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Sample records for reinforced shear joints

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Connections with Governing Joint Shear Failure Mode

    M.A. Najafgholipour

    Full Text Available Abstract Reinforced concrete (RC beam-column connections especially those without transverse reinforcement in joint region can exhibit brittle behavior when intensive damage is concentrated in the joint region during an earthquake event. Brittle behavior in the joint region can compromise the ductile design philosophy and the expected overall performance of structure when subjected to seismic loading. Considering the importance of joint shear failure influences on strength, ductility and stability of RC moment resisting frames, a finite element modeling which focuses on joint shear behavior is presented in this article. Nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA of RC beam-column connections is performed in order to investigate the joint shear failure mode in terms of joint shear capacity, deformations and cracking pattern. A 3D finite element model capable of appropriately modeling the concrete stress-strain behavior, tensile cracking and compressive damage of concrete and indirect modeling of steel-concrete bond is used. In order to define nonlinear behavior of concrete material, the concrete damage plasticity is applied to the numerical model as a distributed plasticity over the whole geometry. Finite element model is then verified against experimental results of two non-ductile beam-column connections (one exterior and one interior which are vulnerable to joint shear failure. The comparison between experimental and numerical results indicates that the FE model is able to simulate the performance of the beam-column connections and is able to capture the joint shear failure in RC beam-column connections.

  2. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  3. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research...... on the shear strength of such connections can be found in the literature, this type of connection is increasingly being used because wire ropes are much more construction-friendly than traditional U-bars. A rigid plastic upper bound model for the shear strength of wall connections reinforced with looped wire...... ropes that are pre-installed in wire boxes is presented along with test results on the shear strength of connections with double-wire boxes. It is shown that the plastic solution agrees well with both the obtained test results and results from previously conducted tests....

  4. Joint model to simulate inelastic shear behavior of poorly detailed exterior and interior beam-column connections reinforced with deformed bars under seismic excitations

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    A model for predicting the nonlinear shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beam column joints based on principal stresses reaching limits is proposed. The joint model proposes shear springs for the column region and rotational spring for the beam region of the joint. This is based on the actual displacement behaviour of the shear buildings. The spring characteristics are calculated based on well-known principal of mechanics using the principal stresses as the failure criteria. The model reasonably accurately predicts the shear behaviour of the joint and also can consider the effect of axial loads on the column. The model does not need any special element or special program for implementation and can be used for nonlinear static pushover analysis of RC framed structures giving due consideration to joint deformations. The model is therefore extremely useful for practical displacement based analysis of old RC buildings where the joints were not designed and detailed as per current codal requirements, invariably making them the weakest link in the structure. The background theory, assumptions followed and the complete formulations for generating the joint characteristics are given in this report. The model is validated with experimental results of tests on exterior and interior beam-column connections given in the published literature having substandard detailing using deformed bars. (author)

  5. Keyed shear joints

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  6. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the plastic shear strength of non shear reinforced T-beams.The influence of an un-reinforced flange on the shear capacity is investigated by considering a failure mechanism involving crack sliding in the web and a kind of membrane action over an effective width of the flange...

  7. Shear behaviour of reinforced phyllite concrete beams

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Owusu Afrifa, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phyllite concrete beams often exhibited shear with anchorage bond failure. ► Different shear design provisions for reinforced phyllite beams are compared. ► Predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams must be modified by a reduction factor. -- Abstract: The shear behaviour of concrete beams made from phyllite aggregates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading is reported. First diagonal shear crack load of beams with and without shear reinforcement was between 42–58% and 42–92% of the failure loads respectively. The phyllite concrete beams without shear links had lower post-diagonal cracking shear resistance compared to corresponding phyllite beams with shear links. As a result of hysteretic energy dissipation, limited cyclic loading affected the stiffness, strength and deformation of the phyllite beams with shear reinforcement. Generally, beams with and without shear reinforcement showed anchorage bond failure in addition to the shear failure due to high stress concentration near the supports. The ACI, BS and EC codes are conservative for the prediction of phyllite concrete beams without shear reinforcement but they all overestimate the shear strength of phyllite concrete beams with shear reinforcement. It is recommended that the predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams reinforced with steel stirrups be modified by a reduction factor of 0.7 in order to specify a high enough safety factor on their ultimate strength. It is also recommended that susceptibility of phyllite concrete beams to undergo anchorage bond failure is averted in design by the provision of greater anchorage lengths than usually permitted.

  8. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed in uncracked concrete.Proposals have been made on how the derived standard solutions may be applied to more complicated cases, such as continuous beams, beams......The report deals with the shear strength of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete beams without shear reinforcement. Solutions for a number of beams with different load and support conditions have been derived by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin- Ping Zhang.This model...

  9. Evaluation of size effect on shear strength of reinforced concrete ...

    of the longitudinal and the web reinforcement, shear span-to-depth ratio and the ... A simple equation for predicting the shear strength of reinforced concrete deep ..... AASHTO 2007 LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, American Association of ...

  10. Seismic behavior of reinforced concrete shear walls

    Wang, F.; Gantenbein, F.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls have an important contribution to building stiffness. So, it is necessary to know their behavior under seismic loads. The ultimate behavior study of shear walls subjected to dynamic loadings includes: - a description of the nonlinear global model based on cyclic static tests, - nonlinear time history calculations for various forcing functions. The comparison of linear and nonlinear results shows important margins related to the ductility when the bandwidth of the forcing function is narrow and centred on the wall natural frequency

  11. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat....... Codes for designing prefabricated reinforced components of aircrete structures have adopted these recently developed approaches.......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  12. A new dedicated finite element for push-over analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall systems

    Delal Doğru ORMANCI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a finite element which has been analyzed based on anisotropic behavior of reinforced shear walls is developed. Element stiffness matrices were varied based on whether the element is in the tension or the compression zone of the cross-section. Nonlinear behavior of reinforced shear wall model is investigated under horizontal loads. This behavior is defined with a similar approach to plastic hinge assumption in frame structures that the finite element behaves lineer elastic between joints and plastic deformations are concentrated on joints as vertical plastic displacements. According to this acceptance, plastic behavior of reinforced shear wall occurs when the vertical strain reaches elastic strain limit. In the definition of finite element, displacement functions are chosen considering that the partition of shear walls just at floor levels, are enough for solution. Results of this study are compared with the solution obtained from a different computer programme and experimental results.

  13. Numerical limit analysis of keyed shear joints in concrete structures

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns the shear capacity of keyed joints, which are transversely reinforced with overlapping U-bar loops. It is known from experimental studies that the discontinuity of the transverse reinforcement affects the capacity as well as the failure mode; however, to the best knowledge...... theorem and uses the modified Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion, which is formulated for second-order cone programming. The model provides a statically admissible stress field as well as the failure mode. Twenty-four different test specimens are modelled and the calculations are compared to the experimental...

  14. Midbroken Reinforced Concrete Shear Frames Due to Earthquakes

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Cakmak, A. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    A non-linear hysteretic model for the response and local damage analyses of reinforced concrete shear frames subject to earthquake excitation is proposed, and, the model is applied to analyse midbroken reinforced concrete (RC) structures due to earthquake loads. Each storey of the shear frame...

  15. Diagonal Cracking and Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Zhang, Jin-Ping

    1997-01-01

    The shear failure of non-shear-reinforced concrete beams with normal shear span ratios is observed to be governed in general by the formation of a critical diagonal crack. Under the hypothesis that the cracking of concrete introduces potential yield lines which may be more dangerous than the ones...

  16. Enhancement of shear strength and ductility for reinforced concrete wide beams due to web reinforcement

    M. Said

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The shear behavior of reinforced concrete wide beams was investigated. The experimental program consisted of nine beams of 29 MPa concrete strength tested with a shear span-depth ratio equal to 3.0. One of the tested beams had no web reinforcement as a control specimen. The flexure mode of failure was secured for all of the specimens to allow for shear mode of failure. The key parameters covered in this investigation are the effect of the existence, spacing, amount and yield stress of the vertical stirrups on the shear capacity and ductility of the tested wide beams. The study shows that the contribution of web reinforcement to the shear capacity is significant and directly proportional to the amount and spacing of the shear reinforcement. The increase in the shear capacity ranged from 32% to 132% for the range of the tested beams compared with the control beam. High grade steel was more effective in the contribution of the shear strength of wide beams. Also, test results demonstrate that the shear reinforcement significantly enhances the ductility of the wide beams. In addition, shear resistances at failure recorded in this study are compared to the analytical strengths calculated according to the current Egyptian Code and the available international codes. The current study highlights the need to include the contribution of shear reinforcement in the Egyptian Code requirements for shear capacity of wide beams.

  17. Shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) beams

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC can improve the shear...... capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear and if ECC can partially or fully replace the conventional transverse steel reinforcement in beams. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the fibers affect the shear carrying capacity and deformation behavior of structural members if used either...

  18. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC......This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behaviour of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behaviour of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC influences the shear...

  19. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs

  20. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions.In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding...

  1. Catenary Action in Rebars Crossing a Casting Joint Loaded in Shear

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement crossing a casting joint loaded in shear exhibits catenary action as the shear displacement increases. The load carrying capacity of such a joint is in practice often calculated by use of empirical methods to account for shear friction effects or by a first order plastic analysis...... if dowel action is included. The strength increase/reserve due to catenary action in the rebars is often neglected; however in some cases it may be necessary to utilize the effect in order to ensure overall structural robustness. This paper presents results of a study, where the increased shear capacity...... and theory is found when reasonable material properties are assumed....

  2. Inplane shear capacity of reinforced composite masonry block walls

    White, W.H.; Tseng, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe a test program performed to determine the inplane shear capacity, stiffness and ductility of composite masonry walls subjected to earthquake type loadings. Specimens were simultaneously subjected to a range of compressive loads to simulate dead load; and inplane shear loads with full load reversal to simulate the earthquake cycling load. The influence of horizontal and vertical reinforcing steel percentages on the inplane shear capacity, stiffness and ductility was also investigated. (orig./HP)

  3. Direct Shear Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Hussein Al-Quraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the accuracy of load-deformation behavior, failure mode, and ultimate load capacity for reinforced concrete members subjected to in-plane loadings such as corbels, wall to foundation connections and panels need shear strength behavior to be included. Shear design in reinforced concrete structures depends on crack width, crack slippage and roughness of the surface of cracks. This paper illustrates results of an experimental investigation conducted to investigate the direct shear strength of fiber normal strength concrete (NSC and reactive powder concrete (RPC. The tests were performed along a pre-selected shear plane in concrete members named push-off specimens. The effectiveness of concrete compressive strength, volume fraction of steel fiber, and shear reinforcement ratio on shear transfer capacity were considered in this study. Furthermore, failure modes, shear stress-slip behavior, and shear stress-crack width behavior were also presented in this study. Tests’ results showed that volume fraction of steel fiber and compressive strength of concrete in NSC and RPC play a major role in improving the shear strength of concrete. As expectedly, due to dowel action, the shear reinforcement is the predominant factor in resisting the shear stress. The shear failure of NSC and RPC has the sudden mode of failure (brittle failure with the approximately linear behavior of shear stress-slip relationship till failure. Using RPC instead of NSC with the same amount of steel fibers in constructing the push-off specimen result in high shear strength. In NSC, shear strength influenced by the three major factors; crack surface friction, aggregate interlock and steel fiber content if present. Whereas, RPC has only steel fiber and cracks surface friction influencing the shear strength. Due to cementitious nature of RPC in comparisons with NSC, the RPC specimen shows greater cracks width. It is observed that the Mattock model gives very satisfactory

  4. Shear transfer capacity of reinforced concrete exposed to fire

    Ahmad, Subhan; Bhargava, Pradeep; Chourasia, Ajay

    2018-04-01

    Shear transfer capacity of reinforced concrete elements is a function of concrete compressive strength and reinforcement yield strength. Exposure of concrete and steel to elevated temperature reduces their mechanical properties resulting in reduced shear transfer capacity of RC elements. The objective of present study is to find the effect of elevated temperature on shear transfer capacity of reinforced concrete. For this purpose pushoff specimens were casted using normal strength concrete. After curing, specimens were heated to 250°C and 500°C in an electric furnace. Cooled specimens were tested for shear transfer capacity in a universal testing machine. It was found that shear transfer capacity and stiffness (slope of load-slip curve) were reduced when the specimens were heated to 250°C and 500°C. Load level for the initiation of crack slip was found to be decreased as the temperature was increased. A simple analytical approach is also proposed to predict the shear transfer capacity of reinforced concrete after elevated temperature.

  5. Effect of steel reinforcement with different degree of corrosion on degeneration of mechanical performance of reinforced concrete frame joints

    Wu Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints which shoulders high-level and vertical shearing effect that maintains balance of beam and column end is the major component influencing the performance of the whole framework. Post earthquake investigation suggests that collapse of frame structure is induced by failure of joints in most cases. Thus, beam-column joints must have strong bearing capacity and good ductility, and reinforced concrete structure just meets the above requirement. But corrosion caused by long time use of reinforced concrete framework will lead to degeneration of mechanical performance of joints. To find out the rule of effect of steel reinforcement with different corrosion rate on degeneration of bearing capacity of reinforced concrete framework joints, this study made a nonlinear numerical analysis on fifteen models without stirrup in the core area of reinforced concrete frame joints using displacement method considering axial load ratio of column end and constraint condition. This work aims to find out the key factor that influences mechanical performance of joints, thus to provide a basis for repair and reinforcement of degenerated framework joints.

  6. Seismic Behaviour of Composite Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    Boita, Ioana-Emanuela; Dan, Daniel; Stoian, Valeriu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper is presented an experimental study conducted at the “Politehnica” University of Timisoara, Romania. This study provides results from a comprehensive experimental investigation on the behaviour of composite steel fibre reinforced concrete shear walls (CSFRCW) with partially or totally encased profiles. Two experimental composite steel fibre reinforced concrete walls (CSFRCW) and, as a reference specimen, a typical reinforced concrete shear wall (RCW), (without structural reinforcement), were fabricated and tested under constant vertical load and quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loads, in displacement control. The tests were performed until failure. The tested specimens were designed as 1:3 scale steel-concrete composite elements, representing a three storeys and one bay element from the base of a lateral resisting system made by shear walls. Configuration/arrangement of steel profiles in cross section were varied within the specimens. The main objective of this research consisted in identifying innovative solutions for composite steel-concrete shear walls with enhanced performance, as steel fibre reinforced concrete which was used in order to replace traditional reinforced concrete. A first conclusion was that replacing traditional reinforcement with steel fibre changes the failure mode of the elements, as from a flexural mode, in case of element RCW, to a shear failure mode for CSFRCW. The maximum lateral force had almost similar values but test results indicated an improvement in cracking response, and a decrease in ductility. The addition of steel fibres in the concrete mixture can lead to an increase of the initial cracking force, and can change the sudden opening of a crack in a more stable process.

  7. Shear Capacity of Steel and Polymer Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Kragh-Poulsen, Jens C.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Goltermann, Per

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of a plasticity model for shear strength estimation of fibre reinforced concrete beams without stirrups. When using plastic theory to shear problems in structural concrete, the so-called effective strengths are introduced, usually determined by calibrating...... the plastic solutions with tests. This approach is, however, problematic when dealing with fibre reinforced concrete (FRC), as the effective strengths depend also on the type and the amount of fibres. In this paper, it is suggested that the effective tensile strength of FRC can be determined on the basis...

  8. Reinforcement of Bolted Timber Joints Using GFRP Sheets in Poplar and Pine Woods

    Mehrab Madhoushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure in timber structures occurs mainly in crucial points such as joints areas. Therefore, the idea of using composite sheets in timber joints has been intro-duced as a method in order to increase the strength and ductility behaviour of timber joints. This research aims to study the behaviour of bolted joints in poplar and pine woods, which are reinforced by two types of GFRP sheets. A single shear bolted joint consisted of 3 timber members whose length and width were 30 cm in length and 5 cm in width. The thickness of each member was 4 cm for internal part and 2 cm for external part. The employed steel bolt was 10 cm in length and 1 cm in diameter. In this respect, one layer of GFRP sheet was used to be bonded to timber members by using epoxy resin and left between the clamps for 24 hours. They were then kept at room temperature for three weeks. Also the effect of adding a wood veneer on the reinforced joints was investigated. The tensile strength of the reinforced and control samples (un-reinforced joints was measured according to ASTM D5652-92 standard. The results show that the reinforced samples have higher tensile strength compared to that of reinforced joints, although it is not statistically signifcant. Also, two types of sheets infuence the joint behaviour as the reinforced joints display more ductility behaviour.

  9. Shake-table testing of a self-centering precast reinforced concrete frame with shear walls

    Lu, Xilin; Yang, Boya; Zhao, Bin

    2018-04-01

    The seismic performance of a self-centering precast reinforced concrete (RC) frame with shear walls was investigated in this paper. The lateral force resistance was provided by self-centering precast RC shear walls (SPCW), which utilize a combination of unbonded prestressed post-tensioned (PT) tendons and mild steel reinforcing bars for flexural resistance across base joints. The structures concentrated deformations at the bottom joints and the unbonded PT tendons provided the self-centering restoring force. A 1/3-scale model of a five-story self-centering RC frame with shear walls was designed and tested on a shake-table under a series of bi-directional earthquake excitations with increasing intensity. The acceleration response, roof displacement, inter-story drifts, residual drifts, shear force ratios, hysteresis curves, and local behaviour of the test specimen were analysed and evaluated. The results demonstrated that seismic performance of the test specimen was satisfactory in the plane of the shear wall; however, the structure sustained inter-story drift levels up to 2.45%. Negligible residual drifts were recorded after all applied earthquake excitations. Based on the shake-table test results, it is feasible to apply and popularize a self-centering precast RC frame with shear walls as a structural system in seismic regions.

  10. Effect of rock joint roughness on its cyclic shear behavior

    S.M. Mahdi Niktabar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock joints are often subjected to dynamic loads induced by earthquake and blasting during mining and rock cutting. Hence, cyclic shear load can be induced along the joints and it is important to evaluate the shear behavior of rock joint under this condition. In the present study, synthetic rock joints were prepared with plaster of Paris (PoP. Regular joints were simulated by keeping regular asperity with asperity angles of 15°–15° and 30°–30°, and irregular rock joints which are closer to natural joints were replicated by keeping the asperity angles of 15°–30° and 15°–45°. The sample size and amplitude of roughness were kept the same for both regular and irregular joints which were 298 mm × 298 mm × 125 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Shear test was performed on these joints using a large-scale direct shear testing machine by keeping the frequency and amplitude of shear load under constant cyclic condition with different normal stress values. As expected, the shear strength of rock joints increased with the increases in the asperity angle and normal load during the first cycle of shearing or static load. With the increase of the number of shear cycles, the shear strength decreased for all the asperity angles but the rate of reduction was more in case of high asperity angles. Test results indicated that shear strength of irregular joints was higher than that of regular joints at different cycles of shearing at low normal stress. Shearing and degradation of joint asperities on regular joints were the same between loading and unloading, but different for irregular joints. Shear strength and joint degradation were more significant on the slope of asperity with higher angles on the irregular joint until two angles of asperities became equal during the cycle of shearing and it started behaving like regular joints for subsequent cycles.

  11. Naesliden Project: direct shear tests of filled and unfilled joints

    Ludvig, B.

    1980-05-15

    Joints from the Naesliden mine have been tested in a small field shear box and in a large shear rig. The large shear rig is described in detail, and its ability to test joints with an area of 600 mc/sup 2/ at a maximum normal stress of up to 20 MPa is emphasized. The stiffness and shear strength of the discontinuities in the Naesliden mine is presented. The values estimated at direct shear tests are compared with results from in situ measurements and tests on drillcores. The results show that the in situ measurements give lower values for the shear resistance than the direct shear tests. Estimation of the normal stiffness for joints in drill cores gave much higher stiffness than the estimations in the shear rig.

  12. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  13. In-plane shear test of fibre reinforced concrete panels

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Stang, Henrik; Goltermann, Per

    2008-01-01

    The present paper concerns the investigation of polymer Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) panels subjected to in-plane shear. The use of fibers as primary reinforcement in panels is a new application of fiber reinforcement, hence test methods, design bases and models are lacking. This paper...... contributes to the investigation of fibers as reinforcement in panels with experimental results and a consistent approach to material characterization and modeling. The proposed model draws on elements from the classical yield line theory of rigid, perfectly plastic materials and the theory of fracture...... mechanics. Model panels have been cast to investigate the correlation between the load bearing capacity and the amount of fibers (vol. %) in the mixture. The type of fibers in the mixture was Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) fibers, length 8 mm, diameter 0.04 mm. The mechanical properties of the FRC have been...

  14. The improved design method of shear strength of reinforced concrete beams without transverse reinforcement

    Vegera Pavlo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, results of experimental testing of reinforced concrete beams without transverse shear reinforcement are given. Three prototypes for improved testing methods were tested. The testing variable parameter was the shear span to the effective depth ratio. In the result of the tests we noticed that bearing capacity of RC beams is increased with the decreasing shear span to the effective depth ratio. The design method according to current codes was applied to test samples and it showed a significant discrepancy results. Than we proposed the improved design method using the adjusted value of shear strength of concrete CRd,c. The results obtained by the improved design method showed satisfactory reproducibility.

  15. Load carrying capacity of keyed joints reinforced with high strength wire rope loops

    Jørgensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2015-01-01

    Vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements are usually made as keyed joints reinforced with overlapping U-bars. The overlapping U-bars form a cylindrical core in which the locking bar is placed and the connection is subsequently grouted with mortar. A more construction friendly shear connection can be obtained by replacing the U-bars with high strength looped wire ropes. The wire ropes have the advantage of being flexible (they have virtually no bending stiffness) which...

  16. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  17. Load carrying capacity of keyed joints reinforced with high strength wire rope loops

    Jørgensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2015-01-01

    friendly shear connection can be obtained by replacing the U-bars with high strength looped wire ropes. The wire ropes have the advantage of being flexible (they have virtually no bending stiffness) which makes installation of wall elements much easier. The looped wire ropes are usually pre-installed in so......-called wire boxes which are embedded in the precast wall elements. Once the joint is grouted with mortar, the boxes will function as shear keys and the overlapping wire loops will function as transverse reinforcement that replaces the U-bars. This paper presents a rigid-plastic upper bound model to determine...... the shear capacity of wire loop connections. Tests have shown that the shear capacity of such joints – due to the relatively high tensile strength of the wire ropes - is more prone to be governed by fracture of the joint mortar in combination with yielding of the locking bar. To model this type of failure...

  18. Gas leakage rate through reinforced concrete shear walls: Numerical study

    Wang Ting; Hutchinson, Tara C.

    2005-01-01

    Unlined reinforced concrete shear walls are often used as 'tertiary boundaries' in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to house dangerous gases. An unanticipated event, such as an earthquake, may cause gases stored inside the walls to disperse into the environment resulting in excess pollution. To address this concern, in this paper, a methodology to numerically predict the gas leakage rate through these shear walls under lateral loading conditions is proposed. This methodology involves finite element and flow rate analysis. Strain distributions are obtained from the finite element analysis, and then used to simulate the crack characteristics on the concrete specimen. The flow rate through the damaged concrete specimen is then estimated using flow rate formulas available from the literature. Results from an experimental specimen are used to evaluate the methodology, and particularly its robustness in the flow rate estimation

  19. Shear strength of reinforced concrete circular cross-section beams

    P. W. G. N. Teixeira

    Full Text Available A proposed adequation of NBR 6118, Item 7.4, related to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams is presented with aims to application on circular cross-section. The actual expressions are most suitable to rectangular cross-section and some misleading occurs when applied to circular sections at determination of VRd2, Vc and Vsw, as consequence of bw (beam width and d (effective depth definitions as well as the real effectiveness of circular stirrups. The proposed adequation is based on extensive bibliographic review and practical experience with a great number of infrastructure elements, such as anchored retaining pile walls, where the use of circular reinforced concrete members is frequent.

  20. Study of the shear behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete beams

    Barragán, B.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a series of tests for characterizing the structural behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete beams subjected to shear loading. The experimental program involves three types of fibres; two steel fibres and a polypropylene fibre. As a reference, plain concrete and conventionally reinforced concrete specimens have also been tested. The ultimate shear capacity of the beams is calculated and these values compared with those predicted by existing formulations. The study confirms that the toughness and shear crack resistance of the material is greatly enhanced by the fibres. However, the incorporation of 1% of fibres yielded lower shear strength than conventionally reinforced beams with the same amount of steel in the form of transversal stirrups. Existing design methods seem sufficiently robust to estimate the maximum shear load, even when using material properties (toughness, tensile strength extrapolated from code formulae.Este trabajo presenta una serie de ensayos para caracterizar el comportamiento estructural de vigas realizadas con hormigón reforzado con fibras sometidas a cortante. El programa de ensayos incluía tres tipos de fibras, dos de acero y una de polipropileno. Asimismo, se realizó una serie de ensayos con una viga confeccionada con hormigón armado convencional. La resistencia a cortante de las vigas es comparada con los valores que la formulación existente predice. El estudio confirma que la tenacidad y la resistencia a cortante son incrementadas tras la adición de fibras al hormigón. Sin embargo, la incorporación de un 1% en volumen de fibras conduce a valores de resistencia última a cortante inferiores a los obtenidos con vigas de hormigón convencional con la misma cantidad de acero dispuesta en forma de cercos de cortante. Los actuales métodos de cálculo parecen lo suficientemente precisos para evaluar la carga de cortante último, incluso cuando los parámetros mecánicos utilizados en las f

  1. A review of shear strength models for rock joints subjected to constant normal stiffness

    Sivanathan Thirukumaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical shear behaviour of rough joints has been studied under constant normal load/stress (CNL boundary conditions, but recent studies have shown that this boundary condition may not replicate true practical situations. Constant normal stiffness (CNS is more appropriate to describe the stress–strain response of field joints since the CNS boundary condition is more realistic than CNL. The practical implications of CNS are movements of unstable blocks in the roof or walls of an underground excavation, reinforced rock wedges sliding in a rock slope or foundation, and the vertical movement of rock-socketed concrete piles. In this paper, the highlights and limitations of the existing models used to predict the shear strength/behaviour of joints under CNS conditions are discussed in depth.

  2. Beam-column joint shear prediction using hybridized deep learning neural network with genetic algorithm

    Mundher Yaseen, Zaher; Abdulmohsin Afan, Haitham; Tran, Minh-Tung

    2018-04-01

    Scientifically evidenced that beam-column joints are a critical point in the reinforced concrete (RC) structure under the fluctuation loads effects. In this novel hybrid data-intelligence model developed to predict the joint shear behavior of exterior beam-column structure frame. The hybrid data-intelligence model is called genetic algorithm integrated with deep learning neural network model (GA-DLNN). The genetic algorithm is used as prior modelling phase for the input approximation whereas the DLNN predictive model is used for the prediction phase. To demonstrate this structural problem, experimental data is collected from the literature that defined the dimensional and specimens’ properties. The attained findings evidenced the efficitveness of the hybrid GA-DLNN in modelling beam-column joint shear problem. In addition, the accurate prediction achived with less input variables owing to the feasibility of the evolutionary phase.

  3. Seismic Failure Mechanism of Reinforced Cold-Formed Steel Shear Wall System Based on Structural Vulnerability Analysis

    Jihong Ye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of structural vulnerability analyses are conducted on a reinforced cold-formed steel (RCFS shear wall system and a traditional cold-formed steel (CFS shear wall system subjected to earthquake hazard based on forms in order to investigate their failure mechanisms. The RCFS shear wall adopts rigid beam-column joints and continuous concrete-filled CFS tube end studs rather than coupled-C section end studs that are used in traditional CFS shear walls, to achieve the rigid connections in both beam-column joints and column bases. The results show that: the RCFS and traditional CFS shear wall systems both exhibit the maximum vulnerability index associated with the failure mode in the first story. Therefore, the first story is likely to be a weakness of the CFS shear wall system. Once the wall is damaged, the traditional CFS shear wall system would collapse because the shear wall is the only lateral-resisting component. However, the collapse resistance of the RCFS shear wall system is effectively enhanced by the second defense, which is provided by a framework integrated by rigid beam-column joints and fixed column bases. The predicted collapse mode with maximum vulnerability index that was obtained by structural vulnerability analysis agrees well with the experimental result, and the structural vulnerability method is thereby verified to be reasonable to identify the weaknesses of framed structures and predict their collapse modes. Additionally, the quantitative vulnerability index indicates that the RCFS shear wall system exhibits better robustness compared to the traditional one. Furthermore, the “strong frame weak wallboard” and the “strong column weak beam” are proposed in this study as conceptional designations for the RCFS shear wall systems.

  4. Shear Strengthening of Corbels with Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP

    Nawaz, A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Corbels constitute what are known as “disturbed” regions in concrete structures, where typical shear failure may be anticipated on the grounds of small shear span-to-depth ratios. The concentration of stress induced by the weight of girders on the very small loadbearing areas in corbels often causes cracking in bridges and other structures. Little experimental research can be found in the literature on the shear strengthening of corbels. In the present study, nine such members were tested. Two had no carbon fibre reinforced polymers attached, while CFRP laminates were externally bonded to the other seven, in a number of different spatial arrangements. Ultimate shear strength was found and compared for all specimens. The results showed that CFRP configuration and geometry directly affected corbel shear strength, which was higher in all the CFRPstrengthened corbels than in the controls. The highest strength values were recorded for specimens whose shear-critical area was wrapped in CFRP.

    Las ménsulas constituyen lo que conocemos como regiones de “distorsión” en las estructuras de hormigón, zonas en que pueden preverse roturas por cortante debido a las bajas relaciones luz de cortante-canto presentes en ellas. La concentración de solicitaciones producida por el peso de las vigas sobre superficies de carga muy reducidas en las ménsulas a menudo provoca el agrietamiento de puentes y otras estructuras de obra civil. En la literatura especializada sobre el refuerzo a cortante de las ménsulas existen escasos ejemplos de estudios experimentales. Para la presente investigación se han realizado ensayos con nueve elementos de este tipo. Dos de ellos no incluían polímeros reforzados con fibra de carbono (CFRP, mientras que los siete restantes llevaban láminas externas de CFRP, dispuestas siguiendo distintas configuraciones espaciales. Los resultados indican que la configuración y la disposición geométrica de los CFRP repercuten

  5. Experimental investigations into the shear behavior of self-compacting RC beams with and without shear reinforcement

    Ammar N. HANOON

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC is a new generation of high-performance concrete, known for its excellent deformability and high resistance to segregation and bleeding. Nonetheless, SCC may be incapable of resisting shear because the shear resistance mechanisms of this concrete are uncertain, especially the aggregate interlock mechanism. This uncertainty is attributed to the fact that SCC contains a smaller amount of coarse aggregates than normal concrete (NC does. This study focuses on the shear strength of self-compacting reinforced concrete (RC beams with and without shear reinforcement. A total of 16 RC beam specimens was manufactured and tested in terms of shear span-to-depth ratio and flexural and shear reinforcement ratio. The test results were compared with those of the shear design equations developed by ACI, BS, CAN and NZ codes. Results show that an increase in web reinforcement enhanced cracking strength and ultimate load. Shear-tension failure was the control failure in all tested beams.

  6. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints

    Davood Askari and Mehrdad N Ghasemi-Nejhad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength using carbon nanotubes (CNTs as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  7. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints.

    Askari, Davood; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N

    2012-08-01

    The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  8. Shear-flow coupling in non-planar rock joints

    Makurat, A.; Barton, N.

    1985-01-01

    Crystalline rock masses are regarded as a possible host rock for permanent nuclear waste disposal. During the excavation of the required shafts and tunnels, the initial state of stress will be changed and cause a deformation of the rock mass and discontinuities. During the lifetime of the nuclear repository joint apertures may change due to thermally induced stress variations during the heating and cooling phase. As the conductivity of a joint is very sensitive to its aperture, fluid flow from and towards a repository, as well as the potential transport times of radionuclides are highly dependent on the deformability of the joints. Theoretical calculations of coupled flow in rock joints (Barton et al. 1984) predict an increase of conductivity of several orders of magnitude for the first few millimeters for shear displacement. The shear-dilation-conductivity coupling for two block sizes at two effective stress levels is shown

  9. Effect of Boundary Condition on the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints in the Direct Shear Test

    Bahaaddini, M.

    2017-05-01

    The common method for determination of the mechanical properties of the rock joints is the direct shear test. This paper aims to study the effect of boundary condition on the results of direct shear tests. Experimental studies undertaken in this research showed that the peak shear strength is mostly overestimated. This problem is more pronounced for steep asperities and under high normal stresses. Investigation of the failure mode of these samples showed that tensile cracks are generated at the boundary of sample close to the specimen holders and propagated inside the intact materials. In order to discover the reason of observed failure mechanism in experiments, the direct shear test was simulated using PFC2D. Results of numerical models showed that the gap zone size between the upper and lower specimen holders has a significant effect on the shear mechanism. For the high gap size, stresses concentrate at the vicinity of the tips of specimen holders and result in generation and propagation of tensile cracks inside the intact material. However, by reducing the gap size, stresses are concentrated on asperities, and damage of specimen at its boundary is not observed. Results of this paper show that understanding the shear mechanism of rock joints is an essential step prior to interpreting the results of direct shear tests.

  10. Construction-friendly ductile shear joints for precast concrete panels

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    . The solution is tested in a push-off experimental setup and the influence of important geometric parameters of the keyed shear joint is investigated. The first peak load carrying capacity is assessed using plasticity models, and the failure modes are identified by the use of digital image correlation...

  11. Review of Punching Shear Behaviour of Flat Slabs Reinforced with FRP Bars

    Mohamed, Osama A.; Khattab, Rania

    2017-10-01

    Using Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars to reinforce two-way concrete slabs can extend the service life, reduce maintenance cost and improve-life cycle cost efficiency. FRP reinforcing bars are more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional reinforcing steel. Shear behaviour of reinforced concrete structural members is a complex phenomenon that relies on the development of internal load-carrying mechanisms, the magnitude and combination of which is still a subject of research. Many building codes and design standards provide design formulas for estimation of punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced flat slabs. Building code formulas take into account the effects of the axial stiffness of main reinforcement bars, the ratio of the perimeter of the critical section to the slab effective depth, and the slab thickness on the punching shear capacity of two-way slabs reinforced with FRP bars or grids. The goal of this paper is to compare experimental data published in the literature to the equations offered by building codes for the estimation of punching shear capacity of concrete flat slabs reinforced with FRP bars. Emphasis in this paper is on two North American codes, namely, ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12. The experimental data covered in this paper include flat slabs reinforced with GFRP, BFRP, and CFRP bars. Both ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12 are shown to be in good agreement with test results in terms of predicting the punching shear capacity.

  12. Numerical rigid plastic modelling of shear capacity of keyed joints

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2015-01-01

    Keyed shear joints are currently designed using simple and conservative design formulas, yet these formulas do not take the local mechanisms in the concrete core of the joint into account. To investigate this phenomenon a rigid, perfectly plastic finite element model of keyed joints is used....... The model is formulated for second-order conic optimisation as a lower bound problem, which yields a statically admissible stress field that satisfies the yield condition in every point. The dual solution to the problem can be interpreted as the collapse mode and will be used to analyse the properties...

  13. Analytical Study on the Beyond Design Seismic Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    Nugroho, Tino Sawaldi Adi [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Ho-Seok [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The OECD-NEA has organized an international benchmarking program to better understand this critical issue. The benchmark program provides test specimen geometry, test setup, material properties, loading conditions, recorded measures, and observations of the test specimens. The main objective of this research is to assess the beyond design seismic capacity of the reinforced concrete shear walls tested at the European Laboratory for Structural Assessment between 1997 and 1998 through participation in the OECD-NEA benchmark program. In this study, assessing the beyond design seismic capacity of reinforced concrete shear walls is performed analytically by comparing numerical results with experimental results. The seismic shear capacity of the reinforced concrete shear wall was predicted reasonably well using ABAQUS program. However, the proper calibration of the concrete material model was necessary for better prediction of the behavior of the reinforced concrete shear walls since the response was influenced significantly by the material constitutive model.

  14. Behavior of Reinforced Hybrid Concrete Corbel-Column Connection with Vertical Construction Joint

    Ammar Yasir Ali

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, shear behavior of reinforced hybrid concrete connection of corbel-column is experimentally investigated. Nine homogenous and hybrid concrete corbel-column connections subjected to vertical applied loads were constructed and tested within two test groups (A, B. The experimental program included the effect of several variables such as type of hybrid concrete;high strength concrete (HSC or steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC, monolithic casting of hybrid concrete connection, and presence of construction joint at the interface of corbel-column. Experimental results showed significant effects of concrete hybridization on the structural behavior of connection specimens such as: ultimate strength, cracking loads, cracking patterns, and failure modes. Hybridization process in group (A included hybrid connection of corbel-column with HSC or SFRC corbel instated of NSC. This process led to increase the capacity of connection by (26%, 38% and shear cracking loads by (20%, 120% respectively. Moreover, connections of hybrid concrete corbels cast monolithically improved the shear capacity of corbels by (19%, 42% for HSC or SFRC respectively. In group (B, presence of construction joint at connection region reduced the shear capacity of connectionsby (10% to 22% and cracking loads by (23%-62% compared with connections cast monolithically.

  15. Influences of Shear History and Infilling on the Mechanical Characteristics and Acoustic Emissions of Joints

    Meng, Fanzhen; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Zaiquan; Zhang, Liming; Kong, Liang; Li, Shaojun; Zhang, Chuanqing

    2017-08-01

    Filled joints, which are characterized by high deformability and low shear strength, are among the most critical discontinuities in rock mass and may be sheared repeatedly when subject to cyclic loading. Shear tests were carried out on tension splitting joints, with soil and granular cement mortar particles used as infillings, and the effects of the shear history on the mechanical behavior and acoustic emission (AE) of clean and filled joints were studied. The maximum strength in the subsequent shears was approximately 60% of the peak strength of the first shear for a clean joint, and the friction angle degraded from 63° to 45° after the first shear. The maximum shear strength of the filled joints was lower than 35% of the peak strength of the clean joint under the same normal stress. The change in the shear strength of filled joints with the number of shearing cycles was closely related to the transformation of the shear medium. Rolling friction occurred and the shear strength was low for the granular particle-filled joint, but the strength was elevated when the particles were crushed and sliding friction occurred. The AEs were significantly reduced during the second shear for the clean joint, and the peak AEs were mainly obtained at or near the turning point of the shear stress curve for the filled joint. The AEs were the highest for the cement particle-filled joint and lowest for the dry soil-filled joint; when subjected to repeated shears, the AEs were more complex because of the continuous changes to the shear medium. The evolution of the AEs with the shear displacement can accurately reflect the shear failure mechanism during a single shear process.

  16. Strength and behavior in shear of reinforced concrete deep beams under dynamic loading conditions

    Adhikary, Satadru Das [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Li, Bing, E-mail: cbli@ntu.edu.sg [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Fujikake, Kazunori [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka 239 8686 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Effects of wider range of loading rates on dynamic shear behavior of RC deep beams. ► Experimental investigation of RC deep beam with and without shear reinforcements. ► Verification of experimental results with truss model and FE simulation results. ► Empirical equations are proposed to predict the dynamic increase factor of maximum resistance. -- Abstract: Research on reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams has seen considerable headway over the past three decades; however, information on the dynamic shear strength and behavior of RC deep beams under varying rates of loads remains limited. This paper describes the experimental results of 24 RC deep beams with and without shear reinforcements under varying rates of concentrated loading. Results obtained serve as useful data on shear resistance, failure patterns and strain rates corresponding to varying loading rates. An analytical truss model approach proves its efficacy in predicting the dynamic shear resistance under varying loading rates. Furthermore, three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) model is described and the simulation results are verified with the experimental results. A parametric study is then conducted to investigate the influence of longitudinal reinforcement ratio, transverse reinforcement ratio and shear span to effective depth ratio on shear behavior. Subsequently, two empirical equations were proposed by integrating the various parameters to assess the dynamic increase factor (DIF) of maximum resistance under varying rates of concentrated loading.

  17. Flexural behaviour and punching shear of selfcompacting concrete ribbed slab reinforced with steel fibres

    Ahmad Hazrina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of steel fibres as a replacement to the conventional reinforcement under flexural behaviour and punching shear in self-compacting (SCC ribbed slab reinforced with steel fibres. Four ribbed slabs with similar dimensions of 2.8 m length × 1.2 m width and 0.2m thickness were constructed. Two of the samples were considered as control samples (conventionally reinforced with reinforcement bars and welded mesh while another two samples were fully reinforced with 1% (80 kg/m3 volume of steel fibres incorporated to the SCC mix. For the flexural behaviour study, the ribbed slab samples were subjected to two line loads under four point bending. Meanwhile, for the punching shear analysis, the ribbed slab samples were subjected to a point load to simulate loading from the column. The analysis of the experimental results displayed that steel fibres incorporation had been found to effectively delay the first crack occurrence under both flexural and punching shear. The steel fibre replacement has been proven to be able to sustain up to 80% and 73% of the ultimate load resistance for flexural and punching shear, respectively, in comparison to conventionally reinforced ribbed slab structure. The visual observation carried out during the experiment exhibited similar failure mode for both steel fibre reinforced and control samples. This was observed for both flexural and punching shear samples. Overall, it can be concluded that the steel fibres had displayed a promising potential to effectively replace the conventional reinforcements.

  18. ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Cuenca Asensio, Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Cuenca Asensio, E. (2012). ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE [Tesis doctoral no publicada]. Universitat Politècnica de València. doi:10.4995/Thesis/10251/18326. Palancia

  19. Evaluation of size dependent design shear strength of reinforced ...

    to the development of the size dependent models on the shear strength in ... predict the diagonal cracking strength and the ultimate shear strength of RC ... ing strength of normal beams was by Zsutty (1968) based on the data base available without .... The comparison of the calculated shear strength of the beams is shown.

  20. Nonlinear shear behavior of rock joints using a linearized implementation of the Barton–Bandis model

    Simon Heru Prassetyo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on rock joint behaviors have shown that joint surface roughness is mobilized under shearing, inducing dilation and resulting in nonlinear joint shear strength and shear stress vs. shear displacement behaviors. The Barton–Bandis (BB joint model provides the most realistic prediction for the nonlinear shear behavior of rock joints. The BB model accounts for asperity roughness and strength through the joint roughness coefficient (JRC and joint wall compressive strength (JCS parameters. Nevertheless, many computer codes for rock engineering analysis still use the constant shear strength parameters from the linear Mohr–Coulomb (M−C model, which is only appropriate for smooth and non-dilatant joints. This limitation prevents fractured rock models from capturing the nonlinearity of joint shear behavior. To bridge the BB and the M−C models, this paper aims to provide a linearized implementation of the BB model using a tangential technique to obtain the equivalent M−C parameters that can satisfy the nonlinear shear behavior of rock joints. These equivalent parameters, namely the equivalent peak cohesion, friction angle, and dilation angle, are then converted into their mobilized forms to account for the mobilization and degradation of JRC under shearing. The conversion is done by expressing JRC in the equivalent peak parameters as functions of joint shear displacement using proposed hyperbolic and logarithmic functions at the pre- and post-peak regions of shear displacement, respectively. Likewise, the pre- and post-peak joint shear stiffnesses are derived so that a complete shear stress-shear displacement relationship can be established. Verifications of the linearized implementation of the BB model show that the shear stress-shear displacement curves, the dilation behavior, and the shear strength envelopes of rock joints are consistent with available experimental and numerical results.

  1. Shear design and assessment of reinforced and prestressed concrete beams based on a mechanical model

    Marí Bernat, Antonio Ricardo; Bairán García, Jesús Miguel; Cladera Bohigas, Antoni; Oller Ibars, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Safe and economical design and assessment of reinforced (RC) and prestressed concrete (PC) beams requires the availability of accurate but simple formulations which adequately capture the structural response. In this paper, a mechanical model for the prediction of the shear-flexural strength of PC and RC members with rectangular, I, or T sections, with and without shear reinforcement, is presented. The model is based on the principles of concrete mechanics and on assumptions supported by the ...

  2. Effects of Particle Size on the Shear Behavior of Coarse Grained Soils Reinforced with Geogrid

    Daehyeon Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to design civil structures that are supported by soils, the shear strength parameters of soils are required. Due to the large particle size of coarse-grained soils, large direct shear tests should be performed. In this study, large direct shear tests on three types of coarse grained soils (4.5 mm, 7.9 mm, and 15.9 mm were performed to evaluate the effects of particle size on the shear behavior of coarse grained soils with/without geogrid reinforcements. Based on the direct shear test results, it was found that, in the case of no-reinforcement, the larger the maximum particle size became, the larger the friction angle was. Compared with the no-reinforcement case, the cases reinforced with either soft geogrid or stiff geogrid have smaller friction angles. The cohesion of the soil reinforced with stiff geogrid was larger than that of the soil reinforced with soft geogrid. The difference in the shear strength occurs because the case with a stiff geogrid has more soil to geogrid contact area, leading to the reduction in interlocking between soil particles.

  3. Effects of Particle Size on the Shear Behavior of Coarse Grained Soils Reinforced with Geogrid.

    Kim, Daehyeon; Ha, Sungwoo

    2014-02-07

    In order to design civil structures that are supported by soils, the shear strength parameters of soils are required. Due to the large particle size of coarse-grained soils, large direct shear tests should be performed. In this study, large direct shear tests on three types of coarse grained soils (4.5 mm, 7.9 mm, and 15.9 mm) were performed to evaluate the effects of particle size on the shear behavior of coarse grained soils with/without geogrid reinforcements. Based on the direct shear test results, it was found that, in the case of no-reinforcement, the larger the maximum particle size became, the larger the friction angle was. Compared with the no-reinforcement case, the cases reinforced with either soft geogrid or stiff geogrid have smaller friction angles. The cohesion of the soil reinforced with stiff geogrid was larger than that of the soil reinforced with soft geogrid. The difference in the shear strength occurs because the case with a stiff geogrid has more soil to geogrid contact area, leading to the reduction in interlocking between soil particles.

  4. Development of Shear Capacity Prediction Model for FRP-RC Beam without Web Reinforcement

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Available codes and models generally use partially modified shear design equation, developed earlier for steel reinforced concrete, for predicting the shear capacity of FRP-RC members. Consequently, calculated shear capacity shows under- or overestimation. Furthermore, in most models some affecting parameters of shear strength are overlooked. In this study, a new and simplified shear capacity prediction model is proposed considering all the parameters. A large database containing 157 experimental results of FRP-RC beams without shear reinforcement is assembled from the published literature. A parametric study is then performed to verify the accuracy of the proposed model. Again, a comprehensive review of 9 codes and 12 available models is done, published back from 1997 to date for comparison with the proposed model. Hence, it is observed that the proposed equation shows overall optimized performance compared to all the codes and models within the range of used experimental dataset.

  5. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under shear

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Coconut shell used as aggregate in concrete production. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior studied under shear. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior are compared with control concrete beams. - Abstract: Lightweight concrete has been produced using crushed coconut shell as coarse aggregate. The shear behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Eight beams, four with coconut shell concrete and four with normal control concrete were fabricated and tested. Study includes the structural shear behavior, shear capacity, cracking behavior, deflection behavior, ductility, strains in concrete and in reinforcement. It was observed that the shear behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under shear loadings. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams

  6. Phenomenological interpretation of the shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite beams

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). This study investigates and quantifies the effect of ECC's strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior on the shear capacity of beams...

  7. Local and Modal Damage Indicators for Reinforced Concrete Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Abbott, J.

    Local, modal and overall damage indicators for reinforced concrete shear frames subject to seismic excitation are defined and studied. Each storey of the shear frame is represented by a Clough and Johnston hysteretic oscillator with degrading elastic fraction of the restoring force. The local max...

  8. Experimental Study on the Shear Transfer Across Cracks in Reinforced Concrete

    Weiqing, Liu; Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Ding, Dajun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the concrete compressive strength and the reinforcement ratio on the shear transfer across cracks are studied experimentally and theoretically. Tests on 84 specimens of the push-off type are reported. Most of the specimens were precracked along the shear plane. Among...

  9. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  10. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Membrane Elements Subjected to Bidirectional Shear Loads

    Labib, M.; Moslehy, Y.; Ayoub, A.

    2013-01-01

    The shear design and behavior of a typical membrane reinforced concrete (RC) element has been extensively studied in the past several decades. Such design requires knowledge of the constitutive behavior of RC elements subjected to a shear stress acting along its plane (in-plane shear). These constitutive models were accurately derived from experimental test data on representative RC panel elements. The true behavior of many large, complex structures, however, involves interaction between the ...

  11. Application Problems of Anchor Dowels in Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall and Frame Connections

    Musa H. Arslan

    2016-01-01

    Strengthening of the existing seismically deficient reinforced concrete (RC) buildings is an important issue in earthquake prone regions. Addition of RC shear wall as infill or external walls into the structural system has been a commonly preferred strengthening technique since the Big Erzincan Earthquake occurred in Turkey, 1992. The newly added rigid infill walls act primarily as shear walls and relieve the non-ductile existing frames from being subjected to large shear demands providing th...

  12. Prediction of punching shear capacities of two-way concrete slabs reinforced with FRP bars

    Ibrahim M. Metwally

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Where corrosion of steel reinforcement is a concern, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP reinforcing bar or grid reinforcement provides an alternative reinforcement for concrete flat slabs. The existing provisions for punching of slabs in most international design standards for reinforced concrete are based on tests of steel reinforced slabs. The elastic stiffness and bonding characteristics of FRP reinforcement are sufficiently different from those of steel to affect punching strength [1]. This paper evaluates the punching shear strength of concrete flat slabs reinforced with different types of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. A total of 59 full-size slabs were constructed and tested collected from the literature of FRP bars reinforced concrete slabs. The test parameters were the amount of FRP reinforcing bars, Young’s modulus of FRP bars, slab thickness, loaded areas and concrete compressive strength. The experimental punching shear strengths were compared with the available theoretical predictions, including the ACI 318 Code, BS 8110 Code, ACI 440 design guidelines, and a number of models proposed by some researchers in the literature. Two approaches for predicting the punching strength of FRP-reinforced slabs are examined. The first is an empirical new model which is considered as a modification of El-Gamal et al. [2] model. The second is a Neural Networks Technique; which has been developed to predict the punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced concrete slabs. The accuracies of both methods were evaluated against the experimental test data. They attained excellent agreement with available test results compared to the existing design formulas.

  13. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Grids for Shear and End Zone Reinforcement in Bridge Beams

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel reduces life spans of bridges throughout the United States; therefore, using non-corroding carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement is seen as a way to increase service life. The use of CFRP as the flexural ...

  14. Stay-in-Place Formwork of TRC Designed as Shear Reinforcement for Concrete Beams

    S. Verbruggen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce on-site building time, the construction industry shows an increasing interest in stay-in-place formwork with a reinforcement function after concrete hardening, such as CFRP formwork confinement for columns. The current combined systems however do not answer the demand of the building industry for a material system that is both lightweight and fire safe. High performance textile reinforced cement (TRC composites can address this need. They can be particularly interesting for the shear reinforcement of concrete beams. This paper describes a preliminary analysis and feasibility study on structural stay-in-place formwork made of TRC. Comparative bending experiments demonstrate that a fully steel reinforced beam and an equivalent beam with shear reinforcement in TRC formwork show similar yielding behaviour, indicating that the TRC shear reinforcement system actually works. Moreover, the cracking moment of the concrete was more or less doubled, resulting in a much lower deflection in serviceability limit state than calculated. Digital image correlation measurements show that the latter is due to the crack bridging capacity of the external TRC shear reinforcement.

  15. Glass Masonry - Experimental Verification of Bed Joint under Shear

    Fíla, J.; Eliášová, M.; Sokol, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Glass is considered as a traditional material for building industry but was mostly used for glazing of the windows. At present, glass is an integral part of contemporary architecture where glass structural elements such as beams, stairs, railing ribs or columns became popular in the last two decades. However, using glass as structural material started at the beginning of 20th century, when masonry from hollow glass blocks were used. Using solid glass brick is very rare and only a few structures with solid glass bricks walls have been built in the last years. Pillars and walls made from solid glass bricks are mainly loaded by compression and/or bending from the eccentricity of vertical load or wind load. Due to high compressive strength of glass, the limiting factor of the glass masonry is the joint between the glass bricks as the smooth surface requires another type of mortar / glue compared to traditional masonry. Shear resistance and failure modes of brick bed joint was determined during series of tests using various mortars, two types of surface treatment and different thickness of the mortar joint. Shear tests were completed by small scale tests for mortar - determination of flexural and compressive strength of hardened mortar.

  16. Study on the shear transfer of reinforced concrete at elevated temperature

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Kanazu, Tsutomu

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power stations, such as a containment vessel and structural members supporting a reactor vessel, are designed assuming that they may be subjected to elevated temperature. In the design code, it is specified that the temperature of concrete must not exceed the limitation, and thermal effect shall be taken into account. In this study, the shearing test using Mattock type specimens was performed to investigate into the shear behavior of the reinforced concrete subjected to elevated temperature. The test parameters studied in this program were the reinforcement ratio in a shear plane, the compressive stress normal to a shear plane and temperature. The maximum shearing load of the specimens heated to 200 degC was about 10-20 % lower than that at normal temperature, but nearly equal to that of the specimens heated to 100 degC. The equation for evaluating the shearing strength ratio was proposed. The cracking width and slip at maximum shearing load increased as temperature rose. Up to 200 degC, the same relation existed between interface shear transfer rigidity and cracking width. (K.I.)

  17. Strength and stiffness of uniaxially tensioned reinforced concrete panels subjected to membrane shear. Technical report

    Hilmy, S.I.; White, R.N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-06-01

    This report presents experimental and analytical results on internal pressurization effects and seismic shear effects in a concrete containment vessel that is cracked by tension in one direction only. The experimental program, which was restricted to 6 in. thick flat specimens with two-way reinforcement, included establishment of (a) extensional stiffness for uniaxially tensioned specimens stressed to 0.6fy, and (b) shear strength and stiffness of these cracked specimens with tension levels ranging from 0 to 0.9fy; values were about 10 to 15 percent higher than in similar biaxially tensioned specimens. Eleven (11) specimens were tested (6 in monotonic shear and 5 in reversing cyclic shear)

  18. Constitutive Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Membrane Elements under Tri-directional Shear

    Labib, Moheb

    The two-dimensional behavior of typical reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been extensively studied in the past several decades by investigating the constitutive behavior of full-scale reinforced concrete elements subjected to a bi-axial state of stress. In order to understand the true behavior of many large complex structures, the goal of this investigation is to develop new constitutive relationships for RC elements subjected to tri-directional shear stresses. Recently, additional out-of-plane jacks were installed on the panel tester at University of Houston so that concrete elements could be subjected to tri-directional shear stresses. This upgrade makes the panel tester the only one of its kind in the US that is capable of applying such combinations of stresses on full-scale reinforced concrete elements. This dissertation presents the details of the mounting and installation of the additional hydraulic jacks on the universal panel tester. The experimental program includes a series of seven reinforced concrete elements subjected to different combinations of in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses. Increasing the applied out-of-plane shear stresses reduced the membrane shear strength of the elements. The effect of applying out-of-plane shear stresses on the in-plane shear strength was represented by modifying the softening coefficient in the compression stress strain curve of concrete struts. The modified model was able to capture the behavior and the ultimate capacity of the tested elements. The effect of the in-plane shear reinforcement ratio on the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses was evaluated. The model was implemented in the Finite Element package FEAP and was used to predict the ultimate capacity of many structures subjected to a combination of in-plane and out-of-plane shear stresses. The results of the analytical model were used to develop simplified design equations for members subjected to bi-directional shear loads

  19. Shear strength in corner region of reinforced concrete duct type structures to be embedded in soil

    Aoyagi, Y.; Endo, T.

    1993-01-01

    Reinforced concrete ducts for accommodating emergency cooling water pipes are generally embedded in soil. The structures is classified as one of the most important structures in terms of earthquake resistant design. During a strong earthquake it is subjected to shear deformations in concerted movement with surrounding soil. The comer regions of the duct should be designed against shear with moment combined. However, the complicated stress conditions in the region render the design more intricate in comparison with the case of simple determinate RC beam type structures. With the above situation in mind an experimental study was conducted, in which prototype as well as one half scale models representing the stress conditions in the region of interest were loaded and brought to failure in shear. The cross section of the prototype test model without shear reinforcements was 60 (height) x 30cm (width), and the tensile reinforcement ratio was 2.58%. The following results were obtained within the limit of the experimental study. (1) The shear capacity predicted by Japanese Design Code for linear RC members over-estimated the experimental ones with a considerably large safety margin of 4.4-5.0. (2) An improved design procedure to be applied to the specific structure was proposed, which gave a reasonable safety factor against shear failure of 1.7-2.0. (3) Combined smeared and discrete cracking model was utilized to simulate the shear failure mechanism, which could realistically pursue experimental behaviors. (author)

  20. Internal inspection of reinforced concrete for nuclear structures using shear wave tomography

    Scott, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Aging of reinforced concrete used for worldwide nuclear structures is increasing and necessitating evaluation. • Nondestructive evaluation is a tool for assessing the condition of reinforced concrete of nuclear structures. • Ultrasonic shear wave tomography as a stress wave technique has begun to be utilized for investigation of concrete material. • A study using ultrasonic shear wave tomography indicates anomalies vital to the long-term operation of the structure. • The use of this technique has shown to successfully evaluate the internal state of reinforced concrete members. - Abstract: Reinforced concrete is important for nuclear related structures. Therefore, the integrity of structural members consisting of reinforced concrete is germane to the safe operation and longevity of these facilities. Many issues that reduce the likelihood of safe operation and longevity are not visible on the surface of reinforced concrete material. Therefore, an investigation of reinforced concrete material should include techniques which will allow peering into the concrete member and determining its internal state. The performance of nondestructive evaluations is pursuant to this goal. Some of the categories of nondestructive evaluations are electrochemical, magnetism, ground penetrating radar, and ultrasonic testing. A specific ultrasonic testing technique, namely ultrasonic shear wave tomography, is used to determine presence and extent of voids, honeycombs, cracks perpendicular to the surface, and/or delamination. This technique, and others similar to it, has been utilized in the nuclear industry to determine structural conditions

  1. Numerical Analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Shear Walls and Steel Strips under Cyclic Loads Using Finite Element Method

    Askarizadeh, N.; Mohammadizadeh, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls are the main elements of resistance against lateral loads in reinforced concrete structures. These walls should not only provide sufficient resistance but also provide sufficient ductility in order to avoid brittle fracture, particularly under strong seismic loads. However, many reinforced concrete shear walls need to be stabilized and reinforced due to various reasons such as changes in requirements of seismic regulations, weaknesses in design and execution, p...

  2. Research status and needs for shear tests on large-scale reinforced concrete containment elements

    Oesterle, R.G.; Russell, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reinforced concrete containments at nuclear power plants are designed to resist forces caused by internal pressure, gravity, and severe earthquakes. The size, shape, and possible stress states in containments produce unique problems for design and construction. A lack of experimental data on the capacity of reinforced concrete to transfer shear stresses while subjected to biaxial tension has led to cumbersome if not impractical design criteria. Research programs recently conducted at the Construction Technology Laboratories and at Cornell University indicate that design criteria for tangential, peripheral, and radial shear are conservative. This paper discusses results from recent research and presents tentative changes for shear design provisions of the current United States code for containment structures. Areas where information is still lacking to fully verify new design provisions are discussed. Needs for further experimental research on large-scale specimens to develop economical, practical, and reliable design criteria for resisting shear forces in containment are identified. (orig.)

  3. Shear Behavior Models of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Modifying Softened Truss Model Approaches.

    Hwang, Jin-Ha; Lee, Deuck Hang; Ju, Hyunjin; Kim, Kang Su; Seo, Soo-Yeon; Kang, Joo-Won

    2013-10-23

    Recognizing that steel fibers can supplement the brittle tensile characteristics of concrete, many studies have been conducted on the shear performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) members. However, previous studies were mostly focused on the shear strength and proposed empirical shear strength equations based on their experimental results. Thus, this study attempts to estimate the strains and stresses in steel fibers by considering the detailed characteristics of steel fibers in SFRC members, from which more accurate estimation on the shear behavior and strength of SFRC members is possible, and the failure mode of steel fibers can be also identified. Four shear behavior models for SFRC members have been proposed, which have been modified from the softened truss models for reinforced concrete members, and they can estimate the contribution of steel fibers to the total shear strength of the SFRC member. The performances of all the models proposed in this study were also evaluated by a large number of test results. The contribution of steel fibers to the shear strength varied from 5% to 50% according to their amount, and the most optimized volume fraction of steel fibers was estimated as 1%-1.5%, in terms of shear performance.

  4. Shear Behavior Models of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Modifying Softened Truss Model Approaches

    Joo-Won Kang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing that steel fibers can supplement the brittle tensile characteristics of concrete, many studies have been conducted on the shear performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC members. However, previous studies were mostly focused on the shear strength and proposed empirical shear strength equations based on their experimental results. Thus, this study attempts to estimate the strains and stresses in steel fibers by considering the detailed characteristics of steel fibers in SFRC members, from which more accurate estimation on the shear behavior and strength of SFRC members is possible, and the failure mode of steel fibers can be also identified. Four shear behavior models for SFRC members have been proposed, which have been modified from the softened truss models for reinforced concrete members, and they can estimate the contribution of steel fibers to the total shear strength of the SFRC member. The performances of all the models proposed in this study were also evaluated by a large number of test results. The contribution of steel fibers to the shear strength varied from 5% to 50% according to their amount, and the most optimized volume fraction of steel fibers was estimated as 1%–1.5%, in terms of shear performance.

  5. Research Status on Reinforcement Connection Form of Precast Concrete Shear Wall Structure

    Zhang, Zhuangnan; Zhang, Yan

    2018-03-01

    With the rapid development of Chinese economy and the speeding up the process of urbanization, housing industrialization has been paid more and more attention. And the fabricated structure has been widely used in China. The key of precast concrete shear wall structure is the connection of precast components. The reinforcement connection can directly affect the entirety performance and seismic behavior of the structure. Different reinforcement connections have a great impact on the overall behavior of the structure. By studying the characteristics of the reinforcement connection forms used in the vertical connection and horizontal connection of precast concrete shear wall, it can provide reference for the research and development of the reinforcement connection forms in the future.

  6. Damage Detection of Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls Using Mathematical Transformations

    Hosein Naderpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring is a procedure to provide accurate and immediate information on the condition and efficiency of structures. There is variety of damage factors and the unpredictability of future damage, is a necessity for the use of structural health monitoring. Structural health monitoring and damage detection in early stages is one of the most interesting topics that had been paid attention because the majority of damages can be repaired and reformed by initial evaluation ,thus the spread of damage to the structures, building collapse and rising of costs can be avoided .Detection of concrete shear wall damages are designed to withstand the lateral load on the structure is critical .Because failures and  malfunctions of shear walls can lead to serious damage or even progressive dilapidation of concrete structures .Change in stiffness and frequency can clearly show the damage occurrence. Mathematical transformation is also a tool to detect damage. In this article, with non- linear time history analysis, the finite element model of structures with concrete shear walls subject to four earthquakes have extracted and using Fourier and wavelet transform, the presence of shear walls is detected at the time of damage.

  7. Failure analysis of edge flat-slab column connections with shear reinforcement

    Bompa, Dan V.; Muttoni, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Flat-slab column connections are susceptible to brittle failure, which lead to the necessity of improving ductility and ultimate strength. In case of edge connections, the behaviour at ultimate state is highly influenced by nonsymmetrical distribution of stresses originated by a moment transfer between the slab and the column. The paper presents the test results of three full-scale reinforced concrete flat-slab edge connections with stud-rail shear reinforcement subjected to concentrated load...

  8. Efficacy of Thermally Conditioned Sisal FRP Composite on the Shear Characteristics of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Tara Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of commercially viable composites based on natural resources for a wide range of applications is on the rise. Efforts include new methods of production and the utilization of natural reinforcements to make biodegradable composites with lignocellulosic fibers, for various engineering applications. In this work, thermal conditioning of woven sisal fibre was carried out, followed by the development of woven sisal fibre reinforced polymer composite system, and its tensile and flexural behaviour was characterized. It was observed that thermal conditioning improved the tensile strength and the flexural strength of the woven sisal fibre composites, which were observed to bear superior values than those in the untreated ones. Then, the efficacy of woven sisal fibre reinforced polymer composite for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete beams was evaluated using two types of techniques: full and strip wrapping techniques. Detailed analysis of the load deflection behaviour and fracture study of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with woven sisal under shearing load were carried out, and it was concluded that woven sisal FRP strengthened beams, underwent very ductile nature of failure, without any delamination or debonding of sisal FRP, and also increased the shear strength and the first crack load of the reinforced concrete beams.

  9. Current status of the quantification of roughness and the peak shear strength criteria for rock joints

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Kang, Chul Hyung

    1999-04-01

    In order to understand the effects of spent nuclear fuel on the hydraulic behaviour of the rock mass it is necessary to have knowledge about the relationship between the stresses and hydraulic properties of the fractures. The roughness of a fracture surface govern the dilation of the fracture and the displacement of the fracture surface under shear stress. The peak shear strength and hydraulic flow properties of fractures depend very much on the surface roughness. This report describes different methods and techniques used in the characterization of rock joint surfaces and their applications in rock mechanics. Joint roughness is an important factor in the shear resistance of a joint. The joint shear strength shows anisotropic properties due to roughness variation with the shearing direction in direct shear tests. Various shear strength criteria are described in this report. (author)

  10. A study on shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams subjected to long-term heating

    Maruta, M.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyashita, T.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to determine the shear behavior of reinforced concrete members in nuclear power plant facilities following sustained heating to high temperatures. A total of nine specimens was tested. The parameters of the tests were (1) heating temperature (65, 90 and 175 C) and (2) heating period (1, 3, 6 or 12 months). Different combinations of these parameters were employed, and the shear strength deterioration rate was evaluated. The test results were confirmed by a non-linear finite element analysis. The relationship between the concrete compressive strengths, which varied from heating face to upper portion, and the shear strength in specimens was evaluated. (orig.)

  11. Partial Prestress Concrete Beams Reinforced Concrete Column Joint Earthquake Resistant On Frame Structure Building

    Astawa, M. D.; Kartini, W.; Lie, F. X. E.

    2018-01-01

    Floor Building that requires a large space such as for the meeting room, so it must remove the column in the middle of the room, then the span beam above the room will be long. If the beam of structural element with a span length reaches 15.00 m, then it is less effective and efficient using a regular Reinforced Concrete Beam because it requires a large section dimension, and will reduce the beauty of the view in terms of aesthetics of Architecture. In order to meet these criteria, in this design will use partial prestressing method with 400/600 mm section dimension, assuming the partial Prestressed Beam structure is still able to resist the lateral force of the earthquake. The design of the reinforcement has taken into account to resist the moment due to the gravitational load and lateral forces. The earthquake occurring on the frame structure of the building. In accordance with the provisions, the flexural moment capacity of the tendon is permitted only by 25% of the total bending moment on support of the beam, while the 75% will be charged to the reinforcing steel. Based on the analysis result, bring ini 1 (one) tendon contains 6 strand with diameter 15,2 mm. On the beam pedestal, requires 5D25 tensile reinforcement and 3D25 for the compression reinforcement, for shear reinforcement on the pedestal using Ø10-100 mm. Dimensional column section are 600/600 mm with longitudinal main reinforcement of 12D25, and transverse reinforcement Ø10-150. At the core of the beam-column joint, use the transversal reinforcement Ø10-100 mm. The moment of Column versus Beam Moment ∑Me > 1.2 Mg, with a value of 906.99 kNm > 832.25 kNm, qualify for ductility and Strong Columns-weak beam. Capacity of contribution bending moment of Strand Tendon’s is 23.95% from the total bending moment capacity of the beam, meaning in accordance with the provisions. Thus, the stability and ductility structure of Beam-Column joint is satisfy the requirements of SNI 2847: 2013 and ACI 318-11.

  12. Evaluation of seismic shear capacity of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Jun Hee [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Fibers have been used in cement mixture to improve its toughness, ductility, and tensile strength, and to enhance the cracking and deformation characteristics of concrete structural members. The addition of fibers into conventional reinforced concrete can enhance the structural and functional performances of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear resisting capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) were investigated in this study. For a comparative evaluation between the shear performances of structural walls constructed with conventional concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, and polyamide fiber reinforced concrete, cyclic tests for wall specimens were conducted and hysteretic models were derived. The shear resisting capacity of a PCCV constructed with fiber reinforced concrete can be improved considerably. When steel fiber reinforced concrete contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be improved by > 50%, in comparison with that of a conventional PCCV. When polyamide fiber reinforced concrete contains polyamide fibers in a volume fraction of 1.5%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be enhanced by ∼40%. In particular, the energy dissipation capacity in a fiber reinforced PCCV can be enhanced by > 200%. The addition of fibers into conventional concrete increases the ductility and energy dissipation of wall structures significantly. Fibers can be effectively used to improve the structural performance of a PCCV subjected to strong ground motions. Steel fibers are more effective in enhancing the shear performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers.

  13. Evaluation of seismic shear capacity of prestressed concrete containment vessels with fiber reinforcement

    Choun, Young Sun; Park, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Fibers have been used in cement mixture to improve its toughness, ductility, and tensile strength, and to enhance the cracking and deformation characteristics of concrete structural members. The addition of fibers into conventional reinforced concrete can enhance the structural and functional performances of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear resisting capacity of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) were investigated in this study. For a comparative evaluation between the shear performances of structural walls constructed with conventional concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, and polyamide fiber reinforced concrete, cyclic tests for wall specimens were conducted and hysteretic models were derived. The shear resisting capacity of a PCCV constructed with fiber reinforced concrete can be improved considerably. When steel fiber reinforced concrete contains hooked steel fibers in a volume fraction of 1.0%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be improved by > 50%, in comparison with that of a conventional PCCV. When polyamide fiber reinforced concrete contains polyamide fibers in a volume fraction of 1.5%, the maximum lateral displacement of a PCCV can be enhanced by ∼40%. In particular, the energy dissipation capacity in a fiber reinforced PCCV can be enhanced by > 200%. The addition of fibers into conventional concrete increases the ductility and energy dissipation of wall structures significantly. Fibers can be effectively used to improve the structural performance of a PCCV subjected to strong ground motions. Steel fibers are more effective in enhancing the shear performance of a PCCV than polyamide fibers

  14. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  15. Full Scale Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Joints Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymer Systems

    Alessandro De Vita

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental campaign performed at the Laboratory of Materials and Structural Testing of the University of Salerno (Italy in order to investigate the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC beam-column joints strengthened with steel reinforced polymer (SRP systems. With the aim to represent typical façade frames’ beam-column subassemblies found in existing RC buildings, specimens were provided with two short beam stubs orthogonal to the main beam and were designed with inadequate seismic details. Five members were strengthened by using two different SRP layouts while the remaining ones were used as benchmarks. Once damaged, two specimens were also repaired, retrofitted with SRP, and subjected to cyclic test again. The results of cyclic tests performed on SRP strengthened joints are examined through a comparison with the outcomes of the previous experimental program including companion specimens not provided with transverse beam stubs and strengthened by carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP systems. In particular, both qualitative and quantitative considerations about the influence of the confining effect provided by the secondary beams on the joint response, the suitability of all the adopted strengthening solutions (SRP/CFRP systems, the performances and the failure modes experienced in the several cases studied are provided.

  16. Design Oriented Model for the Assessment of T-Shaped Beam-Column Joints in Reinforced Concrete Frames

    Antonio Bossio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints represent very important elements of reinforced concrete (RC structures. In fact, beams and columns, at the boundary, generate internal forces acting on concrete core and on reinforcement bars with a very high gradient. To fully understand the seismic performances and the failure modes of T-shaped beam-column joints (external corner-positioned in RC structures, a simplified analytical model of joint behaviour is proposed and theoretical simulations have been performed. The model is based on the solution of a system of equilibrium equations of cracked joint portions designed to evaluate internal stresses at different values of column shear forces. The main aim of the proposed model is to identify the strength hierarchy. Limit values of different internal stresses allow us to detect the occurrence of different failure modes (namely the failure of the cracked joint, the bond failure of passing through bars, and the flexural/shear failures of columns or beams associated with column shear forces; the smaller one represents the capacity of the joint. The present work, focusing on T-shaped joints, could represent a useful tool for designers to quantify the performance of new structures or of existing ones. In fact, such a tool allows us to push an initial undesired failure mode to a more appropriate one to be evaluated. Finally, some experimental results of tests available in literature are reported, analysed, and compared to the predictions of the proposed model (by means of a worked example and of some international codes. The outcomes confirm that failure modes and corresponding joint capacities require an analytical model, like the proposed one, to be accurately predicted.

  17. An experimental study on the flexural and shear behavior of steel plate concrete—reinforced concrete connected structures

    Hwang, K.M.; Lee, K.J.; Yang, H.J.; Kim, W.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper confirmed the structural behavior of the connection plane between a RC and a SC member. ► Out-of-plane flexural load tests verified the appropriateness of the ductile non-contact splice length. ► The test results for the in-plane shear load showed the needlessness of horizontal bars in the SC member. ► In order to consider dynamic loads such as earthquakes, cyclic loading tests were carried out. ► Numerical analysis was carried out to verify test results and its results was compared with them. -- Abstract: This paper describes an experimental study on the structural behavior of the joint plane between a RC (reinforced concrete) wall and a SC (steel plate concrete) wall under out-of-plane flexural loads and in-plane shear loads. L- and I-shaped test specimens were produced to efficiently assess the flexural and shear behavior of the structures. In order to consider dynamic loads such as earthquakes, cyclic loading tests were carried out. The out-of-plane flexural test conducted on the short development length L-shaped specimen with a non-contact splice length exhibited a ductile failure mode that surpassed the nominal strength, verifying the validity of the splice length used in its design. The in-plane shear test was conducted on two I-shaped specimens varying the compositional presence of horizontal bars in the SC member. The test results showed that the capacity of the specimens was more than their nominal strength regardless of the compositional presence of horizontal bars. The shear friction tests of the RC–SC member connection conducted on the other L-shaped specimen caused the failure of the SC member and verified a shear resistance of at least 85.5% compared to the theoretical value

  18. Study on shear transfer analysis of reinforced concrete across a crack

    Endoh, Takao; Katoh, Osamu

    1984-11-01

    It is a one of the most important problems in the reinforced concrete engineering to clarify the mechanism of shear transfer across cracked concrete planes crossed by reinforcement. By many experimental studies the mechanism of shear transfer across crack surfaces has gradually become clear. And based on those experimental studies, various analytical models of shear transfer have been developed. In this study, the mathematical model presented by M. N. Fardis is adopted and finite element formulation was carried out by the use of developed concrete constitutive law for cracked surface. The numerical result was compared with the experimental ones of Mattock-type push-off tests. Equating the effective range of the cracked bondless zone with the element area where special constitutive law is applied, a satisfying analytical result was obtained.

  19. A study on shear transfer analysis of reinforced concrete across a crack

    Endoh, Takao; Katoh, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    It is a one of the most important problems in the reinforced concrete engineering to clarify the mechanism of shear transfer across cracked concrete planes crossed by reinforcement. By many experimental studies the mechanism of shear transfer across crack surfaces has gradually become clear. And based on those experimental studies, various analytical models of shear transfer have been developed. In this study, the mathematical model presented by M. N. Fardis is adopted and finite element formulation was carried out by the use of developed concrete constitutive law for cracked surface. The numerical result was compared with the experimental ones of Mattock-type push-off tests. Equating the effective range of the cracked bondless zone with the element area where special constitutive law is applied, a satisfying analytical result was obtained. (author)

  20. Simulation of reinforced concrete short shear wall subjected to cyclic loading

    Parulekar, Y.M.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Pegon, P.; Wenzel, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Prediction of the capacity of squat shear wall using tests and analysis. • Modification of model of concrete in the softening part. • Pushover analysis using softened truss theory and FE analysis is performed. • Modified concrete model gives reasonable accurate peak load and displacement. • The ductility, ultimate load and also crack pattern can be accurately predicted. - Abstract: This paper addresses the strength and deformation capacity of stiff squat shear wall subjected to monotonic and pseudo-static cyclic loading using experiments and analysis. Reinforced concrete squat shear walls offer great potential for lateral load resistance and the failure mode of these shear walls is brittle shear mode. Shear strength of these shear walls depend strongly on softening of concrete struts in principal compression direction due to principal tension in other direction. In this work simulation of the behavior of a squat shear wall is accurately predicted by finite element modeling by incorporating the appropriate softening model in the program. Modification of model of concrete in the softening part is suggested and reduction factor given by Vecchio et al. (1994) is used in the model. The accuracy of modeling is confirmed by comparing the simulated response with experimental one. The crack pattern generated from the 3D model is compared with that obtained from experiments. The load deflection for monotonic loads is also obtained using softened truss theory and compared with experimental one

  1. Assessment of the Mechanical Properties of Sisal Fiber-Reinforced Silty Clay Using Triaxial Shear Tests

    Yankai Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil’s strength and improves the soil’s mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  2. Evaluation of Interface Shear Strength Properties of Geogrid Reinforced Foamed Recycled Glass Using a Large-Scale Direct Shear Testing Apparatus

    Arul Arulrajah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interface shear strength properties of geogrid reinforced recycled foamed glass (FG were determined using a large-scale direct shear test (DST apparatus. Triaxial geogrid was used as a geogrid reinforcement. The geogrid increases the confinement of FG particles during shear; consequently the geogrid reinforced FG exhibits smaller vertical displacement and dilatancy ratio than FG at the same normal stress. The failure envelope of geogrid reinforced FG, at peak and critical states, coincides and yields a unique linear line possibly attributed to the crushing of FG particles and the rearrangement of crushed FG after peak shear state. The interface shear strength coefficient α is approximately constant at 0.9. This value can be used as the interface parameter for designing a reinforced embankment and mechanically stabilized earth (MSE wall when FG is used as a lightweight backfill and triaxial geogrid is used as an extensible earth reinforcement. This research will enable FG, recently assessed as suitable for lightweight backfills, to be used together with geogrids in a sustainable manner as a lightweight MSE wall. The geogrid carries tensile forces, while FG reduces bearing stresses imposed on the in situ soil. The use of geogrid reinforced FG is thus significant from engineering, economical, and environmental perspectives.

  3. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  4. In-plane Shear Joint Capacity of Pracast Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Elements

    Larsen, Henning; Goltermann, Per; Scherfig, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The paper establishes and documents formulas for the in-plane shear capacity between precast elements of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure. The joints investigated are rough or toothed and have all been precracked prior to the testing in order to obtain realistic test results....... The paper documents the shear force capacity for the joint strength between the most common joint types between precast LAC roof and floor elements used in Scandinavia....

  5. Evaluation of Shear Resisting Capacity of a Prestressed Concrete Containment Building with Steel or Polyamide Fiber Reinforcement

    Choun, Youngsun; Park, Junhee

    2014-01-01

    Conventional reinforced concrete (RC) members generally show a rapid deterioration in shear resisting mechanisms under a reversed cyclic load. However, the use of high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites provides excellent damage tolerance under large displacement reversals compared with regular concrete. Previous experimental studies have indicated that the use of fibers in conventional RC can enhance the structural and functional performance of prestressed concrete containment buildings (PCCBs) in nuclear power plants. This study evaluates the shear resisting capacity for a PCCB constructed using steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) or polyamide fiber reinforced concrete (PFRC). The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear performance of a PCCB were investigated. It was revealed that steel fibers are more effective to enhance the shear resisting capacity of a PCCB than polyamide fibers. The ductility and energy dissipation increase significantly in fiber reinforced PCCBs

  6. Evaluation of Shear Resisting Capacity of a Prestressed Concrete Containment Building with Steel or Polyamide Fiber Reinforcement

    Choun, Youngsun; Park, Junhee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Conventional reinforced concrete (RC) members generally show a rapid deterioration in shear resisting mechanisms under a reversed cyclic load. However, the use of high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites provides excellent damage tolerance under large displacement reversals compared with regular concrete. Previous experimental studies have indicated that the use of fibers in conventional RC can enhance the structural and functional performance of prestressed concrete containment buildings (PCCBs) in nuclear power plants. This study evaluates the shear resisting capacity for a PCCB constructed using steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) or polyamide fiber reinforced concrete (PFRC). The effects of steel and polyamide fibers on the shear performance of a PCCB were investigated. It was revealed that steel fibers are more effective to enhance the shear resisting capacity of a PCCB than polyamide fibers. The ductility and energy dissipation increase significantly in fiber reinforced PCCBs.

  7. Shear strength of reinforced concrete beams strengthened by P.B.O. fiber mesh under loading

    Blikharskyy Zinoviy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents experimental study of sheer strength of reinforced concrete beams without transverse steel reinforcement, which strengthened by composite materials. The feature of tests is that the beams’ strengthening is made under simultaneous action of loading. The research program involves a series of test beams with size 2100 × 200 × 100 mm and which contains control sample and three reinforced samples by reinforcing FRCM system. FRCM system consisting of two components: mineral mortar based on modified cement Ruredil X Mesh M750 and reinforcing P.B.O. fiber mesh Ruredil X Mesh Gold (Italy. The strength research of test samples was carried out with the shear distance to effective depth ratio a/d = 2. The strengthening loading levels were selected at 0.0, 0.3, 0.5 from shear strength of non strengthened control sample. As a result of experimental studies we found that during strengthening design the inclined cross section of beams we should take into account the existing level of loading. Using the strengthening system Ruredil X Mesh Gold the strengthening effect is reduced at 2.8 to 2.9 times while the existing level of loading increase from 0 to 50%.

  8. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid...... is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program included testing of small scale specimens by applying shear (push-off) loading and semi-full scale specimens...... on finite element modelling showed that the developed panel system meets the objectives of the research and is expected to have promising future....

  9. Hysteretic evaluation of seismic performance of normal and fiber reinforced concrete shear walls

    Choun, Young Sun; Hahm, Dae Gi

    2012-01-01

    The use of fibers in concrete or cement composites can enhance the performance of structural elements. Fibers have been used for a cement mixture to increase the toughness and tensile strength, and to improve the cracking and deformation characteristics. The addition of fibers into concrete can improve the ductility and increase the seismic resistance of concrete structures. The application of fibers to earthquake-resistant concrete structures has a major research topic. A recent study shows that an excellent seismic performance can be obtained in shear critical members constructed with high performance fiber reinforced cement composites. To increase the seismic performance of safety related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, fibers can be used. This study investigated the effect of fibers on the hysteretic behavior of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall by cyclic tests

  10. Hysteretic evaluation of seismic performance of normal and fiber reinforced concrete shear walls

    Choun, Young Sun; Hahm, Dae Gi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The use of fibers in concrete or cement composites can enhance the performance of structural elements. Fibers have been used for a cement mixture to increase the toughness and tensile strength, and to improve the cracking and deformation characteristics. The addition of fibers into concrete can improve the ductility and increase the seismic resistance of concrete structures. The application of fibers to earthquake-resistant concrete structures has a major research topic. A recent study shows that an excellent seismic performance can be obtained in shear critical members constructed with high performance fiber reinforced cement composites. To increase the seismic performance of safety related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, fibers can be used. This study investigated the effect of fibers on the hysteretic behavior of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall by cyclic tests.

  11. Evaluation of shear bond strength and shear stress on zirconia reinforced lithium silicate and high translucency zirconia.

    Amanda Maria de Oliveira Dal Piva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the shear stress distribution on the adhesive interface and the bond strength between resin cement and two ceramics. For finite element analysis (FEA, a tridimensional model was made using computer-aided design software. This model consisted of a ceramic slice (10x10x2mm partially embedded on acrylic resin with a resin cement cylinder (Ø=3.4 mm and h=3mm cemented on the external surface. Results of maximum principal stress and maximum principal shear were obtained to evaluate the stress generated on the ceramic and the cylinder surfaces. In order to reproduce the in vitro test, similar samples to the computational model were manufactured according to ceramic material (Zirconia reinforced lithium silicate - ZLS and high translucency Zirconia - YZHT, (N=48, n=12. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond test after 24h using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min, 50kgf until fracture. The other half was stored (a (180 days, water, 37ºC prior to the test. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and submitted to analysis of variance. The results showed that ceramic material influenced bond strength mean values (p=0.002, while aging did not: YZHT (19.80±6.44a, YZHTa (17.95±7.21a, ZLS (11.88±5.40b, ZLSa (11.76±3.32b. FEA results showed tensile and shear stress on ceramic and cylinder surfaces with more intensity on their periphery. Although the stress distribution was similar for both conditions, YZHT showed higher bond strength values; however, both materials seemed to promote durable bond strength.

  12. Flexural and Shear Behavior of RC Concrete Beams Reinforced with Fiber Wire Mesh

    Rafea Flaih Hassan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study  the effect of using fiber wire mesh on the flexural and shear properties of RC concrete beams. Six reinforced concrete beams (120*180*1220mm were tested under two load points. Fiber wire mesh was applied with two manners, first one is three layers as U shape around the section of the beam, the second one is four layers around overall section of beam. The test results indicated that using of fiber wire mesh as additional reinforcement can increase the ultimate load of about (1.85-3.58% in the case of flexural and (17.7-23.7% in case of shear. Also,  results showed that an increasing in  first cracking  load is obtained from  (42.8-85.7% in case of flexural and from (41.2-76.5% in case of shear. Also the shear behavior of beams becomes more ductile when the fiber wire mesh was used in beams. The cracks of shrinkage was disappeared when the fiber wire mesh surround the section of the beam. 

  13. Punching shear in reinforced concrete flat slabs with hole adjacent to the column and moment transfer

    D. C. Oliveira

    Full Text Available The structural behavior and the ultimate punching shear resistance of internal reinforced concrete flat slab-column connections, with one hole adjacent to the column, with or without flexural moment transfer of the slab to the column was investigated. Main variables were: the existence whether or not hole, flexural reinforcement layout and ratio, the direction and sense of the moment transferred and the eccentricity of the load (M (moment transferred to column / V (shear ratio at the connection - 0,50 m or 0,25 m. Seven internal slab-column joining were tested and ultimate loads, cracking, deflections, concrete and reinforcement strains were analyzed. The existence of hole adjacent to the smaller column dimension, the hole dimension, flexural reinforcement rate and placing, the variation of relation Mu/Vu in function of the load, and, than, of eccentricity of the load, influenced the slabs behavior and rupture load. Test results were compared with the estimations from CEB-FIP/MC1990 [7], EC2/2004 [12], ACI-318:2011 [1] and NBR 6118:2007 [5]. ACI [1] and EC2 [12] presented most conservative estimates, although have presented some non conservative estimates. Brazilian NBR [5], even though being partly based in EC2 [12], presented smaller conservative estimates and more non conservative estimates. A modification on all codes is proposed for taking in account the moment caused by the eccentricity at the critical perimeter for slabs with holes.

  14. Strength and durability of near-surface mounted CFRP bars for shear strengthening reinforced concrete bridge girders : final report appendices.

    2012-03-01

    During the interstate expansion of the 1950s, many conventionally reinforced concrete deck girder bridges were built throughout the country. These aging bridges commonly exhibit diagonal cracking and rate inadequately for shear, thus they are candida...

  15. Strength and durability of near-surface mounted CFRP bars for shear strengthening reinforced concrete bridge girders : appendices.

    2012-01-01

    During the interstate expansion of the 1950s, many conventionally reinforced concrete deck girder bridges were built throughout the country. These aging bridges commonly exhibit diagonal cracking and rate inadequately for shear, thus they are candida...

  16. Strength and durability of near-surface mounted CFRP bars for shear strengthening reinforced concrete bridge girders.

    2012-03-01

    During the interstate expansion of the 1950s, many conventionally reinforced concrete deck girder bridges were built throughout the country. These aging bridges commonly exhibit diagonal cracking and rate inadequately for shear, thus they are candida...

  17. Strength and durability of near-surface mounted CFRP bars for shear strengthening reinforced concrete bridge girders : final report.

    2012-03-01

    During the interstate expansion of the 1950s, many conventionally reinforced concrete deck girder bridges were built throughout the country. These aging bridges commonly exhibit diagonal cracking and rate inadequately for shear, thus they are candida...

  18. Study of the Peak Shear Strength of a Cement-Filled Hard Rock Joint

    She, Cheng-Xue; Sun, Fu-Ting

    2018-03-01

    The peak shear strength of a cement-filled hard rock joint is studied by theoretical analysis and laboratory testing. Based on the concept of the shear resistance angle, by combining the statistical method and fractal theory, three new parameters are proposed to characterize the three-dimensional joint morphology, reflecting the effects of the average roughness, multi-scale asperities and the dispersion degree of the roughness distribution. These factors are independent of the measurement scale, and they reflect the anisotropy of the joint roughness. Compressive shear tests are conducted on cement-filled joints. Because joints without cement can be considered special cement-filled joints in which the filling degree of cement is zero, they are also tested. The cement-filled granite joint fails primarily along the granite-cement interfaces. The filling degree of cement controls the joint failure and affects its mechanical behaviour. With a decrease in the filling degree of cement, the joint cohesion decreases; however, the dilatancy angle and the basic friction angle of the interface increase. As the filling degree approaches zero, the cohesion approaches zero, while the dilatancy angle and the basic friction angle increase to those of the joint without cement. A set of formulas is proposed to evaluate the peak shear strength of the joints with and without cement. The formulas are shown to be reasonable by comparison with the tested peak shear strength, and they reflect the anisotropy of the strength. This research deepens the understanding of cement-filled joints and provides a method to evaluate their peak shear strength.

  19. Characteristics of Asperity Damage and Its Influence on the Shear Behavior of Granite Joints

    Meng, Fanzhen; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Zaiquan; Zhang, Chuanqing; Li, Shaojun; Zhang, Liming; Kong, Liang

    2018-02-01

    Surface roughness significantly affects the shear behavior of rock joints; thus, studies on the asperity damage characteristics and its influence on the shear behavior of joints are extremely important. In this paper, shear tests were conducted on tensile granite joints; asperity damage was evaluated based on acoustic emission (AE) events; and the influence of asperity damage on joint shear behavior was analyzed. The results indicated that the total AE events tended to increase with normal stress. In addition, the asperity damage initiation shear stress, which is defined as the transition point from slow growth to rapid growth in the cumulative events curve, was approximately 0.485 of the peak shear strength regardless of the normal stress. Moreover, 63-85% of the AE events were generated after the peak shear stress, indicating that most of the damage occurred in this stage. Both the dilation and the total AE events decreased with shear cycles because of the damage inflicted on asperities during the previous shear cycle. Two stages were observed in the normal displacement curves under low normal stress, whereas three stages (compression, dilation and compression again) were observed at a higher normal stress; the second compression stage may be caused by tensile failure outside the shear plane. The magnitude of the normal stress and the state of asperity are two important factors controlling the post-peak stress drop and stick-slip of granite joints. Serious deterioration of asperities will stop stick-slip from recurring under the same normal stress because the ability to accumulate energy is decreased. The AE b-value increases with the number of shear cycles, indicating that the stress concentration inside the fault plane is reduced because of asperity damage; thus, the potential for dynamic disasters, such as fault-slip rockbursts, will be decreased.

  20. Shear strength estimation of the concrete beams reinforced with FRP; comparison of artificial neural network and equations of regulations

    Mahmood Akbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, numerous experimental tests were done on the concrete beams reinforced with the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. In this way, some equations were proposed to estimate the shear strength of the beams reinforced with FRP. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN model to predict the ultimate shear strength of the beams strengthened with FRP composites. For this purpose, a database consists of 304 reinforced FRP concrete beams have been collected from the available articles on the analysis of shear behavior of these beams. The inputs to the ANN model consists of the 11 variables including the geometric dimensions of the section, steel reinforcement amount, FRP amount and the properties of the concrete, steel reinforcement and FRP materials while the output variable is the shear strength of the FRP beam. To assess the performance of the ANN model for estimating the shear strength of the reinforced beams, the outputs of the ANN are compared to those of equations of the Iranian code (Publication No. 345 and the American code (ACI 440. The comparisons between the outputs of Iran and American regulations with those of the proposed model indicates that the predictive power of this model is much better than the experimental codes. Specifically, for under study data, mean absolute relative error (MARE criteria is 13%, 34% and 39% for the ANN model, the American and the Iranian codes, respectively.

  1. Multifunctional Shear Pressed CNT Sheets for Strain Sensing and Composite Joint Toughening

    2015-09-30

    thermoplastic films (with widely varying success), and various fiber - reinforced (e.g. glass, aramid, carbon ) interleaves. The latter category of interleaves... Article ID 746308, 25 pp. 7. Godwin, E. W.; Matthews, F. L. “A Review of the Strength of Joints in Fibre- Reinforced Plastics . Part 1. Mechanically...R.; Joshi, M. “A Review on Carbon Epoxy Nanocomposites.” J. Reinforced Plastics and Composites, 2009, 28, 461-487. 4. Air Force STTR Phase I

  2. Seismic Retrofitting: Reinforced Concrete (RC shear wall versus Reinforcement of RC element by Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP using PUSHOVER analysis

    Yahya RIYAD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Seismic retrofitting of constructions vulnerable to earthquakes is a current problem of great political and social relevance. During the last sixty years, moderate to severe earthquakes have occurred in Morocco (specifically in Agadir 1960 and Hoceima 2004. Such events have clearly shown the vulnerability of the building stock in particular and of the built environment in general. Hence, it is very much essential to retrofit the vulnerable building to cope up for the next damaging earthquake. In this paper, the focus will be on a comparative study between two techniques of seismic retrofitting, the first one is a reinforcement using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP applied to RC elements by bonding , and the second one is a reinforcement with a shear wall. For this study, we will use a non-linear static analysis -also known as Pushover analysis - on a reinforced concrete structure consisting of beams and columns, and composed from eight storey with a gross area of 240 m², designed conforming to the Moroccan Seismic code[1].

  3. Load carrying capacity of shear wall t-connections reinforced with high strength wire ropes

    Jørgensen, Henrik B.; Bryndom, Thor; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    -friendly solution. The wire ropes have no bending stiffness and therefore allow for an easier vertical installation of the wall elements. During the last 10 – 15 years, a number of shear tests on plane wire rope connections have been carried out. However, to the best knowledge of the authors, tests on wire rope......Traditionally, U-bar loop connections with keyed joints have been used in vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements. However, in the recent years, connections with looped high strength wire ropes instead of U-bar loops have proven to be a much more construction...... connections for assembly of precast elements in different planes, such as T- and L-connections, have not yet been published. This paper presents the results of a large test series recently conducted at the University of Southern Denmark to study the shear behaviour of high strength wire rope T...

  4. The rheological properties of shear thickening fluid reinforced with SiC nanowires

    Jianhao Ge

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of shear thickening fluid (STF reinforced with SiC nanowires were investigated in this paper. Pure STF consists of 56 vol% silica nano-particles and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400 solvent was fabricated; and a specific amount of SiC nanowires were dispersed into this pure STF, and then the volume fraction of PEG400 was adjusted to maintain the volume fraction of solid phase in the STF at a constant of 56%. The results showed there was almost 30% increase in the initial and shear thickening viscosity of the STF reinforced with SiC nanowires compared to the pure STF. Combining with the hydrodynamic cluster theory, the effect of the mechanism of SiC nanowire on the viscosity of STF was discussed, and based on the experimental results, an analytical model of viscosity was used to describe the rheological properties of STF, which agreed with the experimental results. Keywords: Shear thickening fluid (STF, Nanowire, Rheology, Viscosity, Analytical model

  5. Load Carrying Capacity of Shear Wall T-Connections Reinforced with High Strength Wire Ropes

    Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Bryndum, Thor; Larsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, U-bar loop connections with keyed joints have been used in vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements. However, in the recent years, connections with looped high strength wire ropes instead of U-bar loops have proven to be a much more construction-friendly so......Traditionally, U-bar loop connections with keyed joints have been used in vertical shear connections between precast concrete wall elements. However, in the recent years, connections with looped high strength wire ropes instead of U-bar loops have proven to be a much more construction......-friendly solution. The wire ropes have no bending stiffness and therefore allow for an easier vertical installation of the wall elements. During the last 10 – 15 years, a number of shear tests on plane wire rope connections have been carried out. However, to the best knowledge of the authors, tests on wire rope...... connections for assembly of precast elements in different planes, such as T- and L-connections, have not yet been published. This paper presents the results of a large test series recently conducted at the University of Southern Denmark to study the shear behaviour of high strength wire rope T...

  6. Impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Norway spruce joints glued with different adhesives

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2015-01-01

    As wood construction increasingly uses engineered wood products worldwide, concerns arise about the integrity of the wood and adhesives used. Bondline strength is a crucial issue for engineered wood applications, especially in cold climates. In this study, Norway spruce (Picea abies) joints (150 mm...... adhesive was tested at six temperatures: 20, −20, −30, −40, −50 and −60 °C. Generally, within the temperature test range, temperature changes significantly affected the shear strength of solid wood and wood joints. As the temperature decreased, the shear strength decreased. PUR adhesive in most cases...... resulted in the strongest shear strength and MUF adhesive resulted in the weakest. MF and PRF adhesives responded to temperature changes in a similar manner to that of the PUR adhesive. The shear strengths of wood joints with PVAc and EPI adhesives were more sensitive to temperature change. At low...

  7. Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beam in Shear Zone by Compensation the Stirrups with Equivalent External Steel Plates

    Khamail Abdul-Mahdi Mosheer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on reinforced concrete beams strengthened with external steel plates instead of shear stirrups has been held in this paper. Eight samples of the same dimensions and properties were used. Two of them were tested up to failure and specified as references beams; one with shear reinforcement and the other without shear reinforcement. Another samples without shear reinforcement were tested until the first shear crack occurs, then the samples strengthened on both sides with external steel plates as equivalent area of removed stirrups. The strengthened beams were divided into three groups according to the thickness of plates (1, 1.5, 2 mm, each group involved two beams; one bonded using epoxy and the other bonded using epoxy with anchored bolts. Finally, the strengthened beams tested when using anchored bolts with epoxy glue to bond plates. Where the increasing in maximum load is higher than that in reference beam with no internal stirrups reach to (75.46 –106.13% and has a good agreement with the control beam with shear reinforcement reach to (76.06 – 89.36% of ultimate load.

  8. Impact of Acid Attack on the Shear Behaviour of a Carbonate Rock Joint

    Nouailletas, O.; Perlot, C.; Rivard, P.; Ballivy, G.; La Borderie, C.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of structural discontinuities in rock mass is a key element of the stability analysis in civil engineering, petroleum engineering and mining engineering. In this paper, the mechanical analysis is coupled with the acidic attack of a rock joint associated with leakage of CO2 through a geological fault in the context of carbon sequestration. Experiments were conducted at the laboratory scale to assess the shear behaviour of degraded joint: direct shear tests were performed on rock joints that have been previously immersed into water or into an acidic solution (pH 0.2). The shear behaviour of joints is governed by the roughness of its walls: the parameters Z2, Z3, Z4 and RL characterize the rough surfaces. They are calculated from the scans of joint surfaces after and before immersion. Their comparison pointed out a slight impact of the acidic attack. However, the results of the direct shear tests show significant modifications in the shear behaviour for the degraded joints: the tangential stress peak disappears, the tangential stiffness decreases in the stress/displacement curve, and the contraction increases, the dilation angle decreases in the dilation curve. Acid attack has a greater impact on the mechanical properties of the asperities than their geometric characteristics. The results of this study will be used to improve chemo-mechanical modelling to better simulate with higher accuracy the fault stability in different cases of civil engineering, petroleum engineering and mining engineering.

  9. Shear Strengthening of RC Beams Using Sprayed Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    Sayed Mohamad Soleimani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of externally bonded sprayed glass fiber reinforced polymer (Sprayed GFRP in shear strengthening of RC beams under quasi-static loading is investigated. Different techniques were utilized to enhance the bond between concrete and Sprayed GFRP, involving the use of through bolts and nuts paired with concrete surface preparation through sandblasting and through the use of a pneumatic chisel prior to Sprayed GFRP application. It was found that roughening the concrete surface using a pneumatic chisel and using through bolts and nuts were the most effective techniques. Also, Sprayed GFRP applied on 3 sides (U-shaped was found to be more effective than 2-sided Sprayed GFRP in shear strengthening. Sprayed GFRP increased the shear load-carrying capacity and energy absorption capacities of RC beams. It was found that the load-carrying capacity of strengthened RC beams was related to an effective strain of applied Sprayed GFRP. This strain was related to Sprayed GFRP configuration and the technique used to enhance the concrete-FRP bond. Finally, an equation was proposed to calculate the contribution of Sprayed GFRP in the shear strength of an RC beam.

  10. Strengthening of Existing Bridge Structures for Shear and Bending with Carbon Textile-Reinforced Mortar

    Martin Herbrand

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing traffic loads and changes in code provisions lead to deficits in shear and flexural capacity of many existing highway bridges. Therefore, a large number of structures are expected to require refurbishment and strengthening in the future. This projection is based on the current condition of many older road bridges. Different strengthening methods for bridges exist to extend their service life, all having specific advantages and disadvantages. By applying a thin layer of carbon textile-reinforced mortar (CTRM to bridge deck slabs and the webs of pre-stressed concrete bridges, the fatigue and ultimate strength of these members can be increased significantly. The CTRM layer is a combination of a corrosion resistant carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP fabric and an efficient mortar. In this paper, the strengthening method and the experimental results obtained at RWTH Aachen University are presented.

  11. Strengthening of Existing Bridge Structures for Shear and Bending with Carbon Textile-Reinforced Mortar.

    Herbrand, Martin; Adam, Viviane; Classen, Martin; Kueres, Dominik; Hegger, Josef

    2017-09-19

    Increasing traffic loads and changes in code provisions lead to deficits in shear and flexural capacity of many existing highway bridges. Therefore, a large number of structures are expected to require refurbishment and strengthening in the future. This projection is based on the current condition of many older road bridges. Different strengthening methods for bridges exist to extend their service life, all having specific advantages and disadvantages. By applying a thin layer of carbon textile-reinforced mortar (CTRM) to bridge deck slabs and the webs of pre-stressed concrete bridges, the fatigue and ultimate strength of these members can be increased significantly. The CTRM layer is a combination of a corrosion resistant carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) fabric and an efficient mortar. In this paper, the strengthening method and the experimental results obtained at RWTH Aachen University are presented.

  12. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  13. Effect of alkali–silica reaction on the shear strength of reinforced concrete structural members. A numerical and statistical study

    Saouma, Victor E.; Hariri-Ardebili, Mohammad Amin [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Le Pape, Yann, E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Balaji, Rajagopalan [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Alkali–silica reaction (ASR) affects reinforced structures shear strength. • Statistical analysis indicates large scattering of post-ASR strength losses/gains. • Competitive structural and materials mechanisms affect the residual shear strength. - Abstract: The residual structural shear resistance of concrete members without shear reinforcement and subject to alkali–aggregate reaction (ASR) is investigated by finite element analysis. A parametric numerical study of 648 analyses considering various structural members’ geometries, boundary conditions, ASR-induced losses of materials properties, ASR expansions and reinforcement ratios is conducted. As a result of competitive mechanisms (e.g., ASR-induced prestressing caused by the longitudinal reinforcement) and loss of concrete materials properties, important scatter in terms of gain or loss of shear strength is observed: about 50% of the studied configurations lead to a degradation of structural performance. The range of variation in terms of post-ASR shear resistance is extremely scattered, in particular, when ASR results in out-of-plane expansion only. Influencing factors are derived by two methods: (i) visual inspection of boxplots and probability distributions, and (ii) information criteria within multiple-linear regression analysis.

  14. Mechanical behaviour of adhesive joint under tensile and shear loading

    Jiang, X.; Kolstein, M.H.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Due to various advantages of Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) decks, the FRP to steel composite bridge system is being increasingly used in new bridge structures as well as rehabilitation projects for old bridges. This paper focuses on the mechanical behaviours and failure modes of the

  15. Experimental investigations and evaluation of strength and deflections of reinforced concrete beam-column joints using nonlinear static analysis

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2009-07-01

    It is now a well-known fact that beam-column connections are one of the most vulnerable zones of a reinforced concrete framed structure subjected to seismic loads. Under dynamic reversing loading, as in case of earthquakes, the inelastic hysteretic behavior of the members joining at these joints provides major contribution towards absorbing the external energy. The energy absorption capacity of a joint mainly depends on the ductility, i.e. capacity to undergo large displacements beyond yield, without significant strength degradation, of the members and the joint itself. Even if the members possess sufficient ductile behavior, the overall ductility of the joint is not warranted, until and unless the joint core itself has capacity to withstand large joint shear forces. Else, the joint core itself fails prematurely and leads to poor performance of the sub-assemblage. Another major objective of this program was to develop a simple yet effective analysis procedure that can closely predict the load-displacement behavior of the joints. Nonlinear dynamic analysis, although effective, is highly time consuming and complex. Resorting to such complex analysis is not encouraging to the practicing civil engineers or even researchers. However, as more and more emphasis is laid on nonlinear analysis and performance based design, nonlinear static pushover analysis is one such tool that is simple and effective and many researchers and engineers are getting encouraged to follow this analytical method. This report includes complete details of all the joints tested and their analysis. It gives complete theoretical formulations and assumptions used in the analysis. In the end, all the results are summarized and observations, conclusions and recommendations are made regarding the effect of various parameters on ductility of a joint. (author)

  16. The use of joint reinforcement in qualifying masonry walls in nuclear power plants

    Harris, H.G.; Becica, I.J.; Chokshi, N.C.; Con, V.N.; Hamid, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Wire joint reinforcement has been traditionally used in block masonry walls for crack control and to provide continuity for multiple wythe walls. In a number of nuclear power plants, vertically unreinforced masonry walls that failed to meet the code allowable stresses for unreinforced masonry were qualified using joint reinforcement as a structural steel to carry lateral loads in the horizontal direction. It is the objective of this paper to examine the adequacy of this approach for seismic load application. A state-of-the-art review of available test data and code design provisions will be presented. It is concluded that the use of joint reinforcement to resist tensile stresses due to seismic loading is questionable because of the lack of test data available and especially the characterization of the cyclic behavior of joint reinforced masonry walls. Further research in this area is recommended

  17. Numerical Analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP Shear Walls and Steel Strips under Cyclic Loads Using Finite Element Method

    N. Askarizadeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete shear walls are the main elements of resistance against lateral loads in reinforced concrete structures. These walls should not only provide sufficient resistance but also provide sufficient ductility in order to avoid brittle fracture, particularly under strong seismic loads. However, many reinforced concrete shear walls need to be stabilized and reinforced due to various reasons such as changes in requirements of seismic regulations, weaknesses in design and execution, passage of time, damaging environmental factors, patch of rebar in plastic hinges and in some cases failures and weaknesses caused by previous earthquakes or explosion loads. Recently, Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP components have been extensively and successfully used in seismic improvement. This study reinforces FRP reinforced concrete shear walls and steel strips. CFRP and steel strips are evaluated by different yield and ultimate strength. Numerical and experimental studies are done on walls with scale 1/2. These walls are exposed to cyclic loading. Hysteresis curves of force, drift and strain of FRP strips are reviewed in order to compare results of numerical work and laboratory results. Both numerical and laboratory results show that CFRP and steel strips increase resistance, capacity and ductility of the structure.

  18. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    Dimassi, M A; Brauner, C; Herrmann, A S

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence. (paper)

  19. Irradiated Effect on Shear-Moment Interaction of Reinforced Concrete Slab

    Kwon, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun Yeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, HyungTae; Park, Kyoungsoo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Ho [Hyundai Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Several deleterious mechanisms include chronic high-temperature exposure, freeze-thaw, and chemical attack and have been reviewed extensively in the literature. On the other hand, the effect of irradiation on RC needs further investigations for the long-term operation of existing NPPs. In this regard, the RC biological shield structure is located in closest proximity to a reactor core and expected to see the highest levels of irradiation over the lifetime. The biological shield structure may undergo a large lateral load from earthquake and become thicker for a suitable shielding. Although the bending strength is easily predictable with the altering steel properties, the more complete behaviors should be studied to see if the promised performance is achievable. Given this, in this study, the shear-moment (VM) interaction of a typical one-way slab representing the biological shield structure is investigated with incremental neutron irradiation. The effect of radiation on the behavior of one-way slab is presented by the shear and moment capacity interaction diagram. The results suggest that the yield strength increase of the longitudinal reinforcement barely affects the shear strength but it increases the bending strength significantly. This may be misleading, however, as the structural capacity to observe the energy from environmental loadings such as earthquake would be actually reducing.

  20. Steady-shear rheological properties of graphene-reinforced epoxy resin for manufacturing of aerospace composite films

    Clausi, Marialaura; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Laurenzi, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the steady-shear rheological behavior and the absolute viscosity of epoxy matrix reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (xGnP) before cure. Three different grades of xGnP (grades C, M and H) were dispersed homogenously at different weight percentages (wt%) into the epoxy matrix, ranging from 0.5 to 5 wt%. It is found that nanocomposite fluids with xGnP-C exhibit a Newtonian behavior at shear rate in the range 0.1-100 s-1, conversely, nanocomposite fluids with xGnP of grade M and H exhibit a shear-thinning behavior with the increase of nanoplatelet loading. Results from this analysis indicate how the steady shear rheological properties of the nano-reinforced polymer fluids depend on the geometrical characteristics of the graphene nanoplatelets.

  1. Shearing of saturated clays in rock joints at high confining pressures

    Wang, C.; Mao, N.

    1979-01-01

    Saturated clays are sheared between rock joints at various pore water pressures and at confining pressures up to 3 kb (300 Mpa). Sliding on these joints is stable. For a given clay, the shear stress required to initiate sliding increases linearly with the effective normal stress across the sliding surface, with a slope of 0.08 +- 0.01 for joints filled with saturated montmorillonite, 0.12 +- 0.01 with saturated chlorite, 0.15 +- 0.01 with saturated kaolinite, and 0.22 +- 0.02 with saturated silty illite. Thus at high confining pressures the shear stress required to initiate sliding on joints filled with saturated clays are very much smaller than that required to initiate sliding on clean rock joints or on joints filled with dry gouge materials. In the crust, saturation of gouge materials along active faults would greatly lower the frictional resistance to faulting and would stabilize fault movement. Different fault behaviors such as stable creep along some faults and intermittent but sudden slip along others may reflect in part different degrees of saturation of fault zones at depth

  2. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 1 summary report: Shear web design development

    Laakso, J. H.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept was developed for the Space Shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The boron-epoxy laminate contributes to the strength and stiffness efficiency of the basic web section. The titanium-cladding functions to protect the polymeric laminate parts from damaging environments and is chem-milled to provide reinforcement in selected areas. Detailed design drawings are presented for both boron/epoxy reinforced and all-metal shear webs. The weight saving offered is 24% relative to all-metal construction at an attractive cost per pound of weight saved, based on the detailed designs. Small scale element tests substantiate the boron/epoxy reinforced design details in critical areas. The results show that the titanium-cladding reliably reinforces the web laminate in critical edge load transfer and stiffener fastener hole areas.

  3. Small-scale multi-axial hybrid simulation of a shear-critical reinforced concrete frame

    Sadeghian, Vahid; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Vecchio, Frank

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a numerical multi-scale simulation framework which is extended to accommodate hybrid simulation (numerical-experimental integration). The framework is enhanced with a standardized data exchange format and connected to a generalized controller interface program which facilitates communication with various types of laboratory equipment and testing configurations. A small-scale experimental program was conducted using a six degree-of-freedom hydraulic testing equipment to verify the proposed framework and provide additional data for small-scale testing of shearcritical reinforced concrete structures. The specimens were tested in a multi-axial hybrid simulation manner under a reversed cyclic loading condition simulating earthquake forces. The physical models were 1/3.23-scale representations of a beam and two columns. A mixed-type modelling technique was employed to analyze the remainder of the structures. The hybrid simulation results were compared against those obtained from a large-scale test and finite element analyses. The study found that if precautions are taken in preparing model materials and if the shear-related mechanisms are accurately considered in the numerical model, small-scale hybrid simulations can adequately simulate the behaviour of shear-critical structures. Although the findings of the study are promising, to draw general conclusions additional test data are required.

  4. Reinforced concrete membrane elements subjected to reversed cyclic in-plane shear stress

    Ohmori, N.; Tsubota, H.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, S.; Kurihara, K.

    1987-01-01

    The response of reinforced concrete elements subjected to reversed cyclic in-plane shear stresses can be predicted by an analytical model, which considers equilibrium, compatibility and stress-strain relationships including hysteresis loop of unloading and reloading stages all expressed in terms of average stresses and average strains. The analytical results show that the dominant hysteretic behaviours in regard to decrease of stiffness during unloading, successive slip phenomena and restoration of compressive stiffness at the reloading stages are well simulated analytically. The results agree quite well with the observed behaviours. As for the envelope curve of the hysteretic response there remain the discrepancies that the stiffness and ultimate strength are a bit larger than the observed results, especially in the case of a panel with a large reinforcement ratio. Such descrepancies are also found in the predicted results of monotonic loading and more precise studies are necessary to evaluate more accurate envelope curves under not only reversed cyclic loading but also monotonic loading. (orig./HP)

  5. An overview of an experimental program for testing large reinforced concrete shear walls

    Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Seismic Category I Structures Program is being carried out at the Los Alamos National Laboratory under sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. In the class of structure being investigated, the primary lateral load-resisting structural element is the reinforced concrete shear wall. Previous results from microconcrete models indicated that these structures responded to seismic excitations with initial frequencies that were reduced by factors of 2 or more over those calculated based on an uncracked cross-section strength-of-materials approach. Furthermore, though the structures themselves were shown to have sufficient reserve margins, the equipment and piping are designed to response spectra that are based on uncracked cross-sectional member properties, and these spectra may not be inappropriate for actual building responses. The current phase of the program is aimed at verification of these conclusions using conventional concrete structures to demonstrate that previous microconcrete results can be scaled to prototype structures. A new configuration of a shear wall structure was designed and tested to investigate the analytical-experimental differences observed during the previous model testing. Shear wall height-to-length aspect ratios were to vary from 1 to 0.25. Percentage steel ratios were to vary from 0.25% to 0.6% by area, in both horizontal and vertical directions. The test structures are shown in Fig. 1. TRG-1 and -2 were constructed with microconcrete. TRG-3, -4, -5, and -6 were constructed with conventional (19-mm aggregate) concrete. 11 refs., 4 figs

  6. Numerical analyses of the effect of SG-interlayer shear stiffness on the structural performance of reinforced glass beams

    Louter, C.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical modelling of SentryGlas-laminated reinforced glass beams. In these beams, which have been experimentally investigated in preceding research, a stainless steel reinforcement section is laminated at the inner recessed edge of a triple-layer glass beam by means...... of SentryGlas (SG) interlayer sheets. The current contribution numerically investigates the effect of the SG-interlayer shear stiffness on the overall structural response of the beams. This is done by means of a 3D finite element model in which the individual glass layers, the SG......-interlayers and the reinforcement are incorporated. In the model, the glass parts are allowed to crack, but all other parts are assumed linear elastic throughout the analyses. By changing the shear modulus of the SG-interlayer in multiple analyses, its contribution to the overall structural performance of the beams - especially...

  7. Friction Joint Between Basalt-Reinforced Composite and Aluminum

    Costache, Andrei; Glejbøl, Kristian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor basalt-reinforced polymers in an aluminum grip using dry friction. Dry friction clamping is considered the optimal solution for post-mounting of load-bearing terminations on composite structures. A new test method is presented for characterizing the frictio......The purpose of this study was to anchor basalt-reinforced polymers in an aluminum grip using dry friction. Dry friction clamping is considered the optimal solution for post-mounting of load-bearing terminations on composite structures. A new test method is presented for characterizing...

  8. Deformation and failure response of 304L stainless steel SMAW joint under dynamic shear loading

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Cheng, J.-I.; Lin, C.-F.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic shear deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of 304L stainless steel shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) joint are studied experimentally with regard to the relations between mechanical properties and strain rate. Thin-wall tubular specimens are deformed at room temperature under strain rates in the range of 8 x 10 2 to 2.8 x 10 3 s -1 using a torsional split-Hopkinson bar. The results indicate that the strain rate has a significant influence on the mechanical properties and fracture response of the tested SMAW joints. It is found that the flow stress, total shear strain to failure, work hardening rate and strain rate sensitivity all increase with increasing strain rate, but that the activation volume decreases. The observed dynamic shear deformation behavior is modeled using the Kobayashi-Dodd constitutive law, and it is shown that the predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy reveals that the tested specimens all fracture within their fusion zones, and that the primary failure mechanism is one of the extensive localized shearing. The fracture surfaces are characterized by the presence of many dimples. A higher strain rate tends to reduce the size of the dimples and to increase their density. The observed fracture features are closely related to the preceding flow behavior

  9. Earthquake countermeasure work on water intake structure based on post-construction shear reinforcement method

    Satou, Yoshihito; Wani, Masaaki; Wachi, Takamitsu

    2017-01-01

    Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station set up 'earthquake motion as the base for remodeling work' by referring to the strong earthquake fault model assumed by the 'Study meeting for Nankai Trough's mega thrust earthquake model' of the Cabinet Office. Based on this earthquake, it implemented seismic countermeasure work using ceramic fixing type post-construction shear reinforcement bars by targeting the Unit 4 water intake tank screen room. This construction work was carried out in a short period of about nine months due to a restriction in the drainage period of the water intake tank. Thanks to the improvement of process control, such as adoption of a two-shift (day and night) system, this work was completed. On the other hand, the quality of construction was secured by adopting a drilling machine with a resistance sensor at the time of drilling and plastic grout at the time of grout filling, as well as through quality inspection based on Construction Technology Review and Certification. (A.O.)

  10. Biofabrication of implants for articular joint repair : Cartilage regeneration in reinforced gelatin-based hydrogels

    Visser, J.

    2015-01-01

    Implants were biofabricated for the repair of chondral and osteochondral articular joint defects. The implants were based on gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogels combined with printed fibers from polycaprolactone (PCL) for mechanical reinforcement. In Part I of the thesis, biological

  11. Performance of Hybrid Reinforced Concrete Beam Column Joint: A Critical Review

    Md Rashedul Kabir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Large residual strain in reinforced concrete structures after a seismic event is a major concern for structural safety and serviceability. Alternative reinforcement materials like fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP have been widely used to mitigate corrosion problems associated with steel. Low modulus of elasticity and brittle behavior compared to steel has made the use of FRP unsuitable in seismic resistant strictures. A combination of steel-FRP reinforcement configuration can address the problem of corrosion. Therefore, introducing a material that shows strong post elastic behavior without any decay due to corrosion is in demand. Shape memory alloy (SMA, a novel material, is highly corrosion resistive and shows super elastic property. Coupling SMA with FRP or steel in the plastic hinge region allows the structure to undergo large deformations, but regains its original shape upon unloading. In this study, the performance characteristics of four previously tested beam-column joints reinforced with different configurations (steel, SMA/steel, glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP and SMA/FRP are compared to assess their capacity to endure extreme loading. Experimental results are scrutinized to compare the behavior of these specimens in terms of load-story drift and energy dissipation capacity. SMA/FRP and SMA/Steel couples have been found to be an acceptable approach to reduce residual deformation in beam-column joints with adequate energy dissipation capacity. However, SMA/FRP is superior to SMA/Steel concerning to the corrosion issue in steel.

  12. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  13. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  14. Composite Behavior of a Novel Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel Reinforced with GFRP Shear Grids: Effects of Insulation Types.

    Kim, JunHee; You, Young-Chan

    2015-03-03

    A full-scale experimental program was used in this study to investigate the structural behavior of novel insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (SWPs) reinforced with grid-type glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shear connectors. Two kinds of insulation-expanded polystyrene (EPS) and extruded polystyrene (XPS) with 100 mm thickness were incased between the two concrete wythes to meet the increasing demand for the insulation performance of building envelope. One to four GFRP shear grids were used to examine the degree of composite action of the two concrete wythes. Ten specimens of SWPs were tested under displacement control subjected to four-point concentrated loads. The test results showed that the SWPs reinforced with GFRP grids as shear connectors developed a high degree of composite action resulting in high flexural strength. The specimens with EPS foam exhibited an enhanced load-displacement behavior compared with the specimens with XPS because of the relatively stronger bond between insulation and concrete. In addition, the ultimate strength of the test results was compared to the analytical prediction with the mechanical properties of only GRFP grids. The specimens with EPS insulation presented higher strength-based composite action than the ones with XPS insulation.

  15. Importance of modeling beam-column joints for seismic safety of reinforced concrete structures

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Eligehausen, R.; Hofmann, J.

    2011-01-01

    Almost all structures, except the containment building, in a NPP can be classified as reinforced concrete (RC) framed structures. In case of such structures subjected to seismic loads, beam-column joints are recognized as the critical and vulnerable zone. During an earthquake, the global behavior of the structure is highly governed by the behavior of the joints. If the joints behave in a ductile manner, the global behavior generally will be ductile, whereas if the joints behave in a brittle fashion then the structure will display a brittle behavior. The joints of old and non-seismically detailed structures are more vulnerable and behave poorly under the earthquakes compared to the joints of new and seismically detailed structures. Modeling of these joint regions is very important for correct assessment of the seismic performance of the structures. In this paper, it is shown with the help of a recently developed joint model that not modeling the inelastic behavior of the joints can lead to significantly misleading and unsafe results in terms of the performance assessment of the structures under seismic loads. Comparison of analytical and experimental results is shown for two structures, tested under lateral monotonic seismic pushover loads. It is displayed that the model can predict the inelastic seismic response of structures considering joint distortion with high accuracy by little extra effort in modeling. (author)

  16. Influence of Reinforcement Anisotropy on the Stress Distribution in Tension and Shear of a Fusion Magnet Insulation System

    Humer, K.; Raff, S.; Prokopec, R.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic laminate, which consists of half-overlapped wrapped Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcing tapes vacuum-pressure impregnated in a cyanate ester/epoxy blend, is proposed as the insulation system for the ITER Toroidal Field coils. In order to assess its mechanical performance under the actual operating conditions, cryogenic (77 K) tensile and interlaminar shear tests were done after irradiation to the ITER design fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). The data were then used for a Finite Element Method (FEM) stress analysis. We find that the mechanical strength and the fracture behavior as well as the stress distribution and the failure criteria are strongly influenced by the winding direction and the wrapping technique of the reinforcing tapes.

  17. Towards completely miscible PMMA nanocomposites reinforced by shear-stiff, nano-mica.

    Ziadeh, Mazen; Weiss, Stephan; Fischer, Bianca; Förster, Stephan; Altstädt, Volker; Müller, Axel H E; Breu, Josef

    2014-07-01

    Optimizing the reinforcement of polymers with nanoplatelets requires optimization of the aspect ratio and the moduli of the filler while providing a complete stress transfer. Employing a novel shear-stiff, nano-mica with large aspect ratio, we focus on maximizing the interfacial interaction between filler and matrix. External surfaces of the nano-mica were selectively modified by a polycationic macro-initiator and two PMMA-polymer brushes of length below and above critical entanglement length, respectively, and the mechanical properties of the three PMMA nanocomposites were measured. The multiple electrostatic anchoring groups of the macro-initiator not only provide reliable adhesion but at the same time allow the variation of the degree of protonation providing a local match between the charge densities of the clay surface and the adsorbed macro-initiator. PMMA coating of the nano-mica via surface initiated polymerization yielded long-term stable suspensions in THF that showed birefringence of a nematic phase. Solution blending of the PMMA coated nano-mica allows for dispersing single clay tactoids in the translucent PMMA nanocomposites at 5 wt% clay loading as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although significantly improved mechanical properties could be achieved as compared to nanocomposites made with conventional clay fillers, the full potential - as expressed by Halpin-Tsai equations - of the PMMA coated nano-mica can still not be completely utilized. This is attributed to the non-wetting character of the densely packed PMMA brushes attached to planar nanoplatelets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interlaminar shear strength of SiC matrix composites reinforced by continuous fibers at 900 °C in air

    Zhang, Chengyu; Gou, Jianjie; Qiao, Shengru; Wang, Xuanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The application of SiC fiber could improve ILSS of the SiC matrix composites. • The orientation of the warp fibers plays a critical role in determining ILSS of 2.5D-C/SiC. • The failure mechanisms of 2D composites involve matrix cracking, and interfacial debonding. - Abstract: To reveal the shear properties of SiC matrix composites, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of three kinds of silicon carbide matrix composites was investigated by compression of the double notched shear specimen (DNS) at 900 °C in air. The investigated composites included a woven plain carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite (2D-C/SiC), a two-and-a-half-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite (2.5D-C/SiC) and a woven plain silicon carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite (2D-SiC/SiC). A scanning electron microscope was employed to observe the microstructure and fracture morphologies. It can be found that the fiber type and reinforcement architecture have significant impacts on the ILSS of the SiC matrix composites. Great anisotropy of ILSS can be found for 2.5D-C/SiC because of the different fracture resistance of the warp fibers. Larger ILSS can be obtained when the specimens was loaded along the weft direction. In addition, the SiC fibers could enhance the ILSS, compared with carbon fibers. The improvement is attributed to the higher oxidation resistance of SiC fibers and the similar thermal expansion coefficients between the matrix and the fibers

  19. Shear strength of match cast dry joints of precast concrete segmental bridges: proposal for Eurocode 2

    Aparicio, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a study on the performance of concretesegmental bridges with shear keys, focusing on theshear behaviour of castellated dry joints under ultimatelimit state conditions. The widely varying formulationused to evaluate joint shear strength were compiled,along with the experimental results published in the literatureon the subject. The various approaches were evaluatedby comparing their predictions of ultimate jointstrength to published empirical findings. The formulagiving the best prediction was adapted to the safety factorprovisions set out in Eurocode 2.Este trabajo presenta un estudio sobre el comportamientode puentes de dovelas de hormigon con llaves de cortante,centrado en el comportamiento a cortante de lasjuntas secas conjugadas en Estado Limite Ultimo. Se harealizado una exhaustiva recopilacion de la dispar formulacionexistente para evaluar la resistencia a cortante delas juntas. Se ha realizado, asimismo, una investigacionbibliografica de los resultados experimentales disponiblessobre este particular en la literatura. Los resultados recogidosen la bibliografia han sido comparados con la variadaformulacion existente para predecir la resistencia ultimade las juntas. La formula que mejor predice laresistencia ha sido identificada. Esta ha sido adaptada alformato de seguridad presente en el Eurocodigo 2.

  20. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and 6O Co γ-rays up to 1.8 x 1 0 8 Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 x lO 22 m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed

  1. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna (Austria); Tschegg, E.K. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik; Egusa, Shigenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerstenberg, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  2. Measurement of gastrocnemius muscle elasticity by shear wave elastography: association with passive ankle joint stiffness and sex differences.

    Chino, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    Passive joint stiffness is an important quantitative measure of flexibility, but is affected by muscle volume and all of the anatomical structures located within and over the joint. Shear wave elastography can assess muscle elasticity independent of the influences of muscle volume and the other nearby anatomical structures. We determined how muscle elasticity, as measured using shear wave elastography, is associated with passive joint stiffness and patient sex. Twenty-six healthy men (24.4 ± 5.9 years) and 26 healthy women (25.2 ± 4.8 years) participated in this study. The passive ankle joint stiffness and tissue elasticity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) were quantified with the ankle in 30° plantar flexion (PF), a neutral anatomical position (NE), and 20° dorsiflexion (DF). No significant difference in passive joint stiffness by sex was observed with the ankle in PF, but significantly greater passive ankle joint stiffness in men than in women was observed in NE and DF. The MG elasticity was not significantly associated with joint stiffness in PF or NE, but it was significantly associated with joint stiffness in DF. There were no significant differences in MG elasticity by sex at any ankle position. Muscle elasticity, measured independent of the confounding effects of muscle volume and the other nearby anatomical structures, is associated with passive joint stiffness in the joint position where the muscle is sufficiently lengthened, but does not vary by sex in any joint position tested.

  3. Comportamiento al corte de hormigones reforzado con fibras de acero Shear behavior of steel fiber reinforced concretes

    Sergio Carmona Malatesta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan los resultados de un estudio experimental a cerca de la influencia de la incorporación de fibras de acero en el comportamiento del hormigón frente a esfuerzos de corte, medidos utilizando el ensayo JSCE - SF6, modificado. Usando los resultados de los ensayos realizados se evalúa La capacidad de disipación de energía del hormigón durante la rotura o tenacidad del hormigón reforzado con fibras en función del contenido y tipo de Fibra utilizada. Con los resultados obtenidos, se puede concluir que la incorporación de fibras como refuerzo al esfuerzo de corte aumenta la ductilidad del hormigón, permitiendo mayores deformaciones que un hormigón convencional. Se observa que la capacidad de absorber energía de los hormigones, cuantificada a través de la tenacidad absoluta, se incrementa más de tres veces cuando se incorporar fibras y no se tienen roturas frágiles. Por lo tanto, la incorporación de fibras como refuerzo es una buena solución para mejorar la respuesta del hormigón ante solicitaciones de corte. Por otra parte, se demuestra que el ensayo de corte propuesto por la recomendación japonesa JSCE-SF6, levemente modificada, entrega resultados coherentes y reproducibles, permitiendo cuantificar diferentes propiedades del hormigón reforzado con fibras sometido a solicitaciones de corte.This paper presents the results of an experimental research on influence of steel fibers on shear behavior of concrete, using modified JSCE - SF6 test. The tests results are used to evaluate the energy dissipation capacity of concrete during failure or fiber reinforced concrete toughness, in terms of amount and type of fibers. With the results, it can be concluded that the addition of fibers as shear reinforcement influence significantly the ductility of concrete. The results show that the absorption energy capacity of concrete, measured by mean of absolute toughness, increase 3 times when concrete is reinforced with

  4. High strength reinforcing steel bars : concrete shear friction interface : final report : Part A.

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcement, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) steel reinf...

  5. The Effect of Wetting Gravity Regime on Shear Strength of SAC and Sn-Pb Solder Lap Joints

    Sona, Mrunali; Prabhu, K. Narayan

    2017-09-01

    The failure of solder joints due to imposed stresses in an electronic assembly is governed by shear bond strength. In the present study, the effect of wetting gravity regime on single-lap shear strength of Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu and Sn-2.5Ag-0.5Cu solder alloys reflowed between bare copper substrates as well as Ni-coated Cu substrates was investigated. Samples were reflowed for 10 s, T gz (time corresponding to the end of gravity regime) and 100 s individually and tested for single-lap shear strength. The single-lap shear test was also carried out on eutectic Sn-Pb/Cu- and Sn-Pb/Ni-coated Cu specimens to compare the shear strength values obtained with those of lead-free alloys. The eutectic Sn-Pb showed significantly higher ultimate shear strength on bare Cu substrates when compared to Sn-Ag-Cu alloys. However, SAC alloys reflowed on nickel-coated copper substrate exhibited higher shear strength when compared to eutectic Sn-Pb/Ni-coated Cu specimens. All the substrate/solder/substrate lap joint specimens that were reflowed for the time corresponding to the end of gravity regime exhibited maximum ultimate shear strength.

  6. Behaviour of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete beam–column joints under reverse cyclic loads

    Ganesan, N.; Indira, P.V.; Sabeena, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed a high performance hybrid fibre reinforced cementitious composite. • Exterior beam-column joints have been tested under reversed cyclic loading. • Ductility factor, energy dissipation and stiffness degradation have been evaluated. • Contribution to reduce congestion of reinforcement in beam column joints. - Abstract: An experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect of hybrid fibres on the strength and behaviour of High performance concrete beam column joints subjected to reverse cyclic loads. A total of 12 reinforced concrete beams column joints were cast and tested in the present investigation. High performance concrete of M60 grade was designed using the modified ACI method suggested by Aïtcin. Crimped steel fibres and polypropylene fibres were used in hybrid form. The main variables considered were the volume fraction of (i) crimped steel fibres viz. 0.5% (39.25 kg/m 3 ) and 1.0% (78.5 kg/m 3 ) and (ii) polypropylene fibres viz. 0.1% (0.9 kg/m 3 ), 0.15% (1.35 kg/m 3 ), and 0.2% (1.8 kg/m 3 ). Addition of fibres in hybrid form improved many of the engineering properties such as the first crack load, ultimate load and ductility factor of the composite. The combination of 1% (78.5 kg/m 3 ) volume fraction of steel fibres and 0.15% (1.35 kg/m 3 ) volume fraction of polypropylene fibres gave better performance with respect to energy dissipation capacity and stiffness degradation than the other combinations

  7. Efficacy of Thermally Conditioned Sisal FRP Composite on the Shear Characteristics of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Sen, Tara; Reddy, H. N. Jagannatha

    2013-01-01

    The development of commercially viable composites based on natural resources for a wide range of applications is on the rise. Efforts include new methods of production and the utilization of natural reinforcements to make biodegradable composites with lignocellulosic fibers, for various engineering applications. In this work, thermal conditioning of woven sisal fibre was carried out, followed by the development of woven sisal fibre reinforced polymer composite system, and its tensile and flex...

  8. The Effect of Tow Shearing on Reinforcement Positional Fidelity in the Manufacture of a Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Matrix Composite via Pultrusion-Like Processing of Commingled Feedstock

    Warlick, Kent M.

    While the addition of short fiber to 3D printed articles has increased structural performance, ultimate gains will only be realized through the introduction of continuous reinforcement placed along pre-planned load paths. Most additive manufacturing research focusing on the addition of continuous reinforcement has revolved around utilization of a prefrabricated composite filament or a fiber and matrix mixed within a hot end prior to deposition on a printing surface such that conventional extrusion based FDM can be applied. Although stronger 3D printed parts can be made in this manner, high quality homogenous composites are not possible due to fiber dominated regions, matrix dominated regions, and voids present between adjacent filaments. Conventional composite manufacturing processes are much better at creating homogeneous composites; however, the layer by layer approach in which they are made is inhibiting the alignment of reinforcement with loads. Automated Fiber Placement techniques utilize in plane bending deformation of the tow to facilitate tow steering. Due to buckling fibers on the inner radius of curves, manufacturers recommend a minimum curvature for path placement with this technique. A method called continuous tow shearing has shown promise to enable the placement of tows in complex patterns without tow buckling, spreading, and separation inherent in conventional forms of automated reinforcement positioning. The current work employs fused deposition modeling hardware and the continuous tow shearing technique to manufacture high quality fiber reinforced composites with high positional fidelity, varying continuous reinforcement orientations within a layer, and plastic elements incorporated enabling the ultimate gains in structural performance possible. A mechanical system combining concepts of additive manufacturing with fiber placement via filament winding was developed. Paths with and without tension inherent in filament winding were analyzed through

  9. EFFECT OF GAMMA RAY IRRADIATION ON INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS AT 77 K

    Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Izumi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    It is known that an organic material is damaged by gamma ray irradiation, and the strength after irradiation has dependence on the gamma ray dose. These issues are important not only to make global understanding of electric insulating performance of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) under irradiation condition but also to develop new insulation materials. This paper presents the dependence of fracture mode and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) on the material and the gamma ray irradiation effect on the fracture mode and the ILSS. 6 mm radius loading nose and supports were used to prompt ILS fracture for a short beam test. A 2.5 mm thick small specimen machined out of a 13 mm thick G-10CR GFRP plate (sliced specimen) showed lower ILSS and translaminar shear (TLS) fracture, although the same size specimen prepared from a 2.5 mm G-10CR GFRP plate (non-sliced specimen) showed ILS fracture and the higher ILSS. Both type of specimens showed the degradation of ILSS after gamma ray irradiation. The fracture mode of the non-sliced specimen changed from ILS to TLS fracture and no bending fracture was observed. The resistance to shear deformation of glass cloth/epoxy laminate structure would be damaged by the irradiation

  10. Full Scale RC Beam-Column Joints Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymer Systems

    De Vita, Alessandro; Napoli, Annalisa; Realfonzo, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental campaign performed at the Laboratory of Materials and Structural Testing of the University of Salerno (Italy) in order to investigate the seismic performance of RC beam-column joints strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymer (SRP) systems. With the aim to represent typical façade frames’ beam-column subassemblies found in existing RC buildings, specimens were provided with two short beam stubs orthogonal to the main beam and were designed with inadequate seismic details. Five members were strengthened by using two different SRP layouts while the remaining ones were used as benchmarks. Once damaged, two specimens were also repaired, retrofitted with SRP and subjected to cyclic test again. The results of cyclic tests performed on SRP strengthened joints are examined through a comparison with the outcomes of the previous experimental program including companion specimens not provided with transverse beam stubs and strengthened by Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) systems. In particular, both qualitative and quantitative considerations about the influence of the confining effect provided by the secondary beams on the joint response, the suitability of all the adopted strengthening solutions (SRP/CFRP systems), the performances and the failure modes experienced in the several cases studied are provided.

  11. Nonlinear seismic analysis of reinforced concrete framed structures considering joint distortion

    Sharma, Akanshu; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Eligehausen, Rolf; Hofmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Seismic behavior of a reinforced concrete framed structure can be assessed with various analytical tools that may broadly be classified as linear elastic procedures and non-linear or inelastic analysis procedures. Since the reinforced concrete structures generally go in the inelastic range due to seismic loading, it can be easily said that the inelastic procedures would predict the performance of the structures in a much better and realistic way than the linear elastic procedures. However, at the same time, the inelastic procedures are computationally much more demanding. Thus, a good balance between accuracy and computational effort is often sought for. To assess the seismic behaviour of reinforced concrete framed structures, various experimental procedures can be used. Pushover tests that consist of loading the structure monotonically till failure can be conducted on large scale structures and give information about the load carrying and deformational capacity of the structure along with sequence of failure modes but only in one direction. Static cyclic tests, where inertia effects are not included give the above mentioned information for to and fro loading direction along with the information on energy consumption. Shake table tests, which are closest to the real life earthquake tests provide almost all the information required to understand the seismic behaviour but the scale of such tests are usually limited by the capacity of the shaking table facility. In this work, practically usable and sufficiently accurate models are reported to realistically model the inelastic response of the structures. A new model to consider the inelastic behaviour of the joints of poorly detailed structures is developed and presented. A practical hysteretic rule based on the extension of Pivot hysteretic model is developed for members and beam-column joints and the same is also reported. The analytical models are validated against the experimental results using pushover analysis

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  13. Dynamic and Capillary Shear Rheology of Natural Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Moigne, Le N.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Budtova, T.

    2013-01-01

    An extended dynamic and capillary rheological study of molten flax and sisal polypropylene (PP) composites was performed. Fiber concentration varied from 20 to 50 wt% and shear rate from 0.1 rad s−1 to 10,000 s#142;−1. Maleic anhydride-grafted-PP was used as compatibilizer; it strongly reduces PP

  14. Dynamic shear-lag model for understanding the role of matrix in energy dissipation in fiber-reinforced composites.

    Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Wenqing; Yu, Zhongliang; Wei, Xiaoding

    2018-07-01

    Lightweight and high impact performance composite design is a big challenge for scientists and engineers. Inspired from well-known biological materials, e.g., the bones, spider silk, and claws of mantis shrimp, artificial composites have been synthesized for engineering applications. Presently, the design of ballistic resistant composites mainly emphasizes the utilization of light and high-strength fibers, whereas the contribution from matrix materials receives less attention. However, recent ballistic experiments on fiber-reinforced composites challenge our common sense. The use of matrix with "low-grade" properties enhances effectively the impact performance. In this study, we establish a dynamic shear-lag model to explore the energy dissipation through viscous matrix materials in fiber-reinforced composites and the associations of energy dissipation characteristics with the properties and geometries of constituents. The model suggests that an enhancement in energy dissipation before the material integrity is lost can be achieved by tuning the shear modulus and viscosity of a matrix. Furthermore, our model implies that an appropriately designed staggered microstructure, adopted by many natural composites, can repeatedly activate the energy dissipation process and thus improve dramatically the impact performance. This model demonstrates the role of matrix in energy dissipation, and stimulates new advanced material design concepts for ballistic applications. Biological composites found in nature often possess exceptional mechanical properties that man-made materials haven't be able to achieve. For example, it is predicted that a pencil thick spider silk thread can stop a flying Boeing airplane. Here, by proposing a dynamic shear-lag model, we investigate the relationships between the impact performance of a composite with the dimensions and properties of its constituents. Our analysis suggests that the impact performance of fiber-reinforced composites could improve

  15. Microstructural and mechanical behaviors of nano-SiC-reinforced AA7075-O FSW joints prepared through two passes

    Bahrami, Mohsen, E-mail: Mohsen.bahrami@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Mining and Materials Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Aveenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahmand Nikoo, Mohsen [Faculty of Mining and Materials Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Aveenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Besharati Givi, Mohammad Kazem [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-25

    In this paper, a threaded tapered pin tool was employed to fabricate a 2-pass friction stir welded (FSWed) joint. To investigate the benefits of nano-sized SiC particles on microstructural and mechanical properties of the joint, the experiment was repeated while SiC particles had been inserted along the joint line. In another joint, a square pin tool was applied in the second pass to evaluate the effectiveness of switching pin geometry between passes on the aforementioned properties. Microstructural features including grain size, second phase particles and reinforcement distribution were examined via optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. In addition to satisfactory connections between SiC particles and the matrix, the most homogenous particles distribution was observed in the specimen FSWed with both pin tools. This observation was further supported by atomic force microscopy (AFM) examination. Additionally, the foregoing joint demonstrated the maximum tensile strength which was synonymous with its smallest grain size. During tensile testing, SiC-free joint and SiC-reinforced ones fractured from stir zone (SZ) and base metal, respectively. Moreover, SiC-free joint showed necking phenomenon. SEM results showed that the SiC-reinforced specimens possessed ductile fracture morphologies. On the other hand, SiC-free specimen showed a quasi-cleavage fracture mode confirming its moderate percent elongation. In the meantime, SiC-reinforced specimens exhibited superior hardness level to SiC-free specimen.

  16. Static and dynamic experimental study of strengthened reinforced short concrete corbel by using carbon fabrics, crack path in shear zone

    I. Ivanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental analysis of tracking the path of the cracks and crack growth in strengthened or repair reinforced concrete short corbels bonded by carbon fiber fabrics under static and dynamic loads. The reinforced short concrete corbel is a used precast element, for industrial buildings and structures. In fact, their functioning interestingly unconventional is compared to classical beam type elements. Then the effects of bending and shearing are combined in this case. The horizontal reinforced steel is localized to resist to tensile strength induced in bending top and a transversal strength-absorbing contribution. The introduction of carbon fiber composite in the field of Civil Engineering allows to strengthen or repair reinforced concrete structures using adhesive. So the carbon fiber material has many advantages as its low weight, flexibility, easier handling and also interesting physicochemical properties. However maintenance of civil engineering works is to protect them by ensuring better sealing or limiting corrosion. Then strengthening is to repair structures by using bonding technique to compensate their rigidity loss and limit the cracking. This allows to improve their performance and durability. Bonding of composite material in tensile zone of corbel retrieves most tensile stress and allows the structure to extend their load-bearing capacity. The local behavior of the structure is measured by means of the extensometer technique based on electrical strain gauges. This technique allowed to measure strains of steel, carbon fiber fabrics and concrete. The results of this investigation showed that strengthened reinforced concrete corbel bonded by carbon fiber fabrics can improve the ultimate load to twice and stiffens less than a third. The ultimate load, strain and displacement of the specimen are compared to reference experimental model of monotonic and cyclic applied loads. The success of strengthening depends strongly

  17. Fluid flow analysis of E-glass fiber reinforced pipe joints in oil and gas industry

    Bobba, Sujith; Leman, Z.; Zainuddin, E. S.; Sapuan, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Glass Fiber reinforced composites have become increasingly important over the past few years and now they are the first choice materials for fabricating pipes with low weight in combination with high strength and stiffness. In Oil And Gas Industry, The Pipelines transporting heavy crude oil are subjected to variable pressure waves causing fluctuating stress levels in the pipes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using solid works flow stimulation software to study the effects of these pressure waves on some specified joints in the pipes. Depending on the type of heavy crude oil being used, the flow behavior indicated a considerable degree of stress levels in certain connecting joints, causing the joints to become weak over a prolonged period of use. This research proposes a new perspective that is still required to be developed regarding the change of the pipe material, fiber winding angle in those specified joints and finally implementing cad wind technology to check the output result of the stress levels so that the life of the pipes can be optimized.

  18. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Helou, S. H.; Touqan, A. R.

    2008-07-01

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended.

  19. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Helou, S. H.; Touqan, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended

  20. Application of the Hybrid Simulation Method for the Full-Scale Precast Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Structure

    Zaixian Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid simulation (HS testing method combines physical test and numerical simulation, and provides a viable alternative to evaluate the structural seismic performance. Most studies focused on the accuracy, stability and reliability of the HS method in the small-scale tests. It is a challenge to evaluate the seismic performance of a twelve-story pre-cast reinforced concrete shear-wall structure using this HS method which takes the full-scale bottom three-story structural model as the physical substructure and the elastic non-linear model as the numerical substructure. This paper employs an equivalent force control (EFC method with implicit integration algorithm to deal with the numerical integration of the equation of motion (EOM and the control of the loading device. Because of the arrangement of the test model, an elastic non-linear numerical model is used to simulate the numerical substructure. And non-subdivision strategy for the displacement inflection point of numerical substructure is used to easily realize the simulation of the numerical substructure and thus reduce the measured error. The parameters of the EFC method are calculated basing on analytical and numerical studies and used to the actual full-scale HS test. Finally, the accuracy and feasibility of the EFC-based HS method is verified experimentally through the substructure HS tests of the pre-cast reinforced concrete shear-wall structure model. And the testing results of the descending stage can be conveniently obtained from the EFC-based HS method.

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Buttons to Lithium Disilicate and Leucite Reinforced Feldspathic Restorations

    2016-05-01

    utilizing enamel bonding procedures. These fixed orthodontic appliances are the gold standard in orthodontic treatment and can be used to correct... enamel of teeth. When this same procedure needs to be done on a restorative material such as lithium disilicate, or leucite reinforced feldspathic...toughness from its crystal size and orientation which causes cracks to deflect instead of propagate. The second material being tested, IPS Empress

  2. Seismic Performance and Modeling of Reinforced Concrete and Post-Tensioned Precast Concrete Shear Walls

    Tanyeri, Ahmet Can

    2014-01-01

    Past earthquakes have shown examples of unsatisfactory performance of buildings using reinforced concrete structural walls as the primary lateral-force-resisting system. In the 1994 Northridge earthquake, examples can be found where walls possessed too much overstrength, leading to unintended failure of collectors and floor systems, including precast and post-tensioned construction. In the 2010 Maule Chile earthquake, many structural wall buildings sustained severe damage. Although Chilean de...

  3. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  4. Web buckling behavior under in-plane compression and shear loads for web reinforced composite sandwich core

    Toubia, Elias Anis

    Sandwich construction is one of the most functional forms of composite structures developed by the composite industry. Due to the increasing demand of web-reinforced core for composite sandwich construction, a research study is needed to investigate the web plate instability under shear, compression, and combined loading. If the web, which is an integral part of the three dimensional web core sandwich structure, happens to be slender with respect to one or two of its spatial dimensions, then buckling phenomena become an issue in that it must be quantified as part of a comprehensive strength model for a fiber reinforced core. In order to understand the thresholds of thickness, web weight, foam type, and whether buckling will occur before material yielding, a thorough investigation needs to be conducted, and buckling design equations need to be developed. Often in conducting a parametric study, a special purpose analysis is preferred over a general purpose analysis code, such as a finite element code, due to the cost and effort usually involved in generating a large number of results. A suitable methodology based on an energy method is presented to solve the stability of symmetrical and specially orthotropic laminated plates on an elastic foundation. Design buckling equations were developed for the web modeled as a laminated plate resting on elastic foundations. The proposed equations allow for parametric studies without limitation regarding foam stiffness, geometric dimensions, or mechanical properties. General behavioral trends of orthotropic and symmetrical anisotropic plates show pronounced contribution of the elastic foundation and fiber orientations on the buckling resistance of the plate. The effects of flexural anisotropy on the buckling behavior of long rectangular plates when subjected to pure shear loading are well represented in the model. The reliability of the buckling equations as a design tool is confirmed by comparison with experimental results

  5. Reliability assessment and probability based design of reinforced concrete containments and shear walls

    Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

    1986-03-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the program entitled, ''Probability-Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures.'' Under this program, the probabilistic models for various static and dynamic loads were formulated. The randomness and uncertainties in material strengths and structural resistance were established. Several limit states of concrete containments and shear walls were identified and analytically formulated. Furthermore, the reliability analysis methods for estimating limit state probabilities were established. These reliability analysis methods can be used to evaluate the safety levels of nuclear structures under various combinations of static and dynamic loads. They can also be used to generate analytically the fragility data for PRA studies. In addition to the development of reliability analysis methods, probability-based design criteria for concrete containments and shear wall structures have also been developed. The proposed design criteria are in the load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. The load and resistance factors are determined for several limit states and target limit state probabilities. Thus, the proposed design criteria are risk-consistent and have a well-established rationale. 73 refs., 18 figs., 16 tabs

  6. Substructure hybrid testing of reinforced concrete shear wall structure using a domain overlapping technique

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Peng; Gong, Runhua; Wang, Tao; Xue, Weichen

    2017-10-01

    An online hybrid test was carried out on a 40-story 120-m high concrete shear wall structure. The structure was divided into two substructures whereby a physical model of the bottom three stories was tested in the laboratory and the upper 37 stories were simulated numerically using ABAQUS. An overlapping domain method was employed for the bottom three stories to ensure the validity of the boundary conditions of the superstructure. Mixed control was adopted in the test. Displacement control was used to apply the horizontal displacement, while two controlled force actuators were applied to simulate the overturning moment, which is very large and cannot be ignored in the substructure hybrid test of high-rise buildings. A series of tests with earthquake sources of sequentially increasing intensities were carried out. The test results indicate that the proposed hybrid test method is a solution to reproduce the seismic response of high-rise concrete shear wall buildings. The seismic performance of the tested precast high-rise building satisfies the requirements of the Chinese seismic design code.

  7. Contribution to the understanding of the behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls under seismic loading: contribution of experiment and modeling to the design

    Ile, N.

    2000-12-01

    This thesis deals with aspects of seismic behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls (RCSW). Its objective is to introduce a useful modelling approach for addressing the non-linear response of a large variety of RCSW and to identify several aspects in which this numerical approach could be implemented into design applications. Firstly, the characteristics of the behaviour of RCSW under seismic loading, some design principles and different modelling approaches are discussed. As an important lack of knowledge in several fields was identified, it was considered that three types of shear walls deserve more attention: slightly reinforced slender walls; U-shaped walls and heavily reinforced squat shear walls. A local modelling approach is adopted and the material constitutive models are described in details. Secondly, the behaviour of the two mock-up, CAMUS I and II, tested on the shaking-table during the CAMUS programme, which are slightly reinforced and designed according to the French code PS92 is simulated using a 2-D finite element model (FEM). For comparison purposes, the case of the CAMUS III mock-up, designed according to EC8, is considered. We are then dealing with the case of U-shaped walls under dynamic and cyclic loading. The results obtained from numerical simulations, based on a 3-D shell FEM, are compared with those obtained from tests carried out in the frame of the ICONS programme. Finally, the numerical model is applied to the case of heavily reinforced squat shear walls (similar to those used in the nuclear power plant buildings) subjected to shear loading. A 2-D FEM is considered in order to simulate the behaviour of three different walls, which were tested pseudo-dynamically during the SAFE programme. The results from both experimental and numerical studies are compared and discussed. The most important factors affecting the behaviour of RCSW are highlighted. Different examples of possible contributions to design are presented. (author)

  8. A More Realistic Lateral Load Pattern for Design of Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Moment Frames and Shear Walls

    Hosseini, Mahmood; Khosahmadi, Arash

    2008-01-01

    In this research it has been tried to find a more realistic distribution pattern for the seismic load in reinforced concrete (R/C) buildings, having moment frames with shear walls as their lateral resisting system, by using Nonlinear Time History Analyses (NLTHA). Having shear wall as lateral load bearing system decreases the effect of infill walls in the seismic behavior of the building, and therefore the case of buildings with shear walls has been considered for this study as the first stage of the studies on lateral load patterns for R/C buildings. For this purpose, by assuming three different numbers of bays in each direction and also three different numbers of stories for the buildings, several R/C buildings, have been studied. At first, the buildings have been designed by the Iranian National Code for R/C Buildings. Then they have been analyzed by a NLTHA software using the accelerograms of some well-known earthquakes. The used accelerograms have been also scaled to various levels of peak ground acceleration (PGA) such as 0.35 g, 0.50 g, and 0.70 g, to find out the effect of PGA in the seismic response. Numerical results have shown that firstly the values of natural period of the building and their shear force values, calculated by the code, are not appropriate in all cases. Secondly, it has been found out that the real lateral load pattern is quite different with the one suggested by the seismic code. Based on the NLTHA results a new lateral load pattern has been suggested for this kind of buildings, in the form of some story-dependent modification factors applied to the existing code formula. The effects of building's natural period, as well as its number of stories, are taken into account explicitly in the proposed new load pattern. The proposed load pattern has been employed to redesign the buildings and again by NLTHA the real lateral load distribution in each case has been obtained which has shown very good agreement with the proposed pattern

  9. Mechanical characterization of PVA hydrogel to be used as artificial joint cartilage reinforced by irradiation techniques

    Bavaresco, Vanessa Petrilli; Zavaglia, Cecilia A.C.; Reis, Marcelo de Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Crosslinked networks of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) produced from PVA aqueous solution and induced by radiation has been recently developed, and their mechanical properties have been studied. These materials are too fragile to be useful for artificial joint cartilage applications, unless reinforced in some way. In this work, the mechanical resistance of PVA hydrogel produced by irradiation techniques was studied. Polyvinyl alcohol films from 15 and 20% w/w aqueous solutions were acetalized by immersing it in an acetalization bath containing aqueous formaldehyde, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate anhydrous (60:50:300 g) at 60 deg C. The acetalized samples were irradiated (Dynamitron (E = 1,5 MeV)) with 25, 50, 75, 100 kGy doses. Hydrogel samples were characterized by indentation creep test and water swelling. The results obtained in this study suggest the improving of the mechanical properties of the hydrogel by the combination of acetalization and electron beam irradiation, without decreasing in the swelling properties. (author)

  10. Influence of groove size and reinforcements addition on mechanical properties and microstructure of friction stir welded joints

    Reddy Baridula, Ravinder; Ibrahim, Abdullah Bin; Yahya, Che Ku Mohammad Faizal Bin Che Ku; Kulkarni, Ratnakar; Varma Ramaraju, Ramgopal

    2018-03-01

    The butt joints fabricated by friction stir welding were found to have more strength than the joints obtained by conventional joining process. The important outcome of this process is the successful fabrication of surface composites with improved properties. Thus in order to further enhance the strength of the dissimilar alloy joints the reinforcements can be deposited in to the aluminium matrix during the process of friction stir welding. In the present study the multi-walled carbon nanotubes were embedded in to the groove by varying the width during joining of dissimilar alloys AA2024 and AA7075. Four widths were selected with constant depth and optimum process parameters were selected to fabricate the sound welded joints. The results show that the mechanical properties of the fabricated butt joints were influenced by the size of the groove, due to variation in the deposition of reinforcement in the stir zone. The microstructural study and identification of the elements of the welded joints show that the reinforcements deposition is influenced by the size of the groove. It has also been observed that the groove with minimum width is more effective than higher width. The mechanical properties are found to be improved due to the pinning of grain boundaries.

  11. The Application of Buckling Reinforced Bracing and Shear Wall in Retrofitting of Existing Concrete Building

    Mahdi Izadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerable buildings and their rehabilitation are important problems for earthquake regions. In recent decades the goal of building rehabilitation and strengthening has gained different rehabilitation systems. However, most of these strengthening techniques disturb the occupants, who must vacate the building during renovation. Several retrofitting techniques such as addition masonry infill wall, application of buckling restrained braces and local modification of components has been studied in order to improve the overall seismic performance of such buildings. In response to many of the practical issues and economic considerations, engineers use often convergent unbuckling steel bracing frames as the lateral load resisting system during an earthquake.This kind of bracings increases the hardness and strength of concrete structures.The aim of the present study is the evaluation and comparison of seismic performance and retrofitting of an existing 7-storeys concrete structure with buckling restrained bracings and shear walls by nonlinear static procedure (NSP and accordance with cod-361. The results show that the buckling restrained bracing, decreased drift to acceptable levels and Structure behaves on the life safety of performance level.

  12. Effect of tension and compression reinforcements on the serviceability of HSC beams with relatively small shear span to depth ratio

    Maghsoudi, A.A.; Akbarzadeh, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the serviceability performance of High-Strength Concrete (HSC) beams, 12 beams (L=2m, b=0.2m, h=0.3m and shear span to depth ratio of 1.8) with different ratios of p and p' (percentage of tensile and compressive steel) were cast and tested under bending. During the test, concrete and steel strains, deflections and crack widths were measured at different locations along each beam. Based on experimental readings and observations, the cracked moment of inertia (Icr) of HSC beams was determined and the results were compared with some selective theoretical methods. Also, the flexural crack widths of the beams were measured and the applicability of ACI, BS and CSA code for normal strength concrete (NSC) was verified for HSC beams tested. The experimental (Icr) exp values of HSC beams were lower than the theoretical (Icr) th values from different codes. It was concluded that the serviceability and post serviceability performance of reinforced concrete structures can be improved using high strength concrete. In general, for almost all HSC tested beams at three crack width (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mm); the use of ACI equation led to predict 50% of the crack width conservatively (the ratio of ((wcr) th / (wcr) exp) is greater than unity) but the results of the BS equation are conservative while compare to the ACI equation. The use of the CSA equation for the beams of higher and lower reinforcement ratio caused a more conservative and a closer value respectively, to limiting values of CSA. The deflection at initial steel horizontal yield plateau is less than 9 mm which is a sign of excellent deflection performance of HSC beams. (author)

  13. Implementation of Highly-Flowable Strain Hardening Fiber Reinforced Concrete in New RC Beam-Column Joints

    Liao Wen-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of New RC project was aimed to reduce the member sections and increase the available space of high rise buildings by using high strength concrete (f’c > 70 MPa and high strength rebars (fy > 685 MPa. Material consumptions and member section sizes can be further reduced owing to the upgrade of strength. However, the nature of brittleness of high strength may also cause early cover spalling and other ductility issues. Addition of steel fibers is an alternative as transverse reinforcement. Highly flowable strain hardening fiber reinforced concrete (HF-SHFRC has excellent workability in the fresh state and exhibits the strain-hardening and multiple cracking characteristics of high performance fiber reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCC in their hardened state. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of implementing HF-SHFRC in New RC building systems, particularly for beam-column joints as an alternative of transverse reinforcements. Four full-scale exterior beam-column joints, including two specimens with intensive transverse reinforcements and two specimens made of HF-SHFRC without any stirrup, are tested. Test results show that the HF-SHFRC specimens perform as well as specimens with intensive transverse reinforcements regarding failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation and crack width control. Integration of New RC building systems and HF-SHFRC can assuring construction qualities and further diminish labor work and give infrastructure longer service life, and eventually lower the life-cycle cost.

  14. Effect of Alkali-Silica Reaction on Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Structural Members

    Hariri-Ardebili, Mohammad [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Saouma, Victor [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Le Pape, Yann [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) was discovered in the early 40s by Stanton (1940) of the California Division of Highways. Since, it has been recognized as a major degradation mechanism for concrete dams and transportation infrastructures. Sometimes described as the ’cancer of concrete’, this internal swelling mechanism causes expansion, cracking and loss of mechanical properties. There are no known economically viable solutions applicable to massive concrete to prevent the reaction once initiated. The e ciency of the mitigation strategies for ASR subjected structures is limited. Several cases of ASR in nuclear generating stations have been disclosed in Japan (Takatura et al. 2005), Canada at Gentilly 2 NPP (Tcherner and Aziz 2009) 1, and more recently, in the United States for which the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Information Notice (IN) 2011-20, ’Concrete Degradation by Alkali Silica Reaction,’ on November 18, 2011, to provide the industry with information related to the ASR identified at Seabrook. Considering that US commercial reactors in operation enter the age when ASR degradation can be visually detected and that numerous non nuclear infrastructures (transportation, energy production) have already experienced ASR in a large majority of the States (e.g., Department of Transportation survey reported by Touma (Touma 2000)), the susceptibility and significance of ASR for nuclear concrete structures must be addressed in the perspective of license renewal and long-term operation beyond 60 years. The aim of this report is to perform an extensive parametric series of 3D nonlinear finite element analyses of three di erent “beam-like” geometries, including two di erent depths, three di erent types of boundary conditions, and four other parameters: namely, the ASR volumetric expansion, the reinforcement ratio, the loss of elastic modulus induced by ASR and the loss of tensile strength caused by ASR.

  15. Full scale heavily reinforced concrete beam-column joints of NPP structures-quality assurance and construction in the laboratory

    Thandavamoorthy, T.S.; Vimalanandam, V.; Anandavalli, N.; Reddy, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    Under the current design philosophy, reactor structures are to be designed to withstand large inelastic deformation caused by strong and severe ground motion. The design of the main structural elements and their connections are to be such that they always fail in ductile mode. This will ensure large energy absorption capacity of the structures under seismic excitation and avoid sudden and brittle failure of the structure. Over the years, a number of experimental investigations have been carried out on RC beam- column joints to study their behaviour and strength. However, these studies mostly pertain to small scale joints of moment resisting frame of residential buildings and commercial complexes. Information on full scale joints existing in NPP structures are scanty. Therefore, experimental programme was planned in the laboratory to construct identical large sized joints with the same reinforcement percentage and detail as that of the existing joints in NPP structures built in 1960's. The cross-sectional dimensions of the beam and column of the joint were 610 mm x 915 mm. The beam was reinforced with 24 numbers of 36 mm bars. Column was reinforced with 4 numbers of 36 mm diameter bars and various other sizes. M25 grade concrete was used for casting of the specimen. The mix proportion was 1:1.657:2.63. The slump achieved was 75 mm to 100 mm. The health of the specimen was monitored by conducting ultrasonic testing with TICO instrument. The paper presents details of the size of the specimen and reinforcement, testing of steel bars for the evaluation of their mechanical properties, procedure of casting of specimen and its health monitoring. (author)

  16. Working Memory and Reinforcement Schedule Jointly Determine Reinforcement Learning in Children: Potential Implications for Behavioral Parent Training

    Elien Segers

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Behavioral Parent Training (BPT is often provided for childhood psychiatric disorders. These disorders have been shown to be associated with working memory impairments. BPT is based on operant learning principles, yet how operant principles shape behavior (through the partial reinforcement (PRF extinction effect, i.e., greater resistance to extinction that is created when behavior is reinforced partially rather than continuously and the potential role of working memory therein is scarcely studied in children. This study explored the PRF extinction effect and the role of working memory therein using experimental tasks in typically developing children.Methods: Ninety-seven children (age 6–10 completed a working memory task and an operant learning task, in which children acquired a response-sequence rule under either continuous or PRF (120 trials, followed by an extinction phase (80 trials. Data of 88 children were used for analysis.Results: The PRF extinction effect was confirmed: We observed slower acquisition and extinction in the PRF condition as compared to the continuous reinforcement (CRF condition. Working memory was negatively related to acquisition but not extinction performance.Conclusion: Both reinforcement contingencies and working memory relate to acquisition performance. Potential implications for BPT are that decreasing working memory load may enhance the chance of optimally learning through reinforcement.

  17. A new peak shear strength criterion for rock joints which includes spectral parameters as roughness measures

    Kulatilake, P.H.S.W.; Shou, G.; Huang, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the natural rock joint surface profiles do not belong to the self similar fractal category. In general, roughness profiles of rock joints consist of non-stationary and stationary components. At the simplest level, only one parameter is sufficient to quantify non-stationary joint roughness. The average inclination angle I, along with the direction considered for the joint surface, is suggested to capture the non-stationary roughness. It is shown that even though the fractal dimension D is a useful parameter, it alone is insufficient to quantify the stationary roughness of non-self similar profiles

  18. Microstructure evolution and shear strength of vacuum brazed joint for super-Ni/NiCr laminated composite with Ni–Cr–Si–B amorphous interlayer

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Ma, Qunshuang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Divorced eutectic of γ-Ni and Ni 3 B formed in the brazed region. • The detailed isothermal solidification mechanism was proposed. • Borides formed at the interfaces at different temperatures were identified. • Effect of brazing temperatures on microstructure and shear strength was investigated. • Excellent joint with shear strength of 191 MPa was obtained at 1100 °C for 20 min. - Abstract: Vacuum brazing of super-Ni/NiCr laminated composite and Cr18–Ni8 steel was carried out with Ni–Cr–Si–B amorphous interlayer at different temperatures (1060–1150 °C). The effects of brazing temperature on the microstructure evolution and shear strength of the joints were investigated. Microstructure, chemical composition and microhardness of the joints were studied using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and microsclerometer. Shear strength of the joints were measured by the electromechanical universal testing machine. Diffusion of B was the controlling factor for microstructure evolution. The detailed isothermal solidification mechanism was proposed in this study. The fracture morphology of the joint made at 1100 °C exhibited plastic feature and the shear strength reached 191 MPa. Bulky Ni 3 B formed in super-Ni cover layer near the brazed region when performed at 1060–1100 °C while Ni–B eutectic formed instead at 1150 °C

  19. Reconstruction of fiber Bragg grating strain profile used to monitor the stiffness degradation of the adhesive layer in carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint

    Song Chunsheng; Zhang Jiaxiang; Yang Mo; Shang Erwei; Zhang Jinguang

    2017-01-01

    The adhesive-bonded joint of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic is one of the core components in aircraft structure design. It is an effective guarantee for the safety and reliability of the aerospace aircraft structure to use effective methods for monitoring and early warning of internal failure. In this article, the mapping relation model between the strain profiles of the adherend of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap adhesive joint and the stiffness degradation evolution of adhes...

  20. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h < 6), combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 < L/h ≤ 42

  1. Testing and modeling dowel and catenary action in rebars crossing shear joints in RC

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    presents a simple, second order plasticity model to describe the non-linear regime of the load-displacement relationship. In the model, kinematic relations and the normality condition of plastic theory are utilized to establish a unique link between the imposed shear displacement and combinations of moment...

  2. KiDS+GAMA: cosmology constraints from a joint analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and angular clustering

    van Uitert, Edo; Joachimi, Benjamin; Joudaki, Shahab; Amon, Alexandra; Heymans, Catherine; Köhlinger, Fabian; Asgari, Marika; Blake, Chris; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Farrow, Daniel J.; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Kitching, Thomas D.; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Merten, Julian; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Schneider, Peter; Valentijn, Edwin; Viola, Massimo

    2018-06-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints from a joint analysis of three cosmological probes: the tomographic cosmic shear signal in ˜450 deg2 of data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), the galaxy-matter cross-correlation signal of galaxies from the Galaxies And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey determined with KiDS weak lensing, and the angular correlation function of the same GAMA galaxies. We use fast power spectrum estimators that are based on simple integrals over the real-space correlation functions, and show that they are practically unbiased over relevant angular frequency ranges. We test our full pipeline on numerical simulations that are tailored to KiDS and retrieve the input cosmology. By fitting different combinations of power spectra, we demonstrate that the three probes are internally consistent. For all probes combined, we obtain S_8≡ σ _8 √{Ω _m/0.3}=0.800_{-0.027}^{+0.029}, consistent with Planck and the fiducial KiDS-450 cosmic shear correlation function results. Marginalizing over wide priors on the mean of the tomographic redshift distributions yields consistent results for S8 with an increase of 28 {per cent} in the error. The combination of probes results in a 26 per cent reduction in uncertainties of S8 over using the cosmic shear power spectra alone. The main gain from these additional probes comes through their constraining power on nuisance parameters, such as the galaxy intrinsic alignment amplitude or potential shifts in the redshift distributions, which are up to a factor of 2 better constrained compared to using cosmic shear alone, demonstrating the value of large-scale structure probe combination.

  3. Evaluate the capability and accuracy of response-2000 program in prediction of the shear capacities of reinforced and prestressed concrete members

    Ibrahim M. Metwally

    2012-08-01

    Member response analysis and sectional analysis were both used in Response-2000 to predict the behavior of the beams. Member response calculates the full member behavior including the deflection and curvature along the member length, as well as predicted failure modes. The analysis was performed by specifying the length subjected to shear and any constant moment region. Response-2000 provided a very good prediction of experimental behavior when compared to a database of 534 beams tested in shear. These include prestressed and reinforced sections, very large footing-like sections, sections made with very high strength concrete and elements with unusual geometry. All are predicted well. The results include that Response-2000 can predict the failure shear with an average experimental over predicted shear ratio of 1.05 with a coefficient of variation of 12%. This compares favorably to the ACI 318-08 [2] Code prediction ratios that have an average of 1.20 and a coefficient of variation of 32%.

  4. Numerical investigation of friction joint between Basalt Fiber Reinforced Composites and aluminum

    Costache, Andrei; Berggreen, Christian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    and stiffer flexible risers, which would be well suited for ultra deep water applications. This paper develops a new finite element model used for evaluating the efficiency of anchoring flat unidirectional fiber reinforced tendons in a mechanical grip. It consists two flat grips with the fiber reinforced...

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Curtailed Reinforcement on the Shear Failure of RC Members Without Stirrups

    Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Curtailing of reinforcement in concrete beams and slabs is often carried out in practice for different reasons; in continuous beams, top reinforcement is often curtailed in accordance with the extent of the hogging moments and generally, in concrete structures it is often necessary to add extra...

  6. The Enhancement of Composite Scarf Joint Interface Strength Through Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement

    Slaff, Randolph E

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the potentially significant improvement to scarf joint bonding achieved through the dispersion of carbon nanotubes along the interface of the composite joint...

  7. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  8. Interfacial microstructure and shear strength of reactive air brazed oxygen transport membrane ceramic-metal alloy joints

    FR, Wahid Muhamad; Yoon, Dang-Hyok; Raju, Kati; Kim, Seyoung; Song, Kwang-sup; Yu, Ji Haeng

    2018-01-01

    To fabricate a multi-layered structure for maximizing oxygen production, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) ceramics need to be joined or sealed hermetically metal supports for interfacing with the peripheral components of the system. Therefore, in this study, Ag-10 wt% CuO was evaluated as an effective filler material for the reactive air brazing of dense Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ-La0.7Sr0.3MnO3±δ (GDC-LSM) OTM ceramics. Thermal decomposition in air and wetting behavior of the braze filler was performed. Reactive air brazing was performed at 1050 °C for 30 min in air to join GDC-LSM with four different commercially available high temperature-resistant metal alloys, such as Crofer 22 APU, Inconel 600, Fecralloy, and AISI 310S. The microstructure and elemental distribution of the ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal interfaces were examined from polished cross-sections. The mechanical shear strength at room temperature for the as-brazed and isothermally aged (800 °C for 24 h) joints of all the samples was compared. The results showed that the strength of the ceramic-ceramic joints was decreased marginally by aging; however, in the case of metal-ceramic joints, different decreases in strengths were observed according to the metal alloy used, which was explained based on the formation of different oxide layers at the interfaces.

  9. Experimental characterization and numerical simulation of riveted lap-shear joints using Rivet Element

    Vivio, Francesco; Fanelli, Pierluigi; Ferracci, Michele

    2018-03-01

    In aeronautical and automotive industries the use of rivets for applications requiring several joining points is now very common. In spite of a very simple shape, a riveted junction has many contact surfaces and stress concentrations that make the local stiffness very difficult to be calculated. To overcome this difficulty, commonly finite element models with very dense meshes are performed for single joint analysis because the accuracy is crucial for a correct structural analysis. Anyhow, when several riveted joints are present, the simulation becomes computationally too heavy and usually significant restrictions to joint modelling are introduced, sacrificing the accuracy of local stiffness evaluation. In this paper, we tested the accuracy of a rivet finite element presented in previous works by the authors. The structural behaviour of a lap joint specimen with a rivet joining is simulated numerically and compared to experimental measurements. The Rivet Element, based on a closed-form solution of a reference theoretical model of the rivet joint, simulates local and overall stiffness of the junction combining high accuracy with low degrees of freedom contribution. In this paper the Rivet Element performances are compared to that of a FE non-linear model of the rivet, built with solid elements and dense mesh, and to experimental data. The promising results reported allow to consider the Rivet Element able to simulate, with a great accuracy, actual structures with several rivet connections.

  10. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    Montazeri, A. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, M. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghdabadi, R., E-mail: naghdabd@sharif.ed [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H. [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-04

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45{sup o} orientation. The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45{sup o} orientation.

  11. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    Montazeri, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: → A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. → Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. → A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45 o orientation. → The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45 o orientation.

  12. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  13. Evaluation of mechanical properties of construction joint between new and old concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses; Shinkyu concrete no uchitsugime no incho sendan oryokuka no kyodo tokusei no hyoka

    Ujiike, I. [Ehime University, Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yoshida, N. [Shikoku Railway Company, Kagawa (Japan); Morishita, S. [Oriental Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-01-15

    The objective of this study is to examine the mechanical properties of construction joints between existing and newly placed concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses. Loading tests are conducted by using push off type specimens. The joint surface of existing concrete is roughened by shot blast and a half of the specimen is reconstructed by new concrete using ultra rapid hardening cement. The insufficient treatment of joint surface of the old concrete causes the lowering of tensile rigidity, while shearing rigidity is almost the same as that of the other specimen. The shearing and tensile rigidities of non jointed concrete and concrete shot blasted properly are not dependent on the combination of shearing and tensile forces. For the jointed concrete shot blasted insufficiently, the shearing rigidity decreases with the increase of tensile force and the tensile digidity also becomes lower by the action of shearing force. Both the tensile strength and shearing strength of jointed concrete become small compared to those of non jointed concrete. The ratio of reduction in tensile strength is larger than that in shearing strength. The strength of jointed concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses can be evaluated by Mohr`s failure envelope expressed by parabola tangent to both tensile strength circle and compressive strength circle. 7 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Three-dimensional submodel for modelling of joints in precast concrete structures

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    The shear capacity of in-situ cast joints is crucial to the overall stability of precast concrete structures. The current design is based on empirical formulas, which account for neither the reinforcement layout of the joint nor the three-dimensional stress states present within the joint...

  15. A Study on the Interlaminar Shear Strength of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Depending on the Lamination Methods

    Min Sang Lee; Hee Jae Shin; In Pyo Cha; Sun Ho Ko; Hyun Kyung Yoon; Hong Gun Kim; Lee Ku Kwac

    2015-01-01

    The prepreg process among the CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) forming methods is the short term of ‘Pre-impregnation’, which is widely used for aerospace composites that require a high quality property such as a fiber-reinforced woven fabric, in which an epoxy hardening resin is impregnated the reality. However, that this process requires continuous researches and developments for its commercialization because the delamination characteristically develops between th...

  16. Improving Performance of Polymer Fiber Reinforced Sandwich X-Joints in Naval Vessels

    Berggreen, Christian; Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Karlsen, Kasper

    2007-01-01

    In many naval ships of fiber composite sandwich construction an X-joint exists where the end bulkhead of the superstructure is attached to the deck, with a bulkhead placed in the same vertical plane below the deck. As the hull girder flexes this joint is subjected to alternating tensile and compr...

  17. Split Personality: Assessing the Potential for Organizational Identity in Reinforcing U.S. Military Jointness

    2015-07-17

    of Identity ...........................................................................................................36 Hybrid -Organizational...force through a theoretical lens, developing a working understanding of military identity. Analysis of the environment will illustrate the hybrid ... departmental civilians, and contractors in the DoD’s employ, and is consistent with CJCS usage. Joint Force. The Joint Force describes a notional

  18. Ductility Analysis of RC Beams Considering the Concrete Confinement Effect Produced by the Shear Reinforcement: a Numerical Approach

    Caio Gorla Nogueira

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a simplified numerical approach to study the influence of the confinement effect provided by transversal reinforcement on the ductility behavior of RC beams in bending is proposed. A unidimensional FEM mechanical model coupled to the Mazars’ damage model to simulate concrete behavior was adopted to assess ductility curvatures at the ultimate limit state. The confinement effect was incorporated to the numerical model through a calibration process of the damage internal parameters, based on the Least Square Method and an analytical law proposed by Kent and Park (1971. Several numerical analyses were carried out considering different designs of RC beams according to a parametric study varying the neutral axis position, concrete compressive strength and the volumetric transversal reinforcement ratio. The obtained results showed the importance of the amount of transversal reinforcement on the ductility behavior, increasing the ductility factor even for the cases with inappropriate neutral axis position.

  19. An investigation on mechanical properties of steel fibre reinforced for underwater welded joint

    Navin, K.; Zakaria, M. S.; Zairi, S.

    2017-09-01

    Underwater pipelines are always exposed to water and have a high tendency to have corrosion especially on the welded joint. This research is about using fiber glass as steel fiber to coat the welded joint to determine the effectiveness in corrosion prevention of the welded joint. Number of coating is varied to determine the better number coating to coat the pipeline. Few samples were left without immersion in salt water and few samples are immersed into salt water with same salinity as sea water. The material sample is prepared in dog bone shape to enable to be used in Universal Tensile Machine (UTM). The material prepared is left immersed for recommended time and tested in Universal Tensile Machine. Upon analyzing the result, the result is used to determine the breakage point whether broken on the welded joint or different place and also the suitable number of coating to be used.

  20. Plasticity Approach to Shear Design

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents some plastic models for shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Distinction is made between two shear failure modes, namely web crushing and crack sliding. The first mentioned mode is met in beams with large shear reinforcement degrees. The mode of crack sliding is met in non......-shear reinforced beams as well as in lightly shear reinforced beams. For such beams the shear strength is determined by the recently developed crack sliding model. This model is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed...... in uncracked concrete. Good agree between theory and tests has been found.Keywords: dsign, plasticity, reinforced concrete, reinforcement, shear, web crushing....

  1. Effects of Carbon Nanomaterial Reinforcement on Composite Joints Under Cyclic and Impact Loading

    2012-03-01

    prepreg . 2 Figure 1. Composite decks on DDG1000. (From [3]) Figure 2. USV built from nanotube-reinforced carbon fiber composites. (From [2...been proven that the infusion of CNTs enhances the strength and fracture toughness of CFRP laminates under static loading (mode I and mode II...Kostopoulos et al. [5] investigated the influence of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the impact and after-impact behavior of CFRP laminates

  2. A joint inversion for shear velocity and anisotropy: the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.

    2016-08-01

    Trade-offs between velocity and anisotropy heterogeneity complicate the interpretation of differential traveltime data and have the potential to bias isotropic tomographic models. By constructing a simple parametrisation to describe an elastic tensor with hexagonal symmetry, we find analytic solutions to the Christoffel equations in terms of fast and slow horizontal velocities that allow us to simultaneously invert differential traveltime data and splitting data from teleseismic S arrivals to recover 3-D velocity and anisotropy structure. This technique provides a constraint on the depth-extent of shallow anisotropy, otherwise absent from interpretations based on SKS splitting alone. This approach is well suited to the young Woodlark Rift, where previous studies have found strong velocity variation and substantial SKS splitting in a continental rift with relatively simple geometry. This study images a low-velocity rift axis with ≤4 per cent spreading-parallel anisotropy at 50-100 km depth that separates regions of pre-existing lithospheric fabric, indicating the synchronous development of extensional crystallographic preferred orientation and lithospheric thinning. A high-velocity slab fragment north of the rift axis is associated with strike-parallel anisotropic fast axes, similar to that seen in the shallow mantle of some subduction zones. In addition to the insights provided by the anisotropy structure, the improvement in fit to the differential traveltime data demonstrates the merit to a joint inversion that accounts for anisotropy.

  3. Geometrically nonlinear resonance of higher-order shear deformable functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite annular sector plates excited by harmonic transverse loading

    Gholami, Raheb; Ansari, Reza

    2018-02-01

    This article presents an attempt to study the nonlinear resonance of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite (FG-CNTRC) annular sector plates excited by a uniformly distributed harmonic transverse load. To this purpose, first, the extended rule of mixture including the efficiency parameters is employed to approximately obtain the effective material properties of FG-CNTRC annular sector plates. Then, the focus is on presenting the weak form of discretized mathematical formulation of governing equations based on the variational differential quadrature (VDQ) method and Hamilton's principle. The geometric nonlinearity and shear deformation effects are considered based on the von Kármán assumptions and Reddy's third-order shear deformation plate theory, respectively. The discretization process is performed via the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method together with numerical differential and integral operators. Then, an efficient multi-step numerical scheme is used to obtain the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the FG-CNTRC annular sector plates near their primary resonance as the frequency-response curve. The accuracy of the present results is first verified and then a parametric study is presented to show the impacts of CNT volume fraction, CNT distribution pattern, geometry of annular sector plate and sector angle on the nonlinear frequency-response curve of FG-CNTRC annular sector plates with different edge supports.

  4. Functionally graded bio-ceramic reinforced PVA hydrogel composites for knee joint artificial cartilages

    Kumar, G. C. Mohan

    2018-04-01

    Research progress in materials science for bio-based materials for cartilage repair or supportive to host tissue has become a fashionable, worldwide. Few efforts in biomedical engineering has attempted in the development of newer biomaterials successfully. Bio ceramics, a class of materials been used in particulate form as a reinforcement with polymers those ensure its biocompatibility. Every artificial biomedical system has to meet the minimum in Vitro requirements for successful application. Equally the biological behavior of normal and diseased tissues is also essential to understand the artificial systems to human body.

  5. Joint Extraction of Entities and Relations Using Reinforcement Learning and Deep Learning

    Yuntian Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We use both reinforcement learning and deep learning to simultaneously extract entities and relations from unstructured texts. For reinforcement learning, we model the task as a two-step decision process. Deep learning is used to automatically capture the most important information from unstructured texts, which represent the state in the decision process. By designing the reward function per step, our proposed method can pass the information of entity extraction to relation extraction and obtain feedback in order to extract entities and relations simultaneously. Firstly, we use bidirectional LSTM to model the context information, which realizes preliminary entity extraction. On the basis of the extraction results, attention based method can represent the sentences that include target entity pair to generate the initial state in the decision process. Then we use Tree-LSTM to represent relation mentions to generate the transition state in the decision process. Finally, we employ Q-Learning algorithm to get control policy π in the two-step decision process. Experiments on ACE2005 demonstrate that our method attains better performance than the state-of-the-art method and gets a 2.4% increase in recall-score.

  6. Joint Extraction of Entities and Relations Using Reinforcement Learning and Deep Learning.

    Feng, Yuntian; Zhang, Hongjun; Hao, Wenning; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    We use both reinforcement learning and deep learning to simultaneously extract entities and relations from unstructured texts. For reinforcement learning, we model the task as a two-step decision process. Deep learning is used to automatically capture the most important information from unstructured texts, which represent the state in the decision process. By designing the reward function per step, our proposed method can pass the information of entity extraction to relation extraction and obtain feedback in order to extract entities and relations simultaneously. Firstly, we use bidirectional LSTM to model the context information, which realizes preliminary entity extraction. On the basis of the extraction results, attention based method can represent the sentences that include target entity pair to generate the initial state in the decision process. Then we use Tree-LSTM to represent relation mentions to generate the transition state in the decision process. Finally, we employ Q -Learning algorithm to get control policy π in the two-step decision process. Experiments on ACE2005 demonstrate that our method attains better performance than the state-of-the-art method and gets a 2.4% increase in recall-score.

  7. 3D finite element analysis of stress distributions and strain energy release rates for adhesive bonded flat composite lap shear joints having pre-existing delaminations

    Parida, S. K.; Pradhan, A. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2014-02-15

    The rate of propagation of embedded delamination in the strap adherend of lap shear joint (LSJ) made of carbon/epoxy composites has been evaluated employing three-dimensional non-linear finite elements. The delamination has been presumed to pre-exist in the thin resin layer between the first and second plies of the strap adherend. The inter-laminar peel and shear stress distributions have been studied in details and are seen to be predominantly three-dimensional in nature. The components of strain energy release rate (SERR) corresponding to the opening, sliding and cross sliding modes of delamination are significantly different at the two fronts of the embedded delamination. The sequential release of multi-point constraint (MPC) finite elements in the vicinity of the delamination fronts enables to simulate the growth of the delamination at either ends. This simulation procedure can be utilized effectively for evaluation of the status of the structural integrity of the bonded joints.

  8. Simulation of Seismic Response of Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Joints with Nurbs Surface Fitting

    Mirhosseini R. Tabatabaei

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach based on NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines to achieve a seismic response surface (SRS from a group of points obtained by using an analytical model of RC joints. NURBS based on the genetic algorithm is an important mathematical tool and consists of generalizations of Bezier curves and surfaces and B-splines. Generally, the accuracy of the design process of joints depends on the number of control points that are captured in the results of experimental research on real specimens. The values obtained from the specimens are the best tools to use in seismic analysis, though more expensive when compared to values simulated by SRSs. The SRS proposed in this paper can be applied to obtain surfaces that show site effect results on destructions of beam-column joint, taking into account different site conditions for a specific earthquake. The efficiency of this approach is demonstrated by the retrieval of simulated-versus-analytical results.

  9. Improving the mechanical performance of Sn57.6Bi0.4Ag solder joints on Au/Ni/Cu pads during aging and electromigration through the addition of tungsten (W) nanoparticle reinforcement

    Li, Yi, E-mail: yili64-c@my.cityu.edu.hk [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Luo, Kaiming; Lim, Adeline B.Y.; Chen, Zhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wu, Fengshun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan (China); Chan, Y.C. [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-04

    Sn57.6Bi0.4Ag solder has been reinforced successfully through the addition of tungsten (W) nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.5 wt%. With the addition of W nanoparticles, the solder matrix lamellar interphase spacing was reduced by 31.0%. Due to the dispersion of W nanoparticles and the consequently refined microstructure, the mechanical properties of the solder alloy were enhanced, as indicated by a 6.2% improvement in the microhardness. During the reflow of solder on Au/Ni/Cu pads, the entire Au layer dissolved into the molten solder rapidly and a large number of (Au,Ni)(Sn,Bi){sub 4} particles were formed. The fracture path of the as-reflowed joint was within the solder region, showing ductile characteristic, and the shear strength was reinforced by 8.2%, due to the enhanced mechanical properties of the solder. During the subsequent aging process, the Au migrated back towards the interface and a thick layer of interfacial (Au,Ni)(Sn,Bi){sub 4} IMC was formed, leading to the shift of the fracture path to the interfacial IMC region, the transformation to brittle fracture and the deterioration of the strength of the joint, due to Au embrittlement. By adding W nanoparticles, the migration of Au was mitigated and the thickness of the (Au,Ni)(Sn,Bi){sub 4} layer was reduced significantly, which reduced the Au embrittlement-induced deterioration of the strength of the joint. During electromigration, the segregation of the Bi-rich and Sn-rich phases and the accumulation of the (Au,Ni)(Sn,Bi){sub 4} layer at cathode interface were mitigated by the addition of W nanoparticles, which improved the electromigration resistance.

  10. Local reinforcement of magnesium components by friction processing. Determination of bonding mechanisms and assessment of joint properties

    Pinheiro, G.A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The development of new creep-resistant and cost effective die casting magnesium alloys, such as AE, MRI, MEZ, ACM, AXJ, AJ, WE, have emerged as an alternative, to fulfil the modern demands in structurally relevant applications, such as engine blocks, gears and converter boxes. However, in most cases, magnesium components are screwed with aluminium and steel bolts, which lead the screwed joints to lose the preload force, due to relaxation. This barrier thereby limits the broad use of magnesium within this segment and should somehow find an adequate solution to help overcome this limitation. Furthermore, together with alloy development and the addition of reinforcement (MMCs), local material engineering processes have been conceived and are considered a method to improve the properties and therefore expand the number of potential applications for magnesium alloys. In this context, Friction Welding (FW) and particularly Friction Hydro Pillar Processing (FHPP), which can be described as a drill and fill process, appear to be an alternative to make the use of magnesium more widespread. For this reason, FHPP is intended to be used, to locally reinforce the mechanically fastened magnesium components. With this approach, regions submitted to the stresses imposed by tightening forces can be compensated by the use of a material with superior properties. It is not required to fabricate the whole structure from an expensive material, thus saving costs and thereby satisfying the economic pressures of an increasingly competitive global market. In the present work, a preliminary experimental matrix was defined and used to determine the optimal welding conditions for each specific material combination selected. Further, elaborate experimental techniques are used to describe the process parameters-microstructure-properties relationships and the consequent mechanisms leading to bonding in FHPP welds in similar and dissimilar configurations. The welds were performed using a hydraulic

  11. Non-linear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete members and punching shear strength of HSC slabs

    Nassim Kernou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A rational three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model (NLFEAS is used for evaluating the behavior of high strength concrete slabs under monotonic transverse load. The non-linear equations of equilibrium have been solved using the incremental-iterative technique based on the modified Newton-Raphson method. The convergence of the solution was controlled by a load convergence criterion. The validity of the theoretical formulations and the program used was verified, through comparison with results obtained using ANSYS program and with available experimental test results. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of different parameters on the behavior of slabs which was evaluated in terms of loaddeflection characteristics, concrete and steel stresses and strains, and failure mechanisms. Also, punching shear resistance of slabs was numerically evaluated and compared with the prediction specified by some design codes.

  12. The Shear Strength and Fracture Behavior of Sn-Ag- xSb Solder Joints with Au/Ni-P/Cu UBM

    Lee, Hwa-Teng; Hu, Shuen-Yuan; Hong, Ting-Fu; Chen, Yin-Fa

    2008-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of Sb addition on the shear strength and fracture behavior of Sn-Ag-based solders with Au/Ni-P/Cu underbump metallization (UBM) substrates. Sn-3Ag- xSb ternary alloy solder joints were prepared by adding 0 wt.% to 10 wt.% Sb to a Sn-3.5Ag alloy and joining them with Au/Ni-P/Cu UBM substrates. The solder joints were isothermally stored at 150°C for up to 625 h to study their microstructure and interfacial reaction with the UBM. Single-lap shear tests were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties, thermal resistance, and failure behavior. The results show that UBM effectively suppressed intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and growth during isothermal storage. The Sb addition helped to refine the Ag3Sn compounds, further improving the shear strength and thermal resistance of the solders. The fracture behavior evolved from solder mode toward the mixed mode and finally to the IMC mode with increasing added Sb and isothermal storage time. However, SnSb compounds were found in the solder with 10 wt.% Sb; they may cause mechanical degradation of the solder after long-term isothermal storage.

  13. Experimental behavior of full-scale exterior beam-column space joints retrofitted by ferrocement layers under cyclic loading

    Ibrahim G. Shaaban

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of the traditional reinforced concrete frame buildings, existing across the Middle East, lack adequate confinement in beam-column joints, or in other words, are shear deficient because they were constructed before the introduction of seismic codes for construction. This research studies the experimental behavior of full-scale beam-column space (three-dimensional joints under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. Eleven joint specimens, included a traditionally reinforced one (without adequate shear reinforcement, a reference one with sufficient shear reinforcement according to ACI 318, and nine specimens retrofitted by ferrocement layers, were experimentally tested to evaluate a retrofit technique for strengthening shear deficient beam column joints. The studied variables were the number of layers, orientation angle of expanded wire mesh per layer, and presence of steel angles in the corners of joint specimen prior to wrapping with ferrocement layers. The experimental results showed that proper shear reinforcement for the test joints, according to ACI 318, enhanced the behavior of the specimen over that of the traditionally reinforced specimens without adequate shear reinforcement. The joints retrofitted by ferrocement layers showed higher ultimate capacity, higher ultimate displacement prior to failure (better ductility, and they did not suffer heavily damage as observed for the traditionally reinforced one. Increasing the number of ferrocement layers for retrofitted specimens led to improving performance for such specimens compared to the traditionally reinforced ones in terms of enhancing the ultimate capacity and ultimate displacement. Specimens retrofitted by ferrocement layers reinforced by expanded wire mesh of 60° orientation angle showed slightly better performance than those of 45° orientation angles. Retrofitting using steel angles in addition to ferrocement layers improves the seismic performance of the specimens

  14. Diffusion bonding of an aluminium alloy (AA 2124) reinforced with SiC whiskers, using AL-Li interlayers (AA 8090)

    Urena, A.; Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Escalera, M.D.; Escriche, E.

    1994-01-01

    The use of an AL-Li alloy as interlayer for the diffusion bonding of an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers has been studied. The influence of the different welding parameters on the joint microstructure and mechanical strength has also been analyzed. Besides, the failure mechanisms of shear tested joints have been investigated using fractographic techniques. (Author) 9 refs

  15. The Effect of Weld Reinforcement and Post-Welding Cooling Cycles on Fatigue Strength of Butt-Welded Joints under Cyclic Tensile Loading.

    Araque, Oscar; Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2018-04-12

    This research deals with the fatigue behavior of butt-welded joints, by considering the geometry and post-welding cooling cycles, as a result of cooling in quiet air and immersed in water. ASTM A-36 HR structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process with welding electrode E6013. The welding reinforcement was 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively; axial fatigue tests were carried out to determine the life and behavior in cracks propagation of the tested welded joints, mechanical characterization tests of properties in welded joints such as microhardness, Charpy impact test and metallographic analysis were carried out. The latter were used as input for the analysis by finite elements which influence the initiation and propagation of cracks and the evaluation of stress intensity factors (SIF). The latter led to obtaining the crack propagation rate and the geometric factor. The tested specimens were analyzed, by taking photographs of the cracks at its beginning in order to make a count of the marks at the origin of the crack. From the results obtained and the marks count, the fatigue crack growth rate and the influence of the cooling media on the life of the welded joint are validated, according to the experimental results. It can be concluded that the welded joints with a higher weld reinforcement have a shorter fatigue life. This is due to the stress concentration that occurs in the vicinity of the weld toe.

  16. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    Nayana Anasane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each, depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round, with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05. Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group ( P < 0.001 (88.77 MPa, with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours ( P < 0.001. Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins.

  17. The variation of grain structure and the enhancement of shear strength in SAC305-0.1Ni/OSP Cu solder joint

    Fleshman, Collin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chou, Tzu-Ting [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jia-Hong [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Duh, Jenq-Gong, E-mail: jgd@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the slow speed shear test in both Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt%)/OSP Cu and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.1Ni (wt%)/OSP Cu assembly with the ball heights of 300 μm and the corresponding grain structures were investigated. With the aid of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) analysis, single grain structure was observed in Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/OSP Cu. Besides, Ni was found to control the grain structure in Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.1Ni solder balls, showing multiple grains with partially interlaced structure. The grain variation resulted from larger undercooling caused by smaller ball size and Ni-dopant induced tiny intermetallic compounds (IMCs). IMCs serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for β-tin and thus alter the grain structure of solder balls. The results of shear test reveal that the peak force of solder joints was efficiently enhanced by the addition of Ni. The enhancement of mechanical strength was attributed to the modification of grain structure by the introduction of Ni dopant. It is believed that the smaller grains, tiny intermetallic compounds, and the oriented interlaced area in Ni-doped solder joints became energy barriers for propagation of cracks and dislocations. It is demonstrated that Ni-doped solder joints tend to exhibit better mechanical reliability in advanced electronic packaging. - Highlights: • The grain structure and slow speed shear test performance were investigated. • Doping Ni into solder induce interlaced grain structure. • Interlaced structure can enhance mechanical reliability in BGA packaging.

  18. Reconstruction of fiber Bragg grating strain profile used to monitor the stiffness degradation of the adhesive layer in carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint

    Song Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive-bonded joint of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic is one of the core components in aircraft structure design. It is an effective guarantee for the safety and reliability of the aerospace aircraft structure to use effective methods for monitoring and early warning of internal failure. In this article, the mapping relation model between the strain profiles of the adherend of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap adhesive joint and the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer was achieved by finite element software ABAQUS. The fiber Bragg grating was embedded in the adherend between the first and second layers at the end of the adhesive layer to calculate the reflection spectrum of fiber Bragg grating sensor region with improved T-matrix method for reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area with the help of genetic algorithm. According to the reconstruction results, the maximum error between the ideal and reconstructed strain profile under different tension loads did not exceed 7.43%, showing a good coincidence degree. The monitoring method of the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint based on the reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area thus was figured out.

  19. Shear wave velocity model beneath CBJI station West Java, Indonesia from joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Simanungkalit, R. H.; Anggono, T.; Syuhada; Amran, A.; Supriyanto

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake signal observations around the world allow seismologists to obtain the information of internal structure of the Earth especially the Earth’s crust. In this study, we used joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure beneath CBJI station in West Java, Indonesia. Receiver function were calculated from earthquakes with magnitude more than 5 and at distance 30°-90°. Surface wave group velocities were calculated using frequency time analysis from earthquakes at distance of 30°- 40°. We inverted shear wave velocity model beneath the station by conducting joint inversion from receiver functions and surface wave dispersions. We suggest that the crustal thickness beneath CBJI station, West Java, Indonesia is about 35 km.

  20. Effect of mixed adhesive joints and tapered plate on stresses in retrofitted beams bonded with a fiber-reinforced polymer plate

    Bouchikhi, A.S.; Megueni, A.; Gouasmi, S.; Boukoulda, F.B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Interface stress distribution in beams reinforced composites jointed by homogeneous adhesive. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by using the tapered plate at edges. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by using the bi-adhesive. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by combining between the tapered plate and the bi-adhesive. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the reduction of interfacial stresses when using bonded laminates in strengthening existing structures. The presence of high interfacial stresses that develop near the end of composite known as edge effect may compromise the résistance to failure of strengthened structure. It is known that the decrease of plate thickness and fitness of adhesive (Young modulus) reduces the stress concentration at plate ends. Another way to tackle the problem is proper design of the plate end shape (tapered plate) and using mixed adhesive joints (MAJs) between the adherents. In this paper, a comprehensive finite element (FE) study has been conducted to investigate the effect of mixed adhesive joints (MAJs) and tapering plate on the interfacial stress distribution in the adhesive layer in retrofitted steel beam with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) plate, This results indicate that using the correct combination of tapering plate at the end and mixed adhesive joints can reduce the magnitude of the interfacial stresses significantly

  1. Tissue engineering of cartilage using a mechanobioreactor exerting simultaneous mechanical shear and compression to simulate the rolling action of articular joints.

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2012-04-01

    The effect of dynamic mechanical shear and compression on the synthesis of human tissue-engineered cartilage was investigated using a mechanobioreactor capable of simulating the rolling action of articular joints in a mixed fluid environment. Human chondrocytes seeded into polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh or PGA-alginate scaffolds were precultured in shaking T-flasks or recirculation perfusion bioreactors for 2.5 or 4 weeks prior to mechanical stimulation in the mechanobioreactor. Constructs were subjected to intermittent unconfined shear and compressive loading at a frequency of 0.05 Hz using a peak-to-peak compressive strain amplitude of 2.2% superimposed on a static axial compressive strain of 6.5%. The mechanical treatment was carried out for up to 2.5 weeks using a loading regime of 10 min duration each day with the direction of the shear forces reversed after 5 min and release of all loading at the end of the daily treatment period. Compared with shaking T-flasks and mechanobioreactor control cultures without loading, mechanical treatment improved the amount and quality of cartilage produced. On a per cell basis, synthesis of both major structural components of cartilage, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II, was enhanced substantially by up to 5.3- and 10-fold, respectively, depending on the scaffold type and seeding cell density. Levels of collagen type II as a percentage of total collagen were also increased after mechanical treatment by up to 3.4-fold in PGA constructs. Mechanical treatment had a less pronounced effect on the composition of constructs precultured in perfusion bioreactors compared with perfusion culture controls. This work demonstrates that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage can be enhanced significantly by application of simultaneous dynamic mechanical shear and compression, with the greatest benefits evident for synthesis of collagen type II. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Advantages of DVW reinforced moment transmitting timber joints with steel flitch plates for colum-beam application

    Leijten, A.J.M.; Brandon, D.; Haddad, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study into the moment-rotation aspects of dvw (densified veneer wood) reinforced timber connections with an inter-connecting flitch plate used as middle member. Previous studies showed that reinforcing dowel-type timber connections with dvw and using expanded tube fasteners

  3. NASA/University JOint VEnture (JOVE) Program: Transverse Shear Moduli Using the Torsional Responses of Rectangular Laminates

    Bogan, Sam

    2001-01-01

    The first year included a study of the non-visible damage of composite overwrapped pressure vessels with B. Poe of the Materials Branch of Nasa-Langley. Early determinations showed a clear reduction in non-visible damage for thin COPVs when partially pressurized rather than unpressurized. Literature searches on Thicker-wall COPVs revealed surface damage but clearly visible. Analysis of current Analytic modeling indicated that that current COPV models lacked sufficient thickness corrections to predict impact damage. After a comprehensive study of available published data and numerous numerical studies based on observed data from Langley, the analytic framework for modeling the behavior was determined lacking and both Poe and Bogan suggested any short term (3yr) result for Jove would be overly ambitious and emphasis should be placed on transverse shear moduli studies. Transverse shear moduli determination is relevant to the study of fatigue, fracture and aging effects in composite structures. Based on the techniques developed by Daniel & Tsai, Bogan and Gates determined to verify the results for K3B and 8320. A detailed analytic and experimental plan was established and carried out that included variations in layup, width, thickness, and length. As well as loading rate variations to determine effects and relaxation moduli. The additional axial loads during the torsion testing were studied as was the placement of gages along the composite specimen. Of the proposed tasks, all of tasks I and 2 were completed with presentations given at Langley, SEM conferences and ASME/AIAA conferences. Sensitivity issues with the technique associated with the use of servohydraulic test systems for applying the torsional load to the composite specimen limited the torsion range for predictable and repeatable transverse shear properties. Bogan and Gates determined to diverge on research efforts with Gates continuing the experimental testing at Langley and Bogan modeling the apparent non

  4. Influence of aluminium sheet surface modification on the self-piercing riveting process and the joint static lap shear strength

    Li, Dezhi

    2017-01-01

    Self-piercing riveting (SPR) has been widely used in automotive as one of the major joining technologies for aluminium structures due to its advantages over some of the more traditional joining technologies. Research has shown that friction is a very important factor that influences both the riveting process and the joint strength for SPR, but these influences have not been fully understood. In this paper, AA5754 sheets with different surface textures, such as original with solid wax, hot wat...

  5. Formation of tough composite joints

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si 3 N 4 -coated fibers had a 0/90 degree architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses

  6. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study.

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins.

  7. A Correlation between the Ultimate Shear Stress and the Thickness Affected by Intermetallic Compounds in Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloy–Stainless Steel Joints

    Florent Picot

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied to join a stainless steel 316L and an aluminum alloy 5083. Ranges of rotation and translation speeds of the tool were used to obtain welding samples with different heat input coefficients. Depending on the process parameters, the heat generated by FSW creates thin layers of Al-rich InterMetallic Compound (IMC mainly composed of FeAl3, identified by energy dispersive spectrometry. Traces of Fe2Al5 were also depicted in some samples by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Monotonous tensile tests performed on the weld joint show the existence of a maximum mechanical resistance for a judicious choice of rotation and translation speeds. It can be linked to an affected zone of average thickness of 15 µm which encompass the presence of IMC and the chaotic mixing caused by plastic deformation in this area. A thickness of less than 15 µm is not sufficient to ensure a good mechanical resistance of the joint. For a thickness higher than 15 µm, IMC layers become more brittle and less adhesive due to high residual stresses which induces numerous cracks after cooling. This leads to a progressive decrease of the ultimate shear stress supported by the bond.

  8. Tomography of core-mantle boundary and lowermost mantle coupled by geodynamics: joint models of shear and compressional velocity

    Gaia Soldati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We conduct joint tomographic inversions of P and S travel time observations to obtain models of delta v_P  and delta v_S in the entire mantle. We adopt a recently published method which takes into account the geodynamic coupling between mantle heterogeneity and core-mantle boundary (CMB topography by viscous flow, where sensitivity of the seismic travel times to the CMB is accounted for implicitly in the inversion (i.e. the CMB topography is not explicitly inverted for. The seismic maps of the Earth's mantle and CMB topography that we derive can explain the inverted seismic data while being physically consistent with each other. The approach involved scaling P-wave velocity (more sensitive to the CMB to density anomalies, in the assumption that mantle heterogeneity has a purely thermal origin, so that velocity and density heterogeneity are proportional to one another. On the other hand, it has sometimes been suggested that S-wave velocity might be more directly sensitive to temperature, while P heterogeneity is more strongly influenced by chemical composition. In the present study, we use only S-, and not P-velocity, to estimate density heterogeneity through linear scaling, and hence the sensitivity of core-reflected P phases to mantle structure. Regardless of whether density is more closely related to P- or S-velocity, we think it is worthwhile to explore both scaling approaches in our efforts to explain seismic data. The similarity of the results presented in this study to those obtained by scaling P-velocity to density suggests that compositional anomaly has a limited impact on viscous flow in the deep mantle.

  9. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed

  10. Shear machines

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  11. Effect of Multiple Reflow Cycles and Al2O3 Nanoparticles Reinforcement on Performance of SAC305 Lead-Free Solder Alloy

    Tikale, Sanjay; Prabhu, K. Narayan

    2018-05-01

    The effect of Al2O3 nanoparticles reinforcement on melting behavior, microstructure evolution at the interface and joint shear strength of 96.5Sn3Ag0.5Cu (SAC305) lead-free solder alloy subjected to multiple reflow cycles was investigated. The reinforced SAC305 solder alloy compositions were prepared by adding Al2O3 nanoparticles in different weight fractions (0.05, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.%) through mechanical dispersion. Cu/solder/Cu micro-lap-shear solder joint specimens were used to assess the shear strength of the solder joint. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the melting behavior of SAC305 solder nanocomposites. The solder joint interfacial microstructure was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the increase in melting temperature (T L) and melting temperature range of the SAC305 solder alloy by addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles were not significant. In comparison with unreinforced SAC305 solder alloy, the reinforcement of 0.05-0.5 wt.% of Al2O3 nanoparticles improved the solder wettability. The addition of nanoparticles in minor quantity effectively suppressed the Cu6Sn5 IMC growth, improved the solder joint shear strength and ductility under multiple reflow cycles. However, the improvement in solder properties was less pronounced on increasing the nanoparticle content above 0.1 wt.% of the solder alloy.

  12. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  13. Contribution to the understanding of the behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls under seismic loading: contribution of experiment and modeling to the design; Contribution a la comprehension du fonctionnement des voiles en beton arme sous sollicitation sismique: apport de l'experimentation et de la modelisation a la conception

    Ile, N

    2000-12-01

    This thesis deals with aspects of seismic behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls (RCSW). Its objective is to introduce a useful modelling approach for addressing the non-linear response of a large variety of RCSW and to identify several aspects in which this numerical approach could be implemented into design applications. Firstly, the characteristics of the behaviour of RCSW under seismic loading, some design principles and different modelling approaches are discussed. As an important lack of knowledge in several fields was identified, it was considered that three types of shear walls deserve more attention: slightly reinforced slender walls; U-shaped walls and heavily reinforced squat shear walls. A local modelling approach is adopted and the material constitutive models are described in details. Secondly, the behaviour of the two mock-up, CAMUS I and II, tested on the shaking-table during the CAMUS programme, which are slightly reinforced and designed according to the French code PS92 is simulated using a 2-D finite element model (FEM). For comparison purposes, the case of the CAMUS III mock-up, designed according to EC8, is considered. We are then dealing with the case of U-shaped walls under dynamic and cyclic loading. The results obtained from numerical simulations, based on a 3-D shell FEM, are compared with those obtained from tests carried out in the frame of the ICONS programme. Finally, the numerical model is applied to the case of heavily reinforced squat shear walls (similar to those used in the nuclear power plant buildings) subjected to shear loading. A 2-D FEM is considered in order to simulate the behaviour of three different walls, which were tested pseudo-dynamically during the SAFE programme. The results from both experimental and numerical studies are compared and discussed. The most important factors affecting the behaviour of RCSW are highlighted. Different examples of possible contributions to design are presented. (author)

  14. Contribution to the understanding of the behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls under seismic loading: contribution of experiment and modeling to the design; Contribution a la comprehension du fonctionnement des voiles en beton arme sous sollicitation sismique: apport de l'experimentation et de la modelisation a la conception

    Ile, N

    2000-12-01

    This thesis deals with aspects of seismic behaviour of reinforced concrete shear walls (RCSW). Its objective is to introduce a useful modelling approach for addressing the non-linear response of a large variety of RCSW and to identify several aspects in which this numerical approach could be implemented into design applications. Firstly, the characteristics of the behaviour of RCSW under seismic loading, some design principles and different modelling approaches are discussed. As an important lack of knowledge in several fields was identified, it was considered that three types of shear walls deserve more attention: slightly reinforced slender walls; U-shaped walls and heavily reinforced squat shear walls. A local modelling approach is adopted and the material constitutive models are described in details. Secondly, the behaviour of the two mock-up, CAMUS I and II, tested on the shaking-table during the CAMUS programme, which are slightly reinforced and designed according to the French code PS92 is simulated using a 2-D finite element model (FEM). For comparison purposes, the case of the CAMUS III mock-up, designed according to EC8, is considered. We are then dealing with the case of U-shaped walls under dynamic and cyclic loading. The results obtained from numerical simulations, based on a 3-D shell FEM, are compared with those obtained from tests carried out in the frame of the ICONS programme. Finally, the numerical model is applied to the case of heavily reinforced squat shear walls (similar to those used in the nuclear power plant buildings) subjected to shear loading. A 2-D FEM is considered in order to simulate the behaviour of three different walls, which were tested pseudo-dynamically during the SAFE programme. The results from both experimental and numerical studies are compared and discussed. The most important factors affecting the behaviour of RCSW are highlighted. Different examples of possible contributions to design are presented. (author)

  15. An experimental investigation of the effect of shear-induced diffuse damage on transverse cracking in carbon-fiber reinforced laminates

    Nouri, Hedi

    2013-12-01

    When subjected to in-plane loading, carbon-fiber laminates experience diffuse damage and transverse cracking, two major mechanisms of degradation. Here, we investigate the effect of pre-existing diffuse damage on the evolution of transverse cracking. We shear-loaded carbon fiber-epoxy pre-preg samples at various load levels to generate controlled configurations of diffuse damage. We then transversely loaded these samples while monitoring the multiplication of cracking by X-ray radiography. We found that diffuse damage has a great effect on the transverse cracking process. We derived a modified effective transverse cracking toughness measure, which enabled a better definition of coupled transverse cracking/diffuse damage in advanced computational models for damage prediction. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Sustainable RC Beam-Column Connections with Headed Bars: A Formula for Shear Strength Evaluation

    Minh-Tung Tran

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints are critical regions for reinforced concrete (RC frames subjected to earthquakes. The steel reinforcement is, in general, highly concentrated in these zones. This is why in many cases, headed bars are used. A headed bar is a longitudinal steel reinforcement whose end has a special button added to reduce the bonding length of the steel rebar. This paper establishes a formula predicting the shear strength of exterior RC beam-column connections where the beam longitudinal reinforcements use headed bars. A database was collected, which contained 30 experimental data about the exterior beam-column joints using headed bars and subjected to quasi-static cyclic loading. First, from the collected database, a statistical study was carried out to identify the most influencing parameters on the shear strength of the beam-column joints tested. The three most important parameters were identified and an empirical modified formula was developed based on the formula existing in the standards. The study showed that the results obtained from the modified formula proposed in the present study were closer to the experimental results than that obtained from the formula existing in the standards. Finally, a numerical study was performed on two T-form RC structures and the numerical results were compared with the prediction calculated from the modified formula proposed. For two investigated cases, the proposed formula provided the results in the safety side and the differences with the numerical results were less than 20%. Thus, the proposed formula can be used for a rapid assessment of the shear strength of RC joints using headed bars.

  17. Study of the early age cracking of concrete massive structures: effect of the temperature decrease rate, steel reinforcement and construction joints

    Briffaut, M.

    2010-01-01

    At early-age, massive concrete structures (ex. nuclear power plant) are submitted to strains due to the hydration reaction. If they are restrained, crossing cracks can occurs. This cracking may increase significantly the concrete wall permeability. The objectives of this work was to characterize the early age concrete behavior (thermal and endogenous shrinkage, basic and thermal transient creep, mechanical characteristic evolution) as well as develop a new device to study the early age cracking of a concrete structure submitted to restrained shrinkage. The experimental campaign achieved with this new device (called thermal active ring test) and the numerical analysis of the test thanks to finite element simulations allows us to evaluate the coupling between creep and damage, to identify the tensile strength decrease due to construction joints and to quantify the effect of reinforcement on the concrete behaviour. Moreover, with this device, permeability measurements have been performed on a cracked specimen. Finally, numerical simulations of massive structures highlight the influence of boundary conditions for restrained shrinkage and the influence of the coupling between creep and damage on the damage pattern. (author)

  18. Stiffness of reinforced concrete walls resisting in-place shear -- Tier 2: Aging and durability of concrete used in nuclear power plants. Final report

    Monteiro, P.J.M.; Moehle, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    Reinforced concrete walls are commonly used in power-plant construction to resist earthquake effects. Determination of wall stiffness is of particular importance for establishing design forces on attached equipment. Available experimental data indicate differences between the measured and calculated stiffness of walls in cases where concrete mechanical properties are well defined. Additional data indicate that in-situ concrete mechanical properties may differ significantly from those specified in design. The work summarized in this report was undertaken to investigate the mechanical properties of concrete considering aging and deterioration. Existing data on mechanical properties of concrete are evaluated, and new tests are carried out on concrete cylinders batched for nuclear power plants and stored under controlled conditions for up to twenty years. It is concluded that concretes batched for nuclear power plants commonly have 28-day strength that exceeds the design value by at least 1000 psi. Under curing conditions representative of those in the interior of thick concrete elements, strength gain with time can be estimated conservatively using the expression proposed by ACI Committee 209, with strengths at 25 years being approximately 1.3 times the 28-day strength. Young's modulus can be estimated using the expression given by ACI Committee 318. Variabilities in mechanical properties are identified. A review of concrete durability identified the main causes and results of concrete deterioration that are relevant for the class of concretes and structures commonly used in nuclear power plants. Prospects for identifying the occurrence and predicting the extent of deterioration are discussed

  19. Effect of shear span-to-depth ratio on the shear behavior of BFRP-RC deep beams

    Alhamad Siyam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the shear behavior of deep concrete beams reinforced with basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP bars for flexure without web reinforcements. The experimental testing performed herein consisted of a total of 4 short beams, three of which were reinforced with BFRP and one beam was reinforced with steel bars. The primary test variable was the shear-span-to-effective-depth ratio (a/d and its influence on the beams’ mid-span deflections, shear capacity, load-deformation relationships and the failure modes.

  20. Research Status on Bonding Behavior of Prefabricated Concrete Shear Wall

    Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Shanshan

    2018-03-01

    Prefabricated shear wall structure adapts to the development and requirements of China’s residential industrialization. The key to the prefabricated concrete shear wall structure is the connection between the prefabricated members, where the reliability of the connection of the concrete joint is related to the overall performance and seismic effect of the structure. In this paper, the microstructures of the joint surface and shear properties are analysed, and the formula for calculating the shear strength of the joint is obtained.

  1. Trunk muscle activation and associated lumbar spine joint shear forces under different levels of external forward force applied to the trunk

    Kingma, I.; Staudenmann, D.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    High anterior intervertebral shear loads could cause low back injuries and therefore the neuromuscular system may actively counteract these forces. This study investigated whether, under constant moment loading relative to L3L4, an increased externally applied forward force on the trunk results in a

  2. Ultra-high performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) for infrastructure rehabilitation : volume 1 : evaluation of ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) in joints of bridge girders.

    2017-03-01

    Joints are often considered as the weak link in a structure and often deterioration of the structure initiates from the : joints. Joints transfer the stresses from super-structure to sub-structure and in this process are subjected to large : transfer...

  3. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of joining electroless nickel plated quartz fibers reinforced silica composite to Invar

    Lei, Zhao; Lixia, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Tian; Peng, He; Jicai, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum brazing of electroless nickel plated quartz fibers reinforced silica composite (QFSC) to Invar alloy using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy at various temperatures (1073-1163 K) and times (5-35 min) has been investigated. The scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction examination of the joints showed that the junction between QFSC and Invar produced reaction products like Cu 3.8 Ni, Cu (s, s), Ni (s, s) and Ag (s, s), with the structure of Invar/Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s)/Ni (s, s) + Cu 3.8 Ni + Ag (s, s) + Cu (s, s)/Cu (s, s) + Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s) + QFSC. The shear strength of joint was effected by the changes of relative amount of Cu-Ni eutectic structure (Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s)) and thickness of nickel plating film at different parameters. The shear strength of joint increased when there were proper amount of Cu-Ni eutectic structure and nickel plating film for reinforcement, and decreased while them were consumed excessively in interaction. The maximum shear strength of joint is 29 MPa, which was brazed at 1103 K for 15 min.

  4. Fatigue life assessment of thin-walled welded joints under non-proportional load-time histories by the shear stress rate integral approach

    A. Bolchoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue life tests under constant and variable amplitude loadings were performed on the tube-tube thin-walled welded specimens made of magnesium (AZ31 and AZ61 alloys. The tests included pure axial, pure torsional and combined in-phase and out-of-phase loadings with the load ratio  RR " ", " " 1  . For the tests with variable amplitude loads a Gaußdistributed loading spectrum with S L 4 5 10  cycles was used. Since magnesium welds show a fatigue life reduction under out-of-phase loads, a stress-based method, which takes this behavior into account, is proposed. The out-of-phase loading results in rotating shear stress vectors in the section planes, which are not orthogonal to the surface. This fact is used in order to provide an out-of-phase measure of the load. This measure is computed as an area covered by the shear stress vectors in all planes over a certain time interval, its computation involves the shear stress and the shear stress rate vectors in the individual planes. Fatigue life evaluation for the variable amplitudes loadings is performed using the Palmgren-Miner linear damage accumulation, whereas the total damage of every cycle is split up into two components: the amplitude component and the out-of-phase component. In order to compute the two components a modification of the rainflow counting method, which keeps track of the time intervals, where the cycles occur, must be used. The proposed method also takes into account different slopes of the pure axial and the pure torsional Wöhler-line by means of a Wöhler-line interpolation for combined loadings

  5. Method for reinforcing threads in multilayer composite tubes and cylindrical structures

    Romanoski, G.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Multilayer techniques such as: tape wrapping, braiding, and filament winding represent versatile and economical routes for fabricating composite tubes and cylindrical structures. However, multilayer architectures lack the radial reinforcement required to retain threads when the desired means of connection or closure is a threaded joint. This issue was addressed in the development of a filament wound, carbon-carbon composite impact shell for the NASA radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The problem of poor thread shear strength was solved by incorporating a number of radial elements of triangular geometry around the circumference of the thread for the full length of thread engagement. The radial elements significantly increased the shear strength of the threaded joint by transmitting the applied force to the balance of composite structure. This approach is also applicable to ceramic composites

  6. Cyclic behavior of non-seismically designed interior reinforced concrete beam-column connections

    Amorn Pimanmas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a test of non-seismically detailed reinforced concrete beam-column connections under reversedcyclic load. The tested specimens represented those of the actual mid-rise reinforced concrete frame buildings, designedaccording to the non-seismic provisions of the ACI building code. The evaluation of 10 existing reinforced concrete frameswas conducted to identify key structural and geometrical indices. It was found that there existed correlation VS structuraland geometrical characteristics and the column tributary area. Hence, the column tributary area was chosen as a parameterfor classifying the specimens. The test results showed that specimens representing small and medium column tributary areafailed by brittle joint shear, while specimen representing large column tributary area failed by ductile flexure, even thoughno ductile seismic details were provided.

  7. Are Available Models Reliable for Predicting the FRP Contribution to the Shear Resistance of RC Beams?

    Sas, G.; Täljsten, Björn; Barros, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the trustworthiness of the existing theory for predicting the fiber-reinforced plastic contribution to the shear resistance of reinforced concrete beams is discussed. The most well-known shear models for external bonded reinforcement are presented, commented on, and compared...

  8. Constraints on the thermal and compositional nature of the Earth's mantle inferred from joint inversion of compressional and shear seismic waves and mineral physics data

    Tesoniero, Andrea

    and by uncertainties in the sensitivity of seismic velocities to these parameters. The combination of seismic observations and information from mineral physics can help overcoming the limited resolution of the seismic data and obtaining an insight into the physical state of the Earth. This Ph.D. project summarizes......- and shear-velocity model has been delivered. The interpretation of the new model gives an insight into lateral compositional variations within the continental lithosphere and upper mantle, as well as a new interpretation of the thermo-chemical state of the lower mantle. Two manuscripts have been prepared...

  9. L4-L5 compression and anterior/posterior joint shear forces in cabin attendants during the initial push/pull actions of airplane meal carts

    Sandfeld, Jesper; Rosgaard, Christian; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the acute low back load of cabin attendants during cart handling and to identify working situations which present the highest strain on the worker. In a setup, 17 cabin attendants (ten females and seven males) pushed, pulled and turned a 20kg standard meal...... was used to calculate the acute L4-L5 load. No working situations created loads greater than the accepted values for single exertions, however compression and anterior/posterior shear forces during pulling and turning were much higher when compared with pushing. There were significant effects of handling...... the cart on different floor types, at the varying inclinations and with different cart weights. Additionally, when external forces were reduced, the cabin attendants did not decrease push/pull force proportionally and thus the L4-L5 load did not decrease as much as expected....

  10. Cálculo de tensiones en uniones soldadas con costuras de filete asimétricas sometidas a flexión. // Bending shear stresses calculation in welded joints with asymmetric welding fillets.

    H. Hernández Herrera

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se presenta el cálculo de las tensiones de cortante en la sección de la garganta para las uniones soldadassometidas a flexión con costuras de filete de sección transversal asimétrica cuando el plano de carga no pasa por el centrode flexión o no coincide con los ejes centroidales principales de inercia. Los resultados obtenidos por las expresiones decálculo propuestas se comparan con los obtenidos por el Método de los Elementos Finitos demostrando de esta manera lavalidez de las mismas.Palabras claves: Flexión, uniones soldadas, soldadura de filete.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.In this paper is presented the bending shear stresses calculation in the throat area for asymmetric welded joints with filletweldings, when the load plane does not go by the flexion center or it do not coincide with the mains inertia centroidal axes.The results obtained by the proposed expressions are compared with those obtained by the Finite Elements Methoddemonstrating by this way the validity of the same ones.Key words: Bending, welded joints, fillet weldings.

  11. Bolt Shear Force Sensor

    2015-03-12

    0030] FIG. 7 is an isometric view of a deformable ring of the bolt shear force sensor of the present invention with an optical Attorney Docket No...102587 9 of 19 fiber having Bragg gratings wound around the ring; [0031] FIG. 8 is an isometric view of the deformable ring with wire strain... strength . [0047] Once the joint is subjected to an external load (see force arrows “F” and “F/2”); any frictional resistance to slip is overcome and

  12. L4-L5 compression and anterior/posterior joint shear forces in cabin attendants during the initial push/pull actions of airplane meal carts.

    Sandfeld, Jesper; Rosgaard, Christian; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the acute low back load of cabin attendants during cart handling and to identify working situations which present the highest strain on the worker. In a setup, 17 cabin attendants (ten females and seven males) pushed, pulled and turned a 20 kg standard meal cart (L: 0.5m × W: 0.3 m × H: 0.92 m) loaded with extra 20 kg and 40 kg, respectively on two different surfaces (carpet and linoleum) and at three floor inclinations (-2°, 0° and +2°). Two force transducers were mounted as handles. Two-dimensional movement analysis was performed and a 4D WATBAK modelling tool was used to calculate the acute L4-L5 load. No working situations created loads greater than the accepted values for single exertions, however compression and anterior/posterior shear forces during pulling and turning were much higher when compared with pushing. There were significant effects of handling the cart on different floor types, at the varying inclinations and with different cart weights. Additionally, when external forces were reduced, the cabin attendants did not decrease push/pull force proportionally and thus the L4-L5 load did not decrease as much as expected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of mid-thickness rebar mesh on the behavior and punching shear strength of interior slab–column connection

    Ahmed Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    The obtained results indicate that, the proposed shear reinforcement system has a positive effect in the enhancement of both the punching shear capacity and the strain energy of interior slab–column connection of both normal and high strength concrete. The general finite element software ANSYS can be used successfully to simulate the punching shear behavior of reinforced concrete flat plates.

  14. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  15. Shear Strength of Concrete I-Beams - Contributions of Flanges

    Teoh, B. K.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of flanges to the shear strength of reinforced concrete beams has up to now either been neglected or evaluated by very simple empirical formulas. However, the contribution may sometimes be large, up to 20-30%. In this paper the flange contribution for shear reinforced I-beams has...... range of geometrical parameters. The comparisons show that the method suggested does indeed lead to very accurate results....

  16. Shear strength of palm oil clinker concrete beams

    Mohammed, Bashar S.; Foo, W.L.; Hossain, K.M.A.; Abdullahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Palm oil clinker can be used as lightweight aggregate for the production of structural concrete. ► The palm oil clinker concrete can be classified as lightweight concrete. ► Full scale reinforced palm oil clinker concrete beams without shear reinforcement were tested. ► The CSA based design equation can be used for the prediction of shear capacity with a limit. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental results on the shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams made of palm oil clinker concrete (POCC). Palm oil clinker (POC) is a by-product of palm oil industry and its utilization in concrete production not only solves the problem of disposing this solid waste but also helps to conserve natural resources. Seven reinforced POCC beams without shear reinforcement were fabricated and their shear behavior was tested. POCC has been classified as a lightweight structural concrete with air dry density less than 1850 kg/m 3 and a 28-day compressive strength more than 20 MPa. The experimental variables which have been considered in this study were the POCC compressive strength, shear span–depth ratio (a/d) and the ratio of tensile reinforcement (ρ). The results show that the failure mode of the reinforced POCC beam is similar to that of conventional reinforced concrete beam. In addition, the shear equation of the Canadian Standard Association (CSA) can be used in designing reinforced POCC beam with ρ ⩾ 1. However, a 0.5 safety factor should be included in the formula for ρ < 1

  17. Modeling of shear wall buildings

    Gupta, A K [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1984-05-01

    Many nuclear power plant buildings, for example, the auxiliary building, have reinforced concrete shear walls as the primary lateral load resisting system. Typically, these walls have low height to length ratio, often less than unity. Such walls exhibit marked shear lag phenomenon which would affect their bending stiffness and the overall stress distribution in the building. The deformation and the stress distribution in walls have been studied which is applicable to both the short and the tall buildings. The behavior of the wall is divided into two parts: the symmetric flange action and the antisymmetry web action. The latter has two parts: the web shear and the web bending. Appropriate stiffness equations have been derived for all the three actions. These actions can be synthesized to solve any nonlinear cross-section. Two specific problems, that of lateral and torsional loadings of a rectangular box, have been studied. It is found that in short buildings shear lag plays a very important role. Any beam type formulation which either ignores shear lag or includes it in an idealized form is likely to lead to erroneous results. On the other hand a rigidity type approach with some modifications to the standard procedures would yield nearly accurate answers.

  18. Creep deformation behavior in eutectic Sn-Ag solder joints using a novel mapping technique

    Lucas, J.P.; Guo, F.; McDougall, J.; Bieler, T.R.; Subramanian, K.N.; Park, J.K.

    1999-11-01

    Creep deformation behavior was measured for 60--100 {micro}m thick solder joints. The solder joints investigated consisted of: (1) non-composite solder joints made with eutectic Sn-Ag solder, and (2) composite solder joints with eutectic Sn-Ag solder containing 20 vol.%, 5 {micro}m diameter in-situ Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic reinforcements. All creep testing in this study was carried out at room temperature. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of creep deformation was characterized on the solder joints. Creep deformation was analyzed using a novel mapping technique where a geometrical-regular line pattern was etched over the entire solder joint using excimer laser ablation. During creep, the laser-ablation (LA) pattern becomes distorted due to deformation in the solder joint. By imaging the distortion of laser-ablation patterns using the SEM, actual deformation mapping for the entire solder joint is revealed. The technique involves sequential optical/digital imaging of the deformation versus time history during creep. By tracing and recording the deformation of the LA patterns on the solder over intervals of time, local creep data are obtained in many locations in the joint. This analysis enables global and localized creep shear strains and strain rate to be determined.

  19. Mechanics of fiber reinforced materials

    Sun, Huiyu

    This dissertation is dedicated to mechanics of fiber reinforced materials and the woven reinforcement and composed of four parts of research: analytical characterization of the interfaces in laminated composites; micromechanics of braided composites; shear deformation, and Poisson's ratios of woven fabric reinforcements. A new approach to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of interfaces between composite laminae based on a modified laminate theory is proposed. By including an interface as a special lamina termed the "bonding-layer" in the analysis, the mechanical properties of the interfaces are obtained. A numerical illustration is given. For micro-mechanical properties of three-dimensionally braided composite materials, a new method via homogenization theory and incompatible multivariable FEM is developed. Results from the hybrid stress element approach compare more favorably with the experimental data than other existing numerical methods widely used. To evaluate the shearing properties for woven fabrics, a new mechanical model is proposed during the initial slip region. Analytical results show that this model provides better agreement with the experiments for both the initial shear modulus and the slipping angle than the existing models. Finally, another mechanical model for a woven fabric made of extensible yarns is employed to calculate the fabric Poisson's ratios. Theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data. A thorough examination on the influences of various mechanical properties of yarns and structural parameters of fabrics on the Poisson's ratios of a woven fabric is given at the end.

  20. Transversely Compressed- and Restrained Shear Joints

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    2013-01-01

    Anchorage of FRP strengthening systems where the deformation perpendicular to the FRP material is restrained or a compressive force is applied on the strengthening, seems to provide ductility, increased utilization of the FRP and failure modes which can be controlled through the anchorage method....

  1. Stress analysis of shear/compression test

    Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.; Ueno, S.

    1997-01-01

    Stress analysis has been made on the glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) subjected to the combined shear and compression stresses by means of finite element method. The two types of experimental set up were analyzed, that is parallel and series method where the specimen were compressed by tilted jigs which enable to apply the combined stresses, to the specimen. Modified Tsai-Hill criterion was employed to judge the failure under the combined stresses that is the shear strength under the compressive stress. The different failure envelopes were obtained between the two set ups. In the parallel system the shear strength once increased with compressive stress then decreased. On the contrary in the series system the shear strength decreased monotonicly with compressive stress. The difference is caused by the different stress distribution due to the different constraint conditions. The basic parameters which control the failure under the combined stresses will be discussed

  2. Experimental investigation on full scale RC beam-column joint of NPP structures

    Thandavamoorthy, T.S.; Lakshmanan, N.; Reddy, G.R.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures in India are constructed using reinforced concrete. The beam-column joint in these structures are critical sub-assemblages because they ensure continuity of a structure and transfer forces from one element to another. Under seismic excitation, the beam-column joint region is subjected to horizontal and vertical shear forces whose magnitudes are typically many times higher than those within the adjacent beams and columns. In view of the increased incidence of seismicity in the country, the safety of these structures against earthquake loading assumes greater significance. There is a growing need to look into the seismic safety aspect of existing RC frame type structures in NPPs, which have been designed as per codes prevalent at the time of their construction. Seismic performance of such joints has not been studied extensively in India. Therefore experimental testing of full scale joint identical to those available in the existing NPP structures, was carried out to study its behaviour and evaluate its capacity. The size of the beam of the joint was 2000 mm x 610 mm x 915 mm and column 2915 mm x 610 mm x 915 mm. The percentage reinforcement of the beam was 4.95 and column 1.5. Such full scale and heavily reinforced concrete joint was cast successfully in the laboratory and tested under monotonic loading. The paper presents a complete description of the experimental testing, observations made during testing as for cracking, deflection and rotation of joint, discussion of results obtained, etc. Conclusions drawn from the investigation are also presented. (author)

  3. Experimental study of a shear wall with numerous small openings

    Sotomura, K.; Murazumi, Y.; Yoshizaki, S.; Ezaki, T.

    1981-01-01

    Many small openings for piping and ducts are usually required in the shear walls for PWR nuclear power plant. It is generally believed that such openings oadversely affect the strength and stiffness of shear walls. However, little information is available concerning the behavior of walls with numerous small openings. Therefore, tests using wall specimens and an analysis using an FEM program were carried out to investigate this behavior. Main findings are as follows: 1) The ultimate strength of a shear wall with numerous small openings may be obtained by using the effective area at the critical cross section of the shear wall. 2) Shear walls with openings can be restored to the same shear strength and stiffness as shear walls without openings by diagonal reinforcement. (orig./HP)

  4. Strength and Failure Mechanism of Composite-Steel Adhesive Bond Single Lap Joints

    Kai Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics- (CFRP- steel single lap joints with regard to tensile loading with two levels of adhesives and four levels of overlap lengths were experimentally analyzed and numerically simulated. Both joint strength and failure mechanism were found to be highly dependent on adhesive type and overlap length. Joints with 7779 structural adhesive were more ductile and produced about 2-3 kN higher failure load than MA830 structural adhesive. Failure load with the two adhesives increased about 147 N and 176 N, respectively, with increasing 1 mm of the overlap length. Cohesion failure was observed in both types of adhesive joints. As the overlap length increased, interface failure appeared solely on the edge of the overlap in 7779 adhesive joints. Finite element analysis (FEA results revealed that peel and shear stress distributions were nonuniform, which were less severe as overlap length increased. Severe stress concentration was observed on the overlap edge, and shear failure of the adhesive was the main reason for the adhesive failure.

  5. Test and Analysis of a New Ductile Shear Connection Design for RC Shear Walls

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    -bar loops. Contrary to the classical shear connections, the planes of the U-bar loops are here parallel to the plane of the wall elements. This feature enables a construction-friendly installation of the elements without the risk of rebars clashing. The core of mortar inside each U-bar loop is reinforced...

  6. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear numerical methods to calculate structures of reinforced concrete or of prestressed concrete are mostly based on two idealizing assumptions: tension stiffness perpendicular to cracks is equal to the stiffness of reinforcement alone and shear modulus is taken as constant. In real reinforced concrete structures concrete contributes to the tension-stiffness perpendicular to cracks and thus to the global stiffness matrix because of bond action between concrete and reinforcement and shear transfer in cracks is depending on stresses acting in cracks. Only few authors are taking these aspects into account and only with rough semiempirical assumptions. In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include these effects, hitherto neglected, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u - uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r - reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c - crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). (Auth.)

  7. Non-linear analysis of the behaviour of a thin and squat reinforced concrete wall on a seismic table

    Mazars, J.; Ghavamian, S.; Ile, N.; Reynouard, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This work concerns the modeling and analysis of the seismic behaviour of a thin reinforced concrete wall using an experiment performed by the NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation) Japanese organisation with the Tadotsu seismic table. The wall with a height/width ratio close to 1, has its extremities stiffened and its base embedded. The wall, loaded on its top with a 122 t weight, is submitted to several seismic levels up to its collapse. A non-linear seismic analysis and different 2-D and 3-D finite elements modeling were used to simulate the behaviour of the structure submitted to a strong dynamic shear. The results presented in this paper belong to the ''Seismic Shear Wall Standard Problem'' benchmark jointly organized the NUPEC and OECD organizations. (J.S.)

  8. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits

  9. Influence of reinforcement's corrosion into hyperstatic reinforced concrete beams: a probabilistic failure scenarios analysis

    G. P. PELLIZZER

    Full Text Available AbstractThis work aims to study the mechanical effects of reinforcement's corrosion in hyperstatic reinforced concrete beams. The focus is the probabilistic determination of individual failure scenarios change as well as global failure change along time. The limit state functions assumed describe analytically bending and shear resistance of reinforced concrete rectangular cross sections as a function of steel and concrete resistance and section dimensions. It was incorporated empirical laws that penalize the steel yield stress and the reinforcement's area along time in addition to Fick's law, which models the chloride penetration into concrete pores. The reliability theory was applied based on Monte Carlo simulation method, which assesses each individual probability of failure. The probability of global structural failure was determined based in the concept of failure tree. The results of a hyperstatic reinforced concrete beam showed that reinforcements corrosion make change into the failure scenarios modes. Therefore, unimportant failure modes in design phase become important after corrosion start.

  10. Influence of facing vertical stiffness on reinforced soil wall design

    Puig Damians, Ivan; Bathurst, Richard; Josa Garcia-Tornel, Alejandro; Lloret Morancho, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Current design practices for reinforced soil walls typically ignore the influence of facing type and foundation compressibility on the magnitude and distribution of reinforcement loads in steel reinforced soil walls under operational conditions. In this paper, the effect of the facing vertical stiffness (due to elastomeric bearing pads placed in the horizontal joints between panels) on load capacity of steel reinforced soil walls is examined in a systematic manner using a numerical modelli...

  11. Meniscal shear stress for punching.

    Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Meulman, Hubert N; Herder, Just L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-01-01

    Experimental determination of the shear stress for punching meniscal tissue. Meniscectomy (surgical treatment of a lesion of one of the menisci) is the most frequently performed arthroscopic procedure. The performance of a meniscectomy is not optimal with the currently available instruments. To design new instruments, the punching force of meniscal tissue is an important parameter. Quantitative data are unavailable. The meniscal punching process was simulated by pushing a rod through meniscal tissue at constant speed. Three punching rods were tested: a solid rod of Oslash; 3.00 mm, and two hollow tubes (Oslash; 3.00-2.60 mm) with sharpened cutting edges of 0.15 mm and 0.125 mm thick, respectively. Nineteen menisci acquired from 10 human cadaveric knee joints were punched (30 tests). The force and displacement were recorded from which the maximum shear stress was determined (average added with three times the standard deviation). The maximum shear stress for the solid rod was determined at 10.2 N/mm2. This rod required a significantly lower punch force in comparison with the hollow tube having a 0.15 mm cutting edge (plt;0.01). The maximum shear stress for punching can be applied to design instruments, and virtual reality training environments. This type of experiment is suitable to form a database with material properties of human tissue similar to databases for the manufacturing industry.

  12. Experimental Verification of Current Shear Design Equations for HSRC Beams

    Attaullah Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on the shear capacity of HSRC (High Strength Reinforced Concrete beams is relatively very limited as compared to the NSRC (Normal Strength Reinforced Concrete beams. Most of the Building Codes determine the shear strength of HSRC with the help of empirical equations based on experimental work of NSRC beams and hence these equations are generally regarded as un-conservative for HSRC beams particularly at low level of longitudinal reinforcement. In this paper, 42 beams have been tested in two sets, such that in 21 beams no transverse reinforcement has been used, whereas in the remaining 21 beams, minimum transverse reinforcement has been used as per ACI-318 (American Concrete Institute provisions. Two values of compressive strength 52 and 61 MPa, three values of longitudinal steel ratio and seven values of shear span to depth ratio have been have been used. The beams were tested under concentrated load at the mid span. The results are compared with the equations proposed by different international building codes like ACI, AASHTO LRFD, EC (Euro Code, Canadian Code and Japanese Code for shear strength of HSRC beams.From comparison, it has been observed that some codes are less conservative for shear design of HSRC beams and further research is required to rationalize these equations.

  13. Repair of reinforced concrete beams using carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Karzad Abdul Saboor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is part of an ongoing research on the behaviour of Reinforced Concrete (RC beams retrofitted with Externally Bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (EB-CFRP. A total of 5 large-scale rectangular beams, previously damaged due to shear loading, were repaired and strengthened with EB-CFRP and tested in this study. The major cracks of the damaged beams were injected with epoxy and the beams were wrapped with 2 layers of EB-CFRP discrete strips with 100mm width and 150mm center to center spacing. The beams were instrumented and tested to failure under three points loading in simply supported configuration. The measured test parameters were the beams deflection, maximum load, and the strain in the FRP strips. The failure mode was also observed. The results showed that applying EB-FRP strips increased the shear strength significantly relative to the original shear capacity of the beam. The results demonstrate that the application of EB-FRP strips used in this study is an effective repair method that can be used to repair and strengthen damaged beams.

  14. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  15. Exterior beam-column joint study with non-conventional ...

    Reinforced concrete structures beam-column joints are the most critical regions in seismic prone areas. Proper reinforcement anchorage is essential to enhance the performance of the joints. An attempt has been made to appraise the performance of the anchorages and joints. The anchorages are detailed as per ACI-352 ...

  16. Experimental study on joint construction method for aseismatic walls of reactor buildings, (1)

    Sugita, Kazunao; Mogami, Tatsuo; Ezaki, Tetsuro

    1987-01-01

    On the aseismatic walls of a reactor auxiliary building, many temporary openings are provided at the time of the construction for carrying equipment in later, due to the demand of shortening the construction period. Thus on the aseismatic walls, in most cases there are the joints due to the concrete placed later. As equipment tends to be unitized and become large, the quipment is placed close to the wall having an opening, consequently, the workability is poor, and the standardization of construction method is urgently demanded. The conventional method of closing temporary openings has the problems of safety and connecting reinforcing bars, therefore, the new construction method was proposed. In reactor buildings, the joints of walls are unavoidable, and since those are large scale structures, the joints are numerous. Therefore, at the joint parts, it abandoned and buried frames are used, it is advantageous in the time and cost of joint construction. In both cases, the mechanical properties were confirmed by the fundamental performance test partially modeling the joints and the verifying test modeling the whole walls. In this paper, the test of applying only shearing force to joint models is reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing rein...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  18. Bonded Joints with “Nano-Stitches”: Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Load Capacity and Failure Modes

    Henrique N. P. Oliva

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes were employed as adhesive reinforcement/nano-stitches to aluminum bonded joints. The CNT addition to an epoxy adhesive not only lead to an increase on load capacity but it is also the most probable cause of the mixed failure mode (adhesive/cohesive. The damage evolution was described as the stiffness decrease and the failure mixed modes were related to the load capacity. Although the presence of CNT cluster were observed, in small concentrations (< 1.0 wt. %, these clusters acted as crack stoppers and lead to an increase on lap joint shear strength. The addition of 2.0 wt. % carbon nanotubes lead to an increase on load capacity of approximately 116.2 % when the results were compared against the single lap joints without carbon nanotubes.

  19. Semiconductor laser shearing interferometer

    Ming Hai; Li Ming; Chen Nong; Xie Jiaping

    1988-03-01

    The application of semiconductor laser on grating shearing interferometry is studied experimentally in the present paper. The method measuring the coherence of semiconductor laser beam by ion etching double frequency grating is proposed. The experimental result of lens aberration with semiconductor laser shearing interferometer is given. Talbot shearing interferometry of semiconductor laser is also described. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs

  20. Interfacial shear behavior of composite flanged concrete beams

    Moataz Awry Mahmoud

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Composite concrete decks are commonly used in the construction of highway bridges due to their rapid constructability. The interfacial shear transfer between the top slab and the supporting beams is of great significance to the overall deck load carrying capacity and performance. Interfacial shear capacity is directly influenced by the distribution and the percentage of shear connectors. Research and design guidelines suggest the use of two different approaches to quantify the required interfacial shear strength, namely based on the maximum compressive forces in the flange at mid span or the maximum shear flow at the supports. This paper investigates the performance of flanged reinforced concrete composite beams with different shear connector’s distribution and reinforcing ratios. The study incorporated both experimental and analytical programs for beams. Key experimental findings suggest that concentrating the connectors at the vicinity of the supports enhances the ductility of the beam. The paper proposes a simple and straight forward approach to estimate the interfacial shear capacity that was proven to give good correlation with the experimental results and selected code provisions. The paper presents a method to predict the horizontal shear force between precast beams and cast in-situ slabs.

  1. Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities

    Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

  2. Influence of Tool Shape on Hole Clinching for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic and SPRC440

    Seung-Hun Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP is a lightweight material that can potentially replace structural steel components in automobiles. The hole-clinching process is a mechanical clinching technique for joining brittle or low-ductility materials, such as CFRP, with ductile materials. In this study, the influence of tool shape on the hole-clinching process for CFRP and SPRC440 was investigated using FE-analysis and experiments. The parameters of the tool shape investigated were the punch corner radius and the punch diameter. The geometrical interlocking shapes of hole-clinched joints were characterized by neck thickness and undercut. Based on the desired joint strength of 2.5 kN, hole-clinching tools were designed on the basis of the relationship between joint strength and geometrical interlocking. FE-analysis and hole-clinching experiments were performed with the designed hole-clinching tools to investigate the geometrical interlocking shape as well as joinability, including neck fracture, undercut, and hole expansion, resulting from changes in tool parameters. Joint strength was evaluated to verify the effectiveness of hole clinching by a single lap shear test.

  3. Strengthening of non-seismically detailed reinforced concrete beam ...

    work and in order to carry the anchorages sufficiently away from the column face ..... Owing to the strengthening application, joint shear stress–strain behaviour was ..... structures (ACI 352R-02), MI: American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills.

  4. artificial neural network model for low strength rc beam shear capacity

    User

    RESEARCH PAPER. Keywords: Shear strength, reinforced concrete, Artificial Neural Network, design equations ... searchers using artificial intelligence to im- prove on theoretical ...... benefit to humanity or a waste of time?” The. Structural ...

  5. Push-out tests and evaluation of FRP perfobond rib shear connectors performance

    Kolpasky, Ludvik; Ryjacek, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    The behavioural characteristics of FRP (fibre-reinforced polymer) perfobond rib shear connector was examined through push-out tests in order to verify the applicability for pedestrian bridge structure. The aim of this study is to determine interaction between high performance concrete slab and handmade FRP plate which represent web of the composite beam. Combination of these modern materials leads to structural system with both great load bearing capacity and also sufficient flexural stiffness of the composite element. Openings cut into the GFRP plate at a variable spacing allow GFRP reinforcement bars to be inserted to act as shear studs. Hand lay-up process can increase suitable properties of FRP for connection by perfobond rib shear connectors. In this study, three push-out tests on fiber-reinforced polymer were performed to investigate their shear behaviour. The results of the push-out tests on FRP perfobond rib shear connector indicates great promise for application in full scale structures.

  6. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    David R Lloyd; David R Lloyd; Douglas J Medina; Larry W Hawk; Whitney D Fosco; Jerry B Richards

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We ar...

  7. Flexural reinforced concrete member with FRP reinforcement

    Putzolu, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    One of the most problematic point in construction is the durability of the concrete especially related to corrosion of the steel reinforcement. Due to this problem the construction sector, introduced the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer, the main fibers used in construction are Glass, Carbon and Aramid. In this study, the author aim to analyse the flexural behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP. This aim is achieved by the analysis of specimens reinforced with GFRP bars, with theoreti...

  8. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  9. Investigation of the fittest shear transfer model used to FEM analysis of RC structures

    Endo, Tatumi; Aoyagi, Masao; Endo, Takao

    1988-01-01

    In order to rationalize the design method of reinforced concrete (RC) structures in the nuclear power plant, the structural analysis, which is able to simulate the seismic behavior of RC structures, should be established. In this report, the investigation of shear transfer model at shear plane to be applied to FEM analysis is performed. Main conclusions obtained within the limit of the study are as follows. 1. Development of the shear transfer model at shear plane. 1) Two shear transfer models are developed to be used to the 2-dimensional nonlinear FEM analysis. 2) In one model suggested, reinforcements are modeled by plate elements and the nonlinearity of concrete surrounding reinforcement but the properties of bond-slip relation between concrete and reinforcements is also considered. 3) In another model, reinforcements are modeled by equivalent concrete properties, in which axial regidity and dowel effects of reinforcements are considered. 2. Verification of the suggested model. 1) It is confirmed that the computational results using the above-mentioned model could simulate the experimental ones fairly well. 2) Considering the application to the analysis of RC structures in the design, the model, in which reinforcement are modeled by equivalent concrete properties, is useful in view point of accuracy and simplicity. (author)

  10. Critical Points of Prefabricated Reinforced Concrete Wall Systems of Multi-storey Buildings

    J. Witzany; T. Čejka; R. Zigler

    2011-01-01

    With respect to the dissipation of energy through plastic deformation of joints of prefabricated wall units, the paper points out the principal importance of efficient reinforcement of the prefabricated system at its joints. The method, quality and amount of reinforcement are essential for reaching the necessary degree of joint ductility. The paper presents partial results of experimental research of vertical joints of prefabricated units exposed to monotonously rising lo...

  11. Strain gradient drives shear banding in metallic glasses

    Tian, Zhi-Li; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Chen, Yan; Dai, Lan-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Shear banding is a nucleation-controlled process in metallic glasses (MGs) involving multiple temporal-spatial scales, which hinders a concrete understanding of its structural origin down to the atomic scale. Here, inspired by the morphology of composite materials, we propose a different perspective of MGs as a hard particle-reinforced material based on atomic-scale structural heterogeneity. The local stable structures indicated by a high level of local fivefold symmetry (L5FS) act as hard "particles" which are embedded in the relatively soft matrix. We demonstrate this concept by performing atomistic simulations of shear banding in CuZr MG. A shear band is prone to form in a sample with a high degree of L5FS which is slowly quenched from the liquid. An atomic-scale analysis on strain and the structural evolution reveals that it is the strain gradient effect that has originated from structural heterogeneity that facilitates shear transformation zones (STZs) to mature shear bands. An artificial composite model with a high degree of strain gradient, generated by inserting hard MG strips into a soft MG matrix, demonstrates a great propensity for shear banding. It therefore confirms the critical role strain gradient plays in shear banding. The strain gradient effect on shear banding is further quantified with a continuum model and a mechanical instability analysis. These physical insights might highlight the strain gradient as the hidden driving force in transforming STZs into shear bands in MGs.

  12. Characteristics and applications of high-performance fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    Park, Philip

    Steel fiber reinforced asphalt concrete (SFRAC) is suggested in this research as a multifunctional high performance material that can potentially lead to a breakthrough in developing a sustainable transportation system. The innovative use of steel fibers in asphalt concrete is expected to improve mechanical performance and electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete that is used for paving 94% of U. S. roadways. In an effort to understand the fiber reinforcing mechanisms in SFRAC, the interaction between a single straight steel fiber and the surrounding asphalt matrix is investigated through single fiber pull-out tests and detailed numerical simulations. It is shown that pull-out failure modes can be classified into three types: matrix, interface, and mixed failure modes and that there is a critical shear stress, independent of temperature and loading rate, beyond which interfacial debonding will occur. The reinforcing effects of SFRAC with various fiber sizes and shapes are investigated through indirect tension tests at low temperature. Compared to unreinforced specimens, fiber reinforced specimens exhibit up to 62.5% increase in indirect tensile strength and 895% improvements in toughness. The documented improvements are the highest attributed to fiber reinforcement in asphalt concrete to date. The use of steel fibers and other conductive additives provides an opportunity to make asphalt pavement electrically conductive, which opens up the possibility for multifunctional applications. Various asphalt mixtures and mastics are tested and the results indicate that the electrical resistivity of asphaltic materials can be manipulated over a wide range by replacing a part of traditional fillers with a specific type of graphite powder. Another important achievement of this study is development and validation of a three dimensional nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model that is capable of simulating both linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of asphaltic materials. The

  13. Time-dependent behavior of rough discontinuities under shearing conditions

    Wang, Zhen; Shen, Mingrong; Ding, Wenqi; Jang, Boan; Zhang, Qingzhao

    2018-02-01

    The mechanical properties of rocks are generally controlled by their discontinuities. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of rough artificial joints under shearing conditions was investigated. Based on Barton’s standard profile lines, samples with artificial joint surfaces were prepared and used to conduct the shear and creep tests. The test results showed that the shear strength of discontinuity was linearly related to roughness, and subsequently an empirical equation was established. The long-term strength of discontinuity can be identified using the inflection point of the isocreep-rate curve, and it was linearly related to roughness. Furthermore, the ratio of long-term and instantaneous strength decreased with the increase of roughness. The shear-stiffness coefficient increased with the increase of shear rate, and the influence of shear rate on the shear stiffness coefficient decreased with the decrease of roughness. Further study of the mechanism revealed that these results could be attributed to the different time-dependent behavior of intact and joint rocks.

  14. Investigation of Shear Stud Performance in Flat Plate Using Finite Element Analysis

    T.S. Viswanathan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of shear stud arrangement, respectively featuring an orthogonal, a radial and a critical perimeter pattern, were evaluated numerically. A numerical investigation was conducted using the finite element software ABAQUS to evaluate their ability to resist punching shear in a flat plate. The finite element analysis here is an application of the nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures using three-dimensional solid finite elements. The nonlinear characteristics of concrete were achieved by employing the concrete damaged plasticity model in the finite element program. Transverse shear stress was evaluated using finite element analysis in terms of shear stress distribution for flat plate with and without shear stud reinforcement. The model predicted that shear studs placed along the critical perimeter are more effective compared to orthogonal and radial patterns.

  15. Study of a railway embankment reinforced with jute tassels

    Embankment; models (physical); soil reinforcement; jute tassel; slope ... Because of high tensile strength of vetiver grass roots, they act like soil .... All the joints are glued as well as reinforced with steel angles and .... slipping, it is nailed to the top of the embankment by several 25.4 mm iron ... The cables can yield in ten-.

  16. Influence of steady shear flow on dynamic viscoelastic properties of ...

    Unknown

    temporary network formed by the fibres, their entangle- ment etc. The structural density is also a function of vol- ume fraction of reinforcing fibres (Amari et al 1992). The complex flow pattern encountered during moulding/ stamping are generally far from simple steady or oscilla- tory shear flow. Therefore, it is important to ...

  17. Reinforced sulphur concrete

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced sulphur concrete wherein one or more metal reinforcing members are in contact with sulphur concrete is disclosed. The reinforced sulphur concrete comprises an adhesion promoter that enhances the interaction between the sulphur and the one or more metal reinforcing members.

  18. Design and experimental analysis of a new shear connector for steel and concrete composite structures

    Veríssimo, G. S.; Paes, J. L. R.; Valente, Isabel; Cruz, Paulo J. S.; Fakury, R. H.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the design of a new shear connector and the corresponding results obtained on push-out tests. This new shear connector consists on a steel rib with indented cut shape that provides resistance to longitudinal shear and prevents transversal separation between the concrete slab and the steel profile (uplift). Adding to this, the connector openings cut makes easier the arrangement of transversal reinforcement bars. The installation of the connectors is simple and requires only ...

  19. Continuum description for jointed media

    Thomas, R.K.

    1982-04-01

    A general three-dimensional continuum description is presented for a material containing regularly spaced and approximately parallel jointing planes within a representative elementary volume. Constitutive relationships are introduced for linear behavior of the base material and nonlinear normal and shear behavior across jointing planes. Furthermore, a fracture permeability tensor is calculated so that deformation induced alterations to the in-situ values can be measured. Examples for several strain-controlled loading paths are presented

  20. Soil reinforcement with recycled carpet wastes.

    Ghiassian, Hossein; Poorebrahim, Gholamreza; Gray, Donald H

    2004-04-01

    A root or fibre-reinforced soil behaves as a composite material in which fibres of relatively high tensile strength are embedded in a matrix of relatively plastic soil. Shear stresses in the soil mobilize tensile resistance in the fibres, which in turn impart greater strength to the soil. A research project has been undertaken to study the influence of synthetic fibrous materials for improving the strength characteristics of a fine sandy soil. One of the main objectives of the project is to explore the conversion of fibrous carpet waste into a value-added product for soil reinforcement. Drained triaxial tests were conducted on specimens, which were prepared in a cylindrical mould and compacted at their optimum water contents. The main test variables included the aspect ratio and the weight percentage of the fibrous strips. The results clearly show that fibrous inclusions derived from carpet wastes improve the shear strength of silty sands. A model developed to simulate the effect of the fibrous inclusions accurately predicts the influence of strip content, aspect ratio and confining pressure on the shear strength of reinforced sand.

  1. Effect of particle size on the friction welding of Al2O3 reinforced 6160 Al alloy composite and SAE 1020 steel

    Hascalik, Ahmet; Orhan, Nuri

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of joining Al 2 O 3 reinforced Al alloy composite to SAE 1020 steel by rotational friction welding. The aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) material containing 5, 10 and 15 vol% Al 2 O 3 particles with average particle sizes of 30 and 60 μm was produced by powder metallurgy technique. The integrity of the joints has been investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, while the mechanical properties assessment included microhardness and shear tests. Results indicated that Al/Al 2 O 3 composite could be joined to SAE 1020 steel by friction welding. However, it was pointed out that the quality of the joint was effected negatively with the increase in particle size and volume percentage of the oxide particles in the MMC

  2. Application of a Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete Jacket in Damaged Reinforced Concrete Beams under Monotonic and Repeated Loading

    Constantin E. Chalioris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental study on the application of a reinforced self-compacting concrete jacketing technique in damaged reinforced concrete beams. Test results of 12 specimens subjected to monotonic loading up to failure or under repeated loading steps prior to total failure are included. First, 6 beams were designed to be shear dominated, constructed by commonly used concrete, were initially tested, damaged, and failed in a brittle manner. Afterwards, the shear-damaged beams were retrofitted using a self-compacting concrete U-formed jacket that consisted of small diameter steel bars and U-formed stirrups in order to increase their shear resistance and potentially to alter their initially observed shear response to a more ductile one. The jacketed beams were retested under the same loading. Test results indicated that the application of reinforced self-compacting concrete jacketing in damaged reinforced concrete beams is a promising rehabilitation technique. All the jacketed beams showed enhanced overall structural response and 35% to 50% increased load bearing capacities. The ultimate shear load of the jacketed beams varied from 39.7 to 42.0 kN, whereas the capacity of the original beams was approximately 30% lower. Further, all the retrofitted specimens exhibited typical flexural response with high values of deflection ductility.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the FRP Shear Mechanism for Concrete Sandwich Panels

    Hodicky, Kamil; Sopal, G.; Rizkalla, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the composite action of 46 segments representing precast concrete sandwich panels (PCSPs) using a fiber-reinforced polymer [FRP; specifically, a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)] grid/rigid foam as a shear mechanism. The experimental aspect of the research reported...... reported in this paper indicated that increasing the spacing between vertical lines of CFRP grid increase the overall shear flow strengths due to the increase of the bonded contact area of the rigid foam to the concrete surface. However, the overall shear stresses were decreased due to the increase...

  4. Effect of epoxy resin and hardener containing microcapsules on healing efficiency of epoxy adhesive based metal joints

    Khan, Nazrul Islam; Halder, Sudipta; Goyat, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Dual component microcapsules of epoxy resin and polyamine hardener with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) shell were synthesized using a water-oil-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The high concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to reduce the thickness of shell wall of dual component microcapsules. The dual microcapsules of 1:1 weight ratio were introduced in the epoxy adhesive to study the healing effect. The morphology, chemical structure and thermal characteristics of the microcapsules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The insertion of dual component microcapsules in epoxy matrix reduced the lap shear strength of adhesive joints, which may be attributed to the generation of stress concentration cites because of micron sized capsules. However, the extension and absorbed failure energy of adhesive joints under uniaxial loading increased with the increase of concentration of dual microcapsules. The viscoelastic nature of the dual microcapsules may be responsible for this enhancement. Significant enhancement in the healing efficiency (90.93%) of the joints was achieved for 10 wt% of dual microcapsules. The crack pinning and crack blunting mechanisms at the vicinity of the crack path adjacent to the microcapsules were found responsible for significant enhancement in the healing efficiency of the adhesive joints. - Highlights: • High SDS concentration was used to control the dual component microcapsules shell wall thickness. • Self-healing performance of dual component microcapsules reinforced epoxy adhesive based single lap joints was studied. • 90.93% of the damage healing was achieved for self-healing adhesive based single lap joints. • Increase in concentration of microcapsules reduces the lap shear properties of the self-healing joints.

  5. Effect of epoxy resin and hardener containing microcapsules on healing efficiency of epoxy adhesive based metal joints

    Khan, Nazrul Islam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Silchar, Silchar 788010, Assam (India); Halder, Sudipta, E-mail: shalder@nits.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Silchar, Silchar 788010, Assam (India); Goyat, M.S. [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum & Energy Studies, Dehradun, Uttarakhand 248007 (India)

    2016-03-01

    Dual component microcapsules of epoxy resin and polyamine hardener with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) shell were synthesized using a water-oil-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The high concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to reduce the thickness of shell wall of dual component microcapsules. The dual microcapsules of 1:1 weight ratio were introduced in the epoxy adhesive to study the healing effect. The morphology, chemical structure and thermal characteristics of the microcapsules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The insertion of dual component microcapsules in epoxy matrix reduced the lap shear strength of adhesive joints, which may be attributed to the generation of stress concentration cites because of micron sized capsules. However, the extension and absorbed failure energy of adhesive joints under uniaxial loading increased with the increase of concentration of dual microcapsules. The viscoelastic nature of the dual microcapsules may be responsible for this enhancement. Significant enhancement in the healing efficiency (90.93%) of the joints was achieved for 10 wt% of dual microcapsules. The crack pinning and crack blunting mechanisms at the vicinity of the crack path adjacent to the microcapsules were found responsible for significant enhancement in the healing efficiency of the adhesive joints. - Highlights: • High SDS concentration was used to control the dual component microcapsules shell wall thickness. • Self-healing performance of dual component microcapsules reinforced epoxy adhesive based single lap joints was studied. • 90.93% of the damage healing was achieved for self-healing adhesive based single lap joints. • Increase in concentration of microcapsules reduces the lap shear properties of the self-healing joints.

  6. Long ligands reinforce biological adhesion under shear flow

    Belyaev, Aleksey V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, computer modeling has been used to show that longer ligands allow biological cells (e.g., blood platelets) to withstand stronger flows after their adhesion to solid walls. A mechanistic model of polymer-mediated ligand-receptor adhesion between a microparticle (cell) and a flat wall has been developed. The theoretical threshold between adherent and non-adherent regimes has been derived analytically and confirmed by simulations. These results lead to a deeper understanding of numerous biophysical processes, e.g., arterial thrombosis, and to the design of new biomimetic colloid-polymer systems.

  7. Shear behavior of concrete beams externally prestressed with Parafil ropes

    A.H. Ghallab

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although extensive work has been carried out investigating the use of external prestressing system for flexural strengthening, a few studies regarding the shear behavior of externally prestressed beams can be found. Five beams, four of them were externally strengthened using Parafil rope, were loaded up to failure to investigate the effect of shear span/depth ratio, external prestressing force and concrete strength on their shear behavior. Test results showed that the shear span to depth ratio has a significant effect on both the shear strength and failure mode of the strengthened beams and the presence of external prestressing force increased the ultimate load of the tested beams by about 75%. Equations proposed by different codes for both the conventional reinforced concrete beams and for ordinary prestressed beams were used to evaluate the obtained experimental results. In general, codes equations showed a high level of conservatism in predicting the shear strength of the beams. Also, using the full strength rather than half of the concrete shear strength in the Egyptian code PC-method improves the accuracy of the calculated ultimate shear strength.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Increasing Column Section and CFRP Reinforcement Method under Different Axial Compression Ratio

    Jinghai, Zhou; Tianbei, Kang; Fengchi, Wang; Xindong, Wang

    2017-11-01

    Eight less stirrups in the core area frame joints are simulated by ABAQUS finite element numerical software. The composite reinforcement method is strengthened with carbon fiber and increasing column section, the axial compression ratio of reinforced specimens is 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 respectively. The results of the load-displacement curve, ductility and stiffness are analyzed, and it is found that the different axial compression ratio has great influence on the bearing capacity of increasing column section strengthening method, and has little influence on carbon fiber reinforcement method. The different strengthening schemes improve the ultimate bearing capacity and ductility of frame joints in a certain extent, composite reinforcement joints strengthening method to improve the most significant, followed by increasing column section, reinforcement method of carbon fiber reinforced joints to increase the minimum.

  9. Full scale model push-off test of reinforced concrete block with 51 mm dia. deformed steel bars

    Aoyagi, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The conclusions of this study are as follows; (1) The equation previously derived from small scale specimens, to predict the shear strength of push-off specimens including both initially cracked and uncracked, can conservatively estimate the experimental data of full scale specimens to the same extent as small scale ones. (2) The equation previously derived from small scale specimens, to predict the shear strength of initially cracked push-off specimens with reinforcements inclined to the shear plane, agrees reasonably well with the experimental data of full scale speciemens. (3) The concrete strength and yield strength of reinforcement theoretically set the balanced reinforcement ratio of the shear area above which the shear strength of specimens is constant. (4) The theoretical shear strength of push-off specimens overestimates the experimental data by about 25%. (orig./HP)

  10. Finite element analyses for Seismic Shear Wall International Standard Problem

    Park, Y.; Hofmayer, C.; Chokshi, N.

    1997-01-01

    In the seismic design of shear wall structures, e.g., nuclear reactor buildings, a linear FEM analysis is frequently used to quantify the stresses under the design loading condition. The final design decisions, however, are still based on empirical design rules established over decades from accumulated laboratory test data. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art on the application of nonlinear FEM analysis to reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings based on the findings obtained during the Seismic Shear Wall International Standard Problem (SSWISP) Workshop in 1996. Also, BNL's analysis results of the International Standard Problem (ISP) shear walls under monotonic static, cyclic static and dynamic loading conditions are described

  11. Experimental report of precast prestressed concrete shear wall. Precast prestressed concrete taishinheki no jikken hokoku

    Takada, K.; Komura, M.; Sakata, H.; Senoo, M. (Fudo Building Research Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-30

    The present report outlines the multi-story precast prestressed concrete earthquake-proof wall (PC shear wall system). The PC shear wall is a precast wall which internally contains the columns and beams as a unit. Therefore, the present system integrates the walls, columns and beams without beam-framing installation for the intermediate stories. It can simplify the concreting in site and ease the construction of building. For the system development, experiment was made on the deformation, sliding, yield strength and destruction state of the shear wall. Used were four types of test unit which are different in both reinforcement and connection methods. The test force was given by a hydraulically drawing jack. In the experiment, the four types were compared in destruction state, relation between load and deformation, yield strength, and strain of main column reinforcing bars and wall connection reinforcing bars. PC shear wall system-based design was studied from the experimental result. The shear wall in which there occurred both bending and shearing deformations was modeled by changing to a brace unit. Divided into bending deformation and shearing deformation, the deformation was calculated, which concluded that the shearing deformation dominates in the present system. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Reinforced concrete behavior due to missile impact

    Alderson, M.A.H.G.; Bartley, R.; O'Brien, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of the safety of nuclear reactors has necessitated the study of the effect of missiles on reinforced concrete containment structures. Two simple theoretical calculational methods have been developed to provide basic information. The first is based on a crude energy balance approach in which that part of the kinetic energy of the missile which is transferred into the containment structure, is absorbed only as bending strain energy. To determine the energy transferred into the structure it is assumed that during the loading the target does not respond. The energy input to the structure is thus equal to the kinetic energy it will possess immediately the impulse has been removed. The boundary of the responding zone is defined by the distance travelled by the shear stress wave during the time in which the impact force increases to the load at which the shear capacity reaches the ultimate shear resistance. The second method is based on the equation of motion for an equivalent one-degree-of-freedom system assuming that only the peak value of deflection is important and that damping can be ignored. The spring stiffness of the equivalent system has been based upon the stiffness of the actual disc configuration responding in the flexural mode only. The boundaries of the disc have been defined by using the elastic plate formulae and equating those positive and negative moments which will produce a specified yield line pattern which may be inferred from plastic plate formulae. The equation of motion is solved to indicate how the quantity of reinforcement included in the structure may modify the peak deflection. By limiting the ductility ratio of the reinforcement to some prescribed level it is possible to indicate the quantity of reinforcement w

  13. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab improves the flexural strength and ductility of the reinforced concrete slab. In the slab with reduction in thickness, the mode of failure change from brittle to ductile with the inclusion of kenaf fiber.

  14. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include the effects, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u-uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r-reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c-crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). The stress tensor of all components is equal to the global stress tensor. The strains are different from component to component corresponding to the local strain distribution in cracked reinforced concrete. For example the uniaxial behavior of reinforced concrete is modelled out of three springs k(u), k(r) and k(c) in series each having variable length l(u), l(r) or l(c). The uncracked structure is represented by k(u) only, l(r) and l(c) are zero. After cracking l(r) and l(c) are growing with the tensile load. When concrete tension stiffness between cracks has diminished, l(u) has reached the zero-value. The stress-dependent weights of the components in the model are derived from uniaxial theory and uniaxial test results

  15. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  16. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  17. Shear Capacity of Large-Scale RC Beams Affected by ASR

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on the shear capacity for concrete slabs without shear reinforcement. An experimental full-scale in-situ program consisting of four slabs from a bridge (Vosnæsvej) has been carried out and the results have been published in ref. [1......) and Eurocode 2 (EN 1992-1-1). The analysis shows that three experiments were highly affected by the preparation of the experimental setup. Only one experiment contained useful information about the shear capacity. The analysis of this experiment shows that the shear capacity is not reduced as much...

  18. Modelling root reinforcement in shallow forest soils

    Skaugset, Arne E.

    1997-01-01

    A hypothesis used to explain the relationship between timber harvesting and landslides is that tree roots add mechanical support to soil, thus increasing soil strength. Upon harvest, the tree roots decay which reduces soil strength and increases the risk of management -induced landslides. The technical literature does not adequately support this hypothesis. Soil strength values attributed to root reinforcement that are in the technical literature are such that forested sites can't fail and all high risk, harvested sites must fail. Both unstable forested sites and stable harvested sites exist, in abundance, in the real world thus, the literature does not adequately describe the real world. An analytical model was developed to calculate soil strength increase due to root reinforcement. Conceptually, the model is composed of a reinforcing element with high tensile strength, i.e. a conifer root, embedded in a material with little tensile strength, i.e. a soil. As the soil fails and deforms, the reinforcing element also deforms and stretches. The lateral deformation of the reinforcing element is treated analytically as a laterally loaded pile in a flexible foundation and the axial deformation is treated as an axially loaded pile. The governing differential equations are solved using finite-difference approximation techniques. The root reinforcement model was tested by comparing the final shape of steel and aluminum rods, parachute cord, wooden dowels, and pine roots in direct shear with predicted shapes from the output of the root reinforcement model. The comparisons were generally satisfactory, were best for parachute cord and wooden dowels, and were poorest for steel and aluminum rods. A parameter study was performed on the root reinforcement model which showed reinforced soil strength increased with increasing root diameter and soil depth. Output from the root reinforcement model showed a strain incompatibility between large and small diameter roots. The peak

  19. Adapting without reinforcement.

    Kheifets, Aaron; Gallistel, C Randy

    2012-11-01

    Our data rule out a broad class of behavioral models in which behavioral change is guided by differential reinforcement. To demonstrate this, we showed that the number of reinforcers missed before the subject shifted its behavior was not sufficient to drive behavioral change. What's more, many subjects shifted their behavior to a more optimal strategy even when they had not yet missed a single reinforcer. Naturally, differential reinforcement cannot be said to drive a process that shifts to accommodate to new conditions so adeptly that it doesn't miss a single reinforcer: it would have no input on which to base this shift.

  20. Numerical modelling of reinforced concrete beams with fracture-plastic material

    O. Sucharda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of models of fracture-plastic materials for reinforced concrete in numerical modelling of beams made from reinforced concrete. The purpose of the paper is to use of a model of concrete for modelling of a behaviour of reinforced concrete beams which have been tested at the University of Toronto within re-examination of classic concrete beam tests. The original tests were performed by Bresler- Scordelis. A stochastic modelling based on LHS (Latin Hypercube Sampling has been performed for the reinforced concrete beam. An objective of the modelling is to evaluate the total bearing capacity of the reinforced concrete beams depending on distribution of input data. The beams from the studied set have longitudinal reinforcement only. The beams do not have any shear reinforcement. The software used for the fracture-plastic model of the reinforced concrete is the ATENA.

  1. Quantifying root-reinforcement of river bank soils by four Australian tree species

    Docker, B. B.; Hubble, T. C. T.

    2008-08-01

    The increased shear resistance of soil due to root-reinforcement by four common Australian riparian trees, Casuarina glauca, Eucalyptus amplifolia, Eucalyptus elata and Acacia floribunda, was determined in-situ with a field shear-box. Root pull-out strengths and root tensile-strengths were also measured and used to evaluate the utility of the root-reinforcement estimation models that assume simultaneous failure of all roots at the shear plane. Field shear-box results indicate that tree roots fail progressively rather than simultaneously. Shear-strengths calculated for root-reinforced soil assuming simultaneous root failure, yielded values between 50% and 215% higher than directly measured shear-strengths. The magnitude of the overestimate varies among species and probably results from differences in both the geometry of the root-system and tensile strengths of the root material. Soil blocks under A. floribunda which presents many, well-spread, highly-branched fine roots with relatively higher tensile strength, conformed most closely with root model estimates; whereas E. amplifolia, which presents a few, large, unbranched vertical roots, concentrated directly beneath the tree stem and of relatively low tensile strength, deviated furthest from model-estimated shear-strengths. These results suggest that considerable caution be exercised when applying estimates of increased shear-strength due to root-reinforcement in riverbank stability modelling. Nevertheless, increased soil shear strength provided by tree roots can be calculated by knowledge of the Root Area Ratio ( RAR) at the shear plane. At equivalent RAR values, A. floribunda demonstrated the greatest earth reinforcement potential of the four species studied.

  2. Joint inversion of shear wave travel time residuals and geoid and depth anomalies for long-wavelength variations in upper mantle temperature and composition along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out for SS-S differential travel time residuals for nearly 500 paths crossing the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, assuming that the residuals are dominated by contributions from the upper mantle near the surface bounce point of the reflected phase SS. Results indicate that the SS-S travel time residuals decrease linearly with square root of age, to an age of 80-100 Ma, in general agreement with the plate cooling model. A joint inversion was formulated of travel time residuals and geoid and bathymetric anomalies for lateral variation in the upper mantle temperature and composition. The preferred inversion solutions were found to have variations in upper mantle temperature along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of about 100 K. It was calculated that, for a constant bulk composition, such a temperature variation would produce about a 7-km variation in crustal thickness, larger than is generally observed.

  3. Genomic Signatures of Reinforcement

    Austin G. Garner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement is the process by which selection against hybridization increases reproductive isolation between taxa. Much research has focused on demonstrating the existence of reinforcement, yet relatively little is known about the genetic basis of reinforcement or the evolutionary conditions under which reinforcement can occur. Inspired by reinforcement’s characteristic phenotypic pattern of reproductive trait divergence in sympatry but not in allopatry, we discuss whether reinforcement also leaves a distinct genomic pattern. First, we describe three patterns of genetic variation we expect as a consequence of reinforcement. Then, we discuss a set of alternative processes and complicating factors that may make the identification of reinforcement at the genomic level difficult. Finally, we consider how genomic analyses can be leveraged to inform if and to what extent reinforcement evolved in the face of gene flow between sympatric lineages and between allopatric and sympatric populations of the same lineage. Our major goals are to understand if genome scans for particular patterns of genetic variation could identify reinforcement, isolate the genetic basis of reinforcement, or infer the conditions under which reinforcement evolved.

  4. Genomic Signatures of Reinforcement

    Goulet, Benjamin E.

    2018-01-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which selection against hybridization increases reproductive isolation between taxa. Much research has focused on demonstrating the existence of reinforcement, yet relatively little is known about the genetic basis of reinforcement or the evolutionary conditions under which reinforcement can occur. Inspired by reinforcement’s characteristic phenotypic pattern of reproductive trait divergence in sympatry but not in allopatry, we discuss whether reinforcement also leaves a distinct genomic pattern. First, we describe three patterns of genetic variation we expect as a consequence of reinforcement. Then, we discuss a set of alternative processes and complicating factors that may make the identification of reinforcement at the genomic level difficult. Finally, we consider how genomic analyses can be leveraged to inform if and to what extent reinforcement evolved in the face of gene flow between sympatric lineages and between allopatric and sympatric populations of the same lineage. Our major goals are to understand if genome scans for particular patterns of genetic variation could identify reinforcement, isolate the genetic basis of reinforcement, or infer the conditions under which reinforcement evolved. PMID:29614048

  5. Structural behavior of human lumbar intervertebral disc under direct shear.

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Häussler, Kim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Wolfram, Uwe

    2015-03-18

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a complex, flexible joint between adjacent vertebral bodies that provides load transmission while permitting movements of the spinal column. Finite element models can be used to help clarify why and how IVDs fail or degenerate. To do so, it is of importance to validate those models against controllable experiments. Due to missing experimental data, shear properties are not used thus far in validating finite element models. This study aimed to investigate the structural shear properties of human lumbar IVDs in posteroanterior (PA) and laterolateral (LL) loading directions. Fourteen lumbar IVDs (median age: 49 years) underwent direct shear in PA and LL loading directions. A custom-build shear device was used in combination with a materials testing machine to load the specimens until failure. Shear stiffness, ultimate shear force and displacement, and work to failure were determined. Each specimen was tested until complete or partial disruption. Median stiffness in PA direction was 490 N/mm and in LL direction 568 N/mm. Median ultimate shear force in the PA direction was 2,877 N and in the LL direction 3,199 N. Work to failure was 12 Nm in the PA and 9 Nm in the LL direction. This study was an experiment to subject IVDs to direct shear. The results could help us to understand the structure and function of IVDs with regard to mechanical spinal stability, and they can be used to validate finite element models of the IVD.

  6. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  7. Flexural strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete beams using polypropylene fiber: An experimental study

    Lisantono, Ade; Praja, Baskoro Abdi; Hermawan, Billy Nouwen

    2017-11-01

    One of the methods to increase the tensile strength of concrete is adding a fiber material into the concrete. While to reduce a noise in a construction project, a self compacting concrete was a good choices in the project. This paper presents an experimental study of flexural behavior and strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete (RC) beams using polypropylene fiber. The micro monofilament polypropylene fibers with the proportion 0.9 kg/m3 of concrete weight were used in this study. Four beam specimens were cast and tested in this study. Two beams were cast of self compacting reinforced concrete without fiber, and two beams were cast of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete using polypropylene. The beams specimen had the section of (180×260) mm and the length was 2000 mm. The beams had simple supported with the span of 1800 mm. The longitudinal reinforcements were using diameter of 10 mm. Two reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for compressive reinforcement and three reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for tensile reinforcement. The shear reinforcement was using diameter of 8 mm. The shear reinforcements with spacing of 100 mm were put in the one fourth near to the support and the spacing of 150 mm were put in the middle span. Two points loading were used in the testing. The result shows that the load-carrying capacity of the self compacting reinforced concrete beam using polypropylene was a little bit higher than the self compacting reinforced concrete beam without polypropylene. The increment of load-carrying capacity of self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete was not so significant because the increment was only 2.80 % compare to self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete. And from the load-carrying capacity-deflection relationship curves show that both the self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete beam and the self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete beam were ductile beams.

  8. Enhancement of C/C-LAS joint using aligned carbon nanotubes prepared by injection chemical vapor deposition

    Zhao, Feng-Ling; Fu, Qian-Gang, E-mail: fuqiangang@nwpu.edu.cn; Feng, Lei; Shen, Qing-Liang

    2016-01-05

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) enhanced carbon/carbon-lithium aluminum silicate (C/C-LAS) joint was prepared by a three-step technique of pack cementation, injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) and hot-pressing. A layer of aligned CNTs was grown on the surface of SiC coated C/C composites by ICVD method, and the joint was obtained by hot-pressing with magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) as the interlayer. SEM observation reveals that the introduced CNTs result in the formation of a dense and crack-free CNT/MAS nanocomposite interface between SiC and MAS. Compared with the joints without CNTs, the average shear strength of the joints reinforced by CNTs was improved by 48% accompanied by an obvious change in failure mode from brittle fracture without CNTs to plastic fracture with CNTs. The pulling-out and bridging of CNTs on the fracture surfaces had a positive effect on the strength enhancement of the C/C-LAS joint.

  9. FRP-RC Beam in Shear: Mechanical Model and Assessment Procedure for Pseudo-Ductile Behavior

    Floriana Petrone

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the development of a mechanics-based shear model for reinforced concrete (RC elements strengthened in shear with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP and a design/assessment procedure capable of predicting the failure sequence of resisting elements: the yielding of existing transverse steel ties and the debonding of FRP sheets/strips, while checking the corresponding compressive stress in concrete. The research aims at the definition of an accurate capacity equation, consistent with the requirement of the pseudo-ductile shear behavior of structural elements, that is, transverse steel ties yield before FRP debonding and concrete crushing. For the purpose of validating the proposed model, an extended parametric study and a comparison against experimental results have been conducted: it is proven that the common accepted rule of assuming the shear capacity of RC members strengthened in shear with FRP as the sum of the maximum contribution of both FRP and stirrups can lead to an unsafe overestimation of the shear capacity. This issue has been pointed out by some authors, when comparing experimental shear capacity values with the theoretical ones, but without giving a convincing explanation of that. In this sense, the proposed model represents also a valid instrument to better understand the mechanical behavior of FRP-RC beams in shear and to calculate their actual shear capacity.

  10. Influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation resistance of reinforced concrete slabs under hard missile impact

    Orbovic, Nebojsa; Sagals, Genadijs; Blahoianu, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the work conducted by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) related to the influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) slabs under “hard” missile impact (impact with negligible missile deformations). The paper presents the results of three tests on reinforced concrete slabs conducted at VTT Technical Research Centre (Finland), along with the numerical simulations as well as a discussion of the current code provisions related to impactive loading. Transverse reinforcement is widely used for improving the shear and punching strength of concrete structures. However, the effect of this reinforcement on the perforation resistance under localized missile impact is still unclear. The goal of this paper is to fill the gap in the current literature related to this topic. Based on similar tests designed by the authors with missile velocity below perforation velocity, it was expected that transverse reinforcement would improve the perforation resistance. Three slabs were tested under almost identical conditions with the only difference being the transverse reinforcement. One slab was designed without transverse reinforcement, the second one with the transverse reinforcement in form of conventional stirrups with hooks and the third one with the transverse reinforcement in form of T-headed bars. Although the transverse reinforcement reduced the overall damage of the slabs (the rear face scabbing), the conclusion from the tests is that the transverse reinforcement does not have important influence on perforation capacity of concrete slabs under rigid missile impact. The slab with T-headed bars presented a slight improvement compared to the baseline specimen without transverse reinforcement. The slab with conventional stirrups presented slightly lower perforation capacity (higher residual missile velocity) than the slab without transverse reinforcement. In conclusion, the performed tests show slightly

  11. Model tests of geosynthetic reinforced slopes in a geotechnical centrifuge

    Aklik, P.

    2012-01-01

    Geosynthetic-reinforced slopes and walls became very popular in recent years because of their financial, technical, and ecological advantages. Centrifuge modelling is a powerful tool for physical modelling of reinforced slopes and offers the advantage to observe the failure mechanisms of the slopes. In order to replicate the gravity induced stresses of a prototype structure in a geometrically 1/N reduced model, it is necessary to test the model in a gravitational field N times larger than that of the prototype structure. In this dissertation, geotextile-reinforced slope models were tested in a geotechnical centrifuge to identify the possible failure mechanisms. Slope models were tested by varying slope inclination, tensile strengths of the geotextiles, and overlapping lengths. Photographs of the geotextile reinforced slope models in flight were taken with a digital camera and the soil deformations of geotextile reinforced slopes were evaluated with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experimental results showed that failure of the centrifuge models initiated at midheight of the slope, and occurred due to geotextile breakage instead of pullout. The location of the shear surface is independent of the tensile strength of the geotextile; it is dependent on the shear strength of the soil. It is logical to see that the required acceleration of the centrifuge at slope failure was decreased with increasing slope inclination. An important contribution to the stability of the slope models was provided by the overlapping of the geotextile layers. It has a secondary reinforcement effect when it was prolonged and passed through the shear surface. Moreover, the location of the shear surface observed with PIV analysis exactly matches the tears of the retrieved geotextiles measured carefully after the centrifuge testing. It is concluded that PIV is an efficient tool to instrument the slope failures in a geotechnical centrifuge.(author) [de

  12. On the Process-Related Rivet Microstructural Evolution, Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V/GFRP Friction-Riveted Joints

    Natascha Z. Borba

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, process-related thermo-mechanical changes in the rivet microstructure, joint local and global mechanical properties, and their correlation with the rivet plastic deformation regime were investigated for Ti-6Al-4V (rivet and glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GF-P friction-riveted joints of a single polymeric base plate. Joints displaying similar quasi-static mechanical performance to conventional bolted joints were selected for detailed characterization. The mechanical performance was assessed on lap shear specimens, whereby the friction-riveted joints were connected with AA2198 gussets. Two levels of energy input were used, resulting in process temperatures varying from 460 ± 130 °C to 758 ± 56 °C and fast cooling rates (178 ± 15 °C/s, 59 ± 15 °C/s. A complex final microstructure was identified in the rivet. Whereas equiaxial α-grains with β-phase precipitated in their grain boundaries were identified in the rivet heat-affected zone, refined α′ martensite, Widmanstätten structures and β-fleck domains were present in the plastically deformed rivet volume. The transition from equiaxed to acicular structures resulted in an increase of up to 24% in microhardness in comparison to the base material. A study on the rivet material flow through microtexture of the α-Ti phase and β-fleck orientation revealed a strong effect of shear stress and forging which induced simple shear deformation. By combining advanced microstructural analysis techniques with local mechanical testing and temperature measurement, the nature of the complex rivet plastic deformational regime could be determined.

  13. On the Process-Related Rivet Microstructural Evolution, Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V/GFRP Friction-Riveted Joints

    Borba, Natascha Z.; Afonso, Conrado R. M.; Blaga, Lucian; dos Santos, Jorge F.; Canto, Leonardo B.; Amancio-Filho, Sergio T.

    2017-01-01

    In the current work, process-related thermo-mechanical changes in the rivet microstructure, joint local and global mechanical properties, and their correlation with the rivet plastic deformation regime were investigated for Ti-6Al-4V (rivet) and glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GF-P) friction-riveted joints of a single polymeric base plate. Joints displaying similar quasi-static mechanical performance to conventional bolted joints were selected for detailed characterization. The mechanical performance was assessed on lap shear specimens, whereby the friction-riveted joints were connected with AA2198 gussets. Two levels of energy input were used, resulting in process temperatures varying from 460 ± 130 °C to 758 ± 56 °C and fast cooling rates (178 ± 15 °C/s, 59 ± 15 °C/s). A complex final microstructure was identified in the rivet. Whereas equiaxial α-grains with β-phase precipitated in their grain boundaries were identified in the rivet heat-affected zone, refined α′ martensite, Widmanstätten structures and β-fleck domains were present in the plastically deformed rivet volume. The transition from equiaxed to acicular structures resulted in an increase of up to 24% in microhardness in comparison to the base material. A study on the rivet material flow through microtexture of the α-Ti phase and β-fleck orientation revealed a strong effect of shear stress and forging which induced simple shear deformation. By combining advanced microstructural analysis techniques with local mechanical testing and temperature measurement, the nature of the complex rivet plastic deformational regime could be determined. PMID:28772545

  14. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness.

    Lloyd, David R; Medina, Douglas J; Hawk, Larry W; Fosco, Whitney D; Richards, Jerry B

    2014-01-09

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect "accelerated-HRE." Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  15. Shear Tests and Calculation of Shear Resistance with the PC Program RFEM from Thin Partition Walls of Brick in Old Buildings

    Korjenic Sinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the shear capacity of partition walls in old buildings based on shear tests which were carried out under real conditions in an existing building. There were experiments conducted on different floors and in each case, the maximum recordable horizontal force and the horizontal displacement of the respective mortar were measured. At the same time material studies and material investigations were carried out in the laboratory. The material parameters were used for the calculation of the precise shear capacity of each joint. In the shear tests, the maximum displacement of a mortar joint was determined at a maximum of two to four millimetres. Furthermore, no direct linear relationship between the theoretical load (wall above it and the shear stress occurred could be detected in the analysis of the experiment, as it was previously assumed.

  16. Shear Tests and Calculation of Shear Resistance with the PC Program RFEM from Thin Partition Walls of Brick in Old Buildings

    Korjenic, Sinan; Nowak, Bernhard; Löffler, Philipp; Vašková, Anna

    2015-11-01

    This paper is about the shear capacity of partition walls in old buildings based on shear tests which were carried out under real conditions in an existing building. There were experiments conducted on different floors and in each case, the maximum recordable horizontal force and the horizontal displacement of the respective mortar were measured. At the same time material studies and material investigations were carried out in the laboratory. The material parameters were used for the calculation of the precise shear capacity of each joint. In the shear tests, the maximum displacement of a mortar joint was determined at a maximum of two to four millimetres. Furthermore, no direct linear relationship between the theoretical load (wall above it) and the shear stress occurred could be detected in the analysis of the experiment, as it was previously assumed.

  17. Joint ventures

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret......Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret...

  18. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  19. An underwater shear compactor

    Biver, E.; Sims, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper, originally presented at the WM'96 Conference in Tucson Arizona, describes a concept of a specialised decommissioning tool designed to operate underwater and to reduce the volume of radioactive components by shearing and compacting. The shear compactor was originally conceived to manage the size reduction of a variety of decommissioned stainless steel tubes stored within a reactor fuel cooling pond and which were consuming a substantial volume of the pond. The main objective of this tool was to cut the long tubes into shorter lengths and to compact them into a flat rectangular form which could be stacked on the pond floor, thus saving valuable space. The development programme, undertaken on this project, investigated a wide range of factors which could contribute to an extended cutting blade performance, ie: materials of construction, cutting blade shape and cutting loads required, shock effects, etc. The second phase was to review other aspects of the design, such as radiological protection, cutting blade replacement, maintenance, pond installation and resultant wall loads, water hydraulics, collection of products of shearing/compacting operations, corrosion of the equipment, control system, operational safety and the ability of the equipment to operate in dry environments. The paper summarises the extended work programme involved with this shear compactor tool. (author)

  20. An evaluation of the lap-shear test for Sn-rich solder/Cu couples: Experiments and simulation

    Chawla, N.; Shen, Y.-L.; Deng, X.; Ege, E. S.

    2004-12-01

    The lap-shear technique is commonly used to evaluate the shear, creep, and thermal fatigue behavior of solder joints. We have conducted a parametric experimental and modeling study, on the effect of testing and geometrical parameters on solder/copper joint response in lap-shear. It was shown that the farfield applied strain is quite different from the actual solder strain (measured optically). Subtraction of the deformation of the Cu substrate provides a reasonable approximation of the solder strain in the elastic regime, but not in the plastic regime. Solder joint thickness has a profound effect on joint response. The solder response moves progressively closer to “true” shear response with increasing joint thickness. Numerical modeling using finite-element analyses were performed to rationalize the experimental findings. The same lap-shear configuration was used in the simulation. The input response for solder was based on the experimental tensile test result on bulk specimens. The calculated shear response, using both the commonly adopted far-field measure and the actual shear strain in solder, was found to be consistent with the trends observed in the lap-shear experiments. The geometric features were further explored to provide physical insight into the problem. Deformation of the substrate was found to greatly influence the shear behavior of the solder.

  1. Coracoclavicular joint

    Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Chan Il; Ahn, Jae Doo; Lim, Chong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    The coracoclvicular joint, a rear abnormality which may be the cause of pain in the shoulder and limitation of motion of the shoulder joint, is discussed. A case of coracoclvicular joint with shoulder pain was observed in 65 yrs old Korean male.

  2. Shear capacity of ASR damaged structures – in-depth analysis of some in-situ shear tests on bridge slabs

    Hansen, Søren Gustenhoff; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on the shear capacity for concrete slabs without shear reinforcement. An experimental full-scale in-situ program consisting of four slabs from a bridge (Vosnæsvej) has been carried out and the results have been published in ref. [1......] with the principal author of this paper as co-author. After the experiments, a detailed measurement of the test specimens was conducted. Based on these measurements a thorough analysis of the experimental results was carried out and evaluated by a plastic model for shear capacity, Crack Sliding Model (CSM...

  3. Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Flexure

    Hestbech, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a rotational capacity model for flexural reinforced concrete elements is presented. The model is based on the general assumption, that any other failure mode than bending is prevented by proper design. This includes failure due to shear, anchorage, concentrated loads etc. Likewise...... are not necessarily so. An example shows the applicability of the model and a parametric study shows the advantages of the model compared with code provisions. Finally, improvements of the compression zone modelling is performed in order to include a better performance when concrete crushing is the failure criterion...

  4. Estimated strength of shear keys in concrete dams

    Curtis, D.D. [Hatch Energy, Niagara Falls, ON (Canada); Lum, K.K.Y. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    BC Hydro requested that Hatch Energy review the seismic stability of Ruskin Dam which was constructed in 1930 at Hayward Lake in British Columbia. The concrete gravity dam is founded nearly entirely on rock in a narrow valley. The vertical joints between blocks are keyed and grouted. The strength of the shear keys was assessed when a non-linear finite element model found that significant forces were being transferred laterally to the abutments during an earthquake. The lateral transfer of loads to the abutment relies on the strength of the shear keys. The dynamic finite element analysis was used to determine the stability of the dam. A review of the shear strength measurements reported in literature showed that the measurements compared well to those obtained by BC Hydro from cores taken from Ruskin Dam. The cohesive strength obtained using the Griffith failure criteria was also in good agreement with both sets of measurements. A simple ultimate shear strength equation was developed using the Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria to determine combined cohesive and frictional strength of shear keys. Safety factors of 2.0 for static loads and 1.5 for seismic loads were proposed to reduce the ultimate strength to allowable values. It was concluded that given the relatively high shear strength established for the shear keys, the abutment rock or dam/abutment contact will control the amount of load which can arch to the abutments. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Experiments on sheet metal shearing

    Gustafsson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Within the sheet metal industry, different shear cutting technologies are commonly used in several processing steps, e.g. in cut to length lines, slitting lines, end cropping etc. Shearing has speed and cost advantages over competing cutting methods like laser and plasma cutting, but involves large forces on the equipment and large strains in the sheet material.Numerical models to predict forces and sheared edge geometry for different sheet metal grades and different shear parameter set-ups a...

  6. Beam Shear Design According to Eurocode 2 - Limitations for the Concrete Strut Inclinations

    Hagsten, Lars German; Hestbech, Lars; Fisker, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    and are presented. These beams are all designed to fail in shear and the shear reinforcement is designed for different values of the concrete strut inclinations (cot θ varies from 1.5 to 3.4). These tests indicate a clear connection between the values of the concrete strut inclinations and crack width in the SLS......The beam shear design method adopted in Eurocode 2 is based on a lower bound plastic solution. This method is combined with limitations on the concrete strut inclination, θ. These limitations are introduced to ensure acceptable crack width in the SLS. 7 full scale beams have been tested....... In cases where larger crack widths (w > 0.4 mm) can be accepted, larger values of the concrete strut inclinations can be chosen. This will lead to less shear reinforcements. The results are also compared with analytical analysis based on energy methods. At the SLS the beams are expected to be cracked...

  7. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  8. Injectable shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels for stem cell delivery

    Thakur, Ashish; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Peak, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    -thinning characteristics, and enhanced mechanical stiffness, elastomeric properties, and physiological stability. The shear-thinning characteristics of nanocomposite hydrogels are investigated for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. The hMSCs showed high cell viability after injection and encapsulated cells......Injectable hydrogels are investigated for cell encapsulation and delivery as they can shield cells from high shear forces. One of the approaches to obtain injectable hydrogels is to reinforce polymeric networks with high aspect ratio nanoparticles such as two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. 2D...... showed a circular morphology. The proposed shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels can be used for cell delivery for cartilage tissue regeneration and 3D bioprinting....

  9. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  10. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  11. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  12. Gelation under shear

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Muzny, C.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  13. Forflytning: shear og friktion

    2005-01-01

    friktion). Formålet med filmprojektet er: At give personalet i Apopleksiafsnittet viden om shear og friktion, så det motiveres til forebyggelse. Mål At udarbejde et enkelt undervisningsmateriale til bed-side-brug Projektbeskrivelse (resume) Patienter med apopleksi er særligt udsatte for tryksår, fordi de...... ofte er immobile, har svært ved at opretholde en god siddestilling eller ligger tungt i sengen som følger efter apopleksien Hvis personalet bruger forkert lejrings-og forflytningsteknik, udsættes patienterne for shear og friktion. Målgruppen i projektet er de personer, der omgås patienterne, dvs...

  14. Hysteretic MDOF Model to Quantify Damage for RC Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    Köylüoglu, H. Ugur; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, Ahmet S.

    A hysteretic mechanical formulation is derived to quantify local, modal and overall damage in reinforced concrete (RC) shear frames subject to seismic excitation. Each interstorey is represented by a Clough and Johnston (1966) hysteretic constitutive relation with degrading elastic fraction of th...... shear frame is subject to simulated earthquake excitations, which are modelled as a stationary Gaussian stochastic process with Kanai-Tajimi spectrum, multiplied by an envelope function. The relationship between local, modal and overall damage indices is investigated statistically....

  15. Shear modulus and damping ratio of natural rubber containing carbon nanotubes

    Ismail, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Rusop, M.; Adnan, A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the potential application of Natural rubber (NR) containing Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) by measuring its shear modulus and damping ratio. Four different types of rubber specimens which fabricated with different MWCNT loadings: 0 wt% (pure natural rubber), 1 wt%, 3 wt%, and 5 wt%. It is observed that the shear modulus and damping ratio of CNTs filled rubber composites are remarkably higher than that of raw rubber indicating the inherent reinforcing potential of CNTs.

  16. A study on shear behavior of R/C beams subjected to long-term heating

    Maruta, M.; Yamazaki, M.

    1993-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, many structural members are subjected to long term heating. There are few experimental data available on the behavior especially in shear of reinforced concrete (R/C) members subjected to long term heating. This paper describes a study aimed at experimentally determining the shear behavior of R/C members in nuclear power plant facilities following sustained heating at high temperatures

  17. Shear Roll Mill Reactivation

    2012-09-13

    pneumatically operated paste dumper and belt conveyor system, the loss in weight feeder system, the hydraulically operated shear roll mill, the pellet...out feed belt conveyor , and the pack out system comprised of the metal detector, scale, and pack out empty and full drum roller conveyors . Page | 4...feed hopper and conveyor supplying the loss in weight feeder were turned on, and it was verified that these items functioned as designed . The

  18. Numerical study on shear resisting mechanism for corroded RC box culverts

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Iwamori, Akiyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of reinforcing steel corrosion on the shear resisting mechanism of RC box culverts and the applicability of the material degradation model in a finite element method. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain due to reinforcement corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete, were considered. Second, cyclic loading tests using full-scale corroded specimens were numerically analyzed. The analyzed crack patterns and load-displacement relationships up to the maximum load were observed to be in close agreement with the experiment results within the average corrosion ratio of 10% of primary reinforcement. The fact that corrosion cracks can importantly affect the progression of shear cracks and shear strength of RC beams was also found. On the other hand, we established that RC box culverts being statically indeterminate structures, sectional forces are redistributed after cracking damage, and local material deterioration has a minor effect on shear capacity. Furthermore, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts using parameters such as size, steel corrosion location, and corrosion level. (author)

  19. An experimental investigation for external RC shear wall applications

    Kaltakci, M. Y.; Ozturk, M.; Arslan, M. H.

    2010-09-01

    The strength and rigidity of most reinforced concrete (RC) buildings in Turkey, which are frequently hit by destructive earthquakes, is not at a sufficient level. Therefore, the result of earthquakes is a significant loss of life and property. The strengthening method most commonly preferred for these type of RC buildings is the application of RC infilled walls (shear walls) in the frame openings of the building. However, since the whole building has to be emptied and additional heavy costs arise during this type of strengthening, users prefer not to strengthen their buildings despite the heavy risk they are exposed to. Therefore, it is necessary to develop easier-to-apply and more effective methods for the rapid strengthening of housing and the heavily-used public buildings which cannot be emptied during the strengthening process (such as hospitals and schools). This study empirically analyses the different methods of a new system which can meet this need. In this new system, named "external shear wall application", RC shear walls are applied on the external surface of the building, along the frame plane rather than in the building. To this end, 7 test samples in 1/2 and 1/3 geometrical scale were designed to analyse the efficiency of the strengthening technique where the shear wall leans on the frame from outside of the building (external shear wall application) and of the strengthening technique where a specific space is left between the frame and the external shear wall by using a coupling beam to connect elements (application of external shear wall with coupling beam). Test results showed that the maximum lateral load capacity, initial rigidity and energy dissipation behaviours of the samples strengthened with external shear wall were much better than those of the bare frames.

  20. An experimental investigation for external RC shear wall applications

    M. Y. Kaltakci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The strength and rigidity of most reinforced concrete (RC buildings in Turkey, which are frequently hit by destructive earthquakes, is not at a sufficient level. Therefore, the result of earthquakes is a significant loss of life and property. The strengthening method most commonly preferred for these type of RC buildings is the application of RC infilled walls (shear walls in the frame openings of the building. However, since the whole building has to be emptied and additional heavy costs arise during this type of strengthening, users prefer not to strengthen their buildings despite the heavy risk they are exposed to. Therefore, it is necessary to develop easier-to-apply and more effective methods for the rapid strengthening of housing and the heavily-used public buildings which cannot be emptied during the strengthening process (such as hospitals and schools. This study empirically analyses the different methods of a new system which can meet this need. In this new system, named "external shear wall application", RC shear walls are applied on the external surface of the building, along the frame plane rather than in the building. To this end, 7 test samples in 1/2 and 1/3 geometrical scale were designed to analyse the efficiency of the strengthening technique where the shear wall leans on the frame from outside of the building (external shear wall application and of the strengthening technique where a specific space is left between the frame and the external shear wall by using a coupling beam to connect elements (application of external shear wall with coupling beam. Test results showed that the maximum lateral load capacity, initial rigidity and energy dissipation behaviours of the samples strengthened with external shear wall were much better than those of the bare frames.

  1. Jointness for the Rest of Us: Reforming Joint Professional Development

    2016-06-10

    requirements. For this reason, improving joint development is not only important for increasing employee job satisfaction , it is essential if DOD...to enhance civilian skill sets and aid in the retention of experienced employees . Further, the report...to the job fully trained. This belief is reinforced by the fact that many mid-and senior-level DOD civilian employees are former members of the armed

  2. Exterior beam-column joint study with non-conventional ...

    for cyclic response were very effective in relocating potential plastic regions. ... joint reinforcement is easy to construct and can be used in moderate ductility ..... In addition easy to repair using FRP composite wraps techniques to restore the ...

  3. APPLICATION PROSPECTS OF THREADED JOINT OF ARMATURE

    A. V. Radkevych

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One of the main technological operations of buildings construction on the basis of monolithic frame systems is the production of mesh reinforcement. The current interest is the new ways specification of advanced bonding armature techniques without reliability weakness and design of the building in whole, as well as the finding of use prospects of screw-threaded joint of armature as the most technological and economic method of re-bars joints. Methodology. Advantages and disadvantages analysis of existing rebar compound technologies was implemented by couplings of different types and constructions. The most promising vertical constructions for the vertical bars joints in frameworks were determined. Findings. Researches of existing technologies of rebar joints by the couplings of different construction were carried out. The installation method of mesh reinforcement of vertical structural elements with the use of the special catching devices was developed. It allows considerably accelerating installation of mesh reinforcement. Originality. Regularity of labor intensiveness change of mesh reinforcement installation of columns at armature joint in vertical position by threaded couplings with the help of catching devices using special construction was determined. This allows substantially reducing the labor expenditures during installation of these elements. Dependency of labor intensiveness and cost of lap welding armature joints, by tub-seam welding and by thread coupling depending on its diameter was designated. Regularity of labor intensiveness changes of installation at armature joints by different methods taking into account preparatory works was defined. Practical value. The analysis of mechanical armature joints techniques was conducted. It will allow selecting methods of armature joints to increase the speed of construction works more economical and effective.

  4. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Batu Pahat (Malaysia); Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer [Faculty of Civil Engineering Omar Al Mukhtar University, Bayda, Libya, Africa (Libya)

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  5. Viability of pHEMA Hydrogels as Coating in Human Synovial Joint Prosthesis

    V.P. Bavaresco

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available In artificial joints, the bone part is usually substituted by a metallic component with high corrosion and strength resistance while the articular cartilage is replaced by a polymer. Use of thin layer of a compliant material acting as a bearing surface in human replacement joints has recently generated considerable interest. This work analyses the coating of a solid porous substrate of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE with a poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA and two sIPN-type blends: pHEMA-cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB and pHEMA-poly (ethyl methacrylate (PEM using 5.0% (w/w of the crosslinking agent and 11.0% (w/w of the linear reinforcing polymer. The wear resistance of the coating materials was evaluated in a TRI PIN ON DISK type equipment and the damage extension was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Preliminary qualitative tests were performed with the goal to identifying the hydrogels show the minimal required properties concerning wear strength. The pHEMA coating was completely destroyed during the first wear cycles, characterizing its low shear strength. By the other hand, after the complete experiment, both pHEMA-CAB and pHEMA-PEM blends showed a slightly improvement of abrasive and adhesive wear. This result indicates that the studied blends are promising materials to be used as compliant surfaces in joint prosthesis.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Steel Joints in Round Wood

    Mikolášek David

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses a drawn steel joint in round logs for which several types of reinforcements have been proposed. The load-carrying capacity of the reinforcements have been tested in laboratories. At the same time, numerical modelling has been performed - it has focused, in particular, on rigidity of the joints during the loading process. Physical and geometrical nonlinearities have been taken into account. The Finite Element Method and 3D computation models have been used in the numerical calculations.

  7. Study on the influence of Alkali-Silica reaction on structural behavior of reinforced concrete members

    Murazumi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Matsumoto, N.; Mitsugi, S.; Takiguchi, K.; Masuda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Expansion produced by alkali-silica reaction (ASR) has been observed in the turbine generator foundation of the unit 1, Ikata nuclear power station, Japan. The foundation is a reinforced concrete frame structure. This paper, as a part of the series of investigation and experiments, discusses tests on structural behavior of concrete members affected by ASR. The purpose of the study is to obtain experimental results on the effects of ASR on bending and shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams and shear walls, and compare with the calculated results by present evaluation methods for normal concrete structures For the experiments on bending/shear behavior of beam, bending test models with a small amount of rebar and shear test models with larger amount were made of concrete in which ASR was induced by adding alkali or concrete without ASR. It was found from the results that bending strength of the bending test models and shear strength of the shear test models did not fall, nor was it lower than the calculated strength for concrete members without ASR. In the shear wall test, the two test models were made of either concrete with ASR or one without it. Horizontal load was applied with actuators on the test model fixed on the test floor, while vertical load was applied with oil jacks. The results did not indicate that ASR lowered the stiffness or strength of the wall test models, showing the strength was able to be calculated with the same formula for reinforced concrete wall without ASR. (authors)

  8. Probabilistic Fatigue Model for Reinforced Concrete Onshore Wind Turbine Foundations

    Marquez-Dominguez, Sergio; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    Reinforced Concrete Slab Foundation (RCSF) is the most common onshore wind turbine foundation type installed by the wind industry around the world. Fatigue cracks in a RCSF are an important issue to be considered by the designers. Causes and consequences of the cracks due to fatigue damage in RCSFs...... are discussed in this paper. A probabilistic fatigue model for a RCSF is established which makes a rational treatment of the uncertainties involved in the complex interaction between fatigue cyclic loads and reinforced concrete. Design and limit state equations are established considering concrete shear...

  9. Seismic fragility of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear facilities

    Gergely, P.

    1985-01-01

    The failure and fragility analyses of reinforced concrete structures and elements in nuclear reactor facilities within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are evaluated. Uncertainties in material modeling, behavior of low shear walls, and seismic risk assessment for nonlinear response receive special attention. Problems with ductility-based spectral deamplification and prediction of the stiffness of reinforced concrete walls at low stress levels are examined. It is recommended to use relatively low damping values in connection with ductility-based response reductions. The study of static nonlinear force-deflection curves is advocated for better nonlinear dynamic response predictions

  10. Algorithms for Reinforcement Learning

    Szepesvari, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcement learning is a learning paradigm concerned with learning to control a system so as to maximize a numerical performance measure that expresses a long-term objective. What distinguishes reinforcement learning from supervised learning is that only partial feedback is given to the learner about the learner's predictions. Further, the predictions may have long term effects through influencing the future state of the controlled system. Thus, time plays a special role. The goal in reinforcement learning is to develop efficient learning algorithms, as well as to understand the algorithms'

  11. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  12. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  13. Perception-based Co-evolutionary Reinforcement Learning for UAV Sensor Allocation

    Berenji, Hamid

    2003-01-01

    .... A Perception-based reasoning approach based on co-evolutionary reinforcement learning was developed for jointly addressing sensor allocation on each individual UAV and allocation of a team of UAVs...

  14. Shear Resistance Variations in Experimentally Sheared Mudstone Granules: A Possible Shear-Thinning and Thixotropic Mechanism

    Hu, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Gonghui; Scaringi, Gianvito; Mcsaveney, Mauri; Hicher, Pierre-Yves

    2017-11-01

    We present results of ring shear frictional resistance for mudstone granules of different size obtained from a landslide shear zone. Little rate dependency of shear resistance was observed in sand-sized granules in any wet or dry test, while saturated gravel-sized granules exhibited significant and abrupt reversible rate-weakening (from μ = 0.6 to 0.05) at about 2 mm/s. Repeating resistance variations occurred also under constant shear displacement rate. Mudstone granules generate mud as they are crushed and softened. Shear-thinning and thixotropic behavior of the mud can explain the observed behavior: with the viscosity decreasing, the mud can flow through the coarser soil pores and migrate out from the shear zone. This brings new granules into contact which produces new mud. Thus, the process can start over. Similarities between experimental shear zones and those of some landslides in mudstone suggest that the observed behavior may play a role in some landslide kinematics.

  15. Durability of shrink joints; Bestaendighet hos krympskarvar

    Forsaeus Nilsson, Stefan; Saellberg, Sven-Erik

    2007-07-01

    About one third of all joint failures are caused by shrink seals losing adhesion, according to statistics from the Swedish District Heating Association. The present project was initiated upon request from the Authorisation Board of the Swedish District Heating Association in order to investigate the potential to enhance the quality of shrink joints. The purpose has been to provide a screening of the key properties of the joint systems currently available on the market. The aim has been to facilitate the choice of right materials and constructions to achieve the best functionality and cost effectiveness. The project has comprised a compilation of the views from industry representatives from manufacturers of shrink and sealing materials, pipe producers, joint contractors and district heating companies, and an experimental study where a number of joints were evaluated with respect to tightness and strength. The following joint systems took part in the investigation: Logstor SX; Canusa SuperCase; Raychem RayJoint; Powerpipe DTK with external seal Nitto NeoCover 1150 in one end and Raychem TPSM in the other; Logstor B2S med external seal Canusa KLD in one end and Raychem TPSM in the other. The joints were installed on pipes of diameters 160 mm and 450 mm. The installation was done under cold and dirty conditions, to simulate a field like worst-case scenario. After the installation, the joints were tested with respect to tightness. Peel strength and shear strength were evaluated before and after thermal ageing in +50 deg C for 70 days. Mechanical tests and ageing followed standardised procedure in EN 12068. A study of the shrink force relaxation in crosslinked and non-crosslinked polyethylene shrink sleeves was undertaken, by shrinking them onto aluminium cylinders and storing them in room temperature for about 2000 hours. The results show that it is clearly possible to install excellent shrink joints also under difficult conditions. In addition, thermal ageing does not

  16. A computational model for three-dimensional jointed media with a single joint set

    Koteras, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional model for jointed rock or other media with a single set of joints. The joint set consists of evenly spaced joint planes. The normal joint response is nonlinear elastic and is based on a rational polynomial. Joint shear stress is treated as being linear elastic in the shear stress versus slip displacement before attaining a critical stress level governed by a Mohr-Coulomb faction criterion. The three-dimensional model represents an extension of a two-dimensional, multi-joint model that has been in use for several years. Although most of the concepts in the two-dimensional model translate in a straightforward manner to three dimensions, the concept of slip on the joint planes becomes more complex in three dimensions. While slip in two dimensions can be treated as a scalar quantity, it must be treated as a vector in the joint plane in three dimensions. For the three-dimensional model proposed here, the slip direction is assumed to be the direction of maximum principal strain in the joint plane. Five test problems are presented to verify the correctness of the computational implementation of the model

  17. Shear-induced chaos

    Lin, Kevin K; Young, Lai-Sang

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a geometric understanding developed in earlier works of Wang and Young, we carry out numerical studies of shear-induced chaos in several parallel but different situations. The settings considered include periodic kicking of limit cycles, random kicks at Poisson times and continuous-time driving by white noise. The forcing of a quasi-periodic model describing two coupled oscillators is also investigated. In all cases, positive Lyapunov exponents are found in suitable parameter ranges when the forcing is suitably directed

  18. Shear-induced chaos

    Lin, Kevin K.; Young, Lai-Sang

    2008-05-01

    Guided by a geometric understanding developed in earlier works of Wang and Young, we carry out numerical studies of shear-induced chaos in several parallel but different situations. The settings considered include periodic kicking of limit cycles, random kicks at Poisson times and continuous-time driving by white noise. The forcing of a quasi-periodic model describing two coupled oscillators is also investigated. In all cases, positive Lyapunov exponents are found in suitable parameter ranges when the forcing is suitably directed.

  19. Inelastic deformations of fault and shear zones in granitic rock

    Wilder, D.G.

    1986-02-01

    Deformations during heating and cooling of three drifts in granitic rock were influenced by the presence of faults and shear zones. Thermal deformations were significantly larger in sheared and faulted zones than where the rock was jointed, but neither sheared nor faulted. Furthermore, thermal deformations in faulted or sheared rock were not significantly recovered during subsequent cooling, thus a permanent deformation remained. This inelastic response is in contrast with elastic behavior identified in unfaulted and unsheared rock segments. A companion paper indicates that deformations in unsheared or unfaulted rock were effectively modeled as an elastic response. We conclude that permanent deformations occurred in fractures with crushed minerals and fracture filling or gouge materials. Potential mechanisms for this permanent deformation are asperity readjustments during thermal deformations, micro-shearing, asperity crushing and crushing of the secondary fracture filling minerals. Additionally, modulus differences in sheared or faulted rock as compared to more intact rock would result in greater deformations in response to the same thermal loads

  20. Shear Stress-Relative Slip Relationship at Concrete Interfaces

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a simple and rational shear stress-relative slip model of concrete interfaces with monolithic castings or smooth construction joints. In developing the model, the initial shear cracking stress and relative slip amount at peak stress were formulated from a nonlinear regression analysis using test data for push-off specimens. The shear friction strength was determined from the generalized equations on the basis of the upper-bound theorem of concrete plasticity. Then, a parametric fitting analysis was performed to derive equations for the key parameters determining the shapes of the ascending and descending branches of the shear stress-relative slip curve. The comparisons of predictions and measurements obtained from push-off tests confirmed that the proposed model provides superior accuracy in predicting the shear stress-relative slip relationship of interfacial shear planes. This was evidenced by the lower normalized root mean square error than those in Xu et al.’s model and the CEB-FIB model, which have many limitations in terms of the roughness of the substrate surface along an interface and the magnitude of equivalent normal stress.

  1. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  2. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  3. Modeling reinforced concrete durability.

    2014-06-01

    This project developed a next-generation modeling approach for projecting the extent of : reinforced concrete corrosion-related damage, customized for new and existing Florida Department of : Transportation bridges and suitable for adapting to broade...

  4. A study on the fatigue strength behavior of reinforced concrete structures

    Chang, D.; Chae, W.K.; Kwak, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Design methods for shear have been developed in these days.However, these are mainly based on the test results under static loading, and there are few information concerning the shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams under repeated dynamic loading. From this point of view, this study was performed to investigate the shear behavior of four reinforced concrete beams with web reinforcement under repeated dynamic loading. From these test results, the changes in strain of stirrups and the crack propagation procedures are found as functions of the number of repeated loading cycles. These results are compared with the existing experimental formula for predicting strain of stirrups under repeated loading and also used to find the coefficients in the empirical formula using the regression technique

  5. Temporomandibular joint

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  6. Cyclic Behavior of Low Rise Concrete Shear Walls Containing Recycled Coarse and Fine Aggregates.

    Qiao, Qiyun; Cao, Wanlin; Qian, Zhiwei; Li, Xiangyu; Zhang, Wenwen; Liu, Wenchao

    2017-12-07

    In this study, the cyclic behaviors of low rise concrete shear walls using recycled coarse or fine aggregates were investigated. Eight low rise Recycled Aggregates Concrete (RAC) shear wall specimens were designed and tested under a cyclic loading. The following parameters were varied: replacement percentages of recycled coarse or fine aggregates, reinforcement ratio, axial force ratio and X-shaped rebars brace. The failure characteristics, hysteretic behavior, strength and deformation capacity, strain characteristics and stiffness were studied. Test results showed that the using of the Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA) and its replacement ratio had almost no influence on the mechanical behavior of the shear wall; however, the using of Recycled Fine Aggregates (RFA) had a certain influence on the ductility of the shear wall. When the reinforcement ratio increased, the strength and ductility also increased. By increasing the axial force ratio, the strength increased but the ductility decreased significantly. The encased brace had a significant effect on enhancing the RAC shear walls. The experimental maximum strengths were evaluated with existing design codes, it was indicated that the strength evaluation of the low rise RAC shear walls can follow the existing design codes of the conventional concrete shear walls.

  7. Cyclic Behavior of Low Rise Concrete Shear Walls Containing Recycled Coarse and Fine Aggregates

    Qiyun Qiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the cyclic behaviors of low rise concrete shear walls using recycled coarse or fine aggregates were investigated. Eight low rise Recycled Aggregates Concrete (RAC shear wall specimens were designed and tested under a cyclic loading. The following parameters were varied: replacement percentages of recycled coarse or fine aggregates, reinforcement ratio, axial force ratio and X-shaped rebars brace. The failure characteristics, hysteretic behavior, strength and deformation capacity, strain characteristics and stiffness were studied. Test results showed that the using of the Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA and its replacement ratio had almost no influence on the mechanical behavior of the shear wall; however, the using of Recycled Fine Aggregates (RFA had a certain influence on the ductility of the shear wall. When the reinforcement ratio increased, the strength and ductility also increased. By increasing the axial force ratio, the strength increased but the ductility decreased significantly. The encased brace had a significant effect on enhancing the RAC shear walls. The experimental maximum strengths were evaluated with existing design codes, it was indicated that the strength evaluation of the low rise RAC shear walls can follow the existing design codes of the conventional concrete shear walls.

  8. Connections in Precast Buildings using Ultra High-Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    Ultra high-strength concrete adds new dimensions to the design of concrete structures. It is a brittle material but introducing fibres into the matrix changes the material into a highly ductile material. Furthermore, the fibre reinforcement increases the anchorage of traditional reinforcement bar...... and the fire resistance. Such a fibre reinforced ultra high-strength material has been used to develop a simple joint solution between slab elements in a column - slab building system....

  9. Model of wind shear conditional on turbulence and its impact on wind turbine loads

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Natarajan, Anand; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    proposed for flat terrain and that can significantly decrease the uncertainty associated with fatigue load predictions for wind turbines with large rotors. An essential contribution is the conditioning of wind shear on the 90% quantile of wind turbulence, such that the appropriate magnitude of the design...... fatigue load is achieved. The proposed wind shear model based on the wind measurements is thereby probabilistic in definition, with shear jointly distributed with wind turbulence. A simplified model for the wind shear exponent is further derived from the full stochastic model. The fatigue loads over...... is most pronounced on the blade flap loads. It is further shown that under moderate wind turbulence, the wind shear exponents may be over-specified in the design standards, and a reduction of wind shear exponent based on the present measurements can contribute to reduced fatigue damage equivalent loads...

  10. Excited waves in shear layers

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  11. Designing shear-thinning

    Nelson, Arif Z.; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2017-11-01

    Design in fluid mechanics often focuses on optimizing geometry (airfoils, surface textures, microfluid channels), but here we focus on designing fluids themselves. The dramatically shear-thinning ``yield-stress fluid'' is currently the most utilized non-Newtonian fluid phenomenon. These rheologically complex materials, which undergo a reversible transition from solid-like to liquid-like fluid flow, are utilized in pedestrian products such as paint and toothpaste, but also in emerging applications like direct-write 3D printing. We present a paradigm for yield-stress fluid design that considers constitutive model representation, material property databases, available predictive scaling laws, and the many ways to achieve a yield stress fluid, flipping the typical structure-to-rheology analysis to become the inverse: rheology-to-structure with multiple possible materials as solutions. We describe case studies of 3D printing inks and other flow scenarios where designed shear-thinning enables performance remarkably beyond that of Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1463203.

  12. Strengthening of defected beam–column joints using CFRP

    Mohamed H. Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC exterior beam–column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP. The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam–column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity.

  13. Strengthening of defected beam-column joints using CFRP.

    Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Afefy, Hamdy M; Kassem, Nesreen M; Fawzy, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC) exterior beam-column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP). The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam-column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM) CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity.

  14. Study on reinforced concrete high-rise building using prefabricated beam-column joints. Part 3. ; Basic anchorage behaviors of longitudinal bars of beams. Hahsirater dot hari setsugobu PC ka koho (PG connection koho) wo mochiita RC koso tatemono no kaihatsu. 3. ; Hari shukin no kisoteki teichaku seijo

    SEkine, M.; Yoshioka, K.; Eto, H. (Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-08-10

    Pull-out tests were carried out to examine basic anchorage behaviors of through holes for beam re-bars by using a PG connection method, in which columns and beam-column joints with through holes for beam re-bars in the reinforced concrete framed construction are precast simultaneously. Specimens made by the PG connection method showed better anchorage behaviors than specimens made by the conventional anchorage method. In case of anchorage width of 80cm and concrete strength of about 350kgf/cm{sup 2}, it was recognized that large slipping of re-bars did not occur under allowable bond stress when the interval between re-bars was not less than 15cm and covering depth to the core of re-bars was not less than 8cm. Concerning a specimen which did not show splitting bond failure because of lateral compressive stress, bond stress of re-bars when large slipping occurred was 1.5 times or more in comparison with the allowable bond stress. Since this specimen held high slipping rigidity even after increase of slipping, its anchoring stress increased by 32-57% compared with a specimen without lateral compressive stress. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  16. Characterization and modeling of fiber reinforced concrete for structural applications in beams and plates

    Paegle, Ieva

    (i.e., stirrups) is investigated in detail using digital image correlation (DIC) measurement technique. The use of steel fibers to replace traditional shear reinforcement is not without precedent in current reinforced concrete design codes. However, more detailed information is provided......Fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) with discrete, short and randomly distributed fibers can be specified and designed for structural applications in flexural members. In certain cases, fibers are used as the only reinforcement, while in other cases fibers are used in combination with a reduced amount...... are considered in structural design, the work presented in this thesis analyzes in detail many commonly used test methods on three types of FRC, including Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Concrete (PP-FRC), Polyvinyl Alcohol Fiber Reinforced Concrete called Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) and Steel Fiber...

  17. Behaviour of concrete beams reinforced withFRP prestressed concrete prisms

    Svecova, Dagmar

    The use of fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) to reinforce concrete is gaining acceptance. However, due to the relatively low modulus of FRP, in comparison to steel, such structures may, if sufficient amount of reinforcement is not used, suffer from large deformations and wide cracks. FRP is generally more suited for prestressing. Since it is not feasible to prestress all concrete structures to eliminate the large deflections of FRP reinforced concrete flexural members, researchers are focusing on other strategies. A simple method for avoiding excessive deflections is to provide sufficiently high amount of FRP reinforcement to limit its stress (strain) to acceptable levels under service loads. This approach will not be able to take advantage of the high strength of FRP and will be generally uneconomical. The current investigation focuses on the feasibility of an alternative strategy. This thesis deals with the flexural and shear behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms. FRP prestressed concrete prisms (PCP) are new reinforcing bars, made by pretensioning FRP and embedding it in high strength grout/concrete. The purpose of the research is to investigate the feasibility of using such pretensioned rebars, and their effect on the flexural and shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beams over the entire loading range. Due to the prestress in the prisms, deflection of concrete beams reinforced with this product is substantially reduced, and is comparable to similarly steel reinforced beams. The thesis comprises both theoretical and experimental investigations. In the experimental part, nine beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms, and two companion beams, one steel and one FRP reinforced were tested. All the beams were designed to carry the same ultimate moment. Excellent flexural and shear behaviour of beams reinforced with higher prestressed prisms is reported. When comparing deflections of three beams designed to have the

  18. Magnetorheological dampers in shear mode

    Wereley, N M; Cho, J U; Choi, Y T; Choi, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three types of shear mode damper using magnetorheological (MR) fluids are theoretically analyzed: linear, rotary drum, and rotary disk dampers. The damping performance of these shear mode MR dampers is characterized in terms of the damping coefficient, which is the ratio of the equivalent viscous damping at field-on status to the damping at field-off status. For these three types of shear mode MR damper, the damping coefficient or dynamic range is derived using three different constitutive models: the Bingham–plastic, biviscous, and Herschel–Bulkley models. The impact of constitutive behavior on shear mode MR dampers is theoretically presented and compared

  19. Testing temperature on interfacial shear strength measurements of epoxy resins at different mixing ratios

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Thomason, James L.; Minty, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial properties as Interfacial Shear Stress (IFSS) in fibre reinforced polymers are essential for further understanding of the mechanical properties of the composite. In this work a single fibre testing method is used in combination with an epoxy matrix made from Araldite 506 epoxy res...

  20. Shear or bending? Experimental results on large t-shaped prestressed conrete beams

    Ensink, S.W.H.; Van der Veen, C.; De Boer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results of four shear tests on two large prestressed concrete beams are compared to nonlinear analysis and design code calculations. The beams have a length of 12 m and a depth of 1.3 m and are reinforced with stirrups and pre-tensioning. The four tests consist of a single point load at

  1. Experimental Studies on the Mechanical Behaviour of Rock Joints with Various Openings

    Li, Y.; Oh, J.; Mitra, R.; Hebblewhite, B.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical behaviour of rough joints is markedly affected by the degree of joint opening. A systematic experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of the initial opening on both normal and shear deformations of rock joints. Two types of joints with triangular asperities were produced in the laboratory and subjected to compression tests and direct shear tests with different initial opening values. The results showed that opened rock joints allow much greater normal closure and result in much lower normal stiffness. A semi-logarithmic law incorporating the degree of interlocking is proposed to describe the normal deformation of opened rock joints. The proposed equation agrees well with the experimental results. Additionally, the results of direct shear tests demonstrated that shear strength and dilation are reduced because of reduced involvement of and increased damage to asperities in the process of shearing. The results indicate that constitutive models of rock joints that consider the true asperity contact area can be used to predict shear resistance along opened rock joints. Because rock masses are loosened and rock joints become open after excavation, the model suggested in this study can be incorporated into numerical procedures such as finite-element or discrete-element methods. Use of the model could then increase the accuracy and reliability of stability predictions for rock masses under excavation.

  2. Behavior of reinforced concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    D. H. Tavares

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars is one of the alternatives presented in recent studies to prevent the drawbacks related to the steel reinforcement in specific reinforced concrete members. In this work, six reinforced concrete beams were submitted to four point bending tests. One beam was reinforced with CA-50 steel bars and five with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars. The tests were carried out in the Department of Structural Engineering in São Carlos Engineering School, São Paulo University. The objective of the test program was to compare strength, reinforcement deformation, displacement, and some anchorage aspects between the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams and the steel-reinforced concrete beam. The results show that, even though four GFRP-reinforced concrete beams were designed with the same internal tension force as that with steel reinforcement, their capacity was lower than that of the steel-reinforced beam. The results also show that similar flexural capacity can be achieved for the steel- and for the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams by controlling the stiffness (reinforcement modulus of elasticity multiplied by the bar cross-sectional area - EA and the tension force of the GFRP bars.

  3. Experimental Study On Flexural Behaviour Of Beams Reinforced With GFRP Rebars

    Naveen Kumar, G.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    In saline, moisture and cold conditions corrosion of steel is inevitable and the lot of economy is used for rehabilitation works. Corrosion of steel is nothing but oxidation of iron in moisture conditions and this corrosion leads to the spalling of concrete which intern reduces the strength of the structure. To reduce this corrosion effects, new materials with resistance against corrosion have to be introduced. Many experiments are going on using Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) as alternate material for steel due to its non-corrosive nature, weight of GFRP is nearly one third of steel and ultimate tensile strength is higher than steel. In this paper, six beams are casted in which three beams are casted with steel as main and shear reinforcement and another three beams are casted with GFRP as main reinforcement with steel as shear reinforcing material. All beams casted are of same dimensions with variation in reinforcement percentage. The size of the beams casted is of length 1200 mm, breadth 100 mm and depth 200 mm. The clear cover of 25 mm is provided on top and bottom of the beam. Beams are tested under two-point loading with constant aspect ratio (a/d) and comparing the flexural strength, load deflection curves and types of failures of beams reinforced with GFRP as main reinforcement and beams reinforced with conventional steel. The final experimental results are compared with numerical results. M30 grade concrete with Conplast as a superplasticizer is used for casting beams.

  4. Joint diseases

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  5. Joint pain

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  6. Joint Commission

    ... for the latest publication of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety (JQPS). . How We Work Process improvement program breeds quality culture, empowers staff An article in Quality Progress, June ...

  7. RC T beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites

    L. A. Spagnolo JR

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental data of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites. The tests were composed of eight T beams, b w=15 cm, h=40 cm, flange width 40 cm, flange height 8 cm, and length 300 cm, divided into two series with the same longitudinal steel reinforcement and a reference beam without strengthening in each series. The beams had two types of arrangement of internal steel stirrups. The test variables were the internal and external geometric ratio of the transverse reinforcement and the mechanical ratio of carbon fiber composites stirrups. All the beams were loaded at two points. The strengthened beams were submitted to a preloading and the strengthening was applied to the cracked beam. All the beams were designed in order to guarantee shear failure, and the ultimate load of the strengthened beams was 36% to 54% greater than the reference beams. The Cracking Sliding Model applied to the strengthened beams was evaluated and showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. The Behavioral Economics of Substance Use Disorders: reinforcement pathologies and their repair

    Bickel, Warren K.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; MacKillop, James; Murphy, James G.

    2015-01-01

    The field of behavioral economics has made important inroads into the understanding of substance use disorders through the concept of reinforcer pathology. Reinforcer pathology refers to the joint effects of (a) the persistently high valuation of a reinforcer, broadly defined to include tangible commodities and experiences, and/or (b) the excessive preference for the immediate acquisition or consumption of a commodity despite long-term negative outcomes. From this perspective, reinforcer pathology results from the recursive interactions of endogenous person-level variables and exogenous environment-level factors. The current review describes the basic principles of behavioral economics that are central to reinforcer pathology, the processes that engender reinforcer pathology, and the approaches and procedures that can repair reinforcement pathologies. The overall goal of this review is to present a new understanding of substance use disorders as viewed by recent advances in behavioral economics. PMID:24679180

  9. The behavioral economics of substance use disorders: reinforcement pathologies and their repair.

    Bickel, Warren K; Johnson, Matthew W; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; MacKillop, James; Murphy, James G

    2014-01-01

    The field of behavioral economics has made important inroads into the understanding of substance use disorders through the concept of reinforcer pathology. Reinforcer pathology refers to the joint effects of (a) the persistently high valuation of a reinforcer, broadly defined to include tangible commodities and experiences, and/or (b) the excessive preference for the immediate acquisition or consumption of a commodity despite long-term negative outcomes. From this perspective, reinforcer pathology results from the recursive interactions of endogenous person-level variables and exogenous environment-level factors. The current review describes the basic principles of behavioral economics that are central to reinforcer pathology, the processes that engender reinforcer pathology, and the approaches and procedures that can repair reinforcement pathologies. The overall goal of this review is to present a new understanding of substance use disorders as viewed by recent advances in behavioral economics.

  10. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  11. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shells

    Mustafa K. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to develop a numerical model suitable for nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete shells. A nine-node Lagrangian element Figure (1 with enhanced shear interpolation will be used in this study. Table (1 describes shape functions and their derivatives of this element.An assumed transverse shear strain is used in the formulation of this element to overcome shear locking. Degenerated quadratic thick plate elements employing a layered discrelization through the thickness will be adopted. Different numbers of layers for different thickness can be used per element. A number of layers between (6 and 10 have proved to be appropriate to represent the nonlinear material behavior in structures. In this research 8 layers will be adequate. Material nonlinearities due to cracking of concrete, plastic flow or crushing of concrete in compression and yield condition of reinforcing steel are considered. The maximum tensile strength is used as a criterion for crack initiation. Attention is given to the tension stiffening phenomenon and the degrading effect of cracking on the compressive and shear strength of concrete. Perfect bond between concrete and steel is assumed. Attention is given also to geometric nonlinearities. An example have been chosen in order to demonstrate the suitability of the models by comparing the predicted behaviour with the experimental results for shell exhibiting various modes of failure.

  12. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...... of the response, results in the ability to determine and characterize the two-way crack propagation, i.e. the relationship between tensile cracking in the concrete and interface debonding between strengthening and concrete. Using the load-crack opening relationship from the strengthened concrete tension member...

  13. The modelling and measurement of super-conducting rock joints

    Barton, N.; Makurat, A.; Vik, G.; Loset, F.

    1985-01-01

    Rock joints exhibiting exceptionally high conductivity have been responsible for severe inflows (10-50 m 3 /min.) and flooding in recent Norwegian tunneling projects. These events may be explained by channeling of flow in partially outwashed mineral fillings, associated with deep weathering in ancient basement rocks. There is also evidence to suggest extensional strain with consistent relationships to regional faulting patterns (Selmer-Olsen 1981). Hydraulic fractures making connection with joint systems that are sheared as a result of increased fluid pressure, has been deduced as the mechanism explaining unusually large fluid losses in the geothermal project in Cornwall, England (Pine and Batchelor, 1984). Such mechanisms also introduce uncertainty into water flood and MHF stimulation treatment of fractured oil and gas reservoirs, particularly when principal stress and joint orientations are poorly understood due to coring and stress measurement problems in weak, overstressed reservoir rocks. The possibility of permanent disposal of nuclear waste in crystalline rock, has also focussed attention on highly conductive (''super-conducting'') joints in nuclear waste programmes in Canada, the USA and in Europe. The bi-modal distributions of joint spacing, continuity, apertures and conductivities resulting from the discovery of super-conducting joints has important implications for the location of planned repositories, due to their dramatic impact on potential transport times. In the laboratory a class of super-conducting joints can be created by shear displacement that causes dilation when shearing non-planar features. Recent biaxial shear testing of rock joints recovered in jointed core has identified a strong coupling of conductivity and shear displacement. The theoretical predictions of constitutive relationships for coupled flow in rock joints (Barton et al. 1985) have been broadly verified

  14. Some special problems of steel reinforcement in nuclear structural engineering

    Bazant, B.; Smejkal, P.; Vetchy, J.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of the mechanical and design characteristics of reinforcing steels for reinforced concrete structures of classes A-0 to A-IV under Czechoslovak State Standard CSN 73 1201 and Soviet standard SNiP II-21-75. Tests were performed to study changes in the values of the yield point, breaking strength, the tensile strength limit and the module of elasticity in selected Czechoslovak steels. The comparison showed that the steels behave in the same manner at high temperatures as Soviet steels of corresponding strength characteristics. Dynamic design strength of Czechoslovak materials also corresponds to values given in the Soviet standard. The technology and evaluation of welded joints equal for both Czechoslovak and Soviet steels. The manufacture was started of tempered wires with a high strength limit for prestressed wire reinforcement. All tests and comparisons showed that Czechoslovak reinforcing steels meet Soviet prescriptions, in some instances Czechoslovak standards are even more strict. (J.B.)

  15. INVESTIGATION OF INNER SHEAR RESISTANCE OF GEOGRIDS BUILT UNDER GRANULAR PROTECTION LAYERS AND RAILWAY BALLAST

    Sz. Fischer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Using adequate granular materials and layer structures in the railway super- and substructure is able to stabilise railway track geometry. For this purpose special behaviour of above materials has to be determined, e.g. inner shear resistance. Inner shear resistance of granular media with and without geogrid reinforcement in different depths is not known yet. Methodology. The author developed a special laboratory method to measure and define inner shear resistance of granular materials, it is called «multi-level shear box test». This method is adequate to determine inner shear resistance (pushing force vs. depth (distance from the «zero» surface. Two different granular materials: andesite railway ballast (31.5/63 mm and andesite railway protection layer material (0/56 mm, and seven different types of geogrids (GG1…GG7 were used during the tests. Findings. Values of inner shear resistance functions of andesite railway ballast without geogrid reinforcement and reinforced with different types of geogrids and andesite granular protection layer in function of the vertical distance from the geogrid plane were determined with multi-layer shear box tests when the material aggregation is uncompacted and compacted. Only the compacted sample was tested in case of the 0/56 mm protection layer. Cubic polynomial regression functions fitted on the mean values of the measurements are described graphically. Determination coefficients with values of R2>0.97 were resulted in all the cases of regression functions. Based on the polynomial regression functions fitted on the mean values of the test results, three increasing factors were determined in function of the distance measured from the geogrid. Increasing factor «A», «B» and «D». Originality. Multi-level shear box test, developed by the author, is certified unequivocally adequate for determining inner shear resistance of reinforced and unreinforced granular materials, e.g. railway ballast

  16. Effect of Fiber Reinforcement on the Response of Structural Members

    Fischer, Gregor; Li, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a series of investigations on the effect of fiber reinforcement on the response of structural members in direct tension and flexure under reversed cyclic loading conditions. The design approach of the fiber reinforced cementitious composite is based on fracture mechanics...... principles, which will be described in the first part of the paper along with an introduction of the relevant material properties of the resulting engineered cementitious composite (ECC). This class of composites is characterized by strain hardening and multiple cracking properties in uniaxial tension...... and an ultimate tensile strain capacity on the order of several percent. Subsequently, the synergistic effects of composite deformation mechanisms in the ECC and structural members subjected to large shear reversals are identified. Beneficial effects observed in the reinforced ECC structural members as compared...

  17. Pile-Reinforcement Behavior of Cohesive Soil Slopes: Numerical Modeling and Centrifuge Testing

    Liping Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrifuge model tests were conducted on pile-reinforced and unreinforced cohesive soil slopes to investigate the fundamental behavior and reinforcement mechanism. A finite element analysis model was established and confirmed to be effective in capturing the primary behavior of pile-reinforced slopes by comparing its predictions with experimental results. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the stress-deformation response was obtained by combining the numerical and physical simulations. The response of pile-reinforced slope was indicated to be significantly affected by pile spacing, pile location, restriction style of pile end, and inclination of slope. The piles have a significant effect on the behavior of reinforced slope, and the influencing area was described using a continuous surface, denoted as W-surface. The reinforcement mechanism was described using two basic concepts, compression effect and shear effect, respectively, referring to the piles increasing the compression strain and decreasing the shear strain of the slope in comparison with the unreinforced slope. The pile-soil interaction induces significant compression effect in the inner zone near the piles; this effect is transferred to the upper part of the slope, with the shear effect becoming prominent to prevent possible sliding of unreinforced slope.

  18. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  19. Reinforced concrete tomography

    Mariscotti, M.A.J.; Morixe, M.; Tarela, P.A.; Thieberger, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the technique of reinforced concrete tomography, its historical background, recent technological developments and main applications. Gamma radiation sensitive plates are imprinted with radiation going through the concrete sample under study, and then processed to reveal the presence of reinforcement and defects in the material density. The three dimensional reconstruction, or tomography, of the reinforcement out of a single gammagraphy is an original development alternative to conventional methods. Re-bar diameters and positions may be determined with an accuracy of ± 1 mm 0.5-1 cm, respectively. The non-destructive character of this technique makes it particularly attractive in cases of inhabited buildings and diagnoses of balconies. (author) [es

  20. Mixed-mode fatigue fracture of adhesive joints in harsh environments and nonlinear viscoelastic modeling of the adhesive

    Arzoumanidis, Alexis Gerasimos

    A four point bend, mixed-mode, reinforced, cracked lap shear specimen experimentally simulated adhesive joints between load bearing composite parts in automotive components. The experiments accounted for fatigue, solvent and temperature effects on a swirled glass fiber composite adherend/urethane adhesive system. Crack length measurements based on compliance facilitated determination of da/dN curves. A digital image processing technique was also utilized to monitor crack growth from in situ images of the side of the specimen. Linear elastic fracture mechanics and finite elements were used to determine energy release rate and mode-mix as a function of crack length for this specimen. Experiments were conducted in air and in a salt water bath at 10, 26 and 90°C. Joints tested in the solvent were fully saturated. In air, both increasing and decreasing temperature relative to 26°C accelerated crack growth rates. In salt water, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature. Threshold energy release rate is shown to be the most appropriate design criteria for joints of this system. In addition, path of the crack is discussed and fracture surfaces are examined on three length scales. Three linear viscoelastic properties were measured for the neat urethane adhesive. Dynamic tensile compliance (D*) was found using a novel extensometer and results were considerably more accurate and precise than standard DMTA testing. Dynamic shear compliance (J*) was determined using an Arcan specimen. Dynamic Poisson's ratio (nu*) was extracted from strain gage data analyzed to include gage reinforcement. Experiments spanned three frequency decades and isothermal data was shifted by time-temperature superposition to create master curves spanning thirty decades. Master curves were fit to time domain Prony series. Shear compliance inferred from D* and nu* compared well with measured J*, forming a basis for finding the complete time dependent material property matrix for this

  1. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  2. Experimental Study and Shear Strength Prediction for Reactive Powder Concrete Beams

    Maha M.S. Ridha

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen reactive powder concrete (RPC beams subjected to monotonic loading were tested to quantify the effect of a novel cementitious matrix materials on the shear behavior of longitudinally reinforced RPC beams without web reinforcement. The main test variables were the ratio of the shear span-to- effective depth (a/d, the ratio of the longitudinal reinforcement (ρw, the percentage of steel fibers volume fractions (Vf and the percentage of silica fume powder (SF. A massive experimental program was implemented with monitoring the concrete strain, the deflection and the cracking width and pattern for each RPC beam during the test at all the stages of the loading until failure. The findings of this paper showed that the addition of micro steel fibers (Lf/Df = 13/0.2 into the RPC mixture did not dramatically influence the initial diagonal cracking load whereas it improved the ultimate load capacity, ductility and absorbed energy. The shear design equations proposed by Ashour et al. and Bunni for high strength fiber reinforced concrete (HSFRC beams have been modified in this paper to predict the shear strength of slender RPC beams without web reinforcement and with a/d ≥ 2.5. The predictions of the modified equations are compared with Equations of Shine et al., Kwak et al. and Khuntia et al. Both of the modified equations in this paper gave satisfied predictions for the shear strength of the tested RPC beams with COV of 7.9% and 10%. Keywords: Beams, Ductility, Crack width, Absorbed energy, Reactive powder concrete, Steel fibers

  3. Co-consolidation of titanium-C/PAEK joints: an investigation into the interfacial performance governing mechanisms

    Su, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Fastener free metal-carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite hybrid joints show a potential for application in aerospace structures. In comparison with fastened hybrid joints, fastener free hybrid joints exhibit advantages in terms of joint weight reduction and a more uniformly distributed

  4. Soil reinforcement with geosynthetics

    Bessaim Mohammed Mustapha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportionality of existence of land with good bearing to erect any building or building is very small, to remedy this deficiency it is necessary to resort to techniques of reinforcement of the soils which can constitute a very important development. Among these methods of remediation, there is reinforcement by the geosynthetics which constitute an effective solution to these constraints. This process tends to stabilize the soil in question with increased load bearing capacity in civil engineering and geotechnical works such as embankments, slopes, embankments and hydraulic structures, with an inestimable gain in time, economy and durability while preserving the natural and environmental aspect.

  5. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  6. Shear buckling of cylindrical vessels benchmark exercise

    Dostal, M; Austin, N.; Combescure, A.; Peano, A.; Angeloni, P.

    1987-01-01

    In Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) potential shear buckling failures of the primary vessel, induced through seismic excitations, have to be considered. The problem is particularly severe in pool type reactors due to their large size, radius of approximately 10 m, coupled with small wall thicknesses of 50 mm and less. The object of this paper is to provide a comparison of three different computer codes capable of performing buckling analyses and to demonstrate on practical problems the level of accuracy that may be expected in design analyses. Three computer codes were examined ABAQUS, CASTEM (INCA/BILBO) and NOVNL and the computer results were compared directly with experimental data and other commonly used empirical formula. The joint effort was co-ordinated through the CEC Working Group on Codes and Standards AG2. (orig./GL)

  7. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  8. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan A; Addison, Laura R; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relations among reinforcer magnitude, preference, and efficacy by drawing on the procedures and results of basic experimenta...

  9. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Schewe, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The seismic response of a typical shear structure in a commercial nuclear power plant was investigated for a series of site and foundation conditions using best estimate and design procedures. The structure selected is a part of the Zion AFT complex which is a connected group of reinforced concrete shear wall buildings, typical of nuclear power plant structures. Comparisons between best estimate responses quantified the effects of placing the structure on different sites and founding it in different manners. Calibration factors were developed by comparing simplified SSI design procedure responses to responses calculated by best estimate procedures. Nineteen basic cases were analyzed - each case was analyzed for ten earthquakes targeted to the NRC R.G. 1.60 design response spectra. The structure is a part of the Zion auxiliary-fuel handling turbine building (AFT) complex to the Zion nuclear power plants. (orig./HP)

  10. D7.21 Report on Validation of design of grouted joints Work Package 7.2

    Rodriguez, Alvaro; Natarajan, Anand; Santos, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    components. As offshore wind turbines reach 10 MW capacities, it is extremely important to determine the reliability of grouted joints and their design configurations so as to ensure integrity of the 10 MW support structure. This report investigates two types of grouted joint connections, the conventional...... cylindrical joint with shear keys and a conical joint without shear keys. In both cases, fully coupled load simulations are made to determine the fatigue resistance and ultimate load resistance of the joint. Key recommendations are made for the reliable design of grouted joints for 10 MW wind turbines...

  11. Joint Intentionality

    Koreň Ladislav

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the shared intentionality hypothesis proposed by Michael Tomasello, two cognitive upgrades – joint and collective intentionality, respectively – make human thinking unique. Joint intentionality, in particular, is a mindset supposed to account for our early, species-specific capacity to participate in collaborative activities involving two (or a few agents. In order to elucidate such activities and their proximate cognitive-motivational mechanism, Tomasello draws on philosophical accounts of shared intentionality. I argue that his deference to such cognitively demanding accounts of shared intentional activities is problematic if his theoretical ambition is in part to show that and how early (prelinguistic and precultural capacities for joint action contribute to the development of higher cognitive capacities.

  12. Turbomachine blade reinforcement

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system having a turbomachine blade segment including a blade and a mounting segment coupled to the blade, wherein the mounting segment has a plurality of reinforcement pins laterally extending at least partially through a neck of the mounting segment.

  13. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  14. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Addison, Laura R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current…

  15. Investigation on the flexural behaviour of reinforced concrete beams using phyllite aggregates from mining waste

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Afrifa, Russell Owusu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Most parts of the world's geology is underlain by phyllite rocks. → Crack widths not well predicted so may not be used in water retaining structures. → Shear failure mode and low displacement ductility often observed in beams. → Concrete shear capacity observed lower than code values. -- Abstract: This paper investigated the flexural behaviour of 12 reinforced concrete (RC) beams made of phyllite coarse aggregates produced as by-product of underground gold mining activity. The beams were tested to failure under four point test. Collapse of the beams which were adequately designed against shear failure occurred mostly through either flexural-shear failure and/or diagonal tension failure. The experimental failure loads averaged approximately 115% of the theoretical failure loads. It was observed that the beams developed early shear cracks and higher flexural crack widths than allowable at service loads. Deflections compared reasonably well with the design code requirement but displacement ductility was low. It is recommended that British Standard (BS) 8110 design concrete shear stress values be multiplied by 0.8 to assure that the predicted shear capacity of phyllite concrete would be low and reasonable as compared to flexural capacity. In that case, BS 8110 can be used to provide adequate load factor against flexural failure for under-reinforced RC beams made of phyllite coarse aggregates.

  16. A method for three-dimensional structural analysis of reinforced concrete containment

    Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element method designed to assist reactor safety analysts in the three-dimensional numerical simulation of reinforced concrete containments to normal and off-normal mechanical loadings is presented. The development of a lined reinforced concrete plate element is described in detail, and the implementation of an empirical transverse shear failure criteria is discussed. The method is applied to the analysis of a 1/6th scale reinforced concrete containment model subjected to static internal pressurization. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  17. Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1998-04-01

    Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation's (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Fifty years of shear zones

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  19. Estimation of in-situ joint properties, Naesliden Mine

    Barton, N.

    1980-05-15

    Finite element modelling of jointed rock masses requires detailed input data concerning the mechanical behaviour of the relevant joint sets. In the case of the Naesliden project, the properties of the footwall and hanging wall contacts were of particular concern because of their planarity. Methods of estimating the full-scale shear strength and shear stiffness are summarized. The estimates are based on assessment of full-scale values of the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), the joint wall compressive strength (JCS) and the residual friction angle. Sensitivity analyses indicate which of these parameters need to be determined with greatest accuracy at the levels of normal stress of interest. The full-scale estimates are compared with laboratory scale data and with data obtained from small scale tilt tests and tests on model tension fractures. A scale effect makes direct application of laboratory data of doubtful value. A simple dimensionless shear force-displacement formulation is suggested that describes the mobilization and subsequent reduction of joint roughness, as peak strength is exceeded during a given shearing event. The effect of changing normal stress during shearing is accounted for using this method.

  20. Reinforced concrete design to Eurocode 2

    Toniolo, Giandomenico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook describes the basic mechanical features of concrete and explains the main resistant mechanisms activated in the reinforced concrete structures and foundations when subjected to centred and eccentric axial force, bending moment, shear, torsion and prestressing,. It presents a complete set of limit-state design criteria of the modern theory of RC incorporating principles and rules of the final version of the official Eurocode 2. This textbook examines methodological more than notional aspects of the presented topics, focusing on the verifications of assumptions, the rigorousness of the analysis and the consequent degree of reliability of results. Each chapter develops an organic topic, which is eventually illustrated by examples in each final paragraph containing the relative numerical applications. These practical end-of-chapter appendices and intuitive flow-charts ensure a smooth learning experience. The book stands as an ideal learning resource for students of structural design and analysis cou...

  1. Flexible concrete link slabs used as expansion joints in bridge decks

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    of water through the expansion joint and subsequent corrosion of girders and girder bearings. Investigations on joint-less superstructures using conventional steel reinforcement in so-called concrete link slabs indicate improved performance and economic feasibility. However, this concept requires...... relatively large amounts of steel reinforcement for crack control purposes and consequently provides a relatively large flexural stiffness and negative moment capacity at the joint between the spans. These contradicting requirements and effects in existing replacement concepts for damaged mechanical bridge...... joints are currently unresolved. In the proposed system described in this paper, a ductile cement-based composite section reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) replaces the damaged expansion joint. The combination of this ductile concrete together with corrosion resistant GFRP...

  2. Microstructural and Mechanical Property Characterization of Shear Formed Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    Troeger, Lillianne P.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes such as near-net-shape forming can reduce production costs and increase the reliability of launch vehicle and airframe structural components through the reduction of material scrap and part count and the minimization of joints. The current research is an investigation of the processing-microstructure-property relationships for shear formed cylinders of the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy 2195 for space applications and the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy C415 for airframe applications. Cylinders which had undergone various amounts of shear-forming strain were studied to correlate the grain structure, texture, and mechanical properties developed during and after shear forming.

  3. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Shear Formed Aluminum Alloys for Airframe and Space Applications

    Troeger, L. P.; Domack, M. S.; Wagner, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes such as near-net-shape forming can reduce production costs and increase the reliability of launch vehicle and airframe structural components through the reduction of material scrap and part count and the minimization of joints. The current research is an investigation of the processing-microstructure-property relationship for shear formed cylinders of the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy 2195 for space applications and the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy C415 for airframe applications. Cylinders which have undergone various amounts of shear-forming strain have been studied to assess the microstructure and mechanical properties developed during and after shear forming.

  4. Seismic and Power Generation Performance of U-Shaped Steel Connected PV-Shear Wall under Lateral Cyclic Loading

    Zhang, Hongmei; Dong, Jinzhi; Duan, Yuanfeng; Lu, Xilin; Peng, Jinqing

    2014-01-01

    BIPV is now widely used in office and residential buildings, but its seismic performance still remained vague especially when the photovoltaic (PV) modules are installed on high-rise building facades. A new form of reinforced concrete shear wall integrated with photovoltaic module is proposed in this paper, aiming to apply PV module to the facades of high-rise buildings. In this new form, the PV module is integrated with the reinforced concrete wall by U-shaped steel connectors through embedd...

  5. The Reinforcing Event (RE) Menu

    Addison, Roger M.; Homme, Lloyd E.

    1973-01-01

    A motivational system, the Contingency Management System, uses contracts in which some amount of defined task behavior is demanded for some interval of reinforcing event. The Reinforcing Event Menu, a list of high probability reinforcing behaviors, is used in the system as a prompting device for the learner and as an aid for the administrator in…

  6. Joint imaging

    Hengst, W.

    1984-01-01

    Joint imaging is a proven diagnostic procedure which has become indispensable to the detection and treatment of different joint diseases in almost all disciplines. The method is suited for early diagnosis of joint affections both in soft tissue and bone which cannot be detected by X-ray or other procedures. The local activity accumulation depends on the rate of metabolism and is visualized in the scan, which in turn enables the extension and floridity of focal lesions to be evaluated and followed-up. Although joint scans may often give hints to probabilities relevant to differential diagnosis, the method is non-specific and only useful if based on the underlying clinical picture and X-ray finding, if possible. The radiation exposure is very low and does not represent a hazard in cases of adequate assessment of indication. In pregnant women and children the assessment of indication has to be based on very strict principles. The method is suited for out-patient diagnosis and can be applied in all installations equipped with a gamma camera and a technetium generator. (orig.) [de

  7. Joint purpose?

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Starting from Crenshaw´s point that antiracism often fails to interrogate patriarchy and that feminism often reproduces racist practices (1991: 1252), this paper asks: What are the theoretical reasons for believing that feminism and anti-racism can be regarded as fighting for the joint purpose...

  8. Some effects of overall rate of earning reinforcers on run lengths and visit durations.

    Macdonall, James S

    2006-07-01

    In a concurrent schedule, responding at each alternative is controlled by a pair of schedules that arrange reinforcers for staying at that alternative and reinforcers for switching to the other alternative. Each pair of schedules operates only while at the associated alternative. When only one pair of stay and switch schedules is presented, the rates of earning reinforcers for staying divided by the rates of earning reinforcers for switching controls the mean number responses in a visit and the mean duration of visits. The purpose of the present experiment was to see whether the sum of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers changed the way that run length and visit duration were affected by the ratio of the rates of stay to switch reinforcers. Rats were exposed to pairs of stay and switch schedules that varied both the ratio of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers and the sum of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers. Run lengths and visit durations were joint functions of the ratio of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers and the sum of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers. These results shows that the effect of the ratio of the sum of the rates of earning stay and switch reinforcers results from processes operating at the alternative, rather than from processes operating at both alternatives.

  9. SEDflume - High Shear Stress Flume

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers High Shear Stress flume (SEDflume) is designed for estimating erosion rates of fine-grained and mixed fine/coarse grained sediments...

  10. Development of a Skewed Pipe Shear Connector for Precast Concrete Structures.

    Kim, Sang-Hyo; Choi, Jae-Gu; Park, Sejun; Lee, Hyunmin; Heo, And Won-Ho

    2017-05-13

    Joint connection methods, such as shear key and loop bar, improve the structural performance of precast concrete structures; consequently, there is usually decreased workability or constructional efficiency. This paper proposes a high-efficiency skewed pipe shear connector. To resist shear and pull-out forces, the proposed connectors are placed diagonally between precast concrete segments and a cast-in-place concrete joint part on a girder. Design variables (such as the pipe diameter, length, and insertion angle) have been examined to investigate the connection performance of the proposed connector. The results of our testing indicate that the skewed pipe shear connectors have 50% higher ductility and a 15% higher ratio of maximum load to yield strength as compared to the corresponding parameters of the loop bar. Finite element analysis was used for validation. The resulting validation indicates that, compared to the loop bar, the skewed pipe shear connector has a higher ultimate shear and pull-out resistance. These results indicate that the skewed pipe shear connector demonstrates more idealized behavior than the loop bar in precast concrete structures.

  11. Air permeability for a concrete shear wall after a damaging seismic load simulation cycle

    Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This paper describes an experiment performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient-pressure decay. Air permeability measurements made on the shear wall before loading fell within the range of values for concrete permeability published in the literature. As long as the structure exhibited linear load-displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked)

  12. Autoshaping Chicks with Heat Reinforcement: The Role of Stimulus-Reinforcer and Response-Reinforcer Relations

    Wasserman, Edward A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The present series of experiments attempted to analyze more fully the contributions of stimulus-reinforcer and response-reinforcer relations to autoshaping within a single conditioning situation. (Author)

  13. Moment Capacity of Timber Reinforced with Punched Metal Plate Fasteners

    Nielsen, Jacob; Ellegaard, Peter

    When designing timber trusses it is often found that the cross section controlling the dimensions of the top chord is located at a joint with a moment peak. However, the timber volume affected by the moment peak is rather limited and by embedding a punched metal plate in this area a reinforcement...... of the section is obtained, resulting in a more economic truss design. In order to develop design methods for sections with plate reinforcement, bending tests have been made. The timber is Swedish spruce of strength class K-18(S8) and K-24(S10) with a thickness of 45 mm. The punched metal plate is from Gang...

  14. Study on reinforced concrete beams with helical transverse reinforcement

    Kaarthik Krishna, N.; Sandeep, S.; Mini, K. M.

    2018-02-01

    In a Reinforced Concrete (R.C) structure, major reinforcement is used for taking up tensile stresses acting on the structure due to applied loading. The present paper reports the behavior of reinforced concrete beams with helical reinforcement (transverse reinforcement) subjected to monotonous loading by 3-point flexure test. The results were compared with identically similar reinforced concrete beams with rectangular stirrups. During the test crack evolution, load carrying capacity and deflection of the beams were monitored, analyzed and compared. Test results indicate that the use of helical reinforcement provides enhanced load carrying capacity and a lower deflection proving to be more ductile, clearly indicating the advantage in carrying horizontal loads. An analysis was also carried out using ANSYS software in order to compare the test results of both the beams.

  15. Degradation of Waterfront Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Key words: Degradation, reinforced concrete, Dar es Salaam port. Abstract—One of the ... especially corrosion of the reinforcement. ... Corrosion of steel reinforcement contributes .... cracks along the line of reinforcement bars and most of the ...

  16. Size effects in shear interfaces

    GARNIER, J

    2001-01-01

    In physical modelling (centrifuge tests, calibration chambers, laboratory tests), the size of the soil particles may not be negligible when compared to the dimensions of the models. Size effects may so disturb the response of the models and the experimental data obtained on these cannot be extended to true scale conditions. Different tests have been performed to study and quantify the size effects that may happen in shear interfaces between soils and structures : modified shear box tests, pul...

  17. Multifractal spectra in shear flows

    Keefe, L. R.; Deane, Anil E.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of three-dimensional homogeneous shear flow and fully developed channel flow, are used to calculate the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation field. Only weak parameterization of the results with the nondimensional shear is found, and this only if the flow has reached its asymptotic development state. Multifractal spectra of these flows coincide with those from experiments only at the range alpha less than 1.

  18. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  19. Effect of fiberglass reinforcement on the behavior of bolted wood connections

    Lawrence A. Soltis; Robert J. Ross; Daniel E. Windorski

    1997-01-01

    Bolted connections often fail by a shear plug or by splitting beneath the bolt caused by tension perpendicular-to-grain stress as the bolt wedges its way through the wood. Preventing this type of failure enhances both the capacity and reliability of bolted connections. This research investigated the use of fiberglass reinforcement to enhance the load-carrying capacity...

  20. Dynamic behavior of reinforced concrete beam subjected to impact load

    Ito, Chihiro; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Sato, Koichi; Takano, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to find out the impact behavior of reinforced concrete beams by means of experiment. The reinforced concrete is widely used for such an important structure as the building facilities of the nuclear power plant, and so the impact behavior of the reinforced concrete structures must be examined to estimate the resistance of concrete containment against impact load and to develope the reasonable and reliable design procedure. The impact test on reinforced concrete beam which is one of the most basic elements in the structure was conducted. Main results are summarized as follows. 1) Bending failure occured on static test. On the other hand, shear failure occured in the case of high impact velocity on impact test. 2) Penetration depth and residual deflection are approximately proportional to V 2 (V: velocity at impact). 3) Flexural wave propagates about at the speed of 2000 m/s. 4) The resistance of reinforced concrete beam against the impact load is fairly good. (author)

  1. Highly radioresistant aramid fiber as a concrete-reinforcing material. Development of reinforced compound materials

    Udagawa, Akira; Moriya, Toshio.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear installations, such as nuclear fusion reactor always receive strong influence from magnetic field. There, stray current is induced by the changes in magnetic fields among iron rods of the construction, resulting that the plasma control magnetic field might be disturbed. As the countermeasures for these troubles, iron rods mixed with non-magnetic Mn-steel have been used in JAERI, but it is insufficient to completely prevent such electromagnetic damages. Thus, aramid fiber reinforced plastics (ArFRP) was paid an attention as a concrete-reinforcing material. JAERI has been attempting to develop a radioresistant ArFRP jointly with Mitsui Construction Co., Ltd. and a highly efficient producing process of ArFRP was developed. The product had superior properties in respects of radioresistancy, heat-resistancy and durability. The properties of newly developed ArFRP rods were compared with those of the conventional ArFRP and iron rods. (M.N.)

  2. Reinforcing mechanism of anchors in slopes: a numerical comparison of results of LEM and FEM

    Cai, Fei; Ugai, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports the limitation of the conventional Bishop's simplified method to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors, and proposes a new approach to considering the reinforcing effect of anchors on the safety factor. The reinforcing effect of anchors can be explained using an additional shearing resistance on the slip surface. A three-dimensional shear strength reduction finite element method (SSRFEM), where soil-anchor interactions were simulated by three-dimensional zero-thickness elasto-plastic interface elements, was used to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors to verify the reinforcing mechanism of anchors. The results of SSRFEM were compared with those of the conventional and proposed approaches for Bishop's simplified method for various orientations, positions, and spacings of anchors, and shear strengths of soil-grouted body interfaces. For the safety factor, the proposed approach compared better with SSRFEM than the conventional approach. The additional shearing resistance can explain the influence of the orientation, position, and spacing of anchors, and the shear strength of soil-grouted body interfaces on the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors.

  3. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  4. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  5. Wrinkles in reinforced membranes

    Takei, Atsushi; Brau, Fabian; Roman, Benoît; Bico, José.

    2012-02-01

    We study, through model experiments, the buckling under tension of an elastic membrane reinforced with a more rigid strip or a fiber. In these systems, the compression of the rigid layer is induced through Poisson contraction as the membrane is stretched perpendicularly to the strip. Although strips always lead to out-of-plane wrinkles, we observe a transition from out-of-plane to in plane wrinkles beyond a critical strain in the case of fibers embedded into the elastic membranes. The same transition is also found when the membrane is reinforced with a wall of the same material depending on the aspect ratio of the wall. We describe through scaling laws the evolution of the morphology of the wrinkles and the different transitions as a function of material properties and stretching strain.

  6. Ultimate shearing strength of aseismatic walls with many small holes for reactor buildings

    Yoshizaki, Seiji; Ezaki, Tetsuro; Korenaga, Takeyoshi; Sotomura, Kentaro.

    1984-01-01

    The aseismatic walls for reactor buildings have complicated forms, and are characterized by large wall thickness and high reinforcement ratio as compared with ordinary aseismatic walls. The forms are mainly box, cylinder or irregular polygonal prism and their combination. The design of the walls with many small holes has been performed on the basis of the reinforced concrete structure calculation standard of the Architectural Institute of Japan, following the case with large opening. When there are many small holes, the arrangement of reinforcement for the openings becomes complex, and the construction is difficult. It is necessary to rationalize the design and to simplify the reinforcement work. Under the background like this, the experiment to examine the shearing property in bending of the aseismatic walls with many small holes for reactor buildings was carried out, and horizontal loading test was performed on 43 specimens. The method of calculating the ultimate shearing strength of a wall without opening was proposed, and the method of applying it to a wall with many small holes is shown. The experimental method and the results, the examination of the experimental results, and the ultimate shearing strength of the aseismatic walls are reported. (Kako, I.)

  7. Deep Reinforcement Fuzzing

    Böttinger, Konstantin; Godefroid, Patrice; Singh, Rishabh

    2018-01-01

    Fuzzing is the process of finding security vulnerabilities in input-processing code by repeatedly testing the code with modified inputs. In this paper, we formalize fuzzing as a reinforcement learning problem using the concept of Markov decision processes. This in turn allows us to apply state-of-the-art deep Q-learning algorithms that optimize rewards, which we define from runtime properties of the program under test. By observing the rewards caused by mutating with a specific set of actions...

  8. Thermal expansion of fibre-reinforced composites

    Schneider, B.

    1991-07-01

    The integral thermal expansion and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon and Kevlar fibre-reinforced composites were measured with high accuracy from 5 K to room temperature. For this, a laser dilatometer and a sophisticated measuring procedure were used. CTE dependence on the orientation angle ω of angle-ply laminates was determined for samples with 5 different fibre alignments (UD 0deg, +/-30deg, +/-45deg, +/-60deg and UD 90deg). A high variability of the CTE with the orientation angle was shown. At angles of approximately +/-30deg even negative CTEs were found. With suitable reinforcing fibres being selected, their absolute values rose up to 30-100% of the positive CTEs of metals. Hence, composites of this type would be suitable as compensating materials in metal constructions where little thermal expansion is desired. To check the lamination theory, theoretical computations of the CTE- ω -dependence were compared with the measured values. An excellent agreement was found. Using the lamination theory, predictions about the expansion behaviour of angle-ply laminates can be made now, if the thermal and mechanical properties of the unidirectional (UD) laminate are known. Furthermore, it is possible to carry out simulation computations aimed at investigating the influence of a single parameter of the UD-laminate (e.g. shear modulus) on the expansion of the angle-ply laminate. (orig.) [de

  9. Analysing hydro-mechanical behaviour of reinforced slopes through centrifuge modelling

    Veenhof, Rick; Wu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Every year, slope instability is causing casualties and damage to properties and the environment. The behaviour of slopes during and after these kind of events is complex and depends on meteorological conditions, slope geometry, hydro-mechanical soil properties, boundary conditions and the initial state of the soils. This study describes the effects of adding reinforcement, consisting of randomly distributed polyolefin monofilament fibres or Ryegrass (Lolium), on the behaviour of medium-fine sand in loose and medium dense conditions. Direct shear tests were performed on sand specimens with different void ratios, water content and fibre or root density, respectively. To simulate the stress state of real scale field situations, centrifuge model tests were conducted on sand specimens with different slope angles, thickness of the reinforced layer, fibre density, void ratio and water content. An increase in peak shear strength is observed in all reinforced cases. Centrifuge tests show that for slopes that are reinforced the period until failure is extended. The location of shear band formation and patch displacement behaviour indicate that the design of slope reinforcement has a significant effect on the failure behaviour. Future research will focus on the effect of plant water uptake on soil cohesion.

  10. Large strain variable stiffness composites for shear deformations with applications to morphing aircraft skins

    McKnight, G. P.; Henry, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Morphing or reconfigurable structures potentially allow for previously unattainable vehicle performance by permitting several optimized structures to be achieved using a single platform. The key to enabling this technology in applications such as aircraft wings, nozzles, and control surfaces, are new engineered materials which can achieve the necessary deformations but limit losses in parasitic actuation mass and structural efficiency (stiffness/weight). These materials should exhibit precise control of deformation properties and provide high stiffness when exercised through large deformations. In this work, we build upon previous efforts in segmented reinforcement variable stiffness composites employing shape memory polymers to create prototype hybrid composite materials that combine the benefits of cellular materials with those of discontinuous reinforcement composites. These composites help overcome two key challenges for shearing wing skins: the resistance to out of plane buckling from actuation induced shear deformation, and resistance to membrane deflections resulting from distributed aerodynamic pressure loading. We designed, fabricated, and tested composite materials intended for shear deformation and address out of plane deflections in variable area wing skins. Our designs are based on the kinematic engineering of reinforcement platelets such that desired microstructural kinematics is achieved through prescribed boundary conditions. We achieve this kinematic control by etching sheets of metallic reinforcement into regular patterns of platelets and connecting ligaments. This kinematic engineering allows optimization of materials properties for a known deformation pathway. We use mechanical analysis and full field photogrammetry to relate local scale kinematics and strains to global deformations for both axial tension loading and shear loading with a pinned-diamond type fixture. The Poisson ratio of the kinematically engineered composite is ~3x higher than

  11. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  12. Evaluation of pavement joint sealants :a new testing technique

    Abo-Qudais, Saad A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method to evaluate the performance of sealants, used in rigid pavement joints, was developed. A special fixture was designed to transfer cyclic in-line deflection, applied by a testing machine, to cyclic normal and shear deflections on a sealant sandwiched between two-2 x 2 x 2 in. portland cement mortar cubes. The normal and shear deflections were applied simultaneously at a specific ratio controlled by the developed fixture. The new testing method simulates field ...

  13. Effect of total cementitious content on shear strength of high-volume fly ash concrete beams

    Arezoumandi, Mahdi; Volz, Jeffery S.; Ortega, Carlos A.; Myers, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Existing design standards conservatively predicted the capacity of the HVFAC beams. ► In general, the HVFAC beams exceeded the code predicted shear strengths. ► The cementitious content did not have effect on the shear behavior of the HVFAC beams. - Abstract: The production of portland cement – the key ingredient in concrete – generates a significant amount of carbon dioxide. However, due to its incredible versatility, availability, and relatively low cost, concrete is the most consumed manmade material on the planet. One method of reducing concrete’s contribution to greenhouse gas emissions is the use of fly ash to replace a significant amount of the cement. This paper compares two experimental studies that were conducted to investigate the shear strength of full-scale beams constructed with high-volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) – concrete with at least 50% of the cement replaced with fly ash. The primary difference between the two studies involved the amount of cementitious material, with one mix having a relatively high total cementitious content (502 kg/m 3 ) and the other mix having a relatively low total cementitious content (337 kg/m 3 ). Both mixes utilized a 70% replacement of portland cement with a Class C fly ash. Each of these experimental programs consisted of eight beams (six without shear reinforcing and two with shear reinforcing in the form of stirrups) with three different longitudinal reinforcement ratios. The beams were tested under a simply supported four-point loading condition. The experimental shear strengths of the beams were compared with both the shear provisions of selected standards (US, Australia, Canada, Europe, and Japan) and a shear database of conventional concrete (CC) specimens. Furthermore, statistical data analyses (both parametric and nonparametric) were performed to evaluate whether or not there is any statistically significant difference between the shear strength of both mixes. Results of these

  14. Strengthening of self-compacting reinforced concrete deep beams containing circular openings with CFRP

    Al-Bayati Nabeel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the behavior of reinforced self-compacting concrete deep beams with circular openings strengthened in shear with various arrangements of externally bonded Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP. Six simply supported deep beams were constructed and tested under two points load up to the failure for this purpose. All tested beams had same geometry, compressive strength, shear span to depth ratio, main flexural and web reinforcement. The variables considered in this study include the influence of fiber orientation, utilizing longitudinal CFRP strips with vertical strips and area of CFRP. The test results indicated that the presence of the circular openings in center of load path reduce stiffness and ultimate strength by about 50% when compared with solid one, also it was found that the externally bonded CFRP can significantly increase the ultimate load and enhance the stiffness of deep beam with openings.

  15. Evaluation of shear-compressive strength properties for laminated GFRP composites in electromagnet system

    Song, Jun Hee; Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Sam Yeon

    2014-07-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composites can be applied to an insulating structure of a nuclear fusion device. It is necessary to investigate the interlaminar fracture characteristics of the laminated composites for the assurance of design and structural integrity. The three methods used to prepare the glass fiber reinforced plastic composites tested in this study were vacuum pressure impregnation, high pressure laminate (HPL), and prepreg laminate. We discuss the design criteria for safe application of composites and the shear-compressive test methods for evaluating mechanical properties of the material. Shear-compressive tests could be performed successfully using series-type test jigs that were inclined 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° to the normal axis. Shear strength depends strongly on the applied compressive stress. The design range of allowable shear stress was extended by use of the appropriate composite fabrication method. HPL had the largest design range, and the allowable interlaminar shear stress was 0.254 times the compressive stress.

  16. Joint Operation Planning

    2006-01-01

    .... It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the joint operation planning activities and performance of the Armed Forces of the United States in joint operations, and provides the joint doctrinal basis...

  17. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  18. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  20. Seismic Performance of High-Ductile Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Short Columns

    Mingke Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mainly aims to investigate the effectiveness of high-ductile fiber-reinforced concrete (HDC as a means to enhance the seismic performance of short columns. Six HDC short columns and one reinforced concrete (RC short column were designed and tested under lateral cyclic loading. The influence of the material type (concrete or HDC, axial load, stirrup ratio, and shear span ratio on crack patterns, hysteresis behavior, shear strength, deformation capacity, energy dissipation, and stiffness degradation was presented and discussed, respectively. The test results show that the RC short column failed in brittle shear with poor energy dissipation, while using HDC to replace concrete can effectively improve the seismic behavior of the short columns. Compared with the RC short column, the shear strength of HDC specimens was improved by 12.6–30.2%, and the drift ratio and the energy dissipation increases were 56.9–88.5% and 237.7–336.7%, respectively, at the ultimate displacement. Additionally, the prediction model of the shear strength for RC columns based on GB50010-2010 (Chinese code can be safely adopted to evaluate the shear strength of HDC short columns.