of bone diseases in the selection of stallions [orthopedic lesions, abnormal radiographic findings, multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valette, J.P.; Touzot, G.; Denoix, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Breeding of sport horses requires products with qualities for performance traits. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relation between radiographical examination and descendant of sires. Foots, fetlocks of both thoracic and pelvic limbs, carpus, tarsus and stifles were examined radiographically in 225 3-year old horses descent from 25 stallions. Data were analysed by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that descendant of a stallion presents the same abnormal radiographic findings. It is concluded that bone diseases are of great importance in breeding sport horses and that these abnormalities could have a genetic component [fr

  8. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive failing of tissues and organs of the human body leading to a large number of age-related diseases. Regenerative medicine is an emerging clinical discipline that aims to employ cellular medicines (normal cells, ex vivo expanded cells, or tissue......-engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal...... and organs in tissue-engineering protocols. However, several challenges confront the use of these cells in the clinic, ranging from biological challenges (e.g., how to isolate a homogenous populations of the cells with specific criteria from the bone marrow and how to expand them ex vivo without affecting...

  9. Effect of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on bone disease in postmenopausal women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nanda, Kavinderjit S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Limited data are available on the contribution of chronic HCV infection to the development of bone disease in postmenopausal women. We studied whether women who acquired HCV infection through administration of HCV genotype 1b-contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin from a single source had decreased bone mineral density (BMD) or altered levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs), compared with women who spontaneously resolved infection or age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: From a cohort of postmenopausal Irish women, we compared BMD, determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and a panel of BTMs in 20 women chronically infected with HCV (PCR(+)), 21 women who had spontaneously resolved infection (PCR(-)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Levels of BTMs and BMD were similar in PCR(+) and PCR(-) women and healthy age-matched controls. However, there was an increased frequency of fractures in PCR(+) (n = 6) compared with PCR(-) women (n = 0, P = .007). PCR(+) women with fractures were postmenopausal for a longer time (median, 15.5, range, 5-20 years vs 4.5, range, 1-20 years in PCR(+) women without fractures; P = .033), had lower BMD at the hip (0.79, range, 0.77-0.9 g\\/cm(2) vs 0.96, range, 0.81-1.10 g\\/cm(2); P = .007), and had a lower body mass index (23.7, range 21.2-28.5 kg\\/m(2) vs 25.6, range 22.1-36.6 kg\\/m(2); P = .035). There was no difference in liver disease severity or BTMs in PCR(+) women with or without fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HCV infection did not lead to discernable metabolic bone disease in postmenopausal women, but it might be a risk factor for bone fractures, so preventive measures should be introduced. To view this article\\'s video abstract, go to the AGA\\'s YouTube Channel.

  10. Gender peculiarities of bone mineral density in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson’s disease is a chronic progressive disease of the brain manifested by a combination of hypokinesia with rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability, as well as a wide spectrum of non-motor manifestations accompanied by an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. The purpose of the study was to study the sexual characteristics of bone mineral density in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Materials and methods. Eighty nine patients with Parkinson’s disease and 89 patients of the corresponding age and sex without neurologic pathology were examined. Women and men of both groups did not differ in age, height and body weight. The bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Osteoporosis in patients with Parkinson’s disease was registered significantly more often in women than in men (48 and 24.3 %, respectively and significantly more often than in the control group. Significantly lower BMD was registered in patients with Parkinson’s disease compared with those of the control group: in men — at the level of the femoral neck, the distal forearm and the total body, in women — at the level of the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip, distal forearm and total body. The negative correlation of the BMD in different regions of the skeleton and age was recorded in women, in men this relationship was registered at the level of the distal forearm. The positive correlation was found between the BMD and body mass index in men and women. Conclusions. The results of our study suggest that Parkinson’s disease leads to the development of osteoporosis, but the condition of bone tissue in patients with Parkinson’s disease has gender features, in particular, the BMD in women is more dependent on age, and in men — on body mass index.

  11. A New Murine Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Frauscher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with mineral and bone disorder (MBD, which is the main cause of the extensively increased cardiovascular mortality in the CKD population. We now aimed to establish a new murine experimental CKD-MBD model. Dilute brown non-Agouti (DBA/2 mice were fed with high-phosphate diet for 4 (HPD4 or 7 (HPD7 days, then with standard chow diet (SCD and subsequently followed until day 84. They were compared to DBA/2 mice maintained on SCD during the whole study period. Both 4 and 7 days HPD-fed mice developed phosphate nephropathy with tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, decreased glomerular filtration rate, and increased serum urea levels. The abdominal aorta of HPD-treated mice showed signs of media calcification. Histomorphometric analysis of HPD-treated mice showed decreased bone volume/tissue volume, low mineral apposition rate, and low bone formation rate as compared to SCD-fed mice, despite increased parathyroid hormone levels. Overall, the observed phenotype was more pronounced in the HPD7 group. In summary, we established a new, noninvasive, and therefore easy to perform reproducible CKD-MBD model, which showed media calcification, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and low-turnover bone disease.

  12. Paget's disease of jaw bones as primary manifestation: A case report of a proper diagnosis made by general dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolongo, Martin G; Cabras, Marco; Bava, Luca; Arduino, Paolo G; Carbone, Mario

    2018-06-01

    To present a case of early diagnosis mandibular Paget's disease of bone (PDB), recognised by a general dentist. PDB is responsible of rapid bone resorption and disorganised bone formation. The patient was a 72-year-old female patient complaining of dental malposition and blatant prognathism. Clinicians should consider PDB in differential diagnosis for an elderly patient undergoing unexplained alteration in face profile and occlusion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Age-related decrements in bone mineral density in women over 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, P.; Cummings, S. R.; Black, D. M.; Spencer, N. E.; Genant, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    Age-related changes in bone density contribute to the risk of fractures. To describe the relationship between age and bone mass in elderly women, we studied a large cohort of women over age 65 years who were recruited from population-based lists in four cities in the United States. Bone density in g/cm2 was measured by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the distal and proximal radius, the calcaneus, the lumbar spine, and the proximal femur. Centralized data collection was used to control data quality and consistency. We found a strong inverse relationship between bone density and age for most sites. Decrements in bone density between women aged 65-69 years and women 85 years and older exceeded 16% in all regions except the spine, where the difference between the two age groups was 6%. Ward's triangle and the calcaneus exhibited the largest decrements, with 26 and 21%, respectively. The estimates of annual changes in bone mineral density by linear regression at sites other than the spine ranged from -0.82% at the femoral neck and trochanter to -1.30% at Ward's triangle. Correlations between the different regions ranged from r = 0.51 between the proximal radius and Ward's triangle to r = 0.66 between the distal radius and calcaneus. We conclude that the inverse relationship between age and bone mass measured by absorptiometry techniques in white women continues into the ninth decade of life. The relationship is strongest for bone density of Ward's triangle and the calcaneus and weakest for the spine.

  14. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyse the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in a population of automobile mechanics. The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos-related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers; who in the case of disagreement discussed until they reached agreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Pleural plaques were observed in five cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in one case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers.

  15. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyze the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on HRCT in a population of automobile mechanics. Methods The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos–related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers, with further consensus in the case of disagreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Results Pleural plaques were observed in 5 cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in 1 case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. Conclusions The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers. PMID:21965465

  16. Solitary Bone Plasmacytoma Progressing into Retroperitoneal Plasma Cell Myeloma with No Related End Organ or Tissue Impairment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi Tikku

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Solitary bone plasmacytomas and plasma cell myeloma are clonal proliferations of plasma cells. Many patients with solitary bone plasmacytomas develop plasma cell myeloma on follow-up. We present a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with fracture and a lytic lesion in the subtrochanteric region of the left femur and was assigned a diagnosis of solitary bone plasmacytoma. He received local curative radiotherapy. However, 4 months later his serum M protein and β2-microglobulin levels increased to 2.31 g/dL and 5.965 mg/L, respectively. He complained of abdominal fullness and constipation. Ultrasound and non-contrast CT imaging revealed multiple retroperitoneal masses. Colonoscopic examination was normal. Biopsy of the a retroperitoneal mass confirmed it to be a plasmacytoma. Repeat hemogram, blood urea, serum creatinine, skeletal survey, and bone marrow examination revealed no abnormalities. This is an unusual presentation of plasma cell myeloma, which manifested as multiple huge extramedullary retroperitoneal masses and arose from a solitary bone plasmacytoma, without related end organ or tissue impairment and bone marrow plasmacytosis. The patient succumbed to his disease 8 months after the appearance of the retroperitoneal masses. This case highlights the importance of close monitoring of patients diagnosed with solitary bone plasmacytoma with increased serum M protein and serum β2-microglobulin levels, so that early therapy can be instituted to prevent conversion to plasma cell myeloma.

  17. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-01-01

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions. (orig.) [de

  18. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-02-01

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions.

  19. Extremes in vitamin K status of bone are related to bone ultrasound properties in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Summeren, M. J. H.; Vermeer, C.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Schurgers, L. J.; Takken, T.; Fischer, K.; Kuis, W.

    2008-01-01

    Osteopenia is a common complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In adults, low bone density and increased fracture risk are associated with low vitamin K status of bone. The vitamin K-dependent protein osteocalcin plays an important role in bone metabolism. Its activity depends upon

  20. Bone and fall-related fracture risks in women and men with a recent clinical fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Svenhjalmar; van Geel, Antonia C M; Geusens, Piet P; Kessels, Alfons; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, Arie C; Brink, Peter R G

    2008-02-01

    Worldwide fracture rates are increasing as a result of the aging population, and prevention, both primary and secondary, is an important public health goal. Therefore, we systematically analyzed risk factors in subjects with a recent clinical fracture. All men and women over fifty years of age who had been treated in the emergency department of, or hospitalized at, our institution because of a recent fracture during a one-year period were offered the opportunity to undergo an evidence-based bone and fall-related risk-factor assessment and bone densitometry. The women included in this study were also compared with a group of postmenopausal women without a fracture history who had been included in another cohort study. Of the 940 consecutive patients, 797 (85%) were eligible for this study and 568 (60%) agreed to participate. The prevalence of fall-related risk factors (75% [95% confidence interval = 71% to 78%]; n = 425) and the prevalence of bone-related risk factors (53% [95% confidence interval = 49% to 57%]; n = 299) at the time of fracture were higher than the prevalence of osteoporosis (35% [95% confidence interval = 31% to 39%]; n = 201) as defined by a dual x-ray absorptiometry T score of fall and bone-related risk factors were present irrespective of the fracture location, patient age, or gender. An overlap between bone and fall-related risk factors was found in 50% of the patients. After adjusting for age, weight, and height, we found that women with a fracture more frequently had a diagnosis of osteoporosis (odds ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval = 2.0 to 4.1) and had a more extensive history of falls (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% confidence interval = 2.7 to 5.9) than did the postmenopausal women without a fracture history. Men and women over fifty years of age who had recently sustained a clinical fracture had, at the time of that fracture, bone and fall-related risk factors that were greater than the risk predicted by the presence of osteoporosis. Risk

  1. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  2. Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation (AAMDSIF): Bone marrow failure disease scientific symposium 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Amer M; Battiwalla, Minoo; Berlyne, Deborah; Winkler, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with acquired and inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) have ineffective hematopoiesis due to impairments of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Common manifestations of BMFS include varying degrees of peripheral blood cytopenias and, sometimes, progression to acute myelogenous leukemia. Research efforts have been made all over the world to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases and their clinical implications. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation (AAMDSIF) is an independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to help patients and family members cope with BMFS. Here, we summarize recent scientific discoveries in several BMFS that were presented at the fifth International Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2016 that AAMDSIF sponsored on March 17-18, 2016, in Rockville, Maryland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Randall Selitto pressure algometry for assessment of bone-related pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, S; Ipsen, D H; Appel, C K; Ugarak, A; Durup, D; Dickenson, A H; Heegaard, A M

    2015-03-01

    Deep pain is neglected compared with cutaneous sources. Pressure algometry has been validated in the clinic for assessment of bone-related pain in humans. In animal models of bone-related pain, we have validated the Randall Selitto behavioural test for assessment of acute and pathological bone pain and compared the outcome with more traditional pain-related behaviour measures. Randall Selitto pressure algometry was performed over the anteromedial part of the tibia in naïve rats, sham-operated rats, and rats inoculated with MRMT-1 carcinoma cells in the left tibia, and the effect of morphine was investigated. Randall Selitto measures of cancer-induced bone pain were supplemented by von Frey testing, weight-bearing and limb use test. Contribution of cutaneous nociception to Randall Selitto measures were examined by local anaesthesia. Randall Selitto pressure algometry over the tibia resulted in reproducible withdrawal thresholds, which were dose-dependently increased by morphine. Cutaneous nociception did not contribute to Randall Selitto measures. In cancer-bearing animals, compared with sham, significant differences in pain-related behaviours were demonstrated by the Randall Selitto test on day 17 and 21 post-surgery. A difference was also demonstrated by von Frey testing, weight-bearing and limb use tests. Our results indicate that pressure applied by the Randall Selitto algometer on a region, where the bone is close to the skin, may offer a way to measure bone-related pain in animal models and could provide a supplement to the traditional behavioural tests and a means to study deep pain. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  4. IgG4-Related Perineural Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Inoue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To elucidate characteristics of IgG4-related disease involving the peripheral nervous system. Methods. Retrospective review of 106 patients with IgG4-related disease identified 21 peripheral nerve lesions in 7 patients. Clinicopathological and radiological features were examined. Results. Peripheral nerve lesions were commonly identified in orbital or paravertebral area, involving orbital (=9, optic (=4, spinal (=7, and great auricular nerves (=1. The predominant radiological feature was a distinct perineural soft tissue mass, ranging 8 to 30 mm in diameter. Histologically, the epineurium was preferentially involved by massive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4+ plasma cells. All lesions were neurologically asymptomatic and steroid-responsive at the first presentation, but one recurrent lesion around the optic nerve caused failing vision. Conclusion. IgG4-related disease of the peripheral nervous system is characterized by orbital or paravertebral localization, perineural mass formation, and rare neurologic symptoms. The term “IgG4-related perineural disease” seems appropriate to describe this entity.

  5. [Bone scintigraphy with 99mTc-MDP in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia initially diagnosed of Still's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Velazco, A; González García, F M; Albalá González, M D; Pacheco Capote, C; Latre Romero, J M

    2005-01-01

    We present a 43-year-old male, who was admitted with the diagnosis of Adult-onset Still's disease, after several months of arthralgias, febricula and loss of weight. Chest x-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, chest, abdomen and pelvic CT scan and bone scintigraphy were performed. Scintigraphic findings oriented to the performance of a bone marrow biopsy with diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Cancer patients undertaking bone scans in a department of Nuclear Medicine have significant stress related to the examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioka, C.; Manetou, M.; Dimakopoulos, N.; Christidi, S.; Kouraklis, G.

    2005-01-01

    Bone scanning is a standard screening procedure for evaluation of metastases in cancer patient. In addition to the staging procedures, bone scan is a valuable test for deciding palliative therapeutic options in selected patients. The aim of this study was to investigate if patients with cancer who were undertaking routine bone scans had any stress related to the test. We asked 83 consecutive patients with various types of cancer if they had anxiety just prior to undergoing the test. Overall, we found that 53 (64%) patients had increased anxiety related to the examination and 30 (36%) patients did not. Among the 53 patients who were anxious about the bone scan, 32 were concerned about the results of the examination, 13 worried about the effects of the radiation, 4 were anxious for both results/radiation, and 4 patients had stress but could not specify the reason. Among the 32 patients who were concerned about the results of the examination, 15 were having their first bone scans, while 17 had already undergone the procedure before. Among the 13 patients who were mainly concerned about the risks of the radiation exposure during the test, 9 were having bone scans for the first time. Out of the 4 patients who feared both the results and radiation, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and 1 had it for several times. Finally, out of the 4 patients who had anxiety about the test but could not identify the reason, 3 were having bone scans for the first time and one had the test before but was claustrophobic. Our findings indicate that most patients (64%) with cancer who underwent a routine bone scan to check for metastatic disease had intense stress related either to the results or the side effects of the examination. However, there were more patients who were concerned about the results of the test rather than the effects of radiation. Among the patients who feared the effects of radioactivity most were having the test for the first time. A previous study in a

  7. Vanishing bone disease of the orbital roof: now you see it, now you don't

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharsono, Ferry; Van Heerden, Jolandi; McAuliffe, William; Ardakani, Nima M.; Franconi, Catherine; Honeybul, Stephen; Lind, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of vascularised orbital roof and calvarial erosions with an associated venous malformation. In the absence of infection, malignancy, trauma and eosinophillic granuloma, the closest previously described entity is vanishing bone disease. Computed tomography (CT), MRI, catheter angiography and pathology were all important in the diagnostic workup to enable surgical planning for biopsy and reconstruction. Ongoing CT and MRI follow-up imaging will determine future treatment planning.

  8. Diagnosis of temporal bone diseases using three-dimensional images with multislice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Yoshihiro; Togami, Taro; Murota, Makiko; Fukunaga, Kotaro; Hino, Ichiro; Sato, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of three-dimensional images with multislice CT in the temporal bone diseases. Fifty-nine cases (26 with medial otitis, 8 choresteatoma, 10 congenital malformation, 3 high jugular bulb, 2 otosclerosis, and 10 others) were included in this study. In the ossicular and inner ear lesions, oblique multiplanar images of the long axis of each ossicle was useful the detection of abnormality. Structural deformity of ossicles and bony labyrinth were clearly delineated by surface rendering images. (author)

  9. Case report 496: Intraosseous gas in Proteus mirabilis osteomyelitis complicating bone infarcts in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, A.C.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Stull, M.A.; Truwit, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Plain film radiographs showed dramatic changes of this rare complication of sickle cell disease in an adult patient, eventually resulting in bilateral amputations of the lower extremities. Cross table radiographs of the knees showed the air-fluid levels without soft tissue swelling or periosteal reaction. The balance of the studies performed confirmed and refined the initial impression that infarction and infection had occurred within the medullary spaces of four long bones. The offending organism was Proteus mirabilis. (orig.)

  10. Case report 496: Intraosseous gas in Proteus mirabilis osteomyelitis complicating bone infarcts in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, A.C.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Stull, M.A.; Truwit, C.L.

    1988-10-01

    Plain film radiographs showed dramatic changes of this rare complication of sickle cell disease in an adult patient, eventually resulting in bilateral amputations of the lower extremities. Cross table radiographs of the knees showed the air-fluid levels without soft tissue swelling or periosteal reaction. The balance of the studies performed confirmed and refined the initial impression that infarction and infection had occurred within the medullary spaces of four long bones. The offending organism was Proteus mirabilis.

  11. MRI bone marrow findings in 63 patients with type I Gaucher's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Duisburg GmbH (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Willers, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Information, Kommunikation und Medientechnologie; Haeussinger, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany). Klinik fuer Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie; Moedder, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom [St.-Franziskus-Hospital Koeln, Akademisches Lehrkrankenhaus der Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether MR bone marrow findings in Gaucher patients may help to identify patients at high risk of developing severe Gaucher bone complications exemplified by avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. Materials and Methods: MR images were obtained in 63 Type I Gaucher patients through a standard protocol using coronal T1 and T2-weighted sequences of the lower extremities. The location and extent of infiltrated marrow was established using a semi-quantitative MRI scoring method (Duesseldorf Gaucher score, DGS) and the morphological pattern of bone marrow involvement determined (whether homogeneous type A or non-homogeneous type B). The active marrow process with bone edema and AVN of the femoral head were also analyzed. Results: Bone marrow involvement was observed in femoral sites more than in tibial sites. A high DGS was significantly correlated with type B morphology and femoral AVN (both p < 0.0001). Splenectomized patients showed a significantly higher Duesseldorf Gaucher score and type B morphology than non-splenectomized patients (both p < 0.05). AVN was seen in 46 % of patients with type B morphology versus 3 % in type A morphology (p < 0.0001). DGS and morphology of bone marrow involvement were not significantly correlated with active marrow processes. Conclusion: Type B marrow morphology and extensive marrow packing were significantly associated with AVN of the femoral head (both p < 0.0001). These patterns are considered predictive and may be employed in a disease management context to alert physicians to the need for urgent therapeutic measures. (orig.)

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and low bone mass: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Low bone mass (osteopenia and osteoporosis is one of the effects associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is very little data from Saudi Arabia on COPD and low bone mass. This retrospective study was done to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in COPD patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU, Alkhobar. Patients and Methods: After obtaining the ethical approval from the research committee, all patients seen between at the King Fahd Hospital of the University between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. The inclusion criteria included a follow up of a minimum 2 years, and the Medical Records should have the details of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 , blood bone profile and bone biomarkers and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan. Patients were labeled as osteopenia if the T score was -<1 to <-2.5 and osteoporosis of <-2.5 as per the WHO definition of osteopenia and osteoporosis. Results: Seventy-three patients were being followed in the clinics and 49 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The average age was 60.6 ± 10.47 years; males were 43 and females 6. Three (6.1% were normal and the remaining 46 (93.9% were with low bone mass. Thirty-two (65.3% were osteoporotic and 14 (28.57% were osteopenic. The average duration of COPD was 4.5 ± 6.2 years. Majority (n = 36, 73.4% of patients were in the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD class II and III. FEV 1 was significantly lower in the patients with low bone mass 1.66 ± 0.60 versus 3.61 ± 0.58 (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Our study shows that over 90% of Saudi Arabian patients with COPD suffer from osteopenia and osteoporosis and unfortunately they remain under-diagnosed and undertreated.

  13. MRI bone marrow findings in 63 patients with type I Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Willers, R.; Haeussinger, D.; Moedder, U.; Dahl, S. vom

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether MR bone marrow findings in Gaucher patients may help to identify patients at high risk of developing severe Gaucher bone complications exemplified by avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. Materials and Methods: MR images were obtained in 63 Type I Gaucher patients through a standard protocol using coronal T1 and T2-weighted sequences of the lower extremities. The location and extent of infiltrated marrow was established using a semi-quantitative MRI scoring method (Duesseldorf Gaucher score, DGS) and the morphological pattern of bone marrow involvement determined (whether homogeneous type A or non-homogeneous type B). The active marrow process with bone edema and AVN of the femoral head were also analyzed. Results: Bone marrow involvement was observed in femoral sites more than in tibial sites. A high DGS was significantly correlated with type B morphology and femoral AVN (both p < 0.0001). Splenectomized patients showed a significantly higher Duesseldorf Gaucher score and type B morphology than non-splenectomized patients (both p < 0.05). AVN was seen in 46 % of patients with type B morphology versus 3 % in type A morphology (p < 0.0001). DGS and morphology of bone marrow involvement were not significantly correlated with active marrow processes. Conclusion: Type B marrow morphology and extensive marrow packing were significantly associated with AVN of the femoral head (both p < 0.0001). These patterns are considered predictive and may be employed in a disease management context to alert physicians to the need for urgent therapeutic measures. (orig.)

  14. Two types of mineral-related matrix vesicles in the bone mineralization of zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L; Zhang, Y; Cui, F Z

    2007-01-01

    Two types of mineral-related matrix vesicle, multivesicular body (MVB) and monovesicle, were detected in the skeletal bone of zebrafish. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of the vesicular inclusions reveal that both types of vesicles contain calcium and phosphorus, suggesting that these vesicles may be involved in mineral ion delivery for the bone mineralization of zebrafish. However, their size and substructure are quite different. Monovesicles, whose diameter ranges from 100 nm to 550 nm, are similar to the previously reported normal matrix vesicles, while MVBs have a larger size of 700-1000 nm in nominal diameter and possess a substructure that is composed of smaller vesicles with their average size around 100 nm. The presence of mineral-related MVBs, which is first identified in zebrafish bone, indicates that the mineralization-associated transportation process of mineral ions is more complicated than is ordinarily imagined

  15. IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzalla Cassione, Emanuele; Stone, John H

    2017-05-01

    Remarkable insights have been gleaned recently with regard to the pathophysiology of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). These findings have direct implications for the development of targeted strategies for the treatment of this condition. Oligoclonal expansions of cells of both the B and T lymphocyte lineages are present in the blood of patients with IgG4-RD. Oligoclonal expansions of plasmablasts are a good biomarker for disease activity. An oligoclonally expanded population of CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes is found not only in the peripheral blood but also at tissue sites of active disease. This cell elaborates cytokines that may drive the fibrosis characteristic of IgG4-RD. T follicular helper cells (Tfhc), particularly the Tfhc2 subset, appear to play a major role in driving the class switch to IgG4 that typifies this disease. The relationship between malignancy and IgG4-RD remains an area of interest. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of IgG4-RD have proceeded swiftly, leading to the identification of a number of potential targeted treatment strategies. The completion of classification criteria for IgG4-RD, an effort supported jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism, will further facilitate studies on this disease.

  16. European origin of patients with Paget's disease of bone in the Buenos Aires area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Acotto, C.; Mautalen, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Paget's bone disease is heterogeneously distributed and several foci of high prevalence have been reported in Europe, United States, Argentina and Australia. The aim of the present work was to determine the ethnic origin of the disease in Buenos Aires using a cross sectional epidemiological study. Sample choice was based on a sampling according to grandparents' nationality. Ninety five percent of Paget patients were of European descent and 5% were non-European, while in the control group the proportion of European descendants is lower: 83% (OR: 3.7; p < 0.007; IC 95%: 1.4-9.7). Within the group of patients with Paget's disease the proportion of Italian and Russian descendants was higher than expected according to the 1914 Argentinean census. The prevalence of Paget's disease among European migrants was higher than in the control group of citizens. Regardless of environmental factors, it is likely that the migrants carried a higher risk of developing the disease

  17. Deoxypyridinoline level in gingival crevicular fluid as alveolar bone loss biomarker in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Wulan Suci Dharmayanti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal diseases have high prevalence in Indonesia. They are caused by bacteria plaque that induced host response to release pro inflammatory mediator. Pro inflammatory mediators and bacteria product cause degradation of collagen fibers in periodontal tissue. Deoxypyridinoline is one of pyridinoline cross-link of collagen type I that can be used as biomarker in bone metabolic diseases, however, their contribution to detect alveolar bone loss in periodontal diseases remains unclear. Purpose: This study was to evaluate deoxypyridinoline level in gingival crevicular fluid as alveolar bone loss biomarker on periodontal disease. Methods: This study used 24 subjects with periodontal diseases and 6 healthy subjects. Dividing of periodontal disease was based on index periodontal. Gingival crevicular fluid was taken at mesial site of maxillary posterior tooth by paper point and deoxypyridinoline be measured by ELISA technique. Results: We found increasing of deoxypyridinoline level following of the severity of periodontal diseases. There was also significant difference between healthy subjects and periodontal diseases subjects (p<0.05. Conclusion: Deoxypyridinoline level in gingiva crevicular fluid can be used as alveolar bone loss biomarker in periodontal disease subjects.Latar belakang: Prevalensi penyakit periodontal di Indonesia cukup tinggi. Ini disebabkan oleh bakteri plak yang merangsang respon tubuh untuk mengeluarkan mediator keradangan. Mediator keradangan dan produk bakteri menyebabkan degradasi serat kolagen jaringan periodontal. Deoksipiridinolin merupakan salah satu ikatan piridinium dari kolagen tipe I yang dapat digunakan sebagai biomarker penyakit metabolisme tubuh. Akan tetapi, penggunaan deoksipiridinolin untuk mendeteksi kehilangan tulang alveolar pada penyakit periodontal masih belum jelas. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui bahwa kadar deoksipiridinolin pada cairan krevikular gingival dapat digunakan

  18. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition.

  19. Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) and bone pain. A case treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, S.; Micke, O.; Schaefer, U.; Willich, N. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2002-05-01

    Background: Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) is a rare disease characterized by a multitopic proliferation of cytologically and/or functionally abnormal tissue mast cells. SMCD preferentially involves the skin, spleen, liver, lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The cause of SMCD is unknown. Bony pain, caused by mast cell infiltration of the marrow cavity, is present in up to 28% of cases and is frequently chronic and difficult to palliate with medical therapy. Case Report: We report one case of refractory bone pain in a 54-year-old female Caucasian patient with advanced SMCD and associated bony involvement, which was treated with radiotherapy for pain palliation. Between 1995 and 1998, the patient was irradiated at four different locations: 1) right shoulder and proximal right humerus, 2) both hands, 3) both knees, 4) left humerus with a total dose of 40 Gy in 2.0 or 2.5 Gy daily fractions. Results: Different results of pain palliation were achieved. In one location the pain was reduced for 55 months until her death due to disease progression, whereas in two other locations a pain control was maintained for 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. In one location, no pain reduction was achieved. Severe side effects were not observed. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy has a role in the control of severe intractable bone pain in patients with advanced SMCD, though in some cases the effect may be short or incomplete. The observed palliation of pain can even differ in the same patient. (orig.)

  20. Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) and bone pain. A case treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, S.; Micke, O.; Schaefer, U.; Willich, N.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) is a rare disease characterized by a multitopic proliferation of cytologically and/or functionally abnormal tissue mast cells. SMCD preferentially involves the skin, spleen, liver, lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The cause of SMCD is unknown. Bony pain, caused by mast cell infiltration of the marrow cavity, is present in up to 28% of cases and is frequently chronic and difficult to palliate with medical therapy. Case Report: We report one case of refractory bone pain in a 54-year-old female Caucasian patient with advanced SMCD and associated bony involvement, which was treated with radiotherapy for pain palliation. Between 1995 and 1998, the patient was irradiated at four different locations: 1) right shoulder and proximal right humerus, 2) both hands, 3) both knees, 4) left humerus with a total dose of 40 Gy in 2.0 or 2.5 Gy daily fractions. Results: Different results of pain palliation were achieved. In one location the pain was reduced for 55 months until her death due to disease progression, whereas in two other locations a pain control was maintained for 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. In one location, no pain reduction was achieved. Severe side effects were not observed. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy has a role in the control of severe intractable bone pain in patients with advanced SMCD, though in some cases the effect may be short or incomplete. The observed palliation of pain can even differ in the same patient. (orig.)

  1. Computed tomography of the petrous bone in otosclerosis and Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.A.M. de.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine if, in the case of otosclerosis and Meniere's disease, one could obtain more information with high resolution computer tomography than with conventional polytomography. In the first part of this thesis a brief survey of some principles of computer tomography is given and a computer tomographic atlas of the normal petrous bone in the otoradiologic planes used in this study. In the introduction of the second part some aspects of otosclerose are discussed (definition, clinical aspects). Subsequently a treatment is given of a part of the histopathology referring to the otospongiotic and otosclerotic changes in the labyrinthine capsule. A survey is given of preceding studies on the petrous bone in the case of otosclerosis; in these studies mostly classical planigraphic techniques were employed. In the third part some general aspects of Meniere's disease are discussed: definition, incidence, clinical aspects and pathophysiology. It is assumed that the symptoms of Meniere's disease are caused by an overpressure in the endolymphatic areas of the labyrinthum ('hydrops'), however till now a proof for this is still not given. The ductus endolympathicus, which passes through a channel in the petrous bone (the vestibular aqueduct), plays a role in the drainage of endolymph. Stagnation of this drainage could cause hydrops. (Auth.)

  2. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD is an increasingly recognized immune-mediated condition comprised of a collection of disorders that share specific pathological, serological, and clinical features. IgG4-RD is a fibroinflammatory condition with a tendency to form tumors with inflammatory infiltrate with IgG4 rich plasma cells and elevation of serum IgG4, which may affect virtually every organ and tissue. IgG4-related ophthalmic disease may present as dacryoadenitis, myositis, or involvement of other orbital tissue. Hypophysitis or pachymeningitis may manifest as cranial neuropathies. The diagnosis of IgG4-RD is based on a typical clinical scenario, supportive laboratory test, expected radiological characteristics, and distinct histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressives form the mainline treatment.

  3. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  4. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow--peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relative accretion of /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate by forming and resorbing bone systems in rats: its significance in the pathologic basis of bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Tow, D.E.; Kapur, K.K.; Wells, H.

    1976-01-01

    The relative roles of osteogenesis and osteolysis in the production of positive radionuclide images of skeletal lesions were investigated. The uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate (Tc-PP) by each process was measured in an animal model that permitted bone formation and resorption to be studied independently. Ten rats received intramuscular implants of bone-forming demineralized matrix (DM) and resorbing devitalized bone (DV). Radiographs and Tc-PP scintiscans were made each week thereafter. At 6 to 10 weeks, the implants and normal bone samples were removed, counted for /sup 99m/Tc, and examined histologically. The uptake of Tc-PP by DM implants was first detected on images made 3 weeks after implantation, and by DV implants, 1 to 2 weeks later. Serial radiography showed progressive calcification of DM and resorption of DV implants. Microscopic examinations of undecalcified sections, stained with a modified Goldner preparation, revealed vital-bone formation in the DM implants and osteoclastic resorption in the DV. Activity counts per gram of DM and DV implants were, respectively, 200 percent and 90 percent that of normal bone. Since only the bone-forming system (DM) accumulated Tc-PP at greater than normal concentrations, this study indicates that positive bone images of osteolytic lesions solely reflect compensatory osteogenic responses

  6. Chondrosarcoma of bone complicating Ollier's disease: Report of a favourable response to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, A.; Ball, D.; Pitman, A.; Fox, R.; King, K.

    2003-01-01

    Because chondrosarcoma of bone is traditionally thought to be a radioresistant malignancy, it is usually managed surgically. We report a case of multifocal chondrosarcoma arising in Ollier's disease for which the patient declined surgery. He was given a course of radical radiotherapy that resulted in symptom palliation and a radiologically confirmed remission that not only palliated his symptoms but also enabled him to achieve his goal of pursuing his profession before he died, 16 months later of multifocal sarcomatous transformation and metastatic disease. It is concluded that in patients with inoperable chondrosarcoma, radiotherapy can provide palliative benefit. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. A fresh look at metabolic bone diseases in reptiles and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaphake, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic bone diseases (MBDs) are a common presenting complaint in reptiles and amphibians to veterinarians; however, understanding of the causes and diagnostic and treatment options is often extrapolated from human or other mammalian medicine models. Although the roles of UV-B, calcium, phosphorus, and cholecalciferol are better understood in some MBDs, there remain many X factors that are not. Likewise, quantitative diagnosis of MBDs has been difficult not only in terms of staging a disease but also regarding whether or not a condition is present. Treatment options also present challenges in corrective husbandry and diet modifications, medication/modality selection, and dosing/regimen parameters. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Bone Marrow in 143 Lymphomas: The Relative Frequency and Pattern of Involvement, Secondary Myelopathies, Pitfalls and Diagnostic Validity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL BOLKAINY, T.M.N.; ABO DEIF, W.S.; MOKHTAR, N.; GOUDA, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the frequency of bone marrow (BM) involvement by both bone marrow aspirate and biopsy (BMA and BMB, respectively) procedures in established cases of lymphomas at initial presentation, and to study the relative frequency of marrow disease in relation to lymphoma types, patterns of infiltration and the 2ry associated changes, as well as the diagnostic challenges. Moreover, the diagnostic validity of BMA is tested taking the results of the BMB as the true test results, in order to determine the role of each procedure in the diagnostic approach of marrow infiltration. Patients and Method: This is a retrospective study carried out on 143 non consecutive Egyptian patients with lymphomas obtained from a private series during the years 2005 to 2008. Criteria of inclusion included the availability of full medical records and material (medical and pathological), patient consent, nodal disease with no therapy prior to BM sampling, except in 7 patients who had another 2nd BMB following therapy. BMA and BMB were performed as part of the routine workup for diagnosis and staging of lymphoma. The patients had a male to female sex ratio of 2.6:1 and a wide age range from 4 to 74 years. Results: In the present series, 64 cases out of the 143 lymphoma patients studied (44.8%) had a BM disease. Involvement was mostly bilateral (80%). Patients older than 40 years showed higher incidence of bone marrow involvement. There was complete concordance (100%) between both diagnostic procedures in the detection of 76 marrow disease-free lymphoma patients. BMA showed no false positive results and a low rate of deference that makes of it an ideal screening test. Three deferred smears of CLL for BMB diagnosis were all positive for involvement. However, in a total number of 64 BMB positive patients, aspirates could only identify lymphoma involvement in 42 lymphoma patients and missed 22 patients with a BM disease, with an overall sensitivity rate of 65

  9. Shape of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone related to breed on MRI of 200 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Xander; Sparkes, Andy; Dennis, Ruth

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The MRI features of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone have not previously been described in the literature. The aims of this study were three-fold. Firstly, to document variations in cerebellar shape on MRI in neurologically normal cats to support our hypothesis that crowding of the contents of the caudal fossa or herniation of the cerebellar vermis through the foramen magnum occurs frequently as an anatomical variant. Secondly, to document variations in the morphology of the occipital bone. Thirdly, to see whether these variations in shape of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone could be associated with head conformation, such as brachycephaly. Methods The imaging records of the small animal clinic at the Animal Health Trust between 2000 and 2013 were searched retrospectively to identify adult cats that had undergone high-field (1.5 T) MRI investigation which included the brain. Exclusion criteria included evidence of intracranial disease or the presence of cervical syringomyelia. Midline sagittal T2-weighted and transverse images were used to assess the occipital bone morphology and cerebellar shape, and to measure the width to length ratio of the cranial cavity. Results Fourteen different breeds were represented. A cerebellar shape consistent with crowding of the contents of the caudal fossa, or herniation through the foramen magnum was present in 40% of the entire population. Persians (recognised as a brachycephalic breed) had a higher proportion of cerebellar crowding or herniation than all other breeds. There was no significant difference in the distribution of occipital bone morphology between these breed groups. Conclusions and relevance It is important to recognise morphological variations of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone in order to avoid false-positive diagnoses of raised intracranial pressure and pathological herniation on MRI.

  10. Bone marrow scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-chloride. A clinical value for the hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujishima, Mamoru; Hiraki, Yoshio; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Yoshihiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Aono, Kaname; Yorimitsu, Seiichi; Takahashi, Isao

    1988-10-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy with indium chloride (/sup 111/In) was performed in fifty-one patients with the hematological diseases. The results of the investigation were that 1) in all patients, as well as in patients with aplastic anemia, no correlation was there between the degree of the indium chloride accumulation and peripheral blood counts, 2) in patients with aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) a tendency to reduction in uptake of indium chloride in bone marrow, 3) in patients with these two good correlation between the degree of indium chloride accumulation and histology of the erythroid bone marrow, but in patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and atypical leukemia no correlation between the two, so it seemed unlikely that indium chloride should reflect the effective production of erythrocytes, 4) four patients with leukemia were studied with indium chloride bone marrow imaging two times to evaluate their responses to chemotherapy, and peripheral expansion was no change or reduced in two patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who obtained complete remission, but on the other hand, it enlarged in one patient with acute myelocytic leukemia who obtained partial remission, and 5) in two patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia it enlarged up to the ankle joints, which was considerably specific.

  11. Instrumental activation and X-ray fluorescent analysis of human bone in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichick, V.Y.

    1994-01-01

    A complex of methods for the in-vitro and in-vivo bone analysis was developed. Among the in-vitro methods are: INAA with reactor and 14 MeV neutrons, IGAA with 25 MeV linear accelerator; XRF with 55 Fe, 109 Cd, 241 Am radionuclide sources. Twenty-five elements could be analyzed by it: N, F, Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, Cs, Ba, Tb, Hg, and Pb. Among the in-vivo methods are: INAA of band, foot and spine Ca and limb bone tumour Ca, Na and Cl with 238 Pu-Be neutron sources; IGAA of N and P in limb bone tumours; XRF of tooth Ca, Zn, Sr and Pb with 109 Cs radionuclide sources. The methods developed were used both in clinical and experimental medicine for studying the healthy human and animal bone with different diseases and environmental influence. (author) 28 refs.; 7 tabs

  12. Prospective evaluation of the super scan of metabolic bone disease (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.U.; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.A.; Khan, S.M.; Rauf, M.

    1999-01-01

    A total of 27 cases (23 females and 4 males) having super scan of metabolic bone disease were prospectively evaluated over a period of 2 years (Jan. 1997 to Dec. 1998) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD), institute of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine (IRNUM), Peshawar to identify various causes for the super scan picture on Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy in our clinical environment. After the three observer confirmation of the bone scan, the serum calcium and Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) estimation was done. The patients having serum PTH greater than 250 Pg/L under went two phase Parathyroid MIBI Scintigraphy 2PP MIBI scan) for the detection of parathyroid adenoma. The patients having positive scans for parathyroid Adenoma were subjected to surgery and histopathological confirmation was obtained. Selected cases under went a trial of deport preparation of vitamin D3 calcium supplementation. The final diagnosis of 16 patients was osteomalacia (59%), six patients had histopathologically confirmed parathyroid adenoma (22.2%), one case each was that of toxic thyroid adenoma (3.7%) and chronic renal failure (3.7%). In three cases the final diagnosis was not reached (11.21%). Osteomalacia and parathyroid adenoma are the two most common causes for the super scan picture on bone scintigraphy. (author)

  13. Quantitative assessment of metabolic bone disease in rat models by dual tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Fumishige; Seto, Hikaru

    1989-05-01

    The usefulness of radionuclide techniques for early differential diagnosis of metabolic bone disease has been controversial. We tried to develop a new method to distinguish alterations in bone metabolism prior to radiologic changes, measuring 24-hr whole-body retention (WBR) and femoral uptake of two radiopharmaceuticals (/sup 47/Ca-chloride, /sup 99m/Tc-MDT). Control normal (C), osteoporosis (P), osteomalacia (M) and steroid-induced osteoporosis (S) were produced in 60 eight-week old Wistar male rats by means of dietary manipulation and steroid administration. Fine detail radiographs of the femurs and bone specimens were obtained over six weeks at two week intervals. Good correlation between WBR and femoral uptake of /sup 47/Ca was noted (r=0.86, p<0.01). WBR ratios of /sup 47/Ca were significantly higher in the M and S groups and were lower in the P group when compared to the C group throughout the study. WBR ratios of /sup 99m/Tc-MDP were significantly higher in the M group and were lower in the S group from the 2nd week. Fine detail radiographs analyzed by microdensitometry revealed significant osteopenia in the S, M and P groups from the 4th week. The dual tracer method was found to distinguish alterations in bone metabolism in the groups examined prior to detectable radiologic changes. (author).

  14. Differentiation of malignant and degenerative benign bone disease using 99mTc-citrate scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Rui; Jin Jianhua; Li Sijin; Li Xianfeng; Zhang Xiaojuan; Ren Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To differentiate malignant and degenerative benign bone disease using 99m Tc- citrate scintigraphy. Methods: Thirty-nine patients (92 lesions) with confirmed malignant bone disease or degenerative benign bone disease were studied, for which the results of 99m Te-methylene diphosphonate( 99m Tc- MDP) scintigraphy were positive. 99m Tc-citrate scintigraphy was performed within a time interval of 2-7 days after 99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy. Visual analysis and semiquantitative analysis were applied. Each lesion was scored as malignant or benign, which was independently verified, using conventional techniques (histopathology, X-ray, CT, MRI and clinical follow up). Results: In visual analysis of 99m Tc-citrate imaging, most malignant lesions (35/48, 72.92%) clearly showed high radioactivity accumulation, while most benign lesions (39/44, 88.64%) had not obviously visible uptake of 99m Tc-citrate. In semiquantitative analysis of 99m Tc- citrate image, malignant lesions demonstrated a higher lesion-to-background radioisotope uptake ratio (RUR) than that of benign degenerative lesions (1.47 ± 0.42 vs. 1.09 ± 0.38, t=2.887, P 99m Tc-MDP in the two groups is of the same (1.96 ± 0.25 vs. 1.87 ± 0.21, t=1.178, P>0.20). Conclusion: 99m Tc- citrate scintigraphy is a promising method to differentiate malignant from benign degenerative lesions seen as areas of increased activity on 99m Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy. (authors)

  15. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan; Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon

    2001-01-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm 2 in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm 2 and 0.765g/cm 2 . Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures

  16. Skeletal-related events in urological cancer patients with bone metastasis. A multicenter study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, Akira; Koga, Hirofumi; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of skeletal-related events (SRE) in urological cancer patients with bone metastases in Japan. Five hundred eleven patients with urological cancer and documented bone metastases treated from January 2003 to April 2008 in ten Japanese institutions were included in a retrospective analysis. Type and incidence of SRE (fracture, radiotherapy, spinal cord compression, surgery, hypercalcemia, and bone pain) were determined from patient medical records. The overall incidence of SRE, including 'pain', was 61%. The most common event was radiotherapy for bone metastases, with an incidence of 31%. The overall incidence of events seemed to be similar among Japanese and Western patients with prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma when comparing data with previously published reports. Nevertheless, a much lower incidence of fracture (19.1%) was observed in Japanese renal cell carcinoma patients. The overall incidence of SRE in Japanese urological cancer patients with bone metastasis was similar to that in Western patients, but the incidence of fracture was lower in Japanese renal cancer patients. (author)

  17. Is tremor related to celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameghino, Lucia; Rossi, Malco Damian; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2017-06-14

    Neurological features in celiac disease (CD) are not rare (5%-36%), but tremor is scarcely described. Subjects with CD and healthy controls completed an online survey using WHIGET tremor rating scale. One thousand five hundred and twelve subjects completed the survey, finally 674 CD patients and 290 healthy subjects were included. A higher prevalence of tremor in CD patients was observed in comparison to controls (28% vs 14%, P tremor in CD patients with and without tremor was 25% and 20% ( P = 0.2), while in the control group it was 41% and 10% ( P tremor showed a higher frequency of family history of tremor when compared to CD patients with tremor (41.5% vs 24.6%, P = 0.03). The results suggested that tremor in CD might be more frequent and possibly related to the disease itself and not due to associated essential tremor.

  18. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P

    2012-01-01

    -up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic...... and associated diseases (rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis) in order to have a uniform definition of severity, control and risk, usable in most situations. It is based on the appropriate diagnosis, availability and accessibility of treatments, treatment responsiveness...... and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies....

  19. Spectrum of bone marrow changes in patients of chronic kidney disease (stage iii, iv and v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, R.K.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.Q.; Arshad, U.

    2017-01-01

    To see the various hematological changes in the bone marrow of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III, IV and V. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study.Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in the department of haematology (Pathology), Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration was one year, from Mar 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Patients of both sexes and all age groups with CKD stage III, IV and V were included in this study. Patients' histories were recorded. Complete blood counts, bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy were done and evaluated microscopically. Mean blood counts of the patients in three groups of CKD were compared. Frequencies of various bone marrow (BM) findings in patients of CKD were calculated. Results: Out of 57 patients, 41 (71.9%) were males while 16 (28%) were females. Mean age was 60 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean hemoglobin, mean white cell count and mean platelets count of the patients in three groups of CKD. Reactive changes due to underlying CKD and inflammation were the most frequent findings in the BM of the patients. Conclusion: Anaemia of mild to moderate severity and reactive changes in the BM are the most frequent haematological findings encountered in patients suffering from advanced stage CKD. Since CKD is predominantly a disease of the elderly so it is not rare to find the co-morbidities including plasmacytosis, malignancies and their effects on the BM in patients of CKD. (author)

  20. Can bone loss be reversed by antithyroid drug therapy in premenopausal women with Graves' disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belsing Tina Z

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Hyperthyroidism can lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk particularly in postmenopausal women, but the mechanism behind is still unclear. Objective Prospective examination of the influence of thyroid hormones and/or thyroid autoantibodies on BMD in premenopause. Design We have examined 32 premenopausal women with untreated active Graves' disease from time of diagnosis, during 18 months of antithyroid drug therapy (ATD and additionally 18 months after discontinuing ATD. Variables of thyroid metabolism, calcium homeostasis and body composition were measured every 3 months. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured at baseline, 18 ± 3 and 36 ± 3 months. Data were compared to base line, a sex- and age matched control group and a group of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis treated with non-suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Results The study showed significantly (p Conclusion The results indicated a clinically relevant impact of thyroid function on bone modulation also in premenopausal women with Graves' disease, and further indicated the possibility for a direct action of TRAb on bones.

  1. Vitamin E Phosphate Coating Stimulates Bone Deposition in Implant-related Infections in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Bottagisio, Marta; Maraldi, Susanna; Violatto, Martina B; Bortolin, Monica; De Vecchi, Elena; Bigini, Paolo; Drago, Lorenzo; Romanò, Carlo L

    2018-06-01

    Implant-related infections are associated with impaired bone healing and osseointegration. In vitro antiadhesive and antibacterial properties and in vivo antiinflammatory effects protecting against bone loss of various formulations of vitamin E have been demonstrated in animal models. However, to the best of our knowledge, no in vivo studies have demonstrated the synergistic activity of vitamin E in preventing bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implants, thus supporting the bone-implant integration. The purpose of this study was to test whether a vitamin E phosphate coating on titanium implants may be able to reduce (1) the bacterial colonization of prosthetic implants and (2) bone resorption and osteomyelitis in a rat model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced implant-related infection. Twelve rats were bilaterally injected in the femurs with S aureus UAMS-1-Xen40 and implanted with uncoated or vitamin E phosphate-coated titanium Kirschner wires without local or systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Eight rats represented the uninfected control group. A few hours after surgery, two control and three infected animals died as a result of unexpected complications. With the remaining rats, we assessed the presence of bacterial contamination with qualitative bioluminescence imaging and Gram-positive staining and with quantitative bacterial count. Bone changes in terms of resorption and osteomyelitis were quantitatively analyzed through micro-CT (bone mineral density) and semiquantitatively through histologic scoring systems. Six weeks after implantation, we found only a mild decrease in bacterial count in coated versus uncoated implants (Ti versus controls: mean difference [MD], -3.705; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.416 to -2.994; p E-treated group compared with uncoated implants (knee joint: MD, -11.88; 95% CI, -16.100 to -7.664; p E-coated nails compared with the uncoated nails. These preliminary findings indicate that vitamin E phosphate implant coatings can exert a

  2. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Sara; Brundin, Charlotte; Karlsson, Magnus; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether bone mass and metabolism are impaired in genetically at-risk children with screening-detected celiac disease. Included were 71 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 10.0 ± 0.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years and 142 matched controls and 30 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 3.3 ± 0.4 years of age presently on a gluten-free diet for 6.9 ± 1.1 years and 60 matched controls. All participants were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD) of total body and spine by dual x-ray absorptiometry, serum 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. At diagnosis, screening-detected celiac disease children as compared to controls had a mean -0.03 g/cm reduced BMD of both total body and spine (P = 0.009 and P = 0.005, respectively), a mean -11.4 nmol/L lower level of 25(OH) vitamin D3 (P celiac disease as compared to controls (P celiac disease have reduced BMD, lower levels of vitamin D3, higher levels of PTH, and signs of systemic inflammation compared with controls. These differences were not found in celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, indicating that children with screening-detected celiac disease benefit from an early diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy for the determination of sex and age related Ca/P ratio at different bone sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The Ca/P ratio of normal cortical and trabecular rat bone was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Semiquantitative analysis was carried out using ratio techniques to draw conclusions on how age, sex and bone site affect the relative composition of calcium and phosphorus. Results show that Ca/P ratio is not sex dependent; quite the opposite, bone sites exhibit variations in elemental stoichiometry where femoral sections demonstrate higher Ca/P ratio than rear and front tibias. Age-related changes are more distinct for cortical bone in comparison with the trabecular bone. The latter's Ca/P ratio remains unaffected from all the parameters under study. This study confirms that AES is able to successfully quantify bone mineral main elements when certain critical points, related to the experimental conditions, are addressed effectively.

  4. Vitamin D, Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: A role in the pathogenesis and management of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Damasiewicz, Matthew John

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by the presence of proteinuria or decreased kidney function, with a prevalence of 10-15% in the adult population. CKD can progress to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and is associated with progressive abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism, defined as CKD mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The use of vitamin D in CKD, the optimal level for initiating treatment and the use of current and novel biomarkers in the management of ...

  5. A murine model of graft-versus-host disease induced by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiangwei; Jin Jiangang; Ning Hongmei; Yu Liquan; Feng Kai; Chen Hu; Wang Lisha

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish the model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in mice with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Methods: Bone marrow cells were combined with spleen cells of male donor C57BL/6 mice according to different proportions, then were transfused into female postradiation recipient BALB/c mice. General state, life span and histopathology of the recipient mice and detected chimera were observed. Results and Conclusion:The recipient mice groups which accepted above 5 x 10 6 donor spleen cells developed acute GVHD after different peroids of time. The GVHD model in mice after allo-BMT was successfully established. The transfusion of 5 x 10 6 -5 x 10 7 spleen cells may be adequate to establish the murine model of GVHD for the prevention and treatment of GVHD. The number of murine spleen cells can be chosen according to the experimental requirement. (authors)

  6. Bilateral Knee Pain Associated with Bone Infarction in a Patient with Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Oktayoglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 31-years-old female patient with severe pain in both knees who had been diagnosed as Behcet’s disease (BD for 12 years. She had had a history of complications due to BD including superior vena cava thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, uveitis, and erythema nodosum and has reported the administration of corticosteroid therapy irregularly. After radiologic evaluation, she has been diagnosed with bone infarction of both left and right knee with the existance of lupus anticoagulants (LA positivity. Severe joint pain without the evidence of arthritis must alert the clinician to the possibility of bone necrosis of the extremity, although those may rarely occur bilateral in BD.

  7. Use of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, the trabecular bone score and quantitative computed tomography in the evaluation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    In subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who suffer a minimal trauma fracture, the problem is to differentiate between osteoporosis and the various forms of renal bone disease associated with CKD-mineral and bone disorder. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that renal osteodystrophy may coexist with osteoporosis. The World Health Organization's bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteopenia ( -2.5 < T-score < -1.0) and osteoporosis (a T-score ≤ -2.5) may be used in patients with CKD stages 1-3. In CKD stages 4-5, BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is less predictive and may underestimate fracture risk. The development of absolute fracture risk (AFR) algorithms, such as FRAX® and the Garvan absolute fracture risk calculator, to predict risk of fracture over a given time (usually 10 years) aims to incorporate non-BMD risk factors into the clinical assessment. FRAX® has been shown to be useful to assess fracture risk in CKD but may underestimate fracture risk in advanced CKD. The trabecular bone score is a measure of grey scale homogeneity obtained from spine DXA, which correlates to trabecular microarchitecture and is an independent risk factor for fracture. Recent data demonstrate the potential utility of the trabecular bone score adjustment of AFR through the FRAX® algorithm in subjects with CKD. Parameters of bone microarchitecture using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) or high-resolution pQCT are also able to discriminate fracture status in subjects with CKD. However, there are at present no convincing data that the addition of pQCT or high-resolution pQCT parameters to DXA BMD improves fracture discrimination. More advanced estimates of bone strength derived from measurements of micro-architecture, by QCT-derived finite element analysis may be incorporated into AFR algorithms in the future. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. [Effect of tumour necrosis factor α blockade on bone metabolism in chronic inflammatory joint diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Del Rey, Francisco Javier; García Portales, Rosa; Haro Liger, Manuel; Rodríguez Andreu, José; Casals Sánchez, José Luis; Pérez González, Rita

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF treatments on bone mineral density (BMD), bone remodelling markers (BRM) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in patients with chronic inflammatory joint diseases. A longitudinal prospective study was performed under clinical practice conditions on 31 patients diagnosed of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthropathy and ankylosing spondylitis who had received treatment with anti-TNF alpha drugs for one year. BMD, OPG and RANKL soluble form (sRANKL) were studied at the onset and end of the study. During the study (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 month), disease activity (SDAI, BASDAI and CRP), functional capacity (HAQ, BASFI), BRM and vitamin D were studied. BMD was not modified after one year of treatment. The patients who took corticosteroids had a mean bone mass loss of 3% in the lumbar spine (±1.6, P=.02). In regards to the BRM, did not experience significant changes over the course of the study. Disease activity, both SDAI (P=.002) and BASDAI (P=.002), decreased. OPG was maintained without changes during the year of treatment while both the sRANKL (0.28±0.22, P=.013) and sRANKL/OPG ratio significantly decreased (0.04±0.03, P=.031). The patients being treated with anti-TNF did not present with a significant loss of DMO during the study (one year), at the same time experiencing an improvement in disease activity. This protection has been clearer in the responding patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of peripheral serotonin on leptin-brain serotonin axis, bone metabolism and strength in growing rats with experimental chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Dariusz; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Znorko, Beata; Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Lipowicz, Paweł; Doroszko, Michał; Karbowska, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in decreased bone strength. Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the critical regulators of bone health, fulfilling distinct functions depending on its synthesis site: brain-derived serotonin (BDS) favors osteoblast proliferation, whereas gut-derived serotonin (GDS) inhibits it. We assessed the role of BDS and peripheral leptin in the regulation of bone metabolism and strength in young rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. BDS synthesis was accelerated during CKD progression. Decreased peripheral leptin in CKD rats was inversely related to BDS content in the hypothalamus, brainstem and frontal cortex. Serotonin in these brain regions affected bone strength and metabolism in the studied animals. The direct effect of circulating leptin on bone was not shown in uremia. At the molecular level, there was an inverse association between elevated GDS and the expression of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (Creb) gene in bone of CKD animals. In contrast, increased expression of activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) was shown, which was associated with GDS-dependent transcription factor 1 (Foxo1), clock gene - Cry-1, cell cycle genes: c-Myc, cyclins, and osteoblast differentiation genes. These results identified a previously unknown molecular pathway, by which elevated GDS can shift in Foxo1 target genes from Creb to Atf4-dependent response, disrupting the leptin-BDS - dependent gene pathway in the bone of uremic rats. Thus, in the condition of CKD the effect of BDS and GDS on bone metabolism and strength can't be distinguished. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The mechanobiology of obesity and related diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Benayahu, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the state-of-knowledge in the study of the relationships between mechanical loading states in tissues and common pathophysiologies related to increase in mass of adipose tissues and/or hyperglycemia which eventually lead to obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, metabolic inflammations, certain types of cancer and other related diseases. There appears to be an interaction between the loading states in tissues and cells and these chronic conditions, as well as with factors such as age, gender and genetics of the individual. Bioengineering has made key contributions to this research field in providing technologies for cell biomechanics experimentation, microscopy and image processing, tissue engineering and multi-scale, multi-physics computational modeling. Topics at the frontier of this field of study include: the continuous monitoring of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation in response to mechanical factors such as stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and...

  11. Thoracic radiation therapy before autologous bone marrow transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.W.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.; Crump, M.; Keating, A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between radiation therapy (RT) and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for recurrent/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD). Between December 1986 and December 1992, 59 patients previously treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital underwent HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) and ABMT, performed for refractory (13 patients) or relapsed (46 patients) HD. RT was incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete control of disease prior to ABMT. RT was given before ABMT in 33 patients, and after ABMT in 4 patients. Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. With a median follow-up of 4.6 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 41%±14% at 5 years. We observed 37 deaths, and 10 of these were TR deaths. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, 3 of these solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure with complicating sepsis as a major medical problem. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 survivors (mean 105 days; range 0-263 days) (P=0.026). Among 9 patients with ABMT within 50 days of thoracic RT, 6 had TR death. In contrast, among the 35 patients without thoracic RT (26 no RT, 9 non-thoracic RT), there were only 2 TR deaths. The 4 patients treated with mantle RT post-ABMT had no serious pulmonary complications. The use of thoracic RT before HDCT and ABMT was associated with a high post-transplant mortality rate. It was most evident in patients who received thoracic RT within 50 days prior to ABMT, or when the target volume included large volume of lung. We recommend that the use of

  12. Progranulin concentration in relation to bone mineral density among obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milajerdi, Alireza; Maghbooli, Zhila; Mohammadi, Farzad; Hosseini, Banafsheh; Mirzaei, Khadijeh

    2018-01-01

    Adipose tissue, particularly visceral adipose tissue, secretes a variety of cytokines, among which progranulin is a glycoprotein related to the immune system. Along with other secreted proteins, progranulin may be associated with bone mineral density. The aim of this study was to find out whether there are associations between the progranulin and bone mineral density among obese people. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 244 obese participants (aged 22-52). Serum progranulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, oxidised-low dencity lipoprotein, tumor necrosis factor-α, parathormone, vitamin D, and interleukins of 1 β, 4, 6, 10, 13, and 17 concentrations were measured. Anthropometric measurements, body composition and bone mineral density were also assessed. Serum progranulin was directly associated with interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β, while it had a negative association with interleukin-17 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We also observed a statistically significant direct association between progranulin concentration and visceral fat, abdominal fat, waist, abdominal and hip circumferences, hip T-score, and Z-score and T-score for the lumbar region. A partial correlation test has also shown a significant positive correlation regarding serum progranulin and the hip Z-score. Moreover, progranulin level is inversely associated with ospteopenia (P = 0.04 and CI: 0.17,0.96). Our study revealed that central obesity may be related to increased progranulin concentration. In addition, progranulin concentration was directly related to bone formation parameters, which indicates the protective effects of progranulin on bone density. Further studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms underlying these associations.

  13. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D.

  14. Premature hair greying may predict reduced bone mineral density in Graves' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leary, A C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Premature hair greying has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), and it may be more frequent in Graves\\' disease. AIMS: To determine whether premature greying is associated with reduced BMD in women with Graves\\' disease and in control women, and to examine whether premature greying is more common in Graves\\' disease. METHODS: Premature greying (> 50% grey by 40 years) and BMD were determined in 44 women with a history of Graves\\' disease and 133 female controls referred for routine BMD measurement. Exclusion criteria included diseases or drugs known to affect BMD. RESULTS: Mean Z and T scores at the lumbar spine were significantly lower (P < 0.04) in subjects with premature greying than in those not prematurely grey among women with Graves\\' disease, but not among control women. Multiple regression confirmed this difference between Graves\\' and control women (P = 0.041). There were no differences at other measurement sites. Of Graves\\' patients, 36% were prematurely grey compared with 25% of control women (P = 0.14). CONCLUSION: Premature greying may be a weak marker for reduced BMD in women with a history of Graves\\' disease, but it is not a marker in normal women.

  15. [Exercise for prevention of osteoporosis and other lifestyle-related diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takao

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases including hypertension, dyslipidemia (hyperlipidemia) and diabetes increases with aging, and all these conditions are risk factors of arteriosclerotic diseases such as cerebrovascular event (stroke) and myocardial infarction. The term "metabolic domino" has been used to describe the collective concept of the development and progression of these lifestyle-related diseases, the sequence of events, and the progression process of complications. Like the first tile of a domino toppling game, undesirable lifestyle such as overeating and underexercising first triggers obesity, and is followed in succession by onset of an insulin resistance state (underlied by a genetic background indigenous to Japanese) , hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and further postprandial hyperglycemia (the pre-diabetic state) , the so-called metabolic syndrome, at around the same time. On the other hand, apart from the other lifestyle-related diseases, the prevalence of osteoporosis also increases rapidly accompanying aging. Osteoporosis is known to be strongly related to disorders due to the metabolic domino such as arteriosclerosis and vascular calcification, and a new disease category called "osteo-vascular interaction" has attracted attention recently. Regarding "osteo-vascular interaction" , a close relation between bone density loss or osteoporotic changes and vascular lesion-associated lifestyle-related diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes has been reported. Therefore, as a common preventive factor for bone mass loss or osteoporosis and lifestyle-related diseases including hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes (osteo-vascular interaction) , exercise has been recognized anew as an important non-pharmaceutical therapy that should take top priority. This article overviews the evidence of exercise therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis and other lifestyle-related diseases, from the viewpoint of health promotion, especially of

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van 't Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-11-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2 -/- ) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2 -/- mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2 -/- mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2 -/- mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2 -/- mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van ‘t Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. Methods OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2−/−) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2−/− mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Results Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2−/− mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2−/− mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2−/− mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. PMID:26698846

  18. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Giro, Gabriela; Taubman, Martin A; Han, Xiaozhe; Mayer, Marcia P A; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2010-11-08

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, we discuss earlier studies of immune intervention, ultimately leading to the identification of bacteria-reactive lymphocytes as the cellular source of osteoclast-induction factor lymphokine (now called RANKL) in the context of periodontal bone resorption. Next, we consider (1) the effects of periodontal bacteria on RANKL production from a variety of adaptive immune effector cells, as well as fibroblasts, in inflamed periodontal tissue and (2) the bifunctional roles (upregulation vs. downregulation) of LPS produced from periodontal bacteria in a RANKL-induced osteoclast-signal pathway. Future studies in these two areas could lead to new therapeutic approaches for the management of PD by down-modulating RANKL production and/or RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in the context of host immune responses against periodontal pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulatessclerostin in Van Buchem disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Kneissel, Michaela; Keller, Hansjoerg; Baptist, Myma; Chang, Jessie; Collette, Nicole M.; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-15

    Mutations in distant regulatory elements can negatively impact human development and health, yet due to the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem disease (VB), a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (sost) from normal (hSOSTwt) or Van Buchem(hSOSTvb D) alleles. Only the hSOSTwt allele faithfully expressed high levels of human sost in the adult bone and impacted bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a sost specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human sost expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the E14.5 mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.

  20. Bone disease in patients awaiting liver transplantation. Has the situation improved in the last two decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monegal, Ana; Navasa, Miquel; Peris, Pilar; Colmenero, Jordi; Cuervo, Andrea; Muxí, Africa; Gifre, Laia; Guañabens, Núria

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there has been speculation about the possibility of a reduction in the incidence of fractures after liver transplantation (LT) because of changes in the characteristics of candidates and the use of different immunosuppressive therapies. We analyzed the characteristics of LT candidates (CTC) and compared them with historical data from a group of LT candidate patients (HTC). Data from 60 CTC patients consecutively included in a screening program of metabolic bone disease were compared with data from 60 HTC patients prospectively evaluated between 1992 and 1993. In all patients, we analyzed the clinical and laboratory characteristics, bone mineral density (BMD) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and skeletal fractures. Patients in the CTC group were older than patients in the HTC group. The CTC group had lower femoral neck T scores. No differences were observed between groups in the proportion of patients with osteoporosis (22 vs. 30 %, p = ns) or fractures (36 vs. 33 %, p = ns). The percentage of patients with normal BMD decreased from 38 to 20 %. 25(OH)D values were low in both groups. Only 7.5 % of the CTC patients received calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation. The prevalence of fractures among CTC patients was similar to that seen two decades ago. At present, candidates for LT are older and have lower femoral bone mass. Vitamin D deficiency remains frequent; however, calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation is uncommon.

  1. Role of TAF12 in the Increased VDR Activity in Paget’s Disease of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, 980 West Walnut Street, R3, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. E ‐mail: groodman@iu.edu ORIGINAL ARTICLE JBMR...and B. Data are expressed as the mean SD (n¼ 25); p< 0.01, significantly different from OCLs formedwith the same treatment inWTmouse cultures. ( E ...Interleukin 6. A potential autocrine/paracrine factor in Paget’s disease of bone. J Clin Invest. 1992;89:46–52. 5. Hoyland JA, Freemont AJ, Sharpe PT

  2. A theoretical framework for strain-related trabecular bone maintenance and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruimerman, R; Hilbers, P; van Rietbergen, B; Huiskes, R

    2005-04-01

    It is assumed that density and morphology of trabecular bone is partially controlled by mechanical forces. How these effects are expressed in the local metabolic functions of osteoclast resorption and osteoblast formation is not known. In order to investigate possible mechano-biological pathways for these mechanisms we have proposed a mathematical theory (Nature 405 (2000) 704). This theory is based on hypothetical osteocyte stimulation of osteoblast bone formation, as an effect of elevated strain in the bone matrix, and a role for microcracks and disuse in promoting osteoclast resorption. Applied in a 2-D Finite Element Analysis model, the theory explained the formation of trabecular patterns. In this article we present a 3-D FEA model based on the same theory and investigated its potential morphological predictability of metabolic reactions to mechanical loads. The computations simulated the development of trabecular morphological details during growth, relative to measurements in growing pigs, reasonably realistic. They confirmed that the proposed mechanisms also inherently lead to optimal stress transfer. Alternative loading directions produced new trabecular orientations. Reduction of load reduced trabecular thickness, connectivity and mass in the simulation, as is seen in disuse osteoporosis. Simulating the effects of estrogen deficiency through increased osteoclast resorption frequencies produced osteoporotic morphologies as well, as seen in post-menopausal osteoporosis. We conclude that the theory provides a suitable computational framework to investigate hypothetical relationships between bone loading and metabolic expressions.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U.; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D.; Willers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet; Willers, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Rechenzentrum

    2001-09-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  5. Epidemiologic Analyses of Risk Factors for Bone Loss and Recovery Related to Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean; Amin, Shreyasee

    2010-01-01

    AIM 1: To investigate the risk of microgravity exposure on long-term changes in bone health and fracture risk. compare data from crew members ("observed") with what would be "expected" from Rochester Bone Health Study. AIM 2: To provide a summary of current evidence available on potential risk factors for bone loss, recovery & fracture following long-duration space flight. integrative review of all data pre, in-, and post-flight across disciplines (cardiovascular, nutrition, muscle, etc.) and their relation to bone loss and recovery

  6. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  7. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Niland, Joyce C.; Vora, Nayana; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  8. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have

  9. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease of bone, subcutaneous tissue and paranasal sinus mucosa with a review of its pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Angela J.; Parisien, May; Feldman, Frieda; Young-In Lee, Francis

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease presenting in a 36-year-old man with lesions of bone, subcutaneous tissue of the arm and maxillary sinus mucosa unassociated with lymphadenopathy or systemic symptoms. These lesions appeared metachronously within a 6-month period. The diagnostic light microscopic and immunohistochemical findings and pathogenesis of this interesting disease are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease with bone destruction in the shoulder. CT an MR findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, H.; Ohba, S.; Sasaki, S.; Ando, K.; Mizutani, M.; Matsushita, Y.; Ohtsuka, T.; Terazawa, T.; Ijima, S.

    1998-01-01

    We report on specific CT and MR features in two cases of tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease in the shoulder with unusually large tumors. CT revealed features that were specific to the disease. MR was useful for detecting the extent of the mass and for obtaining information on adjacent soft-tissue and bone-marrow changes. (orig.)

  11. Bone metastases in breast cancer and its risk factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigeko; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tanaka, Masahiro

    1991-01-01

    Breast cancer is considered to often involve bone metastasis. Early detection and treatment of bone metastasis are essential in improving the prognosis of this disease. In 47 patients with bone metastasis confirmed with bone scintigraphy, we examined the appearance time of bone metastasis; bone metastasis was frequently observed with the progress of stage, but no association with the appearance time was found. Age was not associated with the incidence of bone metastasis but was found to be closely related to its appearance time. That is to say, patients with breast cancer below 40 years of age showed relatively early bone metastasis. Bone scintigraphy is required every 6 months at least for 3 years after the operation. In patients over 40 years of age, on the other hand, bone scintigraphy is required only once a year but has to be continued for 5 years or more, because they often show relatively late bone metastasis. (author)

  12. The Role of Peripheral Nerve Function in Age-Related Bone Loss and Changes in Bone Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    E Production of Osteoblasts, and Attenuates the Inflammatory Bone Loss Induced by Lipopolysaccharide. ISRN Pharmacol, 2012. 2012: p. 439860. 17...Kobayashi M, Watanabe K, Yokoyama S, et al. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 Ligand, Suppresses Bone Resorption by Inhibit- ing the Prostaglandin E Production of...example, mechanoreceptors in the skin respond to bending and stretching and can provide information about touch. Pacini’s corpuscle consists of onion like

  13. Cognitive function in relation with bone mass and nutrition: cross-sectional association in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownbill Rhonda A

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that bone loss and cognitive decline are co-occurring conditions, possibly due to their relationship with estrogen. Cognitive decline has been associated with various nutritional deficiencies as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if cognitive function is related to bone mineral density of various skeletal sites as well as to various dietary components. Methods Cross-sectional study with 97 healthy, Caucasian, postmenopausal women (59.4–85.0 years enrolled in a larger longitudinal study, investigating the effects of sodium on bone mass. The subjects were divided into two groups based on cognition scores. Group 1 represented lower and Group 2 higher scores on cognitive function. Bone mineral density from the whole body, lumbar spine, femur and forearm were measured with the Lunar DPX-MD instrument. Anthropometry was measured by standard methods. Cognition was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination. Cumulative (over 2 years dietary intake from 3-day records was analyzed by Food Processor® (ESHA Research, Salem, OR and cumulative physical activity was assessed using Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey for older adults. Results Subjects' cognition scores ranged from 22–30 (normal, 27–30, indicating all subjects had either mild or no cognitive impairment. Multiple Analysis of Covariance adjusted for age, height, weight, physical activity, alcohol, calcium, sodium and energy intake, showed a statistically significant association between cognition and bone mineral density of all measurable sites (η2 = 0.21, P 2 = 0.07, P = 0.050. Group 2 did have a significantly higher potassium intake (P = 0.023. In multiple regression, saturated fat had a significant negative relationship with cognitive function. Conclusions It appears mild degree of cognitive impairment may be a marker for lower bone mineral density as well as for a diet lower in carbohydrate and potassium intake, and higher

  14. Functional bracing for delayed union of a femur fracture associated with Paget's disease of the bone in an Asian patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuta Masashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paget's disease of the bone is a common metabolic bone disease in most European countries, Australia, New Zealand, and North America. Conversely, this disease is rare in Scandinavia, Asia, and Africa. In Japan, it is extremely rare, with a prevalence of 0.15/100000. Paget's disease is a localized disorder of bone remodeling. Excessive bone resorption and abnormal bone formation result in biomechanically weakened bone and predispose patients to fracture. Delayed union and non-union of fractures have been reported in patients with Paget's disease. Therefore, open reduction and internal fixation of fractures has been recommended to prevent such complications. Here we report an unusual case of a 63-year-old Asian woman with delayed union of a femur fracture secondary to Paget's disease, which was treated successfully by functional bracing.

  15. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Zhu, Shaobo; Wang, Mingbo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP 2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP 2 /PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP 2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP 2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP 2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. (paper)

  16. Factors that affect postnatal bone growth retardation in the twitcher murine model of Krabbe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Ries, William Louis; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Krabbe disease is an inherited lysosomal disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates mainly in the central nervous system. To gain insight into the possible mechanism(s) that may be participating in the inhibition of the postnatal somatic growth described in the animal model of this disease (twitcher mouse, twi), we studied their femora. This study reports that twi femora are smaller than of those of wild type (wt), and present with abnormality of marrow cellularity, bone deposition (osteoblastic function), and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, lipidomic analysis indicates altered sphingolipid homeostasis, but without significant changes in the levels of sphingolipid-derived intermediates of cell death (ceramide) or the levels of the osteoclast-osteoblast coupling factor (sphingosine-1-phosphate). However, there was significant accumulation of psychosine in the femora of adult twi animals as compared to wt, without induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-6. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plasma levels, a liver secreted hormone known to play a role in bone growth, indicated a drastic reduction in twi animals when compared to wt. To identify the cause of the decrease, we examined the IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein levels in the liver. The results indicated a significant reduction of IGF-1 mRNA as well as protein levels in the liver from twi as compared to wt littermates. Our data suggest that a combination of endogenous (psychosine) and endocrine (IGF-1) factors play a role in the inhibition of postnatal bone growth in twi mice; and further suggest that derangements of liver function may be contributing, at least in part, to this alteration. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding the biology of bone sarcoma from early initiating events through late events in metastasis and disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin eZhu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The two most common primary bone malignancies, osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma, are both aggressive, highly metastatic cancers that most often strike teens, though both can be found in younger children and adults. Despite distinct origins and pathogenesis, both diseases share several mechanisms of progression and metastasis, including neovascularization, invasion, anoikis resistance, chemoresistance and evasion of the immune response. Some of these processes are well-studies in more common carcinoma models, and the observation from adult diseases may be readily applied to pediatric bone sarcomas. Neovascularization, which includes angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, is a clear example of a process that is likely to be similar between carcinomas and sarcomas, since the responding cells are the same in each case. Chemoresistance mechanisms also may be similar between other cancers and the bone sarcomas. Since osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma are mesenchymal in origin, the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation is largely absent in bone sarcomas, necessitating different approaches to study progression and metastasis in these diseases. One process that is less well-studied in bone sarcomas is dormancy, which allows micrometastatic disease to remain viable but not growing in distant sites – typically the lungs – for months or years before renewing growth to become overt metastatic disease. By understanding the basic biology of these processes, novel therapeutic strategies may be developed that could improve survival in children with osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma.

  18. Reduced bone mass and preserved marrow adipose tissue in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases in long-term remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, C M; Araújo, I M; Nogueira-Barbosa, M H; Salmon, C E G; de Paula, F J A; Troncon, L E A

    2017-07-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue has not been studied in patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease. We found that these patients have preserved marrow adiposity even with low bone mass. Factors involved in bone loss in active disease may have long-lasting effects but do not seem to affect bone marrow adiposity. Reduced bone mass is known to occur at varying prevalence in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) because of inflammation, malnutrition, and steroid therapy. Osteoporosis may develop in these patients as the result of an imbalanced relationship between osteoblasts and adipocytes in bone marrow. This study aimed to evaluate for the first time bone mass and bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) in a particular subgroup of IBD patients characterized by long-term, steroid-free remission. Patients with Crohn's disease (CD; N = 21) and ulcerative colitis (UC; N = 15) and controls (C; N = 65) underwent dual X-ray energy absorptiometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the L3 lumbar vertebra for BMAT assessment. Both the CD and UC subgroups showed significantly higher proportions of patients than controls with Z-score ≤-2.0 at L1-L4 (C 1.54%; CD 19.05%; UC 20%; p = 0.02), but not at other sites. The proportions of CD patients with a T-score ˂-1.0 at the femoral neck (C 18.46%; CD 47.62%; p = 0.02) and total hip (C 16.92%; CD 42.86%; p = 0.03) were significantly higher than among controls. There were no statistically significant differences between IBD patients and controls regarding BMAT at L3 (C 28.62 ± 8.15%; CD 29.81 ± 6.90%; UC 27.35 ± 9.80%; p = 0.67). IBD patients in long-term, steroid-free remission may have a low bone mass in spite of preserved BMAT. These findings confirm the heterogeneity of bone disorders in IBD and may indicate that factors involved in bone loss in active disease may have long-lasting effects on these patients.

  19. Calcium isotope signature: new proxy for net change in bone volume for chronic kidney disease and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yu-Ki; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Yusuke; Yamato, Hideyuki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we measure the Ca isotope ratios ( 44 Ca/ 42 Ca and 43 Ca/ 42 Ca) in serum and bone samples collected from rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes mellitus (DM). For the serum samples, the isotope ratios are lower for the CKD (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.16 ± 0.11‰; 2SD, n = 6) and the DM (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = -0.11 ± 0.25‰; 2SD, n = 7) rats than that for the control rats (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.25 ± 0.04‰; 2SD, n = 7). Bone samples from two distinct positions of 20 rats in total, namely, the center and proximal parts of the tibial diaphysis, are subject to Ca isotope analysis. The resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values for the bone of the proximal part are about 0.3‰ lower than that for the serum samples from the same rats. The larger isotope fractionations between the serum and bone are consistent with previously reported data for vertebrate animals (e.g., Skulan and DePaolo, 1999), which suggests the preferential incorporation of lighter Ca isotopes through bone formation. For the bones from the control and CKD rats, there were no differences in the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values between the positions of the bone. In contrast, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values of the bone for the DM rats were different between the positions of the bone. Due to the lower bone turnover rate for the DM rats, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca for the middle of the diaphysis can reflect the Ca isotopes in the bone formed prior to the progression of DM states. Thus, the resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values show a clear correlation with bone mineral density (BMD). This can be due to the release of isotopically lighter Ca from the bone to the serum. In the present study, our data demonstrate that the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca value for serum can be used as a new biomarker for evaluating changes in bone turnover rate, followed by changes in bone volume.

  20. THE DIFFERENCES OF BONE METABOLISM IN MALES WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AND POSTMENOPAUSAL FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mardanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim — to compare bone metabolism activity in males with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and postmenopausal females.Materials and methods. The prospective cohort study was conducted. 33 male patients with COPD over 55 years old and 33 female patients without respiratory diseases over 55 were included. General examination, clinical and biochemical blood analyses, densitometry of lumbar spine and proximal part of left femoral bone, respiratory function, osteocalcin and C-telopeptids blood levels have been performed to the patients.Results. Male patients with COPD had lower T-score for the femoral neck than postmenopausal female patients without pulmonary disorders,(–1.05 ± 0.85 SD and –0.36 ± 1.24 SD respectively, р < 0.05. Osteocalcin level in males with COPD was significantly higher and C‑telopeptids level was significantly lower than in postmenopausal females (р < 0.05.Conclusion. Male patients with COPD have lower T‑score for the femoral neck than postmenopausal females without pulmonary disorders of the same age. Furthermore osteoclasts in COPD patients seem to be more activated than in postmenopausal females, on the contrary osteoblasts activity is significantly depressed. Therefore it is necessary to use another approach of prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with COPD.

  1. Archaeological skeletons support a northwest European origin for Paget's disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Simon

    2010-08-01

    The strong genetic component in the etiology of Paget's disease of bone (PDB), together with marked geographic variation in its prevalence, with high frequencies in British populations, has led some to suggest that the disease originated in Britain and spread around the world in recent times by the migration and admixture of British populations. This study aims to investigate this hypothesis by studying the world geographic distribution of PDB cases identified in ancient skeletons excavated from archaeological sites. The methodology is a review of PDB cases described in the literature. There were 109 cases that met modern diagnostic criteria. All came from Western Europe, 94% from England. These data support the hypothesis that PDB originated in this geographic region.

  2. The negative correlation between thyrotropin receptor-stimulating antibodies and bone mineral density in postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Medea; Korinteli, Maka; Zerekidze, Tamar; Jikurauli, Nino; Shanava, Shorena; Tsagareli, Marina; Giorgadze, Elen

    2013-06-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder with various clinical manifestations. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs), the circulating autoantibodies specific to Graves' disease, are the cause for hyperthyroidism, the most prevalent abnormality. Hyperthyroidism leads to increased bone turnover and a negative bone balance. The aims of the present study were to determine the relationship between TRAbs and bone mineral density (BMD), to assess the extent of BMD change in patients with Graves' disease, and to determine the impact of conservative and surgical therapy on BMD. Fifty female postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease were chosen for this study. Twenty women had a recent diagnosis of Graves' disease, 30 women presented with a compensated disease state after either conservative or surgical treatment, and 30 healthy postmenopausal women served as controls. Thyroid parameters were measured, and BMD values were obtained by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scan.Femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD and T-scores were significantly lower in newly diagnosed patients compared with the control group, but a difference was not observed between the treated and control groups. Statistical analysis revealed a strong and significant negative correlation between femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD and TRAb values.Both surgical and conservative therapies are effective for restoring BMD in postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease, and the increased level of TRAb can be a useful marker of bone density impairment.