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Sample records for reinap rando pikner

  1. Instituutide areng saab paika / Paavo Kaimre, Rando Värnik, Illar Lemetti, Ants Soon...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Koostatavaid arengukavasid tutvustavad Metsandus- ja maaehitusinstituudi direktor Paavo Kaimre, Majandus- ja sotsiaalinstituudi direktor Rando Värnik, Põllumajandus- ja keskkonnainstituudi direktor Illar Lemetti, Tehnikainstituudi direktor Ants Soon ja Veterinaarmeditsiini ja loomakasvatuse instituudi direktor Toomas Tiirats

  2. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Salmon Junior, Helio A.; Soares, Alessandro F.N.S.

    2011-01-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  3. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ). Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salmon Junior, Helio A., E-mail: heliosalmon@coinet.com.br [COI - Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas, MD.X Barra Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Soares, Alessandro F.N.S., E-mail: afacure@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  4. Alderson-Rando phantom 'voxelization' for use in numerical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.; Vieira, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology used for creating a voxel phantom from the tomographic physical Alderson-Rando phantom images (HR) and to develop a computer model formed by exposure of the resulting phantom 'voxelization' of AR coupled to the Monte Carlo code EGS4 plus algorithms to simulate radioactive sources in internal dosimetry

  5. Evaluation of Target Position's Accuracy in 2D-3D Matching using Rando Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Eun Sung; Kang, Soo Man; Lee, Chul Soo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare patient's body posture and its position at the time of simulation with one at the treatment room using On-board Imaging (OBI) and CT (CBCT). The detected offsets are compared with position errors of Rando Phantom that are practically applied. After that, Rando Phantom's position is selected by moving couch based on detected deviations. In addition, the errors between real measured values of Rando Phantom position and theoretical ones is compared. And we will evaluate target position's accuracy of KV X-ray imaging's 2D and CBCT's 3D one. Using the Rando Phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc. Stanford. CT, USA) which simulated human body's internal structure, we will set up Rando Phantom on the treatment couch after implementing simulation and RTP according to the same ways as the real radioactive treatment. We tested Rando Phantom that are assumed to have accurate position with different 3 methods. We measured setup errors on the axis of X, Y and Z, and got mean standard deviation errors by repeating tests 10 times on each tests. The difference between mean detection error and standard deviation are as follows; lateral 0.4±0.3 mm, longitudinal 0.6±0.5 mm, vertical 0.4±0.2 mm which all within 0-10 mm. The couch shift variable after positioning that are comparable to residual errors are 0.3±0.1, 0.5±0.1, and 0.3±0.1 mm. The mean detection errors by longitudinal shift between 20-40 mm are 0.4±0.3 in lateral, 0.6±0.5 in longitudinal, 0.5±0.3 in vertical direction. The detection errors are all within range of 0.3-0.5 mm. Residual errors are within 0.2-0.5 mm. Each values are mean values based on 3 tests. Phantom is based on treatment couch shift and error within the average 5 mm can be gained by the diminution detected by image registration based on OBI and CBCT. Therefore, the selection of target position which depends on OBI and CBCT could be considered as useful.

  6. LHV töötajad jäid USA börsil vahele salajase info hankimisega / Aivar Reinap, Aleksei Günter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    USA väärtpaberijärelevalve (SEC) ametnike andmetel varastasid Investeerimisfirma Lõhmus, Haavel & Viisemann (LHV) töötajad Oliver Peek ja Kristjan Lepik arvutiprogrammi abil USA börsiettevõtete veel avaldamata pressiteateid, teenides selle abil USA börsidel vähemalt 7,8 miljonit dollarit kasumit. SEC andis LHV ja tema kaks töötajad petuskeemi korraldamise süüdistusega kohtusse. Lisa: LHV tehingud. Vt. samas: Hindrek Riikoja, Aivar Reinap. Skandaal LHV äri Eestis veel ohtu ei sea. Kommenteerivad: ettevõtja Heldur Meerits, Eesti Panga nõukogu esimees Mart Sõrg, IT-spetsialist Linnar Viik, Tallinna Börsi juht Kaidi Oone

  7. Optimisation need of dental radiodiagnostic procedures: results of effective dose evaluation from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Degli Esposti, P.; Rongoni, A.; Sabatini, P.; Saetta, D.M.S.; Regi, L.; Caprino, G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiological examinations of different types are needed in dental practice both to make a correct diagnosis and to carry out an adequate therapy. Particularly in orthodentic practices, because of the youth of the majority of the patients, an assessment of the detriment to health (through the effective dose equivalent) caused by medical diagnostic exposure to ionising radiation is needed to make decisions about the optimisation of dental radiodiagnostic procedures. Experimental data from measurements on a Rando phantom were collected for the radiological examinations required for dental and for orthodontic practices (with and without protective apron and collar). The results show the effectiveness of the leaded apron and collar in all the examinations carried out, particularly in reducing thyroid dose. (author)

  8. Experience with the Alderson Rando phantom. [17-MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerwil, A; Kleffens, H.J. Van [Rotterdams Radio Therapeutisch Instituut (Netherlands)

    1977-04-01

    The dose delivered to the spinal cord is of particular interest in electron beam therapy of medulloblastoma. Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used in an assessment of the dose distributions from a 17 MeV electron beam in an Alderson Rando Phantom (Alderson, S.W., Lanzl, L.H., Rollins, M., and Spira, J., 1962, American J. of Roentgenology, Radium Therapy and Nuclear Medicine, vol. 87, 185). Measurements were also made on three autopsy specimens immersed in water. There were substantial differences between the two sets of results. The density of the bony part of the phantom seemed to be markedly lower than that of the water; radiographs of various parts of the phantom confirmed that large areas of low density existed. The manufacturers have stated that in order to simulate true in vivo conditions, an artificial skeleton would have to be introduced into the tissue-like material of the phantom, and that the real skeletons now used appear to be unsuitable for electron beam dosimetry. It is therefore doubtful whether this electron beam dosimetry justifies the expense associated with the insertion of these unsatisfactory skeletons into the soft tissue-equivalent material.

  9. Monte Carlo and experimental internal radionuclide dosimetry in RANDO head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghahraman Asl, Ruhollah; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Parach, Ali Asghar; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Momennezhad Mehdi; Davenport, David

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are widely employed in internal dosimetry to obtain better estimates of absorbed dose distributions from irradiation sources in medicine. Accurate 3D absorbed dosimetry would be useful for risk assessment of inducing deterministic and stochastic biological effects for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the use of Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package for 3D internal dosimetry using the head portion of the RANDO phantom. GATE package (version 6.1) was used to create a voxel model of a human head phantom from computed tomography (CT) images. Matrix dimensions consisted of 319 × 216 × 30 voxels (0.7871 × 0.7871 × 5 mm 3 ). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100). One rod-shaped source with 94 MBq activity of 99m Tc was positioned in the brain tissue of the posterior part of the human head phantom in slice number 2. The results of the simulation were compared with measured mean absorbed dose per cumulative activity (S value). Absorbed dose was also calculated for each slice of the digital model of the head phantom and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each slice from the simulation data. The S-values calculated by GATE and TLD methods showed a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, r 2 ≥ 0.99, p < 0.05) with each other. The maximum relative percentage differences were ≤14 % for most cases. DVHs demonstrated dose decrease along the direction of movement toward the lower slices of the head phantom. Based on the results obtained from GATE Monte Carlopackage it can be deduced that a complete dosimetry simulation study, from imaging to absorbed dose map calculation, is possible to execute in a single framework.

  10. Dose Measurements of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord in Conventional Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using RANDO Phantom and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Radiotherapy is regarded as the first treatment of choice for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Despite the advantages of radiotherapy, patients may suffer from a wide range of side-effects due to the presence of many sensitive normal tissues in these regions. If the absorbed dose exceeds the tolerance level in parotid glands and the spinal cord, myelopathy, Lhermitte's sign and xerostomia cannot be avoided. Materials and Methods The head and neck of a RANDO phantom (reference man, which was regarded as a hypothetical patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma was evaluated. The full course of treatment consisted of three phases. At the beginning of each phase, an oncologist marked conventional fields on the RANDO phantom using a simulator. For measuring the absorbed dose, Thermoluminescent Dosimeters(TLD chips (TLD-100 were utilized.The absorbed dose by TLDs was read by Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. Results The total absorbed dose was calculated by measuring the absorbed dose in each phase, multiplied by the fraction numbers of each phase; the obtained values were summed up. The results showed that the received doses by spinal cord ranged from 15.24 to 54.56 Gy. Also, the absorbed dose of parotid glands was approximately 39.23 Gy. Conclusion Considering the minimum tolerance dose the absorbed doses in the spinal cord and parotid glands were above the tolerance level. The incidence rate of xerostomia and myelopathy were higher in patients, treated by conventional methods.

  11. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  12. Plaadid / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2003-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest Back in the ESSR "From the Archives of Eesti raadio 1966-1982", The Donnas "Spend the Night", "Furure Sounds of Jazz vol. 9", Dino Saluzzi "Responsorium", The Clash "Essential Clash", Sly & Family Stone "Essential", Madonna "American Life", Louis Armstrong & Ella Fitzgerald "Ella & louis Again"

  13. SU-F-T-76: Total Skin Electron Therapy: An-End-To-End Examination of the Absolute Dosimetry with a Rando Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Ha, J; Zhou, S; Cui, J; Shiu, A [University Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine and validate the absolute dose for total skin electron therapy (TSET) through an end-to-end test with a Rando phantom using optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and EBT3 radiochromic films. Methods: A Varian Trilogy linear accelerator equipped with the special procedure 6 MeV HDTSe- was used to perform TSET irradiations using a modified Stanford 6-dual-field technique. The absolute dose was calibrated using a Markus ion chamber at a reference depth of 1.3cm at 100 cm SSD with a field size of 36 × 36 cm at the isocenter in solid water slabs. The absolute dose was cross validated by a farmer ion chamber. Then the dose rate in the unit of cGy/Mu was calibrated using the Markus chamber at the treatment position. OSLDs were used to independently verify the dose using the calibrated dose rate. Finally, a patient treatment plan (200 cGy/cycle) was delivered in the QA mode to a Rando phantom, which had 16 pairs of OSLDs and EBT3 films taped onto its surface at different anatomical positions. The doses recorded were read out to validate the absolute dosimetry for TSET. Results: The OSLD measurements were within 7% agreement with the planned dose except the shoulder areas, where the doses recorded were 23% lower on average than those of the planned. The EBT3 film measurements were within 10% agreement with the planned dose except the shoulder and the scalp vertex areas, where the respective doses recorded were 18% and 14% lower on average than those of the planned. The OSLDs gave more consistent dose measurements than those of the EBT3 films. Conclusion: The absolute dosimetry for TSET was validated by an end-to-end test with a Rando phantom using the OSLDs and EBT3 films. The beam calibration and monitor unit calculations were confirmed.

  14. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  15. Rahvas palkab 101 töötajat / Tarmo Pikner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pikner, Tarmo

    2003-01-01

    Saare Maavalitsuse arengu- ja planeeringu osakonna juhataja Tarmo Pikneri sõnul on piirkondlike erinevustega arvestamine meie riigi seadusandluses enam kui puudulik. Igal Riigikogu liikmel peaks olema ette näidata tema panus Eesti riigi seadusloomesse

  16. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G., E-mail: jggc59@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Hospital de Oncología, IMSS, CMN Siglo XXI, Cuauhtémoc 330 Col. Doctores (Mexico); Álvarez Romero, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com, E-mail: victor.tovar@inin.gob.mx; Calderón, A. Torres, E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com, E-mail: victor.tovar@inin.gob.mx; M, V. Tovar, E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com, E-mail: victor.tovar@inin.gob.mx [SSDL, Departamento de Metrología ININ, Salazar, Estado de México 15245 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  17. Konjunktuuriinstituut : Eesti majandusolukord halveneb / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2001-01-01

    Eesti Konjunktuuriinstituudi ekspertide hinnanguil on Eesti majanduse kliima halvenemas, põhjuseks probleemid maailmamajanuses ning tööpuuduse ja inflatsioni kasv. Graafikud: EKI ekspertide hinnangud Eesti majandusele

  18. Suur laenukoormus pidurdab pensionibuumi / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    Kolmanda pensionisambaga on liitunud üle 72 000 inimese, neist 90% kogub raha kindlustusseltsides. Kokku on kolmandasse sambasse investeeritud ligi miljard krooni. Keskmine pensioniinvesteering oli 2003. aastal 6390 krooni. Lisa: Kolmas pensionisammas

  19. Hansapank tunnistas oma viga / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Kui aastaid tagasi müüs Hansapank talle kuulunud Eesti suurima kindlustusseltsi Eesti Kindlustus konkurentidele Sampo grupist, siis praegu pank tunnistab oma kunagist viga ja on otsustanud naasta varakindlustusturule

  20. "Matrix" sobitub iga filosoofiaga / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2003-01-01

    Andy ja Larry Wachowski ulmefilmide triloogia "Matrix" fenomeni analüüsist ajakirja "Vikerkaar" 2003. aasta 9. numbris, kus sellele on pühendatud nelja filosoofi artiklid ( Slavoj Zhizhek, Jüri Eintalu, Bruno Mölder, Tanel Tammet)

  1. Fin de siecle, Beat Generation / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2002-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm kolmest biitnikute ideoloogist-kirjanikust Jack Kerouac'ist, William S. Burroughs'st ja Allen Ginsburgist "Hipid ja biitnikud" ("The Source") : režissöör Chuck Workman : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1998

  2. Eestlased arendavad uudset biodiisli tootmise tehnoloogiat / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    Eesti kapitalile kuuluv OÜ Nordic Biodiesel leiutas ja patendeeris uudse tehnoloogia biodiisli valmistamiseks, mis on võrreldes senise tehnoloogiaga ligi viiendiku võrra efektiivsem ja keskkonnasõbralikum

  3. Neitsid troonivad maailma rikkurite edetabelis / Kaire Uusen, Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Uusen, Kaire

    2006-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 25. apr. lk. 8-9. Majandusajakirja Forbes andmetel on maailma miljardäride hulgas enim neid, kes on sündinud neitsi tähemärgis. Eesti rikaste edetabelit juhtiv ärimees Toomas Annus on sündinud Kaalude tähemärgis. Lisad: Eesti rikaste tähemärgid; Forbes'i miljardäride TOP. Vt. samas: Edda Paukson. Astroloogi kommentaar

  4. Savisaar ähvardab Eesti Raudteed taasriigistamisega / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniminister Edgar Savisaare hinnangul ei ole Baltic Rail Service täitnud endale võetud kohustusi, eelkõige on vajakajäämised raudtee infrastruktuuri kapitaalremondi investeeringutes

  5. Majandusedu kindlustas eakatele pensionitõusu / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 9. märts lk. 7. Tänu sotsiaalmaksu üliheale laekumisele suureneb aprillist keskmine pension 2742 kroonilt 3136 kroonile - tõus 393 krooni ehk 14% võrra. Lisa: Pensionitõus

  6. Vene turist tooks raha meeleldi Eestisse / Aivar Reinap, Helve Laasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2000-01-01

    Keerulised viisatingimused peletavad Vene turiste Eestist eemale. Tabelid: Eestit külastanud turistide arv, s.h. Soome ja Vene turistide arv, venelaste reisisihid. Kommenteerivad: J. Ligi, Y. Vanhanen, H. Tiido. Parlamendisaadik (J. Ligi)

  7. Kultuuriministeerium jättis parima harrastusteatri toetuseta / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2003-01-01

    Kultuuriministeerium loobus toetamast harrastusteatri sõitu Ülemaailmsele amatöörteatrite festivalile Kanadas. Tegemist on Eestit Harrastusteatrite Liidu, Teoteatri, Tallinna Toomklubi ja Botaanikaaia ühisprojektiga - A. Alegria "Niagaara" (lavastaja Jaan Urvet), mille rahvusvaheline žürii valis 300 hulgast 14 parima hulka

  8. LHV pankureid vanglakaristus esialgu ei ähvarda / Aleksei Günter, Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Günter, Aleksei, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 8. nov., lk 10. New Yorgis algavast kohtuprotsessist, milles USA väärtpaberituru järelvalve (SEC) süüdistab Eesti investeerimispanga LHV töötajaid Oliver Peeki ja Kristjan Lepikut ning LHV-d börsiettevõtte siseinfo varguses pressiteateid avaldavast portaalist Business Wire

  9. AvtoVAZ tahab lõpetada seniste mudelite tootmist / Aivar Reinap, Erkki Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2003-01-01

    Venemaa tuntuim autotehas AvtoVAZ plaanib lähiaastatel lõpetada kõikide vananenud automarkide tootmise ja uuendada täielikult oma mudelivalikut. Vt. samas: AvtoVAZi peagi tootmisse jõudvad mudelid

  10. Euroopa Liit võtab Eestilt statistikaga 200 miljonit / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    EL-i arvutusnõuete tõttu kasvas Eesti 2003. aasta SKP ligi 10 miljardi krooni võrra, mistõttu peab Eesti maksma igal aastal 200 miljoni võrra senisest rohkem liikmemaksu. Lisa: Pool miljardit lisaks

  11. Eesti Energia kärpis elektrihinna tõusu / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Põhjarannik, 13. veebr. 2004, lk. 1. Eesti Energia nõukogu otsustas vähendada taotletavat elektrienergia hinnatõusu 15%ni ja lükkas hinnapakettide lõpliku kinnitamise edasi nädala võrra. Riigikogu ja Eesti Energia nõukogu liikme Janno Reiljani arvamus

  12. Majandusminister Edgar Savisaar loodab arengufondi abil tuua uut hingamist / Edgar Savisaar ; interv. Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Savisaar, Edgar, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniminister vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad arengufondi, võõrtööjõudu, riigiettevõtete vähemusosaluse müümise ideed, reisijateveo doteerimist, sadamatasusid, praamidega seonduvat, põlevkivienergeetikat. Lisad: CV; Ministri viis esimest tööd

  13. EMT ajab Rate.ee abil noori kliente taga / Aivar Reinap, Kaire Uusen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke, Pärnu Postimees 6. apr. lk. 8,7. Mobiilifirma EMT ostis Sereda Invest OÜ-lt ligi 40 miljoni krooni eest enamusosaluse suhtlusportaalis Rate.ee vältimaks konkurendi mõjujõu kasvu. Vt. samas: Üksikisikud hoiavad internetiäri üleval. Lisa: Internetiäri

  14. Paet : "Nam ne vsjo ravno, kto investirujet v ER" / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Välisminister Urmas Paet viitas välispoliitika arutelul Riigikogus vajadusele kontrollida Vene välisinvesteeringute julgeolekuriske, seda peamiselt tundlikes valdkondades nagu energeetika ja infrastruktuurid

  15. Dental radiography: tooth enamel EPR dose assessment from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragno, D.; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.

    2000-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry of tooth enamel is now established as a suitable method for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The accuracy of the method is limited by some confounding factors, among which is the dose received due to medical x-ray irradiation. In the present paper the EPR response of tooth enamel to endoral examination was experimentally evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The dose to enamel for a single exposure of a typical dental examination performed with a new x-ray generation unit working at 65 kVp gave rise to a CO 2 -signal of intensity similar to that induced by a dose of about 2 mGy of 60 Co. EPR measurements were performed on the entire tooth with no attempt to separate buccal and lingual components. Also the dose to enamel for an orthopantomography exam was estimated. It was derived from TLD measurements as equivalent to 0.2 mGy of 60 Co. In view of application to risk assessment analysis, in the present work the value for the ratio of the reference dose at the phantom surface measured with TLD to the dose at the tooth measured with EPR was determined. (author)

  16. Eesti aidsiennetus saab 52 miljonit välisraha / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2003-01-01

    Rahvusvaheline finantsorganisatsioon Global Fund (Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria) annab Eestile 2 aasta jooksul aidsiennetustööks 52 miljonit krooni. Kommenteerib Nelli Kalikova

  17. Matrix - kultusfilm, mis muutus müüdiks / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2003-01-01

    Andy ja Larry Wachowski ulmefilmide triloogia 3. osa "Matrix : Revolutsioon" ("The Marix Revolutions") jõuab 5. novembril esilinastuseni korraga enam kui 50 riigis, sealhulgas MPDE vahendusel ka Eestis. Eesti filmikriitikute arvamusi Matrix'i fenomenist

  18. Radiation protection in CT pelvis in Fantoma Rando by thermoluminescent dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid-González, O A; Rivera-Montalvo, T; Azorín-Nieto, J

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results of equivalent dose organ determining to both primary beam and scattered radiation in a computed tomography (CT) procedures. All measurements were carried out to abdomen and critical organ (gonads) area. Selected dosimeters showed a standard deviation of 4.1% below to the reference values established by international guide lines. The equivalent dose in gonads was 14.27 mGy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. ELi majanduslik võimekus jääb konkurentidele alla / Maria Joao Rodrigues ; interv. Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rodrigues, Maria Joao

    2004-01-01

    Praxis'e kutsel Eestis viibinud Euroopa Komisjoni nõuniku hinnangul ei suuda Euroopa Liit tõusta lähiaastatel maailma kõige konkurentsivõimelisemaks piirkonnaks. Lissaboni strateegiast, Euroopa konkurentsivõimest, Aasia ohust, Eesti võimalustest. Lisa: Euroopa Liidu majandusideoloog

  20. Kaks firmat soovivad rajada Kiviõlisse nafta töötlemise tehase / Gerli Romanovitsh, Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Romanovitš, Gerli, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Põhjarannik 23. apr. 2005, lk. 1,4, Severnoje Poberezhje 23. apr. 2005, lk. 1,3. Kaks ettevõtet - OÜ Dreivex Baltic ja OÜ Uus Tehas - on huvitatud toornafta töötlemisega tegeleva tehase ehitamisest Kiviõlisse

  1. Rein Ratase allkiri paneb rattad käima ; kommenteerinud Rein Ratas, Neeme Reinap, Vilmar Rei...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jakobson, Kadri, 1970-

    2010-01-01

    Riigikogu keskkonnakomisjoni liige Rein Ratas surub läbi firma EcoPro, mille üks omanik on Ratase hea tuttav, arendust Saaremaal Ruhve poolsaarel, mis asub kaitsealal ja ehituskeeluvööndis. Rein Ratas on tuludeklaratsioonis jätnud märkimata firmast Adepte Ekspert saadava tulu

  2. Radiological protection in pelvis studies by computed tomography in Rando phantom by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry; Proteccion radiologica en estudios de pelvis por tomografia computada en fantoma Rando mediante dosimetria termoluminiscente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid G, O. A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: riveramt@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The risks of the radiation in computed tomography (CT) studies have been recently reported in many works. Caution should be had in the environment of the exploration in the patient. To maintain the radiation doses so low as is reasonably possible during the CT examination, is important that in the CT the parameters are correctly adjusted for each patient with the purpose of having the minimum dose in the application of the study. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the absorbed dose and to measure the CT profiles of dose. The distribution of the dose in the CT abdominal examination in the simulated patients was evaluated. The exploration parameters of the CT were 130 kV, 90 m A, with a cut thickness of 3 mm and a field of 1.0 in the pitch. The assignment dose was increased in an axis along the direction of the study, they were also studied. The equivalent dose due to the direct and dispersed radiation was determined during the procedures of the irradiation in pelvis examinations, for the next areas to the study like is in specific the critical organ (gonads) that is the terminal area of the exploration. During this study of 26 cuts was obtained an equivalent dose to critical organ of 14.27 mSv. (Author)

  3. Measurement of X-ray for the dose area product and spectrum by the added filtration in Rando phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Woong; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The most important point in the medical use of radiation is to minimize the patient entrance dose while maintaining the diagnostic information. Low-energy photons (long-wave X-ray) are unnecessary among diagnostic X-ray because they are mostly absorbed and increase the patient's entrance dose. The most effective method to eliminate the low-energy photon is use of a filtering plate. Using a filter appropriate for the image will maintain diagnostic value. Obtaining an effective image allows comparison of the resulting images in a logical objective way. This experiment was performed to determine the quality of image dosimeter when there is no filter, and when 2 mm Al, 0.1 mm Cu + 1 mm Al, 0.2 mm Cu + 1 mm Al filters are used. Using TORECK PD-8100 dose area products meter placed on top of an abdominal phantom, we measured the dose when the filter changes in this condition 85 kVp, 40 mAs, anode angle 13, source image distance 100 cm, 20 cm × 20 cm. We used the SRS-78 program for accurate comparison because we could not evaluate the difference in the image optically. The spectrum changed due to the emission of X-rays as the filter changed. We observed that the use of a filter eliminated the low-energy photons and revealed continuous X-ray and special X-ray. Therefore, the experiment highlighted the advantages of filters and confirmed that there are no changes in the quality of image through signal to noise ratio, peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error comparison. We found that the use of filter did not lead to distortions in the image or drop in diagnostic value while minimizing the radiation dose. This means that it can help manage long-term patient dose. We conclude that we need to recommend the use of the filter as it reduces the area of dose.

  4. Tõuni imekitarr kõlab nagu mesi . Pedaal-steel teeb popmuusikas taassündi / Rando Tooming

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooming, Rando

    2009-01-01

    Muusik Tõnu Timm jutustab loo, kuidas hankis Ameerikast haruldase pedaal-steel- kitarri. Eesti kasutusel olevatest vanematest pedaal-steel-kitarridest. Ansamblid, kus kasutatakse kõneall olevat kitarri

  5. Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month rando­mized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggenberger P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Eggenberger,1 Vera Schumacher,2,3 Marius Angst,1 Nathan Theill,4,5 Eling D de Bruin1,6,7 1Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, 2Department of Gerontopsychology and Gerontology, 3University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Zurich, 4Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, Schlieren, 5Center for Gerontology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 6CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Epidemiology, 7Centre for Evidence Based Physiotherapy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive–physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training.Methods: Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1 virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE, 2 treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY, or 3 treadmill walking (PHYS. Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated.Results: Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive–physical programs were found in two dimensions of executive function. “Shifting attention” showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE/MEMORY versus PHYS (F[2, 68] =1.95, trend P=0.075, r=0.17; and “working memory” showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE versus MEMORY (F[1, 136] =2.71, trend P=0.051, R2=0.006. Performance improvements in executive functions, long-term visual memory (episodic memory, and processing speed were maintained at follow-up in all groups.Conclusion: Particular executive functions benefit from simultaneous cognitive–physical training compared to exclusively physical multicomponent training. Cognitive–physical training programs may counteract widespread cognitive impairments in the elderly. Keywords: elderly, executive function, transfer, cognitive impairment, dance, video game

  6. Etude des catalyseurs hétérogènes à base de Co en conditions réactives "réalistes" par microscopie électronique in-situ et opérando

    OpenAIRE

    Dembélé , Kassiogé

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we studied cobalt catalysts used in producing hydrocarbons through the Fischer-Trospch synthesis process, in which their activation, operation and deactivation mechanisms are recorded using in-situ and environmental transmission electron microscopy. An operando methodology was developed by combining electron microscopy-based structural studies in an environmental cell and mass spectrometry analysis of the reacting gases. Using controlled-morphology nanocatalysts we have demonstr...

  7. Bush jätkab maailma dirigeerimist / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2004-01-01

    USA president George W. Bush peab oma tagasivalimise kindlustajaks elluviidud välispoliitikat. Autori hinnangul on Bush varasematest presidentidest jõulisemalt muutmas USA-d kapitalismi lipulaevaks, Bushi USA vastandab end euroopalikule mudelile, kus riik tagab kodanikele turvatunde. Kavandatavatest muudatustest USA sisepoliitikas. Vt. samas: Arko Olesk. Verine aasta Iraagi sõjas; Aivar Reinap. USA majandus mustas augus; Andres Keil. Tsivilisatsiooni häirekell

  8. Ühisraha peab saama inimestele lähedaseks / Joaquin Almunia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Almunia, Joaquin, 1948-

    2005-01-01

    Euroopa Komisjoni rahandusasjade volinik hoiatab, et tõenäoliselt peavad mõned Euroopa Liidu rahaliiduga ühineda soovivad riigid kõrge inflatsiooni või eelarvepuudujäägi likvideerimise liialt aeglase tempo tõttu euroalaga ühinemise edasi lükkama. Voliniku sõnul tuleb eurole üleminekut plaanivates riikides tõsta tehniliste ettevalmistuste tempot ja tõhustada teavitustööd elanike seas. Kommenteerivad Riigikogu liige Liina Tõnisson ja rahandusminister Aivar Sõerd. Vt. samas lk. 3: Aivar Reinap. Eurovolinik ründab Eestit vananenud andmetega

  9. Kas elu maal läheb paremaks? / interv. Sirje Niitra

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Uue valitsuse koalitsioonileppe maainimest enim puudutavaid peatükke kommenteerivad: EMÜ majandus- ja sotsiaalinstituudi direktor Rando Värnik, sotsioloog Ülo Vooglaid, TÜ Pärnu kolledzhi direktor Garri Raagmaa, ärimees Urmas Sõõrumaa

  10. Patient Doses and Risk Evaluation in Bone Mineral Densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelucci, M.; Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Degli Esposti, P.; Dipilato, A.C.; Policani, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the equipment dose to the organs and tissues and the effective dose of patients undergoing the most frequent examinations carried out in bone mineral densitometry (BMD): lumbar spine and femur. Experimental measurements of absorbed doses on a Rando phantom, allow comparison of the performances of three different photon emitter facilities. The comparison of the entrance and exit doses measured on a Rando phantom and on 50 female non-obese patients show that entrance doses on Rando can be used as 'diagnostic reference levels' for patients. A quantitative estimate of the stochastic risk due to BMD procedures was made: the results obtained show that the stochastic risk is very low and that the BMD is, at present, the most confirmed procedure for osteoporosis diagnosis and management. (author)

  11. Interventional radiology simulation and measurement of patient doses; Simulacion en radiologia intervencionista y medida de dosis a pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz Lablanca, M. d.; Diaz Romero, F.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a method of work to calculate the effective dose in any interventional radiology procedure using an Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and dosimeters TLD 100 chip. We applied this method in the case of biliary drainage and allowed us to establish the dose value corresponding reference in the Hospital Universitario de Canarias (HUC).

  12. "Vanade ja kobedate" Väino uuendas tutvust maaga / Gert Kiiler

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiiler, Gert

    2002-01-01

    RUUT Pictures alustas täispika rahvakomöödia "Vanad ja kobedad saavad jalad alla" või "Seiklusjutte maalt" võtteid Viljandimaal Mustlas, peaosades Henrik Normann ja Madis Milling. Režissöör on Rando Pettai

  13. Keskmiselt kobe vaatamine / Küllike Rooväli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rooväli, Küllike, 1969-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti komöödiafilm "Vanad ja kobedad saavad jalad alla" : režissöör Rando Pettai : operaator Mait Mäekivi : näitlejad Henrik Normann, Madis Milling, Robert Gutman jt. : muusika - ansambel Genialistid : Ruut Pictures 2003

  14. Fetal dose determination in patients with breast cancer submitted to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, H.C.; Roesler, I.C.; Leon, E.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure that the fetus receive during radiotherapy treatment for patients with breast cancer submitted to cobalt 60 and linear accelerator of 6 MV is studied. Measurements with a rando-Alderson Phantom and ionization chamber for each individualized irradiation field, at the body level where the fetus is localized during the several stages of pregnancy, are made. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Radiation protection of staff in 111In radionuclide therapy--is the lead apron shielding effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, M; Charalambatou, P; Sotiropoulos, M; Diamantopoulos, S

    2011-09-01

    (111)In (Eγ = 171-245 keV, t1/2 = 2.83 d) is used for targeted therapies of endocrine tumours. An average activity of 6.3 GBq is injected into the liver by catheterisation of the hepatic artery. This procedure is time-consuming (4-5 min) and as a result, both the physicians and the technical staff involved are subjected to radiation exposure. In this research, the efficiency of the use of lead apron has been studied as far as the radiation protection of the working staff is concerned. A solution of (111)In in a cylindrical scattering phantom was used as a source. Close to the scattering phantom, an anthropomorphic male Alderson RANDO phantom was positioned. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were located in triplets on the front surface, in the exit and in various depths in the 26th slice of the RANDO phantom. The experiment was repeated by covering the RANDO phantom by a lead apron 0.25 mm Pb equivalent. The unshielded dose rates and the shielded photon dose rates were measured. Calculations of dose rates by Monte Carlo N-particle transport code were compared with this study's measurements. A significant reduction of 65 % on surface dose was observed when using lead apron. A decrease of 30 % in the mean absorbed dose among the different depths of the 26th slice of the RANDO phantom has also been noticed. An accurate correlation of the experimental results with Monte Carlo simulation has been achieved.

  16. Radiation protection of staff in 111In radionuclide therapy-Is the lead apron shielding effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, M.; Charalambatou, P.; Sotiropoulos, M.; Diamantopoulos, S.

    2011-01-01

    111 In (Eγ=171-245 keV, t1/2=2.83 d) is used for targeted therapies of endocrine tumours. An average activity of 6.3 GBq is injected into the liver by catheterisation of the hepatic artery. This procedure is time-consuming (4-5 min) and as a result, both the physicians and the technical staff involved are subjected to radiation exposure. In this research, the efficiency of the use of lead apron has been studied as far as the radiation protection of the working staff is concerned. A solution of 111 In in a cylindrical scattering phantom was used as a source. Close to the scattering phantom, an anthropomorphic male Alderson RANDO phantom was positioned. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were located in triplets on the front surface, in the exit and in various depths in the 26. slice of the RANDO phantom. The experiment was repeated by covering the RANDO phantom by a lead apron 0.25 mm Pb equivalent. The unshielded dose rates and the shielded photon dose rates were measured. Calculations of dose rates by Monte Carlo N-particle transport code were compared with this study's measurements. A significant reduction of 65 % on surface dose was observed when using lead apron. A decrease of 30 % in the mean absorbed dose among the different depths of the 26. slice of the RANDO phantom has also been noticed. An accurate correlation of the experimental results with Monte Carlo simulation has been achieved. (authors)

  17. Dose distribution and risk factors in tele cobalt therapy and intracavitary treatment with sealed sources of Cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briquet, C.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate dose to organs, outside the treatment volume. The experimental measurements were done using TLD dosemeters, placed in various regions of a Rando Alderson Phantom. The theoretical absorbed doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method applied to a mathematical phantom. (author)

  18. Improviseeritud lugu ja zhanriga mäng / Donald Tomberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tomberg, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Eesti komöödiafilm "Vanad ja kobedad saavad jalad alla" : režissöör Rando Pettai : operaator Mait Mäekivi : näitlejad Henrik Normann, Madis Milling, Robert Gutman jt. : muusika - ansambel Genialistid : Ruut Pictures 2003

  19. Influence of a Saccharomyces cerevisia fermentation product on the pathophysiological response to a combined intranasal bovine herpesvirus-1 and intratracheal Mannheimia haemolytica challenge in Holstein steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of supplementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product prototype (Prototype) on the pathophysiological response during a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge. Holstein steer calves (126.5±6.11kg; N=16) were completely rando...

  20. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-09-08

    Sep 8, 2015 ... dosage of the plasma free metanephrines. The dosage of ... Buonuomo V, Ruggiero A, Rando G, D'urzo C, Manzoni C,. Pintus C. Malignant ... Pavai Z, Orosz Z, Horvath E, Seres-Sturnl L, Jung J. Immunohistochimical features ...

  1. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  2. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  3. Insertion of the structure of irregular geometries DICOM image-making into a cell for the simulation in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible nowadays to make changes in any digital image format due to the advancement of editing systems for images, with a little definition loss. Intending to increase the degrees of freedom on computer simulation fields, a process of integration of irregular geometries in the structure of medical DICOM images of the Anthropomorphic Rando Phantom making it so a cell is developed in this work and, therefore, the inclusion or change of the TLD's location in phantom for dosimetric studies, become a more dynamic simulation in MCNP. At first, creation and processing of the desired geometry are proceeded. It was coupled to the geometry in the study area of the DICOM image and the image's conversion into a MCNP input file was performed by software Scan2MCNP. Using the proposed computational process, a case of a clot and its ramifications was studied in Alderson Rando Phantom's left side brain area. (author)

  4. Effective dose evaluation for workers assisting new-borns in nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falivene, A.; Gori, C.; Mazzocchi, S.; Targetti, S.; Zatelli, G.

    2002-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is a very frequent nuclear medicine procedure for new-borns when deemed necessary after prenatal ultrasounds investigation. The procedure requires the physical proximity of workers to the patient, particularly during the examination of new-borns, in order to keep the young patients still. The irradiation of nurses during kidney examination of new-borns has been measured by simulating the examination procedure with an Alderson Rando phantom stuffed with thermoluminescent detectors, positioned near a radioactive source obtained with a tank filled with a 9 9mT c solution. Measurements have been carried out both with and without radiation protection devices positioned on the Rando phantom. Different organ doses have been evaluated. The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the amount of dose reduction that can be achieved by utilising lead aprons, glasses and thyroid collars

  5. Tomodensitometry images: integration in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessy, F; Hoornaert, M T [Jolimont Hospital, Haine Saint Paul (France). Cancer and Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Malchair, F [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    With a view to utilization of CT scan images in radiotherapy, the effective energy and the linearity of four different scanners (Siemens somatom CR, HiQS, Plus and Picker PQ 2000) and two non standard scanners, simulators with CT option (Webb 1990) (Varian Ximatron and Oldelft Simulx CT) has been measured using the method described by White and Speller in 1980. When the linearity relation in presented using the density or the electron density as the abscissa, a blurred area where two different components of equal density or electron density can have two different Hounsfield`s numbers. Using the linearity relation, the density of Rando`s lung heterogeneity is determined. We calculated a treatment planning (TP) using this value and made a comparison between the TP and the real absorbed dose with was measured using diodes. The comparison between the TP and the relative Absorbed doses showed a difference of up to 4.5%.

  6. Small unilamellar vesicles as reagents: a chemically defined, quantitative assay for lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Samll unilamellar vesicles containing synthetic glycolipids can be prepared. These vesicles are aggregated by the appropriate lectin (Orr et al., 1979; Rando and Bangerter, 1979; Slama and Rando, 1980). It is shown here that extent of aggregation of these vesicles as measured by light scattering at 360 nm, is, under certain conditions, linear with amount of lectin added. This forms the basis of a rapid and simple quantitative assay for lectins using the modified vesicles as a defined chemical substrate. The assay is sensitive to lectin concentrations in the low ..mu..g range. The assay is applied here to studies on concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and the ..cap alpha..-fucosyl binding lectin from Ulex europaeus (Type I).

  7. ALGORITHM VERIFICATION FOR A TLD PERSONAL DOSIMETRY SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHAHEIN, A.; SOLIMAN, H.A.; MAGHRABY, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dose algorithms are used in thermoluminescence personnel dosimetry for the interpretation of the dosimeter response in terms of equivalent dose. In the present study, an automated Harshaw 6600 reader was vigorously tested prior to the use for dose calculation algorithm according to the standard established by the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). Also, manual Harshaw 4500 reader was used along with the ICRU slab phantom and the RANDO phantom in experimentally determining the photon personal doses in terms of deep dose; Hp(10), shallow dose; Hp(0.07), and eye lens dose; Hp(3). Also, a Monte Carlo simulation program (VMC-dc) free code was used to simulate RANDO phantom irradiation process. The accuracy of the automated system lies well within DOELAP tolerance limits in all test categories

  8. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram,; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected rando...

  9. Uus-Maailma uued kortermajad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Korter endises büroohoones Luha 16 - rekonstrueerimisprojekt Tormi Sooväljalt, korter uues galeriimajas Koidu 60-62/ Komeedi 14 - arhitektid Rein Murula ja Karl Koosa (Rein Murula Arhitektuuribüroo OÜ) ja korter uues büroo- ja kortermajas Villardi 22 - Humana Grupp Arhitektuuri- ja Inseneribüroolt. Kommenteerivad arhitektid Peeter Tambu ja Eve Arpo ning kinnisvara maakler Rando Vanaveski

  10. Dosimetric verification of a software for planning of radio therapeutical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, R.; Huerta, U.; Alfonso, J.L.; Torres, M.

    1995-01-01

    A software for radiation treatment planning was recently developed by medical physicists at the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital in Havana. Selected locations in head and neck region were used to evaluate the reliability of calculated dose distributions in patients, taking as a reference the results of dosimetric measurements with TLD-700 powder in a RANDO type phantom. The different options is shown. Causes of discrepancies are analyzed and recommendations are made for the use of data acquisitions options

  11. The Fermi Large Area Telescope on Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden 8 Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa, Italy...France 10 Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste, Italy 11 Dipartimento di Fisica , Università di Trieste, I-34127...Trieste, Italy 12 Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova, Italy; rando@pd.infn.it 13 Dipartimento di Fisica e

  12. Clinical dosimetry of large shaped 60Co irradiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.

    1979-01-01

    The determination is described of absorbed doses in the Alderson-Rando phantom by thermoluminescent dosemeters in patients irradiated with irregularly shaped large-surface fields of Co 60 . In a range of 3 to 5% the measured values correspond to the values calculated with the aid of relations presented by Bukowitz. Non-homogeneity of irradiation when two supradiaphragmatic fields are used and its improvement are discussed. (author)

  13. Walking training associated with virtual reality-based training increases walking speed of individuals with chronic stroke: systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana M. Rodrigues-Baroni; Lucas R. Nascimento; Louise Ada; Luci F. Teixeira-Salmela

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of walking training associated with virtual reality-based training in patients with stroke. The specific questions were: Is walking training associated with virtual reality-based training effective in increasing walking speed after stroke? Is this type of intervention more effective in increasing walking speed, than non-virtual reality-based walking interventions? METHOD: A systematic review with meta-analysis of rando...

  14. The Effect of Parenting Styles on Children Attachment Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    علي زينالي

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of parenting style on prediction of children's attachment style. To achieve this aim, the study investigates whether different parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive and neglectful) Leads to shaping various attachment styles (secure, fearful, preoccupied and dismissing) in children? 508 high school adolescent boys and girls with the age range of 14-19 participated in this study and were selected through Stratified Rando...

  15. Physical and technical quality assurance in the CHARTWEL-bronchus trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, D.; Voigtmann, L.; Herrmann, T.; Baumann, M.; Leetz, H.K.; Hodapp, N.

    2003-01-01

    Background: On-site physical quality assurance (QA) was performed in the participating centers of the CHARTWEL-Bronchus trial to ensure that physical and technical treatment parameters correspond with the requirements of this trial. Material and Methods: Questionnaires were sent to the clinics to obtain information on the equipment and in-house QA policies. In addition, two phantoms with drillings for an ionization chamber were shipped with detailed instructions for CT-based treatment planning of a fixed field (RW3 phantom) and a standardized isocentric 3-field technique (Rando trademark humanoid phantom). Using their routine treatment planning system, the participating centers performed point dose calculations for the isocenters in both phantoms and for defined points in the lungs and the spinal cord of the Rando trademark phantom. During the on-site visit, the doses in these points and the deviation of the actual monitor calibration from the internal reference value of the department were determined. In addition, relevant geometric parameters of the accelerator were checked. Results: In the RW3 phantom, the maximum dose deviations from the prescribed value were 3.5% without correction for the actual monitor calibration and 2.1% after correction. The maximum dose deviation in the isocenter of the Rando trademark phantom was 4.0%. To separate the influence of the treatment planning system on this deviation from other sources, all measurements in the Rando trademark phantom were corrected for the deviations determined in the RW3 phantom. After this correction, the maximum deviation was 3.0% in the isocenter. For the other measurement points, the largest dose deviation of 7% was found in the left lung. Deviations of geometric parameters were negligible in all audited departments. Conclusion: The CHARTWEL-Bronchus physical QA program revealed a high conformity of geometric and dosimetric parameters and valid dose calculations by the CT-based treatment planning systems

  16. Validation of key behaviourally based mental health diagnoses in administrative data: suicide attempt, alcohol abuse, illicit drug abuse and tobacco use

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Hyungjin; Smith Eric G; Stano Claire M; Ganoczy Dara; Zivin Kara; Walters Heather; Valenstein Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Observational research frequently uses administrative codes for mental health or substance use diagnoses and for important behaviours such as suicide attempts. We sought to validate codes (International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, clinical modification diagnostic and E-codes) entered in Veterans Health Administration administrative data for patients with depression versus a gold standard of electronic medical record text ("chart notation"). Methods Three rando...

  17. Harm reduction as a strategy for supporting people who self-harm on mental health wards : the views and experiences of practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    James, Karen; Samuels, Isaac; Moran, Paul; Stewart, Duncan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Harm reduction has had positive outcomes for people using sexual health and substance misuse services. Clinical guidance recommends these approaches may be appropriately adopted by mental health practitioners when managing some people who self-harm. There has, however, been very little research in this area. Methods: We explored practitioners’ views of harm reduction as a strategy for supporting people who self-harm. The Self Harm Antipathy Scale (SHAS) was administered to a rando...

  18. Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Thapa, Tribikram

    2018-01-01

    Objective.:  To examine the effect of motor activity on the magnitude and duration of altered corticomotor output following experimental muscle pain. Design. : Experimental, pre-post test. Setting. : University laboratory. Subjects. : Twenty healthy individuals. Methods.:  Participants were rando....... Understanding corticomotor depression in the postpain period and what factors promote recovery has relevance for clinical pain syndromes where ongoing motor dysfunction, in the absence of pain, may predispose to symptom persistence or recurrence....

  19. Tuberculosis among transhumant pastoralist and settled communities of south-eastern Mauritania

    OpenAIRE

    L?, Aissata; Tall-Dia, Anta; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Schelling, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transhumant pastoralists of Mauritania were assumed to have a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) because of reduced access to diagnostic testing. No population-based survey on TB has been published for Mauritania.Objective: The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of presumptive TB cases among mobile pastoralists and villagers in a remote zone of Mauritania.Design: In the south-eastern province of Hodh Ech Chargui, 250 adult pastoralists and 250 villagers were rando...

  20. Lambda-cyhalothrin efficiency on fruit borer control and quali-quantitative spraying aspects in a pinecone crop

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Lavinscky Costa Morais; Maria Aparecida Castellani; Carlos Gilberto Raetano; Juliana Alves de Macêdo; Moisés Silva Nery; Gabriela Luz Pereira Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Brazil, the state of Bahia is one of the largest pinecone (Annona squamosa L.) growers; nevertheless, fruit borer (Cerconota anonella L.) presence limits production. This research aimed to test the efficiency of lambda-cyhalothrin in controlling fruit borer using different spray volumes; additionally, this research tested qualitative and quantitative operational aspects. Trials were carried out in pinecone orchards in Caraíbas-BA, Brazil. Pesticide efficiency was tested by a rando...

  1. Design of the Intravenous Magnesium Efficacy in Acute Stroke (IMAGES) trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, A.; Lees, K.

    2000-01-01

    The Intravenous Magnesium Efficacy in Acute Stroke (IMAGES) trial is a multicentre,randomised, placebo-controlled trial of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) funded by the UK Medical Research Council. When complete, it will be the largest single neuroprotective study undertaken to date. Conscious patients presenting within 12 h of acute stroke with limb weakness are eligible. The primary outcome measure is combined death and disability as measured using the Barthel Index at 90-day follow up. By rando...

  2. Do pregnant women know about danger signs of pregnancy and childbirth? – A study of the level of knowledge and its associated factors from a tertiary care hospital in Southern India

    OpenAIRE

    R Nithya; Gowri Dorairajan; Palanivel Chinnakali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Awareness about danger signs during pregnancy is essential for a woman to seek prompt care. This can avert long-term morbidity and mortality. This study was aimed to find the level of knowledge and its related factors about danger signs of pregnancy and childbirth among pregnant women attending a tertiary care hospital in southern India. Patients and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of pregnant women attending a tertiary care hospital in South India. Systematic rando...

  3. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Hanseo Univ., Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose.

  4. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose

  5. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  6. Close contact dose: a radioiodine therapy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchyna, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: External radiation dose rates were measured immediately post administration and periodically thereafter at 0.3 and 1.0 m from a patient who received a 555 MBq therapeutic dose of I-131. The dose received by the partner during the close contact period of sleep was measured with an anthropomorphic RANDO phantom representing a standard man with ICRP60 organs critical for dosimetry. RANDO occupied the same bed as the patient at a skin to skin distance of 30 cm with up to 30 TLD rods (1 x 1 x 6mm, LiF:Mg) inserted at critical organ positions within the phantom. The measurements were compared with empirical estimates provided by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet (Cormack and Shearer, 1998). The measured external dose rate of 19.3microSv/hr obtained immediately post administration rose slightly, to 26.3microSv/hr during the first 12 hours, however subsequently demonstrated a slow decrease. The TLDs embed- ded in RANDO recorded a dose of 0.24mSv during the hours of sleep. The total dose received by the partner over the two days was 0.29mSv, which compared favourably with a figure of 0.31mSv obtained by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet. The doses received demonstrate the validity of restricting patient partner contact during the hours of sleep within the first few days post administration. Monitoring of the bedroom, bed linen, bathroom, toilet and personal effects showed slight levels of contamination ranging from background to 20 cps. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Investigation of the Entrance Surface Dose and Dose to Different Organs in Lumbar Spine Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dose assessment using proper dosimeters is especially important in radiation protection optimization and imaging justification in diagnostic radiology. Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD of patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging using two thermoluminescence dosimeters TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti and GR-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P and also to obtain the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging with several views. Methods: To measure the ESD values of the patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging, the two TLD types were put on their skin surface. The ESD values for different views of lumbar spine imaging were also measured by putting the TLDs at the surface of the Rando phantom. Several TLD chips were inserted inside different organs of Rando phantom to measure the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging. Results: The results indicate that there is a close agreement between the results of the two dosimeters. Based on the results of this experiment, the ESD dose of the 16 patients included in this study varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for GR-200 measurements. The ESDs obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom are in close agreement. Conclusion: According to the results, the GR200 has greater sensitivity than the TLD-100.

  8. Investigation of the Entrance Surface Dose and Dose to Different Organs in Lumbar Spine Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipoorfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Zamani, E; Faghihi, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dose assessment using proper dosimeters is especially important in radiation protection optimization and imaging justification in diagnostic radiology. Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) of patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging using two thermoluminescence dosimeters TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) and GR-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) and also to obtain the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging with several views. Methods: To measure the ESD values of the patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging, the two TLD types were put on their skin surface. The ESD values for different views of lumbar spine imaging were also measured by putting the TLDs at the surface of the Rando phantom. Several TLD chips were inserted inside different organs of Rando phantom to measure the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging. Results: The results indicate that there is a close agreement between the results of the two dosimeters. Based on the results of this experiment, the ESD dose of the 16 patients included in this study varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for GR-200 measurements. The ESDs obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom are in close agreement. Conclusion: According to the results, the GR200 has greater sensitivity than the TLD-100. PMID:25599058

  9. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology

  10. Evaluation of the reconstruction of image acquired from CT simulator to reduce metal artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong; Choi, Byung Don; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Goo, Jang Hyun; Hong, Joo Wan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the usefulness assessment of metal artifact reduction for orthopedic implants(O-MAR) to decrease metal artifacts from materials with high density when acquired CT images. By CT simulator, original CT images were acquired from Gammex and Rando phantom and those phantoms inserted with high density materials were scanned for other CT images with metal artifacts and then O-MAR was applied to those images, respectively. To evaluate CT images using Gammex phantom, 5 regions of interest(ROIs) were placed at 5 organs and 3 ROIs were set up at points affected by artifacts. The averages of standard deviation(SD) and CT numbers were compared with a plan using original image. For assessment of variations in dose of tissue around materials with high density, the volume of a cylindrical shape was designed at 3 places in images acquired from Rando phantom by Eclipse. With 6 MV, 7-fields, 15x15cm 2 and 100 cGy per fraction, treatment planning was created and the mean dose were compared with a plan using original image. In the test with the Gammex phantom, CT numbers had a few difference at established points and especially 3 points affected by artifacts had most of the same figures. In the case of O-MAR image, the more reduction in SD appeared at all of 8 points than non O-MAR image. In the test using the Rando Phantom, the variations in dose of tissue around high density materials had a few difference between original CT image and CT image with O-MAR. The CT images using O-MAR were acquired clearly at the boundary of tissue around high density materials and applying O-MAR was useful for correcting CT numbers

  11. Determination of gonad doses during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery for various tumor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorlu, Faruk; Dugel, Gozde; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Hurmuz, Pervin; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yildiz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil; Gurkaynak, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the absorbed dose received by the gonads during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of different tumor localizations. Methods: The authors measured the gonad doses during the treatment of head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic tumors in both RANDO phantom and actual patients. The computerized tomography images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The contours of tumor and critical organs were delineated on each slice, and treatment plans were generated. Measurements for gonad doses were taken from the geometric projection of the ovary onto the skin for female patients, and from the scrotal skin for male patients by attaching films and Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). SRS was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). Results: The median gonadal doses with TLD and film dosimeter in actual patients were 0.19 Gy (range, 0.035–2.71 Gy) and 0.34 Gy (range, 0.066–3.18 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median ovarian doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.08 Gy (range, 0.03–0.159 Gy) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0.015–0.13 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median testicular doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.134 Gy (range 0.056–1.97 Gy) and 0.306 Gy (range, 0.065–2.25 Gy). Conclusions: Gonad doses are below sterility threshold in robotic SRS for different tumor localizations. However, particular attention should be given to gonads during robotic SRS for pelvic tumors.

  12. Determination of gonad doses during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery for various tumor sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorlu, Faruk; Dugel, Gozde; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Hurmuz, Pervin; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yildiz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil; Gurkaynak, Murat [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara 06100 (Turkey)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the absorbed dose received by the gonads during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of different tumor localizations. Methods: The authors measured the gonad doses during the treatment of head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic tumors in both RANDO phantom and actual patients. The computerized tomography images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The contours of tumor and critical organs were delineated on each slice, and treatment plans were generated. Measurements for gonad doses were taken from the geometric projection of the ovary onto the skin for female patients, and from the scrotal skin for male patients by attaching films and Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). SRS was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). Results: The median gonadal doses with TLD and film dosimeter in actual patients were 0.19 Gy (range, 0.035-2.71 Gy) and 0.34 Gy (range, 0.066-3.18 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median ovarian doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.08 Gy (range, 0.03-0.159 Gy) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0.015-0.13 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median testicular doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.134 Gy (range 0.056-1.97 Gy) and 0.306 Gy (range, 0.065-2.25 Gy). Conclusions: Gonad doses are below sterility threshold in robotic SRS for different tumor localizations. However, particular attention should be given to gonads during robotic SRS for pelvic tumors.

  13. A feasibility study for image guided radiotherapy using low dose, high speed, cone beam X-ray volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Czajka, Jadwiga; Moore, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Image Guidance of patient set-up for radiotherapy can be achieved by acquiring X-ray volumetric images (XVI) with Elekta Synergy and registering these to the planning CT scan. This enables full 3D registration of structures from similar 3D imaging modalities and offers superior image quality, rotational set-up information and a large field of view. This study uses the head section of the Rando phantom to demonstrate a new paradigm of faster, lower dose XVI that still allows registration to high precision. Materials and methods: One high exposure XVI scan and one low exposure XVI scan were performed with a Rando Head Phantom. The second scan was used to simulate ultra low dose, fast acquisition, full and half scans by discarding a large number of projections before reconstruction. Dose measurements were performed using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and an ion chamber. The reconstructed XVI scans were automatically registered with a helical CT scan of the Rando Head using the volumetric, grey-level, cross-correlation algorithm implemented in the Syntegra software package (Philips Medical Systems). Reproducibility of the registration process was investigated. Results: In both XVI scans the body surface, bone-tissue and tissue air interfaces were clearly visible. Although the subjective image quality of the low dose cone beam scan was reduced, registration of both cone beam scans with the planning CT scan agreed within 0.1 mm and 0.1 deg. Dose to the patient was reduced from 28 mGy to less than 1 mGy and the equivalent scan speed reduced to one minute or less. Conclusions: Automatic 3D registration of high speed, ultra low dose XVI scans with the planning CT scan can be used for precision 3D patient set-up verification/image guidance on a daily basis with out loss of accuracy when compared to higher dose XVI scans

  14. Dermatologic radiotherapy and thyroid cancer. Dose measurements and risk quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid doses for various dermatologic radiation techniques were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization rate meters in an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom. The effects of changes in radiation quality and of the use or nonuse of treatment cones and thyroid shields were evaluated in detail. The results indicate that the potential risk of radiogenic thyroid cancer is very small when proper radiation protection measures are used. The probability of radiogenic thyroid cancer developing and the potential mortality risk were assessed quantitatively for each measurement. The quantification of radiation risks allows comparisons with risks of other therapeutic modalities and the common hazards of daily life

  15. Construction of an analytic-realistic phantom for adaptation of the radiographic techniques in any conventional X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, D.R.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Trad, C.S.; Brochi, M.A. Corte; Duarte, S.B.; Pina, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work we construct a homogeneous phantom, for calibrating the X-ray beam. Each homogeneous phantom was used in the time-scale sensitometric method for obtaining a radiographic technique which is able to produce in the film, an optical density around 1,0 higher than the density of base plus fog. These radiographic techniques were applied in a anthropomorphic phantom (Rando) and its images were analyzed by specialists in radiology. They identified the best image and then a ideal radiographic technique for a standard patient with smaller doses, at any conventional X-ray equipment. (author)

  16. Experimental method for calculation of effective doses in interventional radiology; Metodo experimental para calculo de dosis efectivas en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz Lblanca, M. D.; Diaz Romero, F.; Casares Magaz, O.; Garrido Breton, C.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes a method that allows you to calculate the effective dose in any interventional radiology procedure using an anthropomorphic mannequin Alderson RANDO and dosimeters TLD 100 chip. This method has been applied to an angio Radiology procedure: the biliary drainage. The objectives that have been proposed are: to) put together a method that, on an experimental basis, allows to know dosis en organs to calculate effective dose in complex procedures and b) apply the method to the calculation of the effective dose of biliary drainage. (Author)

  17. Digital image manipulation of underexposed X-rays - examinations with a fluorescent light scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidajat, N.; Schroeder, R.J.; Bergh, B.; Cordes, M.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    Incorrect exposure of conventional radiographs frequently leads to repetition of the examination and thereby to increased radiation exposure for the patient. Underexposed films of an Alderson-Rando phantom, an ankle joint and a patella were digitised by means of an inexpensive fluorescent light scanner, and subsequent image manipulation improved quality so as to make the image diagnostically adequate. For the demonstration of markedly underexposed structures digitalisation with subsequent contrast enhancement was used. Well exposed structures are best evaluated in contrast enhanced transmitted light. Our results suggest it should be possible to reduce the number of repeat exposures and thereby to limit radiation exposure. (orig.) [de

  18. New strategies for collision resolution of multi-access channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Multi-access protocol is one of the commonlyapplied access control protocols,in which commonchannels is shared by multi-users(as shown inFig.1).In recent years,this protocol has been suc-cessfully applied to various communication sys-tems[1].Typical examples are satellite communica-tion system,mobile communication system,localarea net work(LAN)and metropolitan area net work(MAN).There are chiefly three kinds of Multi-ac-cess channel models,i.e.fixed allocation model,self-adjusting allocation model and rando...

  19. Evaluation of fetal dose from megavoltage irradiation of the knee and neonate followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R.P.; Nair, T.K.; El-Akkad, S.

    1983-01-01

    A 24-yr-old female patient who was to undergo radiation therapy management for a recurrent low-grade fibrosarcoma on her right knee was found to be 9 weeks pregnant. The patient and her relatives insisted on carrying the pregnancy to maturity, despite undergoing irradiation of her right knee for local control of her disease and to take the teratological risk, if any, that it entails. This paper discusses the measurement of scattered dose in water, fetal dose estimation in an Alderson-Rando human phantom and possible ways of minimizing it

  20. Evaluation of fetal dose from megavoltage irradiation of the knee and neonate followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R.P.; Nair, T.K.M.; El-Akkad, S.

    1983-01-01

    A 24-yr-old female patient who was to undergo radiation therapy management for a recurrent low-grade fibrosarcoma on her right knee was found to be 9 weeks pregnant. The patient and her relatives insisted on carrying the pregnancy to maturity, despite undergoing irradiation of her right knee for local control of her disease and to take the teratological risk, if any, that it entails. This paper discusses the measurement of scattered dose in water, fetal dose estimation in an Alderson--Rando human phantom and possible ways of minimizing it

  1. Dose distribution in lungs and thyroid from scatter photons of x-ray mammography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of scatter photons in dose of mammography image in thyroid and lungs are studied. Thyroid and in the form of distribution function and total delivered dose studied by direct measurement with Thermoluminescence dosimeter. The results of measurements compared to other published measurements and the total dose compared to our modelling with Monte Carlo method.. Our phantoms for direct measurement of Dose are a compressed breast phantom placed on a female RANDO phantom. The results of modelling and measurement are in agreement for the total delivered dose to thyroid and lungs and comparable to doses reported by the other researcher

  2. Irradiation of parametria by double-wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisz, Csaba; Katona, Ernoe; Zarand, Pal; Polgar, Istvan; Nemeth, Gyoergy

    1984-01-01

    The dose distribution of a cobalt unit modified with a double-wedge as well as its combination with intracavitary radiotherapy was investigated. The measurements were made in both Alderson-Rando and wather phantom by using film densitometry, thermoluminescence dosimetry and ionization chambers. The dose distribution calculated on the basis of the Van de Geij program was in good agreement with the measurements. A homogeneous irradiation of the parametria can be obtained by using a combination of intracavitary and external double-wedge irradiation. (author)

  3. Oxidized LDL levels decreases after the consumption of ready-to-eat meals supplemented with cocoa extract within a hypocaloric diet

    OpenAIRE

    Ibero-Baraibar, I. (Idoia); Abete, I. (Itziar); Navas-Carretero, S. (Santiago); Massis-Zaid, A. (A.); Martinez, J.A. (José Alfredo); Zulet, M.A. (María Ángeles)

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Cocoa flavanols are recognised by their favourable antioxidant and vascular effects. This study investigates the influence on health of the daily consumption of ready-to-eat meals supplemented with cocoa extract within a hypocaloric diet, on middle-aged overweight/obese subjects. Methods and results Fifty healthy male and female middle-aged volunteers [57.26 ± 5.24 years and body mass index (BMI) 30.59 ± 2.33 kg/m2] were recruited to participate in a 4 week rando...

  4. Comparison between the distribution of the calculated dose and the media with thermoluminescent dosemeters 7 LiF in bladder tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.M.C. de.

    1974-01-01

    For the central plane of an assumed malignant tumor of the bladder, Cobalt - 60 treatment plans were calculated from published isodose curves. The calculation was done for the three field technique, unbalanced and balanced, and for 120 degree rotational therapy with wedge filter. A Rando-Alderson phantom and calibrated encapsulated 7 LiF dosimeters with a standard deviation better than 3% of each were used to verify the treatment plans. Furthermore the dose distribution to an assumed extension of the tumor and to the rectum were measured. (author)

  5. LongoVital i forebyggelsen af recidiverende aftøs stomatit. 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Hougen, H P; Klausen, B

    1991-01-01

    LongoVital (LV) (DK. reg. no. 5178/75) is a herbal based tablet enriched with recommended doses of vitamins. The present study was undertaken to investigate prevention of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) during daily intake of LV for six months as compared with placebo in a double-blind, rando......LongoVital (LV) (DK. reg. no. 5178/75) is a herbal based tablet enriched with recommended doses of vitamins. The present study was undertaken to investigate prevention of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) during daily intake of LV for six months as compared with placebo in a double...

  6. Total irradiation due to radiodiagnostic procedures in France, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnani, F.; Maccia, C.; Benedittini, M.; Lefaure, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper recalls the main concepts of dosimetry which are useful when assessing the collective dose to the patient from medical X-ray examinations. It describes the general protocol which has been followed in measuring dose associated to each x-ray exam (antropomorphic Rando phantom, in vivo measurement) and gives some results about the variations of parameters such as the mAs, the kVp and the fluoroscopy screening time. As far as the gonadal dose and the effective dose equivalent are concerned a first evaluation is given per type of examination carried out in France in 1982 [fr

  7. Measurements of dose distribution in thyroids, gonads, crystalline and other organs, for radio-diagnostics with computorized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of radiation doses in organs, from radiologic examinations by computorized tomography was done, comparing with theoretic data obtained by Monte Carlo method. The measurements were done with help of a 'Rando Alderson Phantom' exposed to irradiation coming from a 0450 AS and E Pfizer Tomographic. The cases under study were the head and abdomen examinations. The dose assessment was done by using mini TLD's of LiF. The calculated dose equivalents were obtained by using the Monte Carlo method applied to a mathematical antropomorphic phantom, simulating the same experimental arrangements. The results were compared with the experimental one. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Exposure to gonads and eyes due to computerised tomography for brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin-Chieh Hsu; Pao-Shan Weng; Ling-Nah Su

    1986-01-01

    Eye and gonad doses for some 150 patients were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters. Doses received during CT scanning using a Toshiba scanner were compared with those obtained using a Pfizer scanner. A female Rando phantom was also used as the reference. For males, the average eye dose for the Toshiba was 1695+-2041 μGy per slice and the gonad dose was 2.0+-1.5 μGy per slice; for females it was 1953+-1923 μGy per slice for eyes and 0.4+-0.3 μGy per slice for gonads. (author)

  9. Postoperative telegammatherapy of breast cancer (Dosimetric studies)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, J; Mitrov, G [Nauchno-Izsledovatelski Onkologichen Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria); Konstantinov, B; Dobrev, D [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1977-01-01

    The method employed for postoperative radiation therapy of breast cancer at the Radiologic Clinic of the Medical Academy in Sofia is described. Results are reported and discussed of dosimetric studies carried out with the T-100 on heterogeneous tissue-equivalent Rando phantom for dose distributions in the regional lymph basin and the underlying tissues and organs. The results show coincidence between calculated and measured doses in the regional lymph basin and the thoracic wall. It was demonstrated that maximal radiation loading (3600 to 5500 rad) occurs in the apical and the hilar lung area.

  10. The Big Mac Index 21 Years On: An Evaluation of Burgereconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth W. Clements; Yihui Lan; Shi Pei Seah

    2007-01-01

    The Big Mac Index, introduced by The Economist magazine 21 years ago, claims to provide the “true value” of a large number of currencies. This paper assesses the economic value of this index. We show that (i) the index suffers from a substantial bias; (ii) once the bias is allowed for, the index tracks exchange rates reasonably well over the medium to longer term in accordance with relative purchasing power parity theory; (iii) the index is at least as good as the industry standard, the rando...

  11. Diagnostic x-ray dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioppolo, J.L.; Tuchyna, T.; Price, R.I.; Buckley, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    An Electron Gamma Shower version 4 (EGS4) based user code was developed to simulate the absorbed dose in humans during routine diagnostic radiological procedures. Measurements of absorbed dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were compared directly with EGS4 simulations of absorbed dose in homogeneous, heterogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms. Realistic voxel-based models characterizing the geometry of the phantoms were used as input to the EGS4 code. The voxel geometry of the anthropomorphic Rando phantom was derived from a CT scan of Rando. The 100 kVp diagnostic energy x-ray spectra of the apparatus used to irradiate the phantoms were measured, and provided as input to the EGS4 code. The TLDs were placed at evenly spaced points symmetrically about the central beam axis, which was perpendicular to the cathode-anode x-ray axis at a number of depths. The TLD measurements in the homogeneous and heterogenous phantoms were on average within 7% of the values calculated by EGS4. Estimates of effective dose with errors less than 10% required fewer numbers of photon histories (1x10 7 ) than required for the calculation of dose profiles (1x10 9 ). The EGS4 code was able to satisfactorily predict and thereby provide an instrument for reducing patient and staff effective dose imparted during radiological investigations. (author)

  12. A customized bolus produced using a 3-dimensional printer for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Wook; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient's skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses.

  13. Growth hormone treatment in 35 prepubertal children with achondroplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Niels Thomas; Eklöf, Ole; Ivarsson, Sten

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia with extreme, disproportionate, short stature. AIM: In a 5-y growth hormone (GH) treatment study including 1 y without treatment, we investigated growth and body proportion response in 35 children with achondroplasia. METHODS: Patients were rando...... treatment of children with achondroplasia improves height during 4 y of therapy without adverse effect on trunk-leg disproportion. The short-term effect is comparable to that reported in Turner and Noonan syndrome and in idiopathic short stature.......BACKGROUND: Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia with extreme, disproportionate, short stature. AIM: In a 5-y growth hormone (GH) treatment study including 1 y without treatment, we investigated growth and body proportion response in 35 children with achondroplasia. METHODS: Patients were...

  14. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  15. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B; Catalan-Acosta, A; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Perez-Martin, C [Servicio de Ingenieria Biomedica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Armas-Trujillo, D de [Servicio de Cardiologia, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  16. Comparison of radiation delivered by current diagnostic procedures for herniated disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasquet, C.; Drouineau, J.; Goubault, F.; Hurmic, A.; Lavigne, B.; Vandermarcq, P.

    1983-01-01

    Three methods are currently employed for the diagnosis of sciatica due to disc lesions: radiculography, spinal phlebography, and computed tomography. Though their indications vary according to the author, it seemed worthwhile to compare radiation delivered by each of them, because of the often young age of the patients. Dosimetric studies using a Rando Phantom enabled calculation of doses to the skin, spinal cord, and gonads. Results indicated that low doses were delivered by the scanner, relatively high doses by spinal phlebography, and intermediate doses by radiculography. These findings suggest that the initial examination preoperatively in cases of simple sciatica due to herniated disc should be a CT scan whenever possible. Phlebography, on the contrary, and particularly in young women, should be used only exceptionally, as a result of the high doses delivered to the ovaries even during technically simple explorations [fr

  17. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  18. Dosimetry of patients submitted to cerebral PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Bernardes, Felipe Dias; Mamede, Marcelo, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mourao, Arnaldo Prata [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objective: the present study was aimed at evaluating the effective radiation dose in patients submitted to PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Materials and methods: TLD-100 detectors inserted into an Alderson Rando® anthropomorphic phantom were utilized to measure the absorbed dose coming from the CT imaging modality. The anthropomorphic phantoms (male and female adult versions) were submitted to the same technical protocols for patients’ images acquisition. The absorbed dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injection was estimated by means of the model proposed by the ICRP publication 106. Results: the effective dose in patients submitted to this diagnostic technique was approximately (5.34 ± 1.99) mSv. Conclusion: optimized protocols for calculation of radioactive activity injected into patients submitted to this diagnostic technique might contribute to reduce the effective radiation dose resulting from PET/CT in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. (author)

  19. Measurement of radiation dose to ovaries from CT of the head and trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Habdhan, M.A.M.; Kinsara, A.R. [King Abdul Aziz Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    With the rise in concern about doses received by patients over recent years, there has been a growing requirement for information on typical doses and the range of dose received during Computerized Tomography (CT). This study was performed for the assessment of radiation dose to the ovaries from various CT protocols for head and trunk imaging. Thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the dosimetry measurement in an anthropomorphic Rando Alderson phantom. The wanted (obligatory) and unwanted (non-useful) radiation doses delivered to the ovaries during CT examinations of head, facial bone, orbits, abdomen, chest, pelvis, neck, nasopharynx, cervical spine, lumber spine and sacroiliac joint were assessed. The results are compared with the corresponding values published in the literature. A comparison of the received dose from CT examinations and general radiography examinations by the ovaries was made. It is found that relatively high doses of unwanted radiation are delivered with computerized tomography. (author)

  20. Determination of Entrance Skin Doses and Organ Doses for Medical X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, C.J.; Cheng, C.Y.; Chao, T.C.; Tsai, H.Y.

    1999-01-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic X ray radiographs is planned in Taiwan. Entrance skin doses and organ doses for all installed X ray machines will be investigated. A pilot study has been carried out for the national survey to develop a protocol for the dose assessment. Entrance skin doses and organ doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several X ray examinations. The conversion factor from free air entrance absorbed dose to entrance skin dose was derived. A formula for the computation of entrance skin doses from inputs of kV p , mA.s, source to skin distance, aluminium filtration, and generator rectifying was constructed. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom. All data will be passed to the Atomic Energy Council for developing a programme of national survey and regulatory controls for diagnostic X ray examinations. (author)

  1. Investigation of a new LiF TLD individual dosimeter for measuring personal dose equivalent Hp(d) on different phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hua

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a new LiF TL dosimeter optimized for measuring personal dose equivalent, H p (d). The results obtained with four types of different phantoms, i.e. a PMMA slab, water slab, ICRU sphere and Alderson Rando phantom, and pertinent conversion coefficients show, that the conversion coefficients for the TE slab phantom are suitable for the calibration of TLD individual dosimeters on a PMMA slab phantom. In the energy range 17 keV to 1250 keV the energy response for H 0 (10) and H p (0.07) is within-20% to 8.4% for frontal irradiation. For angles within +- 60 degree the dosimeters indicate H p (10) within 0 to 22.5%, and H p (0.07) within-11.1% to 1.3%. respectively

  2. Dosimetric evaluation program for dental radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Milat, J.; Fernandez, J.; Micinquevich, S.; Andrieu, J.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary results of a program undertaken to estimate the doses to patients associated with dental radiology practices in Argentine, are presented. Information collected from the search demonstrated that the Dieck and coronal techniques are the most commonly used practices, while all the examinations are performed by using a circular collimator. For both practices, the dosimetric studies were carried out on a Rando Alderson phantom. All dose measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors LiF and Ca 2 F. In addition, a mathematical model was developed by applying the Monte Carlo method to a MIRD-V phantom. Circular and rectangular collimators were used. Absorbed dose distribution on head and neck, as well as surface dose distribution, were estimated. The comparison of the performance of both collimators shows that the use of the rectangular one allows for a dose reduction of 80%. Besides, a good correlation between the physical and mathematical models applied was found. (author)

  3. Exposure to radiation in whole body and skull CT examinations depending upon parameters determined by the technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, B.J.O.; Makoski, H.B.; Ewen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The article gives the organ doses for whole body CT examinations of the thoracic region, the upper abdomen, the mesogastric and pelvic regions as well as of the lumbar vertebral column and for CT scanning of the skull. The examinations were performed using in Alderson-Rando phantom with the whole body computer thomograph Somatom DR2 supplied by Siemens and with the skull computer tomograph Siretom 2000, also supplied by Siemens, It was found that the magnitude of radiation exposure of the patient depends not only on instrument-specific properties, but also to a very large measure on the examination parameters and techniques which can vary considerably from one clinic to another. (orig.) [de

  4. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  5. Human geography in the French Institute: new discipline or missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staum, M S

    1987-10-01

    The geography section of the Class of Moral and Political Sciences of the French National Institute, which was in existence from December 1795 to January 1803, responded inadequately to the theoretical challenges of Montesquieu, the hygienists, Volney, and Degérando to study thoroughly native peoples to determine the effects of physical geographic conditions on the body and mind. Most geographers had no interest in human geography, and even statistical geography received only superficial discussion. Despite the emergence of the scientific journal, only a few authors partly transcended the stereotypes of the noble-ignoble savage. The only expedition partly planned by the Institute in this period had an ambitious exploration program that precluded a linguistically sophisticated study of native peoples. Bonaparte's dissolution of the Class hindered further opportunities for studying human geography during the Empire.

  6. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B.; Catalan-Acosta, A.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Martin, C.; Armas-Trujillo, D. de

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  7. An instrument to perform automated quality assurance and patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapple, C.-L.; Faulkner, K.

    1992-01-01

    A computerised method of automatically monitoring tube and generator parameters to perform on-line quality assurance and patient dosimetry has been developed. A microcomputer has been interfaced to a microprocessor controlled X ray generator and dose-area product meter. The instrument prompts the operator to enter details of the examination and projection before an examination is made. The field size and dose-area product are monitored by the instrument. These data, together with information on the tube potential are used to deduce the patient entrance dose and energy imparted. Organ doses are estimated using normalised organ dose data. The accuracy and reproducibility of the instrument were investigated. Doses measured in a Rando phantom were compared with calculations made by the instrument. The instrument will compare various measured quality assurance parameters against their nominal values. The implications of this instrument for both patient dosimetry studies and effective continuous quality assurance are discussed. (author)

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Akimune; Kitamura, Tatsuo; Yamashita, Koosuke; Muranishi, Hisayuki; Hioki, Minoru [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1992-07-01

    A basic and clinical study of radiosurgery using the linear accelerator (Linac) system for unremovable deep-seated brain tumors is reported. A Komai stereotactic ring was used to locate the target coordinates. The patient was laid on the Linac treatment table and held in the head fixation system. Irradiation was given in five positions. The dose profile by film dosimetry and Rando phantom was satisfactory. Seventeen tumors in 14 patients were treated. Clinical or histological diagnoses were nine metastases, one benign and two malignant gliomas, one meningioma, and one carcinopharyngioma. Tumor sizes were between 8 and 30 mm. Doses were between 12 and 30 Gy. Computed tomographic evaluation after 3 months of 12 tumors in 11 survivors showed one complete remission, three partial remission, six no change, and two partial deterioration. For progressive tumors, Linac radiosurgery results are excellent. (author).

  9. Is energy imparted a good measure of the radiation risk associated with CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.

    1984-01-01

    The dose distribution in a Rando phantom has been measured for typical EMI 5005 CT scans of the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. These dose distributions have been used to generate quantitative estimates of the somatic and genetic radiation risks associated with these CT examinations and also to measure the total energy imparted during each scan. A comparison has been made between the radiation risk estimates and the energy imparted measurements. The energy imparted measurements are not a good indicator of the somatic and/or genetic risks when one type of CT scan is compared with another. However, for a given type of scan, the energy imparted may be a reasonable indicator of the relative somatic risks associated with different CT examinations. Considerable care should be taken when interpreting and using any measured value of energy imparted in a radiological examination since published values of the risk per unit energy imparted can significantly underestimate the radiation risk. (author)

  10. Dosimetry of patients submitted to cerebral PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Bernardes, Felipe Dias; Mamede, Marcelo; Mourao, Arnaldo Prata; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da

    2014-01-01

    Objective: the present study was aimed at evaluating the effective radiation dose in patients submitted to PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Materials and methods: TLD-100 detectors inserted into an Alderson Rando® anthropomorphic phantom were utilized to measure the absorbed dose coming from the CT imaging modality. The anthropomorphic phantoms (male and female adult versions) were submitted to the same technical protocols for patients’ images acquisition. The absorbed dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injection was estimated by means of the model proposed by the ICRP publication 106. Results: the effective dose in patients submitted to this diagnostic technique was approximately (5.34 ± 1.99) mSv. Conclusion: optimized protocols for calculation of radioactive activity injected into patients submitted to this diagnostic technique might contribute to reduce the effective radiation dose resulting from PET/CT in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. (author)

  11. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs

  12. Marrow, ovary, and breast doses delivered by CHR diagnostic x-ray examinations: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.

    1977-01-01

    The mean absorbed dose averaged over the marrow volume in a RANDO phantom is 232 +- 14 mrad and 175 +- 26 mrad when the ANL examination is made using 1 mm Al and 3 mm Al added filtration, respectively; it is 606 +- 69 mrad when the MIT examination is made. The absorbed dose averaged over the ovaries is 243 +- 25 mrad and 162 +- 38 mrad for 1 mm Al and 3 mm Al at ANL and 606 +- 40 mrad for the MIT examination. Breast doses are 388 +- 35 mrad, 226 +- 9 mrad, and 333 +- 103 mrad. Dose reduction could be achieved by using a faster film-screen combination for the MIT examination, by routinely using 3 mm Al added filtration at ANL and by improving the collimation at ANL

  13. In vivo dosimetry using thermoluminescent detector in cancer therapy of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, Claudio C.B.; Batista, D.V.; Campos, A.M.; Lopes, R.T.

    2002-01-01

    The viability and implementation of a routine in vivo dosimetry, using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD), at the radiotherapy section of the National Institute of Cancer in Brazil, in the case of head and neck treatment is shown. In order to reach that aim, the characteristics of the response of the LiF:Mg;Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent detectors in powder form were determined. The performed of this detector for in vivo dosimetry was testes using an RANDO Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and, once their adequability proved for the kind of measurements proposed , it was used for dose assessment in the case of tumour treatments in the head and neck regions, for Cobalt-60 irradiations. (author)

  14. Survey of dose distribution in patients due to operation of CT machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ling-Nah; Hsu, Pin-Chieh; Weng, Pao-Shan.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with dose measurement in gonad and eyes with self-fabricated thermoluminescent dosimeters during CT scanning for brain. A female Rando phantom was used as the reference. The experimental results obtained from several patients show that for brain scan, the average eye dose was 169.5 ± 204.1 mrad/slice and gonad dose 0.20 ± 0.15 mrad/slice for male, and that for female was 195.3 ± 193.2 mrad/slice for eyes and 0.04 ± 0.03 mrad/slice for gonad. The results are also compared with that obtained from other models of CT scanner. (author)

  15. Scattered radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in using mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit: Which position is riskiest?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salleh, H.; Matori, M. K.; Isa, M. J. M. [Agensi Nuklear Malaysia, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Samat, S. B. [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Cataractogenesis is something to be concerned by radiologist and radiographer who work extensively in fluoroscopy. The increasing use of fluoroscopy or interventional fluoroscopy has to come with safety awareness on scattered radiation risk for staff performing the procedure. This study is looking into the radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in fluoroscopy using the mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit. The Toshiba SXT-1000A and Alderson Rando phantom were used in this study. Based on the results, it is found clearly that over couch (OC) procedure is riskier than under couch (UC) procedure. The cathode bound area is clearly riskier than anode bound area especially for UC procedure. More doses (at least +1,568 % of safest position) are received by the lens of the eyes for staff standing at the cathode bound area especially the position opposite to the x-ray tube.

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities.

  17. Scattered radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in using mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit: Which position is riskiest?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salleh, H.; Matori, M. K.; Isa, M. J. M.; Samat, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is something to be concerned by radiologist and radiographer who work extensively in fluoroscopy. The increasing use of fluoroscopy or interventional fluoroscopy has to come with safety awareness on scattered radiation risk for staff performing the procedure. This study is looking into the radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in fluoroscopy using the mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit. The Toshiba SXT-1000A and Alderson Rando phantom were used in this study. Based on the results, it is found clearly that over couch (OC) procedure is riskier than under couch (UC) procedure. The cathode bound area is clearly riskier than anode bound area especially for UC procedure. More doses (at least +1,568 % of safest position) are received by the lens of the eyes for staff standing at the cathode bound area especially the position opposite to the x-ray tube

  18. Secreted microvesicular miR-31 inhibits osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weilner, Sylvia; Schraml, Elisabeth; Wieser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Damage to cells and tissues is one of the driving forces of aging and age-related diseases. Various repair systems are in place to counteract this functional decline. In particular, the property of adult stem cells to self-renew and differentiate is essential for tissue homeostasis and regeneration....... However, their functionality declines with age (Rando, 2006). One organ that is notably affected by the reduced differentiation capacity of stem cells with age is the skeleton. Here, we found that circulating microvesicles impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stem cells....... As a potential source of its secretion, we identified senescent endothelial cells, which are known to increase during aging in vivo (Erusalimsky, 2009). Endothelial miR-31 is secreted within senescent cell-derived microvesicles and taken up by mesenchymal stem cells where it inhibits osteogenic differentiation...

  19. Neutron response study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Fix, J.J.; Thorson, M.R.; Nichols, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron response of the albedo type dosimeter is strongly dependent on the energy of the incident neutrons as well as the moderating material on the backside of the dosimeter. This study characterizes the response of the Hanford dosimeter for a variety of neutron energies for both a water and Rando phantom (a simulated human body consisting of an actual human skeleton with plastic for body muscles and certain organs). The Hanford dosimeter response to neutrons of different energies is typical of albedo type dosimeters. An approximate two orders of magnitude difference in response is observed between neutron energies of 100 keV and 10 MeV. Methods were described to compensate for the difference in dosimeter response between a laboratory neutron spectrum and the different spectra encountered at various facilities in the field. Generally, substantial field support is necessary for accurate neutron dosimetry

  20. Dose Evaluation and Quality Criteria in Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, C.; Rossi, F.; Stecco, A.; Villari, N.; Zatelli, G.

    2000-01-01

    Radioprotection in dental radiology is of particular interest in the framework of the Revised Medical Exposure Directive for the great number of examinations involving the adult as well as the paediatric population (Article 9: Special Practice). The present study is intended to find the quality criteria of orthodontic imaging and for evaluating the dose absorbed within the dental and maxillary volume in connection with radiological examinations performed with either spiral CT, dental panoramic tomography or teleradiography. The X ray dose to organs sited in the body, neck, ocular and intracranial area was measured using lithium fluoride dosemeters, positioned in a Rando phantom. Quality criteria have been established by an expert radiologist considering the diagnostic information obtained in the images. The dosimetric data obtained were comparable with other authors', although with some differences due to technical characteristics. These result data are useful for choosing the patient's diagnostic path, considering the radiobiological risk associated with increasing orthodontic imaging. (author)

  1. A Topographically and anatomically unified phantom model for organ dose determination in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Rannikko, S.; Ermakov, I.; Masarskyi, L.; Saltukova, L.

    1989-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent is used as a risk-related factor for assessing radiation impact on patients. In order to assess the effective dose equivalent, data on organ doses in several organs are needed. For calculation of the collective effective dose equivalent, data on the sex and size distribution of the exposed population are also needed. A realistic phantom model based on the Alderson-Rando anatomical phantom has been developed for these purposes. The phantom model includes 22 organs and takes into account the deflections due to sex, height, weight and other anatomical features. Coordinates of the outer contours of inner organs are given in different slabs of the phantom. The images of cross sections of different slabs realistically depict the distribution of the organs in the phantom. Statistics about height and weight distribution as a function of the age of the Finnish population are also given. (orig.)

  2. Feasibility and radiation dose of high-pitch acquisition protocols in patients undergoing dual-source cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Wieland H; Albrecht, Edda; Bamberg, Fabian; Schenzle, Jan C; Johnson, Thorsten R; Neumaier, Klement; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstatin

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch and established retrospectively and prospectively gated cardiac CT protocols using an Alderson-Rando phantom and a set of patients. An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminiscent detectors and a set of clinical patients underwent the following cardiac CT protocols: high-pitch acquisition (pitch 3.4), prospectively triggered acquisition, and retrospectively gated acquisition (pitch 0.2). For patients with sinus rhythm below 65 beats per minute (bpm), high-pitch protocol was used, whereas for patients in sinus rhythm between 65 and 100 bpm, prospective triggering was used. Patients with irregular heart rates or heart rates of ≥ 100 bpm, were examined using retrospectively gated acquisition. Evaluability of coronary artery segments was determined, and effective radiation dose was derived from the phantom study. In the phantom study, the effective radiation dose as determined with thermoluminescent detector (TLD) measurements was lowest in the high-pitch acquisition (1.21, 3.12, and 11.81 mSv, for the high-pitch, the prospectively triggered, and the retrospectively gated acquisition, respectively). There was a significant difference with respect to the percentage of motion-free coronary artery segments (99%, 87%, and 92% for high-pitch, prospectively triggered, and retrospectively gated, respectively (p pitch protocol (p pitch scans have the potential to reduce radiation dose up to 61.2% and 89.8% compared with prospectively triggered and retrospectively gated scans. High-pitch protocols lead to excellent image quality when used in patients with stable heart rates below 65 bpm.

  3. A customized bolus produced using a 3-dimensional printer for radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Wook Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient's skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. METHODS: We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. RESULTS: The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. CONCLUSIONS: A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses.

  4. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 07: Optimizing dual-energy x-ray parameters using a single filter for both high and low-energy images to enhance soft-tissue imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Wesley; Sattarivand, Mike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University at Nova Scotia Health Authority, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University at Nova Scotia Health Authority (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Objective: To optimize dual-energy parameters of ExacTrac stereoscopic x-ray imaging system for lung SBRT patients Methods: Simulated spectra and a lung phantom were used to optimize filter material, thickness, kVps, and weighting factors to obtain bone subtracted dual-energy images. Spektr simulations were used to identify material in the atomic number (Z) range [3–83] based on a metric defined to separate spectrums of high and low energies. Both energies used the same filter due to time constraints of image acquisition in lung SBRT imaging. A lung phantom containing bone, soft tissue, and a tumor mimicking material was imaged with filter thicknesses range [0–1] mm and kVp range [60–140]. A cost function based on contrast-to-noise-ratio of bone, soft tissue, and tumor, as well as image noise content, was defined to optimize filter thickness and kVp. Using the optimized parameters, dual-energy images of anthropomorphic Rando phantom were acquired and evaluated for bone subtraction. Imaging dose was measured with dual-energy technique using tin filtering. Results: Tin was the material of choice providing the best energy separation, non-toxicity, and non-reactiveness. The best soft-tissue-only image in the lung phantom was obtained using 0.3 mm tin and [140, 80] kVp pair. Dual-energy images of the Rando phantom had noticeable bone elimination when compared to no filtration. Dose was lower with tin filtering compared to no filtration. Conclusions: Dual-energy soft-tissue imaging is feasible using ExacTrac stereoscopic imaging system utilizing a single tin filter for both high and low energies and optimized acquisition parameters.

  6. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 07: Optimizing dual-energy x-ray parameters using a single filter for both high and low-energy images to enhance soft-tissue imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Wesley; Sattarivand, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To optimize dual-energy parameters of ExacTrac stereoscopic x-ray imaging system for lung SBRT patients Methods: Simulated spectra and a lung phantom were used to optimize filter material, thickness, kVps, and weighting factors to obtain bone subtracted dual-energy images. Spektr simulations were used to identify material in the atomic number (Z) range [3–83] based on a metric defined to separate spectrums of high and low energies. Both energies used the same filter due to time constraints of image acquisition in lung SBRT imaging. A lung phantom containing bone, soft tissue, and a tumor mimicking material was imaged with filter thicknesses range [0–1] mm and kVp range [60–140]. A cost function based on contrast-to-noise-ratio of bone, soft tissue, and tumor, as well as image noise content, was defined to optimize filter thickness and kVp. Using the optimized parameters, dual-energy images of anthropomorphic Rando phantom were acquired and evaluated for bone subtraction. Imaging dose was measured with dual-energy technique using tin filtering. Results: Tin was the material of choice providing the best energy separation, non-toxicity, and non-reactiveness. The best soft-tissue-only image in the lung phantom was obtained using 0.3 mm tin and [140, 80] kVp pair. Dual-energy images of the Rando phantom had noticeable bone elimination when compared to no filtration. Dose was lower with tin filtering compared to no filtration. Conclusions: Dual-energy soft-tissue imaging is feasible using ExacTrac stereoscopic imaging system utilizing a single tin filter for both high and low energies and optimized acquisition parameters.

  7. Evaluation of dose exposure in 64-slice CT colonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, O.; Trabold, T.; Kopp, A.F.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Buchgeister, M.; Klabunde, M. [University of Tuebingen, Institute of Medical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    The radiation exposure of four different 64-slice MDCT-colonography (CTC) protocols was evaluated using an Alderson-Rando phantom. Protocols using 30 mAs (collimation 20 x 1.2mm), 50 mAs (collimation 20 x 1.2 and 64 x 0.6mm) and 80 mAs (20 x 1.2 mm) representing screening low-dose, routine, narrow collimation and oncologic staging setups were measured with an Alderson-Rando phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc.). Scans were performed on a 64-row MDCT (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens) simulating the prone and supine positions with a constant voltage of 120 kV. Dose values (male/female) were 2.5/2.9, 3.8/4.2, 4.2/4.5 and 5.7/6.4 mSv for 30, 50 (20 x 1.2 and 64 x 0.6 mm) and 80 mAs, respectively. Measurements showed an elevated dose for females (11.5% mean; compared to males). Use of narrow collimation combined with 50 mAs resulted in a small increase of dose exposure of 10.5 (male) and 7.1% (female). Gonad doses ranged from 0.9 to 2.6 mSv (male) and from 1.5 to 3.5 mSv (female). In all protocols, the stomach wall, lower colon, urinary bladder and liver were slightly more highly exposed (all <2.3 mSv) than the other organs, and the breast dose was <0.3 mSv in every setup. Values of radiation exposure in 64- and 16-slice CTC differ only marginally when using the narrow collimation. In 64-slice CTC, the use of narrow (64 x 0.6 mm) collimation shows slightly elevated dose values compared to wider (20 x 1.2 mm) collimation. (orig.)

  8. Mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, N; Marchand, C; Liu, J; Mitra, R; Hogan, M E; Pommier, Y

    2000-07-14

    The G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides and have been identified as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) activity (Rando, R. F., Ojwang, J., Elbaggari, A., Reyes, G. R., Tinder, R., McGrath, M. S., and Hogan, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1754-1760; Mazumder, A., Neamati, N., Ojwang, J. O., Sunder, S., Rando, R. F., and Pommier, Y. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 13762-13771; Jing, N., and Hogan, M. E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 34992-34999). To understand the inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by the G-quartet inhibitors, we have designed the oligonucleotides and, composed of three and four G-quartets with stem lengths of 19 and 24 A, respectively. The fact that increasing the G-quartet stem length from 15 to 24 A kept inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity unchanged suggests that the binding interaction occurs between a GTGT loop domain of the G-quartet inhibitors and a catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, referred to as a face-to-face interaction. Docking the NMR structure of (Jing and Hogan (1998)) into the x-ray structure of the core domain of HIV-1 IN, HIV-1 IN-(51-209) (Maignan, S., Guilloteau, J.-P. , Qing, Z.-L., Clement-Mella, C., and Mikol, V. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 282, 359-368), was performed using the GRAMM program. The statistical distributions of hydrogen bonding between HIV-1 IN and were obtained from the analyses of 1000 random docking structures. The docking results show a high probability of interaction between the GTGT loop residues of the G-quartet inhibitors and the catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, in agreement with the experimental observation.

  9. Evaluation of dose exposure in 64-slice CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, O.; Trabold, T.; Kopp, A.F.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M.; Buchgeister, M.; Klabunde, M.

    2007-01-01

    The radiation exposure of four different 64-slice MDCT-colonography (CTC) protocols was evaluated using an Alderson-Rando phantom. Protocols using 30 mAs (collimation 20 x 1.2mm), 50 mAs (collimation 20 x 1.2 and 64 x 0.6mm) and 80 mAs (20 x 1.2 mm) representing screening low-dose, routine, narrow collimation and oncologic staging setups were measured with an Alderson-Rando phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc.). Scans were performed on a 64-row MDCT (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens) simulating the prone and supine positions with a constant voltage of 120 kV. Dose values (male/female) were 2.5/2.9, 3.8/4.2, 4.2/4.5 and 5.7/6.4 mSv for 30, 50 (20 x 1.2 and 64 x 0.6 mm) and 80 mAs, respectively. Measurements showed an elevated dose for females (11.5% mean; compared to males). Use of narrow collimation combined with 50 mAs resulted in a small increase of dose exposure of 10.5 (male) and 7.1% (female). Gonad doses ranged from 0.9 to 2.6 mSv (male) and from 1.5 to 3.5 mSv (female). In all protocols, the stomach wall, lower colon, urinary bladder and liver were slightly more highly exposed (all <2.3 mSv) than the other organs, and the breast dose was <0.3 mSv in every setup. Values of radiation exposure in 64- and 16-slice CTC differ only marginally when using the narrow collimation. In 64-slice CTC, the use of narrow (64 x 0.6 mm) collimation shows slightly elevated dose values compared to wider (20 x 1.2 mm) collimation. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography automatic exposure control techniques in 18F-FDG oncology PET-CT scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, Gareth R; Tout, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) automatic exposure control (AEC) systems are now used in all modern PET-CT scanners. A collaborative study was undertaken to compare AEC techniques of the three major PET-CT manufacturers for fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose half-body oncology imaging. An audit of 70 patients was performed for half-body CT scans taken on a GE Discovery 690, Philips Gemini TF and Siemens Biograph mCT (all 64-slice CT). Patient demographic and dose information was recorded and image noise was calculated as the SD of Hounsfield units in the liver. A direct comparison of the AEC systems was made by scanning a Rando phantom on all three systems for a range of AEC settings. The variation in dose and image quality with patient weight was significantly different for all three systems, with the GE system showing the largest variation in dose with weight and Philips the least. Image noise varied with patient weight in Philips and Siemens systems but was constant for all weights in GE. The z-axis mA profiles from the Rando phantom demonstrate that these differences are caused by the nature of the tube current modulation techniques applied. The mA profiles varied considerably according to the AEC settings used. CT AEC techniques from the three manufacturers yield significantly different tube current modulation patterns and hence deliver different doses and levels of image quality across a range of patient weights. Users should be aware of how their system works and of steps that could be taken to optimize imaging protocols.

  11. SU-G-206-05: A Comparison of Head Phantoms Used for Dose Determination in Imaging Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine similarities and differences between various head phantoms that might be used for dose measurements in diagnostic imaging procedures. Methods: We chose four frequently used anthropomorphic head phantoms (SK-150, PBU-50, RS-240T and Alderson Rando), a computational patient phantom (Zubal) and the CTDI head phantom for comparison in our study. We did a CT scan of the head phantoms using the same protocol and compared their dimensions and CT numbers. The scan data was used to calculate dose values for each of the phantoms using EGSnrc Monte Carlo software. An .egsphant file was constructed to describe these phantoms using a Visual C++ program for DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc simulation. The lens dose was calculated for a simulated CBCT scan using DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc and the calculated doses were validated with measurements using Gafchromic film and an ionization chamber. Similar calculations and measurements were made for PA radiography to investigate the attenuation and backscatter differences between these phantoms. We used the Zubal phantom as the standard for comparison since it was developed based on a CT scan of a patient. Results: The lens dose for the Alderson Rando phantom is around 9% different than the Zubal phantom, while the lens dose for the PBU-50 phantom was about 50% higher, possibly because its skull thickness and the density of bone and soft tissue are lower than anthropometric values. The lens dose for the CTDI phantom is about 500% higher because of its totally different structure. The entrance dose profiles are similar for the five anthropomorphic phantoms, while that for the CTDI phantom was distinctly different. Conclusion: The CTDI and PBU-50 head phantoms have substantially larger lens dose estimates in CBCT. The other four head phantoms have similar entrance dose with backscatter hence should be preferred for dose measurement in imaging procedures of the head. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems

  12. The impact of the AEC mode of tube current on the dose at CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Cheol [Dept. of of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University,Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the automatic exposure control (AEC) modes of tube current (SIEMENSCare Dose 4D and GE AEC mode) that CT manufacturers are using was applied to neck, chest and abdomen in order to determine the difference in the respective dose parameters (CTDIvol, DLP and mSv) resulting from the dose reduction. Equipment in use at C university adopted Care Dose 4D of Siemens and AEC mode of General Electric (GE), and the x-ray exposure conditions were adjusted to be as identical as possible between the experiments. For the assessment of the dose reduction, the differences between the doses with and without the use of the tube current AEC mode by the respective manufacturer were measured for each body part including neck, chest and abdomen of a human phantom, Rando Phantom (Art-200x, Fluke Biomedical, USA). First, the assessment of SIEMENS-Care Dose 4D yielded the following results. At the neck, the automatic exposure control resulted in a 3.3% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 3% reduction in the effective dose, mSv, compared to manual exposure control. The automatic exposure control at the chest displayed the reduction in CTDIvol and DLP by 25.5%, and in the effective dose, mSv, by 25.4% compared to the manual exposure control. In case of abdomen, CTDIvol and DLP were shown to be reduced by 16%, and the effective dose (mSv) by 16.3% under the automatic exposure control compared to the manual exposure. Second, the assessment results of GE AEC mode are as follows. The automatic exposure control at the neck resulted in a 45.1% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 44.7% reduction in the effective dose (mSv) in comparison to the manual exposure control. At the chest, the automatic exposure control displayed a 47.6% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 47.5% reduction in the effective dose, mSv, compared to the manual exposure control. At the abdomen, it was shown that CTDIvol and DLP were reduced by 26.9%, and the effective dose (mSv) by 26.8% under the automatic

  13. SU-F-J-62: Assessment of Dose Changes Due to Anterior-Posterior Patient Separation During Daily MVCT Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leney, M [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Nalichowski, A; Patel, S [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effects of patient separation on absolute dose and dose distribution in patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy on TomoTherapy. Methods: An Alderson RANDO phantom with 4cm of bolus was imaged on a CT simulator and the resulting scans were contoured as a whole pelvic case. Using TomoTherapy Planning Station, the plan was designed to give 45 Gy to 95% of the treatment volume in 25 fractions. TomoTherapy MVCT scans were performed on the RANDO phantom with 2cm and 4cm of bolus removed to simulate visible changes in a patient’s anatomy. The MVCT images were rigidly registered with planning CT images on TomoTherapy Planned Adaptive. The original fluence was recalculated on the MVCT images and changes in dose distribution due to patient separation were quantified by the changes in DVHs for the target volume and the organs at risk. Results: Patient separation difference equivalent to 2cm and 4cm in anterior-posterior direction resulted in an increase of the PTV D50 and maximum PTV dose of 5.6%, 6.2% for 2cm and 7.7%, 10.4% for 4cm, respectively. For the 2cm change, D50 and maximum doses to organs at risk increased by 6.5%, 7.1% in the bladder, 4.9%, 4.8% in the rectum, and 5.3%, 6.6% in the bowel. For the 4cm change, D50 and maximum doses increased by 10.7%, 12.2% in the bladder, 5.9%, 6.1% in the rectum, and 7.7%, 10.1% in the bowel. Conclusion: This research indicates that, without any changes to the structures, patient separation in the anterior-posterior direction can affect the dose distribution for the PTV and organs at risk. These results can assist physicians in determining if obtaining a new CT simulation set and replanning is necessary for pelvic patients on TomoTherapy.

  14. SU-E-T-541: Bolus Effect of Thermoplastic Masks in IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, H; Nedzi, L; Chen, S; Jiang, S; Zhao, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the bolus effect of thermoplalstic mask on patient skin dose during multi-field IMRT and VMAT treatment. Methods: The clinically approved target contours for five head and neck patients were deformably registered to an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. Two plans: Multifield IMRT plan with 7-9 beams and VMAT plan with 2-4 arcs were created for each patient following same dose constraints. 3mm skin was excluded from PTVs but not constrained during optimization. The prescription dose was 200-220 cGy/fraction. A thermoplastic head and shoulder mask was customized for the Rando phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom twice with and without mask. During each delivery, two rectangular strips of EBT3 films (1cm x 6.8cm) were placed across the anterior upper and lower neck near PTVs to measure the surface dose. For consistency films were positioned at same locations for same patient. A total of 8 film strips were obtained for each patient. Film dose was calibrated in the range of 0-400cGy on the day of plan delivery. For dose comparison 3 regions of interests (ROIs) of 1×1 cm 2 were selected at left, right and middle part of each film, resulting in 6 point doses at each plan delivery. Results: The films without mask show relatively uniform dose distribution while those with mask clearly show mesh pattern of mask, usually indicating an increase in skin dose. On average the increase in skin dose over all ROIs with mask was 31.9%(±14.8%) with a range of 11.4%- 58.4%. There is no statistically significant difference (p=0.44) between skin dose increase in VMAT (30.8%±15.3%) and IMRT delivery (33.0%±14.9%). Conclusion: Thermoplastic immobilization masks increase surface dose for HN patient by around 30%. The magnitude is comparable between multi-field IMRT and VMAT. Radiochromic EBT3 film serves as an effective tool to quantify bolus effect

  15. MOSFET detectors in quality assurance of tomotherapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpak, Amanda; Studinski, Ryan C N; Cygler, Joanna E

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in a 6 MV conventional linac and investigate their use for quality assurance of radiotherapy treatments with a tomotherapy Hi-Art unit. High sensitivity and standard sensitivity MOSFETs were first calibrated and then tested for reproducibility, field size dependence, and accuracy of measuring surface dose in a 6 MV beam as well as in a tomotherapy Hi-Art unit. In vivo measurements were performed on both a RANDO phantom and several head and neck cancer patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements and treatment plan doses to evaluate the performance of MOSFETs in a high gradient radiation field. The average calibration factor found was 0.345+/-2.5%cGy/mV for the high sensitivity MOSFETs tested and 0.901+/-2.4%cGy/mV for the standard sensitivity MOSFETs. MOSFET measured surface doses had an average agreement with ion chamber measurements of 1.55% for the high sensitivity MOSFET and 5.23% for the standard sensitivity MOSFET when averaged over all trials and field sizes tested. No significant dependence on field size was found for the standard sensitivity MOSFETs, however a maximum difference of 5.34% was found for the high sensitivity MOSFET calibration factors in the field sizes tested. Measurements made with MOSFETS on head and neck patients treated on a tomotherapy Hi-Art unit had an average agreement of (3.26+/-0.03)% with TLD measurements, however the average of the absolute difference between the MOSFET measurements and the treatment plan skin doses was (12.2+/-7.5)%. The MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1.4% to 6.6%. Similar results were found from trials using a RANDO phantom. The MOSFETs performed well when used in the tomotherapy Hi-Art unit and did not increase the overall treatment set-up time when used for patient measurements. It was found that MOSFETs

  16. The impact of the AEC mode of tube current on the dose at CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae; Kim, Kwang Cheol

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the automatic exposure control (AEC) modes of tube current (SIEMENSCare Dose 4D and GE AEC mode) that CT manufacturers are using was applied to neck, chest and abdomen in order to determine the difference in the respective dose parameters (CTDIvol, DLP and mSv) resulting from the dose reduction. Equipment in use at C university adopted Care Dose 4D of Siemens and AEC mode of General Electric (GE), and the x-ray exposure conditions were adjusted to be as identical as possible between the experiments. For the assessment of the dose reduction, the differences between the doses with and without the use of the tube current AEC mode by the respective manufacturer were measured for each body part including neck, chest and abdomen of a human phantom, Rando Phantom (Art-200x, Fluke Biomedical, USA). First, the assessment of SIEMENS-Care Dose 4D yielded the following results. At the neck, the automatic exposure control resulted in a 3.3% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 3% reduction in the effective dose, mSv, compared to manual exposure control. The automatic exposure control at the chest displayed the reduction in CTDIvol and DLP by 25.5%, and in the effective dose, mSv, by 25.4% compared to the manual exposure control. In case of abdomen, CTDIvol and DLP were shown to be reduced by 16%, and the effective dose (mSv) by 16.3% under the automatic exposure control compared to the manual exposure. Second, the assessment results of GE AEC mode are as follows. The automatic exposure control at the neck resulted in a 45.1% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 44.7% reduction in the effective dose (mSv) in comparison to the manual exposure control. At the chest, the automatic exposure control displayed a 47.6% reduction in CTDIvol and DLP, and a 47.5% reduction in the effective dose, mSv, compared to the manual exposure control. At the abdomen, it was shown that CTDIvol and DLP were reduced by 26.9%, and the effective dose (mSv) by 26.8% under the automatic

  17. A modification to the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) head frame for stereotactic radiosurgery of head and neck and cervical spine sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, G.; Hasala, P.; Rashid, H.; Costantino, T.; Cangiane, L.; Lombardi, E.; Arbit, E; Lederman, G.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery (FSR) is used primarily to treat intracranial lesions. Many tumors which arise at or inferior to the base of skull and about the cervical spine area were not amenable to radiosurgery. Presented is a modification to the GTC head frame which permits stereotactic radiosurgery to be directed at head and neck tumors with accurate reproducible precision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The original GTC head frame has two fixation points; an anterior individualized dental impression and a posterior occipital plate with a mold contoured to the occipital pertuberance. The height of the occipital plate is adjustable in its vertical plane. However, the position of the dental piece is fixed and, therefore, limits treatment to regions superior. Treatment of head and neck and cervical spine tumors has been accomplished with a modification of the dental apparatus. Presented is our new device; a bracket extension which attaches to the dental piece and allows the head frame to be lowered to multiple desired positions. The occipital plate is elevated accordingly to support the occipital pertuberance. The depth helmet is also modified for quality assurance. A Rando phantom was used to test the accuracy and reproducibility of the new equipment. Bracket extensions lowering the head frame by 3 cm and 8 cm, respectively, were tested for accuracy of relocation on the Rando Phantom. Each extension was tested 20 times and for each individual test 18 depth helmet positions were obtained. RESULTS: The standard deviation of the modified head frame for each depth helmet measurement ranged from 0.05 to 0.35mm (mean 0.20) as compared to the standard deviation for the original GTC head frame which was 0.13 to 0.34mm (mean 0.24). The new device maintains the accuracy and reproducibility of the original GTC head frame. CONCLUSION: The GTC relocatable head frame for FSR has been modified to treat tumors of the head and neck and cervical spine sites

  18. Feasibility study of helical tomotherapy for total body or total marrow irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Susanta K.; Kapatoes, Jeff; Fowler, Jack; Henderson, Douglas; Olivera, Gustavo; Manon, Rafael R.; Gerbi, Bruce; Mackie, T. R.; Welsh, James S.

    2005-01-01

    Total body radiation (TBI) has been used for many years as a preconditioning agent before bone marrow transplantation. Many side effects still plague its use. We investigated the planning and delivery of total body irradiation (TBI) and selective total marrow irradiation (TMI) and a reduced radiation dose to sensitive structures using image-guided helical tomotherapy. To assess the feasibility of using helical tomotherapy (A) we studied variations in pitch, field width, and modulation factor on total body and total marrow helical tomotherapy treatments. We varied these parameters to provide a uniform dose along with a treatment times similar to conventional TBI (15-30 min). (B) We also investigated limited (head, chest, and pelvis) megavoltage CT (MVCT) scanning for the dimensional pretreatment setup verification rather than total body MVCT scanning to shorten the overall treatment time per treatment fraction. (C) We placed thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) inside a Rando phantom to measure the dose at seven anatomical sites, including the lungs. A simulated TBI treatment showed homogeneous dose coverage (±10%) to the whole body. Doses to the sensitive organs were reduced by 35%-70% of the target dose. TLD measurements on Rando showed an accurate dose delivery (±7%) to the target and critical organs. In the TMI study, the dose was delivered conformally to the bone marrow only. The TBI and TMI treatment delivery time was reduced (by 50%) by increasing the field width from 2.5 to 5.0 cm in the inferior-superior direction. A limited MVCT reduced the target localization time 60% compared to whole body MVCT. MVCT image-guided helical tomotherapy offers a novel method to deliver a precise, homogeneous radiation dose to the whole body target while reducing the dose significantly to all critical organs. A judicious selection of pitch, modulation factor, and field size is required to produce a homogeneous dose distribution along with an acceptable treatment time. In

  19. An investigation into the use of CMOS active pixel technology in image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmond, J P F; Holland, A D; Harris, E J; Ott, R J; Evans, P M; Clark, A T

    2008-01-01

    The increased intelligence, read-out speed, radiation hardness and potential large size of CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) gives them a potential advantage over systems currently used for verification of complex treatments such as IMRT and the tracking of moving tumours. The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using an APS-based system to image the megavoltage treatment beam produced by a linear accelerator (Linac), and to demonstrate the logic which may ultimately be incorporated into future sensor and FPGA design to evaluate treatment and track motion. A CMOS APS was developed by the MI 3 consortium and incorporated into a megavoltage imaging system using the standard lens and mirror configuration employed in camera-based EPIDs. The ability to resolve anatomical structure was evaluated using an Alderson RANDO head phantom, resolution evaluated using a quality control (QC3) phantom and contrast using an in-house developed phantom. A complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment was imaged and two algorithms were used to determine the field-area and delivered dose, and the position of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves off-line. Results were compared with prediction from the prescription and found to agree within a single image frame time for dose delivery and 0.02-0.03 cm for the position of collimator leaves. Such a system therefore shows potential as the basis for an on-line verification system capable of treatment verification and monitoring patient motion

  20. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, M J; Abreu-Luis, J; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada-Martinez, E [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm{sup 2} in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  1. O desenvolvimento do modo narrativo de pensamento em pré-adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Suzana Rocha de Macedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio investiga la comprensión de niños acerca de la covariación de los términos de la división sin la presencia explicita del número. El objetivo es verificar si hay diferencia en el desempeño cuando se incluyen cantidades que son expresadas por números o por códigos relativos. Participaron 72 estudiantes pertenecientes a una escuela particular de Recife (Brasil, distribuidos en tres grupos: Prescolar (Infantil 3, primero y segundo año. Estos grupos resolvieron 12 problemas de división conside- rando dos condiciones: C1 (con la presencia explicita del número y C2 (con la presen- cia del código relativo. Los resultados revelan que los niños de 1º y 2º año presentan mejor desempeño cuando los problemas son presentados en la C2, a diferencia de los niños de prescolar (Infantil 3 que presentan mejor desempeño en la C1. Estos resul - tados apuntan a que el uso del código relativo parece ayudar a los niños en los años iniciales, principalmente a aquellos que están iniciando el aprendizaje de operaciones a pensar sobre las relaciones presentes en los enunciados de los problemas.

  2. Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-07

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  3. NOTE: Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-01

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  4. Effective radiation dose from semicoronal CT of the sacroiliac joints in comparison with axial CT and conventional radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurik, Anne Grethe; Boecker Puhakka, Katriina [Department of Radiology R, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Kommunehospital, Noerrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hansen, Jolanta [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Kommunehospital, Noerrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose given by semicoronal CT of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in comparison with axial CT and conventional radiography. The total effective radiation doses given by serial contiguous semicoronal and axial CT, using 5-mm slices, 120 kV and 330 mAs, were determined by measurement of organ doses using an anthropomorphic Rando Alderson phantom paced with thermoluminescence dosimeters. The doses given by conventional antero-posterior (AP) and oblique projections of the SIJs were determined similarly. In a female the total effective dose by semicoronal CT was found to be more than six times lower than by axial CT and 2.5 times lower than the dose use to obtain a conventional AP radiograph, the values being 102, 678, and 255 {mu}Sv, respectively. The effective dose by semicoronal CT was only a little higher than the dose given to obtain two oblique radiographs. In a male with lead protection of the gonads the dose by semicoronal CT was four times lower than by axial CT, but higher than by conventional radiography. In conclusion, the effective dose by semicoronal CT of the SIJs is lower than by axial CT, and in females a semicoronal CT implies a lower effective radiation dose that used to obtain an AP radiograph. (orig.)

  5. Investigation of a new LiF TLD individual dosimeter for measuring personal dose equivalent Hp(d) on different phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, H.; Duftschmid, K.E.; Strachotinsky, C.

    1992-09-01

    The paper describes a new LiF TLD dosimeter designed for measuring personal dose equivalent, H p (d). Its energy and angular response have been studied in detail on a PMMA slab phantom using the conversion factors for TE slab phantom. According to the results obtained with four types of different conversion coefficients and phantoms, i.e. a PMMA slab, Water slab, ICRU sphere and Alderson Rando phantom, the conversion coefficients for the TE slab phantom are suitable for the calibration of TLD individual dosimeters on PMMA slab phantom. In the energy range 17 keV to 1250 KeV the energy response for H p (10) and H p (0.07) is energy independent within -20% to 8.4% for frontal irradiation. For angles within ±60 deg the new TLD dosimeters indicate H p (10) within 0 to 22.5% and H p (0.07) within -11.1% to 1.3%, respectively. (authors)

  6. Determination of organ doses in radiographic imaging and diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjen, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier publications on diagnostic radiation exposure commonly presented data on the gonadal dose. This emphasis on the genetic radiation risk is no longer valid in view of recent radiobiological findings; equal attention should be paid to the somatic radiation risk which is manifested by the induction of malignant neoplasms, e.g. in the lungs, red bone marrow, thyroid and female breast (ICRP 26). The permissible radiation doses for these organs and the gonals for routine diagnostic radiology are determined. A formula is established on the basis of terms from relevant publications (e.g. open-air dose, backscattering factor) and from the author's own measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom (depth dose curves, dose decrements). The measurements were carried out using CaP 2 thermoluminescence dosemeters, and the organ doses for the various techniques of X-ray examination were calculated by computer. Calculations of this type will enable the radiologist to determine the patient exposure quickly and easily from the records kept according to Sect. 29 of the X-ray Ordinance. Experimental value from relevant publications are compared with the author's own results. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Evaluation of radiation exposure with singleslice- and a multislice-spiral CT system (a phantom study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomuzzi, S.M.; Rieger, M.; Lottersberger, C.; Peer, S.; Peer, R.; Buchberger, W.; Bale, R.; Mallouhi, A.; Jaschke, W.; Torbica, P.; Perkmann, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of study was to compare patient dose applying singleslice- and multislice-spiral CT. Methods: The examinations were performed with a singleslice-spiral CT (Highspeed Advantage; GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA) and with a multislice CT systems (LightSpeed QX/i GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA). For the determination of the radiation exposure (absorbed dose) a selection of most executed protocols (thorax-helical, abdomen-helical, petrous bone-axial, head-axial) were simulated using an Alderson Rando Phantom. The dose was determined by means of lithiumfluorid-thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR 200). Results: For thorax and abdomen protocols higher energy dose values could be found using a multislice CT. On the average the energy dose values were increased by 2.6 on an average in relation to single slice spiral CT. The energy dose values of the multisclice CT using head protocols could be reduced by 30% in relation to single slice spiral CT due to suitable parameter selections. The energy dose applying a petrous bone protocol resulted in an average increase by a factor 1.5 using a multislice CT. Conclusion: Using the new multislice CT technique protocol strategies must be optimized regarding the patient doses. Users can operate critically in the sense of the radiation protection only if they are aware of the occurring dose amounts to the patient. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiation dose of digital tomosynthesis for sinonasal examination: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Numano, Tomokazu; Abe, Shinji; Sabol, John M; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-06-01

    Using an anthropomorphic phantom, we have investigated the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis (DT) of flat-panel detector (FPD) radiography to reduce radiation dose for sinonasal examination compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). A female Rando phantom was scanned covering frontal to maxillary sinus using the clinically routine protocol by both 64-detector CT (120 kV, 200 mAs, and 1.375-pitch) and DT radiography (80 kV, 1.0 mAs per projection, 60 projections, 40° sweep, and posterior-anterior projections). Glass dosimeters were used to measure the radiation dose to internal organs including the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, and the surface dose at various sites including the eyes during those scans. We compared the radiation dose to those anatomies between both modalities. In DT radiography, the doses of the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, skin, and eyes were 230 ± 90 μGy, 1770 ± 560 μGy, 1400 ± 80 μGy, 1160 ± 2100 μGy, and 112 ± 6 μGy, respectively. These doses were reduced to approximately 1/5, 1/8, 1/12, 1/17, and 1/290 of the respective MDCT dose. For sinonasal examinations, DT radiography enables dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and dose to the head and neck region, particularly to the lens of the eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduction of patient dose delivered by CHR diagnostic x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.D.; Schlenker, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Three changes in technique have been made which reduce the x-ray dose delivered by diagnostic examinations of patients of the Center for Human Radiobiology (CHR): Kodak Lanex Regular screens and Kodak Ortho G film have been substituted for DuPont Cronex Parspeed screens and DuPont Cronex 4 film for five projections in the MIT examinations; 3 mm Al added filtration is now used in place of 1 mm Al added filtration in the ANL examination; improvements in collimation for the ANL examination have been made. Use of the new screen-film combination at MIT has reduced the mean dose to the active marrow of the female RANDO phantom from 606 +- 69 mrad to 235 +- 16 mrad; it has reduced the ovary dose from 606 +- 40 mrad to 291 +- 19 mrad and has left the breast dose unchanged at 333 +- 103 mrad. The change from 1 mm Al to 3 mm Al added filtration at ANL, without changes in collimation, would reduce the mean marrow dose in the phantom from 232 +- 14 mrad to 175 +- 26 mrad, reduce the ovary dose from 243 +- 25 mrad to 162 +- 38 mrad and reduce the breast dose from 388 +- 35 mrad to 226 +- 9 mrad. The changes in collimation at ANL should reduce these doses even further but the quantitative effect has not been ascertained

  10. Determination of isodose curves in Radiotherapy using an Alanine/ESR dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.; Baffa, O.; Graeff, C.F.O.

    1998-01-01

    It was studied the possible use of an Alanine/ESR dosemeter in the isodose curves mapping in normal treatments of Radiotherapy. It was manufactured a lot of 150 dosemeters with base in a mixture of D-L Alanine dust (80 %) and paraffin (20 %). Each dosemeter has 4.7 mm diameter and 12 mm length. A group of 100 dosemeters of the lot were arranged inside 50 holes of the slice 25 of the phantom Rando Man. The phantom irradiation was realized in two opposed projections (AP and PA) in Co-60 equipment. A group of 15 dosemeters was take of the same lot for obtaining the calibration curve in a 1-20 Gy range. After irradiation the signal of each dosemeter was measured in an ESR spectrometer operating in the X-band (∼ 9.5 GHz) and the wideness of Alanine ESR spectra central line was correlated with the radiation dose. The wideness dose calibration curve resulted linear with a correlation coefficient 0.9996. The isodose curves obtained show a profile enough similar at comparing with the theoretical curves. (Author)

  11. An evaluation of in-plane shields during thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, S J; McEntee, M F; Rainford, L A

    2013-08-01

    The object of this study was to compare organ dose and image quality effects of using bismuth and barium vinyl in-plane shields with standard and low tube current thoracic CT protocols. A RANDO phantom was scanned using a 64-slice CT scanner and three different thoracic protocols. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned in six locations to record surface and absorbed breast and lung doses. Image quality was assessed quantitatively using region of interest measurements. Scanning was repeated using bismuth and barium vinyl in-plane shields to cover the breasts and the results were compared with standard and reduced dose protocols. Dose reductions were most evident in the breast, skin and anterior lung when shielding was used, with mean reductions of 34, 33 and 10 % for bismuth and 23, 18 and 11 % for barium, respectively. Bismuth was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values for all the three protocols, especially anteriorly and centrally. Barium shielding had a reduced impact on image quality. Reducing the overall tube current reduced doses in all the locations by 20-27 % with similar increases in noise as shielding, without impacting on attenuation values. Reducing the overall tube current best optimises dose with minimal image quality impact. In-plane shields increase noise and attenuation values, while reducing anterior organ doses primarily. Shielding remains a useful optimisation tool in CT and barium is an effective alternative to bismuth especially when image quality is of concern.

  12. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductor and thermoluminescent detectors applied to head and neck cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, Claudio Castelo Branco

    2003-03-01

    In vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy, i. e, the assessment of the doses received by patients during their treatments, permits a verification of the therapy quality. A routine of in vivo dosimetry is, undoubtedly, a direct benefit for the patient. Unfortunately, in Brazil and in Latin America this procedure is still a privilege for only a few patients. This routine is of common application only in developed countries. The aim of this work is to show the viability and implementation of a routine in vivo dosimetry, using diodes semiconductors and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), at the radiotherapy section of the National Institute of Cancer in Brazil, in the case of head and neck cancer treatment. In order to reach that aim, the characteristics of the response of diodes ISORAD-p and LiF:Mg;Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent detectors in powder form were determined. The performance of those detectors for in vivo dosimetry was tested using an RANDO Alderson anthropomorfic phantom and, once their adequacy proved for the kind of measurements proposed, they were used for dose assessment in the case of tumour treatments in the head and neck regions, for Cobalt-60 irradiations. (author)

  13. Hair {sup 32}P measurement for body dose mapping in non-fatal exposures to fast neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mianji, Fereidoun A. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iran Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Sheyda; Zaryouni, Saiedeh [Bu-Ali Sina University, Faculty of Science, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Bardia [Iran Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Dosimetry bioassay methods are the backbone of a personal dosimetry in criticality accidents. Although methods like hair dosimetry and the use of activation foils (e.g., {sup 32}S) have been employed for decades, capabilities of different techniques, effects of hair type and neutron spectrum on the dose response, sensitivity and uncertainties of different techniques, etc., need more investigations. For this reason, the use of the {sup 32}S(n,p){sup 32}P reaction and hair samples for estimating non-fatal doses from fast neutrons was studied. The experiments were carried out with the hair samples attached on a RANDO phantom in a Cf-252 neutron field, in the dose range of about 0.05-1.15 Gy. In addition, the adequate post-accident preparation for hair samples including optimum conditioning and timing were investigated. Experimental results prove the good sensitivity and merit of the method for neutron quantification in the mentioned dose range for which other bioassay methods are of poor resolution and sensitivity. A rough estimation of the dose-response curve for Iranian hair was also derived. (orig.)

  14. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  15. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  16. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  17. Estimation of the radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gating in dual-source computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Luetkhoff, Marie H.; Thomas, Christoph; Werner, Matthias; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Reimann, Anja; Kopp, Andreas F.; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin; Buchgeister, Markus; Burgstahler, Christof

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gated dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). An Alderson Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a dual-source computed tomography system with a standard protocol for chest pain evaluation (120 kV, 320 mAs/rot) with different simulated heart rates (HRs). The dose of a standard chest CT examination (120 kV, 160 mAs) was also measured. Effective dose of the chest pain protocol was 19.3/21.9 mSv (male/female, HR 60), 17.9/20.4 mSv (male/female, HR 80) and 14.7/16.7 mSv (male/female, HR 100). Effective dose of a standard chest examination was 6.3 mSv (males) and 7.2 mSv (females). Radiation dose of the chest pain protocol increases significantly with a lower heart rate for both males (p = 0.040) and females (p = 0.044). The average radiation dose of a standard chest CT examination is about 36.5% that of a CT examination performed for chest pain. Using DSCT, the evaluated chest pain protocol revealed a higher radiation exposure compared with standard chest CT. Furthermore, HRs markedly influenced the dose exposure when using the ECG-gated chest pain protocol. (orig.)

  18. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO"R phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500"R, ProMax"R 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax"R 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 μSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 μSv (SD = 0.31 μSv). For the CS 9500"R, the ED was 88 and 86 μSv (SD = 0.95 μSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam. (authors)

  19. X-ray protective clothing. Does DIN 6857-1 allow an objective comparison between lead-free and lead-composite materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, H.; Schlattl, H.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The validity of DIN 6857-1 to establish lead equivalence for protective clothing is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Materials and Methods: Commercially available protective clothing made of lead, lead-free and lead-composite materials has been tested regarding its protective efficacy. The analysis has been performed on the one hand in accordance with the test conditions described in the manufacturing standard DIN EN 61331-3 and on the other hand following the new DIN 6857-1 standard. Additionally, measurements have been carried out under simulated patient conditions by using an Alderson-Rando phantom. Results: Following DIN EN 61331-3, the lead-free protective clothing achieved the required protective efficacy only at a restricted tube-voltage range. The test according to DIN 6857-1 showed that the protective criteria were fulfilled only by one lead-composite apron, but not by the three lead-free aprons examined. Thus, in order to guarantee the same protection as lead between 50 and 120 kV, the conditions of DIN 6857-1 must be fulfilled. Conclusion: A modification of DIN EN 61331-3 to account for secondary radiation is strongly advised in the case of lead-free materials. In summary, most of the protective lead-free aprons in use should be used with care, particularly for examinations with a high dose. (orig.)

  20. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  1. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. A simple calculation for the determination of organ or tissue dose from medical x-ray diagnosis for stomach and chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kanae

    1984-01-01

    A simple calculation method has been developed to determine the organ or tissue doses of patients for typical X-ray diagnoses. The absorbed doses related to radiation-induced stochastic effects were calculated based on the dosimetric parameters experimentally determined and technical parameters for X-ray diagnostic examinations. The present method is principally based on the TRA method for the beam therapy. The dosimetric parameters such as percentage depth-dose curves and isodose curves were measured with ionization chambers in the MixDP phantom. The distance from the incident surface of X-ray beams to the organ or tissue of interest was determined with a mathematical phantom, which was the modified version of the MIRD phantom for the average Japanese adult. The absorbed doses were determined with a simple table look-up method using a computer. The calculated doses were tabulated for various technical parameters of stomach and chest X-ray examinations. The present calculation was applied to the Rando woman phantom to compare with the phantom measurements. The calculated values agree with the experimental doses within 20% discrepancy. It was concluded that the present calculation method can determine organ or tissue doses very simply for various X-ray examinations and that it was valuable for the estimation of population doses and risks from X-ray diagnoses. (author)

  3. Estimation of absorbed and effective dose in {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT exams for diagnosis of lung cancer; Estimativa de dose absorvida e efetiva em exames de {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT para diagnostico de cancer de pulmao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Guilherme Neto de Pinho; Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: guinpc1@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Reis, Lucas Paixao dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of tissues and organs absorbed doses as well as the effective dose resulting from PET-CT scans performed with {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical for lung cancer diagnosis in whole body scans. The ICRP-106 biokinetic model was used to estimate the absorbed and effective doses from the radiopharmaceutical for both male and female patient according to the characteristics of anthropomorphic Alderson Rando® simulators. Computer Tomography doses were evaluated using thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the same anthropomorphic simulators. Optimization protocols for image acquisition and the use of automatic exposure control were used in order to reduce patient doses, taking into account the equipment model and its system. The effective dose in female patients was 5.8 mSv. The effective dose in male patients was 8.4 mSv. The dose values estimated for the {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan are below the values described in the literature. This is because the CT was not used for diagnostic but for morphological mapping. (author)

  4. Investigation of conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques to determine the absorbed fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öğretici, Akın, E-mail: akinogretici@gmail.com; Akbaş, Uğur; Köksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the fetal doses of pregnant patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancers. An Alderson Rando phantom was chosen to simulate a pregnant patient with breast cancer who is receiving radiation therapy. This phantom was irradiated using the Varian Clinac DBX 600 system (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) linear accelerator, according to the standard treatment plans of both three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) and IMRT techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the irradiated phantom's virtually designated uterus area. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements (in the phantom) revealed that the mean cumulative fetal dose for 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and for IMRT it is 8.48 cGy, for a pregnant breast cancer woman who received radiation treatment of 50 Gy. The fetal dose was confirmed to increase by 70% for 3-D CRT and 40% for IMRT, if it is closer to the irradiated field by 5 cm. The mean fetal dose from 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and IMRT is 8.48 cGy, consistent with theoretic calculations. The IMRT technique causes the fetal dose to be 5 times more than that of 3-D CRT. Theoretic knowledge concerning the increase in the peripheral doses as the measurements approached the beam was also practically proven.

  5. Application of digital image processing for the generation of voxels phantoms for Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, L.S.; Menezes, A.F.; Cardoso, M.A.C. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE (Brazil); Rosa, L.A.R. da [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria-IRD, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CP 37760, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Batista, D.V.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria-IRD, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CP 37760, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Cancer-Secao de Fisica Medica, Praca Cruz Vermelha, 23-Centro, 20230-130 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cardoso, S.C. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Bloco A-Sala 307, CP 68528, CEP 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/Escola Politecnica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, R. Gal. Severiano 90, sala 409, 22294-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    This paper presents the application of a computational methodology for optimizing the conversion of medical tomographic images in voxel anthropomorphic models for simulation of radiation transport using the MCNP code. A computational system was developed for digital image processing that compresses the information from the DICOM medical image before it is converted to the Scan2MCNP software input file for optimization of the image data. In order to validate the computational methodology, a radiosurgery treatment simulation was performed using the Alderson Rando phantom and the acquisition of DICOM images was performed. The simulation results were compared with data obtained with the BrainLab planning system. The comparison showed good agreement for three orthogonal treatment beams of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. The percentage differences were 3.07%, 0.77% and 6.15% for axial, coronal and sagital projections, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use a method to optimize the CT image conversion in voxel model for MCNP simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a methodology to compress a DICOM image before conversion to input file. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To validate this study an idealized radiosurgery applied to the Alderson phantom was used.

  6. Effective dose for patient in multimode panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaki, Shiro; Daibo, Motoji

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, multimode panoramic radiography has had various functions, such as the auto exposure function, auto focus function (auto function), TMJ radiography and tomogram radiography functions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective dose for patients in each mode of the new multimode panoramic radiography (J. MORITA MFG. CORP. Dental Panorama X-ray Apparatus: Veraview Scope X 600). The absorbed doses in important organs involved in the causation of stochastic effects were measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter using RANDO phantom. The effective doses were calculated using modified tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1999. The mean field size over skin in typical panoramic and tomographic examinations was about 3% and 0.4% of the total body surface area of 15000 cm 2 . Assuming that the incidence of skin cancer is proportional to the area of skin exposed to ionizing radiation, the tissue weighting factor of skin can be estimated to be about 0.0003 and 0.00004. The estimate in effective dose was lower (5.3 μSv) in the panoramic auto function mode (an average exposure condition of 69 kV 7 mA) than that (6.5-13.8 μSv) in the linear tomogram modes. Since the linear tomogram mode requires a scout view, such as standard panoramic radiography, the dose in the linear tomogram mode becomes higher than other modes. A percentage of gonad doses in effective doses was negligible. (author)

  7. X-ray CT high-density artefact suppression in cryosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jikun; Sandison, George A; Chen Laigao; Liang Yun; Xu, Lisa X

    2002-01-01

    Advantages of x-ray CT for imaging guidance of cryosurgery include 3D visualization of frozen and unfrozen tissue and calibration of temperature in the tissue water-ice interface (0-10 deg. C) to Hounsfield units. However, use of x-ray CT images and their thermal calibration can be compromised by the cryoprobes generating high-density streak artefacts. A new subtraction technique for artefact suppression is proposed and tested in prostate cryosurgery simulations. By subtracting the measured CT x-ray projection profile without cryoprobes from the profile with cryoprobes plus iceballs, one obtains the combined profile of the cryoprobes and a low value background. Polynomial interpolation to obtain the background profile allows its addition to the original profile without probes. The result may then be fed to a conventional filtered back-projection routine to reconstruct the probe-free image. Finally the cryoprobe pixels in the originally constructed image with probes and iceballs are added back to the probe-free image to get the final artefact-suppressed image. The major advantage of this subtraction technique is that it can successfully suppress the high-density artefacts in bone-abundant body regions such as the pelvis. X-ray CT images of cryoprobe arrays in a homogeneous gelatin phantom and the pelvic region of an anthropomorphic Rando phantom containing a human skeleton were generated. After suppression, cryoprobe metal artefact streaks are reduced and visualization of the positions and dimensions of the cryoprobes are well preserved. (note)

  8. Analysis of thyroid absorbed dose in cervical CT scan with the use of bismuth shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Fernanda S.; Gómez, Álvaro M.L.; Mourão, Arnaldo P.; Santana, Priscila C.

    2017-01-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) has become an important tool to diagnose cancer and to obtain additional information for different clinical questions. Today, it is a very fast, painless and noninvasive test that can be performed high quality images. However, CT scan usually requires a higher radiation exposure dose than a conventional radiography examination. The aim of this study is to determine the dose variation deposited in thyroid and in nearby radiosensitive organs, such as: lenses, pharynx, hypophysis, salivary gland and spinal cord with and without the use of bismuth shielded. A cervical CT scan was performed on anthropomorphic male phantom model Alderson Rando, from the occipital to the first thoracic vertebra, using a GE scanner, Discovery model with 64 channels. Dose measurements have been performed by using radiochromic film strips to register the individual doses in the organs of interest. After the phantom cervical CT scan the radiochromic film strips were processed for obtaining digital images. Digital images were worked to obtain the dose variation profiles for each film. With the data obtained, it was found the organ dose variation. The results show that the thyroid received the highest dose, 40.9 mGy, in the phantom, according to the incidence of the primary X-ray beam. (author)

  9. The development of a specialized in-vivo body counter for radiation monitoring in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, construction, calibration and testing of a prototype mobile counting system to measure natural uranium in the lungs of workers in the nuclear fuel industry is described. The measurement method is based on the detection of gamma rays emitted during the decay of the daughters of uranium. The mobile facility consisted of a shadow shield and phoswich detector system mounted in a medium-sized trunk. Care was taken to ensure undistorted visual and verbal contact between the subject and the operator. Tests were made to optimize the location and thickness of the lead shielding. A single axle truck was insulated and a heater was installed for winter operation. There was sufficient room in the box to include a change room and waiting area as well as the shadow shield and electronics rack. An extensive series of test measurements was made at a number of locations. Control group studies of males were carried out and a model was developed which correctly predicted the subject background in the uranium region of the gamma spectrum when no uranium was present. The mobile counter was calibrated using the Rando Phantom. On a field trip to Bancroft In February 1981 the shadow shield configuration was shown to provide adequate background reduction for accurate uranium-in-lung measurements. With repeated measurements, changes in an individual's lung burden as small as 2 mg uranium could be detected. The minimum detectable amount of uranium on the basis of one measurement was 5.4 mg

  10. Assessing doses of radiotherapy with the risk of developing cancer in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Cheng-Ching; Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Yu, Wan-Hsuan; Liu, Mu-Tai; Huang, Sheng-Shien

    2011-01-01

    Radiation is known to be a major cause of cancer in normal tissue. After treatment with radiotherapy, for young patients or the patients can survive for a long time, the radiation-induced cancer risk is noteworthy. This research investigated the dose delivered by the treatment of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer, such as NPC and oral cancer, and assessed the risk of developing radiation-induced secondary cancer in non-targeted normal tissues. A Rando phantom was used to simulate a patient with NPC or oral cancer, and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed inside the phantom to estimate the doses delivered by IMRT. In summary, the risks to patients with NPC was somewhat higher than for those with oral cancer, because the region of the PTV was lower, requiring larger field sizes be used for cases of NPC. The smaller the field size used, the less the risk was of developing secondary cancer. In addition, the higher the value of MU used, the higher the dose delivered to normal tissues was. The risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer was proportional to the delivered dose.

  11. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 10: Use of the Microsoft Kinect for applications of patient surface data to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, Dominique; Syme, Alasdair; DeBlois, François [McGill University, Montréal, QC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Current techniques to acquire patient surface data are often very expensive and lack flexibility. In this study, the use of the Microsoft Kinect to reliably acquire 3D scans of patient surface is investigated. A design is presented to make the system easily applicable to the clinic. Potential applications of the device to radiotherapy are also presented. Scan reproducibility was tested by repeatedly scanning an anthropomorphic phantom. Scan accuracy was tested by comparing Kinect scans to the surface extracted from a CT dataset of a Rando® anthropomorphic phantom, which was considered as the true reference surface. Average signed distances of 0.12 ± 2.34 mm and 0.13 ± 2.04 mm were obtained between the compared surfaces for reproducibility and accuracy respectively. This is conclusive, since it indicates that the variations observed come largely from noise distributed around an average distance close to 0 mm. Moreover, the range of the noise is small enough for the system to reliably capture a patient's surface. A system was also designed using two Kinects used together to acquire 3D surfaces in a quick and stable way that is applicable to the clinic. Finally, applications of the device to radiotherapy are demonstrated. Its use to detect local positioning errors is presented, where small local variations difficult to see with the naked eye are clearly visible. The system was also used to predict collisions using gantry and patient scans and thus ensure the safety of unconventional trajectories.

  12. Ultra-low dose dual-source high-pitch computed tomography of the paranasal sinus: diagnostic sensitivity and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Boris; Zangos, Stefan; Friedrichs, Ingke; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kerl, Matthias; Vogl, Thomas J.; Martin M Mack, Martin M.; Potente, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Today's gold standard for diagnostic imaging of inflammatory diseases of the paranasal sinus is computed tomography (CT). Purpose: To evaluate diagnostic sensitivity and radiation dose of an ultra-low dose dual-source CT technique. Material and Methods: Paranasal sinuses of 14 cadaveric heads were independently evaluated by two readers using a modern dual-source CT with lowest reasonable dosage in high-pitch mode (100 kV, 10 mAs, collimation 0.6 mm, pitch value 3.0). Additionally the head part of an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescent detectors to measure radiation exposure to the eye lenses and thyroid gland. Results: Diagnostic accuracy regarding sinusoidal fluid, nasal septum deviation, and mucosal swelling was 100%. Mastoid fluid was detected in 76% and 92%, respectively. In the phantom study, average measured eye lens dosage was 0.64 mGy; radiation exposure of the thyroid gland was 0.085 mGy. Conclusion: Regarding evaluation of inflammatory diseases of the paranasal sinus this study indicates sufficient accuracy of the proposed CT protocol at a very low dosage level

  13. Dosimetry of cone beam computed tomography scanning for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Pinto de A, E. L.; Manzi, F. R.; Goncalves Z, E.; Nogueira, M. S.; Fernandes Z, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The radiation dose and estimate the radiation induced risk of cancer and morpho functional alterations according to BEIR VII (2006) and recommendations of the ICRP 103 (2007) were measured in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning (Tc Kodak 9000C 3D) in different oral and maxillofacial regions for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry for each examination protocol: jaw full, maxilla full and jaw and maxilla full associated. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD- 100 H) were placed in an Alderson-Rando in regions corresponding to the crystalline, parotid, submandibular and thyroid glands and ovaries. The highest values for entrance skin dose were observed in the region of the parotid and submandibular glands, 9.612 mGy to 7.912 mGy and 8.818 mGy to 0.483 mGy, respectively. All examination protocols presented on the right and left sides in the region of the submandibular gland the highest values for absorbed dose (D). In the jaw full exam the thyroid glands on both sides presented highest dose values than maxilla full exam. This study allowed measuring the entrance skin dose and the absorbed dose (D) highlighting a dosimetric preponderance to the salivary glands. With danger of to radiation that induces cancer risk was observed that the age group most likely to have to risk of cancer was 20 years, compared to 30, 40, 50, 60,70 and 80 years. (Author)

  14. Dose characteristics of in-house-built collimators for stereotactic radiotherapy with a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrgaard, F. Stefan E.; Kulmala, Jarmo A.J.; Minn, Heikki R.I.; Sipilae, Petri M.

    1998-01-01

    Dose characteristics of a stereotactic radiotherapy unit based on a standard Varian Clinac 4/100 4 MV linear accelerator, in-house-built Lipowitz collimators and the SMART stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning software have been determined. Beam collimation is constituted from the standard collimators of the linear accelerator and a tertiary collimation consisting of a replaceable divergent Lipowitz collimator. Four collimators with isocentre diameters of 15, 25, 35 and 45 mm, respectively, were constructed. Beam characteristics were measured in air, acrylic or water with ionization chamber, photon diode, electron diode, diamond detector and film. Monte Carlo simulation was also applied. The radiation leakage under the collimators was less than 1% at 50 mm depth in water. Specific beam characteristics for each collimator were imported to SMART and dose planning with five non-coplanar converging 140 deg. arcs separated by 36 deg. angles was performed for treatment of a RANDO phantom. Dose verification was made with TLD and radiochromic film. The in-house-built collimators were found to be suitable for stereotactic radiotherapy and patient treatments with this system are in progress. (author)

  15. Determination of isodose curves in Radiotherapy using an Alanine/ESR dosemeter; Determinacion de curvas de isodosis en Radioterapia usando un dosimetro de Alanina/ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.; Baffa, O.; Graeff, C.F.O. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica. Universidade de Sao Paulo FFCLRP. 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    It was studied the possible use of an Alanine/ESR dosemeter in the isodose curves mapping in normal treatments of Radiotherapy. It was manufactured a lot of 150 dosemeters with base in a mixture of D-L Alanine dust (80 %) and paraffin (20 %). Each dosemeter has 4.7 mm diameter and 12 mm length. A group of 100 dosemeters of the lot were arranged inside 50 holes of the slice 25 of the phantom Rando Man. The phantom irradiation was realized in two opposed projections (AP and PA) in Co-60 equipment. A group of 15 dosemeters was take of the same lot for obtaining the calibration curve in a 1-20 Gy range. After irradiation the signal of each dosemeter was measured in an ESR spectrometer operating in the X-band ({approx} 9.5 GHz) and the wideness of Alanine ESR spectra central line was correlated with the radiation dose. The wideness dose calibration curve resulted linear with a correlation coefficient 0.9996. The isodose curves obtained show a profile enough similar at comparing with the theoretical curves. (Author)

  16. Evaluation of DQA for tomography using 3D volumetric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University of Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The study investigates the necessity of 3 dimensional dose distribution evaluation instead of point dose and 2 dimensional dose distribution evaluation. Treatment plans were generated on the RANDO phantom to measure the precise dose distribution of the treatment site 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 cm with the prescribed dose; 1,200 cGy, 5 fractions. Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) of dose distribution was evaluated with gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom. The average error of absolute dose was measured at 0.76±0.59% and 1.37±0.76% in cheese phantom and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 3%/3 mm were 97.72±0.02% and 99.26±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 2%/2 mm were 94.21±0.02% and 93.02±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. There was a more accurate dose distribution of 3D volume phantom than cheese phantom in patients DQA using tomotherapy. Therefor it should be evaluated simultaneously 3 dimensional dose evaluation on target and peripheral area in rotational radiotherapy such as tomotherapy.

  17. Optimization and objective and subjective analysis of thorax image for computerized radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed at optimizing computational chest radiographic images (in previous posterior projection-PA). To this end, we used a homogeneous patient equivalent phantom in Computational Imaging System calibration, in order to obtain a satisfactory noise signal relation for a diagnosis, adjusting to a minimum dose received by the patient. The techniques have been applied in an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO). The images obtained were evaluated by a radiologist, which identified the best image to determine possible pathologies (fracture or pneumonia). The technique were quantified objectively (Detective Quantum Efficiency - DQE, Modulation Transfer Function MTF, Noise Power Spectrum, NPS). Comparing optimized techniques with the clinical routine, it is concluded that all provide doses below reference levels. However the choice of the best technique for viewing possible pneumonia and/or fracture, was determined based on the first 3D (Dose, Diagnostic, Dollar) and regarded as gold standard. This image presented a reduction of dose and loading of tube around 70.5% and 80% respectively when compared with the clinical routine

  18. Fabrication of malleable three-dimensional-printed customized bolus using three-dimensional scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Park

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D-printed customized bolus (3D bolus can be used for radiotherapy application to irregular surfaces. However, bolus fabrication based on computed tomography (CT scans is complicated and also delivers unwanted irradiation. Consequently, we fabricated a bolus using a 3D scanner and evaluated its efficacy. The head of an Alderson Rando phantom was scanned with a 3D scanner. The 3D surface data were exported and reconstructed with Geomagic Design X software. A 3D bolus of 5-mm thickness designed to fit onto the nose was printed with the use of rubber-like printing material, and a radiotherapy plan was developed. We successfully fabricated the customized 3D bolus, and further, a CT simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D bolus to the nose. There was no air gap between the bolus and the phantom surface. The percent depth dose (PDD curve of the phantom with the 3D bolus showed an enhanced surface dose when compared with that of the phantom without the bolus. The PDD of the 3D bolus was comparable with that of a commercial superflab bolus. The radiotherapy plan considering the 3D bolus showed improved target coverage when compared with that without the bolus. Thus, we successfully fabricated a customized 3D bolus for an irregular surface using a 3D scanner instead of a CT scanner.

  19. The use of the eyes protection for dose reduction in CT scans of skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P.; Silva, Teogenes A.; Alonso, Thessa C.

    2013-01-01

    The technique for imaging the brain scans of the skull by computed tomography (CT) scanning is the volume bounded by the foramen magnum and the apex of the skull. The lenses are radiosensitive tissues and CT scans of the head deposited significant doses on them, since they are in the region of incidence of the primary beam of X-rays. Thus, the variation of the dose deposited in the crystalline skull CT scans for diagnostic imaging of the brain was investigated. Cranial scans were performed using the acquisition protocol routine with or without the use of bismuth to shield the eyes. To carry out the scans we used a male anthropomorphic phantom, Alderson Rando model and dosimeters (TLD-100) were used to record the doses. These TLDs were used to record specific doses internally to the phantom in specific organs (crystalline, pituitary, thyroid, spinal cord and breasts). The scans were performed on a GE machine, model 64 Discovery channels. The data obtained allowed to observe the variation of dose in organs. The highest dose was recorded in the lens (26,18 mGy), followed by spinal cord (17,79 mGy). Comparing the doses of the two scans it was significant variation in the crystal. Scan using bismuth shield generated smaller doses in the eyes and in the eyes occurred the higher dose reduction, about 37%. The results may contribute to spread a suitable procedure for the optimization of CT scans of the skull

  20. Methodology for converting CT medical images to MCNP input using the Scan2MCNP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, L.S.; Silva, A.X.; Cardoso, S.C.; Castro, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a methodology for the application software Scan2MCNP, which converts medical images DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) for MCNP input file. The Scan2MCNP handles, processes and executes the medical images generated by CT equipment, allowing the user to perform the selection and parameterization of the study area in question (tissues and organs). The details of these worked in medical imaging software, therefore, will be converted to equity to the process of language analysis of MCNP radiation transport, through the generation of a code input file. With this file, it is possible to simulate any situation/problem of the type and level of radiation to the proposed treatment chosen by the medical staff responsible for the patient. Within a computational process oriented, the Scan2MCNP can contribute along with other software that has been used recently in the area of medical physics, to improve the levels of quality and precision of radiotherapy treatments. In this work, medical images DICOM of the Anthropomorphic Rando Phantom were used in the process of analysis and development of computer software Scan2MCNP. However, it emphasized that the software is successful in certain situations, depending upon a number of auxiliary procedures and software that can help in the solution of certain problems in the natural radiation treatment or express agility by the team of medical physics. (author)

  1. Assessment of dose in thyroid and salivary glands in dental radiology using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantuano, Natalia de O.; Silva, Ademir X. da; Correa, Samanda C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiobiological and epidemiological studies have provided evidence of risk of salivary and thyroid glands tumors incidence associated with oral radiology. Based on these studies, the tissue weighting factors were reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 2007. The main objective of the present work is to estimate the absorbed dose on thyroid and salivary glands (parotid, submandibular and sublingual), during a complete periapical examination. The complete periapical examination was simulated using a Spectro 70X Seletronic X-ray dental equipment on an Alderson Rando phantom with Harshaw LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD100). A PTW DIADOS dosimetric system was used for calibration. The TLD100 were inserted into the phantom slices corresponding to the organs of interest. During a complete periapical examination, the highest evaluated mean absorbed dose was 4.9 mGy in the right submandibular gland and the lowest one of 1.5 mGy in the left thyroid lobe. Entrance surface doses ranged from 2.1 to 2.6 mGy, measured, respectively, for the techniques of upper left molar and lower right molar. When compared with the diagnostic reference levels (DRL), the entrance surface doses values were lower than the DRLs recommended in Brazilian current legislation. However, the dosimetric results show the need of optimization for complete periapical examination to minimize patient exposure. Measurements were performed without the use of thyroid protectors. The use of this device is certainly an easy and simple method of dose reduction. (author)

  2. Estimation of population doses from diagnostic medical examinations in Japan, 1974. II. Estimation of genetically significant dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Kumamoto, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1976-03-01

    The genetically significant dose from radiographic and fluoroscopic examination in Japan has been estimated based on a 1974 nation wide survey of randomly sampled hospitals and clinics. The gonad dose during x-ray diagnosis was determined with an ionization chamber placed at the positions of ovary and testis in a Rando phantom. The instrumented phantom was irradiated with medical diagnostic x-rays on the basis of the exposure data on the patients selected in the nation wide survey. In the calculation of the genetically significant dose, the child expectancy of the patients that undergo each particular type of examination was assumed to be same as that of the general population. The resultant genetically significant dose was 11.1 and 5.43 mrad per person per year for radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. These values were compared with those of 1960 and 1969. Though the number of examinations per year shows a yearly increase, the genetically significant dose is gradually on the decrease. This may be due to technical improvements in medical radiological practices.

  3. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loubele, M.; Bogaerts, R.; Van Dijck, E.; Pauwels, R.; Vanheusden, S.; Suetens, P.; Marchal, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 μSv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 μSv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  4. Dose compensation of the total body irradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.-P.; Chu, T.-C.; Liu, M.-T.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study is to improve dose uniformity in the body by the compensator-rice and to decrease the dose to the lung by the partial lung block. Rando phantom supine was set up to treat bilateral fields with a 15 MV linear accelerator at 415 cm treatment distance. The experimental procedure included three parts. The first part was the bilateral irradiation without rice compensator, and the second part was with rice compensator. In the third part, rice compensator and partial lung block were both used. The results of thermoluminescent dosimeters measurements indicated that without rice compensator the dose was non-uniform. Contrarily, the average dose homogeneity with rice compensator was measured within ±5%, except for the thorax region. Partial lung block can reduce the dose which the lung received. This is a simple method to improve the dose homogeneity and to reduce the lung dose received. The compensator-rice is cheap, and acrylic boxes are easy to obtain. Therefore, this technique is suitable for more studies

  5. Gonad dose in cineurethrocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Dixon-Brown, A.; Fursdon, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    The technical factors used for cineurethrocystography for the true lateral projection in females are given. The mid-line radiation dose has been measured with LiF TLD inserted into the vagina in 19 examinations. The average dose recorded was 148 mrad, the range being 50 to 306 mrad, the average number of cine frames exposed was 96. Data obtained using a Rando phantom indicated that the average ovary dose would be 30% greater than the mid-line dose since the near ovary receives a higher dose than the more distant one. The technique used for men is also given, the average gonad dose in six men being 123 mrad, range 56 to 243 mrad when simple lead foil gonad protection was used; the average number of cine frames was 107. The dose in one man without gonad protection was 1575 mrad for 112 cine frames. The results for both sexes compare favourably with those of others reported in the literature and with gonad doses recorded in typical IVP examinations. (author)

  6. Determination of gonad, eye and bone marrow doses with EMI-5005 head and whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kanae; Iwata, Takeo; Furuya, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Hashizume, Tadashi.

    1979-01-01

    Dose determinations of tissues and organs during head and whole body scanning with an EMI computed tomographic equipment have been carried out using a Rando woman phantom. The surface dose on the phantom was measured with a Sakura lith Contact film dosimeter system. The absorbed doses in the eyes, thyroids, ovaries and the bone marrow were measured with a thermoluminescent dosimeter. The resultant surface doses for head scanning were 2.8 rad (28 mGy) per scan at maximum and 0.26 rad (2.6 mGy) per scan at minimum, and the doses for whole body scanning were 2.7 rad (27 mGy) per scan at maximum and 0.1 rad (1.0 mGy) per scan at minimum. For the complete gynecological scanning consisting of 8 slices, the eye, thyroid, ovary and the bone marrow dose was 2.4 mrad (24 μGy), 3.5 mrad (35 μGy), 500 mrad (5 mGy) and 225 mrad (2.25 mGy), respectively. And, for a typical head scanning consisting of 5 slices, the eye, thyroid, ovary and the bone marrow dose was 1400 mrad (14 mGy), 46 mrad (460 μGy), 0.60 mrad (6 μGy) and 73 mrad (730 μGy), respectively. (author)

  7. Evaluations of gonad and fetal doses for diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, C J; Tsai, H Y

    1999-07-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic radiology was planned in the Republic of China. We performed a pilot study for this survey to develop a protocol of the dose assessments. Entrance skin doses and organ (including ovary, testicle and uterus) doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations for several diagnostic procedures. We derived a formula and used the RadComp software for the computation of entrance skin doses. This formula involves several factors, such as kVp, mAs, the focus-to-skin-distance and aluminum filtration. RadComp software was applied to obtain free-air entrance exposures which were converted to entrance skin doses by considering the backscattering radiation from the body. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom for several diagnostic examinations. Genetically significant doses were calculated from ovary and testicle doses for the evaluation of hereditary effects. Embryo/fetal doses were determined from the uterine doses by considering the increase in uterus size with gestational age. We found that the patient doses studied in this work were all below the reference doses recommended by the National Radiological Protection Board of the U.K.

  8. Analysis of thyroid absorbed dose in cervical CT scan with the use of bismuth shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Fernanda S.; Gómez, Álvaro M.L.; Mourão, Arnaldo P., E-mail: fernanda.stephaniebh@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Santana, Priscila C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2017-07-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) has become an important tool to diagnose cancer and to obtain additional information for different clinical questions. Today, it is a very fast, painless and noninvasive test that can be performed high quality images. However, CT scan usually requires a higher radiation exposure dose than a conventional radiography examination. The aim of this study is to determine the dose variation deposited in thyroid and in nearby radiosensitive organs, such as: lenses, pharynx, hypophysis, salivary gland and spinal cord with and without the use of bismuth shielded. A cervical CT scan was performed on anthropomorphic male phantom model Alderson Rando, from the occipital to the first thoracic vertebra, using a GE scanner, Discovery model with 64 channels. Dose measurements have been performed by using radiochromic film strips to register the individual doses in the organs of interest. After the phantom cervical CT scan the radiochromic film strips were processed for obtaining digital images. Digital images were worked to obtain the dose variation profiles for each film. With the data obtained, it was found the organ dose variation. The results show that the thyroid received the highest dose, 40.9 mGy, in the phantom, according to the incidence of the primary X-ray beam. (author)

  9. Characterization of MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of overexposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassinet, Céline; Huet, Christelle; Baumann, Marion; Etard, Cécile; Réhel, Jean-Luc; Boisserie, Gilbert; Debroas, Jacques; Aubert, Bernard; Clairand, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    As MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) detectors allow dose measurements in real time, the interest in these dosimeters is growing. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of commercially available TN-502RD-H MOSFET silicon detectors (Best Medical Canada, Ottawa, Canada) in order to use them for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of overexposure. Reproducibility of the measurements, dose rate dependence, and dose response of the MOSFET detectors have been studied with a Co source. Influence of the dose rate, frequency, and pulse duration on MOSFET responses has also been studied in pulsed x-ray fields. Finally, in order to validate the integrated dose given by MOSFET detectors, MOSFETs and TLDs (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) were fixed on an Alderson-Rando phantom in the conditions of an interventional neuroradiology procedure, and their responses have been compared. The results of this study show the suitability of MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry in interventional radiology and for dose reconstruction in case of accident, provided a well-corrected energy dependence, a pulse duration equal to or higher than 10 ms, and an optimized contact between the detector and the skin of the patient are achieved.

  10. Assessment of effective radiation dose of an extremity CBCT, MSCT and conventional X ray for knee area using MOSFET dosemeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the organ and effective doses in the knee area resulting from different commercially available multislice computed tomography devices (MSCT), one cone beam computed tomography device (CBCT) and one conventional X-ray radiography device using MOSFET dosemeters and an anthropomorphic RANDO knee phantom. Measurements of the MSCT devices resulted in effective doses ranging between 27 and 48 µSv. The CBCT measurements resulted in an effective dose of 12.6 µSv. The effective doses attained using the conventional radiography device were 1.8 µSv for lateral and 1.2 µSv for anterior-posterior projections. The effective dose resulting from conventional radiography was considerably lower than those recorded for the CBCT and MSCT devices. The MSCT effective dose results were two to four times higher than those measured on the CBCT device. This study demonstrates that CBCT can be regarded as a potential low-dose 3D imaging technique for knee examinations.

  11. The validation of organ dose calculations using voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo methods applied to point and water immersion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J G; da Silva, F C A; Mauricio, C L P; dos Santos, D S

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program 'Visual Monte Carlo-dose calculation' (VMC-dc) uses a voxel phantom to simulate the body organs and tissues, transports photons through this phantom and reports the absorbed dose received by each organ and tissue relevant to the calculation of effective dose as defined in ICRP Publication 60. This paper shows the validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc and with a physical phantom containing TLDs. The validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc was made for a collimated beam of 0.662 MeV photons irradiating a cube of water. For the validation by comparison with the physical phantom, the case considered was a whole body irradiation with a point 137Cs source placed at a distance of 1 m from the thorax of an Alderson-RANDO phantom. The validation results show good agreement for the doses obtained using VMC-dc and EGSnrc calculations, and from VMC-dc and TLD measurements. The program VMC-dc was then applied to the calculation of doses due to immersion in water containing gamma emitters. The dose conversion coefficients for water immersion are compared with their equivalents in the literature.

  12. The validation of organ dose calculations using voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo methods applied to point and water immersion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J. G.; Da Silva, F. C. A.; Mauricio, C. L. P.; Dos Santos, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program 'Visual Monte Carlo-dose calculation' (VMC-dc) uses a voxel phantom to simulate the body organs and tissues, transports photons through this phantom and reports the absorbed dose received by each organ and tissue relevant to the calculation of effective dose as defined in ICRP Publication 60. This paper shows the validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc and with a physical phantom containing TLDs. The validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc was made for a collimated beam of 0.662 MeV photons irradiating a cube of water. For the validation by comparison with the physical phantom, the case considered was a whole body irradiation with a point 137 Cs source placed at a distance of 1 m from the thorax of an Alderson-RANDO phantom. The validation results show good agreement for the doses obtained using VMC-dc and EGSnrc calculations, and from VMC-dc and TLD measurements. The program VMC-dc was then applied to the calculation of doses due to immersion in water containing gamma emitters. The dose conversion coefficients for water immersion are compared with their equivalents in the literature. (authors)

  13. Dose to the uterus from radiotherapy procedures for breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Rincon, C.; Jerez Sainz, I.; Modolell Farre, I.; Espana Lopez, M.L.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2001-01-01

    In the early period of the pregnancy, the radiological protection of the unborn child is of particular concern. In several reports dose thresholds for deterministic effects as well as dose values that increase the probability of stochastic effects have been established. The aim of this article was to estimate the peripheral dose (PD) in order to evaluate the absorbed dose in utero for breast carcinoma treatment related to the radiotherapy procedures established in our hospital. The treatment was simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom Alderson-Rando, and two similar treatment planning with and without wedges were performed, taken into account the average field parameters used in 300 treatment planning patients. The PD values were determined with a NE 2571 ionization chamber in a General Electric linac for the treatments considered. Experimental measures provided dose in utero values slightly higher than 5 cGy, dose threshold established in some articles for radioinduced effects in the fetus. The planning system underestimated the PD values and no significant influence with the use of wedges was found. (author)

  14. Radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformation during pregnancy: A case report focusing on fetal exposure to radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kazuki; Kurita, Hiroki; Tonari, Ayako; Takayama, Makoto; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We present the case of a pregnant woman who underwent linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and we discuss the fetal exposure to radiation. Clinical Presentation: A 20-year-old woman at 18 weeks of gestation presented with right cerebral hemorrhage and underwent urgent evacuation of the hematoma. She recovered well after surgery, but cerebral angiography after the surgery revealed a small deeply seated arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the right frontal lobe extending to the right basal ganglia. Methods and Results: We examined the diffuse AVM and treated it with LINAC-based SRS at 24 weeks of gestation. Before SRS, the fetus was exposed to a radiation dose of 8.26 mGy, which was estimated by conducting an experiment using an adult RANDO phantom, and a radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system. The patient underwent Caesarean delivery at 36 weeks of gestation and gave birth to a healthy baby. Conclusion: The exposure of fetus to radiation during SRS was exceedingly low. SRS can be used as an alternative treatment to microsurgery for resolving small deeply seated AVMs even in pregnant patients. PMID:22028762

  15. Use of 3D printers to create a patient‐specific 3D bolus for external beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jamie; Hsia, An Ting; Xu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an inexpensive 3D printer can be used to manufacture patient‐specific bolus for external beam therapy, and to show we can accurately model this printed bolus in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery. Percent depth‐dose measurements and tissue maximum ratios were used to determine the characteristics of the printing materials, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polylactic acid, as bolus material with physical density of 1.04 and 1.2 g/cm3, and electron density of 3.38×1023electrons/cm3 and 3.80×1023 electrons/cm3, respectively. Dose plane comparisons using Gafchromic EBT2 film and the RANDO phantom were used to verify accurate treatment planning. We accurately modeled a printing material in Eclipse treatment planning system, assigning it a Hounsfield unit of 260. We were also able to verify accurate treatment planning using gamma analysis for dose plane comparisons. With gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 2 mm DTA, we were able to have 86.5% points passing, and with gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 3 mm DTA, we were able to have 95% points passing. We were able to create a patient‐specific bolus using an inexpensive 3D printer and model it in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery. PACS numbers: 87.53.Jw, 87.53.Kn, 87.56.ng PMID:26103485

  16. SOCIO - DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF OLD AGE PEOPLE LIVING IN URBAN & URBAN SLUM AREAS IN MAHARASHTRA, KARAD: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Rahul Salunkhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Aging refers to normal, progressive and irreversible biological changes that occur over an individual’s life span. The advancement of medical science and increased awareness among the people has brought about a sharp decline in mortality and a steady decline in fertility. This has resulted in a worldwide shift in the demographic profile and has led to significant increase in the aged population. About two thirds of all older people are concentrated in the developing world. OBJECTIVES: to study & compare socio - demographic variables of old age people living in Urban & Urban slum areas. MATERIAL & METHODS: all the old age people living in urb a n slum area & rando mly selected one urban area of K arad town were interviewed by using pre structured proforma about socio - demographic variable & compared with each other. OBSERVATIONS: Total 153 from urban & 135 from urban slum were enrolled for the study. Nearly 2/3 rd subjects were above age 65yrs in both areas with more female proportions in slum area than urban area. Significant difference was found with education, occupation & socio - economic status in both areas. CONCLUSION: Ageing is a universal phenomenon, with advanced fertility control, improvement in health and social services life expectancy has increased. Ageing has profound effect on the individual status in the family, the work force, goals and organization of health, social services, policies and practices of the government

  17. Craniospinal axis irradiation: an improved electron technique for irradiation of the spinal axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Li; Vijayakumar, S.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Muller-Runkel, R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors review dosimetric features of craniospinal axis irradiation in the areas of matching cranial and spinal fields, with reference to normal structures within the spinal field. The implications of the use of photon or electron modalities for the spinal port were evaluated. A novel method of matching the cranial photon and the spinal electron fields involving a computer-aided junction design is presented, involving moving the photon beam in three steps to degrade its penumbra to match that of the electron field. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in a Rando phantom and computed tomography-based dose-volume histogram study for an illustrative paediatric case were used to compare dose to normal structures within the spinal field. Results show that the use of electrons for the spinal field leads to better sparing of deep seated normal structures. For bone marrow, the use of a customized bolus for the spinal field results in an improved dose distribution, making electrons potentially superior to photons for radiobiological reasons. (author)

  18. Ambient and personal dose assessment of a container inspection site using a mobile X-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.Y., E-mail: fyhsu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuangfu Rd., 300 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lee, W.F., E-mail: 005679@webmail.customs.gov.tw [Taichung Customs Office, Ministry of Finance, 2, Sec. 3, Chung-Chie Rd., Sha Lu, 435 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tung, C.J., E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, 333 Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Peitou, 112 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.H., E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Peitou, 112 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, S.M., E-mail: smhsu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Rd., 404 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Su, H.T., E-mail: edwardsu1027@hotmail.com [School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, T.R., E-mail: trchen@csmu.edu.tw [School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Image, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Ambient monitor and phantom studies of absorbed and effective doses by TLDs were carried out in a non-intrusive inspection station for containers, Terminal I, of Taichung harbor, Taiwan. The doses from the X-ray scan in the control room and driver waiting room, located outside of the radiation control area, were quite small and could not be distinguished from the natural background radiation. The doses in the driver cab and the inspector cab of the X-ray scan car were also within background radiation levels. The protection wall, a 40-cm thick concrete barrier, can effectively attenuate the intensity of the primary X-ray scan. The possible effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3.15{+-}0.23 {mu}Sv/scan and 2.31{+-}0.38 {mu}Sv/scan. This dose is below the annual background dose. If someone was to be scanned by the X-ray, the effective dose would be at an acceptable level. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used TLDs to evaluate the dose in the environment and in the Rando phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absorbed dose in the container Terminal showed a natural background level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protection wall effectively lowers the X-ray intensity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3 {mu}Sv/scan.

  19. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  20. An algorithm to biological tissues evaluation in pediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.T.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Alvarez, M.; Velo, A.F.; Pina, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    A prerequisite for the construction of phantoms is the quantification of the average thickness of biological tissues and the equivalence of these simulators in simulator material thicknesses. This study aim to develop an algorithm to classify and quantify tissues, based on normal distribution of CT numbers of anatomical structures found in the mean free path of the X-rays beam, using the examination histogram to carry out this evaluation. We have considered an algorithm for the determination of the equivalent biological tissues thickness from histograms. This algorithm classifies different biological tissues from tomographic exams in DICOM format and calculates the average thickness of these tissues. The founded results had revealed coherent with literature, presenting discrepancies of up to 21,6%, relative to bone tissue, analyzed for anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO). These results allow using this methodology in livings tissues, for the construction of thorax homogeneous phantoms, of just born and suckling patients, who will be used later in the optimization process of pediatrics radiographic images. (author)

  1. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductor and thermoluminescent detectors applied to head and neck cancer treatment; Dosimetria in vivo com uso de detectores semicondutores e termoluminescentes aplicada ao tratamento de cancer de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas, Claudio Castelo Branco

    2003-03-15

    In vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy, i. e, the assessment of the doses received by patients during their treatments, permits a verification of the therapy quality. A routine of in vivo dosimetry is, undoubtedly, a direct benefit for the patient. Unfortunately, in Brazil and in Latin America this procedure is still a privilege for only a few patients. This routine is of common application only in developed countries. The aim of this work is to show the viability and implementation of a routine in vivo dosimetry, using diodes semiconductors and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), at the radiotherapy section of the National Institute of Cancer in Brazil, in the case of head and neck cancer treatment. In order to reach that aim, the characteristics of the response of diodes ISORAD-p and LiF:Mg;Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent detectors in powder form were determined. The performance of those detectors for in vivo dosimetry was tested using an RANDO Alderson anthropomorfic phantom and, once their adequacy proved for the kind of measurements proposed, they were used for dose assessment in the case of tumour treatments in the head and neck regions, for Cobalt-60 irradiations. (author)

  2. Treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation using thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.F.; Amaral, L.L.; Costa, A.M.; Netto, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors and their applications in treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation (TBI) technique. Dose measurements of TBI treatment simulation performed with thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the holes of a “Rando anthropomorphic phantom” showed agreement with the prescribed dose. For regions of the upper and lower chest where thermoluminescent detectors received higher doses it was recommended the use of compensating dose in clinic. The results of in vivo entrance dose measurements for three patients are presented. The maximum percentual deviation between the measurements and the prescribed dose was 3.6%, which is consistent with the action level recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), i.e., ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system and of a semiconductor dosimetric system for performing treatment verification and in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques demonstrated the value of these methods and the applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments. - Highlights: • Characterization of a semiconductor dosimetric system. • Characterization of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system. • Application of the TLDs for treatment verification in total body irradiation treatments. • Application of semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation treatments. • Implementation of in vivo dosimetry as a part of a quality assurance program in radiotherapy

  3. Quality assurance of CT-PET alignment and image registration for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.J.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Gunawardana, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layer point source phantom was first used to calibrate and verify the CT-PET system alignment. A partial whole-body Aldcrson RANDO Man Phantom (head through mid-femur) was externally and internally marked with small metal cannulas filled with 18F-FDG and then scanned with both modalities. Six series of phantom studies with different acquisition settings and scan positions were performed to reveal possible system bias and evaluate the accuracy and reliabilities of Philips Syntegra program in image alignment, coregistration and fusion. The registration error was assessed quantitatively by measuring the root-mean-square distance between the iso-centers of corresponding fiducial marker geometries in reference CT volumes and transformed CT or PET volumes. Results: Experimental data confirms the accuracy of manual, parameter, point and image-based registration using Syntegra is better than 2 mm. Comparisons between blind and cross definition of iso-centers of fiducial marks indicate that the fused CT and PET is superior to visual correlation of CT and PET side-by-side. Conclusion: In this work we demonstrate the QA procedures of Gemini image alignment and registration. Syntegra produces intrinsic and robust multi-modality image registration and fusion with careful user interaction. The registration accuracy is generally better than the spatial resolution of the PET scanner used and this appears to be sufficient for most RTP CT-PET registration procedures

  4. Dosimetry of cone beam computed tomography scanning for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Pinto de A, E. L.; Manzi, F. R.; Goncalves Z, E. [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Jose Gaspar 500, 30535-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S.; Fernandes Z, M. A., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Development Center of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The radiation dose and estimate the radiation induced risk of cancer and morpho functional alterations according to BEIR VII (2006) and recommendations of the ICRP 103 (2007) were measured in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning (Tc Kodak 9000C 3D) in different oral and maxillofacial regions for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry for each examination protocol: jaw full, maxilla full and jaw and maxilla full associated. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD- 100 H) were placed in an Alderson-Rando in regions corresponding to the crystalline, parotid, submandibular and thyroid glands and ovaries. The highest values for entrance skin dose were observed in the region of the parotid and submandibular glands, 9.612 mGy to 7.912 mGy and 8.818 mGy to 0.483 mGy, respectively. All examination protocols presented on the right and left sides in the region of the submandibular gland the highest values for absorbed dose (D). In the jaw full exam the thyroid glands on both sides presented highest dose values than maxilla full exam. This study allowed measuring the entrance skin dose and the absorbed dose (D) highlighting a dosimetric preponderance to the salivary glands. With danger of to radiation that induces cancer risk was observed that the age group most likely to have to risk of cancer was 20 years, compared to 30, 40, 50, 60,70 and 80 years. (Author)

  5. Measurement of Skin Dose from Using the Treatment Immobilization Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Je, Jae Yong; Park, Chul Woo; Noh, Kyung Suk

    2009-01-01

    The research was about the relation between the dorsal side dose measured by using the phantom body (Alderson Rando Phantom) and factors like contacted material of the patients, the size of the field, angle of incidence. Compared with mylar (tennis racket), the dose on 10 x 10 cm 2 field size of cotton was increased by 2% and by 8% in the case of breast board. In the case of 15 x 15 cm 2 field size, the dose was increased by 6% compared with 10 x 10 cm 2 size. The field size of 20 x 20 cm 2 resulted in 10% increase of dose, while 5 x 5 cm 2 produced 13% decrease. Compared with incident angle 0 degree, the cases for the incident angle 5 degrees had 0.4% less dose for breast board, 0.5% for tennis racket, 1.1% for cotton. The cases for the incident angle 10 degrees had 1.5% less dose for breast board, 1.9% for tennis racket, 2.6% for cotton. For the incident angle 15 degrees, breast board, tennis racket, cotton caused decrease of dose by 3.9%, 2.6%, 3.86% respectively. Resultantly carbon material can cause more skin dose in treatment field. By the results of this study, we recommend that one should avoid the contact between the carbon material and skin.

  6. Assessment of dose in thyroid and salivary glands in dental radiology using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantuano, Natalia de O.; Silva, Ademir X. da [Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Canevaro, Luca V.; Mauricio, Claudia Lucia P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Correa, Samanda C.A., E-mail: scorrea@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radiobiological and epidemiological studies have provided evidence of risk of salivary and thyroid glands tumors incidence associated with oral radiology. Based on these studies, the tissue weighting factors were reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 2007. The main objective of the present work is to estimate the absorbed dose on thyroid and salivary glands (parotid, submandibular and sublingual), during a complete periapical examination. The complete periapical examination was simulated using a Spectro 70X Seletronic X-ray dental equipment on an Alderson Rando phantom with Harshaw LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD100). A PTW DIADOS dosimetric system was used for calibration. The TLD100 were inserted into the phantom slices corresponding to the organs of interest. During a complete periapical examination, the highest evaluated mean absorbed dose was 4.9 mGy in the right submandibular gland and the lowest one of 1.5 mGy in the left thyroid lobe. Entrance surface doses ranged from 2.1 to 2.6 mGy, measured, respectively, for the techniques of upper left molar and lower right molar. When compared with the diagnostic reference levels (DRL), the entrance surface doses values were lower than the DRLs recommended in Brazilian current legislation. However, the dosimetric results show the need of optimization for complete periapical examination to minimize patient exposure. Measurements were performed without the use of thyroid protectors. The use of this device is certainly an easy and simple method of dose reduction. (author)

  7. Ethylene-vinyl acetate foam as a new lung substitute in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués, Enrique; Mancha, Pedro J

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) foam as a new lung substitute in radiotherapy and to study its physical and dosimetric characteristics. We calculated the ideal vinyl acetate (VA) content of EVA foam sheets to mimic the physical and dosimetric characteristics of the ICRU lung tissue. We also computed the water-to-medium mass collision stopping power ratios, mass attenuation coefficients, CT numbers, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for: ICRU lung tissue, the RANDO commercial phantom, scaled WATER and EVA foam sheets with varying VA contents in a range between the minimum and maximum values supplied by the manufacturer. For all these substitutes, we simulated percent depth-dose curves with EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC PDDs) in a water-lung substitute-water slab phantom expressed as dose-to-medium and dose-to-water for 3 × 3- and 10 × 10-cm 2 field sizes. PDD for the 10 × 10-cm 2 field size was also calculated with the MultiGrid Superposition algorithm (MGS PDD) for a relative electron density to water ratio of 0.26. The latter was compared with the MC PDDs in dose-to-water for scaled WATER and EVA foam sheets with the VA content that was most similar to the calculated ideal content that is physically achievable in practice. We calculated an ideal VA content of 55%; however, the maximum physically achievable content with current manufacturing techniques is 40%. The physical characteristics of the EVA foam sheets with a VA content of 40% (EVA40) are very close to those of the ICRU lung reference. The physical densities of the EVA40 foam sheets ranged from 0.030 to 0.965 g/cm 3 , almost covering the entire physical density range of the inflated/deflated lung (0.260-1.050 g/cm 3 ). Its mass attenuation coefficient at the effective energy of a 6-MV photon beam agrees within 0.8% of the ICRU reference value, and its CT number agrees within 6 HU. The effective atomic number for EVA40 varies by less than 0.42 of the

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of total marrow irradiation using 2 different planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalichowski, Adrian; Eagle, Don G.; Burmeister, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This study compared 2 different treatment planning systems (TPSs) for quality and efficiency of total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans. The TPSs used in this study were VOxel-Less Optimization (VoLO) (Accuray Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) using helical dose delivery on a Tomotherapy Hi-Art treatment unit and Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery on a Varian iX treatment unit. A total dose of 1200 cGy was prescribed to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were optimized and calculated based on a single CT data and structure set using the Alderson Rando phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and physician contoured target and organ at risk (OAR) volumes. The OARs were lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, and small bowel. The plans were evaluated based on plan quality, time to optimize the plan and calculate the dose, and beam on time. The resulting mean and maximum doses to the PTV were 1268 and 1465 cGy for VoLO and 1284 and 1541 cGy for Eclipse, respectively. For 5 of 6 OAR structures the VoLO system achieved lower mean and D10 doses ranging from 22% to 52% and 3% to 44%, respectively. Total computational time including only optimization and dose calculation were 0.9 hours for VoLO and 3.8 hours for Eclipse. These times do not include user-dependent target delineation and field setup. Both planning systems are capable of creating high-quality plans for total marrow irradiation. The VoLO planning system was able to achieve more uniform dose distribution throughout the target volume and steeper dose fall off, resulting in superior OAR sparing. VoLO's graphics processing unit (GPU)–based optimization and dose calculation algorithm also allowed much faster creation of TMI plans.

  9. SU-F-T-314: Estimation of Dose Distributions with Different Types of Breast Implants in Various Radiation Treatment Techniques for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S; Cho, Y; Lee, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the effects of different kinds and designs of commercialized breast implants on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy under a variety of conditions. Methods: The dose for the clinical conventional tangential irradiation, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) breast plans was measured using radiochromic films and stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD). The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the OSLDs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of dose from individual segment. The films were placed at various slices in the Rando phantom and between the body and breast surface OSLDs were used to measure skin dose at 18 positions spaced on the two (right/left) breast. The implant breast was placed on the left side and the phantom breast was remained on the right side. Each treatment technique was performed on different size of the breasts and different shape of the breast implant. The PTV dose was prescribed 50.4 Gy and V47.88≥95%. Results: In different shapes of the breast implant, because of the shadow formed extensive around the breast implant, dose variation was relatively higher that of prescribed dose. As the PTV was delineated on the whole breast, maximum 5% dose error and average 3% difference was observed averagely. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin by an average of 25% compared with IMRT. The both IMRT and VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than tangential plans for nearly all dose analyzation. Conclusion: Compared to the other technique, IMRT reduced radiation dose exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target homogeneity and for the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body.

  10. Evaluation on organ dose and image quality of lumber spine radiography using glass dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide resources for medical exposure reduction through evaluation of organ dose and image resolution for lumbar spine around according to the size of the collimator in DR system. The size of the collimator were varied from 8″×17″ to 14″×17″ by 1″ in AP and lateral projection for the lumbar spine radiography with RANDO phantom. The organ dose measured for liver, stomach, pancreas, kidney and gonad by the glass dosimeter. The image resolution was analyzed using the Image J program. The organ dose of around lumbar spine were reduced as the size of the collimator is decreased in AP projection. There were no significant changes decreasing rate whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″ in the gonad. The organ dose showed higher on liver and kidney near the surface in lateral projection. There were decreasing rate of less than 5% in liver and kidney, but decreasing rate was 24.34% in the gonad whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″. Organ dose difference for internal and external of collimator measured 549.8 μGy in the liver and 264.6 μGy in the stomach. There were no significant changes organ dose difference that measured 1,135.1 μG in the gonad. Image Quality made no difference because SNR and PSNR were over than 30 dB when the collimator size is less than 9″×17″ on AP projection and 10″×17″ on lateral projection. Therefore, we are considered that the recommendations criterion for control of collimator were suggested in order to reduce unnecessary X-ray exposure and to obtain good image quality because lumbar spine radiography contains a lot of peripheral organs rather than other area radiography

  11. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  12. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  13. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  14. Evaluation of patient dose in imaging using a cone-beam CT dosimetry by X-ray films for radiotherapeutic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yuri; Morita, Yasuhiko; Honda, Eiichi; Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    A limited cone-beam X-ray CT (3DX multi-image micro CT; 3DX-FPD) is widely used in dentistry because it provides a lower cost, smaller size, and higher spatial resolution than a CT for medicine. Our recent research suggested that the patient dose of 3DX-FPD was less than 7/10 of that of CT, and it was several to 10 times more than that of dental or panoramic radiography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution from 3DX-FPD and to estimate the influence of dose by positioning of the region of interest. Dosimetry of the organs and the tissues was performed using an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and X-ray films for measurement of radiotherapeutic dose. Measurements of dose distribution were performed using a cylinder-type tank of water made of acrylic resin imitating the head and X-ray films. The results are summarized as follows: The dose was higher as the ratio of the air region included in the region of interest increased. The dose distribution was not homogeneous and the dose was highest in the skin region. The dose was higher for several seconds after the beginning of exposure. It was concluded that patient positioning, as well as exposure conditions including the size of the exposure field and tube current, could greatly influence the patient dose in 3DX-FPD. In addition, it is necessary to consider the influence of image quality for the treatment of dental implants. (author)

  15. The study of patient exposure and protection from dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1979-01-01

    The utilization of x-ray for diagnosis and examination is increasing by about 5-15% every year, therefore, it would be mandatory to protect the patients from exposures and so, studies in this field are performed even now. In dental field, the area of irradiation is limited any to the head and neck area, but the irradiated angle is varied following the objected tooth, so the adjacent structures lens and thyroid gland would be fragile to radiation. And the scattered radiation is one of the complicated problems in the protection because of specificity of dental x-ray and its object structures. The author, by using TLD(Thermoluminescent Dosimeter; Teledyne Isotopes Model 7300, Element; TLD 200(CaF2: Dy) and Capintec(Capintec Model 192, PM-30 Diagnostic chamber 28 ml active volume), tried a measurement of air dose distribution of the scattered radiation and the irradiated dose of lens and thyroid gland under the condition of taking the film on the left maxillary molar. The results were as follows: 1. The half value layer of adapted dental x-ray machine was measured, and is 1.44 mm Al. 2. The time of irradiation on the left maxillary molar in the Alderson Rando Phantom, the measured doses of left and right lens, and thyroid gland were 8, 9 mR, 1, 2 mR and 2, 8 mR. Under the same conditions, the scattered radiation at the distance of 1 meter from the phantom were 84 μR at the front side, 11 μR at the back side, 18 μR at the right side and 72 μR at the left side. 3. Under the same conditions, the dose showed higher value by about 5% in the presence of object(phantom) than in the case of absence.

  16. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Maruyama, Takashi; Noda, Yutaka; Iwai, Kazuo; Tateno, Y.; Nishizawa, Kanae.

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10 -6 . In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10 -6 for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination. (author)

  17. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy dose measurement for head and neck cancer using optical stimulated luminescence dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Lu-Han; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Liu, Yi-Chi; Kuo, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Jao-Perng

    2017-01-01

    The in-vivo dose distributions of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a newly developed technique, for head and neck cancer have been investigated for several years. The present study used a head-and-neck RANDO phantom to simulate the clinical conditions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and compare the radiation doses between VMAT and IMRT. Three types of planning target volume (PTV) profiles were targeted by reducing the PTV surface margin by 0, 3, and 5 mm. An optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter was used to measure the surface doses. The results revealed that VMAT provided on average 16.8–13.8% lower surface doses within the PTV target areas than IMRT. When the PTV margin was reduced by 0 mm, the surface doses for IMRT reached their maximum value, accounting for 75.1% of its prescribed dose (Dp); however, the Dp value of VMAT was only 61.1%. When the PTV margin was reduced by 3 or 5 mm, the surface doses decreased considerably. The observed surface doses were insufficient when the tumours invaded the body surface; however, VMAT exerted larger skin-sparing effects than IMRT when the tumours away from the skin. These results suggest that the skin doses for these two techniques are insufficient for surface tumours. Notably, VMAT can provide lower skin doses for deep tumours. - Highlights: • The surface doses of NPC patients are compared between VMAT and IMRT. • VMAT exerts lower skin dose than IMRT for deep tumours. • The surface tumour coverage is insufficient for VMAT and IMRT.

  18. Dosimetry of 3 CBCT devices for oral and maxillofacial radiology: CB Mercuray, NewTom 3G and i-CAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, J B; Davies-Ludlow, L E; Brooks, S L; Howerton, W B

    2006-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), which provides a lower dose, lower cost alternative to conventional CT, is being used with increasing frequency in the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology. This study provides comparative measurements of effective dose for three commercially available, large (12'') field-of-view (FOV), CBCT units: CB Mercuray, NewTom 3G and i-CAT. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were placed at 24 sites throughout the layers of the head and neck of a tissue-equivalent human skull RANDO phantom. Depending on availability, the 12'' FOV and smaller FOV scanning modes were used with similar phantom positioning geometry for each CBCT unit. Radiation weighted doses to individual organs were summed using 1990 (E(1990)) and proposed 2005 (E(2005 draft)) ICRP tissue weighting factors to calculate two measures of whole-body effective dose. Dose as a multiple of a representative panoramic radiography dose was also calculated. For repeated runs dosimetry was generally reproducible within 2.5%. Calculated doses in microSv [corrected] (E(1990), E(2005 draft)) were NewTom3G (45, 59), i-CAT (135, 193) and CB Mercuray (477, 558). These are 4 to 42 times greater than comparable panoramic examination doses (6.3 microSv [corrected] 13.3 mSv). Reductions in dose were seen with reduction in field size and mA and kV technique factors. CBCT dose varies substantially depending on the device, FOV and selected technique factors. Effective dose detriment is several to many times higher than conventional panoramic imaging and an order of magnitude or more less than reported doses for conventional CT.

  19. Estimation of Radiation Exposure of 128-Slice 4D-Perfusion CT for the Assessment of Tumor Vascularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horger, Marius; Buchgeister, Markus; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Schulze, Maximilian; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Objective We aimed to estimate the effective dose of 4D-Perfusion-CT protocols of the lung, liver, and pelvis for the assessment of tumor vascularity. Materials and Methods An Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used to determine the effective dose values of 4D-Perfusion-CT. Phantom measurements were performed on a 128-slice single-source scanner in adaptive 4D-spiral-mode with bidirectional table movement and a total scan range of 69 mm over a time period of nearly 120 seconds (26 scans). Perfusion measurements were simulated for the lung, liver, and pelvis under the following conditions: lung (80 kV, 60 mAs), liver (80 kV/80 mAs and 80 kV/120 mAs), pelvis (100 kV/80 mAs and 100 kV/120 mAs). Results Depending on gender, the evaluated body region and scan protocol, an effective whole-body dose between 2.9-12.2 mSv, was determined. The radiation exposure administered to gender-specific organs like the female breast tissue (lung perfusion) or to the ovaries (pelvic perfusion) led to an increase in the female specific dose by 86% and 100% in perfusion scans of the lung and the pelvis, respectively. Conclusion Due to a significant radiation dose of 4D-perfusion-CT protocols, the responsible use of this new promising technique is mandatory. Gender- and organ-specific differences should be considered for indication and planning of tumor perfusion scans. PMID:20808699

  20. Estimation of radiation exposure of prospectively triggered 128-slice computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D.; Fenchel, M.; Thomas, C.; Boehringer, N.; Tsiflikas, I.; Kaempf, M.; Syha, R.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Buchgeister, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Physik

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To estimate the effective dose of prospectively triggered computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in step-and-shoot (SAS) mode, depending on the tube current and tube voltage modulation. Materials and Methods: For dose measurements, an Alderson-Rando-phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 103. Exposure was performed on a 128-slice single source scanner providing a collimation of 128 x 0.6 mm and a rotation time of 0.38 seconds. CTCA in the SAS mode was acquired with variation of the tube current (160, 240, 320 mAs) and tube voltage (100, 120, 140 kV) at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute and a scan range of 13.5 cm. Results: Depending on gender, tube current and tube voltage, the effective dose of a CTCA in SAS mode varies from 2.8 to 10.8 mSv. Due to breast tissue in the primary scan range, exposure in the case of females showed an increase of up to 60.0 {+-}.4 % compared to males. The dose reduction achieved by a reduction of tube current showed a significant positive, linear correlation to effective dose with a possible decrease in the effective dose of up to 60.4 % (r = 0.998; p = 0.044). Disproportionately high, the estimated effective dose can be reduced by using a lower tube voltage with a dose reduction of up to 52.4 %. Conclusion: Further substantial dose reduction of low-dose CTCA in SAS mode can be achieved by adapting the tube current and tube voltage and should be implemented in the clinical routine, i.e. adapting those protocol parameters to patient body weight. (orig.).

  1. Estimation of Radiation Exposure of 128-Slice 4D-Perfusion CT for the Assessment of Tumor Vascularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Horger, Marius; Buchgeister, Markus; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Schulze, Maximilian; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    We aimed to estimate the effective dose of 4D-Perfusion-CT protocols of the lung, liver, and pelvis for the assessment of tumor vascularity. An Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used to determine the effective dose values of 4D Perfusion-CT. Phantom measurements were performed on a 128-slice single source scanner in adaptive 4D-spiral-mode with bidirectional table movement and a total scan range of 69 mm over a time period of nearly 120 seconds (26 scans). Perfusion measurements were simulated for the lung, liver, and pelvis under the following conditions: lung (80 kV, 60 mAs), liver (80 kV/80 mAs and 80 kV/120 mAs), pelvis (100 kV/80 mAs and 100 kV/120 mAs). Depending on gender, the evaluated body region and scan protocol, an effective whole-body dose between 2.9-12.2 mSv, was determined. The radiation exposure administered to gender-specific organs like the female breast tissue (lung perfusion) or to the ovaries (pelvic perfusion) led to an increase in the female specific dose by 86% and 100% in perfusion scans of the lung and the pelvis, respectively. Due to a significant radiation dose of 4D-perfusion-CT protocols, the responsible use of this new promising technique is mandatory. Gender- and organ-specific differences should be considered for indication and planning of tumor perfusion scans

  2. Assessment of medical staff radiation doses received in some interventional examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oenal, E.

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this work is to suggest a simple method for the estimation of cardiologist extremity doses. The extremity and effective doses The extremity and effective doses of nine cardiologists working at five different angiographic units were measured for 157 interventional examinations. Simultaneous measurement of patient doses were also carried out using a DAP meter separately for each projection. Fluoroscopy time (T f l), number of radiographic frames (N) were recorded on-line during these measurements. A Rando phantom was exposed at similar projections with patient studies and one minute of fluoroscopic exposure (D 1 50 n T f l n ) and one frame of radiographic exposure (D 1 50 n N n ) were determined for each projection. Scatter radiations from these exposures were also measured at 50, 100 and 150 cm above the floor level at the cardiologist positions for the estimation of legs, wrists and thyroid (or eye) doses. Weighting of projections were determined for the patient group of each cardiologist using the recorded values of T f l and N r f. Extremity doses, D x were calculated with the following formula: D 1 50=Σ n D 1 50 n T f l n (T f l n )+Σ n D 1 50 n N n (N n ), n=4, 5, 6, 7, 10. n gives the projection numbert and x is the distance from the floor level. Measured and calculated extremity doses for each cardiologist were in good agreement. The calculated doses for 50cm and 100cm were found within the measured values of left and right legs and wrists. The use of dominant projection data alone still provided comparable results

  3. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, W [Borame Medical Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, W [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center.

  4. SU-E-T-366: Estimation of Whole Body Dose From Cranial Irradiation From C and Perfexion Series Gamma Knife Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S [Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleaveland, OH (United States); Andersen, A; Lulu, B; Das, I [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleaveland, OH (United States); Cheng, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Leksell Gamma Knife (GK) B & C series contains 201 Cobalt-60 sources with a helmet. The new model, Perfexion uses 192 Cobalt-60 sources without a helmet; using IRIS system for collimation and stereotactic guidance to deliver SRS to brain tumors. Relative dose to extracranial organs at risk (OARs) is measured in phantom in this study for Perfexion and C-series GK. Materials & Methods: Measurements were performed in a Rando anthropomorphic phantom on both systems using a large ion chamber (Keithley-175) for each collimator. The Keithley-175 cc ion chamber was sandwiched between phantom slices at various locations in the phantom to correspond to different extracranial OARs (thyroid, heart, kidney, ovary and testis, etc.) The dose measurement was repeated with OSL detectors for each position and collimator. Results: A large variation is observed in the normalized dose between these two systems. The dose beyond the housing falls off exponentially for Perfexion. Dose beyond the C-series GK housing falls off exponentially from 0–20cm then remains relatively constant from 20–40cm and again falls off with distance but less rapidly. The variation of extracranial dose with distance for each collimator is found to be parallel to each other for both systems. Conclusion: Whole body dose is found to vary significantly between these systems. It is important to measure the extracranial dose, especially for young patients. It is estimated that dose falls off exponentially from the GK housing and is about 1% for large collimators at 75 cm. The dose is two-orders of magnitude smaller for the 4mm collimator. However, this small dose for patient may be significant radiologically.

  5. Effective dose in two different dental CBCT Systems: NewTom VGi and Planmeca 3D Mid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaedizirgar, Mohammad; Faghihi, Reza; Paydar, Reza; Sina, Sedigheh

    2017-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography, CBCT, is a kind of CT scanner producing conical diverging X-rays, in which a large area of a two-dimensional detector is irradiated in each rotation. Different investigations have been performed on dosimetry of dental CBCT. As there is no special protocol for dental CBCT, CT scan protocols are used for dosimetry. The purpose of this study is measurement of dose to head and neck organs in two CBCT systems, i.e. Planmeca 3D Mid (PM) and NewTom VGi (NT), using thermoluminescence dosimetry and Rando phantom. The thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD)-100 chips were put at the position of different organs of the head and neck. Two TLD-100 chips were inserted at each position, the dose values were measured for several different field sizes, i.e. 8 x 8, 12 x 8 and 15 x 15 cm"2 for NewTom, and 10 x 10 and 20 x 17 cm"2 for Planmeca systems. According to the results, the average effective dose in PM is much more than the NT system in the same field size, because of the greater mAs values. For routine imaging protocols used for NT, the effective dose values are 70, 73 and 121 μSv for 8 x 8, 12 x 8 and 15 x 15 cm"2 field sizes, respectively. In PM, the effective dose in 10 x 10 cm"2 and 17 x 20 cm"2 is 259 and 341 μSv, respectively. (authors)

  6. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities

  7. Evaluation of Usefulness on In-vivo Diode Dosimetry for Measuring the Tumor Dose of Oral Cancer Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Kyung Su; Lee, Je Hee; Park, Heung Deuk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    This test is designed to identify the validity of treatment plan by implementing real-time dosimetry by means of dose that is absorbed into PTV and OAR when preparing doses of 3D and POP plans. In treatment. error can be calculated be comparing Exp. Dose with the actual dose, which has been converted from 'the reading value obtained by placing diode detector on the area to be measured'. Same test can be repeated using Alderson-Rando phantom. Errors were found: A patient(POP plan): 197.6/199=-1.2%, B patient(3D-plan): 199.9/198.7=+0.6%, C patient: 196/200=-1.5%. In addition, considering the resulted value of measuring OAR besides target-dose for C patient showed 96/200, representing does of 47%, the purpose of protection was judged to be duly accomplished. Also it was acknowledged the resulted value of -3.7% met the targeted dose within the range of {+-}5%. Aimed for identifying the usefulness of pre-treatment dose measurement using diode detector, this test was useful to evaluate the validity of curing because it resulted in the identification of category to be protected as well as t dose. Moreover, it is thought to have great advantage in ascertaining the dose of target, dose of which is not calculated yet. Similar to L-gram before treatment, this test is thought to be very effective so that it can bring great advantages in the aspects such as validity of curing method and post-treatment plan as well.

  8. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, S [Radiation Research Center, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi, R [Radiation Research Center, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities.

  9. EFFECTIVE DOSE IN TWO DIFFERENT DENTAL CBCT SYSTEMS: NEWTOM VGi AND PLANMECA 3D MID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedizirgar, Mohammad; Faghihi, Reza; Paydar, Reza; Sina, Sedigheh

    2017-11-01

    Cone beam computed tomography, CBCT, is a kind of CT scanner producing conical diverging X-rays, in which a large area of a two-dimensional detector is irradiated in each rotation. Different investigations have been performed on dosimetry of dental CBCT. As there is no special protocol for dental CBCT, CT scan protocols are used for dosimetry. The purpose of this study is measurement of dose to head and neck organs in two CBCT systems, i.e. Planmeca 3D Mid (PM) and NewTom VGi (NT), using thermoluminescence dosimetry and Rando phantom. The thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD)-100 chips were put at the position of different organs of the head and neck. Two TLD-100 chips were inserted at each position, the dose values were measured for several different field sizes, i.e. 8 × 8, 12 × 8 and 15 × 15 cm2 for NewTom, and 10 × 10 and 20 × 17 cm2 for Planmeca systems. According to the results, the average effective dose in PM is much more than the NT system in the same field size, because of the greater mAs values. For routine imaging protocols used for NT, the effective dose values are 70, 73 and 121 µSv for 8 × 8, 12 × 8 and 15 × 15 cm2 field sizes, respectively. In PM, the effective dose in 10 × 10 cm2 and 17 × 20 cm2 is 259 and 341 µSv, respectively. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam TM STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy

  11. Evaluation of accuracy in the ExacTrac 6D image induced radiotherapy using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ho Chun; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Jong Deok; Ji, Dong Hwa; Song, Ju Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To verify the accuracy of the image guided radiotherapy using ExacTrac 6D couch, the error values in six directions are randomly assigned and corrected and then the corrected values were compared with CBCT image to check the accurateness of ExacTrac. The therapy coordination values in the Rando head Phantom were moved in the directions of X, Y and Z as the translation group and they were moved in the directions of pitch, roll and yaw as the rotation group. The corrected values were moved in 6 directions with the combined and mutual reactions. The Z corrected value ranges from 1mm to 23mm. In the analysis of errors between CBCT image of the phantom which is corrected with therapy coordinate and 3D/3D matching error value, the rotation group showed higher error value than the translation group. In the distribution of dose for the error value of the therapy coordinate corrected with CBCT, the restricted value of dosage for the normal organs in two groups meet the prescription dose. In terms of PHI and PCI values which are the dose homogeneity of the cancerous tissue, the rotation group showed a little higher in the low dose distribution range. This study is designed to verify the accuracy of ExacTrac 6D couch using CBCT. It showed that in terms of the error value in the simple movement, it showed the comparatively accurate correction capability but in the movement when the angle is put in the couch, it showed the inaccurate correction values. So, if the body of the patient is likely to have a lot of changes in the direction of rotation or there is a lot of errors in the pitch, roll and yaw in ExacTrac correction, it is better to conduct the CBCT guided image to correct the therapy coordinate in order to minimize any side effects.

  12. Preliminary results of an attempt to predict over apron occupational exposure of cardiologists from cardiac fluoroscopy procedures based on DAP (dose area product) values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Nademi, Hossein; Fardid, Reza

    2015-03-01

    This study is an effort to propose a mathematical relation between the occupational exposure measured by a dosimeter worn on a lead apron in the chest region of a cardiologist and the dose area product (DAP) recorded by a meter attached to the X-ray tube. We aimed to determine factors by which DAP values attributed to patient exposure could be converted to the over-apron entrance surface air kerma incurred by cardiologists during an angiographic procedure. A Rando phantom representing a patient was exposed by an X-ray tube from 77 pre-defined directions. DAP value for each exposure angle was recorded. Cardiologist exposure was measured by a Radcal ionization chamber 10X5-180 positioned on a second phantom representing the physician. The exposure conversion factor was determined as the quotient of over apron exposure by DAP value. To verify the validity of this method, the over-apron exposure of a cardiologist was measured using the ionization chamber while performing coronary angiography procedures on 45 patients weighing on average 75 ± 5 kg. DAP values for the corresponding procedures were also obtained. Conversion factors obtained from phantom exposure were applied to the patient DAP values to calculate physician exposure. Mathematical analysis of our results leads us to conclude that a linear relationship exists between two sets of data: (a) cardiologist exposure measured directly by Radcal & DAP values recorded by the X-ray machine system (R (2) = 0.88), (b) specialist measured and estimated exposure derived from DAP values (R (2) = 0.91). The results demonstrate that cardiologist occupational exposure can be derived from patient data accurately.

  13. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottke, D; Grossekettler, L; Sawada, K; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the absorbed doses in a full anthropomorphic body phantom from two different panoramic radiography devices, performing protocols with and without applying a lead apron. A RANDO(®) full body phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc., Stamford, CT) was equipped with 110 thermoluminescent dosemeters at 55 different sites and set up in two different panoramic radiography devices [SCANORA(®) three-dimensional (3D) (SOREDEX, Tuusula, Finland) and ProMax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland)] and exposed. Two different protocols were performed in the two devices. The first protocol was performed without any lead shielding, whereas the phantom was equipped with a standard adult lead apron for the second protocol. A two-tailed paired samples t-test for the SCANORA 3D revealed that there is no difference between the protocol using lead apron shielding (m = 87.99, s = 102.98) and the protocol without shielding (m = 87.34, s = 107.49), t(54) = -0.313, p > 0.05. The same test for the ProMax 3D showed that there is also no difference between the protocol using shielding (m = 106.48, s = 117.38) and the protocol without shielding (m = 107.75, s = 114,36), t(54) = 0.938, p > 0.05. In conclusion, the results of this study showed no statistically significant differences between a panoramic radiography with or without the use of lead apron shielding.

  14. Evaluation of Usefulness on In-vivo Diode Dosimetry for Measuring the Tumor Dose of Oral Cancer Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Kyung Su; Lee, Je Hee; Park, Heung Deuk

    2005-01-01

    This test is designed to identify the validity of treatment plan by implementing real-time dosimetry by means of dose that is absorbed into PTV and OAR when preparing doses of 3D and POP plans. In treatment. error can be calculated be comparing Exp. Dose with the actual dose, which has been converted from 'the reading value obtained by placing diode detector on the area to be measured'. Same test can be repeated using Alderson-Rando phantom. Errors were found: A patient(POP plan): 197.6/199=-1.2%, B patient(3D-plan): 199.9/198.7=+0.6%, C patient: 196/200=-1.5%. In addition, considering the resulted value of measuring OAR besides target-dose for C patient showed 96/200, representing does of 47%, the purpose of protection was judged to be duly accomplished. Also it was acknowledged the resulted value of -3.7% met the targeted dose within the range of ±5%. Aimed for identifying the usefulness of pre-treatment dose measurement using diode detector, this test was useful to evaluate the validity of curing because it resulted in the identification of category to be protected as well as t dose. Moreover, it is thought to have great advantage in ascertaining the dose of target, dose of which is not calculated yet. Similar to L-gram before treatment, this test is thought to be very effective so that it can bring great advantages in the aspects such as validity of curing method and post-treatment plan as well.

  15. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647

  16. Optimisation and evaluation of the foetal dose during a radiotherapy of the right parotid; Optimisation et evaluation de la dose foetale pendant une radiotherapie de la parotide droite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Noel, A. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique Medicale, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Graff, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, CRAN, CNRS UMR-7039, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose was to optimize and to estimate the dose delivered to the foetus during a postoperative irradiation of a 5-month twin pregnant woman presenting with adenocarcinoma of the right parotid. The treatment protocol aimed to deliver 66 Gy conformal radiation therapy on the tumour bed associated to a prophylactic irradiation of 50 Gy on the upper cervical nodes. A series of measurements allowed to estimate the delivered dose in the abdomen by the means of an ion chamber inserted in a water phantom placed side by side of an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom simulating the body of the patient from the head to the pelvis. An appropriate optimisation of the number and orientation of beams were performed in order to minimize the peripheral dose, which is mostly dependent of the total number of monitor unit per fraction: cervical nodes and tumour site included in the same fields, limitation of the irradiated volume, 6 MV X-ray beams rather than Cobalt beams. The measured doses at the upper, in the middle and at the lower part of the abdomen were 17.0, 11.0 and 11.9 mGy, respectively, for the entire treatment, representing 0.025, 0.016 and 0.017%, respectively of the prescribed dose. The actions conducted to optimise the treatment allowed to lower doses delivered to the foetus under the limits proposed by international recommendations (100 mGy). Thus, the treatment of the pregnant patient had been performed with a minimized risk for the foetus. (authors)

  17. Imaging of 1.0-mm-diameter radiopaque markers with megavoltage X-rays: an improved online imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, G.; Beachey, D.J.; O'Brien, P.F.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To improve an online portal imaging system such that implanted cylindrical gold markers of small diameter (no more than 1.0 mm) can be visualized. These small markers would make the implantation procedure much less traumatic for the patient than the large markers (1.6 mm in diameter), which are usually used today to monitor prostate interfraction motion during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Several changes have been made to a mirror-video based online imaging system to improve image quality. First, the conventional camera tube was replaced by an avalanche-multiplication-based video tube. This new camera tube has very high gain at the target such that the camera noise, which is one of the main causes of image degradation of online portal imaging systems, was overcome and effectively eliminated. Second, the conventional linear-accelerator (linac) target was replaced with a low atomic number (low-Z) target such that more diagnostic X-rays are present in the megavoltage X-ray beam. Third, the copper plate buildup layer for the phosphor screen was replaced by a thin plastic layer for detection of the diagnostic X-ray components in the beam generated by the low-Z target. Results: Radiopaque fiducial gold markers of different sizes, i.e., 1.0 mm (diameter) x 5 mm (length) and 0.8 mm (diameter) x 3 mm (length), embedded in an Alderson Rando phantom, can be clearly seen on the images acquired with our improved system. These markers could not be seen on images obtained with any commercial system available in our clinic. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the visibility of small-diameter radiopaque markers with an improved online portal imaging system. These markers can be easily implanted into the prostate and used to monitor the interfraction motion of the prostate

  18. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  19. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  20. SU-F-T-314: Estimation of Dose Distributions with Different Types of Breast Implants in Various Radiation Treatment Techniques for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M; Lee, S; Suh, T; Jung, J; Kim, S; Cho, Y; Lee, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the effects of different kinds and designs of commercialized breast implants on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy under a variety of conditions. Methods: The dose for the clinical conventional tangential irradiation, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) breast plans was measured using radiochromic films and stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD). The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the OSLDs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of dose from individual segment. The films were placed at various slices in the Rando phantom and between the body and breast surface OSLDs were used to measure skin dose at 18 positions spaced on the two (right/left) breast. The implant breast was placed on the left side and the phantom breast was remained on the right side. Each treatment technique was performed on different size of the breasts and different shape of the breast implant. The PTV dose was prescribed 50.4 Gy and V47.88≥95%. Results: In different shapes of the breast implant, because of the shadow formed extensive around the breast implant, dose variation was relatively higher that of prescribed dose. As the PTV was delineated on the whole breast, maximum 5% dose error and average 3% difference was observed averagely. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin by an average of 25% compared with IMRT. The both IMRT and VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than tangential plans for nearly all dose analyzation. Conclusion: Compared to the other technique, IMRT reduced radiation dose exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target homogeneity and for the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body.

  1. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  2. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed by a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelfhout, J.; Derycke, S.; Fortan, L.; Van Duyse, B.; Colle, C.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility to plan and deliver beam intensity modulated radiotherapy using a general purpose 3D-planning system (Sherouse's GRATISTM) and a linear accelerator equipped with a standard multileaf collimator (MLC) was investigated in view of limiting the dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. During the planning process, dose homogenization at the target is obtained by the calculation of the weights, given to beam segments of a specific predetermined geometry. This specific geometry maximizes the area of each segment and thus reduces the number of segments. With a virtual patient in supine position, a first planning using a single isocenter, with gantry positions of -60, -30, 0, 30 and 60 degrees was performed. Medial edges of all segments were located tangential to the spinal cord. The resulting dose distribution allowed to encompass the target by an isodose surface of 66-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance but required 42 segments distributed over 5 gantry angles. Therefore, dose-volume histogram analysis were performed for those cases where: 1) for some gantry positions, all beam segments could be omitted; 2) at the remaining gantry angles, segments could be omitted; 3) at least 2 segments could be traded off against 1 additional gantry angle. This procedure resulted in a final plan containing 22 segments spread over 8 gantry angles. Preliminary dosimetric results on a RANDO phantom support the robustness of the method. The first clinical applications have been planned. Although up to 99 beam segments can be programmed on the Philips SL25 linear accelerator, it remained impossible to use these segments synchronized with the MLC. From a clinical viewpoint, the proposed treatment for irradiating lower neck and upper mediastinal targets could be used as a standard against which other solutions might be tested

  3. Estilos de aprendizaje y desempeño en educación a distancia: un estudio empírico con alumnos de las disciplinas de contabilidad general y de gestión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramos Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la presente pesquisa es verificar si el desempeño de los alumnos de educación a distancia en las disciplinas de contabilidad general, gerencial y en el módulo de contabilidad es diferente de acuerdo con su estilo de aprendizaje. La pesquisa fue realizada con 109 alumnos de un curso de educación a distancia y utilizó como variable independiente el estilo de aprendizaje (verificado por el LSI de Kolb y como variable dependiente la nota en las disciplinas de contabilidad general, gerencial y del módulo de contabilidad (media entre la nota de contabilidad general y gerencial. Fueron realizados testes de confiabilidad ( Alpha de Cronba - ch para el instrumento LSI de Kolb y tests de normalidad de los datos. Además de eso, se procedió a análisis estadísticos descriptivos y tests de diferencias de medias ( Kruskall-wallis y ANOVA para responder a la cues - tión de pesquisa. Los resultados evidencian que la mayor parte de los alumnos es del estilo Asimilador (44% y Divergente (34%. E indican que no fue posible constatar que los estilos de aprendizaje proporcionasen diferencias en el desempeño de los alumnos. De esa forma, no se puede afirmar que un estilo de aprendizaje presente medias de desempeño superior a los demás estilos estudiando en la modalidad a distancia. Conside - rando el pequeño número de observaciones las conclusiones no deben ser generalizadas, quedando restrictas a la población pesquisada

  4. Dual-energy CT for the characterization of urinary calculi: In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.; Patschan, O.; Nagele, U.; Stenzl, A.; Ketelsen, D.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Brodoefel, H.; Claussen, C.; Kopp, A.; Heuschmid, M.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Buchgeister, M.

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency and radiation dose of a low-dose dual-energy (DE) CT protocol for the evaluation of urinary calculus disease were evaluated. A low-dose dual-source DE-CT renal calculi protocol (140 kV, 46 mAs; 80 kV, 210 mAs) was derived from the single-energy (SE) CT protocol used in our institution for the detection of renal calculi (120 kV, 75 mAs). An Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescence dosimeters and examined by CT with both protocols. The effective doses were calculated. Fifty-one patients with suspected or known urinary calculus disease underwent DE-CT. DE analysis was performed if calculi were detected using a dedicated software tool. Results were compared to chemical analysis after invasive calculus extraction. An effective dose of 3.43 mSv (male) and 5.30 mSv (female) was measured in the phantom for the DE protocol (vs. 3.17/4.57 mSv for the SE protocol). Urinary calculi were found in 34 patients; in 28 patients, calculi were removed and analyzed (23 patients with calcified calculi, three with uric acid calculi, one with 2,8-dihyxdroxyadenine-calculi, one patient with a mixed struvite calculus). DE analysis was able to distinguish between calcified and non-calcified calculi in all cases. In conclusion, dual-energy urinary calculus analysis is effective also with a low-dose protocol. The protocol tested in this study reliably identified calcified urinary calculi in vivo. (orig.)

  5. Dual-energy CT for the characterization of urinary calculi: In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Patschan, O; Ketelsen, D; Tsiflikas, I; Reimann, A; Brodoefel, H; Buchgeister, M; Nagele, U; Stenzl, A; Claussen, C; Kopp, A; Heuschmid, M; Schlemmer, H-P

    2009-06-01

    The efficiency and radiation dose of a low-dose dual-energy (DE) CT protocol for the evaluation of urinary calculus disease were evaluated. A low-dose dual-source DE-CT renal calculi protocol (140 kV, 46 mAs; 80 kV, 210 mAs) was derived from the single-energy (SE) CT protocol used in our institution for the detection of renal calculi (120 kV, 75 mAs). An Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescence dosimeters and examined by CT with both protocols. The effective doses were calculated. Fifty-one patients with suspected or known urinary calculus disease underwent DE-CT. DE analysis was performed if calculi were detected using a dedicated software tool. Results were compared to chemical analysis after invasive calculus extraction. An effective dose of 3.43 mSv (male) and 5.30 mSv (female) was measured in the phantom for the DE protocol (vs. 3.17/4.57 mSv for the SE protocol). Urinary calculi were found in 34 patients; in 28 patients, calculi were removed and analyzed (23 patients with calcified calculi, three with uric acid calculi, one with 2,8-dihyxdroxyadenine-calculi, one patient with a mixed struvite calculus). DE analysis was able to distinguish between calcified and non-calcified calculi in all cases. In conclusion, dual-energy urinary calculus analysis is effective also with a low-dose protocol. The protocol tested in this study reliably identified calcified urinary calculi in vivo.

  6. Dual-energy CT for the characterization of urinary calculi: In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Patschan, O.; Nagele, U.; Stenzl, A. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Urology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ketelsen, D.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Brodoefel, H.; Claussen, C.; Kopp, A.; Heuschmid, M.; Schlemmer, H.P. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Buchgeister, M. [University of Tuebingen, Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The efficiency and radiation dose of a low-dose dual-energy (DE) CT protocol for the evaluation of urinary calculus disease were evaluated. A low-dose dual-source DE-CT renal calculi protocol (140 kV, 46 mAs; 80 kV, 210 mAs) was derived from the single-energy (SE) CT protocol used in our institution for the detection of renal calculi (120 kV, 75 mAs). An Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescence dosimeters and examined by CT with both protocols. The effective doses were calculated. Fifty-one patients with suspected or known urinary calculus disease underwent DE-CT. DE analysis was performed if calculi were detected using a dedicated software tool. Results were compared to chemical analysis after invasive calculus extraction. An effective dose of 3.43 mSv (male) and 5.30 mSv (female) was measured in the phantom for the DE protocol (vs. 3.17/4.57 mSv for the SE protocol). Urinary calculi were found in 34 patients; in 28 patients, calculi were removed and analyzed (23 patients with calcified calculi, three with uric acid calculi, one with 2,8-dihyxdroxyadenine-calculi, one patient with a mixed struvite calculus). DE analysis was able to distinguish between calcified and non-calcified calculi in all cases. In conclusion, dual-energy urinary calculus analysis is effective also with a low-dose protocol. The protocol tested in this study reliably identified calcified urinary calculi in vivo. (orig.)

  7. Usability of Smartphones for dose alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaireit, T.; Stamm, G.; Wacker, F.K.; Hoeschen, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. Materials and Methods: 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 μSv/h and 5.7 μSv/h generated by a C-arm system. Results: The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 μSv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 μSv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 μSv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45 rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 μSv/h to 972 μSv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 μSv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Conclusion: Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. (orig.)

  8. Patient doses due to a diagnostic X-ray picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riet, A. van 't.

    1977-09-01

    The influence of technical parameters on patient doses in X-ray diagnostics has been investigated. During an X-ray picture (30 x 40 or 35 x 43 cm 2 ) for general survey in intraveneous pyelography (IVP), skin exposure measurements in the centre of the radiation beam were carried out at 650 adult female patients in 46 Dutch hospitals. In addition, the first half-value layer of the radiation was measured. In 15 of these hospitals, similar measurements were also carried out at a Rando phantom. Small LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters were used for all measurements. The results show a remarkable variation in the mean entrance- and exit-exposure per hospital. The variation in the mean entrance-exposure per hospital (factor 8) is mainly caused by differences in radiation quality. In some hospitals, no added filtration is used while others use a relatively heavy filtration. The variation in the mean exit-exposure per hospital could not be explained uniquely from technical parameters like grid, screen and film sensivity. From phantom measurements it was found that other parameters like adjustment of the automatic exposure timer and film density required by the radiographer are of importance. The measuring system used has shown to be an adequate and simple tool for a crude selection of those hospitals where skin exposures are relatively high. On the basis of the collected data some recommendations are given to promote dose reduction in X-ray diagnostics. The use of fast screen-film combinations is of great potential importance. However further investigation seems desirable, especially concerning patient dose during fluoroscopy 0

  9. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M; Suh, T; Cho, W; Jung, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: A method to evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties using radiochromic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, Gianluca; Vaccara, Elena; Corvisiero, Roberta; Cavazzani, Paolo; Ruggieri, Filippo Grillo; Taccini, Gianni [S. C. Fisica Sanitaria, E.O. Ospedali Galliera di Genova, Via Alessandro Volta, 8 16128 Genova (Italy); S. C. Radioterapia, E.O. Ospedali Galliera di Genova, Via Alessandro Volta, 8 16128 Genova (Italy); S. C. Fisica Sanitaria, E.O. Ospedali Galliera di Genova, Via Alessandro Volta, 8 16128 Genova (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    In the authors' hospital, stereotactic radiotherapy treatments are performed with a Varian Clinac 600C equipped with a BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf-collimator generally using the dynamic conformal arc technique. Patient immobilization during the treatment is achieved with a fixation mask supplied by BrainLAB, made with two reinforced thermoplastic sheets fitting the patient's head. With this work the authors propose a method to evaluate treatment geometric accuracy and, consequently, to determine the amount of the margin to keep in the CTV-PTV expansion during the treatment planning. The reproducibility of the isocenter position was tested by simulating a complete treatment on the anthropomorphic phantom Alderson Rando, inserting in between two phantom slices a high sensitivity Gafchromic EBT film, properly prepared and calibrated, and repeating several treatment sessions, each time removing the fixing mask and replacing the film inside the phantom. The comparison between the dose distributions measured on films and computed by TPS, after a precise image registration procedure performed by a commercial piece of software (FILMQA, 3cognition LLC (Division of ISP), Wayne, NJ), allowed the authors to measure the repositioning errors, obtaining about 0.5 mm in case of central spherical PTV and about 1.5 mm in case of peripheral irregular PTV. Moreover, an evaluation of the errors in the registration procedure was performed, giving negligible values with respect to the quantities to be measured. The above intrinsic two-dimensional estimate of treatment accuracy has to be increased for the error in the third dimension, but the 2 mm margin the authors generally use for the CTV-PTV expansion seems adequate anyway. Using the same EBT films, a dosimetric verification of the treatment planning system was done. Measured dose values are larger or smaller than the nominal ones depending on geometric irradiation conditions, but, in the authors' experimental

  11. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: A method to evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coscia, Gianluca; Vaccara, Elena; Corvisiero, Roberta; Cavazzani, Paolo; Ruggieri, Filippo Grillo; Taccini, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    In the authors' hospital, stereotactic radiotherapy treatments are performed with a Varian Clinac 600C equipped with a BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf-collimator generally using the dynamic conformal arc technique. Patient immobilization during the treatment is achieved with a fixation mask supplied by BrainLAB, made with two reinforced thermoplastic sheets fitting the patient's head. With this work the authors propose a method to evaluate treatment geometric accuracy and, consequently, to determine the amount of the margin to keep in the CTV-PTV expansion during the treatment planning. The reproducibility of the isocenter position was tested by simulating a complete treatment on the anthropomorphic phantom Alderson Rando, inserting in between two phantom slices a high sensitivity Gafchromic EBT film, properly prepared and calibrated, and repeating several treatment sessions, each time removing the fixing mask and replacing the film inside the phantom. The comparison between the dose distributions measured on films and computed by TPS, after a precise image registration procedure performed by a commercial piece of software (FILMQA, 3cognition LLC (Division of ISP), Wayne, NJ), allowed the authors to measure the repositioning errors, obtaining about 0.5 mm in case of central spherical PTV and about 1.5 mm in case of peripheral irregular PTV. Moreover, an evaluation of the errors in the registration procedure was performed, giving negligible values with respect to the quantities to be measured. The above intrinsic two-dimensional estimate of treatment accuracy has to be increased for the error in the third dimension, but the 2 mm margin the authors generally use for the CTV-PTV expansion seems adequate anyway. Using the same EBT films, a dosimetric verification of the treatment planning system was done. Measured dose values are larger or smaller than the nominal ones depending on geometric irradiation conditions, but, in the authors' experimental conditions, always

  12. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed by a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelfhout, J; Derycke, S; Fortan, L; Van Duyse, B; Colle, C; De Wagter, C; De Neve, W [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    The possibility to plan and deliver beam intensity modulated radiotherapy using a general purpose 3D-planning system (Sherouse`s GRATISTM) and a linear accelerator equipped with a standard multileaf collimator (MLC) was investigated in view of limiting the dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. During the planning process, dose homogenization at the target is obtained by the calculation of the weights, given to beam segments of a specific predetermined geometry. This specific geometry maximizes the area of each segment and thus reduces the number of segments. With a virtual patient in supine position, a first planning using a single isocenter, with gantry positions of -60, -30, 0, 30 and 60 degrees was performed. Medial edges of all segments were located tangential to the spinal cord. The resulting dose distribution allowed to encompass the target by an isodose surface of 66-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance but required 42 segments distributed over 5 gantry angles. Therefore, dose-volume histogram analysis were performed for those cases where: (1) for some gantry positions, all beam segments could be omitted; (2) at the remaining gantry angles, segments could be omitted; (3) at least 2 segments could be traded off against 1 additional gantry angle. This procedure resulted in a final plan containing 22 segments spread over 8 gantry angles. Preliminary dosimetric results on a RANDO phantom support the robustness of the method. The first clinical applications have been planned. Although up to 99 beam segments can be programmed on the Philips SL25 linear accelerator, it remained impossible to use these segments synchronized with the MLC. From a clinical viewpoint, the proposed treatment for irradiating lower neck and upper mediastinal targets could be used as a standard against which other solutions might be tested.

  13. Dosimetric studies of the lens of the eye using a new dosimeter - polls in two departments of Interventional Radiology of the autonomous city of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, R.; Sánchez, H.; Domazet, W

    2013-01-01

    During interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) procedures, medical staff can receive high doses to their eye lenses. The Retrospective Evaluation of Lens Injuries and Dose (RELID) study organized in Argentina in 2010 found incipient opacity in 50% of IC physicians and 41% of IC technicians/nurses. These results, added to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which lowered their former occupational equivalent dose limit for the lens, led us to assess the eye lens dose, Hp(3), during interventional procedures. To this end, a new dosemeter was designed and calibrated at the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina to evaluate Hp(3). Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)), and Hp(3) were assessed for 3 months in two IC and IR departments of Buenos Aires City using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and electronic personal dosimeter (EPD). An Rando Alderson phantom was used to simulate monthly exposures of five occupational staff members. Hp(3) and Hp(10) were obtained monthly for 14 occupational staff members exposed to 121 IR and IC procedures. We concluded that the annual effective dose and Hp(3) were lower than 0.3 and 10 mSv, respectively. An occupational annual dose constraint of 0.3 mSv was calculated. Average cumulative Hp(3) for working life of 40 years should be lower than 400 and 200 mSv for physicians and technicians/scrub nurse, respectively. Also we concluded that a calibrated EPD worn on a pocket in the lead apron and a TLD dosemeter worn on the collar thyroid (both at the maximal radiation side) could be used as guidance to the lens dose. Finally, To reduce doses of medical staff, actions should be promoted to maximize radiation protection in interventional procedures with appropriate training, using personal dosimetry and protection instruments as lead glasses, ceiling-suspended shields and others. (author)

  14. Minimizing and measuring lens dose when giving cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, S.Y.; Donaldson, S.S.; Heck, R.J.; Nielson, K.L.; Shostak, C.

    1989-01-01

    Three different techniques of administering cranial irradiation were used to determine the dose to the lens as measured in the Rando phantom. The techniques employed were as follows: (1) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the thickest portion of the cranium; (2) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the lateral orbital rim (bon canthus); (3) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the thickest portion of the cranium but with the beam angled 5deg posteriorly away from the eye. Thermal luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed in a phantom, at a point determined from a life-sized anatomical section of the plane through the midsection of the eye, to be at the location of the posterior capsule of the lens. In addition, TLDs were placed on the outer surface of the phantom head, directly lateral to the location determined to be where the lens would lie. With equally weighted lateral opposed beams, delivering a midplane dose of 200cGy, the TLDs at the point of the lens measured 21, 9.9 and 10.6% of the midplane doses from the three techniques respectively. TLDs placed directly lateral to the lens on the surface of the phantom head gave an approximation of the lens dose, particularly when techniques 2 and 3 were used. Isodose curve generated by a General Electric treatment planning computer gave lens doses similar to those of the phantom data for each of the three different radiotherapy techniques. Cranial irradiation should be carried out by either technique 2 or technique 3 to minimize radiation dose to the lens. (author). 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Assessment of fetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E.K.

    2000-07-01

    A major source of uncertainty in the estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose is the influence of fetal size and position as these change with gestational age. Consequently, dose to the fetus is related to gestational age. Most studies of fetal dose estimation during pregnancy assume that the uterus dose is equal to fetal dose. These dose estimates do not take account of gestational age and individual fetal depth, factors which are significant when calculating dose. To establish both positional and size data for estimation of fetal absorbed dose from radiological examinations, the depths from the mother's anterior surface to the mid-line of the fetal head and abdomen were measured from ultrasound scans in 215 pregnant women. Depths were measured along a ray path projected in the anterior-posterior direction from the mother's abdomen. The fetal size was estimated from measurements of the fetal abdominal and head circumference, femur length and the biparietal diameter. The effects of fetal presentation, maternal bladder volume, placenta location, gestational age and maternal AP thickness on fetal depth and size were analysed. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was developed, and used to derive factors for converting dose-area product and free-in-air entrance surface dose from medical exposure of a pregnant patient to absorbed dose to the uterus/embryo, and for converting uterus dose to fetal dose in the later stages of pregnancy. Also presented are factors for converting thermoluminescence dosimeter reading from occupational exposure of a pregnant worker to equivalent dose to the fetus. The MC model was verified experimentally by direct measurement of uterus depth dose in a female Rando phantom, and also by comparison with other experimental work and MC results in the literature. The application of the various conversion factors is demonstrated by a review of the dose estimation process in 50 cases of fetal irradiation from medical exposures. (author)

  16. Manual Therapy in the Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. Analysis of Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2016-10-28

    Apart from the recommended specific physiotherapy, the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) also incorporates non-specific manual therapy (NMT). The aim of this paper is to assess the efficacy of NMT (manual therapy, chiropractic, osteopathy) used in the treatment of children and adolescents with IS. The study analysed systematic reviews (Analysis 1) and other recent scientific publications (Analysis 2). Analysis 1 encompassed papers on the use of NMT in patients with IS. Works concerning specific physiotherapy (SP) or bracing (B) and other types of scoliosis were excluded from the analysis. Inclusion criteria for Analysis 2 were: treatment with NMT; subjects aged 10-18 years with IS. The following types of papers were excluded: works analysing NMT combined with SP or B, reports concerning adult pa tients, analyses of single cases and publications included in Analysis 1. Analysis 1: six systematic reviews contained 6 papers on the efficacy of NMT in the treatment of IS. The results of these studies are contradictory, ranging from Cobb angle reduction to no treatment effects whatsoever. The papers analysed are characterised by poor methodological quality: small group sizes, incomplete descriptions of the study groups, no follow-up and no control groups. Analysis 2: in total, 217 papers were found. None of them met the criteria set for the analysis. 1. Few papers verifying the efficacy of manual therapy, chiropractic and osteopathy in the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis have been published to date. 2. The majority are experimental studies with poor methodology or observational case studies. 3. At present, the efficacy of non-specific manual therapy in the treatment of patients with idiopathic scoliosis cannot be reliably evaluated. 4. It is necessary to conduct further research based on appropriate methods (prospective, rando mi s ed, controlled studies) in order to reliably assess the usefulness of non-specific manual therapy in the treatment of idiopathic

  17. Usability of Smartphones for dose alerts; Smartphones jetzt noch smarter? Moeglichkeit des Einsatzes als 'Dosiswarner'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaireit, T.; Stamm, G.; Wacker, F.K. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Hoeschen, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Neuherberg (Germany). Abt. Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Diagnostik

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. Materials and Methods: 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 {mu}Sv/h and 5.7 {mu}Sv/h generated by a C-arm system. Results: The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 {mu}Sv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 {mu}Sv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 {mu}Sv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45 rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 {mu}Sv/h to 972 {mu}Sv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 {mu}Sv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Conclusion: Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. (orig.)

  18. Reduction of radiation exposure and image quality using dose reduction tool on computed tomography fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakabe, Daisuke; Tochihara, Syuichi; Ono, Michiaki; Tokuda, Masaki; Kai, Noriyuki; Nakato, Kengo; Hashida, Masahiro; Funama, Yoshinori; Murazaki, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to measure the reduction rate of radiation dose and variability of image noise using the angular beam modulation (ABM) on computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy. The Alderson-Rando phantom and the homemade phantom were used in our study. These phantoms were scanned at on-center and off-center positions at -12 cm along y-axis with and without ABM technique. Regarding the technique, the x-ray tube is turned off in a 100-degree angle sector at the center of 12 o'clock, 10 o'clock, and 2 o'clock positions during CT fluoroscopy. CT fluoroscopic images were obtained with tube voltages, 120 kV; tube current-time product per reconstructed image, 30 mAs; rotation time, 0.5 s/rot; slice thickness, 4.8 mm; and reconstruction kernel B30s in each scanning. After CT scanning, radiation exposure and image noise were measured and the image artifacts were evaluated with and without the technique. The reduction rate for radiation exposure was 75-80% with and without the technique at on-center position regardless of each angle position. In the case of the off-center position at -12 cm, the reduction rate was 50% with and without the technique. In contrast, image noise remained constant with and without the technique. Visual inspection for image artifacts almost have the same scores with and without the technique and no statistical significance was found in both techniques (p>0.05). ABM is an appropriate tool for reducing radiation exposure and maintaining image-noise and artifacts during CT fluoroscopy. (author)

  19. A phantom study on fetal dose reducing factors in pregnant patients with breast cancer during radiotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Ogretici

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to investigate the factors that reduce fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer throughout their radiation treatment. Two main factors in a standard radiation oncology center are considered as the treatment planning systems (TPSs and simple shielding for intensity modulated radiation therapy technique. Materials and Methods: TPS factor was evaluated with two different planning algorithms: Anisotropic analytical algorithm and Acuros XB (external beam. To evaluate the shielding factor, a standard radiological purpose lead apron was chosen. For both studies, thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the point dose, and an Alderson RANDO-phantom was used to simulate a female pregnant patient in this study. Thirteen measurement points were chosen in the 32nd slice of the phantom to cover all possible locations of a fetus up to 8th week of gestation. Results: The results show that both of the TPS algorithms are incapable of calculating the fetal doses, therefore, unable to reduce them at the planning stage. Shielding with a standard lead apron, however, showed a slight radiation protection (about 4.7% to the fetus decreasing the mean fetal dose from 84.8 mGy to 80.8 mGy, which cannot be disregarded in case of fetal irradiation. Conclusions: Using a lead apron for shielding the abdominal region of a pregnant patient during breast irradiation showed a minor advantage; however, its possible side effects (i.e., increased scattered radiation and skin dose should also be investigated further to solidify its benefits.

  20. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); NECTAR Imaging srl Imola (Italy); Casali, F. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, M. [CEFLA Dental Group Imola (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  1. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A.; Casali, F.; Bontempi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-T-540: Volumetric Modulated Total Body Irradiation Using a Rotational Lazy Susan-Like Immobilization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, X; Hrycushko, B; Lee, H; Lamphier, R; Jiang, S; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional extended SSD total body irradiation (TBI) techniques can be problematic in terms of patient comfort and/or dose uniformity. This work aims to develop a comfortable TBI technique that achieves a uniform dose distribution to the total body while reducing the dose to organs at risk for complications. Methods: To maximize patient comfort, a lazy Susan-like couch top immobilization system which rotates about a pivot point was developed. During CT simulation, a patient is immobilized by a Vac-Lok bag within the body frame. The patient is scanned head-first and then feet-first following 180° rotation of the frame. The two scans are imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system and concatenated to give a full-body CT dataset. Treatment planning matches multiple isocenter volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) fields of the upper body and multiple isocenter parallel-opposed fields of the lower body. VMAT fields of the torso are optimized to satisfy lung dose constraints while achieving a therapeutic dose to the torso. The multiple isocenter VMAT fields are delivered with an indexed couch, followed by body frame rotation about the pivot point to treat the lower body isocenters. The treatment workflow was simulated with a Rando phantom, and the plan was mapped to a solid water slab phantom for point- and film-dose measurements at multiple locations. Results: The treatment plan of 12Gy over 8 fractions achieved 80.2% coverage of the total body volume within ±10% of the prescription dose. The mean lung dose was 8.1 Gy. All ion chamber measurements were within ±1.7% compared to the calculated point doses. All relative film dosimetry showed at least a 98.0% gamma passing rate using a 3mm/3% passing criteria. Conclusion: The proposed patient comfort-oriented TBI technique provides for a uniform dose distribution within the total body while reducing the dose to the lungs

  3. Optimized lens-sparing treatment of retinoblastoma with electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Altschuler, Martin D.; D'Angio, Giulio J.; Goldwein, Joel W.; Kassaee, Alireza

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The ideal lens-sparing radiotherapy technique for retinoblastoma calls for 100% dose to the entire retina including the ora serrata and zero dose to the lens. Published techniques, most of which use photons, have not accomplished this ideal treatment. We describe here a technique that approaches this ideal configuration using electron beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-modeling calculations were made using a computer program built around a proprietary algorithm. This program calculates 3D dose distribution for electrons and photons and uses the Cimmino feasibility method for the inverse problem of beam weighting to achieve the prescribed dose. The algorithm has been verified in the ocular region by measurements in a RANDO phantom. To search for an ideal lens-sparing beam setup, a stylized phantom of an 8-month-old infant was generated with built-in inhomogeneities, and a phantom of a 5-year-old child was generated from a patient CT series. Results: Of more than 100 different beam setups tested, two 9 MeV electron beams at gantry angles plus and minus 26 degrees from the optic nerve axis achieved the best distribution. Both fields have a lens block and an isocenter between the globe and origin of the optic nerve. When equal doses are given to both fields, the entire extent of the retina (including ora serrata) received 100%, while the lens received 10% or less. Conclusion: The two-oblique-electron-beam technique here described appears to meet most of the stringent dosimetry needed to treat retinoblastoma. It is suitable for a range of ages, from infancy to early childhood years

  4. SU-E-T-71: A Radiochromic Film Based Quantitative Assessment of Thermoplastic Mask Bolus Effect in Head and Neck IMRT/VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lin, M; Snider, J; Xu, H; Schrum, A; Vadnais, P; Marter, K; Suntharalingam, M; Prado, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the factors leading to thermoplastic mask bolus-associated-increased skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT using EBT2 film. Methods: EBT2 film placed beneath a dual layer 3-point ORFIT head, neck and shoulder mask was used to test the effect of mask thickness, beam modulation, air gap, and beam obliquity on bolus effect. Mask thickness was varied based on the distribution of 1.6mm Orfilight layer on top of 2 mm Efficast layer. Beam modulation was varied by irradiating the film with an open field (no beam modulation) and a step and shoot field (beam modulation). Air gap between mask and film was varied from 0 to 5mm. Beam obliquity was varied by irradiating the film at gantry angles of 0°, 35°, and 70°.Finally, film strips placed on a Rando phantom under an Orfit mask, in regions of expected high dose, were irradiated using 5 IMRT and 5 VMAT plans with various modulation levels (modulation factor 2 to 5) and the results were compared with those obtained placing OSLDs at the same locations. Results: An 18–34% increase in mask bolus effect was observed for three factors where the effect of beam obliquity ≥ beam modulation > mask thickness. No increase in mask bolus effect was observed for change in air gap. A 6–13% increase in dose due to mask bolus effect was observed on film strips. Conclusion: This work underlines the role of beam obliquity and beam modulation combined with thermoplastic mask thickness in increasing mask bolus-associated skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT. One possible method of dose reduction, based on knowledge gained from this work, is inclusion of skin as an avoidance structure in treatment planning. Another approach is to design a mask with the least amount of thermoplastic material necessary for immobilization.

  5. SU-E-I-72: First Experimental Study of On-Board CBCT Imaging Using 2.5MV Beam On a Radiotherapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li, R; Yang, Y; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantom with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.

  6. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2. Risk estimates of individuals from x-ray diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Noda, Y; Iwai, K; Tateno, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nishizawa, K

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10/sup -6/. In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10/sup -6/ for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination.

  7. Estimation of population doses from diagnostic medical examinations in Japan, 1974. IV. Dose estimation of fetus exposed in utero to diagnostic x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Kumamoto, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1976-07-01

    In fetus exposed in utero to diagnostic x rays for the medical examinations of the mother, the absorbed dose has been estimated on the basis of a 1974 nation wide radiological survey. The results of the survey showed that the number of radiographs per year connected with pregnant women was 0.32 million for chest examination excluding mass surveys. 0.29 million for obstetrical examinations including pelvimetry, and 0.21 million for abdominal and pelvic examinations with a total of 0.82 million. The dose absorbed in the fetus was measured with an ionization chamber placed at the hypothetical center of the fetus in an ''average woman'' Rando phantom in which a maternal body was simulated by adding MixDp materials. ''The collective dose'' to the fetus in the pregnant women receiving a given type of examination was calculated from the number of radiographs per year connected with the pregnant women and the fetal doses. The percapita mean marrow dose (CMD), the leukemia significant dose (LSD) and the genetically significant dose (GSD) for the fetus were determined from the collective dose, taking into account the birth expectancy, the child expectancy, life expectancy and significant factor for the fetus. The collective dose to the fetus was estimated to be 9.3 x 10/sup 4/ man rad per year. The resultant values of CMD, LSD and GSD were 0.81 mrad per year, 0.79 mrad per person per year and 1.44 mrad per person per year, respectively.

  8. Significant reduction of radiation exposure to operator and staff during cardiac interventions by analysis of radiation leakage and improved lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuon, Eberhard; Schmitt, Moritz; Dahm, Johannes B

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to disclose and to reduce occupational radiation leakage in invasive cardiology. Prospectively, we analyzed various dose parameters for 330 coronary procedures. We used a Rando phantom to measure scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator (S-ESAK-O) during fluoroscopy for all standard tube angulations, and to plot isodose lines for 0 degrees /0 degrees -posterior anterior angulation. The patient's measured dose area product due to diagnostic catheterization and elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was 6.2 and 10.4 Gycm(2), which represents 11% and 13% of currently typical values, respectively. With use of 0.5- and 1.0-mm overcouch and undercouch shielding, it was possible to reduce the mean of 4,686 nSv/Gycm(2) to 677 and 277 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. Closure of radiation leakage up to 897 microSv/hour at the operator's gonadal height (80 to 105 cm), not heretofore described, was achieved by an additional 1.0-mm, lead-equivalent undercouch-top and overcouch-flap adjacent to the table, down to a S-ESAK-O/dose area product level of 47.5 nSv/Gycm(2). With use of a 0.5-mm lead apron, collar, glasses, foot-switch shield and 1.0-mm lead cover around the patient's thighs, the operator received a mean S-ESAK-O of 8.5, while his forehead, eyes, thyroid, chest, gonads, and hands were exposed to 68.2, 1.2, 1.2, 1.2, 0.8, and 58.2 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. In conclusion, radiation-attenuating intervention techniques and improved lead protection can effectively contribute to a new state of the art in invasive cardiology, with reduction of operator radiation exposure to 0.8% of typical S-ESAK-O levels in advanced catheterization laboratories.

  9. Low-dose dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustemeyer, P.; Eich, H.T.; John-Mikolajewski, V.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The intention of this study was to reduce patient dose during dental CT in the planning for osseointegrated implants. Methods and Materials: Dental CTs were performed with a spiral CT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens) and a dental software package. Use of the usual dental CT technique (120 kVp; 165 mA, 1 s rotation time, 165 mAs; pitch factor 1) was compared with a new protocol (120 kVp; 50 mA; 0.7 s rotation time; 35 mAs; pitch factor 2) which delivered the best image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose, as tested in a preceding study. Image quality was analysed using a human anatomic head preparation. Four radiologists analysed the images independently. A Wilcoxon rank pair-test was used for statistic evaluation. The doses to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the salivary glands, and the eye lens were determined in a tissue-equivalent phantom (Alderson-Rando Phantom) with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters at the appropriate locations. Results: By mAs reduction from 165 to 35 and using a pitch factor of 2, the radiation dose could be reduced by a factor of nine (max.) (e.g., the bone marrow dose could be reduced from 23.6 mSv to 2.9 mSv, eye lens from 0.5 mSv to 0.3 mSv, thyroid gland from 2.5 mSv to 0.5 mSv, parotid glands from 2.3 mSv to 0.4 mSv). The dose reduction did not lead to an actual loss of image quality or diagnostic information. Conclusion: A considerable dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information is achievable in dental CT. Dosereducing examination protocols like the one presented may further expand the use of preoperative dental CT. (orig.) [de

  10. WE-G-BRF-05: Feasibility of Markerless Motion Tracking Using Dual Energy Cone Beam Computed Tomography (DE-CBCT) Projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfil, J; Patel, R; Surucu, M; Roeske, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare markerless template-based tracking of lung tumors using dual energy (DE) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections versus single energy (SE) CBCT projections. Methods: A RANDO chest phantom with a simulated tumor in the upper right lung was used to investigate the effectiveness of tumor tracking using DE and SE CBCT projections. Planar kV projections from CBCT acquisitions were captured at 60 kVp (4 mAs) and 120 kVp (1 mAs) using the Varian TrueBeam and non-commercial iTools Capture software. Projections were taken at approximately every 0.53° while the gantry rotated. Due to limitations of the phantom, angles for which the shoulders blocked the tumor were excluded from tracking analysis. DE images were constructed using a weighted logarithmic subtraction that removed bony anatomy while preserving soft tissue structures. The tumors were tracked separately on DE and SE (120 kVp) images using a template-based tracking algorithm. The tracking results were compared to ground truth coordinates designated by a physician. Matches with a distance of greater than 3 mm from ground truth were designated as failing to track. Results: 363 frames were analyzed. The algorithm successfully tracked the tumor on 89.8% (326/363) of DE frames compared to 54.3% (197/363) of SE frames (p<0.0001). Average distance between tracking and ground truth coordinates was 1.27 +/− 0.67 mm for DE versus 1.83+/−0.74 mm for SE (p<0.0001). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of markerless template-based tracking using DE CBCT. DE imaging resulted in better detectability with more accurate localization on average versus SE. Supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems

  11. SU-F-SPS-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of the Dose Calculation Accuracy of Different Algorithms for Two Different Treatment Techniques During Whole Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacaci, P; Cebe, M; Mabhouti, H; Codel, G; Serin, E; Sanli, E; Kucukmorkoc, E; Doyuran, M; Kucuk, N; Canoglu, D; Altinok, A; Acar, H; Caglar Ozkok, H [Medipol University, Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, dosimetric comparison of field in field (FIF) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques used for treatment of whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) were made. The dosimetric accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) for Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) algorithms in predicting PTV and OAR doses was also investigated. Methods: Two different treatment planning techniques of left-sided breast cancer were generated for rando phantom. FIF and IMRT plans were compared for doses in PTV and OAR volumes including ipsilateral lung, heart, left ascending coronary artery, contralateral lung and the contralateral breast. PTV and OARs doses and homogeneity and conformality indexes were compared between two techniques. The accuracy of TPS dose calculation algorithms was tested by comparing PTV and OAR doses measured by thermoluminescent dosimetry with the dose calculated by the TPS using AAA and AXB for both techniques. Results: IMRT plans had better conformality and homogeneity indexes than FIF technique and it spared OARs better than FIF. While both algorithms overestimated PTV doses they underestimated all OAR doses. For IMRT plan, PTV doses, overestimation up to 2.5 % was seen with AAA algorithm but it decreased to 1.8 % when AXB algorithm was used. Based on the results of the anthropomorphic measurements for OAR doses, underestimation greater than 7 % is possible by the AAA. The results from the AXB are much better than the AAA algorithm. However, underestimations of 4.8 % were found in some of the points even for AXB. For FIF plan, similar trend was seen for PTV and OARs doses in both algorithm. Conclusion: When using the Eclipse TPS for breast cancer, AXB the should be used instead of the AAA algorithm, bearing in mind that the AXB may still underestimate all OAR doses.

  12. SU-E-T-71: A Radiochromic Film Based Quantitative Assessment of Thermoplastic Mask Bolus Effect in Head and Neck IMRT/VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lin, M; Snider, J; Xu, H; Schrum, A; Vadnais, P; Marter, K; Suntharalingam, M; Prado, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the factors leading to thermoplastic mask bolus-associated-increased skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT using EBT2 film. Methods: EBT2 film placed beneath a dual layer 3-point ORFIT head, neck and shoulder mask was used to test the effect of mask thickness, beam modulation, air gap, and beam obliquity on bolus effect. Mask thickness was varied based on the distribution of 1.6mm Orfilight layer on top of 2 mm Efficast layer. Beam modulation was varied by irradiating the film with an open field (no beam modulation) and a step and shoot field (beam modulation). Air gap between mask and film was varied from 0 to 5mm. Beam obliquity was varied by irradiating the film at gantry angles of 0°, 35°, and 70°.Finally, film strips placed on a Rando phantom under an Orfit mask, in regions of expected high dose, were irradiated using 5 IMRT and 5 VMAT plans with various modulation levels (modulation factor 2 to 5) and the results were compared with those obtained placing OSLDs at the same locations. Results: An 18–34% increase in mask bolus effect was observed for three factors where the effect of beam obliquity ≥ beam modulation > mask thickness. No increase in mask bolus effect was observed for change in air gap. A 6–13% increase in dose due to mask bolus effect was observed on film strips. Conclusion: This work underlines the role of beam obliquity and beam modulation combined with thermoplastic mask thickness in increasing mask bolus-associated skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT. One possible method of dose reduction, based on knowledge gained from this work, is inclusion of skin as an avoidance structure in treatment planning. Another approach is to design a mask with the least amount of thermoplastic material necessary for immobilization

  13. Poster - 33: Dosimetry Comparison of Prone Breast Forward and Inverse Treatment planning considering daily setup variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Runqing; Zhan, Lixin; Osei, Ernest [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of daily setup variations on prone breast forward field-in-field (FinF) and inverse IMRT treatment planning. Methods: Rando Phantom (Left breast) and Pixy phantom (Right breast) were built and CT scanned in prone position. The treatment planning (TP) is performed in Eclipse TP system. Forward FinF plan and inverse IMRT plan were created to satisfy the CTV coverage and OARs criteria. The daily setup variations were assumed to be 5 mm at left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions. The DVHs of CTV coverage and OARs were compared for both forward FinF plan and inverse IMRT plans due to 5mm setup variation. Results and Discussions: DVHs of CTV coverage had fewer variations for 5m setup variation for forward FinF and inverse IMRT plan for both phantoms. However, for the setup variations in the left-right direction, the DVH of CTV coverage of IMRT plan showed the worst variation due to lateral setup variation for both phantoms. For anterior-posterior variation, the CTV could not get full coverage when the breast chest wall is shallow; however, with the guidance of MV imaging, breast chest wall will be checked during the MV imaging setup. So the setup variations have more effects on inverse IMRT plan, compared to forward FinF plan, especially in the left-right direction. Conclusions: The Forward FinF plan was recommended clinically considering daily setup variation.

  14. SU-F-T-568: QA of a Multi-Target Multi-Dose VMAT SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, D; Kuo, J [University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Gonzales, A [Clinica Aliada contra el Cancer, Lima (Peru)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To, experimentally, corroborated the prescribed doses utilizing dosimeters (e.g. films and TLDs) that can provide high spatial resolution, allow dose measurement of multiple targets at once, and provide accurate dosimetric results. Methods: A single-isocenter 6FFF SRS VMAT plan consisting of one 358° arc at 0° couch angle and four 179° arcs at 30°, 60°, 330° and 300° couch angles respectively, was generated in ECLIPSE v.11 using a Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic head phantom CT study. This plan was a reproduction of a clinical plan generated for a stage-IV melanoma patient diagnosed with 19 intracranial lesions. The phantom was loaded with axially mounted (between phantom slabs) Gafchromic EBT3 film and TLDs strategically positioned within various target volumes. Film and TLDS were calibrated according to established protocols. Target prescription doses were 16 Gy (3cc≤, 3 lesions), 18 Gy (∼1–3cc, 10 lesions) and 20 Gy (≤1cc, 6 lesions). Phantom setup was verified through CBCT imaging prior to irradiation. Gafchromic films were scanned in transmission mode and TLDs were read, respectively, ∼24 hrs after irradiation. Results: Dose calibrated Gafchromic film data were compared to the ECLIPSE calculated data using a 3% / 3mm gamma function analysis. Results for the gamma values were 96–99% in agreement with the calculated data and with 84–90% of the film pixels within the 3% dose difference. TLD data showed a dose difference of 0.4–8% while the film data for those same locations yielded a difference of 0.4–4%. It was observed that the highest dose discrepancies correlated with the location of the small volume targets. Conclusion: Overall this study corroborated that a VMAT SRS treatment, employing various treatment table rotations and arcs, to multiple intracranial lesions with multiple dose prescriptions can be delivered accurately with the existing radiotherapy technology.

  15. Determination of eye lens doses and identification of risk groups among radiation exposed workers. An Austrian pilot study; Bestimmung der Augenlinsen-Dosis und Identifizierung von Risikogruppen bei beruflich strahlenexponierten Personen. Eine Pilotstudie in Oesterreich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadtmann, H.; Hranitzky, C.; Willer, H. [Seibersdorf Labor GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Radiation Protection Dosimetry; Strebl, F.; Ernst, G. [Seibersdorf Labor GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Radiation Safety and Applications; Aspek, W. [Allgemeine Unfallversicherungsanstalt (AUVA), Wien (Austria). Abt. Unfallverhuetung und Berufskrankheitenbekaempfung (HUB)

    2015-07-01

    On European level, in 2014 the dose limit for the lens of the eye of radiation exposed workers has been reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year (2013/59/Euratom). Data about eye lens exposition measured under realistic operational conditions of Austrian radiation exposed workers is sparse and there is no information to verify, if all professional groups identified to be at risk for elevated eye doses will remain below the new annual dose limit. Therefore, financed by the Austrian Workers Compensation Board, AUVA, a pilot study has been initiated to answer this question. Based on published information professional groups of radiation exposed workers and operational tasks with an enhanced risk of elevated eye lens doses have been identified. By dosimetric measurements with volunteers (forehead dose meters and parallel measurements with whole-body TL-dose meters above and under the lead apron) realistic lens doses will be estimated during selected radiation exposed tasks. Comparison of yielded doses will show whether a TLD outside the apron could serve as an alternative to forehead dose meters dedicated to measure eye lens doses. Measurements with leaded protective eyewear based on IEC61331 yield results for lead equivalent in good agreement with manufacturers' information. Results for eye lens doses determined by use of a RANDO head phantom and a standardized phantom simulating a body in a typical exposition situation for interventional radiologists show that wearing of leaded goggles allows for a 90% dose reduction. Under such conditions the eye lens dose is dominated by backscatter and stray radiation from the operator's head and patient body. This has to be considered for the evaluation of protective effectiveness for leaded eye wear.

  16. Assessment of skin dose modification caused by application of immobilizing cast in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Toossi, Mohammad T.B.; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Tabrizi, Fatemeh Varshoee

    2014-01-01

    Skin dose assessment for radiotherapy patients is important to ensure that the dose received by skin is not excessive and does not cause skin reactions. Immobilizing casts may have a buildup effect, and can enhance the skin dose. This study has quantified changes to the surface dose as a result of head and neck immobilizing casts. Medtech and Renfu casts were stretched on the head of an Alderson Rando-Phantom. Irradiation was performed using 6 and 15 MV X-rays, and surface dose was measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. In the case of 15MV photons, immobilizing casts had no effect on the surface dose. However, the mean surface dose increase reached up to 20 % when 6MV X-rays were applied. Radiation incidence angle, thickness, and meshed pattern of the casts affected the quantity of dose enhancement. For vertical beams, the surface dose increase was more than tangential beams, and when doses of the points under different areas of the casts were analysed separately, results showed that only doses of the points under the thick area had been changed. Doses of the points under the thin area and those within the holes were identical to the same points without immobilizing casts. Higher dose which was incurred due to application of immobilizing casts (20 %) would not affect the quality of life and treatment of patients whose head and neck are treated. Therefore, the benefits of head and neck thermoplastic casts are more than their detriments. However, producing thinner casts with larger holes may reduce the dose enhancement effect.

  17. NOTE: Patient-specific planning for prevention of mechanical collisions during radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2003-11-01

    A common unwanted difficulty in treatment planning, especially in non-coplanar radiotherapy set-ups, is the potential collision of the rotating gantry with the couch and/or the patient's body. A technique and computer program that detects these and signals avoidance of such beam directions is presented. The problem was approached using analytical geometry. The separate components within the treatment room have either been measured and modelled for an Elekta linear accelerator, or read out from a Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and are represented as an integer grid of points in three-dimensional (3D) space. The module is attached to the treatment planning system and can provide rejection or acceptance of unwanted beam directions in a plan. In contrast to previous work that has only used patient models, each individual patient's outlines are considered here in their actual treatment position inclusive of any immobilization device. The extremities of the patient superiorly and inferiorly to the scanned region are simulated by an expanded version of the RANDO phantom. In this way, 'potential' collisions can be detected in addition to the certain ones. Patient position is not a limiting factor for the accuracy of the collision detection anymore, as each set-up is always created around the isocentre. Maps of allowed and forbidden zones within the treatment suite have been created by running the code for all possible gantry and couch angles for three commonly arising cases: a head and neck plan utilizing a small stereotactic collimator, a prostate plan with multileaf collimators and an abdominal plan with the lead tray attached. In the last case, the 3D map permitted significantly fewer set-up combinations. Good agreement between prediction and experiment confirmed the capability of the program and introduces a promising add-on for treatment planning.

  18. A technique for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head ring fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulin, Kenneth; Bornstein, Linda E.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Saris, Stephen; Wu, Julian K.; Curran, Bruce H.; Wazer, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A two-step procedure is described for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head-ring fixation. Methods and Materials: Approximately 2 weeks prior to implant a CT scan without the head ring is performed for treatment-planning purposes. An entry point and a reference point, both marked with barium and later tattooed, facilitate planning and permit correlation of the images with a later CT scan. A plan is generated using a conventional treatment-planning system to determine the number and activity of I-125 seeds required and the position of each catheter. I-125 seed anisotropy is taken into account by means of a modification to the treatment planning program. On the day of the implant a second CT scan is performed with the head ring affixed to the skull and with the same points marked as in the previous scan. The planned catheter coordinates are then mapped into the coordinate system of the second CT scan by means of a manual translational correction and a computer-calculated rotational correction derived from the reference point coordinates in the two scans. Results: The rotational correction algorithm was verified experimentally in a Rando phantom before it was used clinically. For analysis of the results with individual patients a third CT scan is performed 1 day following the implant and is used for calculating the final dosimetry. Conclusion: The technique that is described has two important advantages: 1) the number and activity of seeds required can be accurately determined in advance; and 2) sufficient time is allowed to derive the best possible plan

  19. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z [Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies.

  20. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies

  1. Radiation exposure during transmission measurements: comparison between CT- and germanium-based techniques with a current PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Yung-Hui; Lee, Jason J.S.; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Su-Cheng; Su, Cheng-Tau; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning, transmission measurements for attenuation correction are commonly performed by using external germanium-68 rod sources. Recently, combined PET and computed tomographic (CT) scanners have been developed in which the CT data can be used for both anatomical-metabolic image formation and attenuation correction of the PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between germanium- and CT-based transmission scanning in terms of their radiation doses by using the same measurement technique and to compare the doses that patients receive during brain, cardiac and whole-body scans. Measurement of absorbed doses to organs was conducted by using a Rando Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Effective doses were calculated according to the guidelines in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication Number 60. Compared with radionuclide doses used in routine 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET imaging, doses absorbed during germanium-based transmission scans were almost negligible. On the other hand, absorbed doses from CT-based transmission scans were significantly higher, particularly with a whole-body scanning protocol. Effective doses were 8.81 mSv in the high-speed mode and 18.97 mSv in the high-quality mode for whole-body CT-based transmission scans. These measurements revealed that the doses received by a patient during CT-based transmission scanning are more than those received in a typical PET examination. Therefore, the radiation doses represent a limitation to the generalised use of CT-based transmission measurements with current PET/CT scanner systems. (orig.)

  2. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university Bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam{sup TM} STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of total marrow irradiation using 2 different planning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalichowski, Adrian, E-mail: nalichoa@karmanos.org [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Eagle, Don G. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Burmeister, Jay [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study compared 2 different treatment planning systems (TPSs) for quality and efficiency of total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans. The TPSs used in this study were VOxel-Less Optimization (VoLO) (Accuray Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) using helical dose delivery on a Tomotherapy Hi-Art treatment unit and Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery on a Varian iX treatment unit. A total dose of 1200 cGy was prescribed to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were optimized and calculated based on a single CT data and structure set using the Alderson Rando phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and physician contoured target and organ at risk (OAR) volumes. The OARs were lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, and small bowel. The plans were evaluated based on plan quality, time to optimize the plan and calculate the dose, and beam on time. The resulting mean and maximum doses to the PTV were 1268 and 1465 cGy for VoLO and 1284 and 1541 cGy for Eclipse, respectively. For 5 of 6 OAR structures the VoLO system achieved lower mean and D10 doses ranging from 22% to 52% and 3% to 44%, respectively. Total computational time including only optimization and dose calculation were 0.9 hours for VoLO and 3.8 hours for Eclipse. These times do not include user-dependent target delineation and field setup. Both planning systems are capable of creating high-quality plans for total marrow irradiation. The VoLO planning system was able to achieve more uniform dose distribution throughout the target volume and steeper dose fall off, resulting in superior OAR sparing. VoLO's graphics processing unit (GPU)–based optimization and dose calculation algorithm also allowed much faster creation of TMI plans.

  4. Evaluation of absorbed dose in organs far from the target volume for different therapies of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletsch, Cristiana

    2013-01-01

    Many advances in radiotherapy are the result of innovations in technology and engineering as well as the information technology revolution applied to the treatment planning of patients. The intensity modulated radiation therapy (lMRT) is a sophisticated treatment technique that allows the concentration of the dose prescribed by radiotherapist in tumor volume, while sparing healthy tissues that surround it. However, the disadvantage of the technique is a potential induction of secondary cancers in distant organs related to the target volume due to leakage and scattered radiation, which generate these higher doses to the distant organs when compared to those measured in conventional treatments. These higher doses are is due to the greater use of monitor units and a larger amount of treatment fields. In this study the absorbed dose values in distant organs from the head and neck region were assessed, comparing conventional treatments and treatments using the IMRT techniques. The evaluation was made considering the assessment of dose in radiological significant organs distant from the treatment area. All measurements were performed using the RANDO Alderson anthropomorphic phantom that has internal components equivalent to muscle, bones and lungs and is sliced for placing thermoluminescent detectors in appropriate holes existing in the slices. This phantom, tilled with TLD-100 dosimeters, was submitted to a head and neck treatment with a cobalt-60 irradiator and a Trilogy linear accelerator. Three treatments were carried out with the accelerator, namely a conventional one and two treatments of IMRT with different complexities, all treatments using the 6MV beam. The results show that IMRT techniques generate large doses in distant organs when compared to those generated due to the conventional 6 MV beam treatment. However, these doses are not very different from those measured in the case of 60 Co treatment. (author)

  5. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  6. The use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction in pediatric head CT: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorona, G A; Zuccoli, G; Sutcavage, T; Clayton, B L; Ceschin, R C; Panigrahy, A

    2013-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction techniques facilitate CT dose reduction; though to our knowledge, no group has explored using iterative reconstruction with pediatric head CT. Our purpose was to perform a feasibility study to assess the use of ASIR in a small group of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. An Alderson-Rando head phantom was scanned at decreasing 10% mA intervals relative to our standard protocol, and each study was then reconstructed at 10% ASIR intervals. An intracranial region of interest was consistently placed to estimate noise. Our ventriculoperitoneal shunt CT protocol was subsequently modified, and patients were scanned at 20% ASIR with approximately 20% mA reductions. ASIR studies were anonymously compared with older non-ASIR studies from the same patients by 2 attending pediatric neuroradiologists for diagnostic utility, sharpness, noise, and artifacts. The phantom study demonstrated similar noise at 100% mA/0% ASIR (3.9) and 80% mA/20% ASIR (3.7). Twelve pediatric patients were scanned at reduced dose at 20% ASIR. The average CTDI(vol) and DLP values of the 20% ASIR studies were 22.4 mGy and 338.4 mGy-cm, and for the non-ASIR studies, they were 28.8 mGy and 444.5 mGy-cm, representing statistically significant decreases in the CTDI(vol) (22.1%, P = .00007) and DLP (23.9%, P = .0005) values. There were no significant differences between the ASIR studies and non-ASIR studies with respect to diagnostic acceptability, sharpness, noise, or artifacts. Our findings suggest that 20% ASIR can provide approximately 22% dose reduction in pediatric head CT without affecting image quality.

  7. [Usability of smartphones for dose alerts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaireit, T; Stamm, G; Hoeschen, C; Wacker, F K

    2013-06-01

    Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 µSv/h and 5.7 µSv/h generated by a C-arm system. The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 µSv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 µSv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 µSv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45° rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 µSv/h to 972 µSv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 µSv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. SU-F-T-86: Electron Dosimetric Effects of Bolus and Lens Shielding in Treating Superficial Eye Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, L [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Wootton, L [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Gopan, O; Liao, J [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Electron therapy for the treatment of ocular lymphomas requires the lens to be shielded to prevent secondary cataracts. This work evaluates the dosimetry under a suspended eyeshield with and without bolus for low energy electron fields. Methods: Film (GafChromic EBT3) dosimetry and relative output factors were measured for 6, 8, and 10 MeV electron energies. A customized 5 cm diameter circle electron orbital cutout was constructed for a 6×6 cm applicator with a lens shield, 1 cm diameter Cerrobend cylinder with 2.2 cm length, suspended from an XV film covering the open field. Relative output factors were measured using a Scanditronix electron diode in a solid water phantom. Depth dose profiles were collected for bolus thicknesses of 0, 3, and 5 mm in solid water at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. These measurements were repeated in a Rando phantom. Results: At 5 mm, the approximate distance of the lens from the surface of the cornea, the estimated dose in solid water under the suspended lens shield was reduced to 16%, 14%, and 13% of the unblocked dose at the same depth, for electron energies of 6, 8, and 10 MeV, respectively. Applying bolus increased estimated doses under the block to 22% for 3-mm and 32% for 5-mm thicknesses for a 6 MeV incident electron beam. This effect is reduced for higher energies where the corresponding values were 15.5% and 18% for 3-mm and 5-mm for an 8 MeV electron beam. Conclusion: The application of bolus to treat superficial eye lesions of the conjunctiva increases lens dose at a depth of 5-mm under the shielding block with decreasing electron energy. Careful selection of electron energy is needed to account for electron scatter under the lens shield with the application of bolus in order to prevent cataracts.

  9. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Sedlmair, Martin; Ritter, Christine; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 × 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner’s isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at ≥150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r 2 = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  10. Estimation of population doses from diagnostic medical examinations in Japan, 1974, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Maruyama, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu

    1976-01-01

    In fetus exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays for the medical examinations of the mother, the absorbed dose has been estimated on the basis of a 1974 nation wide radiological survey. The results of the survey showed that the number of radiographs per year connected with pregnant women was 0.32 million for chest examination excluding mass surveys. 0.29 million for obstetrical examinations including pelvimetry, and 0.21 million for abdominal and pelvic examinations with a total of 0.82 million. The dose absorbed in the fetus was measured with an ionization chamber placed at the hypothetical center of the fetus in an ''average woman'' Rando phantom in which a maternal body was simulated by adding MixDp materials. ''The collective dose'' to the fetus in the pregnant women receiving a given type of examination was calculated from the number of radiographs per year connected with the pregnant women and the fetal doses. The percapita mean marrow dose (CMD), the leukemia significant dose (LSD) and the genetically significant dose (GSD) for the fetus were determined from the collective dose, taking into account the birth expectancy, the child expectancy, life expectancy and significant factor for the fetus. The collective dose to the fetus was estimated to be 9.3 x 10 4 man rad per year. The resultant values of CMD, LSD and GSD were 0.81 mrad per year, 0.79 mrad per person per year and 1.44 mrad per person per year, respectively. (Evans, J.)

  11. High-pitch computed tomography coronary angiography-a new dose-saving algorithm: estimation of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Buchgeister, Markus; Korn, Andreas; Fenchel, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas G; Thomas, Christoph; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Syha, Roland; Claussen, Claus D; Heuschmid, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate effective dose and organ equivalent doses of prospective ECG-triggered high-pitch CTCA. Materials and Methods. For dose measurements, an Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 103. Exposure was performed on a second-generation dual-source scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). The following scan parameters were used: 320 mAs per rotation, 100 and 120 kV, pitch 3.4 for prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch CTCA, scan range of 13.5 cm, collimation 64 × 2 × 0.6 mm with z-flying focal spot, gantry rotation time 280 ms, and simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute. Results. Depending on the applied tube potential, the effective whole-body dose of the cardiac scan ranged from 1.1 mSv to 1.6 mSv and from 1.2 to 1.8 mSv for males and females, respectively. The radiosensitive breast tissue in the range of the primary beam caused an increased female-specific effective dose of 8.6%±0.3% compared to males. Decreasing the tube potential, a significant reduction of the effective dose of 35.8% and 36.0% can be achieved for males and females, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The radiologist and the CT technician should be aware of this new dose-saving strategy to keep the radiation exposure as low as reasonablly achievable.

  12. Optimisation and evaluation of the foetal dose during a radiotherapy of the right parotid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, V.; Noel, A.; Graff, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Peiffert, D.; Noel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose was to optimize and to estimate the dose delivered to the foetus during a postoperative irradiation of a 5-month twin pregnant woman presenting with adenocarcinoma of the right parotid. The treatment protocol aimed to deliver 66 Gy conformal radiation therapy on the tumour bed associated to a prophylactic irradiation of 50 Gy on the upper cervical nodes. A series of measurements allowed to estimate the delivered dose in the abdomen by the means of an ion chamber inserted in a water phantom placed side by side of an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom simulating the body of the patient from the head to the pelvis. An appropriate optimisation of the number and orientation of beams were performed in order to minimize the peripheral dose, which is mostly dependent of the total number of monitor unit per fraction: cervical nodes and tumour site included in the same fields, limitation of the irradiated volume, 6 MV X-ray beams rather than Cobalt beams. The measured doses at the upper, in the middle and at the lower part of the abdomen were 17.0, 11.0 and 11.9 mGy, respectively, for the entire treatment, representing 0.025, 0.016 and 0.017%, respectively of the prescribed dose. The actions conducted to optimise the treatment allowed to lower doses delivered to the foetus under the limits proposed by international recommendations (100 mGy). Thus, the treatment of the pregnant patient had been performed with a minimized risk for the foetus. (authors)

  13. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2002-01-01

    High energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators produce large scattered radiation by various components of the treatment head, collimator and walls or objects in the treatment room including the patient. These scattered radiation do not provide therapeutic dose and are considered a hazard from the radiation safety perspective. Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams are contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. ICRP take the position that a dose of 500mGy may cause abortion at any stage of pregnancy and that radiation detriment to the fetus includes risk of mental retardation with a possible threshold in the dose response relationship around 100 mGy for the gestational period. The ICRP principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) was recommended for protection of occupation upon the linear no-threshold dose response hypothesis for cancer induction. We suggest this ALARA principle be applied to the fetus and testicle in therapeutic treatment. Radiation dose outside a photon treatment filed is mostly due to scattered photons . This scattered dose is a function of the distance from the beam edge, treatment geometry, primary photon energy, and depth in the patient. The need for effective shielding of the fetus and testicle is reinforced when young patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy and then shielding designed to reduce the scattered photon dose to normal organs have to considered. Irradiation was performed in phantom using high energy photon beams produced by a Varian 2100C/D medical linear accelerator (Varian Oncology Systems, Polo Alto, CA) located at the Yonsei Cancer Center. The composite phantom used was comprised of a commercially available anthropomorphic Rando phantom (Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, YN) and a rectangular solid polystyrene phantom of dimensions 30cm x 30cm x 20cm. The anthropomorphic Rando phantom represents an average man made from tissue equivalent materials that is

  14. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    High energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators produce large scattered radiation by various components of the treatment head, collimator and walls or objects in the treatment room including the patient. These scattered radiation do not provide therapeutic dose and are considered a hazard from the radiation safety perspective. Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams are contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. ICRP take the position that a dose of 500mGy may cause abortion at any stage of pregnancy and that radiation detriment to the fetus includes risk of mental retardation with a possible threshold in the dose response relationship around 100 mGy for the gestational period. The ICRP principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) was recommended for protection of occupation upon the linear no-threshold dose response hypothesis for cancer induction. We suggest this ALARA principle be applied to the fetus and testicle in therapeutic treatment. Radiation dose outside a photon treatment filed is mostly due to scattered photons . This scattered dose is a function of the distance from the beam edge, treatment geometry, primary photon energy, and depth in the patient. The need for effective shielding of the fetus and testicle is reinforced when young patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy and then shielding designed to reduce the scattered photon dose to normal organs have to considered. Irradiation was performed in phantom using high energy photon beams produced by a Varian 2100C/D medical linear accelerator (Varian Oncology Systems, Polo Alto, CA) located at the Yonsei Cancer Center. The composite phantom used was comprised of a commercially available anthropomorphic Rando phantom (Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, YN) and a rectangular solid polystyrene phantom of dimensions 30cm x 30cm x 20cm. The anthropomorphic Rando phantom represents an average man made from tissue equivalent materials that is

  15. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Ning; Guan Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2007-04-21

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was {approx}4.0 cGy, which was {approx}40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of {approx}2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm x 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370{sup 0} scan rotation (10{sup 0} scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of {approx}10-11 cGy while the right hip received {approx}6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than {approx}12% to the table-drop setup.

  16. SU-F-T-500: The Effectiveness of a Patient Specific Bolus Made by Using Three-Dimensional Printing Technique in Photon Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K; Yuasa, Y [Department of Radiological Technology, Yamaguchi University Hospital (Japan); Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Shibuya, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate school of Medicine, Yamaguchi University (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A commercially available bolus (commercial-bolus) would not completely contact with the irregular shape of a patient’s skin. The purposes of this study were to customize a patient specific three-dimensional (3D) bolus using a 3D printer (3D-bolus) and to evaluate its clinical feasibility for photon radiotherapy. Methods: The 3D-bolus was designed using a treatment planning system (TPS) in DICOM-RT format. To print the 3D bolus, the file was converted into stereolithography format. To evaluate its physical characteristics, plans were created for water equivalent phantoms without the bolus, with the 3D-bolus printed in a flat form, and with the virtual bolus which supposed a commercial-bolus. These plans were compared with the percent depth dose (PDD) measured from the TPS. Furthermore, to evaluate its clinical feasibility, the treatment plans were created for RANDO phantoms without the bolus and with the 3D-bolus which was customized for contacting with the surface of the phantom. Both plans were compared with the dose volume histogram (DVH) of the target volume. Results: In the physical evaluation, dmax of the plan without the bolus, with the 3D-bolus, and with the virtual bolus were 2.2 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.7 cm, respectively. In the evaluation of clinical feasibility, for the plan without the bolus, Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90% of the target volume were 102.6 %, 1.6 %, 88.8 %, 57.2 %, and 69.3 %, respectively. By using the 3D-bolus, the prescription dose could be delivered to at least 90 % of the target volume, Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90% of the target volume were 104.3 %, 91.6 %, 92.1 %, 91.7 %, and 98.0 %, respectively. The 3D-bolus has the potential to be useful for providing effective dose coverage in the buildup region. Conclusion: A 3D-bolus produced using 3D printing technique is comparable to a commercially available bolus.

  17. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L

    2002-07-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with {sup 192}Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for lung, 0.9x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for oesophagus and 0.48x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for colon, 7.8x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for stomach and 1.7x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}, whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  18. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L.

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 192 Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for lung, 0.9x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for oesophagus and 0.48x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for colon, 7.8x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for stomach and 1.7x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 , whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 ; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  19. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  20. The evaluation of lens absorbed dose according to the optimold for whole brain radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong Mo; Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In the current whole brain Radiation Therapy, Optimold was used to immobilize the head. However, skin dose was increased about 22% due to the scattering radiation by the Optimold. Since the minimum dose causing cataracts was 2 Gy, it could be seen that the effects were large especially on the lens. Therefore, in the whole brain Radiation Therapy, it was to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part. In order to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part, the Optimold mask was made up to 5 mm bolus on the part of the eye lens in the human model phantom (Anderson Rando Phantom, USA). In the practice treatment, to measure the lens dose, the simulation therapy was processed by placing the GafChromic EBT3 film under bolus, and after the treatment plan was set up through the treatment planning system (Pinnacle, PHILIPS, USA), the treatments were measured repeatedly three times in the same way. After removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured in the same way as above. After scanning the film and measuring the dose by using the Digital Flatbed Scanner (Expression 10000XL, EPSON, USA), the doses were compared and evaluated according to the presence of Optimold mask in the eyeball part. When there was the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured at 10.2cGy ± 1.5 in the simulation therapy, and at 24.8cGy ± 2.7 in the treatment, and when the Optimold mask was removed in the eye part, it was measured at 12.9cGy ± 2.2 in the simulation therapy, and at 17.6cGy ± 1.5 in the treatment. In case of removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, the dose was increased approximately 3cGy in the simulation therapy and was reduced approximately 7cGy in the treatment in comparison to the case that the Optimold mask was not removed. During the whole treatment, since the lens absorbed dose was reduced about 27%, the chance to cause

  1. The evaluation of lens absorbed dose according to the optimold for whole brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong Mo; Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    In the current whole brain Radiation Therapy, Optimold was used to immobilize the head. However, skin dose was increased about 22% due to the scattering radiation by the Optimold. Since the minimum dose causing cataracts was 2 Gy, it could be seen that the effects were large especially on the lens. Therefore, in the whole brain Radiation Therapy, it was to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part. In order to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part, the Optimold mask was made up to 5 mm bolus on the part of the eye lens in the human model phantom (Anderson Rando Phantom, USA). In the practice treatment, to measure the lens dose, the simulation therapy was processed by placing the GafChromic EBT3 film under bolus, and after the treatment plan was set up through the treatment planning system (Pinnacle, PHILIPS, USA), the treatments were measured repeatedly three times in the same way. After removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured in the same way as above. After scanning the film and measuring the dose by using the Digital Flatbed Scanner (Expression 10000XL, EPSON, USA), the doses were compared and evaluated according to the presence of Optimold mask in the eyeball part. When there was the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured at 10.2cGy ± 1.5 in the simulation therapy, and at 24.8cGy ± 2.7 in the treatment, and when the Optimold mask was removed in the eye part, it was measured at 12.9cGy ± 2.2 in the simulation therapy, and at 17.6cGy ± 1.5 in the treatment. In case of removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, the dose was increased approximately 3cGy in the simulation therapy and was reduced approximately 7cGy in the treatment in comparison to the case that the Optimold mask was not removed. During the whole treatment, since the lens absorbed dose was reduced about 27%, the chance to cause

  2. Patient and staff doses from digital Bi-plane coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; James, D.; Beal, A.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary angiography is the standard technique for imaging the left ventricle and coronary arteries and is a high radiation dose procedure. The number of these procedures has significantly increased in recent years with a resultant increase in radiation dose to staff and patients. When the new Philips Bi-plane BV-5000 digital angiography unit was installed in Tawam Hospital the assessment of staff and patient doses was undertaken as a part of ongoing program of quality assurance. In this study we examine the technique at Tawam Hospital to determine current practice and measure radiation dose to patient and staff resulting from coronary angiography examinations. Two sets of measurements were conducted: scattered radiation distribution around the unit and patient equivalent dose with additional entrance dose from LAT and AP fields. Prior to the measurements analysis of 10 cardiac procedures involving patients of average size (70-80 kg) was performed and their radiographic parameters recorded and averaged. Dose area product DAP were recorded during these procedures and were used as a reference in both measurements. TLD-100 and TLD-MCP were used for scatter radiation measurements. The former were positioned close to the patient and the latter (due to their higher sensitivity) further away. For patient entrance dose assessment TLD-100 were used. TLD chips were arranged in a 3-D structure positioned close to the patient to measure the scattered dose distribution at the place where the cardiologist, assistant cardiologist and nurse would stand. The other TLDs were placed on thin plastic poles 100 cm from the floor in the areas of interest. Dosimeters were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to air and soft tissue. TLDs were placed positions and the cardiac procedure was recreated using a Rando Alderson phantom to simulate patient of average size. The mean total DAP calculated from the measurements recorded during 10 patient examinations was 11.8 Gy cm 2 . Using a

  3. Dose assessment of the patient and the helper in emergency head computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Rong-Chou; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Chen, Tou-Rong; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) becomes more and more important and is frequently used in modern diagnostic techniques. CT offers an effective diagnosis on lesion and pathology; however, it also delivers a radiation dose to patients. Besides, in some special emergency cases, the patient may require someone to help him in the examination room to perform the head CT, due to the patient lost intellectual and operational capacity. This study evaluated the delivered radiation dose and the risk of radiation-induced cancer for the patient and for the helper after carrying out the emergent head CT examination. A Rando phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips inside relevant organs was used to simulate the patient during head CT examination. An effective dose of 2.06 ± 0.16 mSv and 1.46 ± 0.07 mSv without and with wearing the lead apron were found respectively, considering ICRP 60 recommendation. ICRP 103 recommendations the readings would have been 1.29 ± 0.15 mSv and 0.71 ± 0.04 mSv. The effective dose determined from the dose-length product (DLP) method (2.19 mSv) was similar to the value (2.06 ± 0.16 mSv) estimated by TLD method considering the ICRP 60 recommendation (without lead apron). Assuming a 5% total risk for fatal cancer per Sv in the general population, risk of radiation-induced cancer for patients were 1.03 × 10 −2 % (without lead apron) and 7.80 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 60, and were 6.45 × 10 −3 % (without lead apron) and 3.55 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 103. The dose received by the helper was assessed by wearing a personal badge. The helper during emergent head CT examination may receive a personal dose equivalent (H p (10)) of 19.36 ± 5.89 μSv and 138.81 ± 101.28 μSv with and without lead apron, respectively, at distance of 0.3–1 m from the center of CT scanner. Based on the observed dose reduction of a factor of 7.17 we recommend that helpers wear lead apron in the CT examination room.

  4. Reduction of uterus dose in clinical thoracic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Keil, B.; Kaestner, B.; Klose, K.J.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Wulff, J.; Fiebich, M.; Zink, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential dose reduction in the uterus as a result of lead apron protection during thoracic CT scans. Moreover, the distribution of the radiation dose in the uterus was determined in order to obtain information about the ratio of internally and externally scattered radiation. Materials and Methods: The uterus doses during thoracic CT were determined by measuring organ doses using an Alderson-RANDO registered -Phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. A 0.25 mm lead equivalent protective apron was used to shield the abdominal area. Three measurement conditions were evaluated: without lead apron, covered with lead apron and wrapped with lead apron. The uterus dose with and without shielding describes the mean value and standard deviation of all examinations and all measurement points in the organ. Results: The uterus dose by thoracic CT was measured to be approximately 66.5 ± 3.1 μGy. If the abdomen is covered with a 0.25 mm Pb equivalent lead apron in the front area and on both sides, the uterus dose is reduced to 49.4 ± 2.8 μGy (26 % reduction, p < 0.001). If a lead apron is wrapped around the abdomen, providing 0.50 mm Pb shielding in the anterior section due to overlap, and 0.25 mm Pb in the posterior section and on both sides, the uterus dose is reduced even more to 43.8 ± 2.5 μGy (34 % reduction, p < 0.001). The dose distribution when the lead apron covers the abdomen shows that the shielding is effective for the scatter radiation that comes from the anterior part. Moreover, the wrapped apron protects the uterus from all directions and is even more effective for dose reduction than the covering apron. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that protective aprons are an effective dose reduction technique without additional costs and little effect on patient examination time. (orig.)

  5. Skin entrance dose with and without lead apron in digital panoramic radiography for selected sensitive body regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Ralf Kurt Willy; Cremers, Catrin; Karle, Heiko; de Las Heras Gala, Hugo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose at skin level at five significant anatomical regions for panoramic radiography devices with and without lead apron by means of a highly sensitive dosimeter. A female RANDO-phantom was exposed in five different digital panoramic radiography systems, and the dose at skin level was assessed tenfold for each measurement region by means of a highly sensitive solid-state-dosimeter. The five measurement regions selected were the thyroid, both female breasts, the gonads, and a central region in the back of the phantom. For each panoramic machine, the measurements were performed in two modes: with and without a commercial lead apron specifically designed for panoramic radiography. Reproducibility of the measurements was expressed by absolute differences and the coefficient of variation. Values between shielded and unshielded doses were pooled for each region and compared by means of the paired Wilcoxon tests (p ≤ 0.05). Reproducibility as represented by the mean CV was 22 ± 52 % (median 2.3 %) with larger variations for small dose values. Doses at skin level ranged between 0.00 μGy at the gonads and 85.39 μGy at the unshielded thyroid (mean ± SD 15 ± 24 μGy). Except for the gonads, the dose in all the other regions was significantly lower (p < 0.001) when a lead apron was applied. Unshielded doses were between 1.02-fold (thyroid) and 112-fold (at the right breast) higher than those with lead apron shielding (mean: 14-fold ± 18-fold). Although the doses were entirely very low, we observed a significant increase in dose in the radiation-sensitive female breast region when no lead apron was used. Future discussions on shielding requirements for panoramic radiography should focus on these differences in the light of the linear non-threshold (LNT) theory which is generally adopted in medical imaging.

  6. SU-D-BRA-03: Analysis of Systematic Errors with 2D/3D Image Registration for Target Localization and Treatment Delivery in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Determine systematic deviations between 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registrations with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) for various imaging modalities and registration algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: The 6DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing automated 2D/3D (kV/MV vs. CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT vs. CT) image registrations from different imaging pairs, CT slice thicknesses, couch angles, similarity measures, etc., using a Rando head and a pelvic phantom. The 2D/3D image registration accuracy was evaluated at different treatment sites (intra-cranial and extra-cranial) by statistically analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification against 3D/3D localization of 192 Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy treatment fractions for 88 patients. Results: The systematic errors of 2D/3D image registration using kV-kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs using 0.8 mm slice thickness CT images were within 0.3 mm and 0.3° for translations and rotations with a 95% confidence interval (CI). No significant difference between 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registrations (P>0.05) was observed for target localization at various CT slice thicknesses ranging from 0.8 to 3 mm. Couch angles (30, 45, 60 degree) did not impact the accuracy of 2D/3D image registration. Using pattern intensity with content image filtering was recommended for 2D/3D image registration to achieve the best accuracy. For the patient study, translational error was within 2 mm and rotational error was within 0.6 degrees in terms of 95% CI for 2D/3D image registration. For intra-cranial sites, means and std. deviations of translational errors were −0.2±0.7, 0.04±0.5, 0.1±0.4 mm for LNG, LAT, VRT directions, respectively. For extra-cranial sites, means and std. deviations of translational errors were - 0.04±1, 0.2±1, 0.1±1 mm for LNG, LAT, VRT directions, respectively. 2D/3D image registration uncertainties for intra-cranial and extra-cranial sites were comparable. Conclusion: The Varian

  7. SU-F-T-500: The Effectiveness of a Patient Specific Bolus Made by Using Three-Dimensional Printing Technique in Photon Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K; Yuasa, Y; Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Shibuya, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A commercially available bolus (commercial-bolus) would not completely contact with the irregular shape of a patient’s skin. The purposes of this study were to customize a patient specific three-dimensional (3D) bolus using a 3D printer (3D-bolus) and to evaluate its clinical feasibility for photon radiotherapy. Methods: The 3D-bolus was designed using a treatment planning system (TPS) in DICOM-RT format. To print the 3D bolus, the file was converted into stereolithography format. To evaluate its physical characteristics, plans were created for water equivalent phantoms without the bolus, with the 3D-bolus printed in a flat form, and with the virtual bolus which supposed a commercial-bolus. These plans were compared with the percent depth dose (PDD) measured from the TPS. Furthermore, to evaluate its clinical feasibility, the treatment plans were created for RANDO phantoms without the bolus and with the 3D-bolus which was customized for contacting with the surface of the phantom. Both plans were compared with the dose volume histogram (DVH) of the target volume. Results: In the physical evaluation, dmax of the plan without the bolus, with the 3D-bolus, and with the virtual bolus were 2.2 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.7 cm, respectively. In the evaluation of clinical feasibility, for the plan without the bolus, Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90% of the target volume were 102.6 %, 1.6 %, 88.8 %, 57.2 %, and 69.3 %, respectively. By using the 3D-bolus, the prescription dose could be delivered to at least 90 % of the target volume, Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90% of the target volume were 104.3 %, 91.6 %, 92.1 %, 91.7 %, and 98.0 %, respectively. The 3D-bolus has the potential to be useful for providing effective dose coverage in the buildup region. Conclusion: A 3D-bolus produced using 3D printing technique is comparable to a commercially available bolus.

  8. The effect of angular and longitudinal tube current modulations on the estimation of organ and effective doses in x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, Marcel van; Deak, Paul; Shrimpton, Paul C.; Kalender, Willi A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Tube current modulation (TCM) is one of the recent developments in multislice CT that has proven to reduce the patient radiation dose without affecting the image quality. Presently established methods and published coefficients for estimating organ doses from the dose measured free in air on the axis of rotation or in the CT dose index (CTDI) dosimetry phantoms do not take into account this relatively new development in CT scanner design and technology. Based on these organ dose coefficients effective dose estimates can be made. The estimates are not strictly valid for CT scanning protocols utilizing TCM. In this study, the authors investigated the need to take TCM into account when estimating organ and effective dose values. Methods: A whole-body adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Rando) was scanned with a multislice CT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) utilizing TCM (CareDose4D). Tube voltage was 120 kV, beam collimation 19.2 mm, and pitch 1. A voxelized patient model was used to define the tissues and organs in the phantom. Tube current values as a function of tube angle were obtained from the raw data for each individual tube rotation of the scan. These values were used together with the Monte Carlo dosimetry tool IMPACTMC (VAMP GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) to calculate organ dose values both with and without account of TCM. Angular and longitudinal modulations were investigated separately. Finally, corresponding effective dose conversion coefficients were determined for both cases according to the updated 2007 recommendations of the ICRP. Results: TCM amplitude was greatest in the shoulder and pelvic regions. Consequently, dose distributions and organ dose values for particular cross sections changed considerably when taking angular modulation into account. The effective dose conversion coefficients were up to 11% lower for a single rotation in the shoulder region and 17% lower in the pelvis when taking angular TCM into

  9. Estimation of radiation exposure of retrospective gated and prospective triggered 128-slice triple-rule-out CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Kaempf, Michael; Claussen, Claus D; Heuschmid, Martin; Buchgeister, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Background: CT has become an important role in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain to exclude an aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary artery syndrome. However, the additional radiation exposure is a cause of concern and dose saving strategies should be applied, if possible. Purpose: To estimate effective dose of retrospective gated and prospective ECG-triggered triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography (TRO-CTA). Material and Methods: An Alderson-Rando-phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a 128-slice single source scanner. The following scan parameters were used (retrospective ECG-gated): 120 kV, 190 mAs/rot., collimation 128x0.6 mm, rotation time 0.3 s. Protocols with a simulated heart rate (HR) of 60 and 100 bpm were performed using the standard ECG-pulsing as well as MinDose. Additionally, a prospective triggered TRO-CTA was acquired (HR 60 bpm). Results: The estimated effective dose of retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA ranged from 7.4-13.4 mSv and from 10.1-17.5 mSv for men and women, respectively. Due to radiosensitive breast tissue, women received a significant increased effective dose of up to 64.7% ± 0.03% (p = 0.028) compared to men. MinDose reduces radiation exposure of up to 33.0% ± 6.5% in comparison to standard ECG-pulsing (p < 0.001). The effective dose increased significantly with lower heart rates (p < 0.001). Prospective ECG-triggered TRO-CTA showed an effective dose of 5.9 mSv and 8.2 mSv for men and women, respectively. Compared to retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA a significant dose reduction was observed (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Due to the significant different dose exposure, scan protocols should be specifically adapted in a patient- and problem-oriented manner

  10. Dose reduction in multi-slice CT of the heart by use of ECG-controlled tube current modulation (''ECG pulsing''): phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Cohnen, M.; Brachten, S.; Moedder, U.; Ewen, K.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of ECG-controlled tube current modulation on radiation exposure in retrospectively-ECG-gated multislice CT (MSCT) of the heart. Material and methods: Three different cardiac MSCT protocols with different slice collimation (4 x 1, and 4 x 2.5 mm), and a pitch-factor of 1.5 and 1.8 were investigated at a multi-slice CT scanner Somatom Volume Zoom, Siemens. An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with LiF-Thermoluminescence dosimeters at several organ sites, and effective doses were calculated using ICRP-weighting factors. Scan protocols were performed with ECG-controlled tube current modulation ('ECG pulsing') at two different heart rates (60 and 80 bpm). These data were compared to previous data from MSCT of the heart without use of 'ECG pulsing'. Results: Radiation exposure with (60 bpm) and without tube current modulation using a 2.5 mm collimation was 1.8 mSv and 2.9 mSv for females, and 1.5 mSv and 2.4 mSv for males, respectively. For protocols using a 1 mm collimation with a pitch-factor of 1.5 (1.8), radiation exposure with and without tube current modulation was 5.6 (6.3) mSv and 9.5 (11.2) mSv for females, and 4.6 (5.2) mSv and 7.7 (9.2) mSv for males, respectively. At higher heart rates (80 bpm) radiation exposure is increased from 1.5-1.8 mSv to 1.8-2.1 mSv, using the 2.5 mm collimation, and from 4.6-5.6 mSv to 5.9-7.2 mSv, for protocols using 1 mm collimation. Conclusions: The ECG-controlled tube current modulation allows a dose reduction of 37% to 44% when retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT of the heart is performed. The tube current - as a function over time - and therefore the radiation exposure is dependent on the heart rate. (orig.) [de

  11. Evaluation of ovary dose for woman of childbearing age woman with breast cancer in tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyeong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Ji Min; Park, Ju Young; Kim, Jong Suk

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate unwanted scattered dose to ovary by scattering and leakage generated from treatment fields of Tomotherapy for childbearing woman with breast cancer. The radiation treatments plans for left breast cancer were established using Tomotherapy planning system (Tomotherapy, Inc, USA). They were generated by using helical and direct Tomotherapy methods for comparison. The CT images for the planning were scanned with 2.5 mm slice thickness using anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson-Rando phantom, The Phantom Laboratory, USA). The measurement points for the ovary dose were determined at the points laterally 30 cm apart from mid-point of treatment field of the pelvis. The measurements were repeated five times and averaged using glass dosimeters (1.5 mm diameter and 12 mm of length) equipped with low-energy correction filter. The measures dose values were also converted to Organ Equivalent Dose (OED) by the linear exponential dose-response model. Scattered doses of ovary which were measured based on two methods of Tomo helical and Tomo direct showed average of 64.94±0.84 mGy and 37.64±1.20 mGy in left ovary part and average of 64.38±1.85 mGy and 32.96±1.11 mGy in right ovary part. This showed when executing Tomotherapy, measured scattered dose of Tomo Helical method which has relatively greater monitor units (MUs) and longer irradiation time are approximately 1.8 times higher than Tomo direct method. Scattered dose of left and right ovary of childbearing women is lower than ICRP recommended does which is not seriously worried level against the infertility and secondary cancer occurrence. However, as breast cancer occurrence ages become younger in the future and radiation therapy using high-precision image guidance equipment like Tomotherapy is developed, clinical follow-up studies about the ovary dose of childbearing women patients would be more required

  12. Evaluation of ovary dose for woman of childbearing age woman with breast cancer in tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyeong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Ji Min; Park, Ju Young; Kim, Jong Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate unwanted scattered dose to ovary by scattering and leakage generated from treatment fields of Tomotherapy for childbearing woman with breast cancer. The radiation treatments plans for left breast cancer were established using Tomotherapy planning system (Tomotherapy, Inc, USA). They were generated by using helical and direct Tomotherapy methods for comparison. The CT images for the planning were scanned with 2.5 mm slice thickness using anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson-Rando phantom, The Phantom Laboratory, USA). The measurement points for the ovary dose were determined at the points laterally 30 cm apart from mid-point of treatment field of the pelvis. The measurements were repeated five times and averaged using glass dosimeters (1.5 mm diameter and 12 mm of length) equipped with low-energy correction filter. The measures dose values were also converted to Organ Equivalent Dose (OED) by the linear exponential dose-response model. Scattered doses of ovary which were measured based on two methods of Tomo helical and Tomo direct showed average of 64.94±0.84 mGy and 37.64±1.20 mGy in left ovary part and average of 64.38±1.85 mGy and 32.96±1.11 mGy in right ovary part. This showed when executing Tomotherapy, measured scattered dose of Tomo Helical method which has relatively greater monitor units (MUs) and longer irradiation time are approximately 1.8 times higher than Tomo direct method. Scattered dose of left and right ovary of childbearing women is lower than ICRP recommended does which is not seriously worried level against the infertility and secondary cancer occurrence. However, as breast cancer occurrence ages become younger in the future and radiation therapy using high-precision image guidance equipment like Tomotherapy is developed, clinical follow-up studies about the ovary dose of childbearing women patients would be more required.

  13. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J; Adams, E; Bidmead, M; Partridge, M; Verhaegen, F

    2005-01-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  14. Pilot study of the dose in crystalline lens in the interventional radiology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Martinez, A.; Fernandez, A.; Molina, D.; Sanchez, L.; Diaz, A.

    2014-08-01

    The interventional radiology involves considerable exposure levels for the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP). The doses can encompass a wide range of values in dependence of the function that develops the personnel and the complexity of each procedure. In organs like the crystalline lens and skin values can be reached that imply the appearance of deterministic effects if is not fulfilled the appropriate measures of radiological protection. This has been demonstrated through multiple studies, among those that the retrospective study of damages in the crystalline lens and dose has been one of those most commented, known as RELID. The objective of that study was to examine the opacity prevalence in the crystalline lens in workers linked to the interventional cardiology and to correlate it with the occupational exposition. The obtained results contributed to that the ICRP recommend a new limit value of equivalent dose for crystalline lens of 20 mSv in one year. With the objective of analyzing the operational implications, in the radiological surveillance programs that they could originate with the new recommendations was developed a pilot study to evaluate the dose in crystalline lens in the OEP linked to the interventional radiology in a Cuban hospital. For this, an anthropomorphic mannequin RANDO-ALDERSON was used on which thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed below and above of the leaded apron and in different positions at level of the crystalline lens: above, below and to the sides of the leaded lenses that the personnel uses routinely. The mannequin was located on the same positions that occupy the main specialist that execute the procedure, as well as of the nurse to assist him. The measurements were made simulating the more representative procedures about complexity, duration time and exposure rate. The used dosimeters were RADOS model for whole body composed of two thermoluminescent detectors Gr-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) to evaluate personal equivalent dose

  15. Dose optimization in pelvic radiography by air gap method on CR and DR systems – A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.T.P.; Fung, K.K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of replacing the anti-scatter grid with an air gap at a pelvic radiographic examination in order to reduce patient dose while retaining diagnostic image quality. Methods: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom was placed on a device that allowed the adjustment of different air gap thicknesses introduced between the phantom and the image receptor of Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR) systems. Grid and non-grid images with different air gap thicknesses of both systems were produced. Ovary and testes doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Radiographic quality of all images was rated by 5 experienced radiographers blindly using the Image Quality Score (IQS) and Visual Grading Analysis (VGA) systems. Results: Images of diagnostic quality were produced while the grid was replaced by a range of 0–25 cm air gap thickness in the pelvic radiographic examination. At non-grid examination with 10 cm air gap thickness, a maximum of relative dose reduction by 70.7% and 81.6% at CR; 68.6% and 79.4% at DR were achieved respectively at ovary and testes locations of the phantom as compared with their corresponding grid examinations. Conclusion: 10 cm was found to be the optimal air gap thickness at the tested pelvic examination. Effective dose was found to be reduced by 2 and 2.3 times respectively at the CR and DR examinations while the anti-scatter grid was replaced by 10 cm air gap. However, dose reduction effect by air gap method was found to be more pronounced in CR than in DR. - Highlights: • 10 cm air gap was found to be a substitute to replace grid in pelvic RANDO in CR/DR. • Over 68.6% of dose reduction effect were achieved at the ovary and testes regions. • Over 76.4% of reduction in effective dose were achieved at both the tested regions. • Dose reduction by air gap method was found to be more pronounced in CR than in DR

  16. Estimation of radiation exposure of retrospective gated and prospective triggered 128-slice triple-rule-out CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Kaempf, Michael; Claussen, Claus D; Heuschmid, Martin (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)), email: dominik.ketelsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Buchgeister, Markus (Depts. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Background: CT has become an important role in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain to exclude an aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary artery syndrome. However, the additional radiation exposure is a cause of concern and dose saving strategies should be applied, if possible. Purpose: To estimate effective dose of retrospective gated and prospective ECG-triggered triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography (TRO-CTA). Material and Methods: An Alderson-Rando-phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a 128-slice single source scanner. The following scan parameters were used (retrospective ECG-gated): 120 kV, 190 mAs/rot., collimation 128x0.6 mm, rotation time 0.3 s. Protocols with a simulated heart rate (HR) of 60 and 100 bpm were performed using the standard ECG-pulsing as well as MinDose. Additionally, a prospective triggered TRO-CTA was acquired (HR 60 bpm). Results: The estimated effective dose of retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA ranged from 7.4-13.4 mSv and from 10.1-17.5 mSv for men and women, respectively. Due to radiosensitive breast tissue, women received a significant increased effective dose of up to 64.7% +- 0.03% (p = 0.028) compared to men. MinDose reduces radiation exposure of up to 33.0% +- 6.5% in comparison to standard ECG-pulsing (p < 0.001). The effective dose increased significantly with lower heart rates (p < 0.001). Prospective ECG-triggered TRO-CTA showed an effective dose of 5.9 mSv and 8.2 mSv for men and women, respectively. Compared to retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA a significant dose reduction was observed (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Due to the significant different dose exposure, scan protocols should be specifically adapted in a patient- and problem-oriented manner

  17. Patient doses from CT examinations in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The main goal of the study was to estimate effective patient doses from the 6 most common CT examinations for different types of CT scanners within the United Arab Emirates. The results were used to assess future trends in patient CT doses following rapid replacement of axial and single-slice spiral scanners by multi-slice scanners. At present all three types of scanner technology exist: axial, spiral and multi-slice with axial scanners being gradually replaced by multi-slice scanners as the medical infrastructure of the country is modernized. Altogether there are more than 30 CT scanners in the country with a population of 4 million. Out of these 11 scanners are 16-slice models with tube-current modulation system. The majority of larger United Arab Emirates hospitals have at least two CT scanners: a single slice and 4 or 16-slice scanner. The survey was carried out with data collection forms distributed to the majority of CT scanner users in the United Arab Emirates hospitals, both private and government. Effective doses for different examinations were calculated from T.L.D. measurements using an Alderson Rando phantom simulating an average size patient. Our results show that effective doses to patients initially increased with the introduction of 4-slice scanners. Multi-slice scanners with 16 and more slices have tube-current modulation system as a standard. It is routinely used by radiographers in almost all examinations resulting in patient dose reduction up to 40 % in certain examinations. Another factor affecting population dose is the increased number of patients examined using multi-slice scanners. In the United Arab Emirates there was an increase of more than 30 % in the annual number of patients examined using multi-slice scanners in comparison to single-slice scanners. This fact is attributed to the ease and speed of operation of multi-slice scanners. Rapid increase in number of CT examinations is of concern. Medical

  18. Dosimetric analysis for photon and electron beams in Whole body irradiation; Analisis dosimetrico para haces de fotones y electrones en irradiacion corporal total

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado G, M [Posgrado. Fisica Medica Radiologica. Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota. Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia. Instituto Regional de Cancer de la Orinoquia. Hospital Regional de Villavicencio, Meta (Colombia)

    1999-12-31

    To initiate the Whole body irradiation as an alternative for the treatment of the hematological diseases, leukemia and assistant for the osseous marrow transplantation, it may be taken account the application of International Protocols about control and quality assurance. It is established the intercomparison by the different dosimetric methods: cylindrical ionization chambers and parallel plane, radiographic emulsion film, semiconductor diodes (Mosfet transistors) and TLD-100 thermoluminescent crystals, obtained measurements for 140 x 140 cm{sup 2} fields and large distances 340 cm respect conventional fields in Radiotherapy. The in vitro dosimetry was realized at the Universal Anthropomorphic puppet Alderson Rando basically with the cylindrical crystals (1 mm diameter) of TLD-100 lithium fluoride. It was obtained the dose value with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber and the Farmer electrometer for Whole body irradiation (ICT) with photons for electrons and were obtained values with the Markus plane parallel camera. Knowing the dose rate value to the source-surface distance DFS= 80 cm, it was calibrated the crystals with the reference radiation beam of {sup 60} Co for obtaining the response curve: Dose vs. Tl lecture. It was characterized the 10 % of the total population for 300 crystals for applying the statistics corresponding. The luminescence curve obtained of Gaussian form was considered satisfactory by its stability during the pre-anneal lecture and anneal process, getting the main peak lecture at 300 Centigrade according to assigned parameters at lecture equipment TLD Harshaw model 4500. The results indicate the functional dependence with the distance DFS= 340 cm for the following depth PPD, the relations TMR and TPR, the TAR is not calculated by the increment of the dispersion in air. The penumbra increment indicates an increase of the radiation field respect of luminous field. The dispersion angle q{sub 1} respect at the field central axis

  19. Differences among doses for neuro-axis radiotherapy planning in the gonadal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.F de; Vilela, E.C.; Oliveira, F.L.; Filho, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy can disrupt the functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, directly causing ovarian deficiencies, such as the decrease in fertility or damage that renders the uterus incapable of accommodating the growth of a fetus. However, these issues have become increasingly important to a growing number of pediatric and adolescent cancer survivors. The whole-body, cranial-spinal axis, as well as abdomen and pelvic region irradiations may expose the ovaries to radiation and may cause premature ovarian failure, whereas doses above 35 Gy cranial can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary functions. This study performed a comparison of four doses of radiotherapy planning techniques for the neural axis. For this analysis, technical simulations were performed for the treatment of medulloblastoma in four different planning, applied in a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom and dosimeters (TLD-100). The radiation fields in the 1”st and 2”nd planning were 40 x 5 cm”2 and 17 x 5 cm”2 with 4.0 cm depth, in which doses were 0.03 and 0.05 Gy / day and 0.11 and 0.09 Gy / days, on the right and left sides, respectively. The 3”rd and 4”th measured planning 32 x 7 cm”2 and 18 x 7 cm”2, with a 2 cm gap and a 4.0 and 5.0 cm depth, in which doses were 1.08 and 0.2 Gy/day and 1.14 and 0.14 Gy/day, on the left and right sides, respectively. It could be observed that the doses in the ovaries in the 3”rd and 4”th schedules proved to be larger than the doses in the 1 s t and 2 n d planning. This is caused by the spinal field width and the depth of the second spinal field, which is 1.0 cm more than the field of the 1”st and 2”nd planning. These differences should be observed in image planning, as incorrect measures can cause damage in the treatment finish. (authors)

  20. TU-D-209-06: Head and Neck Tissue Dose From X-Ray Scatter to Physicians Performing Cardiovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Schueler, B; Grams, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Sturchio, G [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to characterize the spatial distribution of scatter radiation to the head and neck of a physician performing an x-ray interventional procedure and assess brain, eye lens, and carotid artery dose. Methods: Radiographic x-ray beams were tuned to match the peak energy (56 to 106 keV) and HVL (3.5 to 6.5 mm Al) of x-ray scatter originating from a patient during a fluoroscopic procedure. The radiographic beam was directed upon a Rando phantom from an inferior-left location to mimic a typical patient-operator geometric relationship. A lead-equivalent protective garment was secured to the phantom. Direct exposure Gafchromic film (XRQA2) was placed between the transverse plane layers of the head and neck region of the phantom and exposed with 4 scatter-equivalent radiographic beams. A 3×3 cm{sup 2} film placed at the left collar of the phantom was used to monitor incident dose in the position of a radiation monitoring badge. The films were converted to 2D dose distribution maps using FilmQA Pro software and an Epson 11000-XL scanner. The 2D dose distributions maps were normalized by the left collar dose and the percent of left collar dose (%LCD) was calculated for select tissues. Results: The dose maps had high dynamic range (10{sub 4}) and spatial detail. Considering all transverse planes and 4 scatter beam qualities, the median %LCD values were: whole brain 8.5%, left brain 13%, right brain 5.4%, left eye lens 67%, right eye lens 25%, left carotid artery 72%, and right carotid artery 28%. Conclusion: Scatter radiation dose to an operator can be simulated using a tuned radiographic beam and used to expose a phantom and Gafchromic film, thereby creating detailed 2D dose distribution maps. This work facilitates individualized estimation of dose to select head and neck tissues based on an operator’s radiation monitoring badge value.

  1. SU-F-J-42: Comparison of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac X-Ray for Cranial Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Lu, B; Yu, Y; Dicker, A; Liu, H [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac x-ray imaging systems for cranial radiotherapy. Method: Phantom and patient studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.5), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.1.1). The phantom study was based on a Rando head phantom, which was designed to evaluate isocenter-location dependence of the image registrations. Ten isocenters were selected at various locations in the phantom, which represented clinical treatment sites. CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray images were taken when the phantom was located at each isocenter. The patient study included thirteen patients. CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray images were taken at each patient’s treatment position. Six-dimensional image registrations were performed on CBCT and ExacTrac, and residual errors calculated from CBCT and ExacTrac were compared. Results: In the phantom study, the average residual-error differences between CBCT and ExacTrac image registrations were: 0.16±0.10 mm, 0.35±0.20 mm, and 0.21±0.15 mm, in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The average residual-error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were: 0.36±0.11 degree, 0.14±0.10 degree, and 0.12±0.10 degree, respectively. In the patient study, the average residual-error differences in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were: 0.13±0.13 mm, 0.37±0.21 mm, 0.22±0.17 mm, respectively. The average residual-error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were: 0.30±0.10 degree, 0.18±0.11 degree, and 0.22±0.13 degree, respectively. Larger residual-error differences (up to 0.79 mm) were observed in the longitudinal direction in the phantom and patient studies where isocenters were located in or close to frontal lobes, i.e., located superficially. Conclusion: Overall, the average residual-error differences were within 0.4 mm in the translational

  2. Stimuli & Task characteristics in the global and local processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Zalabarod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available La primacía de los rasgos globales de una forma visual sobre los locales, o viceversa, es todavía una cuestión sin resolver. Algunos autores han señalado que la precedencia global sucede cuando se iguala la excentricidad de los niveles global y local mediante la utilización de estímulos concéntricos. Sin embargo, otras investigaciones con patrones visuales similares han obtenido precedencia local. El presente trabajo incluye dos experimentos planificados para arrojar luz sobre la interpretación de estos resultados inconsistentes. En conjunto, se pretende analizar si la diferencia en la densidad estimular utilizada en los distintos experimentos o la diferencia en el tipo de tarea pueden ser hipótesis plausibles para explicar la obtención de los resultados contradictorios. En el primer experimento, bajo condiciones de atención selectiva y dividida, se incluye una tarea de detección de una figura-objetivo en el estímulo con un tiempo de exposición de 150 msg. y con estímulos concéntricos con mayor número de elementos locales que los empleados en experimentos previos (Blanca, López, Luna, Zalabardo y Rando, 2000; 2001. Los resultados apuntan a una ausencia de ventaja global o local y a una interferencia bidireccional para la condición de atención selectiva, y bidreccional pero asimétrica para la condición de atención dividida, siendo mayor la interferencia global. En el segundo experimento, se instruye a los sujetos para que indiquen la dirección, izquierda o derecha, de la apertura de un semicírculo en el nivel pertinente, según la condición de dirección de la atención. Los estímulos se presentan con un tiempo de exposición de 150 msg. o ilimitado. Los resultados muestran una ventaja global, tanto bajo condiciones de atención dividida como selectiva, la cual es independiente del tiempo de exposición del estímulo. La comparación de los resultados extraídos de los dos experimentos, junto

  3. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with raster scanning, the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons in the energy region between 0.8 and 10 MeV is almost two orders of

  4. Dosimetric analysis for photon and electron beams in Whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado G, M.

    1998-01-01

    To initiate the Whole body irradiation as an alternative for the treatment of the hematological diseases, leukemia and assistant for the osseous marrow transplantation, it may be taken account the application of International Protocols about control and quality assurance. It is established the intercomparison by the different dosimetric methods: cylindrical ionization chambers and parallel plane, radiographic emulsion film, semiconductor diodes (Mosfet transistors) and TLD-100 thermoluminescent crystals, obtained measurements for 140 x 140 cm 2 fields and large distances 340 cm respect conventional fields in Radiotherapy. The in vitro dosimetry was realized at the Universal Anthropomorphic puppet Alderson Rando basically with the cylindrical crystals (1 mm diameter) of TLD-100 lithium fluoride. It was obtained the dose value with a 0.6 cm 3 cylindrical ionization chamber and the Farmer electrometer for Whole body irradiation (ICT) with photons for electrons and were obtained values with the Markus plane parallel camera. Knowing the dose rate value to the source-surface distance DFS= 80 cm, it was calibrated the crystals with the reference radiation beam of 60 Co for obtaining the response curve: Dose vs. Tl lecture. It was characterized the 10 % of the total population for 300 crystals for applying the statistics corresponding. The luminescence curve obtained of Gaussian form was considered satisfactory by its stability during the pre-anneal lecture and anneal process, getting the main peak lecture at 300 Centigrade according to assigned parameters at lecture equipment TLD Harshaw model 4500. The results indicate the functional dependence with the distance DFS= 340 cm for the following depth PPD, the relations TMR and TPR, the TAR is not calculated by the increment of the dispersion in air. The penumbra increment indicates an increase of the radiation field respect of luminous field. The dispersion angle q 1 respect at the field central axis was determined and was

  5. Dosimetric analysis for photon and electron beams in Whole body irradiation; Analisis dosimetrico para haces de fotones y electrones en irradiacion corporal total

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado G, M. [Posgrado. Fisica Medica Radiologica. Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota. Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia. Instituto Regional de Cancer de la Orinoquia. Hospital Regional de Villavicencio, Meta (Colombia)

    1998-12-31

    To initiate the Whole body irradiation as an alternative for the treatment of the hematological diseases, leukemia and assistant for the osseous marrow transplantation, it may be taken account the application of International Protocols about control and quality assurance. It is established the intercomparison by the different dosimetric methods: cylindrical ionization chambers and parallel plane, radiographic emulsion film, semiconductor diodes (Mosfet transistors) and TLD-100 thermoluminescent crystals, obtained measurements for 140 x 140 cm{sup 2} fields and large distances 340 cm respect conventional fields in Radiotherapy. The in vitro dosimetry was realized at the Universal Anthropomorphic puppet Alderson Rando basically with the cylindrical crystals (1 mm diameter) of TLD-100 lithium fluoride. It was obtained the dose value with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber and the Farmer electrometer for Whole body irradiation (ICT) with photons for electrons and were obtained values with the Markus plane parallel camera. Knowing the dose rate value to the source-surface distance DFS= 80 cm, it was calibrated the crystals with the reference radiation beam of {sup 60} Co for obtaining the response curve: Dose vs. Tl lecture. It was characterized the 10 % of the total population for 300 crystals for applying the statistics corresponding. The luminescence curve obtained of Gaussian form was considered satisfactory by its stability during the pre-anneal lecture and anneal process, getting the main peak lecture at 300 Centigrade according to assigned parameters at lecture equipment TLD Harshaw model 4500. The results indicate the functional dependence with the distance DFS= 340 cm for the following depth PPD, the relations TMR and TPR, the TAR is not calculated by the increment of the dispersion in air. The penumbra increment indicates an increase of the radiation field respect of luminous field. The dispersion angle q{sub 1} respect at the field central axis

  6. SU-E-J-123: Targeting Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiosurgery for Intracranial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Wen, N; Zhao, B; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracies of image-guided intracranial radiosurgery across several different linear accelerator platforms. Methods: A CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.0 mm was acquired of a Rando head phantom (The Phantom Laboratory) in a U-frame mask (BrainLAB AG). The phantom had three embedded BBs, simulating a central, left, and anterior lesion. The phantom was setup with each BB placed at the radiation isocenter under image guidance. Four different setup procedures were investigated: (1) NTX-ExacTrac: 6 degree-of-freedom (6D) correction on a Novalis Tx (BrainLAB AG) with ExacTrac localization (BrainLAB AG); (2) NTX-CBCT: 4D correction on the Novalis Tx with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT); (3) TrueBeam-CBCT: 4D correction on a TrueBeam (Varian) with CBCT; (4) Edge-CBCT: 6D correction on an Edge (Varian) with CBCT. The experiment was repeated 5 times with different initial setup error at each BB location on each platform, and the mean (μ) and one standard deviation (σ) of the residual error was compared.The congruence between radiation and imaging isocenters on each platform was evaluated by acquiring Winston Lutz (WL) images of a WL jig followed by imaging using ExacTrac or CBCT. The difference in coordinates of the jig relative to radiation and imaging isocenters was then recorded. Results: Averaged over all three BB locations, the residual vector setup errors (μ±σ) of the phantom in mm were 0.6±0.2, 1.0±0.5, 0.2±0.1, and 0.3±0.1 on NTX-ExacTrac, NTX-CBCT, TrueBeam-CBCT, and Edge-CBCT, with their ranges in mm being 0.4∼1.1, 0.4∼1.9, 0.1∼0.5, and 0.2∼0.6, respectively. And imaging isocenter was found stable relative to radiation isocenter, with the congruence to radiation isocenter in mm being 0.6±0.1, 0.7±0.1, 0.3±0.1, 0.2±0.1, respectively, on the four systems in the same order. Conclusion: Millimeter accuracy can be achieved with image-guided radiosurgery for intracranial lesions based on this set of experiments.

  7. Evaluation of Skin Dose and Image Quality on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jong Ho; Hong, Chae Seon; Kim, Jin Man; Jang, Jun Young

    2008-01-01

    Cone-beam CT using linear accelerator attached to on-board imager is a image guided therapy equipment. Because it is to check the patient's set-up error, correction, organ and target movement. But imaging dose should be cause of the secondary cancer when taking a image. The aim of this study is investigation of appropriate cone beam CT scan mode to compare and estimate the image quality and skin dose. Measurement by Thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD-100, Harshaw) with using the Rando phantom are placed on each eight sites in separately H and N, thoracic, abdominal section. each 4 methods of scan modes of are measured the for skin dose in three time. Subsequently, obtained average value. Following image quality QA protocol of equipment manufacturers using the catphan 504 phantom, image quality of each scan mode is compared and analyzed. The results of the measured skin dose are described in here. The skin dose of Head and Neck are measured mode A: 8.96 cGy, mode B: 4.59 cGy, mode C: 3.46 cGy mode D: 1.76 cGy and thoracic mode A: 9.42 cGy, mode B: 4.58 cGy, mode C: 3.65 cGy, mode D: 1.85 cGy, and abdominal mode A: 9.97 cGy, mode B: 5.12 cGy, mode C: 4.03 cGy, mode D: 2.21 cGy. Approximately, dose of mode B are reduced 50%, mode C are reduced 60%, mode D are reduced 80% a point of reference dose of mode A. the results of analyzed HU reproducibility, low contrast resolution, spatial resolution (high contrast resolution), HU uniformity in evaluation item of image quality are within the tolerance value by recommended equipment manufacturer in all scan mode. Maintaining the image quality as well as reducing the image dose are very important in cone beam CT. In the result of this study, we are considered when to take mode A when interested in soft tissue. And we are considered to take mode D when interested in bone scan and we are considered to take mode B, C when standard scan. Increasing secondary cancer risk due to cone beam CT scan should be reduced by low m

  8. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  9. Effective dose assessment in the maxillofacial region using thermoluminescent (TLD) and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosemeters: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, J; Schulze, D; Wolff, J; Rottke, D

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology dosemeters with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) (TLD 100; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) in the maxillofacial area. Organ and effective dose measurements were performed using 40 TLD and 20 MOSFET dosemeters that were alternately placed in 20 different locations in 1 anthropomorphic RANDO(®) head phantom (the Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The phantom was exposed to four different CBCT default maxillofacial protocols using small (4 × 5 cm) to full face (20 × 17 cm) fields of view (FOVs). The TLD effective doses ranged between 7.0 and 158.0 µSv and the MOSFET doses between 6.1 and 175.0 µSv. The MOSFET and TLD effective doses acquired using four different (FOV) protocols were as follows: face maxillofacial (FOV 20 × 17 cm) (MOSFET, 83.4 µSv; TLD, 87.6 µSv; -5%); teeth, upper jaw (FOV, 8.5 × 5.0 cm) (MOSFET, 6.1 µSv; TLD, 7.0 µSv; -14%); tooth, mandible and left molar (FOV, 4 × 5 cm) (MOSFET, 10.3 µSv; TLD, 12.3 µSv; -16%) and teeth, both jaws (FOV, 10 × 10 cm) (MOSFET, 175 µSv; TLD, 158 µSv; +11%). The largest variation in organ and effective dose was recorded in the small FOV protocols. Taking into account the uncertainties of both measurement methods and the results of the statistical analysis, the effective doses acquired using MOSFET dosemeters were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using TLD dosemeters. The MOSFET dosemeters constitute a feasible alternative for TLDs for the effective dose assessment of CBCT devices in the maxillofacial region.

  10. Comparison of Online 6 Degree-of-Freedom Image Registration of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac X-Ray for Intracranial Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Shi, Wenyin; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Lu, Bo; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Liu, Haisong

    2017-06-01

    The study was aimed to compare online 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam computed tomography and BrainLab ExacTrac X-ray imaging systems for intracranial radiosurgery. Phantom and patient studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (version 2.5), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (version 6.1.1). The phantom study was based on a Rando head phantom and was designed to evaluate isocenter location dependence of the image registrations. Ten isocenters at various locations representing clinical treatment sites were selected in the phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken when the phantom was located at each isocenter. The patient study included 34 patients. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken at each patient's treatment position. The 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations were performed on cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac, and residual errors calculated from cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac were compared. In the phantom study, the average residual error differences (absolute values) between cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac image registrations were 0.17 ± 0.11 mm, 0.36 ± 0.20 mm, and 0.25 ± 0.11 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.34° ± 0.08°, 0.13° ± 0.09°, and 0.12° ± 0.10°, respectively. In the patient study, the average residual error differences in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.20 ± 0.16 mm, 0.30 ± 0.18 mm, 0.21 ± 0.18 mm, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.40°± 0.16°, 0.17° ± 0.13°, and 0.20° ± 0.14°, respectively. Overall, the average residual error differences were cone-beam computed tomography image registration in intracranial treatments.

  11. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Ning; Guan Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was ∼4.0 cGy, which was ∼40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of ∼2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm x 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370 0 scan rotation (10 0 scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of ∼10-11 cGy while the right hip received ∼6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than ∼12% to the table-drop setup

  12. Measurement of mean cardiac dose for various breast irradiation techniques and corresponding risk of major cardiovascular event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Rodrigo Merino Lara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available After breast conserving surgery, early stage breast cancer patients are currently treated with a wide range of radiation techniques including whole breast irradiation (WBI, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy, or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. This study compares the mean heart’s doses for a left breast irradiated with different breast techniques.An anthropomorphic Rando phantom was modified with gelatin-based breast of different sizes and tumors located medially or laterally. The breasts were treated with WBI, 3D-CRT or HDR APBI. The heart’s mean doses were measured with Gafchromic films and controlled with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs. Following the model reported by Darby (16, major cardiac were estimated assuming a linear risk increase with the mean dose to the heart of 7.4% per gray.Whole breast irradiation lead to the highest mean heart dose (2.99 Gy compared to 3D-CRT APBI, (0.51 Gy, multicatheter (1.58 Gy and balloon HDR (2.17 Gy for a medially located tumor. This translated into long-term coronary event increases of 22%, 3.8%, 11.7%, and 16% respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the tumor location had almost no effect on the mean heart dose for 3D-CRT APBI and a minimal impact for HDR APBI. For WBI large breast size and set-up errors lead to sharp increases of the mean heart dose. Its value reached 10.79 Gy for women with large breast and a set-up error of 1.5 cm. Such a high value could increase the risk of having long-term coronary events by 80%.Comparison among different irradiation techniques demonstrates that 3D-CRT APBI appears the safest one with less probability of having cardiovascular events in the future. A sensitivity analysis showed that WBI is the most challenging technique for patients with large breasts or when significant set-up errors are anticipated. In those cases additional heart shielding techniques are required.

  13. Pilot study of the dose in crystalline lens in the interventional radiology practice; Estudio piloto de la dosis en cristalino en la practica de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.; Martinez, A.; Fernandez, A.; Molina, D. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Carretera de la Cantera, Victoria II, Km. 21.5 Guanabacoa, La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez, L.; Diaz, A., E-mail: ailza@cphr.edu.cu [Hospital Clinico Quirurgico Hermanos Ameijeiras, San Lazaro 701, Centro Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    The interventional radiology involves considerable exposure levels for the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP). The doses can encompass a wide range of values in dependence of the function that develops the personnel and the complexity of each procedure. In organs like the crystalline lens and skin values can be reached that imply the appearance of deterministic effects if is not fulfilled the appropriate measures of radiological protection. This has been demonstrated through multiple studies, among those that the retrospective study of damages in the crystalline lens and dose has been one of those most commented, known as RELID. The objective of that study was to examine the opacity prevalence in the crystalline lens in workers linked to the interventional cardiology and to correlate it with the occupational exposition. The obtained results contributed to that the ICRP recommend a new limit value of equivalent dose for crystalline lens of 20 mSv in one year. With the objective of analyzing the operational implications, in the radiological surveillance programs that they could originate with the new recommendations was developed a pilot study to evaluate the dose in crystalline lens in the OEP linked to the interventional radiology in a Cuban hospital. For this, an anthropomorphic mannequin RANDO-ALDERSON was used on which thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed below and above of the leaded apron and in different positions at level of the crystalline lens: above, below and to the sides of the leaded lenses that the personnel uses routinely. The mannequin was located on the same positions that occupy the main specialist that execute the procedure, as well as of the nurse to assist him. The measurements were made simulating the more representative procedures about complexity, duration time and exposure rate. The used dosimeters were RADOS model for whole body composed of two thermoluminescent detectors Gr-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) to evaluate personal equivalent dose

  14. Monte Carlo model of diagnostic X-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kutsen, Semion; Gatskevich, George

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A Monte Carlo simulation of absorbed dose distribution in patient's tissues is often used in a dosimetry assessment of X-ray examinations. The results of such simulations in Belarus are presented in the report based on an anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent Rando-like physical phantom. The phantom corresponds to an adult 173 cm high and of 73 kg and consists of a torso and a head made of tissue-equivalent plastics which model soft (muscular), bone, and lung tissues. It consists of 39 layers (each 25 mm thick), including 10 head and neck ones, 16 chest and 13 pelvis ones. A tomographic model of the phantom has been developed from its CT-scan images with a voxel size of 0.88 x 0.88 x 4 mm 3 . A necessary pixelization in Mathematics-based in-house program was carried out for the phantom to be used in the radiation transport code MCNP-4b. The final voxel size of 14.2 x 14.2 x 8 mm 3 was used for the reasonable computer consuming calculations of absorbed dose in tissues and organs in various diagnostic X-ray examinations. MCNP point detectors allocated through body slices obtained as a result of the pixelization were used to calculate the absorbed dose. X-ray spectra generated by the empirical TASMIP model were verified on the X-ray units MEVASIM and SIREGRAPH CF. Absorbed dose distributions in the phantom volume were determined by the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations with a set of point detectors. Doses in organs of the adult phantom computed from the absorbed dose distributions by another Mathematics-based in-house program were estimated for 22 standard organs for various standard X-ray examinations. The results of Monte Carlo simulations were compared with the results of direct measurements of the absorbed dose in the phantom on the X-ray unit SIREGRAPH CF with the calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeter DTU-01. The measurements were carried out in specified locations of different layers in heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, and stomach at high voltage of

  15. SU-D-BRA-03: Analysis of Systematic Errors with 2D/3D Image Registration for Target Localization and Treatment Delivery in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Determine systematic deviations between 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registrations with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) for various imaging modalities and registration algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: The 6DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing automated 2D/3D (kV/MV vs. CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT vs. CT) image registrations from different imaging pairs, CT slice thicknesses, couch angles, similarity measures, etc., using a Rando head and a pelvic phantom. The 2D/3D image registration accuracy was evaluated at different treatment sites (intra-cranial and extra-cranial) by statistically analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification against 3D/3D localization of 192 Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy treatment fractions for 88 patients. Results: The systematic errors of 2D/3D image registration using kV-kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs using 0.8 mm slice thickness CT images were within 0.3 mm and 0.3° for translations and rotations with a 95% confidence interval (CI). No significant difference between 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registrations (P>0.05) was observed for target localization at various CT slice thicknesses ranging from 0.8 to 3 mm. Couch angles (30, 45, 60 degree) did not impact the accuracy of 2D/3D image registration. Using pattern intensity with content image filtering was recommended for 2D/3D image registration to achieve the best accuracy. For the patient study, translational error was within 2 mm and rotational error was within 0.6 degrees in terms of 95% CI for 2D/3D image registration. For intra-cranial sites, means and std. deviations of translational errors were −0.2±0.7, 0.04±0.5, 0.1±0.4 mm for LNG, LAT, VRT directions, respectively. For extra-cranial sites, means and std. deviations of translational errors were - 0.04±1, 0.2±1, 0.1±1 mm for LNG, LAT, VRT directions, respectively. 2D/3D image registration uncertainties for intra-cranial and extra-cranial sites were comparable. Conclusion: The Varian

  16. Comparative dose evaluations between XVI and OBI cone beam CT systems using Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, Tawfik; Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James; Yu Yan; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of energy (kVp) and filters (no filter, half Bowtie, and full Bowtie) on the dose response curves of the Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in CBCT dose fields. To measure surface and internal doses received during x-ray volume imager (XVI) (Version R4.5) and on board imager (OBI) (Version 1.5) CBCT imaging protocols using these two types of dosimeters. Methods: Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLD dose response curves were generated at different kV imaging settings used by XVI (software version R4.5) and OBI (software version 1.5) CBCT systems. The settings for the XVI system were: 100 kVp/F0 (no filter), 120 kVp/F0, and 120 kVp/F1 (Bowtie filter), and for the OBI system were: 100 kVp/full fan, 125 kVp/full fan, and 125 kVp/half fan. XRQA2 film was calibrated in air to air kerma levels between 0 and 11 cGy and scanned using reflection scanning mode with the Epson Expression 10000 XL flat-bed document scanner. NanoDot OSLDs were calibrated on phantom to surface dose levels between 0 and 14 cGy and read using the inLight TM MicroStar reader. Both dosimeters were used to measure in field surface and internal doses in a male Alderson Rando Phantom. Results: Dose response curves of XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs at different XVI and OBI CBCT settings were reported. For XVI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in head region during fast head and neck scan and 4.99 cGy in the chest region during symmetry scan. On the other hand, the internal dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 3.17 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. The average (internal and external) dose ranged between 0.05 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 2.41 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. For OBI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.19 cGy in head region during head scan and 4.55 cGy in the pelvis region during spot

  17. A study on developing customized bolus using 3D prints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sang Min; Yang, Jin Ho; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jin Uk; Yeom, Du Seok

    2015-01-01

    3D Printers are used to create three-dimensional models based on blueprints. Based on this characteristic, it is feasible to develop a bolus that can minimize the air gap between skin and bolus in radiotherapy. This study aims to compare and analyze air gap and target dose at the branded 1 cm bolus with the developed customized bolus using 3D printers. RANDO phantom with a protruded tumor was used to procure images using CT simulator. CT DICOM file was transferred into the STL file, equivalent to 3D printers. Using this, customized bolus molding box (maintaining the 1 cm width) was created by processing 3D printers, and paraffin was melted to develop the customized bolus. The air gap of customized bolus and the branded 1 cm bolus was checked, and the differences in air gap was used to compare D max , D min , D mean , D 95% and V 95% in treatment plan through Eclipse. Customized bolus production period took about 3 days. The total volume of air gap was average 3.9 cm 3 at the customized bolus. And it was average 29.6cm 3 at the branded 1 cm bolus. The customized bolus developed by the 3D printer was more useful in minimizing the air gap than the branded 1 cm bolus. In the 6 MV photon, at the customized bolus, D max , D min , D mean , D 95% , V 95% of GTV were 102.8%, 88.1%, 99.1%, 95.0%, 94.4% and the D max , D min , D mean , D 95% , V 95% of branded 1 cm bolus were 101.4%, 92.0%, 98.2%, 95.2%, 95.7%, respectively. In the proton, at the customized bolus, D max , D min , D mean , D 95% , V 95% of GTV were 104.1%, 84.0%, 101.2%, 95.1%, 99.8% and the D max , D min , D mean , D 95% , V 95% of branded 1cm bolus were 104.8%, 87.9%, 101.5%, 94.9%, 99.9%, respectively. Thus, in treatment plan, there was no significant difference between the customized bolus and 1 cm bolus. However, the normal tissue nearby the GTV showed relatively lower radiation dose. The customized bolus developed by 3D printers was effective in minimizing the air gap, especially when it is used against

  18. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, Osvaldo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto; Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K_a_i_r), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ doses

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R; St James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-09-12

    RaySearch Americas Inc. (NY) has introduced a commercial Monte Carlo dose algorithm (RS-MC) for routine clinical use in proton spot scanning. In this report, we provide a validation of this algorithm against phantom measurements and simulations in the GATE software package. We also compared the performance of the RayStation analytical algorithm (RS-PBA) against the RS-MC algorithm. A beam model (G-MC) for a spot scanning gantry at our proton center was implemented in the GATE software package. The model was validated against measurements in a water phantom and was used for benchmarking the RS-MC. Validation of the RS-MC was performed in a water phantom by measuring depth doses and profiles for three spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams with normal incidence, an SOBP with oblique incidence, and an SOBP with a range shifter and large air gap. The RS-MC was also validated against measurements and simulations in heterogeneous phantoms created by placing lung or bone slabs in a water phantom. Lateral dose profiles near the distal end of the beam were measured with a microDiamond detector and compared to the G-MC simulations, RS-MC and RS-PBA. Finally, the RS-MC and RS-PBA were validated against measured dose distributions in an Alderson-Rando (AR) phantom. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film in the AR phantom and compared to doses using the RS-PBA and RS-MC algorithms. For SOBP depth doses in a water phantom, all three algorithms matched the measurements to within  ±3% at all points and a range within 1 mm. The RS-PBA algorithm showed up to a 10% difference in dose at the entrance for the beam with a range shifter and  >30 cm air gap, while the RS-MC and G-MC were always within 3% of the measurement. For an oblique beam incident at 45°, the RS-PBA algorithm showed up to 6% local dose differences and broadening of distal fall-off by 5 mm. Both the RS-MC and G-MC accurately predicted the depth dose to within  ±3% and distal fall-off to within 2

  20. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between True

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R.; St. James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-10-01

    RaySearch Americas Inc. (NY) has introduced a commercial Monte Carlo dose algorithm (RS-MC) for routine clinical use in proton spot scanning. In this report, we provide a validation of this algorithm against phantom measurements and simulations in the GATE software package. We also compared the performance of the RayStation analytical algorithm (RS-PBA) against the RS-MC algorithm. A beam model (G-MC) for a spot scanning gantry at our proton center was implemented in the GATE software package. The model was validated against measurements in a water phantom and was used for benchmarking the RS-MC. Validation of the RS-MC was performed in a water phantom by measuring depth doses and profiles for three spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams with normal incidence, an SOBP with oblique incidence, and an SOBP with a range shifter and large air gap. The RS-MC was also validated against measurements and simulations in heterogeneous phantoms created by placing lung or bone slabs in a water phantom. Lateral dose profiles near the distal end of the beam were measured with a microDiamond detector and compared to the G-MC simulations, RS-MC and RS-PBA. Finally, the RS-MC and RS-PBA were validated against measured dose distributions in an Alderson-Rando (AR) phantom. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film in the AR phantom and compared to doses using the RS-PBA and RS-MC algorithms. For SOBP depth doses in a water phantom, all three algorithms matched the measurements to within  ±3% at all points and a range within 1 mm. The RS-PBA algorithm showed up to a 10% difference in dose at the entrance for the beam with a range shifter and  >30 cm air gap, while the RS-MC and G-MC were always within 3% of the measurement. For an oblique beam incident at 45°, the RS-PBA algorithm showed up to 6% local dose differences and broadening of distal fall-off by 5 mm. Both the RS-MC and G-MC accurately predicted the depth dose to within  ±3% and distal fall-off to within 2

  2. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy; Contribuicao ao planejamento e a dosimetria de feixes de fotons aplicados a radiocirurgia e a radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-15

    radiosurgery. Measurements were also performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in order to verify the degree of compliance between the doses calculated through the Radionics{sup TM} Planning System and the actual treatment dose. This was accomplished by using a Rando(R) anthropomorphic phantom. The results showed that the two doses agree within {+-} 2%. The influence of the presence of inhomogeneities within the irradiated volume, due to the presence of air or bone in the radiation path was assessed. The results showed that these inhomogeneities significantly affect both the dose distribution pattern and the beam profiles in the treatment volume. The results of this study show that the dosimetry of small diameter radiation beams is still challenging, due mainly to the limited resolution of available detectors and to the lack of lateral equilibrium in small diameter radiation beams. (author)

  3. A comparison of two patient friendly ERG electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidajat, R.; McLay, J.; Elder, M.; Burley, C.; Goode, D.; Morton, J.

    2000-01-01

    a few (3/17) actually preferred the H-K loop. The remaining subject (1/17) was ambivalent. Consequently if patient comfort, high amplitudes and reproducible results are the most desirable characteristics then gold foils are the electrode of choice. conformity between the EGS4 simulated dose distributions and the TLD dose measurements was ∼ 4-7% and within the experimental error of the TLDs (Figure). The standard distribution of the EGS4 code does not include the binding effect of orbital electrons and its inclusion into the code only slightly affected the dose distribution in the phantom (varying less than 3% throughout phantom). Appropriately modified for diagnostic energies, the EGS4 code can be readily applied to heterogeneous anthropomorphic phantoms such as RANDO, in order to more accurately predict, and thereby reduce, patient dose in routine radiological procedures.Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2000-12-01

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO{sub 4}: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin

  5. Robust fluoroscopic tracking of fiducial markers: exploiting the spatial constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    err : 0.78–1.74 mm, σ err : 0.39–1.16 mm) for the images taken at low exposure (50 mAs). At higher exposure (500 mAs), the stochastic method gave the best performance (μ err : ∼0.39 mm, σ err : ∼0.27 mm). In contrast, the tracker (MHT) that does not model the spatial constraints only performs well when there is no occluded fiducial. With the RANDO phantom data, both of our proposed methods performed well and have the mean tracking errors around ∼1.8 mm with the standard deviations ∼0.93 mm at 100 mAs and ∼0.91 mm with 0.88 mm standard deviation at 500 mAs. The MHT tracker has the largest tracking errors with mean ∼4.8 mm) and standard deviation ∼2.4 mm in both sessions with the Rondo phantom data. On the patient data sets, the detection based method gave the smallest error (μ err : 0.39 mm, σ err : ∼0.19 mm). The stochastic method performed well (μ err : ∼0.58 mm, σ err : ∼0.39 mm) when the patient breathed consistently, the accuracy dropped to (μ err : ∼1.55 mm) when the patient breathed differently across sessions. (paper)

  6. Dual-energy imaging method to improve the image quality and the accuracy of dose calculation for cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jianrong; Chen, Xinyuan; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    To improve the image quality and accuracy of dose calculation for cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images through implementation of a dual-energy cone-beam computed tomography method (DE-CBCT), and evaluate the improvement quantitatively. Two sets of CBCT projections were acquired using the X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) system on a Synergy (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) system with 120kV (high) and 70kV (low) X-rays, respectively. Then, the electron density relative to water (relative electron density (RED)) of each voxel was calculated using a projection-based dual-energy decomposition method. As a comparison, single-energy cone-beam computed tomography (SE-CBCT) was used to calculate RED with the Hounsfield unit-RED calibration curve generated by a CIRS phantom scan with identical imaging parameters. The imaging dose was measured with a dosimetry phantom. The image quality was evaluated quantitatively using a Catphan 503 phantom with the evaluation indices of the reproducibility of the RED values, high-contrast resolution (MTF 50% ), uniformity, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Dose calculation of two simulated volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans using an Eclipse treatment-planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) was performed on an Alderson Rando Head and Neck (H&N) phantom and a Pelvis phantom. Fan-beam planning CT images for the H&N and Pelvis phantom were set as the reference. A global three-dimensional gamma analysis was used to compare dose distributions with the reference. The average gamma values for targets and OAR were analyzed with paired t-tests between DE-CBCT and SE-CBCT. In two scans (H&N scan and body scan), the imaging dose of DE-CBCT increased by 1.0% and decreased by 1.3%. It had a better reproducibility of the RED values (mean bias: 0.03 and 0.07) compared with SE-CBCT (mean bias: 0.13 and 0.16). It also improved the image uniformity (57.5% and 30.1%) and SNR (9.7% and 2.3%), but did not affect the MTF 50% . Gamma

  7. Absorbed Dose and Effective Dose for Lung Cancer Image Guided Radiation Therapy(IGRT) using CBCT and 4D-CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Woo Suk; Koo, Ki Lae; Kim, Joo Seob; Lee, Sang Hyeon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, GangNeung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the results of absorbed and effective doses using CBCT and 4D-CBCT settings for lung cancer. This experimental study. Measurements were performed using a Anderson rando phantom with OSLD(optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters). It was performed computed tomography(Lightspeed GE, USA) in order to express the major organs of the human body. Measurements were obtained a mean value is repeated three times each. Evaluations of effective dose and absorbed dose were performed the CL-IX-Thorax mode and Truebeam-Thorax mode CBCT. Additionally, compared Truebeam-Thorax mode CBCT with Truebeam-Thorax mode 4D-CBCT(Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography). Average absorbed dose in the CBCT of CL-IX was measured in lung 2.505cGy, heart 2.595cGy, liver 2.145cGy, stomach 1.934cGy, skin 2.233cGy, in case of Truebeam, It was measured lung 1.725cGy, heart 2.034cGy, liver 1.616cGy, stomach 1.470cGy, skin 1.445cGy. In case of 4D-CBCT, It was measured lung 3.849cGy, heart 4.578cGy, liver 3.497cGy, stomach 3.179cGy, skin 3.319cGy Average effective dose, considered tissue weighting and radiation weighting, in the CBCT of CL-IX was measured lung 2.164mSv, heart 2.241mSVv, liver 0.136mSv, stomach 1.668mSv, skin 0.009mSv, in case of Turebeam, it was measured lung 1.725mSv, heart 1.757mSv, liver 0.102mSv, stomach 1.270mSv, skin 0.005mSv, In case of 4D-CBCT, It was measured lung 3.326mSv, heart 3.952mSv, liver 0.223mSv, stomach 2.747mSv, skin 0.013mSv. As a result, absorbed dose and effective Dose in the CL-IX than Truebeam was higher about 1.3 times and in the 4D-CBCT Truebeam than CBCT of Truebeam was higher about 2.2times However, a large movement of the patient and respiratory gated radiotherapy may be more accurate treatment in 4D-CBCT. Therefore, it will be appropriate to selectively used.

  8. A study on developing customized bolus using 3D prints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sang Min; Yang, Jin Ho; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jin Uk; Yeom, Du Seok [Dept. of Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    3D Printers are used to create three-dimensional models based on blueprints. Based on this characteristic, it is feasible to develop a bolus that can minimize the air gap between skin and bolus in radiotherapy. This study aims to compare and analyze air gap and target dose at the branded 1 cm bolus with the developed customized bolus using 3D printers. RANDO phantom with a protruded tumor was used to procure images using CT simulator. CT DICOM file was transferred into the STL file, equivalent to 3D printers. Using this, customized bolus molding box (maintaining the 1 cm width) was created by processing 3D printers, and paraffin was melted to develop the customized bolus. The air gap of customized bolus and the branded 1 cm bolus was checked, and the differences in air gap was used to compare D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}, D{sub 95%} and V{sub 95%} in treatment plan through Eclipse. Customized bolus production period took about 3 days. The total volume of air gap was average 3.9 cm{sup 3} at the customized bolus. And it was average 29.6cm{sup 3} at the branded 1 cm bolus. The customized bolus developed by the 3D printer was more useful in minimizing the air gap than the branded 1 cm bolus. In the 6 MV photon, at the customized bolus, D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}, D{sub 95%}, V{sub 95%} of GTV were 102.8%, 88.1%, 99.1%, 95.0%, 94.4% and the D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}, D{sub 95%}, V{sub 95%} of branded 1 cm bolus were 101.4%, 92.0%, 98.2%, 95.2%, 95.7%, respectively. In the proton, at the customized bolus, D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}, D{sub 95%}, V{sub 95%} of GTV were 104.1%, 84.0%, 101.2%, 95.1%, 99.8% and the D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}, D{sub 95%}, V{sub 95%} of branded 1cm bolus were 104.8%, 87.9%, 101.5%, 94.9%, 99.9%, respectively. Thus, in treatment plan, there was no significant difference between the customized bolus and 1 cm bolus. However, the normal tissue nearby the GTV showed relatively lower radiation dose. The

  9. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy; Contribuicao ao planejamento e a dosimetria de feixes de fotons aplicados a radiocirurgia e a radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-15

    . Measurements were also performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in order to verify the degree of compliance between the doses calculated through the Radionics{sup TM} Planning System and the actual treatment dose. This was accomplished by using a Rando(R) anthropomorphic phantom. The results showed that the two doses agree within {+-} 2%. The influence of the presence of inhomogeneities within the irradiated volume, due to the presence of air or bone in the radiation path was assessed. The results showed that these inhomogeneities significantly affect both the dose distribution pattern and the beam profiles in the treatment volume. The results of this study show that the dosimetry of small diameter radiation beams is still challenging, due mainly to the limited resolution of available detectors and to the lack of lateral equilibrium in small diameter radiation beams. (author)

  10. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-01

    performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in order to verify the degree of compliance between the doses calculated through the Radionics TM Planning System and the actual treatment dose. This was accomplished by using a Rando(R) anthropomorphic phantom. The results showed that the two doses agree within ± 2%. The influence of the presence of inhomogeneities within the irradiated volume, due to the presence of air or bone in the radiation path was assessed. The results showed that these inhomogeneities significantly affect both the dose distribution pattern and the beam profiles in the treatment volume. The results of this study show that the dosimetry of small diameter radiation beams is still challenging, due mainly to the limited resolution of available detectors and to the lack of lateral equilibrium in small diameter radiation beams. (author)

  11. Effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral pediatric and adult CT angiography: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Antonios E; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present phantom study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral computed tomographic (CT) angiographic examinations of pediatric and adult individuals. Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms that represent the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, and 10-year-old children and the RANDO phantom that simulates the average adult individual were used. Cylindrical vessels were bored along the brain-equivalent plugs of each physical phantom. To simulate the brain vasculature, vessels of 0.6, 1, 2, and 3 mm in diameter were created. These vessels were filled with contrast medium (CM) solutions at different iodine concentrations, that is, 5.6, 4.2, 2.7, and 1.4 mg I/mL. The phantom heads were scanned at 120, 100, and 80 kV. The applied quality reference tube current-time product values ranged from a minimum of 45 to a maximum of 680. The CT acquisitions were performed on a 16-slice CT scanner using the automatic exposure control system. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the contrast-enhanced iodinated vessels and the unenhanced regions of interest. Dose reduction was calculated as the percentage difference of the CT dose index value at the quality reference tube current-time product and the CT dose index at the mean modulated tube current-time product. Image noise that was measured using the preset tube current-time product settings varied significantly among the different phantoms (P Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels was linearly related to CM concentration (r² = 0.907) and vessel diameter (r² = 0.918). The Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels followed a decreasing trend from the neonate phantom to the adult phantom at all kilovoltage settings. For the same image noise level, a CNR improvement of up to 69% and a dose reduction of up to 61% may be achieved when CT acquisition

  12. Processing of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix using natural smoke flavouring as coadjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Augusto Gonçalves

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix constitutes the main fishing resource in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil coast in the autumn, winter and spring months. Considering that this fish is highly perishable, to have its shelf life increased an adequate treatment and processing are needed as soon as its capture occurs. Its use in the elaboration of a smoked product can represent considerable economic growth, if compared to its current "in natura" or frozen commercialization. A bluefish base smoked product was elaborated using natural smoke flavouring (known commercially as liquid smoke defining the adjusted technological characteristics during the processing. The best form of liquid smoke application (immersion or sprinkling was chosen sensorially by hedonic scale. The sprinkling of liquid smoke in the concentration of 20% on unskinned bluefish fillets showed better acceptance in the sensorial evaluation. A daily 49.5ºC pay-drying of 45 minutes before the liquid smoke application favored its larger penetration in the bluefish muscle. The thermal treatment used (52.8ºC for 45 minutes; 67ºC for 45 minutes and 80.8ºC for two and a half hours was enough to get a product with good sensorial acceptance. The final yield of the used processing was of 39.58%, similar with the yield shown by other authors of other commercial species. The product must be kept under freezing temperature.A anchova constitui o principal recurso pesqueiro na costa do Rio Grande do Sul nos meses de outono, inverno e primavera. Conside-rando que este pescado é altamente perecível, para poder prolongar sua vida-de-prateleira necessita-se de um tratamento e processamento adequados tão logo ocorra sua captura. Sua utilização na elaboração de um produto defumado pode representar um crescimento econômico considerável, se comparado com sua atual comercialização na forma "in natura" ou congelada. Foi elaborado um produto defumado à base de anchova utilizando aroma natural de fuma