WorldWideScience

Sample records for reheat helium brayton

  1. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  2. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  3. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  4. Transient analysis of an FHR coupled to a helium Brayton power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Minghui [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Kim, In Hun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Christensen, Richard [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Utgikar, Vivek [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) features a passive decay heat removal system and a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity generation. It typically employs an intermediate loop, consisting of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX), to couple the primary system with the power conversion unit (PCU). In this study, a preliminary dynamic system model is developed to simulate transient characteristics of a prototypic 20-MWth Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR). The model consists of a series of differential conservation equations that are numerically solved using the MATLAB platform. For the reactor, a point neutron kinetics model is adopted. For the IHX and SHX, a fluted tube heat exchanger and an offset strip-fin heat exchanger are selected, respectively. Detailed geometric parameters of each component in the FHTR are determined based on the FHTR nominal steady-state operating conditions. Three initiating events are simulated in this study, including a positive reactivity insertion, a step increase in the mass flow rate of the PCU helium flow, and a step increase in the PCU helium inlet temperature to the SHX. The simulation results show that the reactor has inherent safety features for those three simulated scenarios. It is observed that the increase in the temperatures of the fuel pebbles and primary coolant is mitigated by the decrease in the reactor power due to negative temperature feedbacks. The results also indicate that the intermediate loop with the two heat exchangers plays a significant role in the transient progression of the integral reactor system.

  5. Preliminary performance of the Brayton 4.25 inch radial compressor operating in a helium xenon gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadourian, A. S.; Hecker, T. P.; Kruchowy, R.

    1971-01-01

    Compressor performance was mapped during the Brayton cycle power system testing. The range of testing included three shaft speeds: the design speed of 36,000 rpm, 10 percent overspeed (39,600 rpm), and 10 percent underspeed (32,400 rpm). A range of compressor inlet temperatures from 60 F to 120 F and discharge pressures from 20 to 45 psia were included. The effects of turbine inlet temperatures (from 1200 F to 1600 F) on the compressor were also studied. The data presented include plots of weight flow, compressor pressure ratio, efficiency, and temperature-rise ratio.

  6. Dark Radiation from Modulated Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    We show that the modulated reheating mechanism can naturally account for dark radiation, which is favored by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the primordial Helium abundance. In this mechanism, the inflaton decay rate depends on a light modulus which acquires almost scale-invariant quantum fluctuations during inflation. We find that the light modulus is generically produced by the inflaton decay and therefore a prime candidate for the dark radiation. Interestingly, an almost scale-invariant power spectrum predicted in the modulated reheating mechanism gives a better fit to the observation in the presence of the extra radiation. We discuss the production mechanism of the light modulus in detail taking account of its associated isocurvature fluctuations. We also consider a case where the modulus becomes the dominant component of dark matter.

  7. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jerome; Vennin, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating proper...

  8. Constraining Curvatonic Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Hardwick, Robert J; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2016-01-01

    We derive the first systematic observational constraints on reheating in models of inflation where an additional light scalar field contributes to primordial density perturbations and affects the expansion history during reheating. This encompasses the original curvaton model but also covers a larger class of scenarios. We find that, compared to the single-field case, lower values of the energy density at the end of inflation and of the reheating temperature are preferred when an additional scalar field is introduced. For instance, if inflation is driven by a quartic potential, which is one of the most favoured models when a light scalar field is added, the upper bound $T_{\\mathrm{reh}}<5\\times 10^{4}\\,\\mathrm{GeV}$ on the reheating temperature $T_{\\mathrm{reh}}$ is derived, and the implications of this value on post-inflationary physics are discussed. The information gained about reheating is also quantified and it is found that it remains modest in plateau inflation (though still larger than in the singl...

  9. Inflection point inflation and reheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min [Chung-Ang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We revisit the inflection point inflation with an extended discussion to large field values and consider the reheating effects on the inflationary predictions. Parametrizing the reheating dynamics in terms of the reheating temperature and the equation of state during reheating, we show how the observationally favored parameter space of inflection point inflation is affected by reheating dynamics. Consequently, we apply the general results to the inflation models with non-minimal coupling, such as the SM Higgs inflation and the B - L Higgs inflation. (orig.)

  10. Exergy analysis for combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zelong; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui [College of Naval Architecture and Power, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the study of exergy analysis of combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. The analytical formulae of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are derived. The largest exergy loss location is determined. By taking the maximum exergy efficiency as the objective, the choice of bottom cycle pressure ratio is optimized by detailed numerical examples, and the corresponding optimal exergy efficiency is obtained. The influences of various parameters on the exergy efficiency and other performances are analyzed by numerical calculations.

  11. Power conversion systems based on Brayton cycles for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research. CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Moratilla, B.Y.; Serrano, I.P. [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    This paper investigates Brayton power cycles for fusion reactors. Two working fluids have been explored: helium in classical configurations and CO{sub 2} in recompression layouts (Feher cycle). Typical recuperator arrangements in both cycles have been strongly constrained by low temperature of some of the energy thermal sources from the reactor. This limitation has been overcome in two ways: with a combined architecture and with dual cycles. Combined architecture couples the Brayton cycle with a Rankine one capable of taking advantage of the thermal energy content of the working fluid after exiting the turbine stage (iso-butane and steam fitted best the conditions of the He and CO{sub 2} cycles, respectively). Dual cycles set a specific Rankine cycle to exploit the lowest quality thermal energy source, allowing usual recuperator arrangements in the Brayton cycle. The results of the analyses indicate that dual cycles could reach thermal efficiencies around 42.8% when using helium, whereas thermal performance might be even better (46.7%), if a combined CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O cycle was set.

  12. Exergy analysis for combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelong Zhang, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of exergy analysis of combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. The analytical formulae of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are derived. The largest exergy loss location is determined. By taking the maximum exergy efficiency as the objective, the choice of bottom cycle pressure ratio is optimized by detailed numerical examples, and the corresponding optimal exergy efficiency is obtained. The influences of various parameters on the exergy efficiency and other performances are analyzed by numerical calculations.

  13. Thermodynamic design of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, C. W.; Yang, H. S.; Sohn, Song Ho; Lim, Ji Hyun; Oh, S. R.; Hwang, Si Dole

    2012-06-01

    Thermodynamic design of Brayton cryocooler is presented as part of an ongoing governmental project in Korea, aiming at 1 km HTS power cable in the transmission grid. The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling liquid nitrogen from 72 K to 65 K. An ideal Brayton cycle for this application is first investigated to examine the fundamental features. Then a practical cycle for a Brayton cryocooler is designed, taking into account the performance of compressor, expander, and heat exchangers. Commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) is used for simulating the refrigeration cycle with real fluid properties of refrigerant. Helium is selected as a refrigerant, as it is superior to neon in thermodynamic efficiency. The operating pressure and flow rate of refrigerant are decided with a constraint to avoid the freezing of liquid nitrogen

  14. Reheating with a Composite Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Croon, Djuna; Tarrant, Ewan R M

    2015-01-01

    The flatness of the inflaton potential and lightness of the Higgs could have the common origin of the breaking of a global symmetry. This scenario provides a unified framework of Goldstone Inflation and Composite Higgs, where the inflaton and the Higgs both have a pseudo--Goldstone boson nature. The inflaton reheats the Universe via decays to the Higgs and subsequent secondary production of other SM particles via the top and massive vector bosons. We find that inflationary predictions and perturbative reheating conditions are consistent with CMB data for sub--Planckian values of the fields, as well as opening up the possibility of inflation at the TeV scale. We explore this exciting possibility, leading to an interplay between collider data and cosmological constraints.

  15. Reheating predictions in single field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Jessica L; Easson, Damien A; Krauss, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Reheating is a transition era after the end of inflation, during which the inflaton is converted into the particles that populate the Universe at later times. No direct cosmological observables are normally traceable to this period of reheating. Indirect bounds can however be derived. One possibility is to consider cosmological evolution for observable CMB scales from the time of Hubble crossing to the present time. Depending upon the model, the duration and final temperature after reheating, as well as its equation of state, are directly linked to inflationary observables. For single-field inflationary models and for reheating scenarios that may be approximated by a constant equation of state, it is straightforward to derive relations between the reheating duration (or final temperature), its equation of state parameter, and the scalar power spectrum amplitude and spectral index. As a result, one may employ current bounds on inflation to constrain the nature of reheating. Alternatively, it is possible to fur...

  16. Inflationary Reheating in Grand Unified Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, B A; Bassett, Bruce A.; Tamburini, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    Grand unified theories may display multiply interacting fields with strong coupling dynamics. This poses two new problems: (1) What is the nature of chaotic reheating after inflation, and (2) How is reheating sensitive to the mass spectrum of these theories ? We answer these questions in two interesting limiting cases and demonstrate an increased efficiency of reheating which strongly enhances non-thermal topological defect formation, including monopoles and domain walls. Nevertheless, the large fluctuations may resolve this monopole problem via a modified Dvali-Liu-Vachaspati mechanism in which non-thermal destabilsation of discrete symmetries occurs at reheating.

  17. Reheating Metastable O'Raifeartaigh Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Nathaniel J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP; Fox, Patrick J.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2006-12-13

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  18. Reheating Metastable O'Raifeartaigh Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Nathaniel J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wacker, Jay G.

    2006-12-05

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  19. Reheating metastable O'Raifeartaigh models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Patrick; Craig, Nathaniel J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wacker, Jay G.

    2006-11-01

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  20. Reheating in nonminimal derivative coupling model

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, H Mohseni

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model with nonminimal derivative coupling of inflaton to gravity. The reheating process during rapid oscillation of the inflaton is studied and the reheating temperature is obtained. Behaviors of the inflaton and produced radiation in this era are discussed.

  1. Reheating After Quintessential Inflation and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, H; Sasaki, M; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Takeshi; Sasaki, Misao

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the gravitational wave spectrum from quintessential inflation on the reheating process. We consider two extreme reheating processes. One is the gravitational reheating by particle creation in the expanding universe in which the beginning of the radiation dominated epoch is delayed due to the presence of the epoch of domination of the kinetic energy of the inflaton (kination). The other is the instant preheating considered by Felder et al. in which the Universe becomes radiation dominated soon after the end of inflation. We find that the spectrum of the gravitational waves at $\\sim 100$ GHz is quite sensitive to the reheating process. Conversely, the detection or non-detection of primordial gravitational waves at $\\sim$100 MHz would provide useful information regarding the reheating process in quintessential inflation.

  2. NERI Quarterly Progress Report -- April 1 - June 30, 2005 -- Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this research is to improve a helium Brayton cycle and to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) that can also be applied to the Fast Gas-Cooled Reactor (FGR) and the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR). The proposed supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle will be used to improve the PBR, FGR, and VHTR net plant efficiency. Another objective of this research is to test materials to be used in the power conversion side at supercritical carbon dioxide conditions. Generally, the optimized Brayton cycle and balance of plant (BOP) to be developed from this study can be applied to Generation-IV reactor concepts. Particularly, we are interested in VHTR because it has a good chance of being built in the near future.

  3. Potential Improvements of Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle by Modifying Critical Point of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Seok; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is one of strong candidates for a next generation nuclear reactor. However, the conventional design of a SFR concept with an indirect Rankine cycle is subjected to a sodium water reaction, which can deteriorate the safety of a SFR. To prevent any hazards from sodium-water reaction, a SFR with the Brayton cycle using Helium or Supercritical Carbon dioxide (S-CO2) as working fluids can be an alternative approach to improve the current SFR design. As in a helium cycle, there has been an investigation to modify thermo-physical properties to increase the efficiency of the cycle and reduce the size of turbomachineries. Particularly, He-Xe or He-N2 binary mixture were successful to decrease the stages of turbomachines due to the increment of molecular weight of gas mixture than that of pure helium. Similar to the case of helium, CO2 has a potential to modify its thermo-physical properties by mixing with other gases. For instance, it was reported that critical point of CO2 can be shifted by mixing with different gases. Since, the efficiency of a S-CO2 cycle is limited to the critical point of CO2, the shift in critical point implies that there is a possibility of improving the cycle efficiency than the current design. This paper presents the results of a preliminary analysis to identify the effects of CO2 critical point modification on the Brayton cycle performance.

  4. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinsuke; Nakayama, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  5. Reheating of zinc-titanate sintered specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work was observing dimensional and heat transfer changes in ZnTiO3 samples during heating in nitrogen and air atmosphere. Interactions of bulk specimens with gaseous surrounding induce microstructure changes during heating. Sintered ZnTiO3 nanopowder samples were submitted to subsequent heating. Dilatation curves and thermogravimetric with simultaneous differential thermal analysis TGA/DTA curves were recorded. Reheating was performed in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Reheated samples obtained at different characteristic temperatures in air were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Microstructures obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM of reheated sintered samples are presented and compared. Reheating in a different atmosphere induced different microstructures. The goal was indicating possible causes leading to the microstructure changes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI172057 i br. III45014

  6. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Kawai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  7. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke.kawai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Nakayama, Yu [California Institute of Technology, 452-48, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-08-10

    Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  8. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model gives significantly lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  9. Evaluation of US demo helium-cooled blanket options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; McQuillan, B.W.; Schleicher, R.W. [and others

    1995-10-01

    A He-V-Li blanket design was developed as a candidate for the U.S. fusion demonstration power plant. This paper presents an 18 MPa helium-cooled, lithium breeder, V-alloy design that can be coupled to the Brayton cycle with a gross efficiency of 46%. The critical issue of designing to high gas pressure and the compatibility between helium impurities and V-alloy are addressed.

  10. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  11. Back Work Ratio of Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaver de la Fuente M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analizes the existing relation between temperatures, back work ratio and net work of Brayton cycle, a cycle that describes gas turbine engines performance. The application of computational soft ware helps to show the influence of back work ratio or coupling ratio, compressor and turbine in let temperatures in an ideal thermodynamical cycle. The results lead to deduce that the maximum value reached in back work ratio will depend on the ranges of maximum and minimal temperatures of Brayton cycle.

  12. Rolling in the modulated reheating scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Naoya [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Kobayashi, Takeshi; Erickcek, Adrienne L., E-mail: nkobayas@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: takeshi@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: erickcek@physics.unc.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    In the modulated reheating scenario, the field that drives inflation has a spatially varying decay rate, and the resulting inhomogeneous reheating process generates adiabatic perturbations. We examine the statistical properties of the density perturbations generated in this scenario. Unlike earlier analyses, we include the dynamics of the field that determines the inflaton decay rate. We show that the dynamics of this modulus field can significantly alter the amplitude of the power spectrum and the bispectrum, even if the modulus field has a simple potential and its effective mass is smaller than the Hubble rate. In some cases, the evolution of the modulus amplifies the non-Gaussianity of the perturbations to levels that are excluded by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background. Therefore, a proper treatment of the modulus dynamics is required to accurately calculate the statistical properties of the perturbations generated by modulated reheating.

  13. Rolling in the Modulated Reheating Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Erickcek, Adrienne L

    2014-01-01

    In the modulated reheated scenario, the field that drives inflation has a spatially varying decay rate, and the resulting inhomogeneous reheating process generates adiabatic perturbations. We examine the statistical properties of the density perturbations generated in this scenario. Unlike earlier analyses, we include the dynamics of the field that determines the inflaton decay rate. We show that the dynamics of this modulus field can significantly alter the amplitude of the power spectrum and the bispectrum, even if the modulus field has a simple potential and its effective mass is smaller than the Hubble rate. In some cases, the evolution of the modulus amplifies the non-Gaussianity of the perturbations to levels that are excluded by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background. Therefore, a proper treatment of the modulus dynamics is required to accurately calculate the statistical properties of the perturbations generated by modulated reheating.

  14. Nonperturbative Dynamics Of Reheating After Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Mustafa A; Kaiser, David I; Karouby, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the state of the universe between the end of inflation and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is incomplete. The dynamics at the end of inflation are rich and a potential source of observational signatures. Reheating, the energy transfer between the inflaton and Standard Model fields (possibly through intermediaries), can provide clues to how inflation fits in with known high-energy physics. We provide an overview of our current understanding of the nonperturbative, nonlinear dynamics at the end of inflation, some salient features of realistic particle physics models of reheating, and how the universe reaches a thermal state before BBN. In addition, we review the analytical and numerical tools available in the literature to study reheating and discuss potential observational signatures from this fascinating era.

  15. Dynamics of cosmological relaxation after reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Kiwoon; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

    2016-01-01

    We examine if the cosmological relaxation mechanism, which was proposed recently as a new solution to the hierarchy problem, can be compatible with high reheating temperature well above the weak scale. As the barrier potential disappears at high temperature, the relaxion rolls down further after the reheating, which may ruin the successful implementation of the relaxation mechanism. It is noted that if the relaxion is coupled to a dark gauge boson, the new frictional force arising from dark gauge boson production can efficiently slow down the relaxion motion, which allows the relaxion to be stabilized after the electroweak phase transition for a wide range of model parameters, while satisfying the known observational constraints.

  16. On Brayton and Moser's missing stability theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, D.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Brayton and Moser proved three theorems concerning the stability of nonlinear electrical circuits. The applicability of each theorem depends on three different conditions on the type of admissible nonlinearities in circuit. Roughly speaking, this means that the theorems apply to

  17. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-31

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included.

  18. Quantifying the reheating temperature of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumdar, Anupam [Consortion for Fundamental Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Zaldívar, Bryan [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to determine an exact definition of the reheat temperature for a generic perturbative decay of the inflaton. In order to estimate the reheat temperature, there are two important conditions one needs to satisfy: (a) the decay products of the inflaton must dominate the energy density of the universe, i.e. the universe becomes completely radiation dominated, and (b) the decay products of the inflaton have attained local thermodynamical equilibrium. For some choices of parameters, the latter is a more stringent condition, such that the decay products may thermalise much after the beginning of radiation–domination. Consequently, we have obtained that the reheat temperature can be much lower than the standard-lore estimation. In this paper we describe under what conditions our universe could have efficient or inefficient thermalisation, and quantify the reheat temperature for both the scenarios. This result has an immediate impact on many applications which rely on the thermal history of the universe, in particular gravitino abundance.

  19. Quantifying the reheating temperature of the universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Mazumdar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine an exact definition of the reheat temperature for a generic perturbative decay of the inflaton. In order to estimate the reheat temperature, there are two important conditions one needs to satisfy: (a the decay products of the inflaton must dominate the energy density of the universe, i.e. the universe becomes completely radiation dominated, and (b the decay products of the inflaton have attained local thermodynamical equilibrium. For some choices of parameters, the latter is a more stringent condition, such that the decay products may thermalise much after the beginning of radiation–domination. Consequently, we have obtained that the reheat temperature can be much lower than the standard-lore estimation. In this paper we describe under what conditions our universe could have efficient or inefficient thermalisation, and quantify the reheat temperature for both the scenarios. This result has an immediate impact on many applications which rely on the thermal history of the universe, in particular gravitino abundance.

  20. No-reheat air-conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obler, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    Air conditioning system, for environmentally controlled areas containing sensitive equipment, regulates temperature and humidity without wasteful and costly reheating. System blends outside air with return air as dictated by various sensors to ensure required humidity in cooled spaces (such as computer room).

  1. Reheating in Gauss-Bonnet-coupled inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of models of inflation with a large Gauss-Bonnet coupling at late times, which have been shown to modify and prevent the end of inflation. Despite the potential of Gauss-Bonnet models in predicting favorable power spectra, capable of greatly lowering the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared to now-disfavored models of standard chaotic inflation, it is important to also understand in what context it is possible for postinflationary (p)reheating to proceed and hence recover an acceptable late-time cosmology. We argue that in the previously studied inverse power law coupling case, reheating cannot happen due to a lack of oscillatory solutions for the inflaton, and that neither instant preheating nor gravitational particle production would avoid this problem due to the persistence of the inflaton's energy density, even if it were to partially decay. Hence we proceed to define a minimal generalization of the model which can permit perturbative reheating and study the consequences of this, including heavily modified dynamics during reheating and predictions of the power spectra.

  2. Closed-Cycle Engine Program Used to Study Brayton Power Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2005-01-01

    One form of power conversion under consideration in NASA Glenn Research Center's Thermal Energy Conversion Branch is the closed-Brayton-cycle engine. In the tens-of-kilowatts to multimegawatt class, the Brayton engine lends itself to potential space nuclear power applications such as electric propulsion or surface power. The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch has most recently concentrated its Brayton studies on electric propulsion for Prometheus. One piece of software used for evaluating such designs over a limited tradeoff space has been the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP). The CCEP originated in the mid-1980s from a Fortran aircraft engine code known as the Navy/NASA Engine Program (NNEP). Components such as a solar collector, heat exchangers, ducting, a pumped-loop radiator, a nuclear heat source, and radial turbomachinery were added to NNEP, transforming it into a high-fidelity design and performance tool for closed-Brayton-cycle power conversion and heat rejection. CCEP was used in the 1990s in conjunction with the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration conducted at Glenn. Over the past year, updates were made to CCEP to adapt it for an electric propulsion application. The pumped-loop radiator coolant can now be n-heptane, water, or sodium-potassium (NaK); liquid-metal pump design tables were added to accommodate the NaK fluid. For the reactor and shield, a user can now elect to calculate a higher fidelity mass estimate. In addition, helium-xenon working-fluid properties were recalculated and updated.

  3. Corrosion of Structural Materials for Advanced Supercritical Carbon- Dioxide Brayton Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-05-13

    The supercritical carbon-dioxide (referred to as SC-CO2 hereon) Brayton cycle is being considered for power conversion systems for a number of nuclear reactor concepts, including the sodium fast reactor (SFR), fluoride saltcooled high temperature reactor (FHR), and high temperature gas reactor (HTGR), and several types of small modular reactors (SMR). The SC-CO2 direct cycle gas fast reactor has also been recently proposed. The SC-CO2 Brayton cycle (discussed in Chapter 1) provides higher efficiencies compared to the Rankine steam cycle due to less compression work stemming from higher SC-CO2 densities, and allows for smaller components size, fewer components, and simpler cycle layout. For example, in the case of a SFR using a SC-CO2 Brayton cycle instead of a steam cycle would also eliminate the possibility of sodium-water interactions. The SC-CO2 cycle has a higher efficiency than the helium Brayton cycle, with the additional advantage of being able to operate at lower temperatures and higher pressures. In general, the SC-CO2 Brayton cycle is well-suited for any type of nuclear reactor (including SMR) with core outlet temperature above ~ 500°C in either direct or indirect versions. In all the above applications, materials corrosion in high temperature SC-CO2 is an important consideration, given their expected lifetimes of 20 years or longer. Our discussions with National Laboratories and private industry early on in this project indicated materials corrosion to be one of the significant gaps in the implementation of SC-CO2 Brayton cycle. Corrosion can lead to a loss of effective load-bearing wall thickness of a component and can potentially lead to the generation of oxide particulate debris which can lead to three-body wear in turbomachinery components. Another environmental degradation effect that is rather unique to CO2 environment is the possibility

  4. CMB Constraints on Reheating Models with Varying Equation of State

    CERN Document Server

    de Freitas, Rodolfo C

    2015-01-01

    The temperature at the end of reheating and the length of this cosmological phase can be bound to the inflationary observables if one considers the cosmological evolution from the time of Hubble crossing until today. There are many examples in the literature where it is made for single-field inflationary models and a constant equation of state during reheating. We adopt two simple varying equation of state parameters during reheating, combine the allowed range of the reheating parameters with the observational limits of the scalar perturbations spectral index and compare the constraints of some inflationary models with the case of a constant equation of state parameter during reheating.

  5. Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, john; Garg, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, have been screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Mar-M247LC has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium indicate this inert environment may debit long term creep resistance of this alloy. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy(Registered TradeMark) X, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 617, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 740, Nimonic(Registered TradeMark) 263, Incoloy(Registered TradeMark) MA956, and Haynes 230 are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. Haynes 230 has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium are just underway for this alloy. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Therefore, long term microstructural stability is also being screened.

  6. Brayton-cycle heat exchanger technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killackey, J. J.; Coombs, M. G.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following five tasks designed to advance this development of heat exchanger systems for close loop Brayton cycle power systems are presented: (1) heat transfer and pressure drop data for a finned tubular heat transfer matrix. The tubes are arranged in a triangular array with copper stainless steel laminate strips helically wound on the tubes to form a disk fin geometry; (2) the development of a modularized waste heat exchanger. Means to provide verified double containment are described; (3) the design, fabrication, and test of compact plate fin heat exchangers representative of full scale Brayton cycle recuperators; (4) the analysis and design of bellows suitable for operation at 1600 F and 200 psia for 1,000 cycles and 50,000 hours creep life; and (5) screening tests used to select a low cost braze alloy with the desirable attributes of a gold base alloy. A total of 22 different alloys were investigated; the final selection was Nicrobraz 30.

  7. Thermal Goldstino Production with Low Reheating Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Monteux, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss thermal production of (pseudo) goldstinos, the Goldstone fermions emerging from (multiple) SUSY breaking sectors, when the reheating temperature is well below the superpartner masses. In such a case, the production during matter-dominated era induced by inflaton decay stage is more important than after reheating. Depending on the SUSY breaking scale, goldstinos are produced by freeze-in or freeze-out mechanism via $1\\to 2$ decays and inverse decays. We solve the Boltzmann equation for the momentum distribution function of the goldstino.In the freeze-out case, goldstinos maintain chemical equilibrium far after they are kinetically decoupled from the thermal bath, and consequently goldstinos with different momentum decouple at different temperatures. As a result their momentum distribution function shows a peculiar shape and the final yield is smaller than if kinetic equilibrium was assumed. We revisit the cosmological implications in both R-parity-conserving and R-parity-violating supersymmetric sce...

  8. Software sensor for slab reheating furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Xiong; Guohong Huang; Huihe Shao

    2005-01-01

    It has long been thought that a reheating furnace, with its inherent measurement difficulties and complex dynamics, posed almost insurmountable problems to engineers in steel plants. A novel software sensor is proposed to make more effective use of those measurements that are already available, which has great importance both to slab quality and energy saving. The proposed method is based on the mixtures of Gaussian processes (GP) with the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm employed for parameter estimation of the mixture of models. The mixture model can alleviate the computational complexity of GP and also accords with the changes of operating condition in practical processes. It is demonstrated by on-line estimation of the furnace gas temperature in 1580 reheating furnace in Baosteel Corporation (Group).

  9. INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM REHEATING BY RELATIVISTIC JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucho, Manel; Quilis, Vicent; Marti, Jose-Maria [Departament d' Astronomia i Astrofisica, Universitat de Valencia, c/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2011-12-10

    Galactic jets are powerful energy sources reheating the intracluster medium in galaxy clusters. Their crucial role in the cosmic puzzle, motivated by observations, has been established by a great number of numerical simulations excluding the relativistic nature of these jets. We present the first relativistic simulations of the very long-term evolution of realistic galactic jets. Unexpectedly, our results show no buoyant bubbles, but large cocoon regions compatible with the observed X-ray cavities. The reheating is more efficient and faster than in previous scenarios, and it is produced by the shock wave driven by the jet, that survives for several hundreds of Myr. Therefore, the X-ray cavities in clusters produced by powerful relativistic jets would remain confined by weak shocks for extremely long periods and their detection could be an observational challenge.

  10. Reheating with a composite Higgs boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croon, Djuna; Sanz, Verónica; Tarrant, Ewan R. M.

    2016-08-01

    The flatness of the inflaton potential and lightness of the Higgs boson could have the common origin of the breaking of a global symmetry. This scenario provides a unified framework of Goldstone inflation and composite Higgs models, where the inflaton and the Higgs particle both have a pseudo-Goldstone boson nature. The inflaton reheats the Universe via decays to the Higgs and subsequent secondzary production of other SM particles via the top and massive vector bosons. We find that inflationary predictions and perturbative reheating conditions are consistent with cosmic microwave background data for sub-Planckian values of the fields, as well as opening up the possibility of inflation at the TeV scale. We explore this exciting possibility, leading to an interplay between collider data cosmological constraints.

  11. Plate-fin Heat-exchangers for a 10 kW Brayton Cryocooler and a 1 km HTS Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Jung, Seyong; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si-Dole

    Plate-fin heat exchangers (PFHX) are designed and fabricated for a cryogenic cooling system, serving for a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler and a 1 km HTS transmission cable under development in Korea. To achieve compactness and thermal efficiency at the same time, a recuperative HX for Brayton cycle and a sub-cooling HX of liquid nitrogen for HTS cable are designed as integrated parts. A key design feature is focused on the coldest part of sub-cooling HX, where the streams of liquid nitrogen and refrigerant (helium gas) are arranged as two-pass cross-flow so that the risk of freeze-out of liquid nitrogen can be reduced. Details of hardware PFHX design are presented and discussed towards its immediate application to the HTS cable system.

  12. Reheating in Gauss-Bonnet-coupled inflation

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of models of inflation with a large Gauss-Bonnet coupling at late times, which have been shown to modify and prevent the end of inflation. Despite the potential of Gauss-Bonnet models in predicting favourable power spectra, capable of greatly lowering the tensor-to-scalar-ratio compared to now-disfavoured models of standard chaotic inflation, it is important to also understand in what context it is possible for post-inflationary (p)reheating to proceed and hence recover an acceptable late-time cosmology. We argue that in the previously-studied inverse power law coupling case, reheating cannot happen due to a lack of oscillatory solutions for the inflaton, and that neither instant preheating nor gravitational particle production would avoid this problem due to the persistence of the inflaton's energy density, even if it were to partially decay. Hence we proceed to define a minimal generalisation of the model which can permit perturbative reheating and study the consequences of th...

  13. An insight on reheat gas turbine for combined cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Marco A.C.; Carneiro, Helder F.F.M.; Barbosa, Joao R. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mail: marco@asap.iae.cta.br; helder@asap.iae.cta.br; barbosa@mec.ita.cta.br; Travieso, Luis E. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)]. E-mail: travisan@adinet.com.uy; Pilidis, Pericles [Cranfield University, Beds (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.pilidis@cranfield.ac.uk

    2000-07-01

    The design point performance of reheat gas turbines for combined cycle is investigated in this work. A comparison of reheat and simple cycle results is used to draw the main conclusions. Some conclusions available in the literature were confirmed; such as the fact that reheat increases the specific power and reduces the efficiency of the gas turbines. The latter is mainly a consequence of the increase of the amount of energy (heat) lost in the exhaust, represented by an increase in turbine exhaust temperature. Thus, the reheat cycle gas turbine can be considered well suitable to combined cycle. In this case the reheat combined cycle efficiency increases, compared to simple cycle, in spite of the reduction in efficiency of the gas turbine reheat cycle, with the advantage of a significant increase in specific power. (author)

  14. Back work ratio of Brayton cycle; La relacion de trabajo de retroceso de un ciclo Brayton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaver de la Fuente, M. [Universidad Maritima del Caribe (Venezuela)]. E-mail: mmf_umc@hotmail.com

    2010-07-15

    This paper analyzes the existing relation between temperatures, back work ratio and net work of Brayton cycle, a cycle that describes gas turbine engines performance. The application of computational software helps to show the influence of back work ratio or coupling ratio, compressor and turbine inlet temperatures in an ideal thermodynamical cycle. The results lead to deduce that the maximum value reached in back work ratio will depend on the ranges of maximum and minimal temperatures of Brayton cycle. [Spanish] En este articulo se estudia la relacion que existe entre las temperaturas, la relacion de trabajo de retroceso y el trabajo neto en el ciclo Brayton, que es el ciclo ideal que describe el comportamiento de los motores de turbina de gas. La aplicacion de programas computarizados ayuda a mostrar la influencia de la relacion de trabajo de retroceso o relacion de acoplamiento, la temperatura de entrada al compresor y la temperatura de entrada a la turbina en este ciclo termodinamico ideal. Los resultados obtenidos permiten deducir que el valor maximo que alcanza la relacion de trabajo de retroceso dependera de los limites de temperatura maxima y minima impuestos en el ciclo Brayton.

  15. Reheating, multifield inflation and the fate of the primordial observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Godfrey; Tarrant, Ewan R.M.; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Byrnes, Christian T., E-mail: ppxgl@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: ppxet@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: cbyrnes@cern.ch, E-mail: ed.copeland@nottingham.ac.uk [PH-TH Division, CERN, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2012-09-01

    We study the effects of perturbative reheating on the evolution of the curvature perturbation ζ, in two-field inflation models. We use numerical methods to explore the sensitivity of f{sub NL}, n{sub ζ} and r to the reheating process, and present simple qualitative arguments to explain our results. In general, if a large non-Gaussian signal exists at the start of reheating, it will remain non-zero at the end of reheating. Unless all isocurvature modes have completely decayed before the start of reheating, we find that the non-linearity parameter, f{sub NL}, can be sensitive to the reheating timescale, and that this dependence is most appreciable for 'runaway' inflationary potentials that only have a minimum in one direction. For potentials with a minimum in both directions, f{sub NL} can also be sensitive to reheating if a mild hierarchy exists between the decay rates of each field. Within the class of models studied, we find that the spectral index n{sub ζ}, is fairly insensitive to large changes in the field decay rates, indicating that n{sub ζ} is a more robust inflationary observable, unlike the non-linearity parameter f{sub NL}. Our results imply that the statistics of ζ, especially f{sub NL}, can only be reliably used to discriminate between models of two-field inflation if the physics of reheating are properly accounted for.

  16. Design and Off-Design Performance of 100 kWe-Class Brayton Power Conversion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Mason, Lee S.

    2005-02-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center in-house computer model Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) was used to explore the design trade space and off-design performance characteristics of 100 kWe-class recuperated Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. Input variables for a potential design point included the number of operating units (1, 2, 4), cycle peak pressure (0.5, 1, 2 MPa), and turbo-alternator shaft speed (30,45, 60 kRPM). The design point analysis assumed a fixed turbine inlet temperature (1150 K), compressor inlet temperature (400 K), helium-xenon working-fluid molecular weight (40 g/mol), compressor pressure ratio (2.0), recuperator effectiveness (0.95), and a Sodium-Potassium (NaK) pumped-loop radiator. The design point options were compared on the basis of thermal input power, radiator area, and mass. For a nominal design point with defined Brayton components and radiator area, off-design cases were examined by reducing turbine inlet temperature (as low as 900 K), reducing shaft speed (as low as 50% of nominal), and circulating a percentage (up to 20%) of the compressor exit flow back to the gas cooler. The off-design examination sought approaches to reduce thermal input power without freezing the radiator.

  17. A Model Independent Approach to (p)Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Özsoy, Ogan; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In this note we propose a model independent framework for inflationary (p)reheating. Our approach is analogous to the Effective Field Theory of Inflation, however here the inflaton oscillations provide an additional source of (discrete) symmetry breaking. Using the Goldstone field that non-linearly realizes time diffeormorphism invariance we construct a model independent action for both the inflaton and reheating sectors. Utilizing the hierarchy of scales present during the reheating process we are able to recover known results in the literature in a simpler fashion, including the presence of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum. We also construct a class of models where the shift symmetry of the inflaton is preserved during reheating, which helps alleviate past criticisms of (p)reheating in models of Natural Inflation. Extensions of our framework suggest the possibility of analytically investigating non-linear effects (such as rescattering and back-reaction) during thermalization without resorting t...

  18. Comparison Between helium cycle and Supercritical CO{sub 2} Cycle for MMR and AMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Jun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Je Kyoung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started the development of Mobile Multi-Purpose Reactor (MMR), which is a 10MWth gas-cooled reactor. MMR is aiming for maximizing mobility, high performance, durability and safety. This is in order to use the MMR for many purposes such as ship propulsion, train engine and so on. MMR generally uses helium Brayton cycle as a power conversion system since it can obtain very simple system arrangement with direct cycle. However, some researchers have proposed that the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle can be more efficient energy converting cycle for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) and the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system as well. Thus, this paper is to compare helium Brayton cycle to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in terms of the efficiency while varying turbine inlet temperature (T. I. T). A cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycle which had been proposed by Argonne National laboratory (ANL) was used as the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle configuration. This cycle is to overcome the mismatch of temperature drop between reactor coolant and CO{sub 2} through the reactor heat exchanger (RHX). Our research team reviewed the ANL research by using the in-house codes developed by the Korea Advanced institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) research team. The calculation error between the in-house code and previous result was -0.36%.

  19. Liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, K R

    1959-01-01

    Originally published in 1959 as part of the Cambridge Monographs on Physics series, this book addresses liquid helium from the dual perspectives of statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics. Atkins looks at both Helium Three and Helium Four, as well as the properties of a combination of the two isotopes. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of science and the study of one of the universe's most fundamental elements.

  20. Chilly Dark Sectors and Asymmetric Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Adshead, Peter; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    In a broad class of theories, the relic abundance of dark matter is determined by interactions internal to a thermalized dark sector, with no direct involvement of the Standard Model (SM). We point out that these theories raise an immediate cosmological question: how was the dark sector initially populated in the early universe? Motivated in part by the difficulty of accommodating large amounts of entropy carried in dark radiation with cosmic microwave background measurements of the effective number of relativistic species at recombination, $N_{\\mathrm{eff}}$, we aim to establish which admissible cosmological histories can populate a thermal dark sector that never reaches thermal equilibrium with the SM. The minimal cosmological origin for such a dark sector is asymmetric reheating, when the same mechanism that populates the SM in the early universe also populates the dark sector at a lower temperature. Here we demonstrate that the resulting inevitable inflaton-mediated scattering between the dark sector and ...

  1. Inhomogeneous reheating scenario with DBI fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng

    2010-08-01

    We discuss a new mechanism which can be responsible for the origin of the primordial perturbation in inflationary models, the inhomogeneous DBI reheating scenario. Light DBI fields fluctuate during inflation, and finally create the density perturbations through modulation of the inflation decay rate. In this note, we investigate the curvature perturbation and its non-Gaussianity from this new mechanism. Presenting generalized expressions for them, we show that the curvature perturbation not only depends on the particular process of decay but is also dependent on the sound speed cs from the DBI action. More interestingly we find that the non-Gaussianity parameter fNL is independent of cs. As an application we exemplify some decay processes which give a viable and detectable non-Gaussianity. Finally we find a possible connection between our model and the DBI-Curvaton mechanism.

  2. Presentation of a modified double reheat cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaer, Sven; Drinhaus, Frank [DONG ENERGY A/S, Frederica (Denmark)

    2008-07-01

    It may be concluded that the Master Cycle offers an excellent opportunity to gain a heat rate improvement in the range of 3% (or an efficiency improvement in the range of 1(1)/(2) %- point) at economic viable capital cost compared with a single reheat cycle. Furthermore, there is no impact on the thermal flexibility of the plant and the erosion and corrosion problems of the last stages of the LP-turbines disappear. Most technical departments of the turbine companies we have talked with recognise the new ideas of the Master cycle but the market departments are still asking for the market possibilities. Therefore, despite of many technical advantages the success of the Master Cycle can only be guaranteed if other power generators than DONG Energy show their interest, and we hereby strongly encourage those power generators being interested in improving efficiencies of coal-fired power generation to contact us and we will share our experiences with you. (orig.)

  3. Inhomogeneous Reheating Scenario with DBI fields

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism which can be responsible for the origin of the primordial perturbation in inflationary models, the inhomogeneous DBI reheating scenario. Light DBI fields fluctuate during inflation, and finally create the density perturbations through modulation of the inflation decay rate. In this note, we investigate the curvature perturbation and its non-Gaussianity from this new mechanism. Presenting generalized expressions for them, we show that the curvature perturbation not only depends on the particular process of decay but is also dependent on the sound speed $c_s$ from the DBI action. More interestingly we find that the non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{NL}$ is independent of $c_s$. As an application we exemplify some decay processes which give a viable and detectable non-Gaussianity. Finally we find a possible connection between our model and the DBI-Curvaton mechanism.

  4. Chilly dark sectors and asymmetric reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adshead, Peter; Cui, Yanou; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-06-01

    In a broad class of theories, the relic abundance of dark matter is determined by interactions internal to a thermalized dark sector, with no direct involvement of the Standard Model (SM). We point out that these theories raise an immediate cosmological question: how was the dark sector initially populated in the early universe? Motivated in part by the difficulty of accommodating large amounts of entropy carried in dark radiation with cosmic microwave background measurements of the effective number of relativistic species at recombination, N eff , we aim to establish which admissible cosmological histories can populate a thermal dark sector that never reaches thermal equilibrium with the SM. The minimal cosmological origin for such a dark sector is asymmetric reheating, when the same mechanism that populates the SM in the early universe also populates the dark sector at a lower temperature. Here we demonstrate that the resulting inevitable inflaton-mediated scattering between the dark sector and the SM can wash out a would-be temperature asymmetry, and establish the regions of parameter space where temperature asymmetries can be generated in minimal reheating scenarios. Thus obtaining a temperature asymmetry of a given size either restricts possible inflaton masses and couplings or necessitates a non-minimal cosmology for one or both sectors. As a side benefit, we develop techniques for evaluating collision terms in the relativistic Boltzmann equation when the full dependence on Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac phase space distributions must be retained, and present several new results on relativistic thermal averages in an appendix.

  5. Reheating, Multifield Inflation and the Fate of the Primordial Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Godfrey; Byrnes, Christian T; Copeland, Edmund J

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of perturbative reheating on the evolution of the curvature perturbation \\zeta, in two-field inflation models. We use numerical methods to explore the sensitivity of f_NL, n_s and r to the reheating process, and present simple qualitative arguments to explain our results. In general, if a large non-Gaussian signal exits at the start of reheating, it will remain non zero at the end of reheating. Unless all isocurvature modes have completely decayed before the start of reheating, we find that the non-linearity parameter, f_NL, can be sensitive to the reheating timescale, and that this dependence is most appreciable for `runaway' inflationary potentials that only have a minimum in one direction. For potentials with a minimum in both directions, f_NL can also be sensitive to reheating if a mild hierarchy exists between the decay rates of each field. Within the class of models studied, we find that the spectral index n_s, is fairly insensitive to large changes in the field decay rates, indicat...

  6. Thermodynamic Optimization of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhim, Dong-Ryul; Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Hyun; Yeom, Choong-Sub [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has been studied for nuclear applications, mainly for one of the alternative power conversion systems of the sodium cooled fast reactor, since 1960's. Although the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has not been expected to show higher efficiency at lower turbine inlet temperature over the conventional steam Rankine cycle, the higher density of supercritical CO{sub 2} like a liquid in the supercritical region could reduce turbo-machinery sizes, and the potential problem of sodium-water reaction with the sodium cooled fast reactor might be solved with the use of CO{sub 2} instead of water. The supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle was proposed for the better thermodynamic efficiency than for the simple supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Thus this paper presents the efficiencies of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle along with several decision variables for the thermodynamic optimization of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle. The analytic results in this study show that the system efficiency reaches its maximum value at a compressor outlet pressure of 200 bars and a recycle fraction of 30 %, and the lower minimum temperature approach at the two heat exchangers shows higher system efficiency as expected.

  7. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  8. Reheating and preheating in the simplest extension of Starobinsky inflation

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, C; Paduraru, L E

    2016-01-01

    The epochs of reheating and preheating are studied in a simple extension of the Starobinsky inflationary model, which consists of an $R^2$--correction to the Einstein--Hilbert action and an additional scalar field. We find that if the $R^2$--correction at the end of inflation is dynamically important, it affects the expansion rate and as a consequence the reheating and preheating processes. While we find that the reheating temperature and duration of reheating are only slightly affected, the effect has to be taken into account when comparing the theory to data. In the case of preheating, the gravitational corrections can significantly affect the decay of the second field. Particle production is strongly affected for certain values of the parameters in the theory.

  9. Bounds on very low reheating scenarios after Planck

    CERN Document Server

    de Salas, P F; Mangano, G; Miele, G; Pastor, S; Pisanti, O

    2015-01-01

    We consider the case of very low reheating scenarios ($T_{\\rm RH}\\sim\\mathcal{O}({\\rm MeV})$) with a better calculation of the production of the relic neutrino background (with three-flavor oscillations). At 95% confidence level, a lower bound on the reheating temperature $T_{\\rm RH}>4.1$ MeV is obtained from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, while $T_{\\rm RH}>4.3$ MeV from Planck data for very light ($\\sum m_i = 0.06$ eV) neutrinos. If neutrino masses are allowed to vary, Planck data yield $T_{\\rm RH}>4.7$ MeV, the most stringent bound on the reheating temperature to date. Neutrino masses as large as 1 eV are possible for very low reheating temperatures.

  10. Reheating mechanism of Curvaton with Nonminimal Derivative Coupling to Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Taotao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we continue our study on the curvaton model with nonminimal derivative coupling (NDC) to Einstein gravity proposed in our previous work, focusing on the reheating mechanism. We found that according to whether the curvaton has dominated the background after the end of inflation, it will have two different behaviors of evolution, which should be the general property of curvaton with nonminimal couplings. This will cause diffferent rates of particle creation, which goes on via the parametric resonance process. The reheating temperature is estimated for both cases in which reheating completes before and after curvaton domination, and the constraints are quite loose compared to that of overproduction of gravitino. Finally we investigated the evolution of curvature perturbation during reheating. We have shown both analytically and numerically that the curvature perturbation will not blow up during the resonance process.

  11. Hemispherical power asymmetry from scale-dependent modulated reheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, John, E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster-Manchester-Sheffield Consortium for Fundamental Physics, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics Group, Dept. of Physics, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    We propose a new model for the hemispherical power asymmetry of the CMB based on modulated reheating. Non-Gaussianity from modulated reheating can be small enough to satisfy the bound from Planck if the dominant modulation of the inflaton decay rate is linear in the modulating field σ. σ must then acquire a spatially-modulated power spectrum with a red scale-dependence. This can be achieved if the primordial perturbation of σ is generated via tachyonic growth of a complex scalar field. Modulated reheating due to σ then produces a spatially modulated and scale-dependent sub-dominant contribution to the adiabatic density perturbation. We show that it is possible to account for the observed asymmetry while remaining consistent with bounds from quasar number counts, non-Gaussianity and the CMB temperature quadupole. The model predicts that the adiabatic perturbation spectral index and its running will be modified by the modulated reheating component.

  12. The reheating era leptogenesis in models with seesaw mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta; Yasuhara, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    Observed baryon asymmetry can be achieved not only by the decay of right-handed neutrinos but also by the scattering processes in the reheating era. In the latter scenario, new physics in high energy scale does not need to be specified, but only two types of the higher dimensional operator of the standard model particles are assumed in the previous work. In this paper, we examine the origin of the higher dimensional operators assuming models with a certain seesaw mechanism at the high energy scale. The seesaw mechanism seems to be a simple realization of the reheating era leptogenesis because the lepton number violating interaction is included. We show that the effective interaction giving CP violating phases is provided in the several types of models and also the reheating era leptogenesis actually works in such models. Additionally, we discuss a possibility for lowering the reheating temperature in the radiative seesaw models, where the large Yukawa coupling is naturally realized.

  13. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  14. Low reheating temperatures in monomial and binomial inflationary models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehagen, Thomas; Gelmini, Graciela B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA,475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-06-23

    We investigate the allowed range of reheating temperature values in light of the Planck 2015 results and the recent joint analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data from the BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck experiments, using monomial and binomial inflationary potentials. While the well studied ϕ{sup 2} inflationary potential is no longer favored by current CMB data, as well as ϕ{sup p} with p>2, a ϕ{sup 1} potential and canonical reheating (w{sub re}=0) provide a good fit to the CMB measurements. In this last case, we find that the Planck 2015 68% confidence limit upper bound on the spectral index, n{sub s}, implies an upper bound on the reheating temperature of T{sub re}≲6×10{sup 10} GeV, and excludes instantaneous reheating. The low reheating temperatures allowed by this model open the possibility that dark matter could be produced during the reheating period instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated, which could lead to very different predictions for the relic density and momentum distribution of WIMPs, sterile neutrinos, and axions. We also study binomial inflationary potentials and show the effects of a small departure from a ϕ{sup 1} potential. We find that as a subdominant ϕ{sup 2} term in the potential increases, first instantaneous reheating becomes allowed, and then the lowest possible reheating temperature of T{sub re}=4 MeV is excluded by the Planck 2015 68% confidence limit.

  15. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sienicki, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nellis, Gregory [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Klein, Sanford [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-21

    -through labyrinth seals was proposed. A stepped labyrinth seal, which mimics the behavior of the labyrinth seal used in the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) S-CO2 Brayton cycle, was also tested in the experiment along with simulations performed. The rest of this study demonstrates the difference of valves' behavior under supercritical fluid and normal fluid conditions. A small-scale valve was tested in the experiment facility using S-CO2. Different percentages of opening valves were tested, and the measured mass flow rate agreed with simulation predictions. Two transients from a real S-CO2 Brayton cycle design provided the data for valve selection. The selected valve was studied using numerical simulation, as experimental data is not available.

  16. Low reheating temperatures in monomial and binomial inflationary potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rehagen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the allowed range of reheating temperature values in light of the Planck 2015 results and the recent joint analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data from the BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck experiments, using monomial and binomial inflationary potentials. While the well studied $\\phi^2$ inflationary potential is no longer favored by current CMB data, as well as $\\phi^p$ with $p>2$, a $\\phi^1$ potential and canonical reheating ($w_{re}=0$) provide a good fit to the CMB measurements. In this last case, we find that the Planck 2015 $68\\%$ confidence limit upper bound on the spectral index, $n_s$, implies an upper bound on the reheating temperature of $T_{re}\\lesssim 6\\times 10^{10}\\,{\\rm GeV}$, and excludes instantaneous reheating. The low reheating temperatures allowed by this model open the possiblity that dark matter could be produced during the reheating period instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated, which could lead to very different predictions for the relic density and mo...

  17. Inflation and Reheating in Spontaneously Generated Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cerioni, A; Tronconi, A; Venturi, G

    2010-01-01

    Inflation is studied in the context of induced gravity (IG) $\\gamma \\sigma^2 R$, where $R$ is the Ricci scalar, $\\sigma$ a scalar field and $\\gamma$ a dimensionless constant, and diverse symmetry-breaking potentials $V(\\sigma)$ are considered. In particular we compared the predictions for Landau-Ginzburg (LG) and Coleman-Weinberg (CW) type potentials and their possible generalizations with the most recent data. We find that large field inflation generally leads to fewer constraints on the parameters and the shape of the potential whereas small field inflation is more problematic and, if viable, implies more constraints, in particular on the parameter $\\gamma$. We also examined the reheating phase and obtained an accurate analytical solution for the dynamics of inflaton and the Hubble parameter by using a multiple scale analysis (MSA). The solutions were then used to study the average expansion of the Universe, the average equation of state for the scalar field and both the perturbative and resonant decays of ...

  18. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  19. Influence of reheating on the trispectrum and its scale dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Godfrey; Tarrant, Ewan R. M.; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Byrnes, Christian T., E-mail: ppxgl@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: ppxet@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: ctb22@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: ed.copeland@nottingham.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    We study the evolution of the non-linear curvature perturbation during perturbative reheating, and hence how observables evolve to their final values which we may compare against observations. Our study includes the evolution of the two trispectrum parameters, g{sub NL} and τ{sub NL}, as well as the scale dependence of both f{sub NL} and τ{sub NL}. In general the evolution is significant and must be taken into account, which means that models of multifield inflation cannot be compared to observations without specifying how the subsequent reheating takes place. If the trispectrum is large at the end of inflation, it normally remains large at the end of reheating. In the classes of models we study, it remains very hard to generate τ{sub NL} >> f{sub NL}{sup 2}, regardless of the decay rates of the fields. Similarly, for the classes of models in which g{sub NL} ≅ τ{sub NL} during slow-roll inflation, we find the relation typically remains valid during reheating. Therefore it is possible to observationally test such classes of models without specifying the parameters of reheating, even though the individual observables are sensitive to the details of reheating. It is hard to generate an observably large g{sub NL} however. The runnings, n{sub f{sub N{sub L}}} and n{sub τ{sub N{sub L}}}, tend to satisfy a consistency relation n{sub τ{sub N{sub L}}} = (3/2)n{sub f{sub N{sub L}}} regardless of the reheating timescale, but are in general too small to be observed for the class of models considered.

  20. Device and Container for Reheating and Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Sudhir K.; Heskitt, Brian F.; Jun, Soojin; Marcy, Joseph E.; Mahna, Ritesh

    2012-01-01

    Long-duration space missions require the development of improved foods and novel packages that do not represent a significant disposal issue. In addition, it would also be desirable if rapid heating technologies could be used on Earth as well, to improve food quality during a sterilization process. For this purpose, a package equipped with electrodes was developed that will enable rapid reheating of contents via ohmic heating to serving temperature during space vehicle transit. Further, the package is designed with a resealing feature, which enables the package, once used, to contain and sterilize waste, including human waste for storage prior to jettison during a long-duration mission. Ohmic heating is a technology that has been investigated on and off for over a century. Literature indicates that foods processed by ohmic heating are of superior quality to their conventionally processed counterparts. This is due to the speed and uniformity of ohmic heating, which minimizes exposure of sensitive materials to high temperatures. In principle, the material may be heated rapidly to sterilization conditions, cooled rapidly, and stored. The ohmic heating device herein is incorporated within a package. While this by itself is not novel, a reusable feature also was developed with the intent that waste may be stored and re-sterilized within the packages. These would then serve a useful function after their use in food processing and storage. The enclosure should be designed to minimize mass (and for NASA's purposes, Equivalent System Mass, or ESM), while enabling the sterilization function. It should also be electrically insulating. For this reason, Ultem high-strength, machinable electrical insulator was used.

  1. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

    2008-09-30

    The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study

  2. Use of dissociating gases in Brayton cycle space power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.M.; Govind, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (US))

    1988-05-01

    In this paper an analysis of the use of dissociating gases in Brayton Cycle Space Power Systems has been presented. It has been shown that the development of higher efficiency cycles is necessary for minimizing isotope costs which have a dominant influence on total cycle economics. A dissociating gas Brayton cycle has been optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum radiator surface area. Results show that 40% higher thermal efficiencies and 25% reduction in radiator area can be achieved with a dissociating gas cycle when compared with a nondissociating gas cycle.

  3. Buffer thermal energy storage for a solar Brayton engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been completed on the application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine. To aid in the study, a computer program was written for complete transient/stead-state Brayton cycle performance. The results indicated that thermal storage can afford a significant decrease in the number of engine shutdowns as compared to operating without thermal storage. However, the number of shutdowns does not continuously decrease as the storage material weight increases. In fact, there appears to be an optimum weight for minimizing the number of shutdowns.

  4. Constraints on \\alpha-attractor inflation and reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Ueno, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a constraint on reheating followed by alpha-attractor-type inflation (the E-model and T-model) from an observation of the spectral index n_s. When the energy density of the universe is dominated by an energy component with the cosmic equation-of-state parameter w_{re} during reheating, its e-folding number N_{re} and the reheating temperature T_{re} are bounded depending on w_{re}. When the reheating epoch consists of two phases, where the energy density of the universe is dominated by uniform inflaton field oscillations in the first phase and by relativistic non-thermalised particles in the second phase, we find a constraint on the e-folding number of the first oscillation phase, N_{sc}, depending the parameters of the inflaton potential. For the simplest perturbative reheating scenario, we find the lower bound for a coupling constant of inflaton decay in the E-model and T-model depending on the model parameters. We also find a constraint on the $\\alpha$ parameter, \\alpha\\simgt 0.01, for the T...

  5. Advanced steel reheat furnaces: Research and development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Q.; Koppang, R.; Maly, P.; Moyeda, D. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Li, X. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1999-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of two phases of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate an Advanced Steel Reheat Furnace (SSRF) concept which incorporates two proven and commercialized technologies, oxy-fuel enriched air (OEA) combustion and gas reburning (GR). The combined technologies aim to improve furnace productivity with higher flame radiant heat transfer in the heating zones of a steel reheat furnace while controlling potentially higher NOx emissions from these zones. The project was conducted under a contract sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). Specifically, this report summarizes the results of a modeling study and an experimental study to define and evaluate the issues which affect the integration and performance of the combined technologies. Section 2.0 of the report describes the technical approach uses in the development and evaluation of the advanced steel reheat furnace. Section 3.0 presents results of the modeling study applied to a model steel furnace. Experimental validation of the modeling results obtained from EER`s Fuel Evaluation Facility (FEF) pilot-scale furnace discussed in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an economic evaluation on the cost effectiveness of the advanced reheat furnace concept. Section 6.0 concludes the report with recommendations on the applicability of the combined technologies of steel reheat furnaces.

  6. Advanced steel reheat furnaces: Research and development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Q.; Koppang, R.; Maly, P.; Moyeda, D. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Li, X. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1999-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of two phases of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate an Advanced Steel Reheat Furnace (SSRF) concept which incorporates two proven and commercialized technologies, oxy-fuel enriched air (OEA) combustion and gas reburning (GR). The combined technologies aim to improve furnace productivity with higher flame radiant heat transfer in the heating zones of a steel reheat furnace while controlling potentially higher NOx emissions from these zones. The project was conducted under a contract sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). Specifically, this report summarizes the results of a modeling study and an experimental study to define and evaluate the issues which affect the integration and performance of the combined technologies. Section 2.0 of the report describes the technical approach uses in the development and evaluation of the advanced steel reheat furnace. Section 3.0 presents results of the modeling study applied to a model steel furnace. Experimental validation of the modeling results obtained from EER`s Fuel Evaluation Facility (FEF) pilot-scale furnace discussed in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an economic evaluation on the cost effectiveness of the advanced reheat furnace concept. Section 6.0 concludes the report with recommendations on the applicability of the combined technologies of steel reheat furnaces.

  7. Reheating constraints on K\\"ahler Moduli Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kabir, R; Lohiya, D

    2016-01-01

    The end of inflation is connected to the standard cosmological scenario through reheating. During reheating, the inflaton oscillates around the minimum of the potential and thus decays into the daughter particles that populate the Universe at later times. Using cosmological evolution for observable CMB scales from the time of Hubble crossing to the present time, we translate the constraint on the spectral index $n_s$ from Planck data to the constraint on the reheating scenario in the context of K\\"ahler Moduli Inflation. In addition, we extend the de-facto analysis generally done only for the pivot scale to all the observable scales which crossed the Hubble radius during inflation. We study how the maximum number of e-folds varies for different scales, and the effect of the equation of state and potential parameters.

  8. Constraints on the reheating temperature from sizable tensor modes

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance for modeling the homogeneous hot early universe very little is experimentally known about the magnitude of the reheating temperature, leaving an uncertainty of remarkable 18 orders of magnitude. In this work we consider a general class of polynomial inflaton potentials up to fourth order. Employing a Monte Carlo scan and imposing theoretical and experimental constraints we derive a robust lower limit on the energy scale at the end of inflation, $V_\\text{end}^{1/4} > 3 \\times 10^{15}$ GeV for sizable tensor modes, $r \\geq 10^{-3}$. If the reheating phase is matter dominated, this translates into a lower bound on the reheating temperature, yielding $T_\\text{rh} > 3 \\times 10^8 \\; (7 \\times 10^2)$ GeV for gravitational inflaton decay through a generic dimension five (six) operator.

  9. CMB and reheating constraints to \\alpha-attractor inflationary models

    CERN Document Server

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Riazi, Nematollah; Kiasatpour, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    After Planck 2013, a broad class of inflationary models called \\alpha-attractors was developed which has universal observational predictions. For small values of the parameter \\alpha, the models have good consistency with the recent CMB data. In this work, we first calculate analytically (and verify numerically) the predictions of these models for spectral index, n_s and tensor-to-scalar ratio, r and then using BICEP2/Keck 2015 data we impose constraints on \\alpha-attractors. Then, we study the reheating in \\alpha-attractors. The reheating temperature, T_{re} and the number of e-folds during reheating, N_{re} are calculated as functions of n_s. Using these results, we determine the range of free parameter \\alpha for two clasees of \\alpha-attractors which satisfy the constraints of recent CMB data.

  10. A Gravitational Wave Background from Reheating after Hybrid Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Sastre, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    The reheating of the universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubble-like structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating. First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally produce a self-similar time evolution, which allows us to extrapolate the amplitude and shape of this background till the end of reheating. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for GUT-scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA or BBO. However, low-scale models ...

  11. RESEARCH ON THE DYNAMIC MATHEMATICAL MODELOF REHEATING FURNACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐立云; 张斌; 王景成; 邵惠鹤

    2001-01-01

    This paper presented a dynamical mathematical model for reheating furnace based on energy balance, which consists of three submodels. With the inputting parameters, adopting the finite difference technique, not only the combustion gas temperature but also the temperature distribution of slabs in the furnace can be predicated. The dynamical mathematical model is the base for the further control and it also can be treated as a simulator of a reheating furnace, optimal and advanced controlling strategies can be applied based on the dynamical model.

  12. Dark matter from gravitational particle production at reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Tommi; Nurmi, Sami

    2017-02-01

    We show that curvature induced particle production at reheating generates adiabatic dark matter if there are non-minimally coupled spectator scalars weakly coupled to visible matter. The observed dark matter abundance implies an upper bound on spectator masses m and non-minimal coupling values ξ. For example, assuming quadratic inflation, instant reheating and a single spectator scalar with only gravitational couplings, the observed dark matter abundance is obtained for m~ 0.1 GeV and ξ ~ 1. Larger mass and coupling values of the spectator are excluded as they would lead to overproduction of dark matter.

  13. Low reheating temperature and the visible sterile neutrino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pascoli, Silvia

    2004-08-20

    We present here a scenario, based on a low reheating temperature T(R)inflation, in which the coupling of sterile neutrinos to active neutrinos can be as large as experimental bounds permit (thus making this neutrino "visible" in future experiments). In previous models this coupling was forced to be very small to prevent a cosmological overabundance of sterile neutrinos. Here the abundance depends on how low the reheating temperature is. For example, the sterile neutrino required by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector result may not have any cosmological problem within our scenario.

  14. On the reversed Brayton cycle with high speed machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, J.

    1996-12-31

    This work was carried out in the laboratory of Fluid Dynamics, at Lappeenranta University of Technology during the years 1991-1996. The research was a part of larger high speed technology development research. First, there was the idea of making high speed machinery applications with the Brayton cycle. There was a clear need to deepen the knowledge of the cycle itself and to make a new approach in the field of the research. Also, the removal of water from the humid air seemed very interesting. The goal of this work was to study methods of designing high speed machinery for the reversed Brayton cycle, from theoretical principles to practical applications. The reversed Brayton cycle can be employed as an air dryer, a heat pump or a refrigerating machine. In this research the use of humid air as a working fluid has an environmental advantage, as well. A new calculation method for the Brayton cycle is developed. In this method especially the expansion process in the turbine is important because of the condensation of the water vapour in the humid air. This physical phenomena can have significant effects on the level of performance of the application. Also, the influence of calculating the process with actual, achievable process equipment efficiencies is essential for the development of future machinery. The above theoretical calculations are confirmed with two different laboratory prototypes. (53 refs.)

  15. Status of Brayton cycle power conversion development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Dolce, James L.; Cataldo, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is pursuing the development of Brayton cycle power conversion for various NASA initiatives. Brayton cycle power systems offer numerous advantages for space power generation including high efficiency, long life, high maturity, and broad salability. Candidate mission applications include surface rovers and bases, advanced propulsion vehicles, and earth orbiting satellites. A key advantage is the ability for Brayton converters to span the wide range of power demands of future missions from several kilowatts to multi-megawatts using either solar, isotope, or reactor heat sources. Brayton technology has been under development by NASA since the early 1960's resulting in engine prototypes in the 2 to 15 kW-class that have demonstrated conversion efficiency of almost 30% and cumulative operation in excess of 40,000 hours. Present efforts at GRC are focusing on a 2 kW testbed as a proving ground for future component advances and operational strategies, and a 25 kW engine design as a modular building block for 100 kW-class electric propulsion and Mars surface power applications. .

  16. Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving VHTR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh

    2006-06-01

    Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase plant net efficiency.

  17. Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

  18. Influence of Reheating on the Trispectrum and its Scale Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Godfrey; Byrnes, Christian T; Copeland, Edmund J

    2013-01-01

    We study the evolution of the non-linear curvature perturbation during perturbative reheating, and hence how observables evolve to their final values which we may compare against observations. Our study includes the evolution of the two trispectrum parameters, $\\gnl$ and $\\taunl$, as well as the scale dependence of both $\\fnl$ and $\\taunl$. In general the evolution is significant and must be taken into account, which means that models of multifield inflation cannot be compared to observations without specifying how the subsequent reheating takes place. If the trispectrum is large at the end of inflation, it normally remains large at the end of reheating. In the classes of models we study, it is very hard to generate $\\taunl\\gg\\fnl^2$, regardless of the decay rates of the fields. Similarly, for the classes of models in which $\\gnl\\simeq\\taunl$ during slow--roll inflation, we find this relation typically remains valid during reheating. Therefore it is possible to observationally test such classes of models with...

  19. Microstructure evolution of semi-solid 2024 alloy during two-step reheating process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-cheng; LI Yuan-yuan; CHEN Wei-ping; ZHENG Xiao-ping

    2008-01-01

    A two-step reheating process was proposed and applied to perform reheating experiments on the semi-solid 2024 alloy billet. In this process, the semi-solid billet was firstly heated over liquidus temperature and then isothermally held at solid-liquid zone temperature. Microstructure evolution of the semi-solid billet during two-step reheating was studied by optical microscope and compared with that during isothermal reheating. The results show that the remelting rate of the semi-solid billet during two-step reheating is faster than that during isothermal reheating. Under the same reheating time, the grains of the semi-solid billet reheated by two-step reheating process are finer and rounder than those by isothermal reheating process. The present experimental results indicate that accelerating the formation of liquid phase during the two-step reheating process can restrain the coalescence of grains to a certain extent, and thus refine the grain size and promote the grain spheroidization.

  20. Evaluation of Active Working Fluids for Brayton Cycles in Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. C.; Courville, G. E.; Scott, J. H.

    2004-02-01

    The main parameter of interest for space thermal power conversion to electricity is specific power, defined as the total electric power output per unit of system mass, rather than the cycle thermal efficiency. For a closed Brayton cycle, performance with two active working fluids, nitrogen tetroxide and aluminum chloride, is compared to that with an inert mixture of helium and xenon having a molecular mass of 40. A chemically active working fluid is defined here as a chemical compound that has a relatively high molecular weight at temperatures appropriate for the compressor inlet and dissociates to a lighter molecular weight fluid at typical turbine inlet temperatures. The active working fluids may have the advantage of a higher net turbomachinery work output and an advantageous enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient in the heat exchangers. The fundamental theory of the active working fluid concept is presented to demonstrate these potential advantages. Scoping calculations of the heat exchanger mass for a selected spacecraft application of 36.4 kW of electrical power output show that the nitrogen tetroxide active working fluid has an advantageous 7% to 30% lower mass-to-power ratio than that for the inert noble gas mixture, depending on the allowable turbine inlet temperature. The calculations for the aluminum chloride system suggest only a slight improvement in performance relative to the inert noble gas mixture.

  1. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  2. Thermodynamic design of methane liquefaction system based on reversed-Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Min Jee; Park, Seong Bum

    2009-06-01

    A thermodynamic design is performed for reversed-Brayton refrigeration cycle to liquefy methane separated from landfill gas (LFG) in distributed scale. Objective of the design is to find the most efficient operating conditions for a skid-mount type of liquefaction system that is capable of LNG production at 160 l/h. Special attention is paid on liquefying counterflow heat exchanger, because the temperature difference between cold refrigerant and methane is smallest at the middle of heat exchanger, which seriously limits the overall thermodynamic performance of the liquefaction system. Nitrogen is selected as refrigerant, as it is superior to helium in thermodynamic efficiency. In order to consider specifically the size effect of heat exchangers, the performance of plate-fin heat exchangers is estimated with rigorous numerical calculations by incorporating a commercial code for properties of methane and the refrigerant. Optimal conditions in operating pressure and heat exchanger size are presented and discussed for prototype construction under a governmental project in Korea.

  3. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  4. Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L [Livermore, CA

    2012-03-13

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  5. Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L [Livermore, CA

    2009-12-29

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  6. Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

  7. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  8. Late Reheating of the IGM by Quasars: A Radiation Hydrodynamical Simulation of Helium II Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, Pascal; Bordner, James O; Harkness, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We study the ionization and thermal evolution of the intergalactic medium during the epoch of \\heii reionization by means of radiation hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. We post-process baryonic density fields from a standard optically-thin IGM simulation with a homogeneous galaxy-dominated UV background (UVB) which reionizes \\hi and \\hei at z=6.5 but does not have any contribution to the ionization of \\heii. Quasars with luminosities proportional to the mass of the host halos are then introduced as point sources throughout the 100 Mpc simulation volume consistent with the Pei luminosity function. We evolve the spatial distribution of the \\heii ionizing radiation field using a time-implicit variable tensor Eddington factor radiative transfer scheme. Simultaneously, we also solve for the local ionization of \\heii to \\heii and the associated photoheating of the gas. We find that the percolation of the \\heiii regions is essentially complete by z=2.5. When comparing to a self-consistent optically thin simul...

  9. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Eun; Kim, S. O.; Seong, S. H.; Eoh, J. H.; Lee, T. H.; Choi, S. K.; Han, J. W.; Bae, S. W

    2007-12-15

    This report contains the description of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to KALIMER-600 as an alternative energy conversion system. For system development, a computer code was developed to calculate heat balance of 100% power operation condition. Based on the computer code, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle energy conversion system was constructed for the KALIMER-600. Using the developed turbomachinery models, the off-design characteristics and the sensitivities of the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery were investigated. For the development of PCHE models, a one-dimensional analysis computer code was developed to evaluate the performance of the PCHE. Possible control schemes for power control in the KALIMER-600 S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle were investigated by using the MARS code. Simple power reduction and recovery event was selected and analyzed for the transient calculation. For the evaluation of Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event, a computer was developed to simulate the complex thermodynamic behaviors coupled with the chemical reaction between liquid sodium and CO{sub 2} gas. The long term behavior of a Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event and its consequences which lead to a system pressure transient were evaluated.

  10. An Advanced Turbo-Brayton Converter for Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarola, Mark V.; Izenson, Michael G.; Breedlove, Jeffrey J.; O'Connor, George M.; Ketchum, Andrew C.; Jetley, Richard L.; Simons, James K.

    2005-02-01

    Past work has shown that Brayton power converters are an attractive option for high power, long-duration space missions. More recently, Creare has shown that Brayton technology could be scaled with high efficiency and specific power to lower power levels suitable for radioisotope power conversion systems. Creare is currently leading the development of an advanced turbo-Brayton converter under NASA's Prometheus Program. The converter design is based on space-proven cryocooler technologies that have been shown to be safe; to provide long, maintenance-free lifetimes; and to have high reliability, negligible vibration emittance, and low EMI/EMC. The predicted performance of a converter at the beginning of life is greater than 20% (including electronic inefficiencies and overhead) with a converter specific power of greater than 8 We/kg for a test unit and greater than 15 We/kg for a flight unit. The degradation in performance over a 14-year mission lifetime is predicted to be negligible, and the primary life limiting factor is not expected to be an issue for greater than twice the mission duration. Work during the last year focused on the material and fabrication issues associated with a high temperature turbine and a lightweight recuperator, and the performance issues associated with the high-temperature insulation and power conversion electronics. The development of the converter is on schedule. Thermal vacuum testing to demonstrate a technology readiness level of 5 is currently planned for 2006.

  11. Reheating predictions in gravity theories with derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalianis, Ioannis; Koutsoumbas, George; Ntrekis, Konstantinos; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the inflationary predictions of a simple Horndeski theory where the inflaton scalar field has a non-minimal derivative coupling (NMDC) to the Einstein tensor. The NMDC is very motivated for the construction of successful models for inflation, nevertheless its inflationary predictions are not observationally distinct. We show that it is possible to probe the effects of the NMDC on the CMB observables by taking into account both the dynamics of the inflationary slow-roll phase and the subsequent reheating. We perform a comparative study between representative inflationary models with canonical fields minimally coupled to gravity and models with NMDC. We find that the inflation models with dominant NMDC generically predict a higher reheating temperature and a different range for the tilt of the scalar perturbation spectrum ns and scalar-to-tensor ratio r, potentially testable by current and future CMB experiments.

  12. Reheating predictions in Gravity Theories with Derivative Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Dalianis, Ioannis; Ntrekis, Konstantinos; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the inflationary predictions of a simple Horndeski theory where the inflaton scalar field has a non-minimal derivative coupling (NMDC) to the Einstein tensor. The NMDC is very motivated for the construction of successful models for inflation, nevertheless its inflationary predictions are not observationally distinct. We show that it is possible to probe the effects of the NMDC on the CMB observables by taking into account both the dynamics of the inflationary slow-roll phase and the subsequent reheating. We perform a comparative study between representative inflationary models with canonical fields minimally coupled to gravity and models with NMDC. We find that the inflation models with dominant NMDC generically predict a higher reheating temperature and a different range for the tilt of the scalar perturbation spectrum $n_s$ and scalar-to-tensor ratio $r$, potentially testable by current and future CMB experiments.

  13. IMPROVEMENT OF SLAB REHEATING PROCESS AT USIMINAS THROUGH MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Adel dos Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Basic characteristics and application examples of the mathematical simulator for reheating process in walking-beam type furnaces, that has been developed and applied to Usiminas plate mill line at Ipatinga, are shown in this paper. This is a bi-dimensional mathematical model solved by the finite volume method, validated by temperature measurements inside the slab during heating and coded as a visual tool. Among these applications, the following can be highlighted: (i determination of suitable furnace zone temperatures and residence times for processing steels by accelerated cooling technology; (ii determination of slab average temperature at discharging as well as at each zone exit, supplying data to be fed to the automation system at the comissioning stage; (iii analyses of slab thermal distribution through the reheating process, enabling operational optimization

  14. The Dark Matter Annihilation Boost from Low-Temperature Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Erickcek, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the Universe between inflation and the onset of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is difficult to probe and largely unconstrained. This ignorance profoundly limits our understanding of dark matter: we cannot calculate its thermal relic abundance without knowing when the Universe became radiation dominated. Fortunately, small-scale density perturbations provide a probe of the early Universe that could break this degeneracy. If dark matter is a thermal relic, density perturbations that enter the horizon during an early matter-dominated era grow linearly with the scale factor prior to reheating. The resulting abundance of substructure boosts the annihilation rate by several orders of magnitude, which can compensate for the smaller annihilation cross sections that are required to generate the observed dark matter density in these scenarios. In particular, thermal relics with masses less than a TeV that thermally and kinetically decouple prior to reheating may already be ruled out by Fermi-LAT observations...

  15. Reheating a multi-throat universe by brane motion

    CERN Document Server

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    We propose a mechanism of reheating after inflation in multi-throat scenarios of warped extra dimensions. Validity of the effective field theory requires that the position of the standard model (SM) brane during inflation be different from the position long after inflation, i.e. the tip of the SM throat. After inflation, when the Hubble expansion rate becomes sufficiently low, the SM brane starts moving towards the tip and eventually oscillates. The SM fields are excited by the brane motion and the universe is reheated. We consider a U(1) gauge field on a wrapped D5-brane as a toy model to illustrate that fields confined on a brane are indeed excited by brane motion.

  16. Reheating temperature in non-minimal derivative coupling model

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, H Mohseni

    2013-01-01

    We consider the inflaton as a scalar field described by a non-minimal derivative coupling model with a power law potential. We study the slow roll inflation, the rapid oscillation phase, the radiation dominated and the recombination eras respectively, and estimate e-folds numbers during these epochs. Using these results we determine the reheating temperature in terms of the spectral index and the amplitude of the power spectrum of scalar perturbations.

  17. The dark matter annihilation boost from low-temperature reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the Universe between inflation and the onset of big bang nucleosynthesis is difficult to probe and largely unconstrained. This ignorance profoundly limits our understanding of dark matter: we cannot calculate its thermal relic abundance without knowing when the Universe became radiation dominated. Fortunately, small-scale density perturbations provide a probe of the early Universe that could break this degeneracy. If dark matter is a thermal relic, density perturbations that enter the horizon during an early matter-dominated era grow linearly with the scale factor prior to reheating. The resulting abundance of substructure boosts the annihilation rate by several orders of magnitude, which can compensate for the smaller annihilation cross sections that are required to generate the observed dark matter density in these scenarios. In particular, thermal relics with masses less than a TeV that thermally and kinetically decouple prior to reheating may already be ruled out by Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Although these constraints are subject to uncertainties regarding the internal structure of the microhalos that form from the enhanced perturbations, they open up the possibility of using gamma-ray observations to learn about the reheating of the Universe.

  18. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  19. Simulation of CO2 Brayton Cycle for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery under Various Operating Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒歌群; 张承宇; 田华; 高媛媛; 李团兵; 仇荣赓

    2015-01-01

    A bottoming cycle system based on CO2 Brayton cycle is proposed to recover the engine exhaust heat. Its performance is compared with the conventional air Brayton cycle under five typical engine conditions. The results show that CO2 Brayton cycle proves to be superior to the air Brayton cycle in terms of the system net output power, thermal efficiency and recovery efficiency. In most cases, the recovery efficiency of CO2 Brayton cycle can be higher than 9%and the system has a better performance at the engine’s high operating load. The thermal efficiency can be as large as 24.83%under 100%operating load, accordingly, the net output power of 14.86 kW is obtained.

  20. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

    2005-02-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

  1. Castables for Steel Rolling Reheating Furnace GB/T 22590-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification, technical requirements, test methods, quality appraisal procedures, packing, marking, transportation, storage and quality certificate of castables for steel rolling reheating furnace.

  2. Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Thomas Lillo; William Windes; Terry Totemeier; Richard Moore

    2004-10-01

    The U.S. and other countries address major challenges related to energy security and the environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Solutions to these issues include carbon-free electricity generation and hydrogen production for fuel cell car, fertilizer synthesis, petroleum refining, and other applications. The Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) has been recognized as a promising technology for high efficiency electricity generation and high temperature process heat applications. Therefore, the U.S. needs to make the HTGR intrinsically safe and proliferation-resistant. The U.S. and the world, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30% reduction in power cost for state-of-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to some Generation-IV reactors such as the HTGR and supercritical water reactor, (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase turbine work enhancing the plant net efficiency.

  3. Performance evaluation of space solar Brayton cycle power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zheng-Gang

    1992-06-01

    Unlike gas turbine power systems which consume chemical or nuclear energy, the energy consumption and/or cycle efficiency should not be a suitable criterion for evaluating the performance of space solar Brayton cycle power. A new design goal, life cycle cost, can combine all the power system characteristics, such as mass, area, and station-keeping propellant, into a unified criterion. Effects of pressure ratio, recuperator effectiveness, and compressor inlet temperature on life cycle cost were examined. This method would aid in making design choices for a space power system.

  4. Life and Reliability Characteristics of TurboBrayton Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedlove, Jeff J.; Zagarola, Mark; Nellis, Greg; Dolan, Frank; Swift, Walt; Gibbon, Judith; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Wear and internal contaminants are two of the primary factors that influence reliable, long-life operation of turbo-Brayton cryocoolers. This paper describes tests that have been conducted and methods that have been developed for turbo-Brayton components and systems to assure reliable operation. The turbomachines used in these coolers employ self-acting gas bearings to support the miniature high-speed shafts, thus providing vibration-free operation. Because the bearings are self-acting, rubbing contact occurs during initial start-up and shutdown of the machines. Bearings and shafts are designed to endure multiple stop/start cycles without producing particles or surface features that would impair the proper operation of the machines. Test results are presented for a variety of turbomachines used in these systems. The tests document extended operating life and start/stop cycling behavior for machines over a range of time and temperature scales. Contaminants such as moisture and other residual gas impurities can be a source of degraded operation if they freeze out in sufficient quantities to block flow passages or if they mechanically affect the operation of the machines. A post-fabrication bakeout procedure has been successfully used to reduce residual internal contamination to acceptable levels in a closed cycle system. The process was developed during space qualification tests on the NICMOS cryocooler. Moisture levels were sampled over a six-month time interval confirming the effectiveness of the technique. A description of the bakeout procedure is presented.

  5. Mini-Brayton economic RTG study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of a radioisotope heated Mini-Brayton power system to the 1973 USAF/AEC requirements established for the SURVSATCOM Mission. The principal requiremenets of the power system, are: 400 We power level; maximum weight 205 lbs.; $1.2 to 2.0 million per unit cost; and 5y mission duration. A radioisotope heat source that meets the ACE Nuclear Safety Criteria is presented. The major aspects of the Reference Design MB-ERTG are summarized. The Reference Design, utilizes a flexible Brayton rotating unit (BRU), a /sup 244/Cm heat source with ceramic clad fuel cylinders and an aluminum radiator. The flexible BRU has a variable power output capability, from 400 We to 3000 We, and is an important factor in the formulation of a cost effective development plan. The system weight is 186 lb and unit cost, including the /sup 244/Cm fuel, acceptance testing and delivery is $748,000. The total development cost for the 5-yr program is estimated at $16.4M with an additional $6.5M required for /sup 244/Cm heat source development support, /sup 244/Cm fuel, heat source fabrication and capital equipment expenditures. (LCL)

  6. Development, application & assessment of improved condenser leak detection program at Brayton Point Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, C.A.; Bennett, B.A.; Thornton, M.W.

    1996-08-01

    The adverse impacts of air inleakage on condenser performance are well known and include elevated turbine back pressure, increased parasitic loads (to remove elevated levels of noncondensables from the condenser), and high dissolved oxygen levels in the feedwater cycle. Prolonged neglect of leakage leads to increased maintenance to feedwater and air removal systems as well as reduced cycle efficiency and the potential of a unit trip on high turbine back pressure. Leak detection performed on a scheduled basis, just prior to a scheduled outage, is an effective preventive maintenance activity for older stations and important for newer stations concerned with heat rate degradation and equipment performance. New England Power began a comprehensive air inleakage reduction program at its Brayton Point Generating Station (BPS) in 1990. The authors describe the development and application on Units 1 through 4, including its unique identification and documentation tools and its computerized leak source tracking and trending software program. Actual results gained from the programs use at BPS will be presented. To put the merits of the program in perspective, historically, many real and potentially large leak paths were not being tested, because helium leak detection crews normally inspected familiar and easy-to-reach areas around the condenser. Tracking and trending was practically non-existent, providing little documentation for root cause analysis when a large leak is suspect. Since the improved program was implemented at BPS, air in-leakage detection has increased by 300 percent, in-leakage rates have reduced 40% and turbine backpressure levels have improved. Station personnel now have a tool to diagnose condenser air in-leakage with test repeatability, whether it be a sudden incident of high in-leakage demanding immediate testing and repair or gradual increases which can be identified during pre-outage testing for repair during their scheduled outage. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Higgs vacuum metastability in primordial inflation, preheating, and reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsui, Hiroki

    2016-11-01

    Current measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top Yukawa coupling suggest that the effective Higgs potential develops an instability below the Planck scale. If the energy scale of inflation is as high as the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, inflationary quantum fluctuations of the Higgs field can easily destabilize the standard electroweak vacuum and produce a lot of anti-de Sitter (AdS) domains. This destabilization during inflation can be avoided if a relatively large nonminimal Higgs-gravity or inflaton-Higgs coupling is introduced. Such couplings generate a large effective mass term for the Higgs, which can raise the effective Higgs potential and suppress the vacuum fluctuation of the Higgs field. After primordial inflation, however, such effective masses drops rapidly and the nonminimal Higgs-gravity or inflaton-Higgs coupling can cause large fluctuations of the Higgs field to be generated via parametric resonance, thus producing AdS domains in the preheating stage. Furthermore, thermal fluctuations of the Higgs field cannot be neglected in the proceeding reheating epoch. We discuss the Higgs vacuum fluctuations during inflation, preheating, and reheating, and show that the Higgs metastability problem is severe unless the energy scale of the inflaton potential is much lower than the GUT scale.

  8. Mutated hybrid inflation on brane and reheating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferricha-Alami, M.; Sakhi, Z.; Chakir, H.; Bennai, M.

    2017-07-01

    In the mutated hybrid-inflation standard case, the spectral index n_s is constrained by the e-folds number N, and the gravitational waves are negligible (r˜ 10^{-4}). Therefore, we propose to study this model in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld scenario. Using the latest observational measurements from Planck data, we have shown that the inflation observables ( n_s, r, and d n_s/d ln k depend on all parameters. On the other hand, from the observed central value of the power spectrum perturbation P_R(k), we have determined the energy scale which must be V0^{1/4} \\succsim 10^{14} GeV and we evaluate the brane tension value λ. We showed that the spectral index takes the central value n_s˜ 0.96 and the gravitational waves becomes important r˜ 2× 10^{-2}. Furthermore the running d n_s/d ln k is perfectly in agreement with the recent observations. For the reheating phase, we have determined the value of reheating temperature T_re˜ 109 GeV.

  9. Reheating and Primordial Gravitational Waves in Generalized Galilean Genesis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishi, Sakine

    2016-01-01

    Galilean genesis is an alternative to inflation, in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski with the stable violation of the null energy condition. In this paper, we discuss how the early universe is reheated through the gravitational particle production at the trasition from the genesis phase to the subsequent phase where the kinetic energy of the scalar field is dominant. We then study the consequences of gravitational reheating after Galilean genesis on the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. The resultant spectrum is strongly blue, and at high frequencies $\\Omega_{\\rm gw}\\propto f^3$ in terms of the energy density per unit logarithmic frequency. Though this cannot be detected in existing detctors, the amplitude can be as large as $\\Omega_{\\rm gw}\\sim 10^{-12}$ at $f\\sim 100\\,$MHz, providing a future test of the genesis scenario. The analysis is performed within the framework of generalized Galilean genesis based on the Horndeski theory, which enables us to derive generic formulas.

  10. Thermodynamic Modeling for Open Combined Regenerative Brayton and Inverse Brayton Cycles with Regeneration before the Inverse Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingen Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic model of an open combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles with regeneration before the inverse cycle is established in this paper by using thermodynamic optimization theory. The flow processes of the working fluid with the pressure drops and the size constraint of the real power plant are modeled. There are 13 flow resistances encountered by the working fluid stream for the cycle model. Four of these, the friction through the blades and vanes of the compressors and the turbines, are related to the isentropic efficiencies. The remaining nine flow resistances are always present because of the changes in flow cross-section at the compressor inlet of the top cycle, regenerator inlet and outlet, combustion chamber inlet and outlet, turbine outlet of the top cycle, turbine outlet of the bottom cycle, heat exchanger inlet, and compressor inlet of the bottom cycle. These resistances associated with the flow through various cross-sectional areas are derived as functions of the compressor inlet relative pressure drop of the top cycle, and control the air flow rate, the net power output and the thermal efficiency. The analytical formulae about the power output, efficiency and other coefficients are derived with 13 pressure drop losses. It is found that the combined cycle with regenerator can reach higher thermal efficiency but smaller power output than those of the base combined cycle at small compressor inlet relative pressure drop of the top cycle.

  11. Enhancing power cycle efficiency for a supercritical Brayton cycle power system using tunable supercritical gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Vernon, Milton E.; Radel, Ross F.

    2017-08-29

    Various technologies pertaining to tuning composition of a fluid mixture in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system are described herein. Compounds, such as Alkanes, are selectively added or removed from an operating fluid of the supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system to cause the critical temperature of the fluid to move up or down, depending upon environmental conditions. As efficiency of the supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system is substantially optimized when heat is rejected near the critical temperature of the fluid, dynamically modifying the critical temperature of the fluid based upon sensed environmental conditions improves efficiency of such a system.

  12. Key Factors Influencing the Decision on the Number of Brayton Units for the Prometheus Space Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, John; Belanger, Sean; Burdge, Wayne; Clementoni, Eric; Jensen, Krista; Proctor, N. Beth; Zemo-Fulkerson, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors (NR) Program and its DOE Laboratories, KAPL and Bettis, were assigned responsibility to develop space reactor systems for the Prometheus Program. After investigating all of the potential reactor and energy conversion options, KAPL and Bettis selected a direct gas Brayton system as the reference approach for the nuclear electric propulsion missions, including the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). In order to determine the optimal plant architecture for the direct gas system, KAPL and Bettis investigated systems with one or two active Brayton units and up to two spare units. No final decision was made on the optimal system configuration for the NEP gas-Brayton system prior to closeout of the project. The two most promising options appear to be a single system without spares and a three Brayton system with two operating units, each producing half of the required load, with a single spare unit. The studies show that a single Brayton system, without spares, offers the lowest mass system, with potential for lower operating temperature, and a minimum of system and operational complexity. The lower required mass and increased system efficiency inherent in the single Brayton system may be exploited to satisfy other design objectives such as reduced reactor and radiator operating temperatures. While Brayton system lifetimes applicable to a JIMO or other nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) mission have not been demonstrated, there is no fundamental limit on the lifetime of the Brayton hardware. Use of additional Brayton units with installed spares will allow for continued operation in the event of a failure of an individual Brayton unit. However, preliminary system reliability evaluations do not point to any substantial reliability benefit provided by carrying spare Brayton units. If a spare unit is used, operating two of the units at full power with an unpowered spare proved more efficient than operating all three units at a reduced power and temperature

  13. Modeling fuzzy state space of reheater system for simulation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirah, W. M. Wan; Ahmad, T.; Ashaari, A.; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-01

    Reheater is one of the important heat exchange components in a high capacity power plant of a boiler system. The aim of this study is to improve heat transfer of a reheater system. The method is to maximize steam production and at the same time, keeping variables within constraints. Fuzzy arithmetic is a powerful tool used to solve engineering problems with uncertain parameters. Therefore, in order to determine heat transfer efficiency, the state space of reheater is simulated using fuzzy arithmetic by taking into account the uncertainties in the reheater system. The uncertain model parameters and the model inputs are represented by fuzzy numbers with their shape derived from quasi-Gaussian function. Finally, this paper discusses how the mathematical model can be manipulated in order to produce maximum heat transfer with least loss of energy. Furthermore, the improvement of the reheater efficiency and the quantification of the heat supplied parameters are presented in this paper.

  14. Reheating microstructure of refined AZ91D magnesium alloy in semi-solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜巨福; 罗守靖

    2004-01-01

    By means of equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) test, upsetting test and metalloscope, reheating microstructures of raw casting ingots, materials prepared by SIMA and materials extruded by ECAE in semi-solid state were investigated. The results show that compared with those of raw casting ingots and materials prepared by SIMA, reheating microstructure of materials extruded by ECAE is the best and the final grain size is the finest.With increasing holding time, a growing phenomenon occurs in reheating microstructure of materials extruded by ECAE, which can be described by Ostwald ripening law. The average grain size increases firstly, subsequently decreases and the shape factor of grains approaches to 1 as the reheating temperature increases. With increasing equivalent strain, the average grain size decreases. This demonstrates that reheating material extruded by ECAE technology is a good method to prepare AZ91D magnesium alloy semi-solid billets.

  15. Development of a 77K Reverse-Brayton Cryocooler with Multiple Coldheads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RTI will design and optimize an 80 W, 77K cryocooler based on the reverse turbo Brayton cycle (RTBC) with four identical coldheads for distributed cooling. Based on...

  16. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-14

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined.

  17. Phase I: controls preliminary design report for Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-20

    Background analyses of three control systems capable of controlling the speed, output voltage, and start rate of Brayton Isotope Power Systems (BIPS) are presented. Conclusions of all functions considered are summarized. (TFD)

  18. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce [Wilson Solarpower Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were:1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system. This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components.

  19. Experimental Validation of a Closed Brayton Cycle System Transient Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Hervol, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) is a closed cycle system with an inert gas working fluid. It is located in Vacuum Facility 6 at NASA Glenn Research Center. Was used in previous solar dynamic technology efforts (SDGTD). Modified to its present configuration by replacing the solar receiver with an electrical resistance heater. The first closed-Brayton-cycle to be coupled with an ion propulsion system. Used to examine mechanical dynamic characteristics and responses. The focus of this work was the validation of a computer model of the BPCU. Model was built using the Closed Cycle System Simulation (CCSS) design and analysis tool. Test conditions were then duplicated in CCSS. Various steady-state points. Transients involving changes in shaft rotational speed and heat input. Testing to date has shown that the BPCU is able to generate meaningful, repeatable data that can be used for computer model validation. Results generated by CCSS demonstrated that the model sufficiently reproduced the thermal transients exhibited by the BPCU system. CCSS was also used to match BPCU steady-state operating points. Cycle temperatures were within 4.1% of the data (most were within 1%). Cycle pressures were all within 3.2%. Error in alternator power (as much as 13.5%) was attributed to uncertainties in the compressor and turbine maps and alternator and bearing loss models. The acquired understanding of the BPCU behavior gives useful insight for improvements to be made to the CCSS model as well as ideas for future testing and possible system modifications.

  20. Calculation principles of humid air in a reversed Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Energy Technology

    1997-12-31

    The article presents a calculation method for reversed Brayton cycle that uses humid air as working medium. The reversed Brayton cycle can be employed as an air dryer, a heat pump or a refrigerating machine. In this research the use of humid air as a working fluid has an environmental advantage, as well. In this method especially the expansion process in the turbine is important because of the condensation of the water vapour in the humid air. This physical phenomena can have significant effects on the level of performance of the application. The expansion process differs physically from the compression process, when the water vapour in the humid air begins to condensate. In the thermodynamic equilibrium of the flow, the water vapour pressure in humid air cannot exceed the pressure of saturated water vapour in corresponding temperature. Expansion calculation during operation around the saturation zone is based on a quasistatic expansion, in which the system after the turbine is in thermodynamical equilibrium. The state parameters are at every moment defined by the equation of state, and there is no supercooling in the vapour. Following simplifications are used in the calculations: The system is assumed to be adiabatic. This means that there is no heat transfer to the surroundings. This is a common practice, when the temperature differences are moderate as here; The power of the cooling is omitted. The cooling construction is very dependent on the machine and the distribution of the losses; The flow is assumed to be one-dimensional, steady-state and homogenous. The water vapour condensing in the turbine can cause errors, but the errors are mainly included in the efficiency calculation. (author) 11 refs.

  1. On the breakdown of the curvature perturbation $\\zeta$ during reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Algan, Merve Tarman; Kutluk, Emine Seyma

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in single scalar field inflationary models the standard curvature perturbation \\zeta, which is supposedly conserved at superhorizon scales, diverges during reheating at times d\\Phi/dt=0, i.e. when the time derivative of the background inflaton field vanishes. This happens because the comoving gauge \\phi=0, where \\phi\\ denotes the inflaton perturbation, breaks down when d\\Phi/dt=0. The issue is usually bypassed by averaging out the inflaton oscillations but strictly speaking the evolution of \\zeta\\ is ill posed mathematically. We solve this problem by introducing a family of smooth gauges that still eliminates the inflaton fluctuation \\phi\\ in the Hamiltonian formalism and gives a well behaved curvature perturbation \\zeta, which is now rigorously conserved at superhorizon scales. In the linearized theory, this conserved variable can be used to unambiguously propagate the inflationary perturbations from the end of inflation to subsequent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results for th...

  2. Pre-reheating magnetogenesis in the kinetic coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Namba, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    Recent blazar observations provide growing evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in the extragalactic regions. While natural speculation is to associate the production with inflationary physics, it is known that magnetogenesis solely from inflation is quite challenging. We therefore study a model in which a noninflaton field χ coupled to the electromagnetic field through its kinetic term, -I2(χ )F2/4 , continues to move after inflation until the completion of reheating. This leads to a postinflationary amplification of the electromagnetic field. We compute all the relevant contributions to the curvature perturbation, including gravitational interactions, and impose the constraints from the CMB scalar fluctuations on the strength of magnetic fields. We, for the first time, explicitly verify both the backreaction and CMB constraints in a simple yet successful magnetogenesis scenario without invoking a dedicated low-scale inflationary model in the weak-coupling regime of the kinetic coupling model.

  3. Modulated Reheating and Large Non-Gaussianity in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Cicoli, M; Zavala, I; Burgess, C P; Quevedo, F

    2012-01-01

    A generic feature of the known string inflationary models is that the same physics that makes the inflaton lighter than the Hubble scale during inflation often also makes other scalars this light. These scalars can acquire isocurvature fluctuations during inflation, and given that their VEVs determine the mass spectrum and the coupling constants of the effective low-energy field theory, these fluctuations give rise to couplings and masses that are modulated from one Hubble patch to another. These seem just what is required to obtain primordial adiabatic fluctuations through conversion into density perturbations through the `modulation mechanism', wherein reheating takes place with different efficiency in different regions of our Universe. Fluctuations generated in this way can generically produce non-gaussianity larger than obtained in single-field slow-roll inflation; potentially observable in the near future. We provide here the first explicit example of the modulation mechanism at work in string cosmology,...

  4. Natural inflation from 5D SUGRA and low reheat temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccetti Correia, Filipe; Schmidt, Michael G.; Tavartkiladze, Zurab

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by recent cosmological observations of a possibly unsuppressed primordial tensor component r of inflationary perturbations, we reanalyze in detail the 5D conformal SUGRA originated natural inflation model of Ref. [1]. The model is a supersymmetric variant of 5D extranatural inflation, also based on a shift symmetry, and leads to the potential of natural inflation. Coupling the bulk fields generating the inflaton potential via a gauge coupling to the inflaton with brane SM states we necessarily obtain a very slow gauge inflaton decay rate and a very low reheating temperature Tr ≲ O (100) GeV. Analysis of the required number of e-foldings (from the CMB observations) leads to values of ns in the lower range of present Planck 2015 results. Some related theoretical issues of the construction, along with phenomenological and cosmological implications, are also discussed.

  5. Natural inflation from 5D SUGRA and low reheat temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Paccetti Correia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by recent cosmological observations of a possibly unsuppressed primordial tensor component r of inflationary perturbations, we reanalyze in detail the 5D conformal SUGRA originated natural inflation model of Ref. [1]. The model is a supersymmetric variant of 5D extranatural inflation, also based on a shift symmetry, and leads to the potential of natural inflation. Coupling the bulk fields generating the inflaton potential via a gauge coupling to the inflaton with brane SM states we necessarily obtain a very slow gauge inflaton decay rate and a very low reheating temperature Tr≲O(100 GeV. Analysis of the required number of e-foldings (from the CMB observations leads to values of ns in the lower range of present Planck 2015 results. Some related theoretical issues of the construction, along with phenomenological and cosmological implications, are also discussed.

  6. Curvaton reheating in a Scale Invariant Two Measures Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo I

    2015-01-01

    The curvaton reheating mechanism in a Scale Invariant Two Measures Theory defined in terms of two independent non-Riemannian volume forms (alternative generally covariant integration measure densities) on the space-time manifold which are metric independent is studied. The model involves two scalar matter fields, a dilaton, that transforms under scale transformations and it will be used also as the inflaton of the model and another scalar, which does not transform under scale transformations and which will play the role of a curvaton field. Potentials of appropriate form so that the pertinent action is invariant under global Weyl-scale symmetry are introduced. Scale invariance is spontaneously broken upon integration of the equations of motion. After performing transition to the physical Einstein frame we obtain: (i) For given value of the curvaton field an effective potential for the scalar field with two flat regions for the dilaton which allows for a unified description of both early universe inflation as ...

  7. Innovative open air brayton combined cycle systems for the next generation nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohuri, Bahman

    The purpose of this research was to model and analyze a nuclear heated multi-turbine power conversion system operating with atmospheric air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a molten salt, or liquid metal, to gas heat exchanger reaching a peak temperature of 660 0C. The effects of adding a recuperator or a bottoming steam cycle have been addressed. The calculated results are intended to identify paths for future work on the next generation nuclear power plant (GEN-IV). This document describes the proposed system in sufficient detail to communicate a good understanding of the overall system, its components, and intended uses. The architecture is described at the conceptual level, and does not replace a detailed design document. The main part of the study focused on a Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle system and a Recuperated Brayton Cycle since they offer the highest overall efficiencies. Open Air Brayton power cycles also require low cooling water flows relative to other power cycles. Although the Recuperated Brayton Cycle achieves an overall efficiency slightly less that the Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle, it is completely free of a circulating water system and can be used in a desert climate. Detailed results of modeling a combined cycle Brayton-Rankine power conversion system are presented. The Rankine bottoming cycle appears to offer a slight efficiency advantage over the recuperated Brayton cycle. Both offer very significant advantages over current generation Light Water Reactor steam cycles. The combined cycle was optimized as a unit and lower pressure Rankine systems seem to be more efficient. The combined cycle requires a lot less circulating water than current power plants. The open-air Brayton systems appear to be worth investigating, if the higher temperatures predicted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant do materialize.

  8. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in a reheating furnace with multi-swirling-burners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Li; Zengwu Zhao; Yike Li; Wenfei Wu; Daqiang Cang

    2003-01-01

    A general numerical simulating program for three-dimensional (3-D) and time-dependent fluid flow for a reheating furnace with multi-swirling-burners has been developed based upon an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian scheme (ALE) with the finite volume method. The parameters of fluid flow in a reheating furnace with multi-swirling-burners was calculated and the 3-D velocity distributions were obtained. The design of the burners was optimized for forming better swirling flow. The simulation shows that the fluid flow in the reheating furnace with the optimized burners is reasonable.

  9. Curvaton reheating in non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity: NO models

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Ramon; Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc

    2016-01-01

    The curvaton reheating mechanism in a non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity for any non-oscillating (NO) model is studied. In this framework, we analyze the energy density during the kinetic epoch and we find that this energy has a complicated dependencies of the scale factor. Considering this mechanism, we study the decay of the curvaton in two different scenarios and also we determine the reheating temperatures. As an example the NO model, we consider an exponential potential and we obtain the reheating temperature indirectly from the inflation through of the number of e-folds.

  10. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2014-01-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics

  11. Standard test method for determination of "microwave safe for reheating" for ceramicware

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method determines the suitability of ceramicware for use in microwave re-heating applications. Microwave ovens are mainly used for reheating and defrosting frozen foods. Severe thermal conditions can occur while reheating foods. Typical reheating of foods requires one to five min. in the microwave at the highest power settings. Longer periods than five minutes are considered cooking. Cooking test methods and standards are not addressed in this test method. Most ceramicware is minimally absorbing of the microwave energy and will not heat up significantly. Unfortunately there are some products that absorb microwave energy to a greater extent and can become very hot in the microwave and pose a serious hazard. Additionally, the nature of microwave heating introduces radiation in a non-uniform manner producing temperature differentials in the food being cooked as well as the ceramic container holding it. The differential may become great enough to thermal shock the ware and create dangerous condition...

  12. Reheating Effects in the Matter Power Spectrum and Implications for Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Erickcek, Adrienne L

    2011-01-01

    The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cut-off in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced non-thermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > 0.1 Earth masses at z=100, ...

  13. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

  14. Finite Element Modeling of Reheat Stretch Blow Molding of PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Dwarak; Dupaix, Rebecca B.

    2004-06-01

    Poly (ethylene terephthalate) or PET is a polymer used as a packaging material for consumer products such as beverages, food or other liquids, and in other applications including drawn fibers and stretched films. Key features that make it widely used are its transparency, dimensional stability, gas impermeability, impact resistance, and high stiffness and strength in certain preferential directions. These commercially useful properties arise from the fact that PET crystallizes upon deformation above the glass transition temperature. Additionally, this strain-induced crystallization causes the deformation behavior of PET to be highly sensitive to processing conditions. It is thus crucial for engineers to be able to predict its performance at various process temperatures, strain rates and strain states so as to optimize the manufacturing process. In addressing these issues; a finite element analysis of the reheat blow molding process with PET has been carried out using ABAQUS. The simulation employed a constitutive model for PET developed by Dupaix and Boyce et al.. The model includes the combined effects of molecular orientation and strain-induced crystallization on strain hardening when the material is deformed above the glass transition temperature. The simulated bottles were also compared with actual blow molded bottles to evaluate the validity of the simulation.

  15. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  16. Helium the disappearing element

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Wheeler M

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is helium, the element, and its use in myriad applications including MRI machines, particle accelerators, space telescopes, and of course balloons and blimps. It was at the birth of our Universe, or the Big Bang, where the majority of cosmic helium was created; and stellar helium production continues. Although helium is the second most abundant element in the Universe, it is actually quite rare here on Earth and only exists because of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. This book includes a detailed history of the discovery of helium, of the commercial industry built around it, how the helium we actually encounter is produced within the Earth, and the state of the helium industry today. The gas that most people associate with birthday party balloons is running out. “Who cares?” you might ask. Well, without helium, MRI machines could not function, rockets could not go into space, particle accelerators such as those used by CERN could not operate, fiber optic cables would not...

  17. Research and Technology Activities Supporting Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The elements of Brayton technology development emphasize power conversion system risk mitigation. Risk mitigation is achieved by demonstrating system integration feasibility, subsystem/component life capability (particularly in the context of material creep) and overall spacecraft mass reduction. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion technology is viewed as relatively mature. At the 2-kWe power level, a CBC conversion system Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six (6) was achieved during the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SD-GTD) in 1998. A TRL 5 was demonstrated for 10 kWe-class CBC components during the development of the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) from 1968 to 1976. Components currently in terrestrial (open cycle) Brayton machines represent TRL 4 for similar uses in 100 kWe-class CBC space systems. Because of the baseline component and subsystem technology maturity, much of the Brayton technology task is focused on issues related to systems integration. A brief description of ongoing technology activities is given.

  18. The optimization on flow scheme of helium liquefier with genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-01-01

    There are several ways to organize the flow scheme of the helium liquefiers, such as arranging the expanders in parallel (reverse Brayton stage) or in series (modified Brayton stages). In this paper, the inlet mass flow and temperatures of expanders in Collins cycle are optimized using genetic algorithm (GA). Results show that maximum liquefaction rate can be obtained when the system is working at the optimal parameters. However, the reliability of the system is not well due to high wheel speed of the first turbine. Study shows that the scheme in which expanders are arranged in series with heat exchangers between them has higher operation reliability but lower plant efficiency when working at the same situation. Considering both liquefaction rate and system stability, another flow scheme is put forward hoping to solve the dilemma. The three configurations are compared from different aspects, they are respectively economic cost, heat exchanger size, system reliability and exergy efficiency. In addition, the effect of heat capacity ratio on heat transfer efficiency is discussed. A conclusion of choosing liquefier configuration is given in the end, which is meaningful for the optimal design of helium liquefier.

  19. Effects of slope plate variable and reheating on semi-solid structure of reheating on semi-solid structure of ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nili-Ahmadabadi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal casting and forming are known as a promising process for a wide range of metal alloys production. In spite of growing application of semi-solid processed light alloys, a few works have been reported about semi-solid processing of iron and steel. In this research inclined plate was used to change dendritic structure of iron to globular one. The effects of length and slope of plate on the casting structure were examined. The results show that the process can effectively change the dendritic structure to globular. In the slope plate angle of 7.5° and length of 560 mm with cooling rate of 67Ks-1 the optimum nodular graphite and solid globular particle were achieved.The results also show that by using slope plate inoculant fading can be prevented more easily since the total time of process is rather short. In addition, the semi-solid ductile cast iron prepared by inclined plate method, was reheated to examine the effect of reheating conditions on the microstructure and coarsening kinetics of the alloy. Solid fraction at different reheating temperatures and holding time was obtained and based on these results the optimum reheating temperature range was determined.

  20. Exergy analyses of an endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle CCHP plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang, Lingen Chen, Yanlin Ge, Fengrui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power plant coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs is presented using finite time thermodynamics (FTT. The CCHP plant includes an endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle, an endoreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption refrigerator and a heat recovery device of thermal consumer. The heat-resistance losses in the hot-, cold-, thermal consumer-, generator-, condenser-, evaporator- and absorber-side heat exchangers and regenerator are considered. The performance of the CCHP plant is studied from the exergetic perspective, and the analytical formulae about exergy output rate and exergy efficiency are derived. Through numerical calculations, the pressure ratio of regenerative Brayton cycle is optimized, the effects of heat conductance of regenerator and ratio of heat demanded by the thermal consumer to power output on dimensionless exergy output rate and exergy efficiency are analyzed.

  1. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lv, Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  2. Modulated reheating and large non-gaussianity in string cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, M.; Quevedo, F. [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Tasinato, G. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Zavala, I. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Burgess, C.P., E-mail: michele.cicoli@desy.de, E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk, E-mail: e.i.zavala@rug.nl, E-mail: cburgess@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: F.Quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    A generic feature of the known string inflationary models is that the same physics that makes the inflaton lighter than the Hubble scale during inflation often also makes other scalars this light. These scalars can acquire isocurvature fluctuations during inflation, and given that their VEVs determine the mass spectrum and the coupling constants of the effective low-energy field theory, these fluctuations give rise to couplings and masses that are modulated from one Hubble patch to another. These seem just what is required to obtain primordial adiabatic fluctuations through conversion into density perturbations through the 'modulation mechanism', wherein reheating takes place with different efficiency in different regions of our Universe. Fluctuations generated in this way can generically produce non-gaussianity larger than obtained in single-field slow-roll inflation; potentially observable in the near future. We provide here the first explicit example of the modulation mechanism at work in string cosmology, within the framework of LARGE Volume Type-IIB string flux compactifications. The inflationary dynamics involves two light Kähler moduli: a fibre divisor plays the rôle of the inflaton whose decay rate to visible sector degrees of freedom is modulated by the primordial fluctuations of a blow-up mode (which is made light by the use of poly-instanton corrections). We find the challenges of embedding the mechanism into a concrete UV completion constrains the properties of the non-gaussianity that is found, since for generic values of the underlying parameters, the model predicts a local bi-spectrum with f{sub NL} of order 'a few'. However, a moderate tuning of the parameters gives also rise to explicit examples with f{sub NL} ∼ O(20) potentially observable by the Planck satellite.

  3. Steam-Reheat Option for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltanov, Eugene

    SuperCritical-Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are being developed as one of the Generation-IV nuclear-reactor concepts. Main objectives of the development are to increase thermal efficiency of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and to decrease capital and operational costs. The first objective can be achieved by introducing nuclear steam reheat inside a reactor and utilizing regenerative feedwater heaters. The second objective can be achieved by designing a steam cycle that closely matches that of the mature supercritical fossil-fuelled power plants. The feasibility of these objectives is discussed. As a part of this discussion, heat-transfer calculations have been performed and analyzed for SuperCritical-Water (SCW) and SuperHeated-Steam (SHS) channels of the proposed reactor concept. In the calculations a uniform and three non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs) were considered for six different fuels (UO2, ThO 2, MOX, UC2, UC, and UN) and at average and maximum channel power. Bulk-fluid, sheath, and fuel centerline temperatures as well as the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were obtained along the fuel-channel length. The HTC values are within a range of 4.7--20 kW/m2·K and 9.7--10 kW/m2·K for the SCW and SHS channels respectively. The main conclusion is that while all the mentioned fuels may be used for the SHS channel, only UC2, UC, or UN are suitable for a SCW channel, because their fuel centerline temperatures are at least 1000°C below melting point, while that of UO2, ThO2 , and MOX may reach melting point.

  4. Task Order 20: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Paul [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Lindsay, Edward [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); McDowell, Michael [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Huang, Megan [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-04-23

    AREVA Inc. developed this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in accordance with Task Order 20 Statement of Work (SOW) covering research and development activities for the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) Brayton Cycle energy conversion. The study addresses the conversion of sCO2 heat energy to electrical output by use of a Brayton Cycle system and focuses on the potential of a net efficiency increase via cycle recuperation and recompression stages. The study also addresses issues and study needed to advance development and implementation of a 10 MWe sCO2 demonstration project.

  5. Exergy Analysis and Second Law Efficiency of a Regenerative Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser M. Jubeh

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The effect of two heat additions, rather than one, in a gas turbine engine is analyzed from the second law of thermodynamics point of view. A regenerative Brayton cycle model is used for this study, and compared with other models of Brayton cycle. All fluid friction losses in the compressor and turbine are quantified by an isentropic efficiency term. The effect of pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, altitude, and altitude with variable ambient temperature on irreversibility "exergy destroyed" and second law efficiency was investigated and compared for all models. The results are given graphically with the appropriate discussion and conclusion.

  6. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  7. Total Heat Exchange Factor Based on Non-Gray Radiation Properties of Gas in Reheating Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Miao; CHEN Hai-geng; XU Li; WU Bin

    2009-01-01

    Modified mathematical models based on imaginary plane zone method in reheating furnace were developed in which non-gray radiation properties of gas were considered,and the Newton's method and the finite difference method were adopted.Effects of productivity,fuel consumption,fuel-air ratio,calorific value of fuel and inserting depth of thermocouple on total heat exchange factor along the length of reheating furnace were investigated.The resuits show that total heat exchange factor increases with productivity or inserting depth of thermocouple,and it decreases when fuel consumption,fuel-air ratio or calorific value of fuel increases.The results are valuable for dynamical compensation of total heat exchange factor for online control mathematical models in reheating furnace.

  8. Brayton-Moser Equations and New Passivity Properties for Nonlinear Electro-Mechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, Dimitri; Clemente-Gallardo, Jesus; Ortega, Romeo; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Klaassens, J. Ben

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative framework for a practically relevant class of nonlinear electro-mechanical systems. The formalism is based on a generalization of Brayton and Moser’s mixed-potential function. Instead of focusing on the usual energy-balance, the models are constructed using the pow

  9. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification program. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A proposal for the demonstration, development and production of the Isotope Brayton Flight System for space vehicles is presented with details on the technical requirements for designing and testing a ground demonstration system and on the program organization and personnel. (LCL)

  10. Specification requirements summary for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, E.E.

    1976-02-10

    This document provides a summary of the required program specifications and procedures for the ERDA Phase I Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Program. Also included are document definitions, descriptions, and formats, and a listing of commonly used abbreviations. This document is intended to be used as a guide in document preparation and control.

  11. From Brayton-Moser formulation to Port Hamiltonian representation : the CSTR case study.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, N.H.; Couenne, Françoise; Dochain, Denis; Le Gorrec, Yann

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper shows that any thermodynamic variable ful lling some stability criterion can be used as Hamiltonian for pseudo hamiltonian representation of a non isothermal Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) model. More precisely it is shown that from Brayton- Moser formulation is obtained some port hamiltonian representation with negative dissipation. This result is shown for reaction A !B.

  12. Identified corrosion and erosion mechanisms in SCO2 Brayton Cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2014-06-01

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO2) is an efficient and flexible working fluid for power production. Research to interface S-CO2 systems with nuclear, thermal solar, and fossil energy sources is currently underway. To proceed, we must address concerns regarding compatibility of materials, at high temperature, and compatibility between significantly different heat transfer fluids. Dry, pure S-CO2 is thought to be relatively inert [1], while the addition of ppm levels of water and oxygen result in formation of a protective chromia layer and iron oxide [2]. Thin oxides are favorable as diffusion barriers, and for their minimal impact on heat transfer. While S-CO2 is typically understood to be the secondary fluid, many varieties of primary fluids exist for nuclear applications. Molten salts, for use in the Molten Salt Reactor concept, are given as an example to contrast the materials requirements of primary and secondary fluids. Thin chromia layers are soluble in molten salt systems (nitrate, chloride, and fluoride based salts) [3-8], making materials selection for heat exchangers a precarious balancing act between high temperature oxidation (S-CO2) and metal dissolution (salt side of heat exchanger). Because concerns have been raised regarding component lifetimes, S-CO2 work has begun to characterize starting materials and to establish a baseline by analysis of 1) as-received stainless steel piping, and 2) piping exposed to S-CO2 under typical operating conditions with Sandia National Laboratories Brayton systems. A second issue discovered by SNL involves substantial erosion in the turbine blade and inlet nozzle. It is believed that this is caused by small particulates that originate from different materials around the loop that are entrained by the S-CO2 to the nozzle, where they impact the inlet nozzle vanes, causing erosion. We believe that, in some way, this is linked to the purity of the S-CO2, the corrosion contaminants, and the metal particulates that

  13. Thermal Efficiency of Cogeneration Units with Multi-Stage Reheating for Russian Municipal Heating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Lisin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the layout of an optimum process for supplying heat to Russian municipal heating systems operating in a market environment. We analyze and compare the standard cogeneration unit design with two-stage reheating of service water coming from controlled extraction locations and layouts that employ three in-line reheaters with heat the supply controlled by a rotary diaphragm and qualitative/quantitative methods (so-called “uncontrolled extraction”. Cogeneration unit designs are benchmarked in terms of their thermal efficiency expressed as a fuel consumption rate. The specific fuel consumption rate on electricity production is viewed as a key parameter of thermal efficiency.

  14. Inflation and reheating in the Starobinsky model with conformal HiggsField

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, D. S.; Tokareva, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    This is a talk presented by A.A. Tokareva at Baikal summer school on physics of elementary particles and astrophysics 2012. We studied the reheating after the Starobinsky inflation and have found that the main process is the inflaton decay to SM gauge fields due to the conformal anomaly. The reheating temperature is low leading to the possibility to detect the gravity wave signal from inflation and evaporation of structures formed after inflation in DECIGO and BBO experiments. Also we give predictions for the parameters of scalar perturbation spectrum at the next-to-leading order of slow roll and obtain a bound on the Higgs mass.

  15. Sensitivity study on nitrogen Brayton cycle coupled with a small ultra-long cycle fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main characteristics of UCFR are constant neutron flux and power density. They move their positions every moment at constant speed along with axial position of fuel rod for 60 years. Simultaneously with the development of the reactors, a new power conversion system has been considered. To solve existing issues of vigorous sodium-water reaction in SFR with steam power cycle, many researchers suggested a closed Brayton cycle as an alternative technique for SFR power conversion system. Many inactive gases are selected as a working fluid in Brayton power cycle, mainly supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}). However, S-CO{sub 2} still has potential for reaction with sodium. CO{sub 2}-sodium reaction produces solid product, which has possibility to have an auto ignition reaction around 600 .deg. C. Thus, instead of S-CO{sub 2}, CEA in France has developed nitrogen power cycle for ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration). In addition to inactive characteristic of nitrogen with sodium, its thermal and physical similarity with air enables to easily adopt to existing air Brayton cycle technology. In this study, for an optimized power conversion system for UCFR, a nitrogen Brayton cycle was analyzed in thermodynamic aspect. Based on subchannel analysis data of UCFR-100, a parametric study for thermal performance of nitrogen Brayton cycle was achieved. The system maximum pressure significantly affects to the overall efficiency of cycle, while other parameters show little effects. Little differences of the overall efficiencies for all cases between three stages (BOC, MOC, EOC) indicate that the power cycle of UCFR-100 maintains its performance during the operation.

  16. Antilisterial properties of marinades during refrigerated storage and microwave oven reheating against post-cooking inoculated chicken breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladkhah, Aliyar; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Nychas, George-John; Sofos, John N

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on cooked chicken meat with different marinades and survival of the pathogen as affected by microwave oven reheating. During aerobic storage at 7 °C, on days 0, 1, 2, 4, and 7, samples were reheated by microwave oven (1100 W) for 45 or 90 s and analyzed microbiologically. L. monocytogenes counts on nonmarinated (control) samples increased (P Microwave oven reheating reduced L. monocytogenes counts by 1.9 to 4.1 (45 s) and >2.4 to 5.0 (90 s) log CFU/g. With similar trends across different marinates, the high levels of L. monocytogenes survivors found after microwave reheating, especially after storage for more than 2 d, indicate that length of storage and reheating time need to be considered for safe consumption of leftover cooked chicken.

  17. Cosmic Ray Helium Hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations by CREAM, ATIC-2 and PAMELA experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR proton below the knee $10^15 eV$ and (2) all CR spectra become hard at $\\gtrsim 10^{11} eV/n$. We propose a new picture that higher energy CRs are generated in more helium-rich region to explain the hardening (1) without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium to proton ratio at $\\sim 100$ TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance $Y=0.25$ by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in the chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium when escaping from the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening (2) because of the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with $\\sim 10^6$ K. Our model predicts hard and con...

  18. Parametric Investigation and Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Combined Cycle for Recovering the Waste Heat from Nuclear Closed Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihuang Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined cycle that combines AWM cycle with a nuclear closed Brayton cycle is proposed to recover the waste heat rejected from the precooler of a nuclear closed Brayton cycle in this paper. The detailed thermodynamic and economic analyses are carried out for the combined cycle. The effects of several important parameters, such as the absorber pressure, the turbine inlet pressure, the turbine inlet temperature, the ammonia mass fraction, and the ambient temperature, are investigated. The combined cycle performance is also optimized based on a multiobjective function. Compared with the closed Brayton cycle, the optimized power output and overall efficiency of the combined cycle are higher by 2.41% and 2.43%, respectively. The optimized LEC of the combined cycle is 0.73% lower than that of the closed Brayton cycle.

  19. Effects of slope plate variable and reheating on semi-solid structure of ductile cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Nili-Ahmadabadi; F. Pahlevani; P. Babaghorbani

    2008-01-01

    Semi-solid metal casting and forming are known as a promising process for a wide range of metal alloys production. In spite of growing application of semi-solid processed light alloys, a few works have been reported about semi-solid processing of iron and steel. In this research inclined plate was used to change dendritic structure of iron to globular one. The effects of length and slope of plate on the casting structure were examined. The results show that the process can effectively change the dendritic structure to globular. In the slope plate angle of 7.5°and length of 560 mm with cooling rate of 67K·s-1 the optimum nodular graphite and solid globular particle were achieved.The results also show that by using slope plate inoculant fading can be prevented more easily since the total time of process is rather short.In addition, the semi-solid ductile cast iron prepared by inclined plate method, was reheated to examine the effect of reheating conditions on the microstructure and coarsening kinetics of the alloy. Solid fraction at different reheating temperatures and holding time was obtained and based on these results the optimum reheating temperature range was determined.

  20. Perturbative Reheating After Multiple-Field Inflation: The Impact on Primordial Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of perturbative reheating on primordial observables in models of multiple-field inflation. By performing a sudden decay calculation, we derive analytic expressions for the local-type non-linearity parameter $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm local}$, the scalar spectral index $n_\\zeta$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_T$ as functions of the decay rates of the inflationary fields. We compare our analytic results to a fully numerical classical field theory simulation, finding excellent agreement. We find that the sensitivity of $f_{\\rm NL}$, $n_\\zeta$, and $r_T$ to the reheating phase depends heavily on the underlying inflationary model. We quantify this sensitivity, and discuss conditions that must be satisfied if observable predictions are to be insensitive to the dynamics of reheating. We demonstrate that upon completion of reheating, all observable quantities take values within finite ranges, the limits of which are determined completely by the conditions during inflation. Furthermore, fluctuations in b...

  1. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direc...

  2. The more investigation of inflation and reheating stages based on the Planck and WMAP-9

    CERN Document Server

    Ghayour, B

    2015-01-01

    The potential $V(\\phi)=\\lambda \\phi^{n}$ is responsible for the inflation of the universe and scalar field $\\phi$ oscillates quickly around some point where $V(\\phi)$ has a minimum. The end of this stage had an important role on the further evolution stages of the universe. The created particles were responsible for reheating the universe at the end of this stage. The behaviour of the inflation and reheating stages are often known as power law expansion $S(\\eta) \\varpropto \\eta^{1+\\beta}$, $S(\\eta) \\varpropto \\eta^{1+\\beta_{s}}$ respectively. The reheating temperature ($T_{rh}$) and $\\beta_{s}$ give us valuable information about reheating stage. Recently people have studied the behaviour of $T_{rh}$ based on slow-roll inflation and initial condition of quantum normalization. It is shown that there is some discrepancy on $T_{rh}$ due to the quantum normalization \\cite{acq}. Therefore the author has believed in \\cite{acq} that the quantum normalization may not be a good initial condition. But it seems that we c...

  3. Broken symmetry makes helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Gray, P L

    2003-01-01

    "The subatomic pion particle breaks the charge symmetry rule that governs both fusion and decay. In experiments performed at the Indiana University Cyclotron Laboratory, physicists forced heavy hydrogen (1 proton + 1 neutron) to fuse into helium in a controlled, measurable environment" (1 paragraph).

  4. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  5. Design, fabrication, and performance of foil journal bearing for the brayton rotating unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, L.; Branger, M.

    1973-01-01

    Foil bearings were designed and manufactured to replace pivoted-shoe journal bearings in an existing Brayton Cycle turbo-alternator-compressor. The design of this unconventional rotor support was accomplished within the constraints and space limitations imposed by the present machine, and the substitution of foil bearings was effected without changes or modification other machine components. A housing and a test rig were constructed to incorporate the new foil-bearing support into a unified assemble with an air-driven rotor and the gimbal-mounted thrust bearing, seals, and shrouds of an actual Brayton Rotating Unit. The foil bearing required no external pressure source, and stable self-acting rotation was achieved at all speeds up to 43,200 rpm. Excellent wipe-wear characteristics of the foil bearing permitted well over 1000 start-stop cycles with no deterioriation of performance in the entire speed range.

  6. The feasibility study on supercritical methane Recuperated Brayton Cycle for waste heat recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Dyuisenakhmetov, Aibolat

    2017-05-01

    Recuperated Brayton Cycle (RBC) has attracted the attention of research scientists not only as a possible replacement for the steam cycle at nuclear power plants but also as an efficient bottoming cycle for waste heat recovery and for concentrated solar power. RBC’s compactness and the ease at which it can be integrated into existent power plants for waste heat recovery require few modifications. Methane, carbon dioxide and trifluoromethane are analyzed as possible working fluids. This work shows that it is possible to achieve higher efficiencies using methane under some operating conditions. However, as it turns out, the performance of Recuperated Brayton Cycle should be evaluated based on net output work. When the performance is assessed on the net output work criteria carbon dioxide still proves to be superior to other gases. This work also suggests that piston engines as compressors and expanders may be used instead of rotating turbines since reciprocating pistons have higher isentropic efficiencies.

  7. Preheating of fluid in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system at cold startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert L.

    2016-07-12

    Various technologies pertaining to causing fluid in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system to flow in a desired direction at cold startup of the system are described herein. A sensor is positioned at an inlet of a turbine, wherein the sensor is configured to output sensed temperatures of fluid at the inlet of the turbine. If the sensed temperature surpasses a predefined threshold, at least one operating parameter of the power generation system is altered.

  8. Preliminary design of S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle for APR-1400 with power generation and desalination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Jun; Lee, Won Woong; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to explore the capabilities of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle for a cogeneration system for APR-1400 application. Three concepts of the S-CO{sub 2} simple recuperated co-generation cycle were designed. A supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is recently receiving significant attention as a promising power conversion system in wide range of energy applications due to its high efficiency and compact footprint. The main reason why the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has these advantages is that the compressor operates near the critical point of CO{sub 2} (30.98 .deg. C, 7.38MPa) to reduce the compression work significantly compared to the other Brayton cycles. In this study, the concept of replacing the entire steam cycle of APR-1400 with the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is evaluated. The power generation purpose S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles are redesigned to generate power and provide heat to the desalination system at the same time. The performance of these newly suggested cycles are evaluated in this paper. The target was to deliver 147MW heat to the desalination process. The thermal efficiencies of the three concepts are not significantly different, but the 3{sup rd} concept is relatively simpler than other cycles because only an additional heat exchanger is required. Although the 2{sup nd} concept is relatively complicated in comparison to other concepts, the temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the DHX are higher than that of the others. As shown in the results, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles are not easy to outperform the steam cycle with very simple layout and general design points under APR-1400 operating condition. However, this study shows that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles can be designed as a co-generation cycle while producing the target desalination heat with a simple configuration. In addition, it was also found that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can achieve higher cycle thermal efficiency than the steam power cycle under

  9. Optimal analysis on the performance of an irreversible harmonic quantum Brayton refrigeration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2003-11-01

    An irreversible model of a quantum refrigeration cycle working with many noninteracting harmonic oscillators is established. The refrigeration cycle consists of two adiabatic and two constant-frequency processes. The general performance characteristics of the cycle are investigated, based on the quantum master equation and the semigroup approach. The expressions for several important performance parameters such as the coefficient of performance, cooling rate, power input, and rate of entropy production are derived. By using numerical solutions, the cooling rate of the refrigeration cycle subject to finite cycle duration is optimized. The maximum cooling rate and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal region of the coefficient of performance and the optimal ranges of temperatures of the working substance and times spent on the two constant-frequency processes are determined. Moreover, the optimal performance of the cycle in the high-temperature limit is compared with that of a classical Brayton refrigerator working with an ideal gas. The results obtained here show that in the high-temperature limit a harmonic quantum Brayton cycle may be equivalent to a classical Brayton cycle.

  10. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-01

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics… and so on. Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  11. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S.; Savolainen, P.; Fredriksson, J.; Paavola, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging cooling-reheating protocol indicates decreased fat fraction via lipid consumption in suspected brown adipose tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lundström, Elin; Strand, Robin; Johansson, Lars; Bergsten, Peter; Ahlström, Håkan; Kullberg, Joel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether a water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cooling-reheating protocol could be used to detect changes in lipid content and perfusion in the main human brown adipose tissue (BAT...

  13. Inflation and reheating in scale-invariant scalar-tensor gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tambalo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We consider the scale-invariant inflationary model studied in [1]. The Lagrangian includes all the scale-invariant operators that can be built with combinations of $R, R^{2}$ and one scalar field. The equations of motion show that the symmetry is spontaneously broken after an arbitrarily long inflationary period and a fundamental mass scale is generated. Upon symmetry breaking, and in the Jordan frame, both Hubble function and the scalar field undergo damped oscillations that can eventually amplify Standard Model fields and reheat the Universe. In the present work, we study in detail inflation and the reheating mechanism of this model in the Einstein frame and we compare some of the results with the latest observational data.

  14. Cosmological evolution of scalar fields and gravitino dark matter in gauge mediation at low reheating temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrantelli, Andrea [University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); McDonald, John, E-mail: andrea.ferrantelli@helsinki.fi, E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk [Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics Group, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    We consider the dynamics of the supersymmetry-breaking scalar field and the production of dark matter gravitinos via its decay in a gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking model with metastable vacuum. We find that the scalar field amplitude and gravitino density are extremely sensitive to the parameters of the hidden sector. For the case of an O'Raifeartaigh sector, we show that the observed dark matter density can be explained by gravitinos even for low reheating temperatures T{sub R}∼<10GeV. Such low reheating temperatures may be implied by detection of the NLSP at the LHC if its thermal freeze-out density is in conflict with BBN.

  15. Higgs inflation, reheating and gravitino production in no-scale Supersymmetric GUTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group,Department of Physics, King’s College London,London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); He, Hong-Jian [Institute of Modern Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Tsinghua University,Beijing 100084 (China); Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi [Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications andDepartment of Physics, Harvard University,Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2016-08-30

    We extend our previous study of supersymmetric Higgs inflation in the context of no-scale supergravity and grand unification, to include models based on the flipped SU(5) and the Pati-Salam group. Like the previous SU(5) GUT model, these yield a class of inflation models whose inflation predictions interpolate between those of the quadratic chaotic inflation and Starobinsky-like inflation, while avoiding tension with proton decay limits. We further analyse the reheating process in these models, and derive the number of e-folds, which is independent of the reheating temperature. We derive the corresponding predictions for the scalar tilt and the tensor-to-scalar ratio in cosmic microwave background perturbations, as well as discussing the gravitino production following inflation.

  16. Thermodynamic modelling and optimization of a dual pressure reheat combined power cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Srinivas

    2010-10-01

    Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plays a key role on performance of combined cycle (CC). In this work, attention was focused on a dual pressure reheat (DPRH) HRSG to maximize the heat recovery and hence performance of CC. Deaerator, an essential open feed water heater in steam bottoming cycle was located to enhance the efficiency and remove the dissolved gasses in feedwater. Each of the heating section in HRSG is solved from the local flue gas condition with an aim of getting minimum possible temperature difference. For high performance, better conditions for compressor, HRSG sections, steam reheater and deaerator are developed. The CC system is optimized at a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1400°C due to the present available technology of modern gas turbine blade cooling systems. The exergetic losses in CC system are compared with each other. The present DPRH HRSG model has been compared and validated with the plant and published data.

  17. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Elias Jabbour Al; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  18. Lessons learned from reheater replacements TVA Gallatin Fossil Plant units 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, P.S.; Stangarone, R.J. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Gallatin Units 1 and 2 have experienced a long history of problems in the reheat front inlet platens and front outlet pendants. Cracks were discovered at lug welds on the reheat inlet platen assemblies after six years of operation. During the next ten years cracking at lugs continued to be a problem in both the inlet platen and front outlet assemblies. Solutions included changing tube material and spacing, and redesigning lugs. None of the solutions were successful. In 1980, a fuel switch to washed coal was made to reduce boiler slagging. Within two years of the fuel change, liquid phase corrosion began to attack the tubes. The corrosion became severe and elements were replaced at seven year intervals. During this time, EPRI sought utilities with boilers experiencing liquid phase corrosion to test new corrosion resistant materials. Gallatin Unit 2 was selected as one of the test units. Probes containing a number of different alloys were inserted into the furnace and subjected to the corrosion attacks. After a five year study, HR3C was selected as the alloy from which to build a complete set of elements for further testing. Reheat assemblies were manufactured from HR3C and installed in Unit 2 and Unit 1 Shortly after Unit 1 returned to service, swages between the front pendant and inlet platen elements failed by brittle fracture due to the cold swaging operation used in fabrication. Cracks were discovered after two years of operation at the tube to lug welds and the new elements were experiencing the same liquid phase corrosion as in the past. The attempt to resolve the liquid phase corrosion problem in Gallatin Units 1 and 2 pendant reheater revealed that past replacements did not address the root cause of the problems. HR3C is a relatively brittle material and manufacturers used traditional methods to design and fabricate the elements. Inadequate fabrication and erection procedures have led to several in-service problems not associated with liquid phase corrosion.

  19. Study on effective parameter of the triple-pressure reheat combined cycle performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Thamir K.; Rahman M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic analyses of the triple-pressure reheat combined cycle gas turbines with duct burner are presented and discussed in this paper. The overall performance of a combined cycle gas turbine power plant is influenced by the ambient temperature, compression ratio and turbine inlet temperature. These parameters affect the overall thermal efficiency, power output and the heat-rate. In this study a thermodynamic model was development on an existing actual combined cycle gas turbin...

  20. A new method for estimating heat flux in superheater and reheater tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purbolaksono, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, km 7 Jalan Kajang-Puchong, Kajang 43009, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: judha@uniten.edu.my; Khinani, A.; Rashid, A.Z.; Ali, A.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, km 7 Jalan Kajang-Puchong, Kajang 43009, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, J. [Kapar Energy Ventures Sdn Bhd, Jalan Tok Muda, Kapar 42200, Selangor (Malaysia); Nordin, N.F. [TNB Research Sdn Bhd, No. 1 Lorong Air Hitam, Kajang 43000, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper a procedure on how to estimate the heat flux in superheater and reheater tubes utilizing the empirical formula and the finite element modeling is proposed. An iterative procedure consisting of empirical formulae and numerical simulation is used to determine heat flux as both temperature and scale thickness increase over period of time. Estimation results of the heat flux over period of time for two different design temperatures of the steam and different heat transfer parameters are presented.

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Steam Power Plant with Double Reheat and Feed Water Heaters

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A steam cycle with double reheat and turbine extraction is presented. Six heaters are used, three of them at high pressure and the other three at low pressure with deaerator. The first and second law analysis for the cycle and optimization of the thermal and exergy efficiencies are investigated. An exergy analysis is performed to guide the thermodynamic improvement for this cycle. The exergy and irreversibility analyses of each component of the cycle are determined. Effects of turbine inlet p...

  2. Dark radiation and dark matter in supersymmetric axion models with high reheating temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, Peter; Steffen, Frank Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure, and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) show trends towards extra radiation. Within the framework of supersymmetric hadronic axion models, we explore two high-reheating-temperature scenarios that can explain consistently extra radiation and cold dark matter (CDM), with the latter residing either in gravitinos or in axions. In the gravitino CDM case, axions from decays of thermal saxions provide extra radiation already prior ...

  3. Supersymmetric mass spectra for gravitino dark matter with a high reheating temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covi, L. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Olechowski, M.; Pokorski, S.; Turzynski, K. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics; Wells, J.D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-09-15

    Supersymmetric theories with gravitino dark matter generally do not allow the high reheating temperature required by thermal leptogenesis without running afoul of relic abundance or big bang nucleosynthesis constraints. We report on a successful search for parameter space that does satisfy these requirements. The main implication is the near degeneracy of the gluino with the other neutralinos in the spectrum. The leading discovery channel at the LHC for this scenario is through monojet plus missing energy events. (orig.)

  4. Economic efficiency of a gas-turbine topping for steam reheating at heating turbo-installations

    OpenAIRE

    Romashova Olga; Belyaev Leonid; Tubolev Aleksandr; Skrebatun Egor

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the ways to improve the operating efficiency of conventional combined heat power plants using gas-turbine topping scheme allowing heat utilization of flue gases for steam reheating in the waste-heat steam boiler. The calculating analysis was performed for a steam-turbine power generating unit with a turbine of the Т-110/120-130 brand name intended for various modes of operation.

  5. Economic efficiency of a gas-turbine topping for steam reheating at heating turbo-installations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashova Olga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the ways to improve the operating efficiency of conventional combined heat power plants using gas-turbine topping scheme allowing heat utilization of flue gases for steam reheating in the waste-heat steam boiler. The calculating analysis was performed for a steam-turbine power generating unit with a turbine of the Т-110/120-130 brand name intended for various modes of operation.

  6. Project for replacement of moisture separators and reheaters (MSR); Proyecto sustitucion recalentadores separadores de humedad (MSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, E.

    2010-07-01

    The new equipment has been designed using materials that are highly resistant to erosion and corrosion in the most sensitive areas, thus improving long-term performance. In order to optimize the performance of new equipment, anew thermal redesign has been undertaken to adjust equipment features to the steam conditions resulting form power uprates. The main improvements are a significatn reduction of load loss through the equipment, as well as better humidity separator efficiency and higher reheating temperature. (Author).

  7. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

  8. Fluid dynamics simulation of the reheating furnace of the continuous mill line of VBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Lis Nunes; Silva, Ricardo Junqueira [V e M do Brasil S.A., Belo Horizonte. MG (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    V and M do Brazil is an integrated steel mill with the production of seamless steel pipe. The manufacture process comprises heating and reheating fuel fired furnaces within two rolling mills lines. The Continuous Mill line reheating furnace has no baffle between heating and soaking zone that might cause a thermofluidodynamics influence between control zones and consequently an overall unbalance within the furnace. The combustion control mesh is based at the real measured temperature per zone. If the thermocouples of the heating zone are influenced by the heat flux coming from the soaking zone, the mesh might receive a wrong temperature signal and send to the heating zone burners a lower thermal demand than the real needed one. The flux unbalance may cause homogeneity problems and/or early equipment worn out. Using the software FLUENT, it was made a 2D fluid dynamic simulation of the reheating furnace with and without a baffle in order to have a qualitative view of its influence in the hot gas flux inside the furnace. Through the simulation it was possible to check the furnace homogeneity gain potential with the installation of the baffle and its better position. The results of this study supported the company decision to actually invest in a baffle installation in this furnace. Further studies will be done to quantify the results of the process. (author)

  9. Demonstration of a Reheat Combustor for Power Production With CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Chorpening; Geo. A. Richards; Kent H. Casleton; Mark Woike; Brian Willis; Larry Hoffman

    2005-10-01

    Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultralow or “zero”-emissions power generation systems. In a concept proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc., nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with steam diluent. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO2 and water streams. The concentrated CO2 stream could then serve as input to a CO2 sequestration process. In this study, experimental data are reported from a full-scale combustion test using steam as the diluent in oxy-fuel combustion. This combustor represents the “reheat” combustion system in a steam cycle that uses a high and low-pressure steam expansion. The reheat combustor serves to raise the temperature of the low-pressure steam turbine inlet, similar to the reheat stage of a conventional steam power cycle. Unlike a conventional steam cycle, the reheat enthalpy is actually generated by oxy-fuel combustion in the steam flow. This paper reports on the unique design aspects of this combustor, as well as initial emissions and operating performance.

  10. Recrystallization behavior of ECAPed A356 alloy at semi-solid reheating temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nili-Ahmadabadi, M., E-mail: nili@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Material, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poorganji, B. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Heidarian, B.; Parsa, M.H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Furuhara, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-06-25

    The microstructural evolution of A356 aluminum alloy during reheating was investigated. In this study, thermomechanical treatment (TMT) method was carried out to produce feed stock for semi-solid forming by using equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) in solid state at ambient temperature. In TMT processes, globular microstructure is obtained by a deformation-recrystallization technique followed by partial re-melting. This work is an attempt to study in detail, the mechanism of the formation of globular microstructure of severely deformed Al-7% Si alloy by ECAP during reheating process by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) provided with an electron back scatter detection (EBSD) observation as well as recrystallization kinetics. The results indicated that equal channel angular pressing followed by reheating was an effective method to produce semi-solid ingot for thixoforming. According to the kinetics calculation and experimental results presented in this paper, recrystallization kinetics, which is mainly depended on the intrinsic material properties, amount of strain and heating rate, plays an important role on the grain size of the semi-solid microstructure.

  11. Helium in Earth's early core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  12. High Efficiency Regenerative Helium Compressor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Helium plays several critical rolls in spacecraft propulsion. High pressure helium is commonly used to pressurize propellant fuel tanks. Helium cryocoolers can be...

  13. Cavitation in liquid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, R. D.; Kagiwada, R.; Barmatz, M.; Rudnick, I.

    1963-11-15

    Ultrasonic cavitation was induced in liquid helium over the temperature range 1.2 to 2.3 deg K, using a pair of identical transducers. The transducers were calibrated using a reciprocity technique and the cavitation threshold was determined at 90 kc/s. It was found that this threshold has a sharp peak at the lambda point, but is, at all temperatures quite low, with an approximate range of 0.001 to 0.01 atm. The significance of the results is discussed. (auth)

  14. Scaling considerations for a multi-megawatt class supercritical CO2 brayton cycle and commercialization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Conboy, Thomas M.; Pasch, James Jay; Wright, Steven A; Rochau, Gary E; Fuller, Robert Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Small-scale supercritical CO2 demonstration loops are successful at identifying the important technical issues that one must face in order to scale up to larger power levels. The Sandia National Laboratories supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle test loops are identifying technical needs to scale the technology to commercial power levels such as 10 MWe. The small size of the Sandia 1 MWth loop has demonstration of the split flow loop efficiency and effectiveness of the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHXs) leading to the design of a fully recuperated, split flow, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle demonstration system. However, there were many problems that were encountered, such as high rotational speeds in the units. Additionally, the turbomachinery in the test loops need to identify issues concerning the bearings, seals, thermal boundaries, and motor controller problems in order to be proved a reliable power source in the 300 kWe range. Although these issues were anticipated in smaller demonstration units, commercially scaled hardware would eliminate these problems caused by high rotational speeds at small scale. The economic viability and development of the future scalable 10 MWe solely depends on the interest of DOE and private industry. The Intellectual Property collected by Sandia proves that the ~10 MWe supercritical CO2 power conversion loop to be very beneficial when coupled to a 20 MWth heat source (either solar, geothermal, fossil, or nuclear). This paper will identify a commercialization plan, as well as, a roadmap from the simple 1 MWth supercritical CO2 development loop to a power producing 10 MWe supercritical CO2 Brayton loop.

  15. Regimes Of Helium Burning

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X

    2000-01-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and ZND detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts which start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star, and the thin shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial directions encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamlet regime at a density of 10^8 g cm^{-3}. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than 10^6 g cm^{-3}. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations travelling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarily, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at 10^7 g cm^{-3}, suggesting that a steady-state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into exista...

  16. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  17. Helium in near Earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cecchi, C; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zuccon, P

    2000-01-01

    The helium spectrum from 0.1 to 100 GeV/nucleon was measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 at altitudes near 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the spectrum is parameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a second helium spectrum was observed. In the second helium spectra over the energy range 0.1 to 1.2 GeV/nucleon the flux was measured to be (6.3+or-0.9)*10/sup -3/ (m/sup 2/ sec sr)/sup -1/ and more than ninety percent of the helium was determined to be /sup 3/He (at the 90% CL). Tracing helium from the second spectrum shows that about half of the /sup 3/He travel for an extended period of time in the geomagnetic field and that they originate from restricted geographic regions similar to protons and positrons. (22 refs).

  18. Development of a Novel Brayton-Cycle Cryocooler and Key Component Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieczkoski, S. J.; Mohling, R. A.

    2004-06-01

    Brayton-cycle cryocoolers are being developed to provide efficient cooling in the 6 K to 70 K temperature range. The cryocoolers are being developed for use in space and in terrestrial applications where combinations of long lifetime, high efficiency, compactness, low mass, low vibration, flexible interfacing, load variability, and reliability are essential. The key enabling technologies for these systems are a mesoscale expander and an advanced oil-free scroll compressor. Both these components are nearing completion of their prototype development phase. The emphasis on the component and system development has been on invoking fabrication processes and techniques that can be evolved to further reduction in scale tending toward cryocooler miniaturization.

  19. Numerical Comparison of NASA's Dual Brayton Power Generation System Performance Using CO2 or N2 as the Working Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownens, Albert K.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Hervol, David S.

    2010-01-01

    A Dual Brayton Power Conversion System (DBPCS) has been tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center using Nitrogen (N2) as the working fluid. This system uses two closed Brayton cycle systems that share a common heat source and working fluid but are otherwise independent. This system has been modeled using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment. This paper presents the results of a numerical study that investigated system performance changes resulting when the working fluid is changed from gaseous (N2) to gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2).

  20. Effects of helium on titanium films and the helium diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG YingMin; LUO ShunZhong; LONG XingGui; AN Zhu; LIU Ning; PANG HongChao; WU XingChun; YANG BenFu; ZHENG SiXiao

    2008-01-01

    Using direct current-magnetron sputtering, Helium-trapped Ti films with a He/Ar mixture was studied. The relative helium content, helium depth profiles for the Ti films and crystallization capacity were analyzed by Enhanced Proton Backscattering Spectrometry (EPBS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that helium diffusion enhanced as more helium trapping into Ti films, and the He holding ratios were 95.9%, 94.9%, 93.9%, 82.8% when the Ti films with the He/Ti of concentrations of 9.7 at.Q, 19.5 at.Q, 19.7 at.Q, 48.3 at.% were measured again 4 months later, respectively. The diffraction peaks be-came weak and wider, the peak of (002) plane was shifted to smaller diffraction angles and the relevant interplanar spacing d(hkl) increased gradually as more helium trapping into Ti films. The main peak was made trending to the (101) plane by both higher deposition temperature and more helium trapping.

  1. Effect of original microstructures on microstructural evolution of A2017 semi-solid alloy billets during reheating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-cheng; CAO Fu-rong; WEN Jing-lin

    2005-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of the A2017 semi-solid alloy billets provided with rheocasting and extruding/extending forming by shearing-cooling-rolling(SCR) technology during reheating in semi-solid state was investigated. The microstructural differences and their generation causes for both billets were also analyzed. The results show that during reheating, the grains of rheocasting billets grow up and spheroidize gradually with the prolongation of isothermal holding time, the eutectic liquid phase at low melting point forms mainly among the grains. However, the grains of the extruding/extending forming billets grow up abnormally through grain coalescence in the initial stage of the reheating, the entrapment of large amount of liquid within grains occurs, and the grain sizes in the reheating billets are coarse and inhomogeneous. Compared with extruding/extending forming billets, rheocasting billets have smaller and uniform grains in reheating microstructure and can rapidly form liquid phase among grains. Therefore, rheocasting billets are more suitable for the semi-solid forming than the extruding/extending forming billets.

  2. Analysis of a reheat gas turbine cycle with chemical recuperation using Aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, S.; Kane, N`Diaye [ISITEM - Lab. d`Energetique, Nantes (France)

    1996-11-01

    Present-day high performance gas turbine based cycles use the combined cycle concept in which the heat in the hot turbine exhaust stream is used to raise steam which can be used to generate electricity using a steam turbine. Recent attention has focused in particular on the chemical heat recovery concept.The potential benefits of such cycles include high conversion efficiency, ultra-low NO{sub x} emission levels (less than 1 ppm) and high power density per unit of land. The low thermal NO{sub X} emissions result from the presence of hydrogen in the reformed fuel gas, which enables combustion at lower flame temperatures. Thus, a CRGT (Chemically Recuperated Gas Turbine) cycle can meet the strictest NO{sub x} limits in operation today without the need for selective catalytic reduction. Such environmental characteristics are the primary reason fuelling current interest in CRGT cycles. For design reasons, reheat combustors cannot be easily adapted to stationary gas turbines, and until recently the CRGT cycle seemed to be limited to aeroderivative gas turbine applications. However, ABB recently unveiled its new GT26 series stationary gas turbines using staged expansion with reheat combustion, allowing high thermal efficiencies with relatively low turbine inlet temperatures. This type of turbine appears particularly well-suited for chemical heat recovery. In this paper, we present a CRGT cycle based on a reheat gas turbine with key design features similar to those of ABB`s GT26 machine. The cycle analysis is performed using ASPEN+ process simulation software. The report includes a detailed first and second law analysis of the cycle. The results confirm that the energy conversion efficiencies of CRGT cycles cannot rival with the efficiencies achieved by state-of-the-art combined cycles. 12 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs

  3. Reheating in tachyonic inflationary models: Effects on the large scale curvature perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar, E-mail: rajeev.jain@unige.ch [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Chingangbam, Pravabati, E-mail: prava@iiap.res.in [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 207-43 Cheongnyangni 2-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2011-11-11

    We investigate the problem of perturbative reheating and its effects on the evolution of the curvature perturbations in tachyonic inflationary models. We derive the equations governing the evolution of the scalar perturbations for a system consisting of a tachyon and a perfect fluid. Assuming the perfect fluid to be radiation, we solve the coupled equations for the system numerically and study the evolution of the perturbations from the sub-Hubble to the super-Hubble scales. In particular, we analyze the effects of the transition from tachyon driven inflation to the radiation dominated epoch on the evolution of the large scale curvature and non-adiabatic pressure perturbations. We consider two different potentials to describe the tachyon and study the effects of two possible types of decay of the tachyon into radiation. We plot the spectrum of curvature perturbations at the end of inflation as well as at the early stages of the radiation dominated epoch. We find that reheating does not affect the amplitude of the curvature perturbations in any of these cases. These results corroborate similar conclusions that have been arrived at earlier based on the study of the evolution of the perturbations in the super-Hubble limit. We illustrate that, before the transition to the radiation dominated epoch, the relative non-adiabatic pressure perturbation between the tachyon and radiation decays in a fashion very similar to that of the intrinsic entropy perturbation associated with the tachyon. Moreover, we show that, after the transition, the relative non-adiabatic pressure perturbation dies down extremely rapidly during the early stages of the radiation dominated epoch. It is these behavior which ensure that the amplitude of the curvature perturbations remain unaffected during reheating. We also discuss the corresponding results for the popular chaotic inflation model in the case of the canonical scalar field.

  4. Dynamic simulation on effect of flame arrangement on thermal process of regenerative reheating furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Jian-ping; MA Ai-chun; ZHAN Shu-hua; ZHOU Jie-min; XIAO Ze-qiang

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the characteristics of combustion and billet heating process, a 3-D transient computer fluid dynamic simulation system based on commercial software CFX4.3 and some self-programmed codes were developed to simulate the thermal process in a continuous heating furnace using high temperature air combustion technology. The effects of different switching modes on injection entrancement of multi burners, combustion and billet heating process in furnace were analyzed numerically, and the computational results were compared with on-site measurement, which verified the practicability of this numerical simulation system.The results indicate that the flow pattern and distribution of temperature in regenerative reheating furnace with partial same-side-switching combustion mode are favorable to satisfy the high quality requirements of reheating, in which the terminal heating temperature of billets is more than 1 460 K and the temperature difference between two nodes is not more than 10 K. But since the surface average temperature of billets apart from heating zone is only about 1 350 K and continued heating is needed in soaking zone, the design and operation of current state are still needed to be optimized to improve the temperature schedule of billet heating. The distribution of velocity and temperature in regenerative reheating furnace with same-side-switching combustion mode cannot satisfy the even and fast heating process. The terminal heating temperature of billets is lower than that of the former case by 30 K. The distribution of flow and temperature can be improved by using cross-switching combustion mode, whose terminal temperature of billets is about 1 470 K with small temperature difference within 10 K.

  5. Solving the Hierarchy Problem at Reheating with a Large Number of Degrees of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Timothy; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Hook, Anson; Kim, Hyung Do; Pinner, David

    2016-12-01

    We present a new solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. We introduce N copies of the standard model with varying values of the Higgs mass parameter. This generically yields a sector whose weak scale is parametrically removed from the cutoff by a factor of 1 /√{N }. Ensuring that reheating deposits a majority of the total energy density into this lightest sector requires a modification of the standard cosmological history, providing a powerful probe of the mechanism. Current and near-future experiments can explore much of the natural parameter space. Furthermore, supersymmetric completions that preserve grand unification predict superpartners with mass below mWMpl/MGUT˜10 TeV .

  6. Reheating via a generalized non-minimal coupling of curvature to matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Páramos, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In this work one shows that a generalized non-minimal coupling between geometry and matter is compatible with Starobinsky inflation and leads to a successful process of preheating, a reheating scenario based on the production of massive particles via parametric resonance. The model naturally extends the usual preheating mechanism, which resorts to an {\\it ad-hoc} scalar curvature-dependent mass term for a scalar field $\\chi$, and also encompasses a previously studied preheating channel based upon a non-standard kinetic term.

  7. Inflation and reheating in theories with spontaneous scale invariance symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Vanzo, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    We study a scale-invariant model of quadratic gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. We focus on cosmological solutions and find that scale invariance is spontaneously broken and a mass scale naturally emerges. Before the symmetry breaking, the Universe undergoes an inflationary expansion with nearly the same observational predictions of Starobinsky's model. At the end of inflation, the Hubble parameter and the scalar field converge to a stable fixed point through damped oscillations and the usual Einstein-Hilbert action is recovered. The oscillations around the fixed point can reheat the Universe in various ways, and we study in detail some of these possibilities.

  8. Inflation and reheating in theories with spontaneous scale invariance symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We study a scale-invariant model of quadratic gravity with a non-minimally coupled scalar field. We focus on cosmological solutions and find that scale invariance is spontaneously broken and a mass scale naturally emerges. Before the symmetry breaking, the Universe undergoes an inflationary expansion with the same characteristics of Starobinsky's model. At the end of inflation, the Hubble parameter and the scalar field converge to a stable fixed point through damped oscillations that are responsible for the reheating of the Universe via parametric amplification of other matter fields.

  9. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1∼3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  10. Progress Towards a 6-10 K Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarola, M. V.; Cragin, K. J.; Breedlove, J. J.; Davis, T. M.

    2006-04-01

    Turbomachine-based Brayton (turbo-Brayton) cryocoolers are an ideal option for long-duration space missions. Key attributes inherent to the technology are high reliability, extremely low vibration emittance, and flexible packaging and integration with instruments and spacecraft systems. The first space implementation of the technology was the NICMOS Cryocooler, which is a single-stage unit that was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope in March 2002. This cryocooler provides 7 W of cooling at 70 K and has been operating for 3.3 years (July 2005) without degradation in performance. New developments at Creare are focused on two-stage configurations with load temperatures as low as 6 K. The lower temperatures and loads have required advances in component technologies to meet aggressive targets for cryocooler mass, size and performance. The development of the electronics, compressors and intermediate turboalternator for a 6-10 K cryocooler are complete. This paper summarizes our accomplishments on the completed components, and reviews our progress towards the development of the remaining critical components, a lightweight recuperator and a high performance low temperature turboalternator.

  11. Counter flow induced draft cooling tower option for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidaparti, Sandeep R., E-mail: sandeep.pidaparti@gmail.com [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ranjan, Devesh, E-mail: devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A code was developed to investigate the various aspects of using cooling tower for S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles. • Cooling tower option to reject heat is quantitatively compared to the direct water cooling and dry air cooling options. • Optimum water conditions resulting in minimal plant capital cost per unit power consumption are calculated. - Abstract: A simplified qualitative analysis was performed to investigate the possibility of using counter flow induced draft cooling tower option to reject heat from the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for advanced fast reactor (AFR)-100 and advanced burner reactor (ABR)-1000 plants. A code was developed to estimate the tower dimensions, power and water consumption, and to perform economic analysis. The code developed was verified against a vendor provided quotation and is used to understand the effect of ambient air and water conditions on the design of cooling tower. The calculations indicated that there exists optimum water conditions for given ambient air conditions which will result in minimum power consumption, thereby increasing the cycle efficiency. A cost-based optimization technique is used to estimate the optimum water conditions which will improve the overall plant economics. A comparison of different cooling options for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle indicated that the cooling tower option is a much more practical and economical option compared to the dry air cooling or direct water cooling options.

  12. Exergetic efficiency optimization for an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuehong Bi; Lingen Chen; Fengrui Sun

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with the performance analysis and optimization for irreversible heat pumps working on reversed Brayton cycle with constant-temperature heat reservoirs by taking exergetic efficiency as the optimization objective combining exergy concept with finite-time thermodynamics (FTT). Exergetic efficiency is defined as the ratio of rate of exergy output to rate of exergy input of the system. The irreversibilities considered in the system include heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and non-isentropic losses in the compression and expansion processes. The analytical formulas of the heating load, coefficient of performance (COP) and exergetic efficiency for the heat pumps are derived. The results are compared with those obtained for the traditional heating load and coefficient of performance objectives. The influences of the pressure ratio of the compressor, the allocation of heat exchanger inventory, the temperature ratio of two reservoirs, the effectiveness of the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and regenerator, the efficiencies of the compressor and expander, the ratio of hot-side heat reservoir temperature to ambient temperature, the total heat exchanger inventory, and the heat capacity rate of the working fluid on the exergetic efficiency of the heat pumps are analysed by numerical calculations. The results show that the exergetic efficiency optimization is an important and effective criterion for the evaluation of an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton cycle.

  13. Thermoeconomic Analysis and Optimization of a New Combined Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Recompression Brayton/Kalina Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammad S. Mahmoudi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new combined supercritical CO2 recompression Brayton/Kalina cycle (SCRB/KC is proposed. In the proposed system, waste heat from a supercritical CO2 recompression Brayton cycle (SCRBC is recovered by a Kalina cycle (KC to generate additional electrical power. The performances of the two cycles are simulated and compared using mass, energy and exergy balances of the overall systems and their components. Using the SPECO (Specific Exergy Costing approach and employing selected cost balance equations for the components of each system, the total product unit costs of the cycles are obtained. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects on the SCRB/KC and SCRBC thermodynamic and thermoeconomic performances of key decision parameters. In addition, considering the exergy efficiency and total product unit cost as criteria, optimization is performed for the SCRBC and SCRB/KC using Engineering Equation Solver software. The results indicate that the maximum exergy efficiency of the SCRB/KC is higher than that of the SCRBC by up to 10%, and that the minimum total product unit cost of the SCRB/KC is lower than that of the SCRBC by up to 4.9%.

  14. Tensile and Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper represents a status report documenting the work on creep of superalloys performed under Project Prometheus. Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, are being screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy X, (Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN), Inconel 617, Inconel 740, Nimonic 263, and Incoloy MA956 (Special Metals Corporation, Huntington, WV) are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Conventional tensile and creep tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 K on specimens extracted from the materials. Initial microstructure evaluations were also undertaken.

  15. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS). Phase I. First annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-27

    The objective of the BIPS program is to develop a closed gas turbine dynamic conversion system for space application. The baseline system is a 7-year life, 450 lb, 1300 W(e) unit using Brayton cycle hardware developed for the NASA LeRC and two 2400 W(t) Multi-Hundred Watt isotope heat sources developed for the ERDA. Phase I of the three-phase BIPS program is the conceptual design of the flight system, the design, development, and testing of a prototype Ground Demonstration System (GDS). The Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU), Mini-BRU Recuperator (MBR), and Heat Source Assembly (HSA) will be integrated into the ground demonstrator loop, and the system will be tested under simulated space conditions at the AiResearch Space Power Laboratory. Successful completion of the Phase I effort in mid 1978 is expected to lead to the Phase II and Phase III follow-on efforts. Phase II is a 24-month effort for the development and qualification of a flight system. Qualification will include testing with an isotope heat source. Phase III is a 12-month effort to fabricate flight-qualified hardware for delivery in April 1981.

  16. Off-design performance prediction of Radial Compressor of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for KAIST Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seongkuk; Lee, Jekyoung; Kim, Seong Gu; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KAIST research team suggested a new concept of SMR, which utilizes S-CO{sub 2} as the operating fluid and coolant. It was named as KAIST MMR(Micro Modular Reactor). Compared with existing SMR concepts, this reactor has advantages of achieving smaller volume of power conversion unit (PCU) containing the core and PCU in one vessel for the complete modularization passive air-cooling system more flexible installation in the inland area. In previous study, performance of turbomachinery in PCU was considered only on-design. But, off-design performances of each component can affect not only PCU but also the core because this reactor adopts the direct S-CO{sub 2} loop in GFR. Nuclear system is applied by relatively conservative criteria of safety. Thus, off-design performances of each component should be considered in order to be more realistic reactor. The suggested turbomachinery size of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is relatively smaller than those of helium Brayton cycle and steam Rankine cycle. Performance analysis of compressor is conducted by KAIST-TMD in case of on-design and off-design. Compressor efficiency in on-design conditions is obtained 84.51 %. But compressor performance in off-design conditions decreases certainly. This means that more heat than existing prediction is rejected by air-cooling system. KAIST-TMD will be verified with more experiment data for providing the results of more accurate analysis. Also, this code will be modified to couple with safety analysis codes and S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis codes in the future. Furthermore, authors will consider aerodynamic performance analysis and various losses for more realization.

  17. Alkali-helium snowball complexes formed on helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S; Mudrich, M; Stienkemeier, F

    2009-07-28

    We systematically investigate the formation and stability of snowballs formed by femtosecond photoionization of small alkali clusters bound to helium nanodroplets. For all studied alkali species Ak = (Na,K,Rb,Cs) we observe the formation of snowballs Ak(+)He(N) when multiply doping the droplets. Fragmentation of clusters Ak(N) upon ionization appears to enhance snowball formation. In the case of Na and Cs we also detect snowballs Ak(2) (+)He(N) formed around Ak dimer ions. While the snowball progression for Na and K is limited to less than 11 helium atoms, the heavier atoms Rb and Cs feature wide distributions at least up to Ak(+)He(41). Characteristic steps in the mass spectra of Cs-doped helium droplets are found at positions consistent with predictions on the closure of the first shell of helium atoms around the Ak(+) ion based on variational Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-09-22

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  19. Transferring superfluid helium in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter

    1986-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic model of a transfer system for resupplying liquid helium in space is presented, with application to NASA projects including the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, the Large Deployable Reflector, and the Hubble Space Telescope. The relations between different thermodynamic regimes that can be expected in the transfer line are used to study the relative efficiencies of various possible transfer techniques. Low heat leak into the transfer line, particularly at point sources such as the coupling, is necesssary for efficient transfer of liquid helium, and proper selection of supply tank temperature is important during helium resupply.

  20. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  1. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  2. Resistor monitors transfer of liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, W. D.

    1966-01-01

    Large resistance change of a carbon resistor at the liquid helium temperature distinguishes between the transfer of liquid helium and gaseous helium into a closed Dewar. The resistor should be physically as small as possible to reduce the heat load to the helium.

  3. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures

  4. Constraining scalar-Gauss-Bonnet inflation by reheating, unitarity, and Planck data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Maity, Debaprasad; Mukherjee, Rupak

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the inflationary dynamics in detail for theories with Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to scalar functions, in light of the Planck data. Considering the chaotic inflationary scenario, we constrain the parameters of two models involving inflaton-Gauss-Bonnet coupling by current Planck data. For nonzero inflaton-Gauss-Bonnet coupling β , an inflationary analysis provides us a big cosmologically viable region in the space of (m , β ), where m is the mass of the inflaton. However, we study further on constraining β arising from reheating considerations and unitarity of tree-level amplitude involving 2-graviton →2 -graviton (h h →h h ) scattering. Our analysis, particularly on reheating significantly reduces the parameter space of (m , β ) for all models. The quadratic Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter turns out to be more strongly constrained than that of the linear coupling. For the linear Gauss-Bonnet coupling function, we obtain β ≲1 03, with the condition β (m /MP)2≃10-4. However, the study of the Higgs inflation scenario in the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet term turns out to be completely disfavored.

  5. Mechanism of crumb toughening in bread-like products by microwave reheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzan, Michael; Ramon, Ory; Kopelman, Ishaiahu J; Kesselman, Ellina; Mizrahi, Shimon

    2007-08-08

    Comparing breads reheated in conventional and microwave ovens revealed that the latter considerably toughens the crumb texture when internal boiling is induced. Moisture loss in itself has a relatively minor toughening effect. The major changes, caused by boiling, occur only in systems with starch concentration in excess of a threshold level of about 37% (wet basis). Substantially greater amounts of amylose are leached out of the granules in the case of sustained boiling during microwave heating, as compared to conventional oven heating. The free amylose solution is being "pushed" by the generated steam pressure toward the air-cell wall interface. A rich amylose phase is accumulated at that interface and over the granules. Upon cooling, the amylose undergoes rapid phase changes; thus, toughening is apparent in a relatively short time after heating. Minimizing the textural deleterious effects in microwave reheating of bread-like products should entail (a) preventing or minimizing internal boiling, (b) diluting of the starch concentration below the threshold level, (c) interfering with the amylose phase change by using complex forming agents.

  6. Calculations of inflaton decays and reheating: with applications to no-scale inflation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics,King’s College London,London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Theory Division, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Garcia, Marcos A.G. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University,College Station, 77843 Texas (United States); Astroparticle Physics Group, Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Mitchell Campus, Woodlands, 77381 Texas (United States); Academy of Athens, Division of Natural Sciences,28 Panepistimiou Avenue, Athens 10679 (Greece); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-07-30

    We discuss inflaton decays and reheating in no-scale Starobinsky-like models of inflation, calculating the effective equation-of-state parameter, w, during the epoch of inflaton decay, the reheating temperature, T{sub reh}, and the number of inflationary e-folds, N{sub ∗}, comparing analytical approximations with numerical calculations. We then illustrate these results with applications to models based on no-scale supergravity and motivated by generic string compactifications, including scenarios where the inflaton is identified as an untwisted-sector matter field with direct Yukawa couplings to MSSM fields, and where the inflaton decays via gravitational-strength interactions. Finally, we use our results to discuss the constraints on these models imposed by present measurements of the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar perturbation ratio r, converting them into constraints on N{sub ∗}, the inflaton decay rate and other parameters of specific no-scale inflationary models.

  7. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  8. ITER helium ash accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  9. Brayton-cycle heat recovery-system characterization program. Subatmospheric-system test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgmeier, L.; Leung, S.

    1981-07-31

    The turbine tests and results for the Brayton cycle subatmospheric system (SAS) are summarized. A scaled model turbine was operated in the same environment as that which a full-scale SAS machine would experience from the hot effluent flue gas from a glass container furnace. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the effects of a simulated furnace flue gas stream on the turbine nozzles and blades. The following specific areas were evaluated: erosion of the turbine nozzles and blades from the dust in the flue gas, hot corrosion from alkali metal salts in the dust and acid vapor (sulfur trioxide and hydrogen chloride) in the flue gas, and fouling and flow blockage due to deposition and/or condensation from the flue gas constituents.

  10. An isothermal model of a hybrid Stirling/reverse-Brayton cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, G. F.; Maddocks, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a cryogenic refrigerator that integrates a reverse-Brayton lower temperature stage with a 2-piston Stirling upper temperature stage using a rectification system of check valves and buffer volumes. The numerical model extends the isothermal Schmidt analysis of the Stirling cycle by deriving the additional dimensionless governing equations that characterize the recuperative system. Numerical errors are quantified and the results are verified against analytical solutions in the appropriate limits. The model is used to explore the effect of the rectification system's characteristics on the overall cycle's behavior. Finally, the model is used to optimize the hybrid system's design by varying the swept volume ratio and phase angle in order to maximize the refrigeration per unit of heat transfer in the recuperator and regenerator.

  11. Test Results From a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a closed cycle system incorporating a turboaltemator, recuperator, and gas cooler connected by gas ducts to an external gas heater. For this series of tests, the BPCU was modified by replacing the gas heater with the Direct Drive Gas heater or DOG. The DOG uses electric resistance heaters to simulate a fast spectrum nuclear reactor similar to those proposed for space power applications. The combined system thermal transient behavior was the focus of these tests. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points. At each point it was subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed or DOG electrical input. This paper outlines the changes made to the test unit and describes the testing that took place along with the test results.

  12. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  13. Optimum distribution of heat exchanger inventory for power density optimization of an endoreversible closed Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun [Naval Univ. of Engineering, Faculty 306, Wuhan (China); Chih Wu [U.S. Naval Academy, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2001-02-07

    In this paper, the power density (defined as the ratio of the power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle) is taken as the objective for performance optimisations of an endoreversible closed Brayton cycle coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs in the viewpoint of finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) or entropy generation minimisation (EGM). The optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the optimum power density of the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers for the fixed heat exchanger inventory is analysed using numerical examples. The influence of some design parameters on the optimum heat conductance distribution and the maximum power density and the optimum pressure ratio corresponding to the maximum power density are provided. The power plant design with optimisation leads to higher efficiency and smaller size. (Author)

  14. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  15. Effect of Slope Plate Variable and Reheating on the Semi-Solid Structure of Ductile Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Nili-Ahmadabadi; F. Pahlevani; P. Babaghorbani

    2008-01-01

    Semi-solid metal casting and forming is a promising production method for a wide range of metal alloys. In spite of many applications for semi-solid processed light alloys, few works have reported on the semi-solid processing of iron and steel. In this research, an inclined plate was used to change the dendritic structure of iron to globular. The effects of the length and slope of the plate on the casting structure were examined. The results show that the process effectively changes the dendritic structure to globular. A sloped plate angle of 7.5° and length of 560 mm with a cooling rate of 67 K·s-1 gave the optimum graphite nodu-larity and solid particle globularity. The results also show that the sloped plate more easily prevents inocu-lant fading since the total time processing is rather short. In addition the semi-solid ductile cast iron prepared using the inclined plate method was reheated to examine the effect of reheating conditions on the micro-structure and coarsening kinetics of the alloy. The solid fractions at different reheating temperatures and holding times were used to find the optimum reheating temperature range.

  16. Application of Advanced Process Control techniques to a pusher type reheating furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoli, S. M.; Pepe, C.; Barboni, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper an Advanced Process Control system aimed at controlling and optimizing a pusher type reheating furnace located in an Italian steel plant is proposed. The designed controller replaced the previous control system, based on PID controllers manually conducted by process operators. A two-layer Model Predictive Control architecture has been adopted that, exploiting a chemical, physical and economic modelling of the process, overcomes the limitations of plant operators’ mental model and knowledge. In addition, an ad hoc decoupling strategy has been implemented, allowing the selection of the manipulated variables to be used for the control of each single process variable. Finally, in order to improve the system flexibility and resilience, the controller has been equipped with a supervision module. A profitable trade-off between conflicting specifications, e.g. safety, quality and production constraints, energy saving and pollution impact, has been guaranteed. Simulation tests and real plant results demonstrated the soundness and the reliability of the proposed system.

  17. A bound on the scale of spacetime noncommutativity from the reheating phase after inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, R

    2011-01-01

    In an approach to noncommutative gauge theories, where the full noncommutative behavior is delimited by the presence of the UV and IR cutoffs, we consider the possibility of describing a system at a temperature T in a box of size L. Employing a specific form of UV/IR relationship inherent in such an approach of restrictive noncommutativity, we derive, for a given temperature T, an upper bound on the parameter of spacetime noncommutativity Lambda_NC ~ |theta|^{-1/2}. Considering such epochs in the very early universe which are expected to reflect spacetime noncommutativity to a quite degree, like the reheating stage after inflation, or believable pre-inflation radiation-dominated epochs, the best limits on Lambda_NC are obtained. We also demonstrate how the nature and size of the thermal system (for instance, the Hubble distance versus the future event horizon) can affect our bounds.

  18. Prediction of Austenitization and Homogenization of Q235 Plain Carbon Steel during Reheating Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the austenitization and homogenization process of Q235 plain carbon steel during reheating is predictedusing a two-dimensional model which has been developed for the prediction of diffusive phase transformation (e.g.α to γ). The diffusion equations are solved within each phase (α and γ) and an explicit finite volume techniqueformulated for a regular hexagonal grid are used. The discrete interface is represented by special volume elementsα/γ, an volume element α undergoes a transition to an interface state before it becomes γ. The procedure allowsus to handle the displacement of the interface while respecting the flux condition at the interface. The simulatedmicrostructure shows the dissolution of ferrite particles in the austenite matrix is presented at different stages ofthe phase transformation. Specifically, the influence of the microstructure scale and the heating rate on the phasetransformation kinetics has been investigated. The experimental results agree well with the simulated ones.

  19. An upper bound on the reheat temperature for short duration inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Lorshbough, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the upper bound on the reheating temperature given the non-observation of gravitational waves if the number of efolds during inflation are the minimum number required to address the horizon problem as formulated in terms of entropy. This bound is valid for canonical single field slow roll inflation with a generic potential. Our bound numerically is $T_{\\text{reh}}\\lesssim1.7\\times10^{13}$ GeV, which is a factor of 428 less the usual bound one obtains from the non-observation of gravitational waves alone. If inflation lasted much longer than the minimum number of required efolds, our bound relaxes to coincide with the usual bound. We discuss the relevance for studies of primordial black holes.

  20. Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

  1. A bound on the scale of spacetime noncommutativity from the reheating phase after inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvat, R., E-mail: horvat@lei3.irb.hr [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Trampetic, J., E-mail: josipt@rex.irb.hr [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-03-29

    In an approach to noncommutative gauge theories, where the full noncommutative behavior is delimited by the presence of the UV and IR cutoffs, we consider the possibility of describing a system at a temperature T in a box of size L. Employing a specific form of UV/IR relationship inherent in such an approach of restrictive noncommutativity, we derive, for a given temperature T, an upper bound on the parameter of spacetime noncommutativity {Lambda}{sub NC}{approx}|{theta}|{sup -1/2}. Considering such epochs in the very early universe which are expected to reflect spacetime noncommutativity to a quite degree, like the reheating stage after inflation, or believable pre-inflation radiation-dominated epochs, the best limits on {Lambda}{sub NC} are obtained. We also demonstrate how the nature and size of the thermal system (for instance, the Hubble distance versus the future event horizon) can affect our bounds.

  2. Hypercharged dark matter and direct detection as a probe of reheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Brian; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2014-03-14

    The lack of new physics at the LHC so far weakens the argument for TeV scale thermal dark matter. On the other hand, heavier, nonthermal dark matter is generally difficult to test experimentally. Here we consider the interesting and generic case of hypercharged dark matter, which can allow for heavy dark matter masses without spoiling testability. Planned direct detection experiments will be able to see a signal for masses up to an incredible 1010  GeV, and this can further serve to probe the reheating temperature up to about 109  GeV, as determined by the nonthermal dark matter relic abundance. The Z-mediated nature of the dark matter scattering may be determined in principle by comparing scattering rates on different detector nuclei, which in turn can reveal the dark matter mass. We will discuss the extent to which future experiments may be able to make such a determination.

  3. Bed system performance in helium circulation mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yean Jin; Jung, Kwang Jin; Ahn, Do Hee; Chung, Hong Suk [UST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Suk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei Hun [NFRI, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, We have conducted an experiment for storing hydrogen to depleted uranium and zirconium cobalt. The helium blanket effect has been observed in experiments using metal hydrides. The collapse of the hydrogen isotopes are accompanied by the decay heat and helium-3. Helium-3 dramatically reduces the hydrogen isotope storage capacity by surrounding the metal. This phenomenon is called a helium blanket effect. In addition the authors are working on the recovery and removal techniques of helium-3. In this paper, we discuss the equipment used to test the helium blanket effect and the results of a helium circulation experiment. The helium-3 produced surrounds the storage material surface and thus disturbs the reaction of the storage material and the hydrogen isotope. Even if the amount of helium-3 is small, the storage capacity of the SDS bed significantly drops. This phenomenon is the helium blanket effect. To resolve this phenomenon, a circulating loop was introduced. Using a circulating system, helium can be separated from the storage material. We made a helium loop that includes a ZrCo bed. Then using a metal bellows pump, we tested the helium circulation.

  4. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting.

  5. Pierre Gorce working on a helium pump.

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This type of pump was designed by Mario Morpurgo, to circulate liquid helium in superconducting magnets wound with hollow conductors. M. Morpurgo, Design and construction of a pump for liquid helium, CRYIOGENICS, February 1977, p. 91

  6. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

  7. The cosmic production of Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, R; MacDonald, J; Gibson, B K; Jimenez, Raul; Flynn, Chris; Donald, James Mac; Gibson, Brad K.

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the cosmic production rate of helium relative to metals ($\\Delta Y/\\Delta Z$) using K dwarf stars in the Hipparcos catalog with accurate spectroscopic metallicities. The best fitting value is $\\Delta Y/\\Delta Z=2.1 \\pm 0.4$ at the 68% confidence level. Our derived value agrees with determinations from HII regions and with theoretical predictions from stellar yields with standard assumptions for the initial mass function. The amount of helium in stars determines how long they live and therefore how fast they will enrich the insterstellar medium with fresh material.

  8. Negative ions in liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapak, A. G.; Schmidt, W. F.

    2011-05-01

    The structure of negative ions in liquid 4He is analyzed. The possibility of cluster or bubble formation around impurity ions of both signs is discussed. It is shown that in superfluid helium, bubbles form around negative alkaline earth metal ions and clusters form around halogen ions. The nature of "fast" and "exotic" negative ions is also discussed. It is assumed that "fast" ions are negative ions of helium excimer molecules localized inside bubbles. "Exotic" ions are stable negative impurity ions, which are always present in small amounts in gas discharge plasmas. Bubbles or clusters with radii smaller the radius of electron bubbles develop around these ions.

  9. Comparison between reverse Brayton and Kapitza based LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    LNG boil-off gas (BOG) reliquefaction systems in LNG carrier ships uses refrigeration devices which are based on reverse Brayton, Claude, Kapitza (modified Claude) or Cascade cycles. Some of these refrigeration devices use nitrogen as the refrigerants and hence nitrogen storage vessels or nitrogen generators needs to be installed in LNG carrier ships which consume space and add weight to the carrier. In the present work, a new configuration based on Kapitza liquefaction cycle which uses BOG itself as working fluid is proposed and has been compared with Reverse Brayton Cycle (RBC) on sizes of heat exchangers and compressor operating parameters. Exergy analysis is done after simulating at steady state with Aspen Hysys 8.6® and the comparison between RBC and Kapitza may help designers to choose reliquefaction system with appropriate process parameters and sizes of equipment. With comparable exergetic efficiency as that of an RBC, a Kaptiza system needs only BOG compressor without any need of nitrogen gas.

  10. A global optimization method synthesizing heat transfer and thermodynamics for the power generation system with Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong-Huan; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide operated in a Brayton cycle offers a numerous of potential advantages for a power generation system, and a lot of thermodynamics analyses have been conducted to increase its efficiency. Because there are a lot of heat-absorbing and heat-lossing subprocesses in a practical thermodynamic cycle and they are implemented by heat exchangers, it will increase the gross efficiency of the whole power generation system to optimize the system combining thermodynamics and heat transfer theory. This paper analyzes the influence of the performance of heat exchangers on the actual efficiency of an ideal Brayton cycle with a simple configuration, and proposes a new method to optimize the power generation system, which aims at the minimum energy consumption. Although the method is operated only for the ideal working fluid in this paper, its merits compared to that only with thermodynamic analysis are fully shown.

  11. Method for controlling start-up and steady state performance of a closed split flow recompression brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasch, James Jay

    2017-02-07

    A method of resolving a balanced condition that generates control parameters for start-up and steady state operating points and various component and cycle performances for a closed split flow recompression cycle system. The method provides for improved control of a Brayton cycle thermal to electrical power conversion system. The method may also be used for system design, operational simulation and/or parameter prediction.

  12. Dynamic neutronic and stability analysis of a burst mode, single cavity gas core reactor Brayton cycle space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Kutikkad, Kiratadas

    The conceptual, burst-mode gaseous-core reactor (GCR) space nuclear power system presently subjected to reactor-dynamics and system stability studies operates on a closed Brayton cycle, via disk MHD generator for energy conversion. While the gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is found to be capable of rapidly stabilizing the GCR system, the power of this feedback renders standard external reactivity insertions inadequate for significant power-level changes during normal operation.

  13. Helium in atmospheres of binary stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leushin, V.V. (Rostovskij-na-Donu Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Fiziki)

    The helium abundances were obtained for 25 bright components of binary stars by model atmosphere analysis. The helium abundance for binary stars that lie on the main sequence are larger in the average than in single normal stars. The stars on the Hertzsppung - russel diagram lie at a larger distance from the zero age line than those with normal helium abundance.

  14. Application of exergetic sustainability index to a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with ideal Bose and Fermi gasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Açıkkalp, Emin, E-mail: eacikkalp@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Bilecik S.E. University, Bilecik (Turkey); Caner, Necmettin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • An irreversible Brayton cycle operating quantum gasses is considered. • Exergetic sustainability index is derived for nano-scale cycles. • Nano-scale effects are considered. • Calculation are conducted for irreversible cycles. • Numerical results are presented and discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with quantum gasses including Bose and Fermi gasses is researched. Developments in the nano-technology cause searching the nano-scale machines including thermal systems to be unavoidable. Thermodynamic analysis of a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with Bose and Fermi gasses was performed (especially using exergetic sustainability index). In addition, thermodynamic analysis involving classical evaluation parameters such as work output, exergy output, entropy generation, energy and exergy efficiencies were conducted. Results are submitted numerically and finally some useful recommendations were conducted. Some important results are: entropy generation and exergetic sustainability index are affected mostly for Bose gas and power output and exergy output are affected mostly for the Fermi gas by x. At the high temperature conditions, work output and entropy generation have high values comparing with other degeneracy conditions.

  15. Helium resources of Mare Tranquillitatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Eugene N.

    Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, Univ. of Wisc., Madison, Wisc. Mare Tranquillitatis, about 300000 sq km in area, is currently the most promising lunar source of He-3 for fueling fusion power plants on Earth. About 60 pct. of the mare regolith consists of particles 100 microns or less in diameter. Helium and other gases derived from the solar wind are concentrated in the fine size fractions. Studies of very small craters indicate that the average regolith exceeds 3 m in areas away from larger craters and other mare features not amenable to mining. There is no evidence of decrease of helium content of regolith and depth. Helium is known to be enriched in regoliths that are high in TiO2 content. Remote sensing indicates that about 90 pct. of Mare Tranquillitatis is covered by regolith ranging from about 6 to +7.5 pct. TiO2; inferred He contents range from 20 to at least 45 wppm total helium (7 to 18 wppb He-3). Detailed studies of craters and inferred ejecta halos displayed on high resolution photographs of the Apollo 11 and Ranger 8 areas suggest that as much as 50 pct. of the mare regolith may be physically minable, on average, with appropriate mining equipment. Assuming that the average thickness of regolith is 3 m, and that 50 pct. of the mare area is minable, the He-3 content of minable regolith containing 20 to 45 wppm total He is estimated at about 94,000 tonnes.

  16. Simplicity works for superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowley, Roger [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The famous philosopher Karl Popper once said that ''science is the art of systematic oversimplification''. Indeed, when faced with a new puzzle the trick is to simplify it without losing the essential physics - something that is easier said than done. However, this approach has paid off recently in low-temperature physics. Last year Richard Packard, Seamus Davis and co-workers at the University of California at Berkeley encountered a puzzling new phenomenon in superfluid helium-3, a quantum fluid that remains a liquid close to absolute zero and exhibits unusual properties such as the ability to flow without friction (A Machenkov et al. 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 3860). Previous experiments had revealed that certain effects in liquid helium are analogous to effects observed in superconductors, materials that lose all resistance to electric current at low temperatures. When the Berkeley researchers connected two reservoirs of superfluid helium-3, the superfluid flowed back and forth through apertures that formed a ''weak link'' between the two containers. This behaviour is similar to the oscillatory current of electrons that can flow across an insulating gap separating two superconductors - a device that is known as a Josephson junction. What was puzzling about the Berkeley results was that the helium-3 had two different stable configurations, both of which behaved in an unconventional way compared with a Josephson junction. This puzzle has now been solved independently by Sidney Yip at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Taiwan, and by Janne Viljas and Erkki Thuneberg at the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland (Phys. Rev. Lett. 1999 83 3864 and 3868). In this article the author describes the latest research on superfluid helium. (UK)

  17. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  18. Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle Power Conversion Design, Physical Performance Estimation and Economic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreades, Charalampos

    The combination of an increased demand for electricity for economic development in parallel with the widespread push for adoption of renewable energy sources and the trend toward liberalized markets has placed a tremendous amount of stress on generators, system operators, and consumers. Non-guaranteed cost recovery, intermittent capacity, and highly volatile market prices are all part of new electricity grids. In order to try and remediate some of these effects, this dissertation proposes and studies the design and performance, both physical and economic, of a novel power conversion system, the Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC). The NACC is a power conversion system that takes a conventional industrial frame type gas turbine, modifies it to accept external nuclear heat at 670°C, while also maintaining its ability to co-fire with natural gas to increase temperature and power output at a very quick ramp rate. The NACC addresses the above issues by allowing the generator to gain extra revenue through the provision of ancillary services in addition to energy payments, the grid operator to have a highly flexible source of capacity to back up intermittent renewable energy sources, and the consumer to possibly see less volatile electricity prices and a reduced probability of black/brown outs. This dissertation is split into six sections that delve into specific design and economic issues related to the NACC. The first section describes the basic design and modifications necessary to create a functional externally heated gas turbine, sets a baseline design based upon the GE 7FB, and estimates its physical performance under nominal conditions. The second section explores the off-nominal performance of the NACC and characterizes its startup and shutdown sequences, along with some of its safety measures. The third section deals with the power ramp rate estimation of the NACC, a key performance parameter in a renewable-heavy grid that needs flexible capacity. The

  19. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  20. Galileogenesis: A new cosmophenomenological zip code for reheating through R-parity violating coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an idea of leptogenesis scenario in higher derivative gravity induced DBI Galileon framework aka Galileogenesis in presence of one-loop R-parity violating couplings in the background of a low energy effective supergravity setup derived from higher dimensional string theory framework. We have studied extensively the detailed feature of reheating constraints and the cosmophenomenological consequences of thermal gravitino dark matter in light of PLANCK and PDG data. Finally, we have also established a direct cosmophenomenological connection among dark matter relic abundance, reheating temperature and tensor-to-scalar ratio in the context of DBI Galileon inflation. Higher order correction terms in the gravity sector are introduced in the effective action as a perturbative correction to the Einstein-Hilbert counterpart coming from the computation of Conformal Field Theory disk amplitude at the two loop level [34-36]. The matter sector encounters the effect of N=1, D=4 supergravity motivated DBI Galileon interaction which is embedded in the D3 brane. Additionally, we have considered the effect of R-parity violating interactions [37-40] in the matter sector which provide a convenient framework for quantifying quark and lepton-flavor violating effects. The low energy UV protective effective action for the proposed cosmophenomenological model is described by [31,32]: S=∫d4x √{-g}[K(Φ,X)-G(Φ,X)□Φ+B1R+(B2RRαβγδ-4B3RRαβ+B4R2)+B5] where the model dependent characteristic functions K(Φ,X) and G(Φ,X) are the implicit functions of Galileon and its kinetic counterpart is X=-1/2 >g∂μΦ∂νΦ. Additionally, Bi∀i are the self-coupling constants of graviton degrees of freedom appearing via dimensional reduction from higher dimensional string theory. Specifically B5 be the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. In general, B2≠B3≠B4 which implies that the quadratic curvature terms originated from two loop correction to the

  1. HeREF-2003: Helium Refrigeration Techniques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Theory, Technology, Maintenance and Control of Helium Refrigerators HeREF-2003 is a course in the framework of the 2002 Technical Training Programme, that will provide a complete introduction to Helium refrigeration, with a practical approach to theory, technology, maintenance and control of Helium refrigeration installations. Theoretical aspects and equations will be limited to a minimum. HeREF-2003 targets an audience of technicians and operators of Helium refrigeration plants at CERN, as well as physicists and engineers needing an overview of current Helium refrigeration techniques. HeREF-2003 will address, among other, issues related to component technology, installation maintenance, process control and Helium purity. A commented visit to a couple of CERN Helium refrigeration or liquefaction plants will also take place. Duration: 7 half days (4 mornings and 3 afternoons), 6-10 October, 2003 Cost per participant: 500.- CHF Language: Bilingual English...

  2. HeREF-2003 : Helium Refrigeration Techniques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Theory, Technology, Maintenance and Control of Helium Refrigerators HeREF-2003 is a course in the framework of the 2002 Technical Training Programme, that will provide a complete introduction to Helium refrigeration, with a practical approach to theory, technology, maintenance and control of Helium refrigeration installations. Theoretical aspects and equations will be limited to a minimum. HeREF-2003 targets an audience of technicians and operators of Helium refrigeration plants at CERN, as well as physicists and engineers needing an overview of current Helium refrigeration techniques. HeREF-2003 will address, among other, issues related to component technology, installation maintenance, process control and Helium purity. A commented visit to a couple of CERN Helium refrigeration or liquefaction plants will also take place. • Duration: 7 half days (4 mornings and 3 afternoons), 6-10 October, 2003 • Cost per participant: 500.- CHF ...

  3. Interaction of Helium Rydberg State Molecules with Dense Helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaci, Nelly; Li, Zhiling; Eloranta, Jussi; Fiedler, Steven L

    2016-11-17

    The interaction potentials of the He2(*) excimer, in the a(3)Σu, b(3)Πg, c(3)Σg, and d(3)Σu electronic states with a ground state helium atom are presented. The symmetry of the interaction potentials closely follows the excimer Rydberg electron density with pronounced short-range minima appearing along the nodal planes of the Rydberg orbital. In such cases, a combination of the electrostatic short-range attraction combined with Pauli repulsion leads to the appearance of unusual long-range maxima in the potentials. Bosonic density functional calculations show that the (3)d state excimer resides in a localized solvation bubble in dense helium at 4.5 K, with radii varying from 12.7 Å at 0.1 MPa to 10.8 Å at 2.4 MPa. The calculated (3)d → (3)b pressure-induced fluorescence band shifts are in good agreement with experimental results determined by application of corona discharge. The magnitude of the spectral shifts indicate that the observed He2(*) molecules emit from dense helium whereas the corresponding fluorescence signal from the discharge zone appears quenched. This implies that fluorescence spectroscopy involving this electronic transition can only be used to probe the state of the surrounding medium rather than the discharge zone itself.

  4. Design and optimization of a single stage centrifugal compressor for a solar dish-Brayton system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Kai; Tong, Zhiting; Lin, Feng; Nie, Chaoqun; Engeda, Abraham

    2013-10-01

    According to the requirements of a solar dish-Brayton system, a centrifugal compressor stage with a minimum total pressure ratio of 5, an adiabatic efficiency above 75% and a surge margin more than 12% needs to be designed. A single stage, which consists of impeller, radial vaned diffuser, 90° crossover and two rows of axial stators, was chosen to satisfy this system. To achieve the stage performance, an impeller with a 6:1 total pressure ratio and an adiabatic efficiency of 90% was designed and its preliminary geometry came from an in-house one-dimensional program. Radial vaned diffuser was applied downstream of the impeller. Two rows of axial stators after 90° crossover were added to guide the flow into axial direction. Since jet-wake flow, shockwave and boundary layer separation coexisted in the impeller-diffuser region, optimization on the radius ratio of radial diffuser vane inlet to impeller exit, diffuser vane inlet blade angle and number of diffuser vanes was carried out at design point. Finally, an optimized centrifugal compressor stage fulfilled the high expectations and presented proper performance. Numerical simulation showed that at design point the stage adiabatic efficiency was 79.93% and the total pressure ratio was 5.6. The surge margin was 15%. The performance map including 80%, 90% and 100% design speed was also presented.

  5. Dynamic modelling and simulation of CSP plant based on supercritical carbon dioxide closed Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Elina; Sihvonen, Teemu; Lappalainen, Jari

    2017-06-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) has recently gained a lot of interest as a working fluid in different power generation applications. For concentrated solar power (CSP) applications, sCO2 provides especially interesting option if it could be used both as the heat transfer fluid (HTF) in the solar field and as the working fluid in the power conversion unit. This work presents development of a dynamic model of CSP plant concept, in which sCO2 is used for extracting the solar heat in Linear Fresnel collector field, and directly applied as the working fluid in the recuperative Brayton cycle; these both in a single flow loop. We consider the dynamic model is capable to predict the system behavior in typical operational transients in a physically plausible way. The novel concept was tested through simulation cases under different weather conditions. The results suggest that the concept can be successfully controlled and operated in the supercritical region to generate electric power during the daytime, and perform start-up and shut down procedures in order to stay overnight in sub-critical conditions. Besides the normal daily operation, the control system was demonstrated to manage disturbances due to sudden irradiance changes.

  6. Numerical simulations of LNG vapor dispersion in Brayton Fire Training Field tests with ANSYS CFX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ruifeng; Ng, Dedy; Cormier, Benjamin R; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-11-15

    Federal safety regulations require the use of validated consequence models to determine the vapor cloud dispersion exclusion zones for accidental liquefied natural gas (LNG) releases. One tool that is being developed in industry for exclusion zone determination and LNG vapor dispersion modeling is computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This paper uses the ANSYS CFX CFD code to model LNG vapor dispersion in the atmosphere. Discussed are important parameters that are essential inputs to the ANSYS CFX simulations, including the atmospheric conditions, LNG evaporation rate and pool area, turbulence in the source term, ground surface temperature and roughness height, and effects of obstacles. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to illustrate uncertainties in the simulation results arising from the mesh size and source term turbulence intensity. In addition, a set of medium-scale LNG spill tests were performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field to collect data for validating the ANSYS CFX prediction results. A comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that CFX was able to describe the dense gas behavior of LNG vapor cloud, and its prediction results of downwind gas concentrations close to ground level were in approximate agreement with the test data.

  7. Optimization of a Brayton cryocooler for ZBO liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserranno, D.; Zagarola, M.; Li, X.; Mustafi, S.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is evaluating and developing technology for long-term storage of cryogenic propellant in space. A key technology is a cryogenic refrigerator which intercepts heat loads to the storage tank, resulting in a reduced- or zero-boil-off condition. Turbo-Brayton cryocoolers are particularly well suited for cryogen storage applications because the technology scales well to high capacities and low temperatures. In addition, the continuous-flow nature of the cycle allows direct cooling of the cryogen storage tank without mass and power penalties associated with a cryogenic heat transport system. To quantify the benefits and mature the cryocooler technology, Creare Inc. performed a design study and technology demonstration effort for NASA on a 20 W, 20 K cryocooler for liquid hydrogen storage. During the design study, we optimized these key components: three centrifugal compressors, a modular high-capacity plate-fin recuperator, and a single-stage turboalternator. The optimization of the compressors and turboalternator were supported by component testing. The optimized cryocooler has an overall flight mass of 88 kg and a specific power of 61 W/W. The coefficient of performance of the cryocooler is 23% of the Carnot cycle. This is significantly better performance than any 20 K space cryocooler existing or under development.

  8. Brayton power conversion system parametric design modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashe, Thomas L.; Otting, William D.

    1993-11-01

    The parametrically based closed Brayton cycle (CBC) computer design model was developed for inclusion into the NASA LeRC overall Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) end-to-end systems model. The code is intended to provide greater depth to the NEP system modeling which is required to more accurately predict the impact of specific technology on system performance. The CBC model is parametrically based to allow for conducting detailed optimization studies and to provide for easy integration into an overall optimizer driver routine. The power conversion model includes the modeling of the turbines, alternators, compressors, ducting, and heat exchangers (hot-side heat exchanger and recuperator). The code predicts performance to significant detail. The system characteristics determined include estimates of mass, efficiency, and the characteristic dimensions of the major power conversion system components. These characteristics are parametrically modeled as a function of input parameters such as the aerodynamic configuration (axial or radial), turbine inlet temperature, cycle temperature ratio, power level, lifetime, materials, and redundancy.

  9. Second-law analysis and optimization of reverse brayton cycles of different configurations for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, James Ryder; Razani, Arsalan

    2012-06-01

    Second-law of thermodynamics (2nd law) and exergy analyses and optimization offour Reverse Brayton Refrigeration (RBR) cryogenic cycle configurations: Conventional 1-stage compression cycle; Conventional 2-stage compression cycle; 1-stage compressionModified cycle with intermediate cooling of the recuperator using an auxiliary cooler; andan Integrated 2-stage expansion RBR cycle are performed. The conventional RBR cyclesare analyzed for low and high pressure ratio applications using multistage compressorswith intercooling. Analytical solutions for the conventional cycles are developed includingthermal and fluid flow irreversibilities of the recuperators and all heat exchangers inaddition to the compression and expansion processes. Analytical solutions are used to findthe thermodynamic bounds for the performance of the cycles. Exergy irreversibilitydiagrams of the cycles are developed and the effects of important system parameters onRBR cycle performance are investigated. 2nd law/exergy analyses, and optimization of thecycles with intermediate cooling of the recuperator, considering the cooling temperatureand the recuperator effectiveness and pressure drop, are included. The effect of the 2ndlaw/exergy efficiency of the auxiliary cooler on the total system efficiencies is presented.

  10. Brayton cycle for internal combustion engine exhaust gas waste heat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Galindo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An average passenger car engine effectively uses about one-third of the fuel combustion energy, while the two-thirds are wasted through exhaust gases and engine cooling. It is of great interest to automotive industry to recover some of this wasted energy, thus increasing the engine efficiency and lowering fuel consumption and contamination. Waste heat recovery for internal combustion engine exhaust gases using Brayton cycle machine was investigated. The principle problems of application of such a system in a passenger car were considered: compressor and expander machine selection, machine size for packaging under the hood, efficiency of the cycle, and improvement of engine efficiency. Important parameters of machines design have been determined and analyzed. An average 2-L turbocharged gasoline engine’s New European Driving Cycle points were taken as inlet points for waste heat recovery system. It is theoretically estimated that the recuperated power of 1515 W can be achieved along with 5.7% improvement in engine efficiency, at the point where engine power is 26550 W.

  11. Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) Power Generation from an Electric Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, David G.; Fox, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Several forms of closed cycle heat engines exist to produce electrical energy suitable for space exploration or planetary surface applications. These engines include Stirling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC). Of these two, CBC has often been cited as providing the best balance of mass and efficiency for deep space or planetary power systems. Combined with an alternator on the same shaft, the hermetically sealed system provides the potential for long life and reliable operation. There is also a list of choices for the type of alternator. Choices include wound rotor machines, induction machines, switched reluctance machines, and permanent magnet generators (PMGs). In trades involving size, mass and efficiency the PMG is a favorable solution. This paper will discuss the consequences of using a CBC-PMG source for an electrical power system, and the system parameters that must be defined and controlled to provide a stable, useful power source. Considerations of voltage, frequency (including DC), and power quality will be discussed. Load interactions and constraints for various power types will also be addressed. Control of the CBC-PMG system during steady state operation and startup is also a factor.s

  12. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/ (kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  13. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, H.E.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an evaluation of Brayton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. It is also shown that, if installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or $170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that would hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified.

  14. EBSD and DTA Characterization of A356 Alloy Deformed by ECAP During Reheating and Partial Re-melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Marzyeh; Nili-Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud; Poorganji, Behrang; Heidarian, Bashir; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2013-11-01

    Recrystallization and partial re-melting processes have been developed for producing semi-solid feedstock in a solid state in which a globular microstructure is obtained by plastic deformation followed by reheating. In this research, to induce strain, a cast- and solution-treated Aluminum A356 (7 wt pct Si) alloy was subjected to a repetitive equal channel angular pressing process using a 90 deg die, up to a total accumulated strain of approximately 8 in route A (increasing strain through a sequence of passes with no rotation of the sample after each pass) at ambient temperature. The microstructural evolutions of deformed and reheated materials were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron back-scattered diffraction analysis. In addition, the influences of pre-deformation on the recrystallization mechanism and liquid formation of A356 alloy were presented and discussed. The results are also supported by differential thermal analysis experiments. Evaluation of the observations indicated that the average cell boundary misorientation increased with increasing strain, so this increased misorientation accelerated the mobility of boundaries and recrystallization kinetics. Therefore, the recrystallization mechanism and kinetics affected by deformation, reheating condition, and intrinsic material properties determined the particle size in the semi-solid state.

  15. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  16. Dark radiation and dark matter in supersymmetric axion models with high reheating temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Peter; Steffen, Frank Daniel, E-mail: graf@mpp.mpg.de, E-mail: steffen@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, D–80805 Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies of the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure, and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) show trends towards extra radiation. Within the framework of supersymmetric hadronic axion models, we explore two high-reheating-temperature scenarios that can explain consistently extra radiation and cold dark matter (CDM), with the latter residing either in gravitinos or in axions. In the gravitino CDM case, axions from decays of thermal saxions provide extra radiation already prior to BBN and decays of axinos with a cosmologically required TeV-scale mass can produce extra entropy. In the axion CDM case, cosmological constraints are respected with light eV-scale axinos and weak-scale gravitinos that decay into axions and axinos. These decays lead to late extra radiation which can coexist with the early contributions from saxion decays. Recent results of the Planck satellite probe extra radiation at late times and thereby both scenarios. Further tests are the searches for axions at ADMX and for supersymmetric particles at the LHC.

  17. Two-Layer Linear MPC Approach Aimed at Walking Beam Billets Reheating Furnace Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Zanoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of the control and optimization of a walking beam billets reheating furnace located in an Italian steel plant is analyzed. An ad hoc Advanced Process Control framework has been developed, based on a two-layer linear Model Predictive Control architecture. This control block optimizes the steady and transient states of the considered process. Two main problems have been addressed. First, in order to manage all process conditions, a tailored module defines the process variables set to be included in the control problem. In particular, a unified approach for the selection on the control inputs to be used for control objectives related to the process outputs is guaranteed. The impact of the proposed method on the controller formulation is also detailed. Second, an innovative mathematical approach for stoichiometric ratios constraints handling has been proposed, together with their introduction in the controller optimization problems. The designed control system has been installed on a real plant, replacing operators’ mental model in the conduction of local PID controllers. After two years from the first startup, a strong energy efficiency improvement has been observed.

  18. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Steam Power Plant with Double Reheat and Feed Water Heaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rashidi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A steam cycle with double reheat and turbine extraction is presented. Six heaters are used, three of them at high pressure and the other three at low pressure with deaerator. The first and second law analysis for the cycle and optimization of the thermal and exergy efficiencies are investigated. An exergy analysis is performed to guide the thermodynamic improvement for this cycle. The exergy and irreversibility analyses of each component of the cycle are determined. Effects of turbine inlet pressure, boiler exit steam temperature, and condenser pressure on the first and second laws' efficiencies are investigated. Also the best turbine extraction pressure on the first law efficiency is obtained. The results show that the biggest exergy loss occurs in the boiler followed by the turbine. The results also show that the overall thermal efficiency and the second law efficiency decrease as the condenser pressure increases for any fixed outlet boiler temperature, however, they increase as the boiler temperature increases for any condenser pressure. Furthermore, the best values of extraction pressure from high, intermediate, and low pressure turbine which give the maximum first law efficiencies are obtained based on the required heat load corresponding to each exit boiler temperature.

  19. Two Dimensional Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis for a Packed Bed Regenerator Used in a Reheating Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Nan Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Packed bed is widely used for different industries and technologies, such as heat exchangers, heat recovery, thermal energy storage and chemical reactors. In modern steel industry, packed bed regenerator is widely utilized in the reheating furnace to increase the furnace efficiency. This study established a two dimensional numerical model to simulate a packed bed used in regenerative furnaces. The physical properties of fluids and packed stuffing (such as density, thermal conductivity, and specific heat are considered as functions of temperature to adapt the large temperature variation in operation. The transient temperature profiles of the flue gas, packed bed, and air during the heating and regeneration period are examined for various switching time (30, 60, 120, and 240 s. The results reveal that, during the heating period, the spanwise averaged heat transfer coefficient is decreased along the longitudinal downstream direction, while during the regeneration period, the opposite trend is true. Moreover, the regenerator thermal effectiveness is decreased by increasing the switching time.

  20. Exergy Analysis of a Subcritical Reheat Steam Power Plant with Regression Modeling and Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHIB ALI RAJPER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, exergy analysis of a 210 MW SPP (Steam Power Plant is performed. Firstly, the plant is modeled and validated, followed by a parametric study to show the effects of various operating parameters on the performance parameters. The net power output, energy efficiency, and exergy efficiency are taken as the performance parameters, while the condenser pressure, main steam pressure, bled steam pressures, main steam temperature, and reheat steam temperature isnominated as the operating parameters. Moreover, multiple polynomial regression models are developed to correlate each performance parameter with the operating parameters. The performance is then optimizedby using Direct-searchmethod. According to the results, the net power output, energy efficiency, and exergy efficiency are calculated as 186.5 MW, 31.37 and 30.41%, respectively under normal operating conditions as a base case. The condenser is a major contributor towards the energy loss, followed by the boiler, whereas the highest irreversibilities occur in the boiler and turbine. According to the parametric study, variation in the operating parameters greatly influences the performance parameters. The regression models have appeared to be a good estimator of the performance parameters. The optimum net power output, energy efficiency and exergy efficiency are obtained as 227.6 MW, 37.4 and 36.4, respectively, which have been calculated along with optimal values of selected operating parameters.

  1. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Baye, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than $10^{-10}$. For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to $10^{-3}$, still improving the best literature results.

  2. Helium atom scattering from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    High resolution helium atom scattering can be applied to study a number of interesting properties of solid surfaces with great sensitivity and accuracy. This book treats in detail experimental and theoretical aspects ofthis method as well as all current applications in surface science. The individual chapters - all written by experts in the field - are devoted to the investigation of surface structure, defect shapes and concentrations, the interaction potential, collective and localized surface vibrations at low energies, phase transitions and surface diffusion. Over the past decade helium atom scattering has gained widespread recognitionwithin the surface science community. Points in its favour are comprehensiveunderstanding of the scattering theory and the availability of well-tested approximation to the rigorous theory. This book will be invaluable to surface scientists wishing to make an informed judgement on the actual and potential capabilities of this technique and its results.

  3. Experimental studies of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    1998-01-01

    This talk describes the experimental studies of metastable antiprotonic helium "atomcules" pHe/sup +/ (a neutral exotic atom consisting of a helium nucleus, an antiproton and an electron) performed at CERN-LEAR, and future plans for experiments at the forthcoming Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Laser spectroscopy experiments are reviewed which led to the observation of a total of 13 resonant transitions of the antiproton in both p/sup 4/He/sup +/ and p/sup 3/He/sup +/, and revealed a hyperfine splitting in one transition. A level of precision has been reached where the most accurate 3-body calculations need to include QED effects like the Lamb-shift to come close to the experimental results. (52 refs).

  4. Rapidly pulsed helium droplet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Dick, Bernhard; Slenczka, Alkwin [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Even, Uzi; Lavie, Nachum; Brown, Raviv; Luria, Kfir [Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    A pulsed valve connected to a closed-cycle cryostat was optimized for producing helium droplets. The pulsed droplet beam appeared with a bimodal size distribution. The leading part of the pulse consists of droplets suitable for doping with molecules. The average size of this part can be varied between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} helium atoms, and the width of the distribution is smaller as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source. The system has been tested in a single pulse mode and at repetition rates of up to 500 Hz with almost constant intensity. The droplet density was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source.

  5. Elusive structure of helium trimers

    CERN Document Server

    Stipanović, Petar; Boronat, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Over the years many He-He interaction potentials have been developed, some very sophisticated, including various corrections beyond Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Most of them were used to predict properties of helium dimers and trimers, examples of exotic quantum states, whose experimental study proved to be very challenging. Recently, detailed structural properties of helium trimers were measured for the first time, allowing a comparison with theoretical predictions and possibly enabling the evaluation of different interaction potentials. The comparisons already made included adjusting the maxima of both theoretical and experimental correlation functions to one, so the overall agreement between theory and experiment appeared satisfactory. However, no attempt was made to evaluate the quality of the interaction potentials used in the calculations. In this work, we calculate the experimentally measured correlation functions using both new and old potentials, compare them with experimental data and rank the po...

  6. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  7. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-12-31

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging cooling-reheating protocol indicates decreased fat fraction via lipid consumption in suspected brown adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Lundström

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether a water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI cooling-reheating protocol could be used to detect changes in lipid content and perfusion in the main human brown adipose tissue (BAT depot after a three-hour long mild cold exposure.Nine volunteers were investigated with chemical-shift-encoded water-fat MRI at baseline, after a three-hour long cold exposure and after subsequent short reheating. Changes in fat fraction (FF and R2*, related to ambient temperature, were quantified within cervical-supraclavicular adipose tissue (considered as suspected BAT, denoted sBAT after semi-automatic segmentation. In addition, FF and R2* were quantified fully automatically in subcutaneous adipose tissue (not considered as suspected BAT, denoted SAT for comparison. By assuming different time scales for the regulation of lipid turnover and perfusion in BAT, the changes were determined as resulting from either altered absolute fat content (lipid-related or altered absolute water content (perfusion-related.sBAT-FF decreased after cold exposure (mean change in percentage points = -1.94 pp, P = 0.021 whereas no change was observed in SAT-FF (mean = 0.23 pp, P = 0.314. sBAT-R2* tended to increase (mean = 0.65 s-1, P = 0.051 and SAT-R2* increased (mean = 0.40 s-1, P = 0.038 after cold exposure. sBAT-FF remained decreased after reheating (mean = -1.92 pp, P = 0.008, compared to baseline whereas SAT-FF decreased (mean = -0.79 pp, P = 0.008, compared to after cold exposure.The sustained low sBAT-FF after reheating suggests lipid consumption, rather than altered perfusion, as the main cause to the decreased sBAT-FF. The results obtained demonstrate the use of the cooling-reheating protocol for detecting changes in the cervical-supraclavicular fat depot, being the main human brown adipose tissue depot, in terms of lipid content and perfusion.

  9. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  10. Charging dynamics of dopants in helium nanoplasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Grüner, Barbara; Schomas, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the charging dynamics of helium nanodroplets doped with atoms of different species and irradiated by intense near-infrared laser pulses (≤1015 W cm−2). In particular, we elucidate the interplay of dopant ionization inducing the ignition...... of a helium nanoplasma, and the charging of the dopant atoms driven by the ionized helium host. Most efficient nanoplasma ignition and charging is found when doping helium droplets with xenon atoms, in which case high charge states of both helium (He2+) and of xenon (Xe21+) are detected. In contrast, only low...... charge states of helium and dopants are measured when doping with potassium and calcium atoms. Classical molecular dynamics simulations which include focal averaging generally reproduce the experimental results and provide detailed insights into the correlated charging dynamics of guest and host clusters....

  11. Critical Landau velocity in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Nils B; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-11

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  12. Behaviour of helium after implantation in molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viaud, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarache (France)], E-mail: viaud@dircad.cea.fr; Maillard, S.; Carlot, G.; Valot, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarache (France); Gilabert, E. [Chimie Nucleaire Analytique and Bio-environnementale (CNAB), Gradignan (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI-CNRS, Orleans (France); Peaucelle, C.; Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), Lyon (France)

    2009-03-31

    This study deals with the behaviour of helium in a molybdenum liner dedicated to the retention of fission products. More precisely this work contributes to evaluate the release of implanted helium when the gas has precipitated into nanometric bubbles close to the free surface. A simple model dedicated to calculate the helium release in such a condition is presented. The specificity of this model lays on the assumption that the gas is in equilibrium with a simple distribution of growing bubbles. This effort is encouraging since the calculated helium release fits an experimental dataset with a set of parameters in good agreement with the literature.

  13. Study on effective parameter of the triple-pressure reheat combined cycle performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Thamir K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic analyses of the triple-pressure reheat combined cycle gas turbines with duct burner are presented and discussed in this paper. The overall performance of a combined cycle gas turbine power plant is influenced by the ambient temperature, compression ratio and turbine inlet temperature. These parameters affect the overall thermal efficiency, power output and the heat-rate. In this study a thermodynamic model was development on an existing actual combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT (In this case study, an effort has been made to enhance the performance of the CCGT through a parametric study using a thermodynamic analysis. The effect of ambient temperature and operation parameter, including compression ratio and turbine inlet temperature, on the overall performance of CCGT are investigated. The code of the performance model for CCGT power plant was developed utilizing the THERMOFLEX software. The simulating results show that the total power output and overall efficiency of a CCGT decrease with increase the ambient temperature because increase the consumption power in the air compressor of a GT. The totals power of a CCGT decreases with increase the compression rate, while the overall efficiency of a CCGT increases with increase the compression ratio to 21, after that the overall efficiency will go down. Far there more the turbine inlet temperature increases the both total power and overall efficiency increase, so the turbine inlet temperature has a strong effect on the overall performance of CCGT power plant. Also the simulation model give a good result compared with MARAFIQ CCGT power plant. With these variables, the turbine inlet temperature causes the greatest overall performance variation.

  14. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  15. Thermodynamic optimisation of supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycles coupled to Direct Steam Generation Line-Focusing solar fields

    OpenAIRE

    Coco Enriquez, Luis; Muñoz Antón, Javier; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a new generation line-focusing solar plants coupled to a s-CO2 Brayton power cycles are studied. These innovative CSP will increase the plant energy efficiency, and subsequently optimizing the SF effective aperture area and SF investment cost for a fixed power output. Two SF configurations were assessed: the Configuration 1 with a condenser between the SF and the Balance Of Plant (BOP), for Turbine Inlet Temperatures (TIT) up to 400oC, and the Configuration 2, for higher TIT up ...

  16. Analysis, design, fabrication and testing of the mini-Brayton rotating unit (Mini-BRU). Volume 1: Text and tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, F. X.

    1978-01-01

    A 500 to 2100 watt power output Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU)was analyzed, designed, fabricated and tested. Performance and test data for the various components is included. Components tested include the 2.12 in. diameter compressor, the 2.86 in. diameter turbine, the Rice alternator and the cantilevered foil-type journal and thrust bearings. Also included are results on the fabrication of a C-103 turbine plenum/nozzle assembly and on offgassing of the organic materials in the alternator stator.

  17. Development of 0.5-5 W, 10K Reverse Brayton Cycle Cryocoolers - Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, F. D.; Boman, A.; Arnold, S.; Spitzmesser, J. B.; Jones, D.; McCree, D.; Hacker, L. J.

    2001-10-15

    Miniature cryocoolers for the 8-30 K range are needed to provide 0.5-5 w of cooling to high sensitivity detectors (for long-wave-length IR, magnetism, mm-wave, X-ray, dark matter, and possibly y-ray detection) while maintaining low mass, ultra-low vibration, and good efficiency. This project presents a new approach to eliminating the problems normally encountered in efforts to build low-vibration, fieldable, miniature cryocoolers. Using the reverse Brayton Cycle (RBC), the approach applies and expands on existing spinner technology previously used only in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes.

  18. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  19. Performance Optimization of a Solar-Driven Multi-Step Irreversible Brayton Cycle Based on a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Mohammad Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An applicable approach for a multi-step regenerative irreversible Brayton cycle on the basis of thermodynamics and optimization of thermal efficiency and normalized output power is presented in this work. In the present study, thermodynamic analysis and a NSGA II algorithm are coupled to determine the optimum values of thermal efficiency and normalized power output for a Brayton cycle system. Moreover, three well-known decision-making methods are employed to indicate definite answers from the outputs gained from the aforementioned approach. Finally, with the aim of error analysis, the values of the average and maximum error of the results are also calculated.

  20. Helium stratification in HD 145792: a new Helium strong star

    CERN Document Server

    Catanzaro, G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on the real nature of the star HD 145792, classified as He weak in {\\it ``The General Catalogue of Ap and Am stars''}. By means of FEROS@ESO1.52m high resolution spectroscopic data, we refined the atmospheric parameters of the star, obtaining: T$_{\\rm eff}$ = 14400 $\\pm$ 400 K, $\\log g$ = 4.06 $\\pm$ 0.08 and $\\xi$ = 0 $^{+0.6}$ km s$^{-1}$. These values resulted always lower than those derived by different authors with pure photometric approaches. Using our values we undertook an abundance analysis with the aim to derive, for the first time, the chemical pattern of the star's atmosphere. For metals a pure LTE synthesis (ATLAS9 and SYNTHE) has been used, while for helium a hybrid approach has been preferred (ATLAS9 and SYNSPEC). The principal result of our study is that HD 145792 belongs to He strong class contrary to the previous classification. Moreover, helium seems to be vertically stratified in the atmosphere, decreasing toward deepest layers. For what that concerns metals abundanc...

  1. Helium transfer line installation details.

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Perinic

    2007-01-01

    A particularity of the 32 m long four in one helium transfer line in between the cold box in USC55 and the cavern UX5 is the fact that the transfer line passes through a hole in the crane rail support beam. In order to ensure the alignment of the suspension rail in the interconnecting tunnel with the hole in the rail support as well as the connection points at both ends required precise measurements of the given geometries as well as the installation of a temporary target for the verification of the theoretical predictions.

  2. Helium II level measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  3. Nanofabrication with a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, D.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Chen, P.; Sidorkin, V; Salemink, H.; Van der Drift, E.; Alkemade, P.

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM) is capable of imaging and fabrication of nanostructures thanks to its sub-nanometer sized ion probe [1,2]. The unique interaction of the helium ions with the sample material provides very localized secondary electron emission, thus providing a valu

  4. Radioactive ions and atoms in superfluid helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.G.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; Aysto, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W.; Harissopulos, S; Demetriou, P; Julin, R

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve t

  5. Organ protection by the noble gas helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, K.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate whether helium induces preconditioning in humans, and to elucidate the mechanisms behind this possible protection. First, we collected data regarding organ protective effects of noble gases in general, and of helium in particular (chapters 1-3). In chapter

  6. Nanofabrication with a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, D.; Van veldhoven, E.; Chen, P.; Sidorkin, V.; Salemink, H.; Van der Drift, E.; Alkemade, P.

    2010-01-01

    The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM) is capable of imaging and fabrication of nanostructures thanks to its sub-nanometer sized ion probe [1,2]. The unique interaction of the helium ions with the sample material provides very localized secondary electron emission, thus providing a valu

  7. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  8. Nanofabrication with a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, D.; Van veldhoven, E.; Chen, P.; Sidorkin, V.; Salemink, H.; Van der Drift, E.; Alkemade, P.

    2010-01-01

    The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM) is capable of imaging and fabrication of nanostructures thanks to its sub-nanometer sized ion probe [1,2]. The unique interaction of the helium ions with the sample material provides very localized secondary electron emission, thus providing a valu

  9. Nanofabrication with a helium ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, D.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Chen, P.; Sidorkin, V; Salemink, H.; Van der Drift, E.; Alkemade, P.

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM) is capable of imaging and fabrication of nanostructures thanks to its sub-nanometer sized ion probe [1,2]. The unique interaction of the helium ions with the sample material provides very localized secondary electron emission, thus providing a valu

  10. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  11. Helium abundances and the helium isotope anomaly of sdB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Geier, S; Edelmann, H; Morales-Rueda, L; Kilkenny, D; O'Donoghue, D; Marsh, T R; Copperwheat, C

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundances and atmospheric parameters have been determined from high resolution spectra for a new sample of 46 bright hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars. The helium abundances have been measured with high accuracy. We confirm the correlation of helium abundance with temperature and the existence of two distinct sequences in helium abundance found previously. We focused on isotopic shifts of helium lines and found helium-3 to be strongly enriched in 8 of our programme stars. Most of these stars cluster in a small temperature range between 27000 K and 31000 K very similar to the known helium-3-rich main sequence B stars, which cluster at somewhat lower temperatures. This phenomenon is most probably related to diffusion processes in the atmosphere, but poses a challenge to diffusion models.

  12. Elusive structure of helium trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipanović, Petar; Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Boronat, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Over the years many He-He interaction potentials have been developed, some very sophisticated, including various corrections beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Most of them were used to predict properties of helium dimers and trimers, examples of exotic quantum states, whose experimental study proved to be very challenging. Recently, detailed structural properties of helium trimers were measured for the first time, allowing a comparison with theoretical predictions and possibly enabling the evaluation of different interaction potentials. The comparisons already made included adjusting the maxima of both theoretical and experimental correlation functions to one, so the overall agreement between theory and experiment appeared satisfactory. However, no attempt was made to evaluate the quality of the interaction potentials used in the calculations. In this work, we calculate the experimentally measured correlation functions using both new and old potentials, compare them with experimental data and rank the potentials. We use diffusion Monte Carlo simulations at T = 0, which give within statistical noise exact results of the ground state properties. All models predict both trimers 4He3 and 4He{}2{}3He to be in a quantum halo state.

  13. Photochemistry inside superfluid helium nano droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slenczka, Alkwin; Vdovin, Alexander; Dick, Bernhard [Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Superfluid helium nano droplets serve as the most gentle cyrogenic matrix for creating isolated and cold molecules. High resolution electronic spectroscopy is sensitive for the investigation of the very weak perturbation of the helium droplet on the embedded molecule. Fluorescence excitation spectra, dispersed emission spectra and pump--probe-spectra show details of the salvation of molecules in helium droplets which were attributed to relaxation processes of the first solvation layer around the dopant. Photochemistry such as ESIPT, tautomerization by proton transfer and charge transfer are highly sensitive on intermolecular perturbations. We have studies such processes in superfluid helium droplets. The comparison with the respective gas phase experiments and quantum chemical calculations reveals further details on the photochemistry as well as on the perturbation by the superfluid helium droplet.

  14. Permeability of Hollow Microspherical Membranes to Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoviev, V. N.; Kazanin, I. V.; Pak, A. Yu.; Vereshchagin, A. S.; Lebiga, V. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the sorption characteristics of various hollow microspherical membranes to reveal particles most suitable for application in the membrane-sorption technologies of helium extraction from a natural gas. The permeability of the investigated sorbents to helium and their impermeability to air and methane are shown experimentally. The sorption-desorption dependences of the studied sorbents have been obtained, from which the parameters of their specific permeability to helium are calculated. It has been established that the physicochemical modification of the original particles exerts a great influence on the coefficient of the permeability of a sorbent to helium. Specially treated cenospheres have displayed high efficiency as membranes for selective extraction of helium.

  15. Gemini helium closed cycle cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Manuel; Galvez, Ramon; Rogers, Rolando; Solis, Hernan; Tapia, Eduardo; Maltes, Diego; Collins, Paul; White, John; Cavedoni, Chas; Yamasaki, Chris; Sheehan, Michael P.; Walls, Brian

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Observatory presents the Helium Closed Cycle Cooling System that provides cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures for instruments and detectors. It is implemented by running three independent helium closed cycle cooling circuits with several banks of compressors in parallel to continuously supply high purity helium gas to cryocoolers located about 100-120 meters apart. This poster describes how the system has been implemented, the required helium pressures and gas flow to reach cryogenic temperature, the performance it has achieved, the helium compressors and cryocoolers in use and the level of vibration the cryocoolers produce in the telescope environment. The poster also describes the new technology for cryocoolers that Gemini is considering in the development of new instruments.

  16. Formation of the helium EUV resonance lines

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Context: While classical models successfully reproduce intensities of many transition region lines, they predict helium EUV line intensities roughly an order of magnitude lower than the observed value. Aims: To determine the relevant formation mechanism(s) of the helium EUV resonance lines, capable of explaining the high intensities under quiet sun conditions. Methods: We synthesise and study the emergent spectra from a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation model. The effects of coronal illumination and non-equilibrium ionisation of hydrogen and helium are included self-consistently in the numerical simulation. Results: Radiative transfer calculations result in helium EUV line intensities that are an order of magnitude larger than the intensities calculated under the classical assumptions. The enhanced intensity of He I 584 is primarily caused by He II recombination cascades. The enhanced intensity of He II 304 and He II 256 is caused primarily by non-equilibrium helium ionisation. Conclusion: The anal...

  17. Global helium particle balance in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motojima, G., E-mail: motojima.gen@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Masuzaki, S.; Tokitani, M.; Kasahara, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Morisaki, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Akiyama, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Global helium particle balance in long-pulse discharges is analyzed for the first time in the Large Helical Device (LHD) with the plasma-facing components of the first wall and the divertor tiles composed of stainless steel and carbon, respectively. During the 2-min discharge sustained by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and electron cyclotron heating (ECH), helium is observed to be highly retained in the wall (regarded as both the first wall and the divertor tiles). Almost all (about 96%) puffed helium particles (1.3 × 10{sup 22} He) are absorbed in the wall near the end of the discharge. Even though a dynamic retention is eliminated, 56% is still absorbed. The analysis is also applied to longer pulse discharges over 40 min by ICRH and ECH, indicating that the helium wall retention is dynamically changed in time. At the initial phase of the discharge, a mechanism for adsorbing helium other than dynamical retention is invoked.

  18. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  19. Proposal for an advanced heat source assembly for the Isotope Brayton Power System. Volume 1. Technical program and statement of work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    The technical program plan for evaluating the performance and safety of a radioisotope-fueled Brayton power system for space vehicles is presented with schedules for evaluating heat source design and safety, for specifying power system requirements, and for the development and operation of a ground demonstration system. (LCL)

  20. Power density analysis and optimization of a regenerated closed variable-temperature heat reservoir Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun [Naval Univ. of Engineering, Faculty 306, Wuhan (China); Chih Wu [US Naval Academy, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2001-06-07

    In this paper, the power density, defined as the ratio of power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the objective for performance analysis and optimisation of an irreversible regenerated closed Brayton cycle coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs from the viewpoint of finite time thermodynamics (FTT) or entropy generation minimisation (EGM). The analytical formulae about the relations between power density and pressure ratio are derived with the heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator, the irreversible compression and expansion losses in the compressor and turbine, the pressure drop losses at the heater, cooler and regenerator as well as in the piping, and the effect of the finite thermal capacity rate of the heat reservoirs. The obtained results are compared with those results obtained by using the maximum power criterion, and the advantages and disadvantages of maximum power density design are analysed. The maximum power density optimisation is performed in two stages. The first is to search the optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the optimum power density among the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the optimum power density between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat source for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters, including the effectiveness of the regenerator, the inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs, the effectiveness of the heat exchangers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the turbine, and the pressure recovery coefficient, on the optimum heat conductance

  1. Power density analysis and optimization of a regenerated closed variable-temperature heat reservoir Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun [Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan (China). Faculty 306; Chih Wu [US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2001-06-07

    In this paper, the power density, defined as the ratio of power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the objective for performance analysis and optimization of an irreversible regenerated closed Brayton cycle coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs from the viewpoint of finite time thermodynamics (FTT) or entropy generation minimization (EGM). The analytical formulae about the relations between power density and pressure ratio are derived with the heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator, the irreversible compression and expansion losses in the compressor and turbine, the pressure drop losses at the heater, cooler and regenerator as well as in the piping, and the effect of the finite thermal capacity rate of the heat reservoirs. The obtained results are compared with those results obtained by using the maximum power criterion, and the advantages and disadvantages of maximum power density design are analysed. The maximum power density optimization is performed in two stages. The first is to search the optimum beat conductance distribution corresponding to the optimum power density among the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and the regenerator for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the optimum power density between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat source for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters, including the effectiveness of the regenerator, the inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs, the effectiveness of the heat exchangers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the turbine, and the pressure recovery coefficient, on the optimum heat conductance distribution, the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching, and the maximum power density are provided by

  2. Supervision system for the plate mill reheating furnaces at Companhia Siderurgica Paulista; Sistema supervisor dos fornos de placas da linha de chapas grossas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Abner Cordeiro; Rother, Ariovaldo; Texeira, Aloisio; Ramos, Carlos; Masulo, Mario Donato [Companhia Siderurgica Paulista, SP (Brazil); Dias, Ronaldo Freitas [TSE Automacao Industrial, XX (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    The Quality Assurance System required by customers from several industrial branches are forcing suppliers to spend more and more money on technological improvements. COSIPA`s Plate Mill, following this tendency, has just installed a Supervisor System for its Reheating Furnaces, which allows the acquisition and retrieving of operational data. This information makes feasible the development of studies and projects for the continuous improvement of the reheating process. This system is reliable, shows low operational coast and has easy maintenance. Finally, last but not least, t has direct data communication with the mainframe as well, enabling interaction with furnace control and, in such way, this system can determine the reheating temperatures and rolling pitch according to the production schedule. This system has also available special software for the generation of production reports according to the QAS (Quality Assurance System) and other standards. (author) 15 figs.

  3. Cycle analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and recuperative gas turbine with an air reheating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiongwen; Li, Jun; Li, Guojun; Feng, Zhenping

    Cycle simulation and analysis for two kinds of SOFC/GT hybrid systems were conducted with the help of the simulation tool: Aspen Custom Modeler. Two cycle schemes of recuperative heat exchanger (RHE) and exhaust gas recirculated (EGR) were described according to the air reheating method. The system performance with operating pressure, turbine inlet temperature and fuel cell load were studied based on the simulation results. Then the effects of oxygen utilization, fuel utilization, operating temperature and efficiencies of the gas turbine components on the system performance of the RHE cycle and the EGR cycle were discussed in detail. Simulation results indicated that the system optimum efficiency for the EGR air reheating cycle scheme was higher than that of the RHE cycle system. A higher pressure ratio would be available for the EGR cycle system in comparison with the RHE cycle. It was found that increasing fuel utilization or oxygen utilization would decrease fuel cell efficiency but improve the system efficiency for both of the RHE and EGR cycles. The efficiency of the RHE cycle hybrid system decreased as the fuel cell air inlet temperature increased. However, the system efficiency of EGR cycle increased with fuel cell air inlet temperature. The effect of turbine efficiency on the system efficiency was more obvious than the effect of the compressor and recuperator efficiencies among the gas turbine components. It was also indicated that improving the gas turbine component efficiencies for the RHE cycle increased system efficiency higher than that for the EGR cycle.

  4. Electric response in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  5. In Beam Tests of Implanted Helium Targets

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J E; Ahmed, M W; Blackston, M A; Delbar, T; Gai, M; Kading, T J; Parpottas, Y; Perdue, B A; Prior, R M; Rubin, D A; Spraker, M C; Yeomans, J D; Weissman, L; Weller, H R; Delbar, Th.; Conn, LNS/U; Duke, TUNL/

    2006-01-01

    Targets consisting of 3,4He implanted into thin aluminum foils (approximately 100, 200 or 600 ug/cm^2) were prepared using intense (a few uA) helium beams at low energy (approximately 20, 40 or 100 keV). Uniformity of the implantation was achieved by a beam raster across a 12 mm diameter tantalum collimator at the rates of 0.1 Hz in the vertical direction and 1 Hz in the horizontal direction. Helium implantation into the very thin (approximately 80-100 ug/cm^2) aluminum foils failed to produce useful targets (with only approximately 10% of the helium retained) due to an under estimation of the range by the code SRIM. The range of low energy helium in aluminum predicted by Northcliffe and Shilling and the NIST online tabulation are observed on the other hand to over estimate the range of low energy helium ions in aluminum. An attempt to increase the amount of helium by implanting a second deeper layer was also carried out, but it did not significantly increase the helium content beyond the blistering limit (ap...

  6. Evolution of dopant-induced helium nanoplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, S R; Fechner, L; Sharma, V; Kremer, M; Fischer, B; Camus, N; Pfeifer, T; Jha, J; Krishnamurthy, M; Schroeter, C -D; Ullrich, J; Stienkemeier, F; Moshammer, R; Fennel, Th; Mudrich, M

    2012-01-01

    Two-component nanoplasmas generated by strong-field ionization of doped helium nanodroplets are studied in a pump-probe experiment using few-cycle laser pulses in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. High yields of helium ions and a pronounced, droplet size-dependent resonance structure in the pump-probe transients reveal the evolution of the dopant-induced helium nanoplasma. The pump-probe dynamics is interpreted in terms of strong inner ionization by the pump pulse and resonant heating by the probe pulse which controls the final charge states detected via the frustration of electron-ion recombination.

  7. Particle detection by evaporation from superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.H. (Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States))

    1992-04-20

    We report the first experiments in which 5-MeV alpha particles are detected via evaporation from a bath of superfluid helium. The {alpha} excites phonons and rotons in the liquid helium, and these excitations are sufficiently energetic to evaporate helium atoms when they reach the free surface of the liquid. The approximate overall efficiency of this process has been determined, and we compare this with expectations. We have also been able to detect evaporation induced by a flux of {gamma}'s from a {sup 137}Cs source.

  8. Calculated Regenerator Performance at 4 K with HELIUM-4 and HELIUM-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, Ray; Huang, Yonghua; O'Gallagher, Agnes; Gary, John

    2008-03-01

    The helium-4 working fluid in regenerative cryocoolers operating with the cold end near 4 K deviates considerably from an ideal gas. As a result, losses in the regenerator, given by the time-averaged enthalpy flux, are increased and are strong functions of the operating pressure and temperature. Helium-3, with its lower boiling point, behaves somewhat closer to an ideal gas in this low temperature range and can reduce the losses in 4 K regenerators. An analytical model is used to find the fluid properties that strongly influence the regenerator losses as well as the gross refrigeration power. The thermodynamic and transport properties of helium-3 were incorporated into the latest NIST regenerator numerical model, known as REGEN3.3, which was used to model regenerator performance with either helium-4 or helium-3. With this model we show how the use of helium-3 in place of helium-4 can improve the performance of 4 K regenerative cryocoolers. The effects of operating pressure, warm-end temperature, and frequency on regenerators with helium-4 and helium-3 are investigated and compared. The results are used to find optimum operating conditions. The frequency range investigated varies from 1 Hz to 30 Hz, with particular emphasis on higher frequencies.

  9. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  10. Charged Condensate and Helium Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    White dwarf stars composed of carbon, oxygen or heavier elements are expected to crystallize as they cool down below certain temperatures. Yet, simple arguments suggest that the helium white dwarf cores may not solidify, mostly because of zero-point oscillations of the helium ions that would dissolve the crystalline structure. We argue that the interior of the helium dwarfs may instead form a macroscopic quantum state in which the charged helium-4 nuclei are in a Bose-Einstein condensate, while the relativistic electrons form a neutralizing degenerate Fermi liquid. We discuss the electric charge screening, and the spectrum of this substance, showing that the bosonic long-wavelength fluctuations exhibit a mass gap. Hence, there is a suppression at low temperatures of the boson contribution to the specific heat -- the latter being dominated by the specific heat of the electrons near the Fermi surface. This state of matter may have observational signatures.

  11. Charging dynamics of dopants in helium nanoplasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Grüner, Barbara; Schomas, Dominik; Stienkemeier, Frank; Krishnan, Siva Rama; Mudrich, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the charging dynamics of helium nanodroplets doped with atoms of different species and irradiated by intense near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses (

  12. Helium-Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Immense quantities of expensive liquefied helium are required at Stennis and Kennedy Space Centers for pre-cooling rocket engine propellant systems prior to filling...

  13. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  14. Helium liquefier cycles with saturated vapor compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minta, M.; Smith, J. L., Jr.

    The three refrigeration stages of the conventional helium liquefaction cycle are related to liquid nitrogen precooling, the use of expansion engines, and a J-T expansion. For an operation of helium refrigerators at temperatures below 4.2 K reduced pressure levels are required. Such an operation makes it necessary to enhance the compressor size and the heat exchanger surface area. In the case of 1.8 K refrigerators, practical cycles with three pressure levels are employed. It is pointed out that the saturated-vapor-compression (SVC) helium cycle provides an alternative solution to these problems. The present investigation is concerned with the design study of a SVC helium liquifier operating at elevated pressures. The study was conducted to demonstrate the potential of the SVC cycle on the basis of a direct comparison with a conventional cycle using the same precooling expanders and a supercritical wet expander instead of a J-T valve.

  15. The design and fabrication of a reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler system for the high temperature superconductivity cable cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kwon, Yong Ha; Kim, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    A high temperature superconductivity cable must be cooled below the nitrogen liquefaction temperature to apply the cable to power generation and transmission systems under superconducting state. To maintain the superconducting state, a reliable cryocooler system is also required. The design and fabrication of a cryocooler system have been performed with a reverse Brayton cycle using neon gas as a refrigerant. The system consists of a compressor, a recuperator, a cold-box, and control valves. The design of the system is made to have 1 kW cooling capacity. The heat loss through multilayer insulators is calculated. Conduction heat loss is about 7 W through valves and access ports and radiation heat loss is about 18 W on the surface of a cryocooler. The design factors are discussed in detail.

  16. Optimum performance of the small scale open and direct solar thermal Brayton cycle at various environmental conditions and constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, W.G.; Bello-Ochende, T.; Meyer, J.P. [Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Pretoria, (South Africa)

    2011-07-01

    The energy of the sun can be transformed into mechanical power through the use of concentrated solar power systems. The use of the Brayton cycle with recuperator has significant advantages but also raises issues such as pressure loss and low net power output which are mainly due to irreversibilities of heat transfer and fluid friction. The aim of this study is to optimize the system to generate maximum net power output. Thermodynamic and dynamic trajectory optimizations were performed on a dish concentrator and an off-the-shelf micro-turbine and the effects of wind, solar irradiance and other environmental conditions and constraints on the power output were analyzed. Results showed that the maximum power output is increased when wind decreases and irradiance increases; solar irradiance was found to have a more significant impact than wind. This study highlighted the factors which impact the power generation of concentrated solar power systems so that designers can take them into account.

  17. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  18. Multiple Population Theory: Extreme helium population problem

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2009-01-01

    The spreads in chemical abundances inferred by recent precision observations suggest that some or possibly all globular clusters can no longer be considered as simple stellar populations. The most striking case is omega Cen in the sense that its bluest main-sequence despite its high metallicity demands an extreme helium abundance of Y > 0.4. I focus on this issue of "the extreme helium population problem" in this review.

  19. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  20. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented.

  1. Helium Reionization in From New Sightlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphers, David

    2017-01-01

    A very small number of sightlines to z~3 quasars have been studied in detail to show the progress of helium reionization. Although studying the same sightlines with each new UV spectrograph lead to a better understanding of them, the sightline variance is very strong during this patchy and extended process. We discuss detailed R>10,000 COS data from new sightlines, and what they reveal about the progress and end of helium reionization.

  2. 超超临界二次再热汽轮机发展综述%Development of Ultra-supercritical Double-reheat Steam Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建录; 张晓东

    2016-01-01

    文章概述了汽轮机二次再热技术的发展历程,当前我国超超临界二次再热汽轮机技术研发情况,并重点介绍了我国首台超超临界二次再热汽轮机技术特点及运行情况,对未来二次再热汽轮机技术发展方向和典型机型进行了探讨。%This paper introduces the evolution of double-reheat turbine technology, the development of the ultra-supercritical double-reheat turbine technology in China,and mainly introduces the technical charateristic and operation conditions of the first ultra-super⁃critical double-reheat turbine unit made by DTC in China. The new development direction and typical models of the double-reheat steam turbine designed by DTC is discussed in this paper.

  3. Pyridine Aggregation in Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Pablo; Poerschke, Torsten; Habig, Daniel; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina

    2012-06-01

    Pyridine crystals show the unusual property of isotopic polymorphism. Experimentally it has been observed that deuterated pyridine crystals exist in two phases while non-deuterated pyridine does not show a phase transition. Therefore, although isotopic substitution is the smallest possible modification of a molecule it greatly affects the stability of pyridine crystals. A possible experimental approach in order to understand this striking effect might be the study of pyridine aggregation for small clusters. By embedding the clusters in helium nanodroplets the aggregates can be stabilized and studied by means of Infrared Depletion Spectroscopy. Pyridine oligomers were investigated in the C-H asymmetric vibration region (2980-3100 cm-1) using this experimental technique. The number of molecules for the clusters responsibles for each band were determined by means of pick-up curves as well as mass sensitive depletion spectra. Furthermore, the intensity dependence of the different bands on applying a dc electric field was studied. The assignment of the different structures for pyridine clusters on the basis of these measurements were also carried out. S. Crawford et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 48, 755 (2009).

  4. Photoionization rates for helium: update

    CERN Document Server

    Sokół, Justyna M

    2014-01-01

    The NIS He gas has been observed at a few AU to the Sun almost from the beginning of the space age. To model its flow an estimate of the loss rates due to ionization by solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) flux is needed. The EUV irradiance has been measured directly from mid 1990-ties, but with high temporal and spectral resolution only from 2002. Beforehand only EUV proxies are available. A new method of reconstruction of the Carrington rotation averaged photoionization rates for neutral interstellar helium (NIS He) in the ecliptic at 1 AU to the Sun before 2002 is presented. We investigate the relation between the solar rotation averaged time series of the ionization rates for NIS He at 1 AU derived from TIMED measurements of EUV irradiance and the solar 10.7 cm flux (F10.7) only. We perform a weighted iterative fit of a nonlinear model to data split into sectors. The obtained formula allows to reconstruct the solar rotation averages of photoionization rates for He between ~1947 and 2002 with an uncertainty ran...

  5. Helium and Neon in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  6. Effect of dislocations on helium retention in deformed pure iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y. H.; Cao, X. Z.; Jin, S. X.; Lu, E. Y.; Hu, Y. C.; Zhu, T.; Kuang, P.; Xu, Q.; Wang, B. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of dislocations created by deformation on helium retention in pure iron, including the helium atoms diffusion along the dislocation line and desorption from dislocation trapping sites, were investigated. The dislocation defect was introduced in specimens by cold-rolling, and then 5 keV helium ions were implanted into the deformed specimens. Slow positron beam technology and thermal desorption spectroscopy were used to investigate the evolution of dislocation defects and the desorption behavior of helium atoms under influence of dislocation. The behaviors of S-E, W-E and S-W plots indicate clearly that lots of helium atoms remain in the deformed specimen and helium atoms combining with dislocation change the distribution of electron density. The helium desorption plot indicates that dislocation accelerates helium desorption at 293 K-600 K and facilitates helium dissociation from HenVm (n/m = 1.8) cluster.

  7. Solid helium, a superfluid?; L'helium solide, un superfluide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balibar, S. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Physique Statistique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    At very low temperature, liquid helium becomes superfluid, meaning that it can flow practically without any friction. But what about solid helium? A recent experiment carried out at the Ecole Normale Superieure of Paris (France) has given amazing results: in some conditions some matter can flow through helium without friction. This article makes a synthesis of the experiments carried out on solid helium since the end of the 1960's and which have tried to explain this 'super-solidity' effect. The recent results indicate that the super-solidity of solid helium is linked to its disorder and probably localized at the grain joints, but is not a fundamental property of its crystalline state. (J.S.)

  8. Full Scale Thermo-hydraulic Simulation of a Helium-Helium Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Injun; Hong, Sungyull; Bai, Cheolho; Shim, Jaesool [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chansoo; Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, the thermo-hydraulic full scale simulation is performed to study the temperature distributions, thermal stress, pressure drop and outlet temperature in a Helium-Helium printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) in a VHTR simulate helium loop. The entire PCHE is composed of 40 stacks of rectangular shaped micro-channels for helium gas [type A] (inlet temperature, 400 .deg. C) and 40 stacks of semi-ellipse shaped micro-channels for helium [type B] (inlet temperature, 300 .deg. C). The experimental result is compared to that of computer simulation, COMSOL multi-physics software. The Helium-Helium PCHE is considered a prototype of the newly developed PCHE by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The full scale thermo-hydraulic simulation was successfully performed to obtain temperature distribution, pressure drop and thermal stress in 40 sets of flow channel stacks in a helium-helium printed circuit heat exchanger in a VHTR simulate helium loop. We obtained a quite similar temperature distribution with the 3D measured infrared temperature distribution. To our knowledge, this is the first full scale numerical study on the PCHE, which considers all microchannels, that the convection effect on the outside surfaces of the PCHE is applied. The very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) or high-temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR) is a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor that uses the ceramic coated fuel, TRISO, in which the fission gas does not leak even at temperatures higher than 1600 .deg. C. The VHTR necessarily requires an intermediate loop composed of a hot gas duct (HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a process heat exchanger (PHE). The IHX is one of the important components of VHTR system because the IHX transfers the 950 .deg. C of high temperature massive heat to a hydrogen production plant or power conversion unit at high system pressure.

  9. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  10. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  11. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    CERN Document Server

    Mocak, M; Weiss, A; Kifonidis, K; 10.1017/S1743921308022813

    2009-01-01

    We describe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M_sol star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of th...

  12. Development of cooling system for 66/6.9kV-20MVA REBCO superconducting transformers with Ne turbo-Brayton refrigerator and subcooled liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuma, M.; Adachi, K.; Yun, K.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Umeno, T.; Konno, M.; Hayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a turbo-Brayton refrigerator with Ne gas as a working fluid for a 3 ϕ- 66/6.9kV-2MVA superconducting transformer with coated conductors which was bath-cooled with subcooled LN2. The two-stage compressor and expansion turbine had non-contact magnetic bearings for a long maintenance interval. In the future, we intend to directly install a heat exchanger into the Glass-Fiber-Reinforced-Plastics cryostat of a transformer and make a heat exchange between the working fluid gas and subcooled LN2. In this paper we investigate the behaviour of subcooled LN2 in a test cryostat, in which heater coils were arranged side by side with a flat plate finned-tube heat exchanger. Here a He turbo-Brayton refrigerator was used as a substitute for a Ne turbo-Brayton one. The pressure at the surface of LN2 in the cryostat was one atmosphere. Just under the LN2 surface, a stationary layer of LN2 was created over the depth of 20 cm and temperature dropped from 77 K to 65 K with depth while, in the lower level than that, a natural convection flow of LN2 was formed and temperature was almost uniform over 1 m depth. The boundary plane between the stationary layer and the natural convection region was visible.

  13. Detailed analysis of the effect of the turbine and compressor isentropic efficiency on the thermal and exergy efficiency of a Brayton cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy and exergy analysis of a Brayton cycle with an ideal gas is given. The irreversibility of the adiabatic processes in turbine and compressor is taken into account through their isentropic efficiencies. The net work per cycle, the thermal efficiency and the two exergy efficiencies are expressed as functions of the four dimensionless variables: the isentropic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, the pressure ratio, and the temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximal values of the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiency are achieved when the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio are as high as possible, while the different values of pressure ratio that maximize the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiencies exist. These pressure ratios increase with the increase of the temperature ratio and the isentropic efficiency of compressor and turbine. The increase of the turbine isentropic efficiency has a greater impact on the increase of the net work per cycle and the thermal efficiency of a Brayton cycle than the same increase of compressor isentropic efficiency. Finally, two goal functions are proposed for thermodynamic optimization of a Brayton cycle for given values of the temperature ratio and the compressor and turbine isentropic efficiencies. The first maximizes the sum of the net work per cycle and thermal efficiency while the second the net work per cycle and exergy efficiency. In both cases the optimal pressure ratio is closer to the pressure ratio that maximizes the net work per cycle.

  14. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  15. Primary neutral helium in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Hans-Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Two years of neutral measurements by IBEX-Lo have yielded several direct observations of interstellar neutral helium and oxygen during preferred viewing seasons. Besides the interstellar signal, there are indications of the presence of secondary neutral helium and oxygen created in the heliosphere. Detailed modeling of these particle species is necessary to connect the measured fluxes to the pristine local interstellar medium while accounting for loss and production of neutral particles during their path through the heliosphere. In this contribution, global heliosphere models are coupled to analytic calculations of neutral trajectories to obtain detailed estimates of the neutral distribution function of primary interstellar helium atoms in the heliosphere, in particular in the inner heliosphere.

  16. The muonic helium lamb shift experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzfried, Johannes; Krauth, Julian [Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: CREMA collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Because of its high sensitivity on finite size effects of the nucleus, the measurement of the Lamb shift in exotic atoms has been on the wish-list of atomic and nuclear physics for a long time. Our previous experiment allowed to determine the proton radius with an order of magnitude higher precision compared to spectroscopic measurements of ordinary hydrogen. The successor experiment in muonic helium is currently performed at the Paul-Scherrer-Institute in Switzerland. Using a low energy muon beam line muons are stopped within low pressure helium gas, where exotic atoms are created. Here we measure the 2S-2P transition frequency of muonic helium illuminated by a pulsed TiSa-laser system pumped with a newly developed Yb-YAG thin disk laser. This measurement will ultimately improve the values of the charge radii of {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} by an order of magnitude.

  17. Helium corona-assisted air discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

  18. Superfluid helium-4 in one dimensional channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Y.; Banavar, Samhita; Chan, Moses H. W.; Hayes, John; Sazio, Pier

    2013-03-01

    Superfluidity, as superconductivity, cannot exist in a strict one-dimensional system. However, the experiments employing porous media showed that superfluid helium can flow through the pores of nanometer size. Here we report a study of the flow of liquid helium through a single hollow glass fiber of 4 cm in length with an open id of 150 nm between 1.6 and 2.3 K. We found the superfluid transition temperature was suppressed in the hollow cylinder and that there is no flow above the transition. Critical velocity at temperature below the transition temperature was determined. Our results bear some similarity to that found by Savard et. al. studying the flow of helium through a nanohole in a silicon nitrite membrane. Experimental study at Penn State is supported by NSF Grants No. DMR 1103159.

  19. Catching proteins in liquid helium droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Kupser, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2010-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented that allows for the incorporation of large mass/charge selected ions in liquid helium droplets. It is demonstrated that droplets can be efficiently doped with a mass/charge selected amino acid as well as with the much bigger m$\\approx$12 000 amu protein Cytochrome C in selected charge states. The sizes of the ion-doped droplets are determined via electrostatic deflection. Under the experimental conditions employed, the observed droplet sizes are very large and range, dependent on the incorporated ion, from 10$^{10}$ helium atoms for protonated Phenylalanine to 10$^{12}$ helium atoms for Cytochrome C. As a possible explanation, a simple model based on the size- and internal energy-dependence of the pickup efficiency is given.

  20. Adsorption of Helium Atoms on Two-Dimensional Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burganova, Regina; Lysogorskiy, Yury; Nedopekin, Oleg; Tayurskii, Dmitrii

    2016-01-01

    The study of the adsorption phenomenon of helium began many decades ago with the discovery of graphite as a homogeneous substrate for the investigation of physically adsorbed monolayer films. In particular, helium monoatomic layers on graphite were found to exhibit a very rich phase diagram. In the present work we have investigated the adsorption phenomenon of helium atoms on graphene and silicene substrates by means of density functional theory with Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Helium-substrate and helium-helium interactions were considered from first principles. Vibrational properties of adsorbed monolayers have been used to explore the stability of the system. This approach reproduces results describing the stability of a helium monolayer on graphene calculated by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for low and high coverage cases. However, for the moderate coverage value there is a discrepancy with QMC results due to the lack of helium zero point motion.

  1. A helium liquefier using three 4 k pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Oviedo, Abner

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a helium liquefier which can be used for recondensing/reliquefying helium vapor in a helium cryostat or liquefying helium gas in a storage dewar. The helium liquefier employs three 4 K pulse tube cryocoolers, Cryomech model PT415. Each PT415 has remote motor/rotary valve assembly to minimize vibration, providing ≥ 1.5W at 4.2K. The liquefier can liquefy room temperature helium gas with a liquefaction rate of 62 Liter/day. When installing it in the cryostat, it can recondense and reliquefy helium vapor with a rate of 78 L/day. The liquefier will be installed in a gravitational wave detector in Brazil to recondense/reliquefy the helium boil off from the cryostat.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Helium Behaviour in Titanium Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Tie-Ying; LONG Xing-Gui; WANG Jun; HOU Qing; WU Zhong-Cheng; PENG Shu-Ming; LUO Shun-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the behaviour of helium atoms in titanium at a temperature of 300 K.The nucleation and growth of helium bubble has been simulated up to 50 helium atoms.The approach to simulate the bubble growth is to add helium atoms one by one to the bubble and let the system evolve.The titanium cohesion is based on the tight binding scheme derived from the embedded atom method,and the helium-titanium interaction is characterized by fitted potential in the form of a Lennard-Jones function.The pressure in small helium bubbles is approximately calculated.The simulation results show that the pressure will decrease with the increasing bubble size,while increase with the increasing helium atoms.An analytic function about the quantitative relationship of the pressure with the bubble size and number of helium atoms is also fitted.

  3. Adsorption of Helium Atoms on Two-Dimensional Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burganova, Regina; Lysogorskiy, Yury; Nedopekin, Oleg; Tayurskii, Dmitrii

    2016-12-01

    The study of the adsorption phenomenon of helium began many decades ago with the discovery of graphite as a homogeneous substrate for the investigation of physically adsorbed monolayer films. In particular, helium monoatomic layers on graphite were found to exhibit a very rich phase diagram. In the present work we have investigated the adsorption phenomenon of helium atoms on graphene and silicene substrates by means of density functional theory with Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Helium-substrate and helium-helium interactions were considered from first principles. Vibrational properties of adsorbed monolayers have been used to explore the stability of the system. This approach reproduces results describing the stability of a helium monolayer on graphene calculated by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for low and high coverage cases. However, for the moderate coverage value there is a discrepancy with QMC results due to the lack of helium zero point motion.

  4. Intramolecular quantum chaos in doped helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, E.; Stolyarov, D.; Zhang, X.; Kresin, V. V.; Wittig, C.

    2003-07-01

    A mass spectrometric depletion spectrum (17 700-18 300 cm -1) is reported for NO 2 in superfluid (0.37 K) helium nanodroplets. Gas phase NO 2 is believed to be vibronically chaotic at these energies. Transitions are broadened and blue-shifted relative to their gas phase counterparts. The spectrum is fitted reasonably well by setting all of the widths and shifts equal to 7 cm -1. Modest dispersions (i.e., 90% lie within 2 cm -1 of the central values) are consistent with quantum chaos in NO 2. Relaxation is dominated by interactions of NO 2 with its non-superfluid helium nearest neighbors.

  5. O(^3 p) Doped Helium Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Joseph T.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic oxygen (^3 P) is generated via thermolysis in a commerical thermal gas cracker (Mantis Ltd. MGC-75). Complexes with HCN were investigated to qualitatively assess the doping efficiency of O(^3 P) into a helium droplet. Theoretical calculations of a linear O \\cdot\\cdot\\cdot HCN (^3 Σ) complex at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level are consistent with the rotational constants extracted from the rotational substructure in the experimental spectra, and with dipole moments approximated from Stark spectra. The thermal source will be used to study reactions between O(^3 P) and hydrocarbons in helium droplets, and preliminary data on this topic will be presented.

  6. Trace Detection of Metastable Helium Molecules in Superfluid Helium by Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A; Rellergert, W

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach to detecting ionizing radiation that combines the special properties of superfluid helium with the sensitivity of quantum optics techniques. Ionization in liquid helium results in the copious production of metastable helium molecules, which can be detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Each molecule can be probed many times using a cycling transition, resulting in the detection of individual molecules with high signal to noise. This technique could be used to detect neutrinos, weakly interacting massive particles, and ultracold neutrons, and to image superfluid flow in liquid He-4.

  7. Variational calculations of coupling of an incident helium atom to a slab of superfluid helium four

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.E.; Halley, J.W.; Hoon, S. [and others

    1995-04-01

    In previous work on the interaction of single helium atoms with a slab of superfluid helium the authors found a large amplitude, dependent on the condensate fraction, for transmission with re-emission of a helium atom at the other side of the slab. Here they report a variational formulation of the problem which permits a time dependent calculation and which does not require any perturbation expansion. The variational principle involves a minimization of the expectation value of the square of the difference H-E. They will present preliminary results of a variational Monte Carlo calculation using a simple variational form for the wave function.

  8. Reheating the universe once more: the dissipation of acoustic waves as a novel probe of primordial inhomogeneities on even smaller scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-08

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 10(4)  Mpc(-1)reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as P(ζ)<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed.

  9. Verification of a 2 kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Mechanical Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwiczak, Damian R.; Le, Dzu K.; McNelis, Anne M.; Yu, Albert C.; Samorezov, Sergey; Hervol, Dave S.

    2005-01-01

    Vibration test data from an operating 2 kWe closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion system (PCS) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center was used for a comparison with a dynamic disturbance model of the same unit. This effort was performed to show that a dynamic disturbance model of a CBC PCS can be developed that can accurately predict the torque and vibration disturbance fields of such class of rotating machinery. The ability to accurately predict these disturbance fields is required before such hardware can be confidently integrated onto a spacecraft mission. Accurate predictions of CBC disturbance fields will be used for spacecraft control/structure interaction analyses and for understanding the vibration disturbances affecting the scientific instrumentation onboard. This paper discusses how test cell data measurements for the 2 kWe CBC PCS were obtained, the development of a dynamic disturbance model used to predict the transient torque and steady state vibration fields of the same unit, and a comparison of the two sets of data.

  10. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerated Brayton cogeneration plant. Part 2: Heat conductance allocation and pressure ratio optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Finite time exergoeconomic performance of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton cogeneration plant is optimized based on the model which is established using finite time thermodynamic in Part 1 of this paper. It is found that the optimal heat conductance allocation of the regenerator is zero. When the total pressure ratio and the heat conductance allocation of the regenerator are fixed, it is shown that there exist an optimal intercooling pressure ratio, and a group of optimal heat conductance allocations among the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers and the intercooler, which correspond to a maximum dimensionless profit rate. When the total pressure ratio is variable, there exists an optimal total pressure ratio which corresponds to a double-maximum dimensionless profit rate, and the corresponding exergetic efficiency is obtained. The effects of the total heat exchanger conductance, price ratios and the consumer-side temperature on the double-maximum dimensionless profit rate and the corresponding exergetic efficiency are discussed. It is found that there exists an optimal consumer-side temperature which corresponds to a thrice-maximum dimensionless profit rate.

  11. Analysis of Superimposed Elementary Thermodynamic Cycles: from the Brayton-Joule to Advanced Mixed (Auto-Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Manente

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The need for efficiency improvement in energy conversion systems leads to a stricter functional integration among system components. This results in structures of increasing complexity, the high performance of which are often difficult to be understood easily. To make the comprehension of these structures easier, a new approach is followed in this paper, consisting in their representation as partial or total superimposition of elementary thermodynamic cycles. Although system performance cannot, in general, be evaluated as the sum of the performance of the separate thermodynamic cycles, this kind of representation and analysis can be of great help in understanding directions of development followed in the literature for the construction of advanced energy systems, and could suggest new potential directions of work. The evolution from the simple Brayton-Joule cycle to the so called “mixed” cycles, in which heat at the turbine discharge is exploited using internal heat sinks only without using a separate bottoming section, is used to demonstrate the potentiality of the approach. Mixed cycles are named here "auto-combined cycles” to highlight the combination of different (gas and steam cycles within the same system components.

    • This paper is an updated version of a paper published in the ECOS'08 proceedings. 

  12. An open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Shaobo [Guangdong Ocean University, College of Engineering, East Jiefang Rd. No. 40, Xiashan, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524006 (China); Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Zhang, Hefei [Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water, and proves its feasibility through performance simulation. Pinch technology is used to analyze the cooling of the wet air after compressor and the water used for cooling wet air after compressor. Its refrigeration depends mainly on the sensible heat of air and the latent heat of water vapor, its performance is more efficient than a conventional air-cycle, and the utilization of turbo-machinery makes it possible. The adoption of this cycle will make deep freeze easily and reduce initial cost because very low temperature, about -55 C, air is obtained. The sensitivity analysis of coefficient of performance to the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and the results of the cycle are also given. The simulation results show that the COP of this system depends on the temperature before turbine, the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and varies with the wet bulb temperature of the outdoor air. Humid air is a perfect working fluid for deep freeze with no cost to the user. (author)

  13. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerated Brayton cogeneration plant. Part 1: Thermodynamic model and parameter analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingen Chen, Bo Yang, Fengrui Sun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic model of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton heat and power cogeneration plant coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs is established by using finite time thermodynamics in Part 1 of this paper. The heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are taken into account. The finite time exergoeconomic performance of the cogeneration plant is investigated. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergetic efficiency are derived. The numerical examples show that there exists an optimal value of intercooling pressure ratio which leads to an optimal value of dimensionless profit rate for the fixed total pressure ratio. There also exists an optimal total pressure ratio which leads to a maximum profit rate for the variable total pressure ratio. The effects of intercooling, regeneration and the ratio of the hot-side heat reservoir temperature to environment temperature on dimensionless profit rate and the corresponding exergetic efficiency are analyzed. At last, it is found that there exists an optimal consumer-side temperature which leads to a double-maximum dimensionless profit rate. The profit rate of the model cycle is optimized by optimal allocation of the heat conductance of the heat exchangers in Part 2 of this paper.

  14. Performance Expectations of Closed-Brayton-Cycle Heat Exchangers in 100-kWe Nuclear Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Performance expectations of closed-Brayton-cycle heat exchangers to be used in 100-kWe nuclear space power systems were forecast. Proposed cycle state points for a system supporting a mission to three of Jupiter s moons required effectiveness values for the heat-source exchanger, recuperator and rejection exchanger (gas cooler) of 0.98,0.95 and 0.97, respectively. Performance parameters such as number of thermal units (Nm), equivalent thermal conductance (UA), and entropy generation numbers (Ns) varied from 11 to 19,23 to 39 kWK, and 0.019 to 0.023 for some standard heat exchanger configurations. Pressure-loss contributions to entropy generation were significant; the largest frictional contribution was 114% of the heat-transfer irreversibility. Using conventional recuperator designs, the 0.95 effectiveness proved difficult to achieve without exceeding other performance targets; a metallic, plate-fin counterflow solution called for 15% more mass and 33% higher pressure-loss than the target values. Two types of gas-coolers showed promise. Single-pass counterflow and multipass cross-counterflow arrangements both met the 0.97 effectiveness requirement. Potential reliability-related advantages of the cross-countefflow design were noted. Cycle modifications, enhanced heat transfer techniques and incorporation of advanced materials were suggested options to reduce system development risk. Carbon-carbon sheeting or foam proved an attractive option to improve overall performance.

  15. Multi-objective thermodynamic optimization of an irreversible regenerative Brayton cycle using evolutionary algorithm and decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brayton heat engine model is developed in MATLAB simulink environment and thermodynamic optimization based on finite time thermodynamic analysis along with multiple criteria is implemented. The proposed work investigates optimal values of various decision variables that simultaneously optimize power output, thermal efficiency and ecological function using evolutionary algorithm based on NSGA-II. Pareto optimal frontier between triple and dual objectives is obtained and best optimal value is selected using Fuzzy, TOPSIS, LINMAP and Shannon’s entropy decision making methods. Triple objective evolutionary approach applied to the proposed model gives power output, thermal efficiency, ecological function as (53.89 kW, 0.1611, −142 kW which are 29.78%, 25.86% and 21.13% lower in comparison with reversible system. Furthermore, the present study reflects the effect of various heat capacitance rates and component efficiencies on triple objectives in graphical custom. Finally, with the aim of error investigation, average and maximum errors of obtained results are computed.

  16. Interatomic Coulombic decay in helium nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shcherbinin, Mykola; Laforge, Aaron; Sharma, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is induced in helium nanodroplets by photoexciting the n=2 excited state of He+ using XUV synchrotron radiation. By recording multiple-coincidence electron and ion images we find that ICD occurs in various locations at the droplet surface, inside the surface region...

  17. Photoassociation of cold metastable helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decades the study of cold atoms has grown in a great measure. Research in this field has been made possible due to the development of laser cooling and trapping techniques. We use laser cooling to cool helium atoms down to a temperature of 1 mK and we are able to tr

  18. Messer to provide helium for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the next few years, industrial gas specialist The Messer Group, through its Swiss subsidiary Messer Schweiz AG, is to provide a 160,000kg supply of helium to the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) for the operation of the world's largest particle accelerator.

  19. Messer to provide helium for LHC project

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the next few years, industrial gas specialist The Messer Group, through its Swiss subsidiary Messer Schweiz AG, is to provide a 160,000kg supply of helium to the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) for the operation of the world's largest particle accelerator.

  20. Thermalization of magnetically trapped metastable helium

    CERN Document Server

    Browaeys, A; Sirjean, O; Poupard, J; Nowak, S; Boiron, D; Westbrook, C I; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We have observed thermalization by elastic collisions of magnetically trapped metastable helium atoms. Our method directly samples the reconstruction of a thermal energy distribution after the application of an RF knife. The relaxation time of our sample towards equilibrium gives an elastic collision rate constant close to the unitarity limit.

  1. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.B. Brauer; S. Smolarek; E. Loginov; D. Mateo; A. Hernando; M. Pi; M. Barranco; W.J. Buma; M. Drabbels

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitatio

  2. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in "The Physics Teacher." As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular.…

  3. Photoassociation of cold metastable helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decades the study of cold atoms has grown in a great measure. Research in this field has been made possible due to the development of laser cooling and trapping techniques. We use laser cooling to cool helium atoms down to a temperature of 1 mK and we are able to

  4. Photoassociation of cold metastable helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decades the study of cold atoms has grown in a great measure. Research in this field has been made possible due to the development of laser cooling and trapping techniques. We use laser cooling to cool helium atoms down to a temperature of 1 mK and we are able to tr

  5. Development of a helium cryostat for laser spectroscopy of atoms with unstable nuclei in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Kei, E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Furukawa, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Instutute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    We are developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopic technique for the study of nuclear structure that can be applied to short-lived low-yield atoms with unstable nuclei. The method utilizes superfluid helium (He II) as a trapping medium for high-energy ion beams. A liquid helium cryostat with optical windows is a key apparatus for this type of experiment. We describe the design and the performance of the cryostat which is developed for the present project.

  6. Femtosecond spectroscopy on alkali-doped helium nanodroplets; Femtosekundenspektroskopie an alkalidotierten Helium-Nanotroepfchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claas, P.

    2006-01-15

    In the present thesis first studies on the short-time dynamics in alkali dimers and microclusters, which were bound on the surface of superfluid helium droplets, were presented. The experiments comprehended pump-probe measurements on the fs scale on the vibration dynamics on the dimers and on the fragmentation dynamics on the clusters. Generally by the studies it was shown that such extremely short slopes can also be observed on helium droplets by means of the femtosecond spectroscopy.

  7. Helium accreting CO white dwarfs with rotation: helium novae instead of double detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, S C

    2004-01-01

    We present evolutionary models of helium accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs in which we include the effects of the spin-up of the accreting star induced by angular momentum accretion, rotationally induced chemical mixing and rotational energy dissipation. Initial masses of 0.6 Msun and 0.8 Msun and constant accretion rates of a few times 10^{-8} Msun/yr of helium rich matter have been considered, which is typical for the sub-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor scenario for Type Ia supernovae. It is found that the helium envelope in an accreting white dwarf is heated efficiently by friction in the differentially rotating spun-up layers. As a result, helium ignites much earlier and under much less degenerate conditions compared to the corresponding non-rotating case. Consequently, a helium detonation may be avoided, which questions the sub-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor scenario for Type Ia supernovae. We discuss implications of our results for the evolution of helium star plus white dwarf binary systems as possible...

  8. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A., E-mail: alkwin.slenczka@chemie.uni-regensburg.de [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  9. Gravitino or Axino Dark Matter with Reheat Temperature as high as $10^{16}$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Co, Raymond T; Hall, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    A new scheme for LSP dark matter is introduced and studied in theories of TeV supersymmetry with a QCD axion, $a$, and a high reheat temperature after inflation, $T_R$. A large overproduction of axinos ($\\tilde{a}$) and gravitinos ($\\tilde{G}$) from scattering at $T_R$, and from freeze-in at the TeV scale, is diluted by the late decay of a saxion condensate that arises from inflation. The two lightest superpartners are $\\tilde{a}$, with mass of order the TeV scale, and $\\tilde{G}$ with mass $m_{3/2}$ anywhere between the keV and TeV scales, depending on the mediation scale of supersymmetry breaking. Dark matter contains both warm and cold components: for $\\tilde{G}$ LSP the warm component arises from $\\tilde{a} \\rightarrow \\tilde{G}a$, while for $\\tilde{a}$ LSP the warm component arises from $\\tilde{G} \\rightarrow \\tilde{a}a$. The free-streaming scale for the warm component is predicted to be of order 1 Mpc, independent of $m_{3/2}$ in the case of $\\tilde{G}$ LSP. $T_R$ can be as high as $10^{16}$ GeV, for an...

  10. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-02-23

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney).

  11. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m{sup 2} at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m{sup 2}. The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100{degrees}C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bao-Ling; Wang Jun; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the pressure state of the helium bubble in titanium is simulated by a molecular dynamics (MD) method. First, the possible helium/vacancy ratio is determined according to therelation between the bubble pressure and helium/vacancy ratio; then the dependences of the helium bubble pressure on the bubble radius at different temperatures are studied. It is shown that the product of the bubble pressure and the radius is approximately a constant, a result justifying the pressure-radius relation predicted by thermodynamics-based theory for gas bubble. Furthermore, a state equation of the helium bubble is established based on the MD calculations. Comparison between the results obtained by the state equation and corresponding experimental data shows that the state equation can describe reasonably the state of helium bubble and thus could be used for Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of helium bubble in metals.

  13. Development and Dissemination of a Nationwide Helium Database for a National Assessment of Helium Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, S. T.; East, J. A., II; Garrity, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, Congress passed the Helium Stewardship Act requiring the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to undertake a national helium gas resource assessment to determine the nation's helium resources. An important initial component necessary to complete this assessment was the development of a comprehensive database of Helium (He) concentrations from petroleum exploration wells. Because Helium is often used as the carrier gas for compositional analyses for commercial and exploratory oil and gas wells, this limits the available helium concentration data. A literature search in peer-reviewed publications, state geologic survey databases, USGS energy geochemical databases, and the Bureau of Land Management databases provided approximately 16,000 data points from wells that had measurable He concentrations in the gas composition analyses. The data from these wells includes, date of sample collection, American Petroleum Institute well number, formation name, field name, depth of sample collection, and location. The gas compositional analyses, some performed as far back as 1934, do not all have the same level of precision and accuracy, therefore the date of the analysis is critical to the assessment as it indicates the relative amount of uncertainty in the analytical results. Non-proprietary data was used to create a GIS based interactive web interface that allows users to visualize, inspect, interact, and download our most current He data. The user can click on individual locations to see the available data at that location, as well as zoom in and out on a data density map. Concentrations on the map range from .04 mol% (lowest concentration of economic value) to 12% (highest naturally occurring values). This visual interface will allow users to develop a rapid appreciation of the areas with the highest potential for high helium concentrations within oil and gas fields.

  14. Universal Expression of Efficiency at Maximum Power: A Quantum-Mechanical Brayton Engine Working with a Single Particle Confined in a Power-Law Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhuo-Lin; Li, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Ming; He, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2015-12-01

    We propose a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine model that works between two superposed states, employing a single particle confined in an arbitrary power-law trap as the working substance. Applying the superposition principle, we obtain the explicit expressions of the power and efficiency, and find that the efficiency at maximum power is bounded from above by the function: η+ = θ/(θ + 1), with θ being a potential-dependent exponent. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11505091, 11265010, and 11365015, and the Jiangxi Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 20132BAB212009

  15. Helium-cooling in fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.B.; Hamilton, C.J.; Schleicher, R.W.; Streckert, H.

    1994-11-01

    This paper reviews different helium-cooled first wall and blanket designs; and compares the selection of structural materials. The authors found that the solid breeder, SiC-composite material option generates the lowest amount of induced radioactivity and afterheat and has the highest temperature capability. When combined with the direct cycle gas turbine system, it has the potential to be the most economical fusion system and can compete with advanced fission reactors. When compared to martensitic steel and V-alloy, SiC-composite is the least developed of these three structural materials, a focused development effort will be needed. Fundamental research has begun in addressing the issues of optimized composite materials, irradiation effects, leak tightness and low activation braze materials. Development of helium-cooled high heat flux components and further development of the direct cycle gas turbine system will also be needed.

  16. Survivor from asphyxiation due to helium inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Etteri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this rare case report we describe a 27- year-old white man survived to suicide by asphyxiation using the so-called suicide bag (or exit bag filled with helium supplied through a plastic tube. He had no previous psychiatric or organic illnesses. At the time of presentation to our Emergency Department he was awake and reported severe dyspnea with a clinical pattern of acute respiratory failure. Imaging studies showed pulmonary edema and the patient was treated with non-invasive ventilation in Intensive Care Unit. After 15 days the patient was discharged from hospital in optimal conditions. These rare cases of survivor might suggest the possible causes of death from inhaling helium.

  17. Laser-Induced Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisky, S.; Yang, Y.; Wei, W.; Maris, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    We report on experiments in which focused laser light is used to induce optical breakdown in liquid helium-4. The threshold intensity has been measured over the temperature range from 1.1 to 2.8 K with light of wavelength 1064 nm. In addition to the measurement of the threshold, we have performed experiments to study how the breakdown from one pulse modifies the probability that a subsequent pulse will result in breakdown.

  18. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  19. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  20. Shift and broadening of resonance lines of antiprotonic helium atoms in solid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    We have estimated the shift and broadening of the resonance lines in the spectrum of antiprotonic helium atoms $\\bar{p}\\mathrm{He}^{+}$ implanted in solid helium $^4$He. The application of the response function for crystalline helium has enabled determination of the contributions from the collective degrees of freedom to the shift and broadening. It occurs that the broadening due to the collective motion is negligible compared to the natural line width. The available pair-correlation functions for crystalline $^4$He have been applied for estimating the resonance-line shift due to collisions of $\\bar{p}\\mathrm{He}^{+}$ atom with the surrounding $^4$He atoms. The dependence of the line shift, which has been calculated in the quasistatic limit, on the solid-$^4$He density is nonlinear.

  1. Multipurpose closed-cycle cryocooler for liquefying hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Calvin

    1990-08-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator utilizing helium-4 gas in closed-cycle Gifford-McMahon and Joule-Thomson cooling loops was built and achieves continuous operating temperatures of 2.8R. The object cooled is a thin walled (0.1mm) seamless electroformed nickel target sample cell with a volume of 160m1. Room temperature hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3 gas, supplied at a pressure slightly above atmospheric, is liquefied by the cryocooler and fills the cell. Unusual features include: horizontal operation; a long narrow extension on the vacuum shroud (900mm long, 76mm diameter) and special valves to select an operating temperature appropriate to the sample gas and maximize the cooling power available at that temperature.

  2. THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF LIQUID HELIUM IN ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.

    2002-07-22

    A CRYOGENIC RESEARCH APPARATUS TO MEASURE THE MOVEMENT OF ELECTRONS UNDER A HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD IN A LIQUID HELIUM BATH WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AND THE NEVIS LABORATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER IS A DOUBLE WALLED CYLINDRICAL CONTAINER EQUIPPED WITH 5 OPTICS WINDOWS AND 10 HIGH VOLTAGE CABLES. TO SHIELD THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER AGAINST THE EXTERNAL HEAT LOADS AND TO PROVIDE THE THERMAL UNIFORMITY IN THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER, THE DOUBLE WALLED JACKET WAS COOLED BY A PUMPED HELIUM BATH. THE HELIUM CHAMBER WAS BUILT INTO A COMMERICAL LN2 / LHE CRYOSTAT. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE DESIGN AND THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION ANALYSIS ON THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF THE ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

  3. Helium liquefaction with a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao

    2001-07-01

    Helium liquefaction with a two-stage 4 K pulse tube cryocooler is introduced in this paper. The helium liquefier has a feature of precooling helium gas to be liquefied by using inefficiency of the second stage regenerator in the pulse tube cryocooler. This process reduces enthalpy of the incoming helium gas when entering the condenser and significantly increases the condensation rate. Numerical analysis predicts the precooling heat load on the second stage regenerator, decreases the PTC second stage cooling capacity by only 11% of the heat actually absorbed into the regenerator. A prototype pulse tube helium liquefier was built, which has two precooling heat exchangers on the first stage cold head and the second stage regenerator. It continuously liquefies helium with a rate of 4.8 l/day under normal pressure while consumes 4.6 kW power input.

  4. Diffusion behaviors of helium atoms at two Pd grain boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ji-xing; HU Wang-yu; YANG Jian-yu; AO Bing-yun

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of helium atoms at two symmetric grain boundaries (Σ5{210} and Σ3 {112}) of Pd were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations through an analytical embedded-atom method(MAEAM) model. The simulations demonstrate that the interstitial helium atoms are easily trapped at the grain boundaries and precipitated into clusters. Due to the closed-shell electronic configurations of both helium and palladium,Pd grain boundaries yield strong capability of retaining helium atoms. By calculating the mean square displacements(MSD) of an interstitial helium atom at the grain boundaries,the diffusion coefficients were determined,and the linear fits to Arrhenius relation. The diffusion activation energies of interstitial helium atom at these two Pd grain boundaries were also evaluated.

  5. Capacity enhancement of indigenous expansion engine based helium liquefier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, R. S.; Kush, P. K.; Maheshwari, G.

    2017-02-01

    Development of technology and understanding for large capacity helium refrigeration and liquefaction at helium temperature is indispensable for coming-up projects. A new version of helium liquefier designed and built to provide approximately 35 liters of liquid helium per hour. The refrigeration capacity of this reciprocating type expansion engine machine has been increased from its predecessor version with continuous improvement and deficiency debugging. The helium liquefier has been built using components by local industries including cryogenic Aluminum plate fin heat exchangers. Two compressors with nearly identical capacity have been deployed for the operation of system. Together they consume about 110 kW of electric power. The system employs liquid Nitrogen precooling to enhance liquid Helium yield. This paper describes details of the cryogenic expander design improvements, reconfiguration of heat exchangers, performance simulation and their experimental validation.

  6. Design of the Helium Purifier for IHEP-ADS Helium Purification System

    CERN Document Server

    Jianqin, Zhang; Zhuo, Zhang; Rui, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Helium Purification System is an important sub-system in the Accelerator Driven Subcritical System of the Institute of High Energy Physics(IHEP ADS). The purifier is designed to work at the temperature of 77K. The purifier will work in a flow rate of 5g/s at 20MPa in continuous operation of 12 hours. The oil and moisture are removed by coalescing filters and a dryer, while nitrogen and oxygen are condensed by a phase separator and then adsorbed in several activated carbon adsorption cylinders. After purification, the purified helium has an impurity content of less than 5ppm.

  7. Existence of liquid helium above melting curve pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, A.L.; Brewer, D.F.; Naji, T.; Haynes, S. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Dept. of Physics); Reppy, J.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    Data are presented on the specific heat of helium confined at a high externally applied pressure within the 60 A pores of vycor glass. The specific heat shows that the helium within the pores remains in the liquid state down to temperatures well below 1 K. On the other hand the helium outside the vycor behaves normally, changing phase from solid to liquid as it warms.

  8. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  9. Asteroseismic estimate of helium abundance of 16 Cyg A, B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The helium ionization zone in a star leaves a characteristic signature on its oscillation frequencies, which can be used to estimate the helium content in the envelope of the star. We use the oscillation frequencies of 16 Cyg A and B, obtained using 2.5 years of Kepler data, to estimate the envelope helium abundance of these stars. We find the envelope helium abundance to lie in the range 0.231–0.251 for 16 Cyg A and 0.218–0.266 for 16 Cyg B.

  10. Simulation of a combustion process of a billet reheating furnace; Simulacao do processo de combustao de um forno de reaquecimento de tarugos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Eduardo Sergio da Silva; Barros, Jose Eduardo Mautone [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Ribeiro, Vicente Aleixo Pinheiro [ArcelorMittal Monlevade, Serra, ES (Brazil); Moura Junior, Jose dos Reis Vieira de [ArcelorMittal Long Carbon Americas (Luxembourg); Belisario, Leandro Pego [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Real data-based energy balances with few simplifications are a powerful tool for furnaces energy performance evaluation, helping technical people to guide efforts in energy consumption issues, and consequently, in a final product cost reduction. This paper presents a methodology to simulate the combustion process in several operational conditions of a walking-hearth reheat furnace for billets in rolling mill facilities. The computational model consists, basically, in a dynamical solution which measured input variables are supplied from the furnaces supervisory and compared to measures by instruments in the system. Finally, it is made a variability analysis of the furnace and heat exchangers efficiencies.. (author)

  11. Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-07

    Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5

  12. Helium-3 and Helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Leemans, W P; Bulanov, S V; Margarone, D; Korn, G; Haberer, T

    2015-01-01

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (Magnetic Vortex Acceleration and hole-boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the ...

  13. Helium-3 and helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Bulanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions (heavier than protons. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (magnetic vortex acceleration and hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He^{3} ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He^{4} with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.

  14. Lamb shift in muonic helium ion

    CERN Document Server

    Martynenko, A P

    2006-01-01

    The Lamb shift (2P_{1/2}-2S_{1/2}) in the muonic helium ion (mu ^4_2He)^+ is calculated with the account of contributions of orders alpha^3, alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. Special attention is given to corrections of the electron vacuum polarization, the nuclear structure and recoil effects. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 1381.716 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with experimental data.

  15. Heat capacity of helium in cylindrical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica, S. M.; Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2003-10-01

    We perform a systematic investigation of the structure, elementary, and phonon excitations of quantum fluid 4He adsorbed in the interior of carbon nanotubes. We show that the helium fluid inside the cylinder behaves exactly as in planar films on a graphite substrate, presenting the same kind of layering transition. This tendency is confirmed by the behavior of a single 3He impurity diluted into adsorbed 4He. We also present a simple description of the lowest excitation modes of the adsorbed fluid and compute the low-temperature contribution of the phonon spectrum to the specific heat, which displays the dimensionality characteristics reported in previous works.

  16. Fano Resonances observed in Helium Nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    LaForge, A C; Jabbari, G; Gokhberg, K; Kryzhevoi, N V; Krishnan, S R; Hess, M; O'Kee?e, P; Ciavardini, A; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Cederbaum, L S; Pfeifer, T; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    Doubly-excited Rydberg states of helium (He) nanodroplets have been studied using synchrotron radiation. We observed Fano resonances related to the atomic N = 2,0 series as a function of droplet size. Although similar qualitatively to their atomic counterparts, the resonance lines are broader and exhibit a shift in energy which increases for the higher excited states. Furthermore, additional resonances are observed which are not seen in atomic systems. We discuss these features in terms of delocalized atomic states perturbed by the surrounding He atoms and compare to singly excited droplets.

  17. Variable helium diffusion characteristics in fluorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, R.; Dunkl, I.; Kempe, U.; Stockli, D.; Wiedenbeck, M.; von Eynatten, H.

    2016-09-01

    Precise analysis of the diffusion characteristics of helium in fluorite is crucial for establishing the new fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer (FHe), which potentially provides a powerful tool for dating ore deposits unsuitable for the application of conventional geochronometers. Incremental helium outgassing experiments performed on fluorites derived from a spectrum of geological environments suggest a thermally activated volume diffusion mechanism. The diffusion behaviour is highly variable and the parameters range between log D0/a2 = 0.30 ± 0.27-7.27 ± 0.46 s-1 and Ea = 96 ± 3.5-182 ± 3.8 kJ/mol. Despite the fact that the CaF2 content of natural fluorites in most cases exceeds 99 weight percent, the closure temperature (Tc) of the fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer as calculated from these diffusion parameters varies between 46 ± 14 °C and 169 ± 9 °C, considering a 125 μm fragment size. Here we establish that minor substitutions of calcium by rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) and related charge compensation by sodium, fluorine, oxygen and/or vacancies in the fluorite crystal lattice have a significant impact on the diffusivity of helium in the mineral. With increasing REE + Y concentrations F vacancies are reduced and key diffusion pathways are narrowed. Consequently, a higher closure temperature is to be expected. An empirical case study confirms this variability: two fluorite samples from the same deposit (Horni Krupka, Czech Republic) with ca. 170 °C and ca. 43 °C Tc yield highly different (U-Th-Sm)/He ages of 290 ± 10 Ma and 79 ± 10 Ma, respectively. Accordingly, the fluorite sample with the high Tc could have quantitatively retained helium since the formation of the fluorite-bearing ores in the Permian, despite subsequent Mesozoic burial and associated regional hydrothermal heating. In contrast, the fluorite with the low Tc yields a Late Cretaceous age close to the apatite fission track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He ages (AHe

  18. Influence of Helium in Gravitational Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Galindo, M. G.; Cardona, O.; Klapp, J.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Hemos analizado los modos hid rod inamicos de un modelo de fluido de dos componentes (hidr6geno y helio), y hemos obtenido la condici6n de inestabilidad para masas mayores que 1.39 veces la bien conocida masa dejeans. ABSTRACT, We have analysed the hydrodynamical modes of a two component fluid model (hydrogen and helium), and we have obtained the instability condition for masses greater than 1.39 times the well-known Jeans mass. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION - INSTABILITIES

  19. Effect of pre-cooking methods on the chemical and sensory deterioration of ready-to-eat chicken patties during chilled storage and microwave reheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Valquíria C S; Morcuende, David; Madruga, Marta S; Hernández-López, Silvia H; Silva, Fábio A P; Ventanas, Sonia; Estévez, Mario

    2016-06-01

    The effects of pre-cooking methods, namely, boiling (BL), roasting (RT) and grilling (GR), refrigerated storage (14 days/+4 °C) and microwave reheating on chicken patties were studied. Physical, chemical and sensory parameters were evaluated in order to correlate the chemical deterioration of ready-to-eat chicken patties with the acceptance of the odor. Chemical deterioration was evaluated through the chemical composition, Maillard compounds, Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and volatiles. Sensory deterioration (odor liking) was performed by an acceptance test with hedonic scale. According to the TBARS values and volatile compounds generated in the head space during the examined stages, the pre-cooking method and the storage time had a significant effect on lipid oxidation, whereas reheating in a microwave had a negligible impact. At each succeeding processing stage, panelists gave lower odor scores to all samples and no significant differences were found between treatments at any stage. RT and GR patties showed less intense chemical changes and presented higher acceptation scores by the sensory panel than BL patties. Thus, the choice of pre-cooking method and control of storage conditions plays a key role in the inhibition of oxidative changes in ready-to-eat chicken patties.

  20. Deposition, milling, and etching with a focused helium ion beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Veldhoven, E. van

    2012-01-01

    The recent successful development of the helium ion microscope has produced both a new type of microscopy and a new tool for nanoscale manufacturing. This chapter reviews the first explorations in this new field in nanofabrication. The studies that utilize the Orion helium ion microscope to grow or

  1. Laser-Induced Rotation of Iodine Molecules in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepperson, Benjamin; Sondergaard, Anders A.; Christiansen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Rotation of molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets is explored by a combination of fs laser-induced alignment experiments and angulon quasiparticle theory. We demonstrate that at low fluence of the fs alignment pulse, the molecule and its solvation shell can be set into coherent collective...... its helium shell. Our results open novel opportunities for studying nonequilibrium solute-solvent dynamics and quantum thermalization....

  2. Helium on Venus - Implications for uranium and thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, M. J.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Helium is removed at an average rate of 10 to the 6th atoms per square centimeter per second from Venus's atmosphere by the solar wind following ionization above the plasmapause. The surface source of helium-4 on Venus is similar to that on earth, suggesting comparable abundances of crustal uranium and thorium.

  3. Thermal Desorption of Helium Implanted in Tungsten at RT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGFu; XUZengyu; LIUXiang; CHENJiming; XUYing; N.Yoshida; H.Iwakiri

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten is envisaged as one of the main candidate materials for divertor plate of ITER and future fusion reactors. Due to D-T reaction, PFMs would suffer helium irradiation from plasma additional to the high heat loads. Helium retention and thermal desorption behavior are largely concerned.

  4. Deposition, milling, and etching with a focused helium ion beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Veldhoven, E. van

    2012-01-01

    The recent successful development of the helium ion microscope has produced both a new type of microscopy and a new tool for nanoscale manufacturing. This chapter reviews the first explorations in this new field in nanofabrication. The studies that utilize the Orion helium ion microscope to grow or

  5. Turnkey Helium Purification and Liquefaction Plant for DARWIN, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, U.; Boeck, S.; Blum, L.; Kurtcuoglu, K.

    2010-04-01

    The Linde Group, through its Australian subsidiary BOC Limited, has signed an agreement with Darwin LNG Pty Ltd for the supply of feed-gas to Linde's new helium refining and liquefaction facility in Darwin, Australia. Linde Kryotechnik AG, located in Switzerland, has carried out the engineering and fabrication of the equipment for the turn key helium plant. The raw feed gas flow of 20'730 Nm3/h contains up to of 3 mol% helium. The purification process of the feed gas consists of partial condensation of nitrogen in two stages, cryogenic adsorption and finally catalytic oxidation of hydrogen followed by a dryer system. Downstream of the purification the refined helium is liquefied using a modified Bryton process and stored in a 30'000 gal LHe tank. For further distribution and export of the liquid helium there are two stations available for filling of truck trailers and containers. The liquid nitrogen, required for refrigeration capacity to the nitrogen removal stages in the purification process as well as for the pre-cooling of the pure helium in the liquefaction process, is generated on site during the feed gas purification process. The optimized process provides low power consumption, maximum helium recovery and a minimum helium loss.

  6. The Orsay polarized electron source from a flowing helium afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianer, J.; Brissaud, I.; Essabaa, S.; Humblot, H.; Zerhouni, W.

    1993-12-01

    A polarized electron source was designed at Orsay. We have chosen to adapt the flowing helium afterglow source working at Rice University because it provides a very high polarization. We have investigated a new way for the optical pumping of the helium metastables. An 85% electron polarization was reached.

  7. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  8. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, P D; Ziman, T; Grigoriev, A D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyse the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time constant of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed one hour, and rapidly increasing with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the scheme of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved access to short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron beta-decay experiments. We also sketch new ex...

  9. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  10. Mining for helium: Site selection and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Eugene N.

    1988-09-01

    Part of the University of Wisconsin study of the feasibility of recovering He-3 from the moon is selection and evaluation of potential mining sites. Selection and evaluation are based primarily on salient findings by investigators: (1) Regoliths from areas underlain by highland materials contain less than 20 wppm He; (2) Regoliths of certain maria or parts of maria also contain less than 20 wppm He, but mare regoliths at the Apollo 11 and 17 sites contain 25 to 49 wppm He; (3) The helium content of a regolith is a function of its composition; and (4) Helium is concentrated in the -50 micron size fractions of regoliths. In site selection, the concern is with the compositions of lunar regoliths, in particular with their titanium contents. It is widely accepted that compositions of mare regoliths are controlled by the nature of the underlying basalts from which the regoliths are largely derived. The distribution and extent of the three groups of basalts and the regoliths derived from them are the first basis for site selection and evaluation. Other considerations are briefly discussed.

  11. Submersion of potassium clusters in helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    An der Lan, Lukas; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Schöbel, Harald; Denifl, Stephan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Ellis, Andrew M.; Scheier, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Small alkali clusters do not submerge in liquid helium nanodroplets but instead survive predominantly in high spin states that reside on the surface of the nanodroplet. However, a recent theoretical prediction by Stark and Kresin [Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.085401 81, 085401 (2010)], based on a classical description of the energetics of bubble formation for a fully submerged alkali cluster, suggests that the alkali clusters can submerge on energetic grounds when they exceed a critical size. Following recent work on sodium clusters, where ion yield data from electron impact mass spectrometry was used to obtain the first experimental evidence for alkali cluster submersion, we report here on similar experiments for potassium clusters. Evidence is presented for full cluster submersion at n>80 for Kn clusters, which is in good agreement with the recent theoretical prediction. In an additional observation, we report “magic number” sizes for both Kn+ and Kn2+ ions derived from helium droplets, which are found to be consistent with the jellium model.

  12. Muon transfer from deuterium to helium

    CERN Document Server

    Augsburger, M A; Breunlich, W H; Cargnelli, M; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; Gartner, B; Hartmann, F J; Huot, O; Jacot-Guillarmod, R; Kammel, P; King, R; Knowles, P; Kosak, A; Lauss, B; Marton, J; Mühlbauer, M; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Prymas, W; Schaller, L A; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Tresch, S; Von Egidy, T; Zmeskal, J

    2003-01-01

    We report on an experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland measuring x rays from muon transfer from deuterium to helium. Both the ground state transfer via the exotic dmu3,4He* molecules and the excited state transfer from mud* were measured. The use of CCD detectors allowed x rays from 1.5 keV to 11 keV to be detected with sufficient energy resolution to separate the transitions to different final states in both deuterium and helium. The x-ray peaks of the dmu3He* and dmu4He* molecules were measured with good statistics. For the D2+3He mixture, the peak has its maximum at E_dmu3He = 6768 +- 12 eV with FWHM Gamma_dmu3He = 863 +- 10 eV. Furthermore the radiative branching ratio was found to be kappa_dmu3He = 0.301 +- 0.061. For the D_2+4He mixture, the maximum of the peak lies at E_dmu4He = 6831 +- 8 eV and the FWHM is Gamma_dmu4He = 856 +- 10 eV. The radiative branching ratio is kappa_dmu4He = 0.636 +- 0.097. The excited state transfer is limited by the probability to reach the deuterium...

  13. Diagnostics of a High Pressure Helium Microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Koleva, Ivanka; Economou, Demetre; Donnelly, Vincent

    2004-09-01

    Gas and plasma diagnostics were performed in a slot-type DC microplasma (200 microns gap) discharge at high pressures. The gas temperature in a helium discharge was estimated by adding small quantities of nitrogen (excimer. At 250 Torr pressure and 200 mA/cm2 current density, the gas temperature was Tg = 350 +/- 25 K. The measured gas temperature was almost independent (to within experimental uncertainty) of pressure (in the range of 150 Torr - 600 Torr), and current density (in the range of 100 mA/cm2 - 400 mA/cm2). These measurements were consistent with a simple heat transfer model. Spatially resolved measurements of electron temperature were also performed using trace rare gas optical emission actinometry (TRG-OES). These measurements are greatly complicated by collisional quenching at the high operating pressures. Electron density and electron temperature profiles was deduced by comparing emission intensities from the Paschen 2px (x = 1-10) manifold of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe trace gases. Results suggested that the electron temperature peaks in the cathode sheath region, while the plasma density peaks away from the cathode sheath. A self-consistent fluid model of a DC helium microdischarge was in agreement with the experimental data. The model was used to study the dependence of discharge characteristics on operating conditions (pressure, gap spacing, current density, etc.).

  14. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We present first results of laser and microwave spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium performed at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Extending a series of previous measurements done at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, several laser- induced transitions of the antiproton in the exotic three-body system He/sup 2+/-e/sup -/-p could be determined with a precision down to 1.3*10/sup -7/. This constitutes an improvement of a factor 3 over previous measurements, and allows to test accurate three-body calculations of this system that include QED corrections. The observed agreement on the same level can be used to infer CPT limits on the antiproton charge and mass. Furthermore, a first indication of a resonance signal of a two-laser microwave triple experiment to measure the hyperfine splitting of antiprotonic helium could been observed. Such a measurement has the potential to determine the antiproton magnetic moment to a higher precision that it is known today. (19 refs).

  15. 小孔多流股蓄热式燃烧和煤气反吹技术的应用%Application of small multi stream ergenerative combustion and gas backblowing technology fo r reheating furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴红; 王浩; 盛立新; 郁苗苗

    2014-01-01

    The small multi stream regenerative combustion technology and gas backblowing technology on reheating furnace were described.The practice indicates that the technologyes have high efficiency, energy saving and low pollution merits etc, should have more application prospect for reheating fur-nace.%主要介绍小孔多流股蓄热式燃烧和煤气反吹技术在加热炉上的应用。实践表明,这两种技术具有高效、节能、低污染等诸多优点,具有广阔的应用前景。

  16. Shock Compression of Liquid Helium to 56 GPa (560) Kbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Trainor, R. J.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  17. Shock compression of liquid helium to 56 GPa (560 kbar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.; Trainor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation of the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  18. Localized helium excitations in 4He_N-benzene clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, P; Huang, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    We compute ground and excited state properties of small helium clusters 4He_N containing a single benzene impurity molecule. Ground-state structures and energies are obtained for N=1,2,3,14 from importance-sampled, rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). Excited state energies due to helium vibrational motion near the molecule surface are evaluated using the projection operator, imaginary time spectral evolution (POITSE) method. We find excitation energies of up to ~23 K above the ground state. These states all possess vibrational character of helium atoms in a highly anisotropic potential due to the aromatic molecule, and can be categorized in terms of localized and collective vibrational modes. These results appear to provide precursors for a transition from localized to collective helium excitations at molecular nanosubstrates of increasing size. We discuss the implications of these results for analysis of anomalous spectral features in recent spectroscopic studies of large aromatic molecules in helium clu...

  19. Using Uncertainty Principle to Find the Ground-State Energy of the Helium and a Helium-like Hookean Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbola, Varun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately estimate the ground-state energy and the atomic radius of the helium atom and a helium-like Hookean atom by employing the uncertainty principle in conjunction with the variational approach. We show that with the use of the uncertainty principle, electrons are found to be spread over a radial region, giving an electron…

  20. Using Uncertainty Principle to Find the Ground-State Energy of the Helium and a Helium-like Hookean Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbola, Varun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately estimate the ground-state energy and the atomic radius of the helium atom and a helium-like Hookean atom by employing the uncertainty principle in conjunction with the variational approach. We show that with the use of the uncertainty principle, electrons are found to be spread over a radial region, giving an electron…

  1. Helium-Charged Titanium Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition in an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Helium Plasma Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金钦华; 胡佩钢; 凌浩; 吴嘉达; 施立群; 周筑颖

    2003-01-01

    Titanium thin films incorporated with helium are produced by pulsed laser deposition in an electron cyclotron resonance helium plasma environment. Helium is distributed evenly in the film and a relatively high He/Ti atomic ratio (~ 20%) is obtained from the proton backscattering spectroscopy. This high concentration ofhelium leads to a surface blistering which is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Laser repetition rate has little influence on film characters. Substrate bias voltage is also changed for the helium incorporating mechanism study, and this is a helium ion implantation process during the film growth. Choosing suitable substrate bias voltage, one can avoid the damage produced by ion implantation, which is always present in general implantation case.

  2. Selection of a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine for an intermediate-duty solar-electric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, G. L.; Plummer, D. F.

    1980-03-01

    Subsystem and system analyses were performed to select the preferred working gas, performance characteristics and size of a closed cycle gas turbine for an intermediate-duty solar-electric power plant. Capital costs for all major subsystems were evaluated, but the principal selection criterion was the projected cost of electricity produced by the plant. Detailed analyses of the power conversion loop were conducted for both air and helium systems. Since the plant was intended for use on an intermediate-duty cycle, thermal storage was required. The coupling of the storage and power conversion loops in combination with the daily operating cycle influenced plant performance and energy costs in addition to the selection of the power conversion cycle.

  3. Closed Brayton Cycle power system with a high temperature pellet bed reactor heat source for NEP applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Harper, William B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Capitalizing on past and future development of high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) technology, a low mass 15 MWe closed gas turbine cycle power system using a pellet bed reactor heating helium working fluid is proposed for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. Although the design of this directly coupled system architecture, comprising the reactor/power system/space radiator subsystems, is presented in conceptual form, sufficient detail is included to permit an assessment of overall system performance and mass. Furthermore, an attempt is made to show how tailoring of the main subsystem design characteristics can be utilized to achieve synergistic system level advantages that can lead to improved reliability and enhanced system life while reducing the number of parasitic load driven peripheral subsystems.

  4. Imprints from the solar cycle on the helium atom and helium pickup ion distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rucinski

    Full Text Available Neutral interstellar helium atoms penetrate into the solar system almost unaffected by gas–plasma interactions in the heliospheric interface region, and thus can be considered as carriers of original information on the basic parameters (like density, temperature, bulk velocity of the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM. Such information can nowadays be derived from analysis of data obtained from different experimental methods: in situ measurements of He atoms (Ulysses, observations of the solar backscattered He 584 A radiation (EUVE, in situ measurements of He + pickup ions (AMPTE, Ulysses, Wind, SOHO, ACE. In view of the current coordinated international ISSI campaign devoted to the study of the helium focusing cone structure and its evolution, we analyze expected variations of neutral He density, of He + pickup fluxes and of their phase space distributions at various phases of the solar activity cycle based on a realistic time-dependent modelling of the neutral helium and He + pickup ion distributions, which reflect solar cycle-induced variations of the photoionization rate. We show that the neutral helium density values are generally anticorrelated with the solar activity phase and in extreme cases (near the downwind axis the maximum-to-minimum density ratio may even exceed factors of ~ 3 at 1 AU. We also demonstrate that in the upwind hemisphere (at 1 AU and beyond the He + fluxes are correlated with the solar cycle activity, whereas on the downwind side the maximum of the expected flux up to distances of ~ 3 AU occurs around solar minimum epoch, and only further away does the correlation with solar activity become positive. Finally, we present the response of the phase space distribution spectra of He + pickup ions (in the solar wind frame for different epochs of the solar cycle and heliocentric distances from 1 to 5 AU covering the range of Ulysses, Wind and ACE observations.

    Key words. Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy

  5. Modeling and sizing of the heat exchangers of a new supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Cantizano, A.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose a procedure to model the heat exchangers of a S-CO2 Brayton power cycle. •Discretization in sub-heat exchangers is performed due to complex behavior of CO{sub 2}. •Different correlations have been tested, verifying them with CFD when necessary. •Obtained sizes are agree with usual values of printed circuit heat exchangers. -- Abstract: TECNO{sub F}US is a research program financed by the Spanish Government to develop technologies related to a dual-coolant (He/Pb–Li) breeding blanket design concept including the auxiliary systems for a future power reactor (DEMO). One of the main issues of this program is the optimization of heat recovery from the reactor and its conversion into electrical power. This paper is focused on the methodology employed for the design and sizing of all the heat exchangers of the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle (S-CO2) proposed by the authors. Due to the large pressure difference between the fluids, and also to their compactness, Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) are suggested in literature for these type of cycles. Because of the complex behavior of CO{sub 2}, their design is performed by a numerical discretization into sub-heat exchangers, thus a higher precision is reached when the thermal properties of the fluids vary along the heat exchanger. Different empirical correlations for the pressure drop and the Nusselt number have been coupled and assessed. The design of the precooler (PC) and the low temperature recuperator (LTR) is also verified by simulations using CFD because of the near-critical behavior of CO{sub 2}. The size of all of the heat exchangers of the cycle have been assessed.

  6. An Update of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Luridiana, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Three of the best determinations of the primordial helium abundance (Yp) are those obtained from low metallicity HII regions by Aver, Olive, Porter, & Skillman (2013); Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014); and Peimbert, Peimbert, & Luridiana (2007). In this poster we update the Yp determination by Peimbert et al. taking into account, among other aspects, recent advances in the determination of the He atomic physical parameters, the temperature structure, the collisional effects of high temperatures on the Balmer lines, as well as the effect of H and He bound-bound absorption.We compare our results with those of Aver et al. and Izotov et al. and point out possible explanations for the differences among the three determinations. We also compare our results with those obtained with the Plank satellite considering recent measurements of the neutron mean life; this comparison has implications on the determination of the number of light neutrino families.

  7. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    CERN Document Server

    Aver, Erik; Porter, R L; Skillman, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y_p. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increase...

  8. Lunar helium-3 and fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar helium-3 and fusion power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  9. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  10. Helium and carbon isotopes in Indian diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, R.; Lal, D.; Craig, H.

    1990-09-01

    Helium and carbon isotope measurements in Indian diamonds (from Andhra Pradesh) were carried out using samples that included mined diamonds from primary kimberlite source rocks and alluvial diamonds from river gravel. The He and C isotope concentrations in diamonds from these two sources were compared, and the Indian diamonds were compared to those from other regions. Results indicate that most of the He-3 in the alluvial diamonds is of cosmogenic origin and that the alluvial diamonds may also have a significant He-4 component due to alpha particles implanted during storage in a secondary matrix. One diamond, a mined kimberlite specimen, was found to have the lowest He-4 content (0.018 microcc/g) so far recorded in diamonds.

  11. Frequency metrology in quantum degenerate helium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassen Wim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the absolute frequency of the 1557-nm doubly forbidden transition between the two metastable states of helium, 2 3S1 (lifetime 8000 s and 2 1S0 (lifetime 20 ms, with 1 kHz precision. With an Einstein coefficient of 10−7 s−1 this is one of weakest optical transitions ever measured. The measurement was performed in a Bose-Einstein condensate of 4He* as well as in a Degenerate Fermi Gas of 3He*, trapped in a crossed dipole trap. From the isotope shift we deduced the nuclear charge radius difference between the α-particle and the helion. Our value differs by 4σ with a very recent result obtained on the 2 3S → 2 3P transition.

  12. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Loughlin, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.]|[JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  13. The Zeeman effect for helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The g-factors of the 23P, 21P, and 33P states of the helium atom are calculated by using the vatiational wave functions constructed from the linear combinations of Slater-type basis sets. The relativistic corrections to order α2(a.u.) and the effect of the motion of the center of mass are treated by using first-order perturbation theory. Most of our predicted results are in good agreement with recent results of Yan and Drake, which were obtained by using the wave functions with doubled Hylleraas coordinates. Based on the analysis of the convergence pattern in our calculation, we believe that our predicted value of the δgL-factor for 33P state in 4He, 2.914 15×10-7, ought to be reasonable and accurate, although there are no corresponding experimental data available in the liteature yet to be compared with.

  14. Helium removal and transport studies in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.T.; Horton, L.D.; Isler, R.C.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Finken, K.H.; Dippel, K.H.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Rusbueldt, D.; Euringer, H. (Association Euratom-Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Wolf, G.H.; Moyer, R.A.; Conn, R.W.; Gray, D.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Re

    1990-01-01

    Experiments demonstrating direct control of the He{sup 2+} density in a tokamak plasma have been performed in the TEXTOR tokamak with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. Helium is injected in a short gas puff from the outside of the plasma, is observed to reach the plasma core, and then is readily from the plasma. Active He pumping is found to be a valuable technique for discriminating the actual He confinement time from {tau}*{sub He}, which is strongly dependent on recycling. Active charge-exchange spectroscopy is used to study the exhaust and transport of He{sup 2+} within the plasma, and the density evolution is modeled with the diffusive/convective transport code, MIST. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Harmonic oscillator model for the helium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A harmonic oscillator model in four dimensions is presented for the helium atom to estimate the distance to the inner and outer electron from the nucleus, the angle between electrons and the energy levels. The method is algebraic and is not based on the choice of correct trial wave function. Three harmonic oscillators and thus three quantum numbers are sufficient to describe the two-electron system. We derive a simple formula for the energy in the general case and in the special case of the Wannier Ridge. For a set of quantum numbers the distance to the electrons and the angle between the electrons are uniquely determined as the intersection between three surfaces. We show that the excited states converge either towards ionization thresholds or towards extreme parallel or antiparallel states and provide an estimate of the ground state energy.

  16. Electron impact ionization of helium isoelectronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, M.R. [Rajshahi Univ., Dept. of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering (Bangladesh)

    2008-09-15

    The electron impact single ionization cross sections, on the helium isoelectronic He, Li{sup 1+}, B{sup 3+}, C{sup 4+} N{sup 5+} O{sup 6+} Ne{sup 8+}, Na{sup 9+}. Ar{sup +16}, Fe{sup 24+}, Mo{sup 41+} Ag{sup 45+}, and U{sup 90+} targets, are calculated modifying the simplified Bell (SBELL) model [Eur. Phys. J. D 46, 281 (2008)]. The results of the present analysis are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. The modified SBELL (MSBELL) model, incorporating the ionic correction factor in it, produces excellent agreement with the experimental data and theoretical calculations for all the two-electron systems, neutral or ions. This model may be a prudent choice in plasma modeling due to its simple inherent structure. (authors)

  17. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in The Physics Teacher.1 As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular. However, there appears to be little information available on the effects of either of these gases on musical instruments.2 We describe here the results of a student project that involved measuring the frequency shifts in an organ pipe, a trumpet, and a trombone as the result of filling the instruments with these two gases. The project was one of several possible end-of-semester projects required in an elective science of sound course for non-science majors.

  18. Radiative corrections to the polarizability of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łach, Grzegorz; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2004-06-11

    The complete alpha(3) QED correction to the helium atom polarizability is computed assuming an infinite nuclear mass and found to be equal to 0.000030666(3) a.u., with the contribution from the electric-field dependence of the Bethe logarithm amounting to 0.000000193(2) a.u. After including the alpha(2) and alpha(3) corrections for the nuclear recoil and the leading part of the alpha(4) QED correction, we find that the molar polarizability of 4He is 0.51725419(9)(4) cm(3)/mol. The first of the two error bounds is dominated by the uncertainty of alpha(4) and higher-order QED corrections and the second reflects the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant.

  19. A Study of Confined Helium Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The helium atom confined by a spherical parabolic potential well is studied employing the adiabatic hyperspherical approach method. Total energies of the ground and three low-excited states are obtained as a function of the confined potential radii. We find that the energies of a spherical parabolic potential well are in good agreement with those of an impenetrable spherical box for the larger confined potential radius. We find also that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-excited states and the inversion of the energy values. The results for the three-dimensional spherical potential well and the two-dimensional disc-like potential well are compared with each other. We find that the energy difference between states in a two-dimensional parabolic potential is also obviously larger than the corresponding levels for a spherical parabolic potential.

  20. Photoionizaton of Pure and Doped Helium Nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    Mudrich, M

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets, commonly regarded as the "nearly ideal spectroscopic matrix", are being actively studied for more than two decades now. While they mostly serve as cold, weakly perturbing and transparent medium for high-resolution spectroscopy of embedded molecules, their intrinsic quantum properties such as microscopic superfluidity still are subject-matter of current research. This article reviews recent work on pure and doped He nanodroplets using PI spectroscopy, an approach which has greatly advanced in the past years. While the notion of the ideal spectroscopic matrix mostly no longer holds in this context, photoionization techniques provide detailed insights into the photo-physical properties of pure and doped He nanodroplets and their relaxation dynamics following electronic excitation. Exploiting nowadays available high laser fields, even highly ionized states of matter on the nanoscale can be formed. Our particular focus lies on recent experimental progress including fs time-resolved spectroscop...

  1. Photoionization of helium dimers; Photoionisation von Heliumdimeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havermeier, Tilo

    2010-06-09

    The helium dimer is one of the most weakly bound systems in the universe. This makes it an interesting quantum mechanical object for investigation. These Van der Waals Clusters can be produced in an expansion of a cryogenic gas jet through a small nozzle into vacuum. In the present experiment we examine the interaction of He dimers with synchrotron radiation at an energy range from 64 to 78 eV. We observed different pathways leading to single ionization of both He atoms of the dimer compound. This two close standing ions begin now to dissociate in cause of their coulomb potential. All charged fragments were detected in coincidence with a COLTRIMS system. Especially Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) and the two step process (TS1) were clearly identified. Furthermore a distribution of the internuclear distance was obtained from the measured Kinetic Energy Release (KER). (orig.)

  2. Helium Inventory Management For LHC Cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Pyarali, Maisam

    2017-01-01

    The LHC is a 26.7 km circumference ring lined with superconducting magnets that operate at 1.9 K. These magnets are used to control the trajectory of beams of protons traveling in opposite directions and collide them at various experimental sites across the LHC where their debris is analyzed. The focus of this paper is the cryogenic system that allows the magnets to operate in their superconducting states. It aims to highlight the operating principles of helium refrigeration and liquefaction, with and without nitrogen pre-cooling; discuss the various refrigerators and liquefiers used at CERN for both LHC and Non-LHC applications, with their liquefaction capacities and purposes; and finally to deliberate the management of the LHC inventory and how it contributes to the strategic decision CERN makes regarding the inventory management during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), Extended Year-End Technical Stop (EYETS) and long shutdowns.

  3. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  4. Analytical modeling of helium turbomachinery using FORTRAN 77

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Purushotham

    Advanced Generation IV modular reactors, including Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), utilize helium as the working fluid, with a potential for high efficiency power production utilizing helium turbomachinery. Helium is chemically inert and nonradioactive which makes the gas ideal for a nuclear power-plant environment where radioactive leaks are a high concern. These properties of helium gas helps to increase the safety features as well as to decrease the aging process of plant components. The lack of sufficient helium turbomachinery data has made it difficult to study the vital role played by the gas turbine components of these VHTR powered cycles. Therefore, this research work focuses on predicting the performance of helium compressors. A FORTRAN77 program is developed to simulate helium compressor operation, including surge line prediction. The resulting design point and off design performance data can be used to develop compressor map files readable by Numerical Propulsion Simulation Software (NPSS). This multi-physics simulation software that was developed for propulsion system analysis has found applications in simulating power-plant cycles.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Ling; Wang, Jun; Hou, Qing

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the pressure state of the helium bubble in titanium is simulated by a molecular dynamics (MD) method. First, the possible helium/vacancy ratio is determined according to therelation between the bubble pressure and helium/vacancy ratio; then the dependences of the helium bubble pressure on the bubble radius at different temperatures are studied. It is shown that the product of the bubble pressure and the radius is approximately a constant, a result justifying the pressure-radius relation predicted by thermodynamics-based theory for gas bubble. Furthermore, a state equation of the helium bubble is established based on the MD calculations. Comparison between the results obtained by the state equation and corresponding experimental data shows that the state equation can describe reasonably the state of helium bubble and thus could be used for Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of helium bubble in metals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10775101) and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (Grant No. 2009GB106004).

  6. Comparison between s-CO2 and other supercritical working Fluids (s-Ethane, s-SF6, s-Xe, s-CH4, s-N2) in Line-Focusing Solar Power Plants with supercritical Brayton power cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Coco Enríquez, Luis; Muñoz Antón, Javier; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Thermosolar power plants with linear solar collectors and Rankine or Brayton power cycles are maturing as a competitive solution for reducing CO2 emissions in power plants as an alternative to traditional fossil and nuclear fuels. In this context, nowadays a great effort is being invested in supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton (s-CO2) power cycles for optimizing the line-focusing solar plants performance and reducing the cost of renewable energy. However, there are other working fluids with ...

  7. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aver, Erik [Department of Physics, Gonzaga University, 502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA, 99258 (United States); Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Porter, R.L., E-mail: aver@gonzaga.edu, E-mail: olive@umn.edu, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  8. Focused helium-ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Miro, H. [Delft University of Technology, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    The recent introduction of the helium ion microscope (HIM) offers new possibilities for materials modification and fabrication with spatial resolution below 10 nm. In particular, the specific interaction of He{sup +} ions in the tens of keV energy range with materials - i.e., minimal deflection and mainly energy loss via electronic excitations - renders the HIM a special tool for ion-beam-induced deposition. In this work, an overview is given of all studies of helium-ion-beam-induced deposition (He-IBID) that appeared in the literature before summer 2014. Continuum models that describe the deposition processes are presented in detail, with emphasis on precursor depletion and replenishment. In addition, a Monte Carlo model is discussed. Basic experimental He-IBID studies are critically examined. They show deposition rates of up to 0.1 nm{sup 3}/ion. Analysis by means of a continuum model yields the precursor diffusion constant and the cross sections for beam-induced precursor decomposition and beam-induced desorption. Moreover, it is shown that deposition takes place only in a small zone around the beam impact point. Furthermore, the characterization of deposited materials is discussed in terms of microstructure and resistivity. It is shown that He-IBID material resembles more electron-beam-induced-deposition (EBID) material than Ga-ion-beam-induced-deposition (Ga-IBID) material. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution for He-IBID is in general better than for EBID and Ga-IBID; in particular, proximity effects are minimal. (orig.)

  9. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  10. Control of lightness and firmness of cold and reheated frankfurter-type sausages using different spectroscopic methods applied to raw batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelandsdal, B; Dingstad, G I; Tøgersen, G; Hildrum, K I

    2007-03-01

    Muscle types and collagen, fat, and muscle protein minus collagen were varied in cooked frankfurter-type sausages made from beef and pork meat as well as pork backfat. The content of collagen was fixed at preset levels with pork rind. The amount of total muscle protein in the sausages varied between 5.9% and 11.9% and the fat between 16.1% and 22.1%. The collagen content varied between 1.3% and 4%. Spectroscopic measurements (near-infrared reflectance spectra 1100 to 2500 nm; front-face autofluorescence emission spectra 360 to 640 nm) on raw batters were used to predict the amounts of total muscle protein minus collagen, collagen, myoglobin, and fat (biochemical components), L* values from a Minolta chromameter, and firmness of cold (22 degrees C) and reheated sausages (60 degrees C). Lightness of sausages was most accurately determined from the batter data with a Minolta chromameter or the autofluorescence measurement system. Firmness of cold sausages could be described by the amounts of biochemical components plus the type of muscle used in the sausage. The 2nd-best approach was to use the shape of the near-infrared spectra to determine firmness. This was possible as the shape of near-infrared spectra depended on total protein content, and total protein content largely determined the firmness of cold sausages. If the sausages were reheated to 60 degrees C, near-infrared spectroscopy alone determined firmness of the sausages with a lower accuracy than a combined solution of fluorescence and near-infrared spectroscopy. The 2 spectroscopic techniques could thus be used to estimate the amount of biochemical components in sausages. Once these components were known, firmness could be calculated from a model between the amounts of biochemical components and firmness. For reheated sausages, as opposed to cold ones, there was a need to differentiate between collagen and the other muscle proteins in order to determine firmness. This was optimally achieved by using both

  11. 加热炉风机噪声特征及控制方法%Characteristics of noise from blower of reheating furnace and its control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张天久; 丁岳明

    2011-01-01

    The noise coming from running blowers of the reheating furnace installed in the technical revamp of a specific mill severely contaminates the environments and hurts the health of the worker and staff.In light of the character of the noise from the blower of the reheating furnace a series counter measures have been taken such as installing a silencers at the inlet of the blower,improving the flexible link of the tuyeres,strengthening the stiffness of the blade of rotors,making proper balance between the dynamic and static status of the blade of rotors and checking and examining their vibration,controlling the value of vibration speed within the range of less than 5 mm/s,selecting proper sound insulation door and windows and wrapping the shell of the blower and network of tubes with selected sound absorb materials,well adjusting the wind blow rate,controlling the angle of the wind door and avoiding the abnormal noise from the ventilation system and mutation.By adoption of the above mentioned noise reduction measures the noise from the reheating furnace blowers has been lowered to about 78 db(A) from original 84 db(A),an average reduction of noise about 6 db(A),therefore the environmental conditions around the blower chamber have been greatly improved.%某厂在技术改造中所安装的加热炉风机运行时产生的噪声严重污染环境并有损职工健康。针对加热炉风机噪声特征,在风机进口处设计安装了阻性复合消声器,改进风口的软连接,增强转子叶轮刚度,做好转子叶轮的动静平衡及振动检测,把振动速度值控制在5 mm/s以下;选用隔声门和隔声窗并采用吸声材料包扎风机外壳和管网,调整风量,控制风门角度,避开通风系统异常噪声及突变。实施一系列降噪措施后使加热炉风机的噪声从84 dB(A)左右降低到78 dB(A)左右,平均降低了6 dB(A),使风机室周边环境得到了改善。

  12. Nucleation, solvation and boiling of helium excimer clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Luis G Mendoza; Watkins, Mark J; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frederic; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Helium excimers generated by a corona discharge were investigated in the gas and normal liquid phases of helium as a function of temperature and pressure between 3.8 and 5.0 K and 0.2 and 5.6 bar. Intense fluorescence in the visible region showed the rotationally resolved $d^3\\Sigma_u^+ \\rightarrow b^3\\Pi_g$ transition of He$_2^*$. With increasing pressure, the rotational lines merged into single features. The observed pressure dependence of linewidths, shapes and lineshifts established phases of coexistence and separation of excimer-helium mixtures, providing detailed insight into nucleation, solvation and boiling of He$_2^*$-He$_n$ clusters.

  13. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  14. Solvation of Na+, K+, and Their Dimers in Helium

    OpenAIRE

    An der Lan, Lukas; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Jochum, Roland; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Helium atoms bind strongly to alkali cations which, when embedded in liquid helium, form so-called snowballs. Calculations suggest that helium atoms in the first solvation layer of these snowballs form rigid structures and that their number (n) is well defined, especially for the lighter alkalis. However, experiments have so far failed to accurately determine values of n. We present high-resolution mass spectra of Na+He n , K+He n , Na2 +He n and K2 +He n , formed by electron ionization of do...

  15. Roles and expectations of cold compressor for helium refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Nobuyoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Yoshinaga, Seiichiro; Ishizawa, Takehiko [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Since around 1970, cryogenic systems have required the use of cold compressors. The requirement appeared for two reasons. The first was reduce the pressure of liquid helium with the intention of realizing the stable operation of large superconducting magnets with the best superconducting ability by decreasing operating temperature. The other was to improve the reliability of helium refrigerator compressors by introducing a turbo-compressor with oil-free bearings. This paper describes the circumstances and particular development of cold compressors, requirements related to helium refrigeration systems and cold compressors and future prospects. (author)

  16. High resolution spectroscopy of six new extreme helium stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, U.; Jones, G.; Drilling, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution spectra of six newly discovered extreme helium stars are presented. LSS 5121 is shown to be a spectroscopical twin of the hot extreme helium star HD 160641. A preliminary LTE analysis of LSS 3184 yielded an effective temperature of 22,000 K and a surface gravity of log g = 3.2. Four stars form a new subgroup, classified by sharp-lined He I spectra and pronounced O II spectra, and it is conjectured that these lie close to the Eddington limit. The whole group of extreme helium stars apparently is inhomogeneous with respect to luminosity to mass ratio and chemical composition.

  17. Helium at White Dwarf Photospheric Conditions: Preliminary Laboratory Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeuble, M.; Falcon, R. E.; Gomez, T. A.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Bailey, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present preliminary results of an experimental study exploring helium at photospheric conditions of white dwarf stars. These data were collected at Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine, the largest x-ray source on earth. Our helium results could have many applications ranging from validating current DB white dwarf model atmospheres to providing accurate He pressure shifts at varying temperatures and densities. In a much broader context, these helium data can be used to guide theoretical developments in new continuum-lowering models for two-electron atoms. We also discuss future applications of our updated experimental design, which enables us to sample a greater range of densities, temperatures, and gas compositions.

  18. Multi-objective Optimization on Helium Liquefier Using Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Meng, Y. R.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Research on optimization of helium liquefier is limited at home and abroad, and most of the optimization is single-objective based on Collins cycle. In this paper, a multi-objective optimization is conducted using genetic algorithm (GA) on the 40 L/h helium liquefier developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Science (TIPC, CAS), steady solutions are obtained in the end. In addition, the exergy loss of the optimized system is studied in the case of with and without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. The results have guiding significance for the future design of large helium liquefier.

  19. Performance of Oil-Injected Scroll Compressors for Helium Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiibayashi, Masao; Izunaga, Yasushi; Sado, Shintaro

    In recent years there arises growing demand of helium liquefaction refrigerators for the magnetic resonance imaging systems, magnetically levitated vehicles and other systems using superconducting magnet. From this background, a small size, scroll type of hermetic helium compressor capable of compressing helium gas to the pressure ratio of 20 in a single stage is developed. Main features of this compressor are as follows. 1) Discharge capacity can be varied from 7 to 20 Nm3/h by changing driving motor frequency from 30 to 80 Hz. 2) The overall adiabatic efficiency showed 72%∼79% under the pressure ratio range of 11∼20 at 60 Hz using oil injection cooling device.

  20. Development of 18 K helium refrigeration system for CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The Conseil Europeen pour Ia Recherche Nucleaire (CERN) placed an order for a 1.8 K helium refrigeration system with IHI for the Large Hadron Collider project in 1999. IHI formed a consortium with Linde Kryotechnik AG (Switzerland), which has long experience with helium refrigeration systems. IHI designed and manufactured cold compressors based on leading technologies and expertise for turbo machinery. The cold compressor has the highest efficiency in the world. This paper describes the 1.8 K helium refrigeration system and performance test results at CERN. (5 refs).