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Sample records for regulatory t-cell increase

  1. Regulatory T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  2. Bath-PUVA therapy improves impaired resting regulatory T cells and increases activated regulatory T cells in psoriasis.

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    Kubo, Ryoji; Muramatsu, Shinnosuke; Sagawa, Yoko; Saito, Chiyo; Kasuya, Saori; Nishioka, Akiko; Nishida, Emi; Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2017-04-01

    Bath-psoralen plus ultraviolet light A (PUVA) therapy is an effective, safe, and inexpensive treatment for psoriasis. Psoriasis might be due to an unbalanced ratio of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells (Treg). The Treg functional ratio is significantly lower in patients with psoriasis compared with controls and is inversely correlated with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. We previously reported that bath-PUVA therapy significantly increases the number of Treg and restores Treg function to almost normal in most patients with psoriasis. We examined the effects of bath-PUVA therapy on three distinct Foxp3(+) subsets: activated Treg (aTreg), resting Treg (rTreg), and cytokine-secreting non-suppressive T cells. We enrolled 15 patients with psoriasis and 11 healthy controls. We examined aTreg, rTreg, and cytokine-secreting non-suppressive T cells in peripheral blood obtained from the psoriasis patients before and after every fifth bath-PUVA therapy session. Levels of aTreg, which are considered to have the strongest suppressive activity in patients with psoriasis, were significantly increased in the early bath-PUVA therapy sessions, and then diminished. Levels of rTreg were lower in psoriasis patients than in healthy controls, and increased during bath-PUVA therapy. Bath-PUVA therapy induced aTreg and rTreg concomitantly with an improvement in the psoriatic lesions, suggesting a mechanism for the effectiveness of bath-PUVA therapy for psoriasis patients. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain induces a heme oxygenase dependent increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

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    Khalil Karimi

    Full Text Available We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells.

  4. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liang [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ouyang, Weiming [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Office of Biotechnology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, United States Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin, Boquan [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  5. Fingolimod increases CD39-expressing regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis patients.

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    Nathalie Muls

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS likely results from an imbalance between regulatory and inflammatory immune processes. CD39 is an ectoenzyme that cleaves ATP to AMP and has been suggested as a novel regulatory T cells (Treg marker. As ATP has numerous proinflammatory effects, its degradation by CD39 has anti-inflammatory influence. The purpose of this study was to explore regulatory and inflammatory mechanisms activated in fingolimod treated MS patients.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from relapsing-remitting MS patients before starting fingolimod and three months after therapy start. mRNA expression was assessed in ex vivo PBMCs. The proportions of CD8, B cells, CD4 and CD39-expressing cells were analysed by flow cytometry. Treg proportion was quantified by flow cytometry and methylation-specific qPCR. Fingolimod treatment increased mRNA levels of CD39, AHR and CYP1B1 but decreased mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-22 and FOXP3 mRNA in PBMCs. B cells, CD4+ cells and Treg proportions were significantly reduced by this treatment, but remaining CD4+ T cells were enriched in FOXP3+ cells and in CD39-expressing Tregs.In addition to the decrease in circulating CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells, our findings highlight additional immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by fingolimod.

  6. Fingolimod increases CD39-expressing regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis patients.

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    Muls, Nathalie; Dang, Hong Anh; Sindic, Christian J M; van Pesch, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) likely results from an imbalance between regulatory and inflammatory immune processes. CD39 is an ectoenzyme that cleaves ATP to AMP and has been suggested as a novel regulatory T cells (Treg) marker. As ATP has numerous proinflammatory effects, its degradation by CD39 has anti-inflammatory influence. The purpose of this study was to explore regulatory and inflammatory mechanisms activated in fingolimod treated MS patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from relapsing-remitting MS patients before starting fingolimod and three months after therapy start. mRNA expression was assessed in ex vivo PBMCs. The proportions of CD8, B cells, CD4 and CD39-expressing cells were analysed by flow cytometry. Treg proportion was quantified by flow cytometry and methylation-specific qPCR. Fingolimod treatment increased mRNA levels of CD39, AHR and CYP1B1 but decreased mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-22 and FOXP3 mRNA in PBMCs. B cells, CD4+ cells and Treg proportions were significantly reduced by this treatment, but remaining CD4+ T cells were enriched in FOXP3+ cells and in CD39-expressing Tregs. In addition to the decrease in circulating CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells, our findings highlight additional immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by fingolimod.

  7. Bifidobacterium breve attenuates murine dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases regulatory T cell responses.

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    Bin Zheng

    Full Text Available While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition.

  8. Carica papaya increases regulatory T cells and reduces IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells in healthy human subjects.

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    Abdullah, Maha; Chai, Pei-Shin; Loh, Chiew-Yee; Chong, Mun-Yee; Quay, Huai-Wei; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; Seman, Zainina; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Seow, Heng-Fong

    2011-05-01

    Fruit and vegetables have therapeutic potential as they dampen inflammation, have no known side-effects and as whole foods have prospective additive and synergistic benefits. Th1 (IFN-γ(+) CD4(+))/Th2 (IL-4(+)CD4(+)) T cells play a vital role in mediating inflammatory responses and may be regulated by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Effects of Carica papaya on cells of healthy individuals were determined using flow cytometry methods. Significant down-regulation of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) (p=0.03, n=13), up-regulation of IL-4(+) CD4(+) (p=0.04, n=13) T cells and up-regulation of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-) (p=0.001, n=15) Tregs were observed after papaya consumption. In vitro cultures showed up-regulation of Tregs in male subjects and was significantly associated with levels of IL-1β in culture supernatants (R(2) =0.608, p=0.04, n=12). Other inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed. Papaya consumption may exert an anti-inflammatory response mediated through Tregs and have potential in alleviating inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Regulatory T cell memory

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    Rosenblum, Md; Way, SS; Abbas, AK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved. Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime–challenge models of infection. However, recent work ...

  10. Downregulated regulatory T cell function is associated with increased peptic ulcer in Helicobacter pylori-infection.

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    Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Elahi, Shokrollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Rashidii, Reza; Sarafnejad, Abdulfatah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Faridani, Rana; Tahmasbi, Kamran; Kheiri, Soleiman; Razavi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes gastric/duodenal mucosa and induces gastroduodenal disease such as gastritis and peptic ulcer and induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. The objective of this study was to determine the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer and determined the relationship between main virulence factor of H. pylori and Tregs. A total of 89 patients with gastritis, 63 patients with peptic ulcer and 40 healthy, H. pylori-negative subjects were enrolled in this study. Expression of CD4 and Foxp3 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, bacterial virulence factors and histopathological assessments. TGF-β1, IL-10 and FOXP3 expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3, INF-γ and IL-17A in infected patients were significantly higher than the ones in uninfected patients. Also, the number of CD4(+) T cells was independent on the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA) and outer inflammatory protein A (oipA), but it was positively correlated with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). Instead, the number of Foxp3(+) T cells was dependent on the vacA and oipA, but it was independent on cagA. The number of Foxp3(+) T cells and the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1 and FOXP3 in infected patients with gastritis were significantly higher than the ones in infected patients with peptic ulcer. Moreover, the number of CD4(+) T cells and the expression of IL-17A and INF-γ was the lowest in the gastritis patients, however, increased progressively in the peptic ulcer patients. Additionally, the numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3 and INF-γ were

  11. Regulating regulatory T cells.

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    Le, N T; Chao, N

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress activation of other immune cells and thereby maintain immune system homeostasis, self-tolerance as well as control excessive response to foreign antigens. The mere concept of Tregs was the subject of significant controversy among immunologists for many years owing to the paucity of reliable markers for defining these cells and the ambiguity of the nature and molecular basis of suppressive phenomena. However, recent advances in the molecular characterization of this cell population have firmly established their existence and their vital role in the vertebrate immune system. Of interest, accumulating evidence from both humans and experimental animal models has implicated the involvement of Tregs in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The demonstration that Tregs could separate GVHD from graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity suggests that their immunosuppressive potential could be manipulated to reduce GVHD without detrimental consequence on GVT effect. Although a variety of T lymphocytes with suppressive capabilities have been reported, the two best-characterized subsets are the naturally arising, intrathymic-generated Tregs (natural Tregs) and the peripherally generated, inducible Tregs (inducible Tregs). This review summarizes our current knowledge of the generation, function and regulation of these two populations of Tregs during an immune response. Their role in the development of GVHD and their therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of GVHD will also be described.

  12. CD27 signaling increases the frequency of regulatory T cells and promotes tumor growth.

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    Claus, Christina; Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian; Matter, Matthias S; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2012-07-15

    Signaling of the TNF receptor superfamily member CD27 activates costimulatory pathways to elicit T- and B-cell responses. CD27 signaling is regulated by the expression of its ligand CD70 on subsets of dendritic cells and lymphocytes. Here, we analyzed the role of the CD27-CD70 interaction in the immunologic control of solid tumors in Cd27-deficient mice. In tumor-bearing wild-type mice, the CD27-CD70 interaction increased the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced tumor-specific T-cell responses, increased angiogenesis, and promoted tumor growth. CD27 signaling reduced apoptosis of Tregs in vivo and induced CD4(+) effector T cells (Teffs) to produce interleukin-2, a key survival factor for Tregs. Consequently, the frequency of Tregs and growth of solid tumors were reduced in Cd27-deficient mice or in wild-type mice treated with monoclonal antibody to block CD27 signaling. Our findings, therefore, provide a novel mechanism by which the adaptive immune system enhances tumor growth and may offer an attractive strategy to treat solid tumors.

  13. Consumption of probiotics increases the effect of regulatory T cells in transfer colitis.

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    Petersen, Emil Rathsach; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Jensen, Simon Skjøde; Ravn, Peter; Olsen, Jørgen; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Kristensen, Nanna Ny

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics may alter immune regulation. Recently, we showed that the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ influenced the activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate if L. acidophilus NCFM™ also affects the function of Tregs in vivo. Development of colitis after transfer of CD4+CD25- T cells and protection from colitis by Tregs was studied in immunodeficient SCID mice which were simultaneously tube-fed with L. acidophilus NCFM™ or L. salivarius Ls-33 for 5 weeks. Probiotic-fed SCID mice transplanted with low numbers of Tregs in addition to the disease-inducing T cells were completely protected from colitis. This was in contrast to the control group, which showed intermediate levels of inflammation. In addition, feeding with probiotics lowered serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in both colitic mice and in mice protected from colitis by Tregs. Gene expression patterns of rectum samples of protected mice that receive either one of the probiotics showed a closer resemblance to naïve SCID mice than did patterns of the control group. The mechanism of action of the probiotics appears to be an indirect effect by inducing a Treg-favorable environment rather than a direct effect on the Tregs. L. acidophilus NCFM™ and L. salivarius Ls-33 feeding of SCID mice increases the in vivo effect of Tregs, resulting in a gene expression pattern in the rectum resembling that of the naïve SCID mouse. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  14. IDO expression in brain tumors increases the recruitment of regulatory T cells and negatively impacts survival.

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    Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Chang, Alan L; Ahmed, Atique U; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2012-11-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive adult brain tumor with a poor prognosis. One hallmark of GBM is the accumulation of immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting CD4(+)FoxP3(+)GITR(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here, we investigated the role of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) in brain tumors and the impact on Treg recruitment. To determine the clinical relevance of IDO expression in brain tumors, we first correlated patient survival to the level of IDO expression from resected glioma specimens. We also used novel orthotopic and transgenic models of glioma to study how IDO affects Tregs. The impact of tumor-derived and peripheral IDO expression on Treg recruitment, GITR expression, and long-term survival was determined. Downregulated IDO expression in glioma predicted a significantly better prognosis in patients. Coincidently, both IDO-competent and deficient mice showed a survival advantage bearing IDO-deficient brain tumors, when compared with IDO-competent brain tumors. Moreover, IDO deficiency was associated with a significant decrease in brain-resident Tregs, both in orthotopic and transgenic mouse glioma models. IDO deficiency was also associated with lower GITR expression levels on Tregs. Interestingly, the long-term survival advantage conferred by IDO deficiency was lost in T-cell-deficient mice. These clinical and preclinical data confirm that IDO expression increases the recruitment of immunosuppressive Tregs that lead to tumor outgrowth. In contrast, IDO deficiency decreases Treg recruitment and enhances T-cell-mediated tumor rejection. Thus, the data suggest a critical role for IDO-mediated immunosuppression in glioma and support the continued investigation of IDO-Treg interactions in the context of brain tumors. ©2012 AACR.

  15. Increased numbers of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric adenocarcinoma

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    Cheng, Hsin-Hung; Tseng, Guan-Ying; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Wang, Hung-Jung; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of gastric antrum biopsy specimens from healthy controls (n = 22) and patients with gastritis (n = 30), peptic ulcer (n = 83), or gastric cancer (n = 32). Expression of CD4, CD25 and Foxp3 was determined by immunohistochemistry in three consecutive sections per sample. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, there was an increased number of CD25+ and Foxp3+ cells in patients with gastritis (P = 0.004 and P = 0.008), peptic ulcer (P gastritis (P gastritis and peptic ulcer groups. PMID:22228968

  16. Narcolepsy Type 1 Is Associated with a Systemic Increase and Activation of Regulatory T Cells and with a Systemic Activation of Global T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoiset, Fabien; Regnault, Armelle; Tran, Tu Anh; Liblau, Roland; Klatzmann, David; Rosenzwajg, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) has been shown to result from a selective loss of hypothalamic hypocretin-secreting neurons with patients typically showing low CSF-hypocretin levels (<110 pg/ml). This specific loss of hypocretin and the strong association with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele led to the hypothesis that NT1 could be an immune-mediated pathology. Moreover, susceptibility to NT1 has recently been associated with several pathogens, particularly with influenza A H1N1 virus either through infection or vaccination. The goal of this study was to compare peripheral blood immune cell populations in recent onset pediatric NT1 subjects (post or non-post 2009-influenza A H1N1 vaccination) to healthy donors. We demonstrated an increased number of central memory CD4+ T cells (CD62L+ CD45RA-) associated to an activated phenotype (increase in CD69 and CD25 expression) in NT1 patients. Percentage and absolute count of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in NT1 patients were increased associated with an activated phenotype (increase in GITR and LAP expression), and of activated memory phenotype. Cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after activation was not modified in NT1 patients. In H1N1 vaccinated NT1 patients, absolute counts of CD3+, CD8+ T cells, and B cells were increased compared to non-vaccinated NT1 patients. These results support a global T cell activation in NT1 patients and thus support a T cell-mediated autoimmune origin of NT1, but do not demonstrate the pathological role of H1N1 prophylactic vaccination. They should prompt further studies of T cells, particularly of Tregs (such as suppression and proliferation antigen specific assays, and also T-cell receptor sequencing), in NT1. PMID:28107375

  17. Consumption of probiotics increases the effect of regulatory T cells in transfer colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emil Rathsach; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics may alter immune regulation. Recently, we showed that the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ influenced the activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate if L. acidophilus NCFM™ also affects the function...... of Tregs in vivo. METHODS: Development of colitis after transfer of CD4+CD25- T cells and protection from colitis by Tregs was studied in immunodeficient SCID mice which were simultaneously tube-fed with L. acidophilus NCFM™ or L. salivarius Ls-33 for 5 weeks. RESULTS: Probiotic-fed SCID mice transplanted...... with low numbers of Tregs in addition to the disease-inducing T cells were completely protected from colitis. This was in contrast to the control group, which showed intermediate levels of inflammation. In addition, feeding with probiotics lowered serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in both colitic mice...

  18. Galectin-9 Ameliorates Con A-Induced Hepatitis by Inducing CD4+CD25low/int Effector T-Cell Apoptosis and Increasing Regulatory T Cell Number

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    Zhang, Mengying; Zhong, Min; Suo, Qifeng

    2012-01-01

    Background T cell-mediated liver damage is a key event in the pathogenesis of many chronic human liver diseases, such as liver transplant rejection, primary biliary cirrhosis, and sclerosing cholangitis. We and other groups have previously reported that galectin-9, one of the β-galactoside binding animal lectins, might be potentially useful in the treatment of T cell-mediated diseases. To evaluate the direct effect of galectin-9 on hepatitis induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration in mice and to clarify the mechanisms involved, we administered galectin-9 into mice, and evaluated its therapeutic effect on Con A-induced hepatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Galectin-9 was administrated i.v. to Balb/c mice 30 min before Con A injection. Compared with no treatment, galectin-9 pretreatment significantly reduced serum ALT and AST levels and improved liver histopathology, suggesting an ameliorated hepatitis. This therapeutic effect was not only attributable to a blunted Th1 immune response, but also to an increased number in regulatory T cells, as reflected in a significantly increased apoptosis of CD4+CD25low/int effector T cells and in reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels. Conclusion/Significance Our findings constitute the first preclinical data indicating that interfering with TIM-3/galectin-9 signaling in vivo could ameliorate Con A-induced hepatitis. This strategy may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating human diseases involving T cell activation. PMID:23118999

  19. Galectin-9 ameliorates Con A-induced hepatitis by inducing CD4(+CD25(low/int effector T-Cell apoptosis and increasing regulatory T cell number.

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    Kun Lv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cell-mediated liver damage is a key event in the pathogenesis of many chronic human liver diseases, such as liver transplant rejection, primary biliary cirrhosis, and sclerosing cholangitis. We and other groups have previously reported that galectin-9, one of the β-galactoside binding animal lectins, might be potentially useful in the treatment of T cell-mediated diseases. To evaluate the direct effect of galectin-9 on hepatitis induced by concanavalin A (Con A administration in mice and to clarify the mechanisms involved, we administered galectin-9 into mice, and evaluated its therapeutic effect on Con A-induced hepatitis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Galectin-9 was administrated i.v. to Balb/c mice 30 min before Con A injection. Compared with no treatment, galectin-9 pretreatment significantly reduced serum ALT and AST levels and improved liver histopathology, suggesting an ameliorated hepatitis. This therapeutic effect was not only attributable to a blunted Th1 immune response, but also to an increased number in regulatory T cells, as reflected in a significantly increased apoptosis of CD4(+CD25(low/int effector T cells and in reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings constitute the first preclinical data indicating that interfering with TIM-3/galectin-9 signaling in vivo could ameliorate Con A-induced hepatitis. This strategy may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating human diseases involving T cell activation.

  20. Regulatory T cell frequencies are increased in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis.

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    Pagel, J; Hartz, A; Figge, J; Gille, C; Eschweiler, S; Petersen, K; Schreiter, L; Hammer, J; Karsten, C M; Friedrich, D; Herting, E; Göpel, W; Rupp, J; Härtel, C

    2016-08-01

    The predisposition of preterm neonates to invasive infection is, as yet, incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) are potential candidates for the ontogenetic control of immune activation and tissue damage in preterm infants. It was the aim of our study to characterize lymphocyte subsets and in particular CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) Tregs in peripheral blood of well-phenotyped preterm infants (n = 117; 23 + 0 - 36 + 6 weeks of gestational age) in the first 3 days of life in comparison to term infants and adults. We demonstrated a negative correlation of Treg frequencies and gestational age. Tregs were increased in blood samples of preterm infants compared to term infants and adults. Notably, we found an increased Treg frequency in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis while cause of preterm delivery, e.g. chorioamnionitis, did not affect Treg frequencies. Our data suggest that Tregs apparently play an important role in maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance, which turns into an increased sepsis risk after preterm delivery. Functional analyses are needed in order to elucidate whether Tregs have potential as future target for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. B7-H4-Ig treatment of normal mice changes lymphocyte homeostasis and increases the potential of regulatory T cells.

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    Kristensen, Nanna N; Schmidt, Esben G W; Rasmussen, Susanne; Balk-Møller, Emilie; Claesson, Mogens H

    2013-08-01

    Enteroantigens (eAgs) drive tolerogenic and inflammatory immune responses in the gut and are of importance for sustained immune homeostasis in colonic mucosa. Decline of regulatory activity in the gut mucosa might result in chronic colitis. B7-H4 is a co-inhibitory receptor expressed by professional antigen-presenting cells. By delivering signal 2 during T cell activation, it inhibits T cell proliferation and inflammation. In this study, we have used a newly developed B7-H4-Ig fusion protein and evaluated its effect on eAg-activated effector and regulatory T cells (Treg) in vitro and in vivo. T cells were recovered from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of untreated or B7-H4-Ig-treated BALB/c mice. Treatment of cells in vitro did neither affect the proliferation of effector T cells nor the function of Tregs. In vivo, B7-H4 treatment increased the total number of MLN-derived CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell subsets as well as the functional activity of MLN-derived Tregs, whereas the proliferative activity of eAg or alloantigen specific effector T cells was not influenced, although treatment resulted in less secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines from these cells. B7-H4-Ig treatment of severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice undergoing T cell transfer colitis did not influence the course of disease probably reflecting the lack of Tregs in this model of chronic colitis. In conclusion, we show that treatment with B7-H4-Ig in vivo changes lymphocyte homeostasis and increases the regulatory potential in normal mice, but does not affect the course of disease development in SCID mice undergoing T cell transfer colitis.

  2. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells...

  3. Interleukin-2 administration after modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer therapy increases peripheral regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunli; Zhou, Lei; Sun, Bei; Li, Xiaoxiao; Duan, Kaiming; Wu, Yuhui; Ouyang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) deaths are a major concern worldwide, and modified radical mastectomy (MRM) still represents a primary therapeutic strategy. Post-surgery administration of interleukin (IL)-2 for BC therapy has been implemented in China recently. Although its impact on regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been documented in some cancer types, such as melanoma, the IL-2-mediated changes in the Treg composition after MRM in BC treatment remain unknown. As registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, 34 newly diagnosed BC patients, aged 20-65 years, were enrolled in this trial. Patients were randomized to the IL-2-treated group (n=15) and the untreated control group (n=19). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated at time points of pre-operation (PreOP) and post-operation Day 1 (POD1), POD3, and POD7. Cells were subjected to flow cytometric assays to identify CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs, as well as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of FOXP3 expression. We found that the surgery caused a significant decrease in the percentage of Tregs on POD1, followed by a significant increase characterized by a peak value on POD7 with a more than 18% increase relative to the Pre-OP levels. We observed that the Treg percentages in the IL-2-treated group were significantly greater than those in the control group on POD3 and POD7, whereas no such statistical difference was observed on POD1. The FOXP3 expression analysis revealed consistent trends as observed by flow cytometry. Post-operative administration of IL-2 amplifies the surgery-induced augmentation of both Tregs and FOXP3 expression in BC therapy.

  4. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are increased in the early stages of halo nevi: clinicopathological features of 30 halo nevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H S; Jin, S A; Choi, Y-D; Shin, M-H; Lee, S E; Yun, S J

    2012-01-01

    There have been few clinical studies of the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in halo formation of halo nevus. To evaluate the clinicopathologic features and the presence of Tregs in halo nevi. We analyzed 30 halo nevi and performed immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against CD4, CD8, CD25 and Foxp3. We also performed double immunohistochemical staining for Foxp3 and CD25. We found significant increases in Foxp3(+) Tregs, and the shorter the halo nevus duration, the more Foxp3(+) Tregs were detected. Also, the ratio of Foxp3 to CD8 T cells was increased in early stages of halo nevi. Double immunohistochemical staining suggested that the Tregs in the halo nevi were CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Foxp3(+) Tregs were greatly increased in the halo nevi. The shorter the halo nevi duration, the more Foxp3(+) Tregs were involved in the earlier developmental stages of halo nevi. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Statins Increase the Frequency of Circulating CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucía Rodríguez-Perea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins have been shown to modulate the number and the suppressive function of CD4+FOXP3+ T cells (Treg in inflammatory conditions. However, it is not well established whether statin could also affect Treg in absence of inflammation. To address this question, eighteen normocholesterolemic male subjects were treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin daily for 45 days. The frequency and phenotype of circulating Treg were evaluated at days 0, 7, 30, and 45. mRNA levels of FOXP3, IDO, TGF-β, and IL-10 were measured in CD4+ T cells. We found that both statins significantly increased Treg frequency and FOXP3 mRNA levels at day 30. At day 45, Treg numbers returned to baseline values; however, TGF-β and FOXP3 mRNA levels remained high, accompanied by increased percentages of CTLA-4- and GITR-expressing Treg. Treg Ki-67 expression was decreased upon statin treatment. Treg frequency positively correlated with plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, suggesting a role for HDL-c in Treg homeostasis. Therefore, statins appear to have inflammation-independent immune-modulatory effects. Thus, the increase in Treg cells frequency likely contributes to immunomodulatory effect of statins, even in healthy individuals.

  6. Higher expression of Bax in regulatory T cells increases vascular inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zeyu; Song, Jian; Yan, Yan; Huang, Yajue; Cowan, Alan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2008-05-01

    This study is to examine our hypothesis that CD4+CD25(high)Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have an interleukin-2 (IL-2) withdrawal-triggered apoptosis pathway, and modulation of Treg apoptosis pathway affects development of vascular inflammation. We found that pro-apoptotic protein Bax upregulation in Tregs is induced by IL-2 withdrawal. Treg apoptosis induced by IL-2 withdrawal is inhibited by a Bax inhibitor, suggesting that highly expressed Bax is functional. To define the role of upregulated Bax in Treg apoptosis, we established a Tregs-specific Bax transgenic mouse model. Enforced expression of Bax in Tregs promotes Treg apoptosis triggered by IL-2 withdrawal and other apoptosis stimuli, suggesting pro-apoptotic role of highly expressed Bax in wild-type Tregs. Finally, higher expression of Bax in Tregs decreases the striking threshold of vascular inflammation due to the failure of suppression of inflammatory cells resulting from Treg apoptosis. These results have demonstrated the proof of principle that the modulation of Tregs apoptosis/survival could be used as a new therapeutic approach for inflammatory cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats have a compensatory increase in renal regulatory T cells in response to elevations in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Ashlee J; Baban, Babak; Sullivan, Jennifer C

    2014-09-01

    Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have more regulatory T cells (Tregs) in their kidneys than males. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of blood pressure (BP) on the renal immune profile. We hypothesize that increases in BP promote a proinflammatory renal T cell and cytokine profile in SHR, although females will have greater hormone-dependent increases in Tregs and males will have greater increases in Th17 cells. Renal T cell and cytokine profiles were assessed in male and female Wistar-Kyoto rats and male and female SHR treated with vehicle or hydrochlorothiazide and reserpine (HCTZ) from 6 to 12 (6-HCTZ) or 11 to 13 weeks of age (2-HCTZ). Regardless of sex, SHR had a more proinflammatory renal immune profile than Wistar-Kyoto rats. 6-HCTZ attenuated age-related increases in BP and 2-HCTZ reversed hypertension compared with vehicle-treated SHR. Neither 6-HCTZ nor 2-HCTZ altered CD3(+), CD4(+), or CD8(+) T cells in either sex. Both treatments decreased Tregs only in female SHR abolishing sex differences in Tregs. 6-HCTZ has no impact on Th17 cells in either sex and 2-HCTZ had a minimal impact on renal Th17 cells. To further assess mechanisms mediating sex differences in the renal immune profile, male and female SHR were gonadectomized to determine the impact of sex hormones. Gonadectomy increased proinflammatory markers in both sexes, suggesting that both male and female sex hormones are anti-inflammatory. In conclusion, BP contributes to sex differences in the renal T-cell profile of SHR; female SHR increase renal Tregs in response to increases in BP. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Regulatory T Cells and Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP. Velavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human host encounters a wide array of parasites; however, the crucial aspect is the failure of the host immune system to clear these parasites despite antigen recognition. In the recent past, a new immunological concept has emerged, which provides a framework to better understand several aspects of host susceptibility to parasitic infection. It is widely believed that parasites are able to modulate the magnitude of effector responses by inducing regulatory T cell (Tregs population and several studies have investigated whether this cell population plays a role in balancing protective immunity and pathogenesis during parasite infection. This review discusses the several mechanism of Treg-mediated immunosuppression in the human host and focuses on the functional role of Tregs and regulatory gene polymorphisms in infectious diseases.

  9. Depletion of regulatory T cells in a hapten-induced inflammation model results in prolonged and increased inflammation driven by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A. D.; Skov, Søren; Kvist, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) are known to play an immunosuppressive role in the response of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), but neither the dynamics of Tregs during the CHS response nor the exaggerated inflammatory response after depletion of Tregs has been characterized in detail. In this study w......). Furthermore, depletion of Tregs enhanced the release of cytokines and chemokines locally in the inflamed ear and augmented serum levels of the systemic inflammatory mediators serum amyloid (SAP) and haptoglobin early in the response....

  10. Regulatory T cells as immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin David Singer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes—autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation—may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease.

  11. B7-H4-Ig treatment of normal mice changes lymphocyte homeostasis and increases the potential of regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna N; Schmidt, Esben G W; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Enteroantigens (eAgs) drive tolerogenic and inflammatory immune responses in the gut and are of importance for sustained immune homeostasis in colonic mucosa. Decline of regulatory activity in the gut mucosa might result in chronic colitis. B7-H4 is a co-inhibitory receptor expressed by professio......Enteroantigens (eAgs) drive tolerogenic and inflammatory immune responses in the gut and are of importance for sustained immune homeostasis in colonic mucosa. Decline of regulatory activity in the gut mucosa might result in chronic colitis. B7-H4 is a co-inhibitory receptor expressed...... by professional antigen-presenting cells. By delivering signal 2 during T cell activation, it inhibits T cell proliferation and inflammation. In this study, we have used a newly developed B7-H4-Ig fusion protein and evaluated its effect on eAg-activated effector and regulatory T cells (Treg) in vitro and in vivo......⁺ T cell subsets as well as the functional activity of MLN-derived Tregs, whereas the proliferative activity of eAg or alloantigen specific effector T cells was not influenced, although treatment resulted in less secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines from these cells. B7-H4-Ig treatment...

  12. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  13. In vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine inhibits T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production and significantly increases the frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueson, Lindsay E; Emmons, Tiffany R; Browning, Dianna L; Kreitinger, Joanna M; Shepherd, David M; Wetzel, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Deacetylase inhibition increases regulatory T cell function and decreases incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouaf, Sandra J; Li, Bin; Zhang, Geng; Shen, Yuan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Hancock, Wayne W; Greene, Mark I

    2009-10-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an established mouse model of disease with hallmarks of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are known to inhibit the pathogenesis of CIA and other models of autoimmune disease, although the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Regulatory T cell (Treg) function is defective in rheumatoid arthritis. FOXP3 proteins in Tregs are present in a dynamic protein complex containing histone acetyltransferase and HDAC enzymes, and FOXP3 itself is acetylated on lysine residues. We therefore investigated the effects of HDACi therapy on regulatory T cell function in the CIA model. Administration of an HDACi, valproic acid (VPA), significantly decreased disease incidence (pincreased both the suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs (pTregs in vivo. Hence, clinically approved HDACi such as VPA may limit autoimmune disease in vivo through effects on the production and function of FOXP3(+) Treg cells.

  15. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  16. Sustained in vivo signaling by long-lived IL-2 induces prolonged increases of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charles J M; Sun, Yongliang; Nowak, Urszula M; Clark, Jan; Howlett, Sarah; Pekalski, Marcin L; Yang, Xin; Ast, Oliver; Waldhauer, Inja; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian; Hosse, Ralf J; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing FOXP3 are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and are deficient in many common autoimmune diseases. Immune tolerance is maintained in part by IL-2 and deficiencies in the IL-2 pathway cause reduced Treg function and an increased risk of autoimmunity. Recent studies expanding Tregs in vivo with low-dose IL-2 achieved major clinical successes highlighting the potential to optimize this pleiotropic cytokine for inflammatory and autoimmune disease indications. Here we compare the clinically approved IL-2 molecule, Proleukin, with two engineered IL-2 molecules with long half-lives owing to their fusion in monovalent and bivalent stoichiometry to a non-FcRγ binding human IgG1. Using nonhuman primates, we demonstrate that single ultra-low doses of IL-2 fusion proteins induce a prolonged state of in vivo activation that increases Tregs for an extended period of time similar to multiple-dose Proleukin. One of the common pleiotropic effects of high dose IL-2 treatment, eosinophilia, is eliminated at doses of the IL-2 fusion proteins that greatly expand Tregs. The long half-lives of the IL-2 fusion proteins facilitated a detailed characterization of an IL-2 dose response driving Treg expansion that correlates with increasingly sustained, suprathreshold pSTAT5a induction and subsequent sustained increases in the expression of CD25, FOXP3 and Ki-67 with retention of Treg-specific epigenetic signatures at FOXP3 and CTLA4. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustained in vivo signaling by long-lived IL-2 induces prolonged increases of regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charles J.M.; Sun, Yongliang; Nowak, Urszula M.; Clark, Jan; Howlett, Sarah; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Yang, Xin; Ast, Oliver; Waldhauer, Inja; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian; Hosse, Ralf J.; Wicker, Linda S.; Peterson, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing FOXP3 are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and are deficient in many common autoimmune diseases. Immune tolerance is maintained in part by IL-2 and deficiencies in the IL-2 pathway cause reduced Treg function and an increased risk of autoimmunity. Recent studies expanding Tregs in vivo with low-dose IL-2 achieved major clinical successes highlighting the potential to optimize this pleiotropic cytokine for inflammatory and autoimmune disease indications. Here we compare the clinically approved IL-2 molecule, Proleukin, with two engineered IL-2 molecules with long half-lives owing to their fusion in monovalent and bivalent stoichiometry to a non-FcRγ binding human IgG1. Using nonhuman primates, we demonstrate that single ultra-low doses of IL-2 fusion proteins induce a prolonged state of in vivo activation that increases Tregs for an extended period of time similar to multiple-dose Proleukin. One of the common pleiotropic effects of high dose IL-2 treatment, eosinophilia, is eliminated at doses of the IL-2 fusion proteins that greatly expand Tregs. The long half-lives of the IL-2 fusion proteins facilitated a detailed characterization of an IL-2 dose response driving Treg expansion that correlates with increasingly sustained, suprathreshold pSTAT5a induction and subsequent sustained increases in the expression of CD25, FOXP3 and Ki-67 with retention of Treg-specific epigenetic signatures at FOXP3 and CTLA4. PMID:25457307

  18. Depletion of regulatory T cells augments a vaccine-induced T effector cell response against the liver-stage of malaria but fails to increase memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Rosario Espinoza Mora

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (T(reg have been shown to restrict vaccine-induced T cell responses in different experimental models. In these studies CD4(+CD25(+ T(reg were depleted using monoclonal antibodies against CD25, which might also interfere with CD25 on non-regulatory T cell populations and would have no effect on Foxp3(+CD25(- T(reg. To obtain more insights in the specific function of T(reg during vaccination we used mice that are transgenic for a bacterial artificial chromosome expressing a diphtheria toxin (DT receptor-eGFP fusion protein under the control of the foxp3 gene locus (depletion of regulatory T cell mice; DEREG. As an experimental vaccine-carrier recombinant Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid fused with a MHC-class I-restricted epitope of the circumsporozoite protein (ACT-CSP of Plasmodium berghei (Pb was used. ACT-CSP was shown by us previously to introduce the CD8+ epitope of Pb-CSP into the MHC class I presentation pathway of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC. Using this system we demonstrate here that the number of CSP-specific T cells increases when T(reg are depleted during prime but also during boost immunization. Importantly, despite this increase of T effector cells no difference in the number of antigen-specific memory cells was observed.

  19. Frequency of circulating regulatory T cells increases during chronic HIV infection and is largely controlled by highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Presicce

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs act by suppressing the activation and effector functions of innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV infection impacts Treg proportion and phenotype, although discrepant results have been reported depending on the patient population and the way Tregs were characterized. The effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART on Treg frequency have not been thoroughly documented. We performed a detailed longitudinal analysis of Treg frequency and phenotype in 11 HIV-infected individuals enrolled in a single, prospective clinical trial, in which all patients underwent the same treatment protocol and were sampled at the same time points. Tregs were characterized for their expression of molecules associated with activation, cell cycle, apoptosis, or function, and compared to circulating Tregs from a group of age-matched healthy individuals.Our results revealed increased proportions, but reduced absolute numbers of circulating CD3(+CD4(+FOXP3(+ Tregs in chronically infected HIV-infected patients. Treg frequency was largely normalized by HAART. Importantly, we show that similar conclusions were drawn regardless of the combination of markers used to define Tregs. Our results also showed increased expression of cell cycle markers (Ki67 and cyclin B in Tregs from untreated infected individuals, which were decreased by HAART. However, the Treg phenotype in untreated patients was not consistent with a higher level of generalized activation, as they expressed very low levels of CD69, slightly elevated levels of HLA-DR and similar levels of GARP compared to Tregs from uninfected donors. Moreover, none of these markers was significantly changed by HAART. Treg expression of CTLA-4 and cytotoxic molecules was identical between patients and controls. The most striking difference in terms of functional molecules was the high expression of CD39 by Tregs in untreated patients, which HAART only partially controlled.

  20. Frequency of circulating regulatory T cells increases during chronic HIV infection and is largely controlled by highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presicce, Pietro; Orsborn, Kris; King, Eileen; Pratt, Jesse; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Chougnet, Claire A

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) act by suppressing the activation and effector functions of innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV infection impacts Treg proportion and phenotype, although discrepant results have been reported depending on the patient population and the way Tregs were characterized. The effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on Treg frequency have not been thoroughly documented. We performed a detailed longitudinal analysis of Treg frequency and phenotype in 11 HIV-infected individuals enrolled in a single, prospective clinical trial, in which all patients underwent the same treatment protocol and were sampled at the same time points. Tregs were characterized for their expression of molecules associated with activation, cell cycle, apoptosis, or function, and compared to circulating Tregs from a group of age-matched healthy individuals.Our results revealed increased proportions, but reduced absolute numbers of circulating CD3(+)CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Tregs in chronically infected HIV-infected patients. Treg frequency was largely normalized by HAART. Importantly, we show that similar conclusions were drawn regardless of the combination of markers used to define Tregs. Our results also showed increased expression of cell cycle markers (Ki67 and cyclin B) in Tregs from untreated infected individuals, which were decreased by HAART. However, the Treg phenotype in untreated patients was not consistent with a higher level of generalized activation, as they expressed very low levels of CD69, slightly elevated levels of HLA-DR and similar levels of GARP compared to Tregs from uninfected donors. Moreover, none of these markers was significantly changed by HAART. Treg expression of CTLA-4 and cytotoxic molecules was identical between patients and controls. The most striking difference in terms of functional molecules was the high expression of CD39 by Tregs in untreated patients, which HAART only partially controlled.

  1. Non-small-cell lung cancer-induced immunosuppression by increased human regulatory T cells via Foxp3 promoter demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xing; Zhang, Shuping; Xu, Jian; Liu, Genyan; Zhang, Lixia; Xie, Erfu; Gao, Li; Li, Daqian; Sun, Ruihong; Wang, Fang; Pan, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have immune defects that are poorly understood. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) is crucial for immunosuppression by CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). It is not well known how NSCLC induces Foxp3 expression and causes immunosuppression in tumor-bearing patients. Our study found a higher percentage of CD4(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of NSCLC compared with healthy donors. NSCLC patients showed demethylation of eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter with methylation ratios negatively correlated with CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T levels. Foxp3 expression in CD4(+) Tregs was directly regulated by Foxp3 promoter demethylation and was involved in immunosuppression by NSCLC. To verify the effect of tumor cells on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) Tregs, we established a coculture system using NSCLC cell line and healthy CD4(+) T cells and showed that SPC-A1 induced IL-10 and TGF-β1 secretion by affecting the function of CD4(+) Tregs. The activity of DNA methyltransferases from CD4(+) T was decreased during this process. Furthermore, eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter also appeared to have undergone demethylation. Foxp3 is highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells, and this may be caused by gene promoter demethylation. These induced Tregs are highly immunosuppressive and dramatically inhibit the proliferative activity of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Our study provides one possible mechanism describing Foxp3 promoter demethylation changes by which NSCLC down-regulates immune responses and contributes to tumor progression. Foxp3 represents an important target for NSCLC anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Emodin inhibits the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells and increases the production of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Hong; Bu, Heqi; Chen, Hui; Tong, Hongfei; Liu, Dianlei; Guo, Hongchun; Lin, Sheng-Zhang

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of emodin on dendritic cells (DCs) and CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Myeloid DCs were prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy human donors and treated with emodin at different concentrations. The phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity of these DCs were analyzed. The expression ratios of CD80 and CD83 in DCs in the presence of emodin (100 µg/ml) were significantly decreased compared with that in DCs without emodin treatment (Pincreased the number of Tregs, which expressed lower levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) as compared to cells without emodin treatment. Our results suggest that emodin inhibits the differentiation and maturation of DCs and induces Tregs, which may be helpful for the modulation of the immune rejection after liver transplantation.

  3. Regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Billerbeck; Tobias B(o)ttler; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections are significantly influenced by the host immune response.The immune system is able to eliminate many viruses in the acute phase of infection. However, some viruses,like hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV),can evade the host immune responses and establish a persistent infection. HCV and HBV persistence is caused by various mechanisms, like subversion of innate immune responses by viral factors, the emergence of T cell escape mutations, or T cell dysfunction and suppression.Recently, it has become evident that regulatory T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections by suppressing antiviral immune responses.Indeed, the control of HCV and HBV specific immune responses mediated by regulatory T cells may be one mechanism that favors viral persistence, but it may also prevent the host from overwhelming T cell activity and liver damage. This review will focus on the role of regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis.

  4. Anti-GITR Antibody Treatment Increases TCR Repertoire Diversity of Regulatory but not Effector T Cells Engaged in the Immune Response Against B16 Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scirka, Bozena; Szurek, Edyta; Pietrzak, Maciej; Rempala, Grzegorz; Kisielow, Pawel; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Miazek, Arkadiusz

    2017-06-21

    Crosslinking of glucocorticoid-induced TNF family-related receptor (GITR) with agonist antibodies restores cancer immunity by enhancing effector T cell (Teff) responses while interfering with intra-tumor regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and/or accumulation. However, how anti-GITR antibody infusion changes T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of Teffs and Tregs engaged in anti-tumor immune response is unclear. Here, we used a transgenic mouse model (TCRmini) where T cells express naturally generated but limited TCR repertoire to trace the fate of individual T cells recognizing B16 melanoma in tumor-bearing mice, treated or non-treated with an anti-GITR monoclonal antibody DTA-1. Analysis of TCRs of CD4(+) T cells from these mice revealed that the TCR repertoire of dominant tumor-reactive Teff clones remained rather similar in treated and non-treated mice. In contrast, both tumor-associated and peripheral TCR repertoire of Tregs, which were mostly distinct from that of Teffs, underwent DTA-1 mediated remodeling characterized by depletion of dominant clones and an emergence of more diverse, low-frequency clones bearing increased numbers of TCRs shared with Teffs. We conclude that the DTA-1 infusion eliminates activated Tregs engaged in the initial maintenance of tolerogenic niche for tumor growth, but over time, it favors tumor replenishment by Tregs expressing an array of TCRs able to compete with Teffs for recognition of the same tumor antigens which may prevent its complete eradication.

  5. Impaired survival of regulatory T cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Broos (Caroline); M. van Nimwegen (Menno); A. Kleinjan (Alex); B. ten Berge (Bregje); F. Muskens (Femke); J.C.C.M. in 't Veen (Johannes); J.T. Annema (Jouke); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); M. Kool (Mirjam); B. van den Blink (Bernt)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function is thought to contribute to ongoing inflammatory responses in sarcoidosis, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Moreover, it is not known if increased apoptotic susceptibility of Tregs may contribute to an impaired

  6. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  7. Increased presence of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in inflamed muscle of patients with active juvenile dermatomyositis compared to peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Vercoulen

    Full Text Available Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting the microvasculature of skin and muscle. CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are key regulators of immune homeostasis. A role for Tregs in JDM pathogenesis has not yet been established. Here, we explored Treg presence and function in peripheral blood and muscle of JDM patients. We analyzed number, phenotype and function of Tregs in blood from JDM patients by flow cytometry and in vitro suppression assays, in comparison to healthy controls and disease controls (Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy. Presence of Tregs in muscle was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Overall, Treg percentages in peripheral blood of JDM patients were similar compared to both control groups. Muscle biopsies of new onset JDM patients showed increased infiltration of numbers of T cells compared to Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Both in JDM and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy the proportion of FOXP3+ T cells in muscles were increased compared to JDM peripheral blood. Interestingly, JDM is not a self-remitting disease, suggesting that the high proportion of Tregs in inflamed muscle do not suppress inflammation. In line with this, peripheral blood Tregs of active JDM patients were less capable of suppressing effector T cell activation in vitro, compared to Tregs of JDM in clinical remission. These data show a functional impairment of Tregs in a proportion of patients with active disease, and suggest a regulatory role for Tregs in JDM inflammation.

  8. Constitutively active Stat5b in CD4+ T cells inhibits graft-versus-host disease lethality associated with increased regulatory T-cell potency and decreased T effector cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtenhuber, Christine; Bucher, Christoph; Highfill, Steven L; Koch, Lisa K; Goren, Emily; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Farrar, Michael A; Blazar, Bruce R

    2010-07-22

    Overexpression of a constitutively active form of Stat5b (Stat5b-CA) increases regulatory T cells (Tregs). We show that Stat5b-CA transgenic (TG) CD4(+) T cells had a markedly reduced graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) capacity versus wild-type (WT) T cells. Stat5b-CA TG versus WT CD4(+) T cells had a higher proportion of Tregs, which were superior in suppressing alloresponses mediated by CD4(+)CD25(-) effector T cells (Teffs). By day 5 after transplantation, Stat5b-CA TG Tregs had expanded approximately 3-fold more than WT Tregs. Purified Stat5b-CA TG Tregs added to WT CD4(+)CD25(-) Teffs were superior on a per-cell basis for inhibiting GVHD versus WT Tregs. Surprisingly, rigorously Treg-depleted Stat5b-CA TG versus WT CD4(+)CD25(-) Teffs caused less GVHD lethality associated with diminished Teff proinflammatory and increased Th2 anti-inflammatory cytokine responses. Reduced GVHD by Stat5b-CA TG versus WT Teffs could not be explained by conversion into Tregs in day 10 posttransplantation spleen or small intestine. In addition, Stat5b-CA TG Teffs retained a graft-versus-leukemia response. These results indicate a major role for Stat5 in Treg expansion and potency along with a lesser but significant role in Teff activation and suggest a strategy of pharmacologic Stat5b up-regulation as a means of decreasing GVHD while retaining a graft-versus-leukemia effect.

  9. Transforming growth factor-β2 increases the capacity of retinal pigment epithelial cells to induce the generation of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng; He, Jin; Tang, Li; Kong, Yi; Shi, Yuhua; Chen, Suihua; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated the underlying mechanism of the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and the characteristics of these Tregs. Human RPE cells were cultured in the presence or absence of transforming growth factor-β 2 (TGF-β2), and reverse-transcription quantitative PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Supernatants of RPE cell cultures were added to CD4+ T cells to induce Tregs. The RPE-induced Tregs were purified by two-step magnetic cell sorting. The natural Tregs were isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers. Purified CD4+ CD25- T cells (2 x 10(5)/well) were cultured alone or with Tregs (various densities, natural or RPE-induced). The proliferation of CD4+ CD25- T cells was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. After 24 h of stimulation with TGF-β2, the mRNA expression of IDO in RPE cells was upregulated. The highest level of IDO mRNA expression was reached after 72 h of stimulation with TGF-β2. However, the Nrf2 mRNA expression was slightly decreased after 24 h of stimulation with TGF-β2 and significantly increased after 48-72 h of TGF-β2 stimulation. Increased levels of CD25 expression were observed on CD4+ T cells exposed to supernatants of RPE cell cultures treated with TGF-β2 and recombinant interleukin-2. The RPE-induced Tregs were more effective at suppressing the proliferation of CD4+ CD25- T cells compared with native Tregs. These findings suggested that IDO may be a signaling protein in RPE cells which is implicated in the induction of Tregs. RPE-induced Tregs have the potential to be applied for immunotherapy for ocular inflammatory diseases.

  10. Regulatory T cells in radiotherapeutic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörthe eSchaue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling danger. The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift towards a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs, suppressor macrophages and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the brakes on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  11. Adoptive transfer of in vitro-stimulated CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells increases bacterial clearance and improves survival in polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Josef G; Zhang, Tonghai; Zhao, Jingyong; Ding, Chunjin; Cramer, Martin; Justen, Kathy L; Vonderfecht, Steven L; Na, Songqing

    2005-06-01

    Regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells (Tregs) suppress autoimmune and inflammatory diseases through mechanisms that are only partly understood. Previous studies suggest that Tregs can suppress bacterially triggered intestinal inflammation and respond to LPS through TLRs with enhanced suppressive activity. In this study, we have used murine cecal ligation and puncture as a model of polymicrobial sepsis to explore the effects of adoptive transfer of Tregs on septic outcome. Adoptive transfer of in vitro-stimulated Tregs in both prevention and therapeutic modes significantly improved survival of cecal ligation and puncture mice. Furthermore, the effect was dependent on both the number of Tregs adoptively transferred and the presence of host T cells. Animals that received stimulated Tregs had significantly increased peritoneal mast cells and peritoneal TNF-alpha production. More importantly, adoptive transfer of in vitro-stimulated Tregs significantly improved bacterial clearance, which resulted in improved survival. Our results suggest a novel role for Tregs in sepsis.

  12. Comparative Approach to Define Increased Regulatory T Cells in Different Cancer Subtypes by Combined Assessment of CD127 and FOXP3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years an increase of functional CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells has been established for patients with solid tumors, acute leukemias, and lymphomas. We have reported an expanded pool of CD4+CD25high Treg cells in patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL, multiple myeloma (MM as well as its premalignant precursor monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. In healthy individuals, low-level expression of CD127 on T cells in addition to the expression of FOXP3 has been associated with Treg cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expanded FOXP3+ T-cell population in patients with colorectal cancer, CLL, MGUS, MM, follicular lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease are exclusively CD127low Treg cells and were strongly suppressive. A significant portion of CD127lowFOXP3+ Treg cells expressed only low levels of CD25 suggesting that the previously reported expansion of CD25+ Treg cells underestimates the true expansion. The assessment of CCR7 and CD45RA expression on the expanded CD4+CD127lowFOXP3+ Treg cells revealed an increase of both naïve as well as central and effector memory Treg cells in peripheral blood. Our data strongly support superiority of combined CD127 and FOXP3 analysis in comparison to CD25 and FOXP3 assessment for further quantification of Treg cells in malignant diseases.

  13. Increased CD45RA+ FoxP3(low regulatory T cells with impaired suppressive function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujun Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg in the control of the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has not been well defined. Therefore, we dissect the phenotypically heterogeneous CD4(+FoxP3(+ T cells into subpopulations during the dynamic SLE development. METHODLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the proliferative and suppressive capacities of different CD4(+ T cell subgroups between active SLE patients and healthy donors, we employed CD45RA and CD25 as surface markers and carboxyfluorescein diacetatesuccinimidyl ester (CFSE dilution assay. In addition, multiplex cytokines expression in active SLE patients was assessed using Luminex assay. Here, we showed a significant increase in the frequency of CD45RA(+FoxP3(low naive Treg cells (nTreg cells and CD45RA(-FoxP3(low (non-Treg cells in patients with active SLE. In active SLE patients, the increased proportions of CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cells were positively correlated with the disease based on SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI and the status of serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. We found that the surface marker combination of CD25(+CD45RA(+ can be used to defined CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cells for functional assays, wherein nTreg cells from active SLE patients demonstrated defective suppression function. A significant correlation was observed between inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-12 and TNFα, and the frequency of nTreg cells. Furthermore, the CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cell subset increased when cultured with SLE serum compared to healthy donor serum, suggesting that the elevated inflammatory cytokines of SLE serum may promote nTreg cell proliferation/expansion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that impaired numbers of functional CD45RA(+FoxP3(low naive Treg cell and CD45RA(-FoxP3(low non-suppressive T cell subsets in inflammatory conditions may contribute to SLE development. Therefore, analysis of subsets of FoxP3(+ T cells, using a

  14. Regulatory T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Clare; Mathen, Stephy; Crocker, Ian; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of reproductive age. As clinical outcomes improve, pregnancy in these women is becoming more common. Although epidemiological data have documented an improvement in the prognosis of pregnancy in these women over recent years, they are still at significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia and impaired foetal growth. The pathogenesis of SLE involves marked immune dysfunction, and in particular, the function of immunosuppressive elements of the immune system is impaired, including regulatory T-cell function. Because regulatory T cells are likely to be the key cell-modulating feto-maternal tolerance, this review overviews the possibility that regulatory T-cell impairments contribute to pregnancy pathology in women with SLE and contribute to the clinical challenge of managing these women during pregnancy.

  15. An increase in tolerogenic dendritic cell and natural regulatory T cell numbers during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Rras-/- mice results in attenuated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Avijit; Basu, Sreemanti; Miller, Nichole M; Chan, Andrew M; Dittel, Bonnie N

    2014-06-01

    R-Ras is a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, which are regulators of various cellular processes, including adhesion, survival, proliferation, trafficking, and cytokine production. R-Ras is expressed by immune cells and has been shown to modulate dendritic cell (DC) function in vitro and has been associated with liver autoimmunity. We used Rras-deficient mice to study the mechanism whereby R-Ras contributes to autoimmunity using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of the CNS autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. We found that a lack of R-Ras in peripheral immune cells resulted in attenuated EAE disease. Further investigation revealed that, during EAE, absence of R-Ras promoted the formation of MHC II(low) DC concomitant with a significant increase in proliferation of natural regulatory T cells, resulting in an increase in their cell numbers in the periphery. Our study suggests a novel role for R-Ras in promoting autoimmunity through negative regulation of natural regulatory T cell numbers by inhibiting the development of MHCII(low) DC with tolerogenic potential.

  16. Expression of GARP Is Increased in Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells and Is Correlated to Clinicopathology of Lung Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Sun, Liping; Tang, Lu; Yu, Wenwen; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are immunosuppressive T cells that play an important role in immune homeostasis. Multiple markers have been associated with the characterization, as well as function of Tregs. Recently, glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats, has been found to be highly expressed on the surface of activated Tregs. GARP maintains Tregs’ regulatory function and homeostasis through the activation and secretion of transforming growth factor β. In this study, we investigated the expression of GARP in Tregs from the peripheral blood (PB) and tumor tissues of lung cancer patients. The association between the proportion and expression level of GARP on Tregs and the clinicopathological factors of lung cancer patients was also analyzed. Results showed that in the tumor tissues of patients with lung cancer, GARP expression was increased in Tregs and was associated with lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and clinical stage. Furthermore, the infiltrating Tregs from early stage patients exhibited higher GARP expression than that from advanced cancer patients, which indicated that GARP might be an early prognostic biomarker. In vitro coculture studies demonstrated that human lung cancer cell lines might induce the expression of GARP in Tregs by certain mechanisms. Overall, this research demonstrated the potential value of GARP in Tregs definition and cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28261204

  17. Loss of regulatory T cell function on anti-inflammation is correlated with increased risk of acute kidney injury development in patients with primary glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qin; Cai, Chen; Gao, Feng; Xu, Ziqian; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Lijie; Cui, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is believed to play a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). The injury induces the generation of inflammatory mediators like cytokines and chemokines by tubular and endothelial cells which contribute to the recruiting of leukocytes into the kidneys. Early AKI risk evaluation is limited to demographic characteristics and past clinical histories, and no specific treatment is available. To better identify patients at risk of developing AKI, and devise more targeted treatment and prevention regimen, we tracked 158 primary glomerulonephritis patients for their occurrence of AKI, and analyzed the characteristics of their adaptive immune system. We found that in patients that later developed AKI, peripheral blood T cell composition is shifted toward IFN-g-producing Th1-like cells. While the composition of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were similar between patients that later developed AKI and patients without AKI development, in patients that later developed AKI, their CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells secreted less regulatory cytokine IL-10, and was unable to suppress proinflammatory cytokine production by CD4(+) T cells, while in patients without AKI development, CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were able to suppress CD4(+) T cell-mediated IFN-g and IL-17 expression under stimulation, partially through IL-10 secretion. Collectively, we identified a defect in CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell regulatory function in patients at risk of developing AKI.

  18. Impaired survival of regulatory T cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Broos (Caroline); M. van Nimwegen (Menno); A. Kleinjan (Alex); B. ten Berge (Bregje); F. Muskens (Femke); J.C.C.M. in 't Veen (Johannes); J.T. Annema (Jouke); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); M. Kool (Mirjam); B. van den Blink (Bernt)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function is thought to contribute to ongoing inflammatory responses in sarcoidosis, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Moreover, it is not known if increased apoptotic susceptibility of Tregs may contribute to an impaired immunosuppres

  19. Imaging regulatory T cell dynamics and CTLA4-mediated suppression of T cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheu, Melanie P; Othy, Shivashankar; Greenberg, Milton L; Dong, Tobias X; Schuijs, Martijn; Deswarte, Kim; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N; Parker, Ian; Cahalan, Michael D

    2015-02-05

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune homoeostasis through mechanisms that remain incompletely defined. Here by two-photon (2P) imaging, we examine the cellular dynamics of endogenous Tregs. Tregs are identified as two non-overlapping populations in the T-zone and follicular regions of the lymph node (LN). In the T-zone, Tregs migrate more rapidly than conventional T cells (Tconv), extend longer processes and interact with resident dendritic cells (DC) and Tconv. Tregs intercept immigrant DCs and interact with antigen-induced DC:Tconv clusters, while continuing to form contacts with activated Tconv. During antigen-specific responses, blocking CTLA4-B7 interactions reduces Treg-Tconv interaction times, increases the volume of DC:Tconv clusters and enhances subsequent Tconv proliferation in vivo. Our results demonstrate a role for altered cellular choreography of Tregs through CTLA4-based interactions to limit T-cell priming.

  20. Regulatory T cells in HIV-infected immunological nonresponders are increased in blood but depleted in lymphoid tissue and predict immunological reconstitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie C; Hartling, Hans J; Ronit, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    (CD4 T-cell count 200-500 cells/μL), 30 responders (CD4 T-cell count >500 cells/μL), and 34 healthy controls. Tregs, Treg subpopulations, and intracellular staining for interleukin 10 in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometry. Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue were evaluated using...... immunolabeling. The CD4 T-cell count was determined at inclusion and after 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS: INR displayed high percentage of Tregs and activated Tregs in peripheral blood accompanied by a high percentage of Tregs expressing interleukin 10, whereas numbers of Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue were low......BACKGROUND: HIV-infected immunological nonresponders fail to immune reconstitute despite optimal treatment. We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in immunological reconstitution. Tregs and Treg subpopulations were measured in blood and Foxp3 cells in lymphoid tissue...

  1. Tumor eradication after cyclophosphamide depends on concurrent depletion of regulatory T cells: a role for cycling TNFR2-expressing effector-suppressor T cells in limiting effective chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Robbert G; Currie, Andrew J; Mahendran, Sathish; Prosser, Amy; Darabi, Anna; Robinson, Bruce W S; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2009-08-01

    Tumor cell death potentially engages with the immune system. However, the efficacy of anti-tumor chemotherapy may be limited by tumor-driven immunosuppression, e.g., through CD25+ regulatory T cells. We addressed this question in a mouse model of mesothelioma by depleting or reconstituting CD25+ regulatory T cells in combination with two different chemotherapeutic drugs. We found that the efficacy of cyclophosphamide to eradicate established tumors, which has been linked to regulatory T cell depletion, was negated by adoptive transfer of CD25+ regulatory T cells. Analysis of post-chemotherapy regulatory T cell populations revealed that cyclophosphamide depleted cycling (Ki-67(hi)) T cells, including foxp3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells. Ki-67(hi) CD4+ T cells expressed increased levels of two markers, TNFR2 and ICOS, that have been associated with a maximally suppressive phenotype according to recently published studies. This suggest that cyclophosphamide depletes a population of maximally suppressive regulatory T cells, which may explain its superior anti-tumor efficacy in our model. Our data suggest that regulatory T cell depletion could be used to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer chemotherapy regimens. Indeed, we observed that the drug gemcitabine, which does not deplete cycling regulatory T cells, eradicates established tumors in mice only when CD25+ CD4+ T cells are concurrently depleted. Cyclophosphamide could be used to achieve regulatory T cell depletion in combination with chemotherapy.

  2. Intradermal application of vitamin D3 increases migration of CD14 (+) dermal dendritic cells and promotes the development of Foxp3 (+) regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schneider, L.P.; Capel, T.M. van; Kapsenberg, M.L.; Teunissen, M.B.M.; Jong, E.C. de

    2013-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3 (VitD) is a potent immunosuppressive drug. Its effects are mediated in part through dendritic cells (DCs) that promote the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, it remains elusive how VitD would influence the different human skin DC subsets, e.g., CD1a (+)

  3. Intradermal application of vitamin D3 increases migration of CD14 (+) dermal dendritic cells and promotes the development of Foxp3 (+) regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schneider, L.P.; Capel, T.M. van; Kapsenberg, M.L.; Teunissen, M.B.M.; Jong, E.C. de

    2013-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3 (VitD) is a potent immunosuppressive drug. Its effects are mediated in part through dendritic cells (DCs) that promote the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, it remains elusive how VitD would influence the different human skin DC subsets, e.g., CD1a (+)

  4. Stimulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by nicotine increases suppressive capacity of naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in mice in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-wei; Zhou, Rong-bin; Yao, Yong-ming; Zhu, Xiao-mei; Yin, Yi-mei; Zhao, Guang-ju; Dong, Ning; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2010-12-01

    α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) has been found in several non-neuronal cells and is described as an important regulator of cellular function. Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study investigated whether naturally occurring Tregs expressed α7 nAChR and investigated the functionary role of this receptor in controlling suppressive activity of these cells. We found that CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs from naive C57BL/6J mice positively expressed α7 nAChR, and its activation by nicotine enhanced the suppressive capacity of Tregs. Nicotine stimulation up-regulated the expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA)-4 and forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3) on Tregs but had no effect on the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 by Tregs. In the supernatants of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs/CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell cocultures, we observed a decrease in the concentration of IL-2 in nicotine-stimulated groups, but nicotine stimulation had no effect on the ratio of IL-4/interferon (IFN)-γ, which partially represented T-cell polarization. The above-mentioned effects of nicotine were reversed by a selective α7 nAChR antagonist, α-bungarotoxin. In addition, the ratio of IL-4/IFN-γ was increased by treatment with α-bungarotoxin. We conclude that nicotine might increase Treg-mediated immune suppression of lymphocytes via α7 nAChR. The effect is related to the up-regulation of CTLA-4 as well as Foxp3 expression and decreased IL-2 secretion in CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs/CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell coculture supernatants. α7 nAChR seems to be a critical regulator for immunosuppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs.

  5. Japanese encephalitis virus expands regulatory T cells by increasing the expression of PD-L1 on dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nimesh; Hegde, Pushpa; Lecerf, Maxime; Nain, Minu; Kaur, Manpreet; Kalia, Manjula; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kaveri, Srini V

    2014-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) pathogenesis need to be thoroughly explored to delineate therapeutic approaches. It is believed that JEV manipulates the innate and adaptive compartments of the host's immune system to evade immune response and cross the blood-brain barrier. The present study was thus designed to investigate the functional modulation of DCs after exposure to JEV and to assess the consequences on CD4(+) T-lymphocyte functions. Human monocyte-derived DCs were either infected with 1 MOI of live virus, UV-inactivated virus, or were mock-infected. Replication-competent JEV induced a significant increase in the expression of maturation markers 48 h postinfection, along with that of programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1; also called B7-H1 and CD274). JEV-infected DCs expanded the Treg cells in allogenic mixed lymphocyte reactions. The expansion of Treg cells by JEV-infected DCs was significantly reduced upon blocking PD-L1 using an antagonist. In addition, JEV-infected DCs significantly altered the proliferation and reduced the polarization of Th cells toward the Th1-cell phenotype. The results, for the first time, suggest that JEV evades the host's immune system by modulating the crosstalk between DCs and T lymphocytes via the PD-L1 axis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. An increase in CD3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells after administration of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells during sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chao

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains an important cause of death worldwide, and vigorous immune responses during sepsis could be beneficial for bacterial clearance but at the price of collateral damage to self tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been found to modulate the immune system and attenuate sepsis. In the present study, MSCs derived from bone marrow and umbilical cord were used and compared. With a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model, the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunoregulation during sepsis were studied by determining the changes of circulating inflammation-associated cytokine profiles and peripheral blood mononuclear cells 18 hours after CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs and umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCMSCs showed a similar morphology and surface marker expression. UCMSCs had stronger potential for osteogenesis but lower for adipogenesis than BMMSCs. Compared with rats receiving PBS only after CLP, the percentage of circulating CD3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells and the ratio of Treg cells/T cells were elevated significantly in rats receiving MSCs. Further experiment regarding Treg cell function demonstrated that the immunosuppressive capacity of Treg cells from rats with CLP-induced sepsis was decreased, but could be restored by administration of MSCs. Compared with rats receiving PBS only after CLP, serum levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were significantly lower in rats receiving MSCs after CLP. There were no differences between BMMSCs and UCMSCs. In summary, this work provides the first in vivo evidence that administering BMMSCs or UCMSCs to rats with CLP-induced sepsis could increase circulating CD3+CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and Treg cells/T cells ratio, enhance Treg cell suppressive function, and decrease serum levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, suggesting the immunomodulatory association of Treg cells and MSCs during sepsis.

  7. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Intradermal application of vitamin D3 increases migration of CD14+ dermal dendritic cells and promotes the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakdash, Ghaith; Schneider, Laura P; van Capel, Toni M M; Kapsenberg, Martien L; Teunissen, Marcel B M; de Jong, Esther C

    2013-02-01

    The active form of vitamin D3 (VitD) is a potent immunosuppressive drug. Its effects are mediated in part through dendritic cells (DCs) that promote the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, it remains elusive how VitD would influence the different human skin DC subsets, e.g., CD1a(+)/langerin(+) Langerhans cells, CD14(+) DDCs and CD1a(+) DDCs upon administration through the skin route in their natural environment. We addressed this issue by intradermal (ID) administration of VitD in a human skin explant system that closely resembles physiological conditions. ID injection of VitD selectively enhanced the migration of CD14(+) DDCs, a subset known for the induction of tolerance. Moreover, ID injection of VitD repressed the LPS-induced T cell stimulatory capacity of migrating DCs. These migrating DCs collectively induced T cells with suppressive activity and abolished IFN-γ productivity. Those induced T cells were characterized by the expression of Foxp3. Thus, we report the novel finding that ID injection of VitD not only modifies skin DC migration, but also programs these DCs in their natural milieu to promote the development of Foxp3(+) Tregs.

  9. Adenosine A₂A receptor agonist-mediated increase in donor-derived regulatory T cells suppresses development of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Lee; Thomas, Stephenie V M; Koontz, Sherry M; Changpriroa, Cattlena M; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Malech, Harry L; Kang, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a significant complication of allogeneic transplantation. We previously reported that the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) specific agonist, ATL146e, decreases the incidence and severity of GVHD in a mouse transplant model. There is increasing interest in treatments that increase CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress GVHD. Our current study found in vitro that A(2A)R selective agonists enhanced TGF-β-induced generation of mouse Tregs 2.3- to 3-fold. We demonstrated in vivo suppression of GVHD with specific A(2A)R agonists in two different murine GVHD transplant models associated with profound increases in both circulating and target tissue Tregs of donor origin. Three different A(2A)R agonists of differing potency, ATL146e, ATL370, and ATL1223, all significantly inhibited GVHD-associated weight loss and mortality. At the same time, Tregs shown to be of donor origin increased 5.1- to 7.4-fold in spleen, 2.7- to 4.6-fold in peripheral blood, 2.3- to 4.7-fold in colon, and 3.8- to 4.6-fold in skin. We conclude that specific activation of A(2A)R inhibits acute GVHD through an increase of donor-derived Tregs. Furthermore, the increased presence of Tregs in target tissues (colon and skin) of A(2A)R-specific agonist-treated mice is likely the mechanistic basis for the anti-inflammatory effect preventing acute GVHD.

  10. Hepatic stellate cells increase the immunosuppressive function of natural Foxp3+ regulatory T cells via IDO-induced AhR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Thomson, Angus W; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2017-02-01

    Immunosuppressive, naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box p3(+) (Foxp3(+)) regulatory T cells (nTregs) offer potential for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. However, potential instability of ex vivo-expanded nTregs following their adoptive transfer may be a significant limitation. LPS-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) induce expansion and enhance the suppressive function and stability of allogeneic nTregs We aimed to delineate mechanisms underlying HSC-induced expansion and increased potency of nTregs HSCs and nTregs were isolated from mouse livers and spleens, respectively. Following coculture with LPS-pretreated allogeneic HSCs (LPS/HSCs), proliferation of nTregs was measured by CFSE dilution, and Foxp3 expression and acetylation were determined by immunoprecipitation (IP) and Western blotting analysis. Expression of various genes associated with immunologic tolerance was determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). LPS stimulation increased the expression and activity of the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO1 in HSCs, and LPS/HSCs stimulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling in cocultured nTregs Reciprocally, Tregs increased IDO1 expression in HSCs. IDO1(-/-) LPS/HSCs were inferior to WT LPS/HSCs in stimulating nTreg expansion. Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO1 in HSCs by 1-methyltryptophan (1MT) inhibited LPS/HSC-induced AhR signaling in nTregs, which was responsible for their expansion, Foxp3 expression, and stabilization of Foxp3 by increasing acetylation of lysine residues. Finally, HSCs cryopreserved, following 2-3 passages, were as potent as primary-cultured HSCs in expanding nTregs In conclusion, LPS/HSCs expand allogeneic nTregs through an IDO-dependent, AhR-mediated mechanism and increase their stability through lysine-acetylation of Foxp3. nTregs expanded by cryopreserved HSCs may have potential for clinical use.

  11. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  13. T cell responses against microsatellite instability-induced frameshift peptides and influence of regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Nelius, Nina; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Jürgen; Steinert, Gunnar; Kopitz, Jürgen; Beckhove, Philipp; Tariverdian, Mirjam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    High-level microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal carcinomas (CRC) represent a distinct subtype of tumors commonly characterized by dense infiltration with cytotoxic T cells, most likely due to expression of MSI-H-related frameshift peptides (FSP). The contribution of FSP and classical antigens like MUC1 and CEA to the cellular immune response against MSI-H CRC had not been analyzed so far. We analyzed tumor-infiltrating and peripheral T cells from MSI-H (n = 4 and n = 14, respectively) and microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumor patients (n = 26 and n = 17) using interferon gamma ELISpot assays. Responses against 4 FSP antigens and peptides derived from MUC1 to CEA were compared with and without depletion of regulatory T cells, and the results were related to the presence of the respective antigens in tumor tissue. Preexisting FSP-specific T cell responses were detected in all (4 out of 4) tumor-infiltrating and in the majority (10 out of 14) of peripheral T cell samples from MSI-H CRC patients, but rarely observed in MSS CRC patients. Preexisting T cell responses in MSI-H CRC patients were significantly more frequently directed against FSP tested in the present study than against peptides derived from classical antigens MUC1 or CEA (p = 0.049). Depletion of regulatory T cells increased the frequency of effector T cell responses specific for MUC1/CEA-derived peptides and, to a lesser extent, T cell responses specific for FSP. Our data suggest that the analyzed FSP may represent an immunologically relevant pool of antigens capable of eliciting antitumoral effector T cell responses.

  14. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Economou, James S. [Department of Surgical Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schaue, Doerthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  15. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  16. Skin-derived TSLP systemically expands regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichner, Theresa M; Satake, Atsushi; Harrison, Victor Sanoe; Tanaka, Yukinori; Archambault, Angela S; Kim, Brian S; Siracusa, Mark C; Leonard, Warren J; Naji, Ali; Wu, Gregory F; Artis, David; Kambayashi, Taku

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells with suppressive function and are critical for limiting inappropriate activation of T cells. Hence, the expansion of Tregs is an attractive strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the skin possesses the remarkable capacity to systemically expand Treg numbers by producing thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in response to vitamin D receptor stimulation. An ∼2-fold increase in the proportion and absolute number of Tregs was observed in mice treated topically but not systemically with the Vitamin D3 analog MC903. This expansion of Tregs was dependent on TSLP receptor signaling but not on VDR signaling in hematopoietic cells. However, TSLP receptor expression by Tregs was not required for their proliferation. Rather, skin-derived TSLP promoted Treg expansion through dendritic cells. Importantly, treatment of skin with MC903 significantly lowered the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice and attenuated disease score in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, these data demonstrate that the skin has the remarkable potential to control systemic immune responses and that Vitamin D-mediated stimulation of skin could serve as a novel strategy to therapeutically modulate the systemic immune system for the treatment of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L- Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25- T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging.

  18. Regulatory T cells and the immune pathogenesis of prenatal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jared H; Ertelt, James M; Xin, Lijun; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Pregnancy in placental mammals offers exceptional comprehensive benefits of in utero protection, nutrition, and metabolic waste elimination for the developing fetus. However, these benefits also require durable strategies to mitigate maternal rejection of fetal tissues expressing foreign paternal antigens. Since the initial postulate of expanded maternal immune tolerance by Sir Peter Medawar 60 years ago, an amazingly elaborate assortment of molecular and cellular modifications acting both locally at the maternal-placental interface and systemically have been shown to silence potentially detrimental maternal immune responses. In turn, simultaneously maintaining host defense against the infinite array of potential pathogens during pregnancy is equally important. Fortunately, resistance against most infections is preserved seamlessly throughout gestation. On the other hand, recent studies on pathogens with unique predisposition for prenatal infections have uncovered distinctive holes in host defense associated with the reproductive process. Using these infections to probe the response during pregnancy, the immune suppressive regulatory subset of maternal CD4 T cells has been increasingly shown to dictate the inter-workings between prenatal infection susceptibility and pathogenesis of ensuing pregnancy complications. Herein, the recent literature suggesting a necessity for maternal regulatory T cells (Tregs) in pregnancy-induced immunological shifts that sustain fetal tolerance is reviewed. Additional discussion is focused on how expansion of maternal Treg suppression may become exploited by pathogens that cause prenatal infections and the perilous potential of infection-induced immune activation that may mitigate fetal tolerance and inadvertently inject hostility into the protective in utero environment.

  19. Metabolic regulation of regulatory T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Coe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require ATP-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets have been shown to require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses.

  20. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4(+) T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3(+) Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3(+) Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  2. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  3. Increased Serum Levels of Inflammatory Mediators and Low Frequency of Regulatory T Cells in the Peripheral Blood of Preeclamptic Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Rodríguez, José María; Vargas-Avila, Karina; Nieto-Velázquez, Nayeli Goreti; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Sierra-Martinez, Mónica; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs; CD4+CD25highFoxp3+) are critical in maintaining immune tolerance during pregnancy and uterine vascularization. In this study, we show that, in Mexican women with different preeclamptic severity levels, the number of Tregs and the subset of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ are decreased compared with those of normotensive pregnant women (NP). Moreover, a systemic inflammatory state is a pivotal feature in the pathogenesis of this disorder and could be related to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Likewise, we observed elevated levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8 in the serum of severe preeclamptic patients (SPE); no differences were found in the IL-1β and IL-10 levels compared with those of NP patients. An analysis of chemokines in the preeclamptic serum samples showed high levels of CXCL10, CCL2, and CXCL9. Our findings suggest that the preeclamptic state is linked with systemic inflammation and reduced numbers of Tregs. PMID:25574467

  4. The regulation of regulation: IL-10 increases CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells but impairs their immunosuppressive activity in murine models with schistosomiasis japonica or asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Zhou, Sha; Qi, Qianqian; Chi, Ying; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Xuefeng; Hoellwarth, Jason; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xiaojun; Su, Chuan

    2017-08-11

    CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis. Interleukin 10 (IL-10), a cytokine with anti-inflammatory capacities, also has a critical role in controlling immune responses. In addition, it is well known that production of IL-10 is one of suppression mechanisms by Tregs. However, the action of IL-10 on Tregs themselves remains insufficiently understood. In this study, by using a Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-infected murine model, we show that the elevated IL-10 contributed to Treg induction but impaired their immunosuppressive function. Our investigations further suggest that this may relate to up-regulating serum TGF-β level but decreasing membrane-bound TGF-β (mTGF-β) of Tregs by IL-10 during S. japonicum infection. In addition, similar IL-10-mediated regulation on Tregs was also confirmed in the murine model of asthma. In general, our findings identify a previously unrecognized opposite regulation of IL-10 on Tregs and provide a deep insight into the precise regulation in immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Tolerogenic dendritic cells for regulatory T cell induction in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena eRaker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are (DC highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells (APC that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy and induction of regulatory T cells. These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DC as a therapeutic strategy for induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In the recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DC have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of regulatory T cells, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DC. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DC therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DC with focus on IL-10-modulated DC as inducers of regulatory T cells and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy.

  6. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  7. Foetal immune programming: hormones, cytokines, microbes and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental cues play important roles in shaping the immune system. The first environment that the developing foetal immune system encounters is the uterus. Although physically the mother and the foetus are separated by the placental membranes, various factors such as hormones and cytokines may provide "environmental cues" to the foetal immune system. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that prenatal maternal environmental factors, particularly microbial exposure, might significantly influence the foetal immune system, affecting long-term outcomes, a concept termed foetal immune programming. Here we discuss the potential mediators of foetal immune programming, focusing on the role of pregnancy-related hormones, cytokines and regulatory T cells, which play a critical role in immune tolerance.

  8. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive Tregs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L.; Gaardbo, J.C.; Skogstrand, K.;

    2009-01-01

    This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores if naive...

  9. CD8+ regulatory T cells, and not CD4+ T cells, dominate suppressive phenotype and function after in vitro live Mycobacterium bovis-BCG activation of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Mardi C; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Joosten, Simone A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M. bovis BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, has been reported to induce regulatory T cells in humans. The activity of regulatory T cells may not only dampen immunogenicity and protective efficacy of tuberculosis-vaccines, but also hamper diagnosis of infection of tuberculosis, when using immune (e.g. IFNγ-release) assays. Still, in settings of infectious diseases and vaccination, most studies have focused on CD4+ regulatory T cells, and not CD8+ regulatory T-cells. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the suppressive phenotype and function of CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells after in vitro live BCG activation of human cells. Moreover, as BCG is administered as a (partly) live vaccine, we also compared the ability of live versus heatkilled BCG in activating CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cell responses. BCG-activated CD8+ T cells consistently expressed higher levels of regulatory T cell markers, and after live BCG activation, density and (co-)expression of markers were significantly higher, compared to CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, selection on CD25-expression after live BCG activation enriched for CD8+ T cells, and selection on co-expression of markers further increased CD8+ enrichment. Ultimately, only T cells activated by live BCG were functionally suppressive and this suppressive activity resided predominantly in the CD8+ T cell compartment. These data highlight the important contribution of live BCG-activated CD8+ Treg cells to immune regulation and emphasize their possible negative impact on immunity and protection against tuberculosis, following BCG vaccination.

  10. Highly-Exposed HIV-1 seronegative Female Commercial Sex Workers sustain in their genital mucosa increased frequencies of tolerogenic myeloid and regulatory T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, V.; Fourcade, L.; Labbé, A.-C.; Alary, M.; Guédou, F.; Poudrier, J.; Roger, M.

    2017-01-01

    We and others have shown that HIV-1 highly-exposed seronegative (HESN) female commercial sex workers (CSWs) maintain low genital inflammatory conditions to prevent HIV infection. HIV-1 interacts with toll-like receptors (TLR)-7/8 to induce interferon (IFN)-α, an important antiviral and immunomodulatory cytokine, which act together with interleukin (IL)-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT)-4 to initiate a “tolerogenic/regulatory” anti-inflammatory loop. In view of further unravelling elements associated with natural immunity to HIV-1, we have characterised TLR-7, IFN-α, IL-10, HLA-G and ILT-4 expression profiles in the genital tract of female CSWs and HIV-1-uninfected non-CSWs from Benin. Endocervical myeloid HLA-DR+ cells from HESN CSWs expressed higher levels of IFN-α, TLR-7, IL-10 and HLA-G than those from both HIV-1-infected CSWs and HIV-1-uninfected non-CSWs. Further characterization of the endocervical myeloid HLA-DR+ cells in HESN CSWs revealed a population of “tolerogenic” CD103+ CD14+ CD11c+ myeloid cells expressing high levels of IFN-α and IL-10. Concomitantly, HESN CSWs had higher frequencies of endocervical regulatory CD4+ T-cells when compared to those from the two other groups of women. These novel findings provide strong evidence to support the implication of tolerogenic myeloid cells expressing high levels of antiviral molecules in shaping the genital mucosal immune response to prevent HIV infection. PMID:28262752

  11. Assay of Peripheral Regulatory Vδ1 T Cells in Ankylosing Spondylitis and its Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongliang; Sun, Na; Li, Ka; Tian, Jiguang; Li, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) involves inflammation at the sacroiliac joint and spine attachment site. This study aimed to observe the ratio and function of peripheral regulatory Vδ1 T cells in AS patients to investigate their roles in AS pathogenesis. Material/Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated by density-gradient centrifugation from AS patients and healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used to determine the ratio between Vδ1 and CD4 T cells of PBMC in AS patients and controls. Flow cytometry sorting (FCS) was used to obtain Vδ1 and naïve CD4 T cells with purity higher than 90%. CFSE staining method was used to detect the effect of Vδ1 T cells on proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells. The effect of Vδ1 T cells on secretion of IFN-γ from naïve CD4 T cells and the ability to secrete IL-10 from Vδ1 T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Results AS patients had significantly lower Vδ1 T cell ratio in PBMC compared to controls (p<0.05), but their CD4 T cell ratio was significantly elevated (p<0.05). Functional assay showed suppression of naïve CD4 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by peripheral Vδ1 T cells in AS patients (p<0.01). AS patients also had lower IL-10 secreting level from peripheral derived Vδ1 T cells (p<0.01). Conclusions The immune suppression of peripheral Vδ1 T cell in AS patient increases the ratio of peripheral CD4 T cells and IFN-γ level, leading to AS pathogenesis. This immune suppression is mainly due to suppressed IL-10 secretion. PMID:27598263

  12. Regulatory T cells protect from autoimmune arthritis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Suano, Alba; Kallikourdis, Marinos; Sarris, Milka; Betz, Alexander G

    2012-05-01

    Pregnancy frequently has a beneficial effect on the autoimmune disease Rheumatoid Arthritis, ranging from improvement in clinical symptoms to complete remission. Despite decades of study, a mechanistic explanation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that an analogous pregnancy-induced remission can be observed in a mouse model of arthritis. We demonstrate that during pregnancy mice are protected from collagen-induced arthritis, but are still capable of launching normal immune responses to influenza infections. We examine the role of regulatory T (T(R)) cells in this beneficial effect. T(R) cells are essential for many aspects of immune tolerance, including the suppression of autoimmune responses. Remarkably, transfer of regulatory T cells from pregnant 'protected' mice was sufficient to confer protection to non-pregnant mice. These results suggest that regulatory T cells are responsible for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of arthritis.

  13. Progression from Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Is Marked by a Higher Frequency of Th17 Cells in the Liver and an Increased Th17/Resting Regulatory T Cell Ratio in Peripheral Blood and in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Monika; Schilling, Anne-Kristin; Meertens, Jan; Hering, Ilona; Weiss, Johannes; Jurowich, Christian; Kudlich, Theodor; Hermanns, Heike M; Bantel, Heike; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is increasing in prevalence. It can be subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Five to twenty percent of cases progress from NAFL to NASH. Increased hepatic Th17 cells and IL-17 expression were observed in NASH mice and patients, respectively. We analyzed CD4(+) effector T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood and livers of NAFL and NASH patients. A total of 51 NAFL patients, 30 NASH patients, 31 nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients (without histology), and 43 healthy controls were included. FACS analysis was performed on PBMCs and intrahepatic lymphocytes. Compared with healthy controls, a lower frequency of resting Tregs (rTregs; CD4(+)CD45RA(+)CD25(++)) and higher frequencies of IFN-γ(+) and/or IL-4(+) cells were detected among CD4(+) T cells of peripheral blood in NASH, and to a lesser degree in NAFL. In hepatic tissue, NAFL to NASH progression was marked by an increase in IL-17(+) cells among intrahepatic CD4(+) T cells. To define immunological parameters in peripheral blood to distinguish NAFL from NASH, we calculated different ratios. Th17/rTreg and Th2/rTreg ratios were significantly increased in NASH versus NAFL. The relevance of our findings for NASH pathogenesis was highlighted by the normalization of all of the changes 1 y after bariatric surgery. In conclusion, our data indicate that NAFL patients show changes in their immune cell profile compared with healthy controls. NAFL to NASH progression is marked by an increased frequency of IL-17(+) cells among intrahepatic CD4(+) T cells and higher Th17/rTreg and Th2/rTreg ratios in peripheral blood.

  14. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive T(regs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L; Gaardbo, J C; Skogstrand, K

    2008-01-01

    (+)human leucocyte antigen D-related) were determined by flow cytometry. Forkhead box P3 mRNA expression and T cell receptor excision circles (T(REC)) content in CD4(+) cells were determined by polymerase chain reaction and cytokines analysed with Luminex technology. Levels of T(regs) were significantly......Summary This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores...

  15. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive Tregs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L.; Gaardbo, J.C.; Skogstrand, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    (+)human leucocyte antigen D-related) were determined by flow cytometry. Forkhead box P3 mRNA expression and T cell receptor excision circles (T(REC)) content in CD4(+) cells were determined by polymerase chain reaction and cytokines analysed with Luminex technology. Levels of T(regs) were significantly......Summary This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores...

  16. Changes of Regulatory T Cells in Graves' Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxiang; ZHAO Shi; TANG Xiaoqiong; LI Jingyuan

    2006-01-01

    The immune mechanism of Graves' diseases (GD) and the roles of regulator T cells were investigated. In 32 patients with GD (GD group) and 20 healthy volunteers (control group), flow cytometry was used to detect the proportion of CD4+CD25+ cells, MACS to isolate CD4+ CD25+ cells,RT-PCR to assay the expression of FOXP3, and ELISA to test the level of IL-10, respectively. It was found that there was no significant change in the proportion of CD4+CD25+ T cells between GD group and control group (P>0.05), while secretion of IL-10 and expression of FOXP3 in GD group were lower than control group (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, though the proportion of regulatory T cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the patients with GD, the functions of them were significantly weakened, which might be a pathogenic factor in GD.

  17. SOCS1 and Regulation of Regulatory T Cells Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have suggested that natural regulatory T cells (Tregs lose Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 expression and suppression activity under certain inflammatory conditions. Treg plasticity has been studied because it may be associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Some studies showed that a minor uncommitted Foxp3+ T cell population, which lacks hypomethylation at Treg-specific demethylation regions (TSDRs, may convert to effector/helper T cells. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling, has been reported to play an important role in Treg cell integrity and function by protecting the cells from excessive inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss Treg plasticity and maintenance of suppression functions in both physiological and pathological settings. In addition, we discuss molecular mechanisms of maintaining Treg plasticity by SOCS1 and other molecules. Such information will be useful for therapy of autoimmune diseases and reinforcement of antitumor immunity.

  18. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  19. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells essentially contribute to peripheral CD8+ T-cell tolerance induced by steady-state dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, Anita; Brauer, Sabine; Brenner, Corinne; Lahl, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Sparwasser, Tim; Probst, Hans Christian; van den Broek, Maries

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell tolerance is thought to significantly contribute to the prevention of autoimmunity, and it has been shown that antigen-presenting steady-state dendritic cells efficiently induce peripheral tolerance. We previously showed that dendritic-cell–induced tolerance is a T-cell–intrinsic process that depends on coinhibitory molecules such as programmed death-1. Here we specifically analyze the involvement of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, which are known to be important for maintenance of self-tolerance. We show that antigen presentation by steady-state dendritic cells failed to induce peripheral tolerance in the absence of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells but induced protective CD8+ T-cell–mediated immunity instead. Regulatory T-cell–depleted mice had massively increased numbers of dendritic cells in lymph nodes. Dendritic cells isolated from mice without regulatory T cells had up-regulated costimulatory molecules and showed stronger T-cell stimulatory capacity ex vivo, suggesting that regulatory T cells contribute to peripheral tolerance by keeping the dendritic cells in an immature state. Using blocking antibodies, we demonstrate that CTLA-4 but not IL-10 is necessary for control of dendritic cells by regulatory T cells. PMID:20018763

  20. MALT1 is an intrinsic regulator of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüstle, A; Brenner, D; Knobbe-Thomsen, C B; Cox, M; Lang, P A; Lang, K S; Mak, T W

    2015-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and their absence or dysfunction can lead to autoimmunity. However, the molecular pathways that govern Treg biology remain obscure. In this study, we show that the nuclear factor-κB signalling mediator mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is an important novel regulator of both Tregs originating in the thymus ('natural' or nTregs) and Tregs induced to differentiate from naive thymocyte helper (Th) cells in the periphery ('induced' or iTregs). Our examination of mice deficient for MALT1 revealed that these mutants have a reduced number of total Tregs. In young Malt1(-/-) mice, nTregs are totally absent and iTreg are diminished in the periphery. Interestingly, total Treg numbers increase in older Malt1(-/-) mice as well as in Malt1(-/-) mice subjected to experimentally induced inflammation. iTregs isolated from WT and Malt1(-/-) mice were indistinguishable with respect to their ability to suppress the activities of effector T cells, but Malt1(-/-) iTregs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Treatment of WT and Malt1(-/-) Th cells in vitro with the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys strongly enhanced the induction and proliferation of Malt1(-/-) iTregs. Our data suggest that MALT1 supports nTreg development in the thymus but suppresses iTreg induction in the periphery during inflammation. Our data position MALT1 as a key molecule that contributes to immune tolerance at steady-state while facilitating immune reactivity under stress conditions.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 25 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cdd.2015.104.

  1. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K; Herold, Kevan C; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R; Li, Kelvin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S Alice; Masiello, Lisa M; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter H; Tang, Qizhi

    2015-11-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo-expanded autologous CD4(+)CD127(lo/-)CD25(+) polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 10(8) to 26 × 10(8) cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD127(lo) phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy-related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Uchida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a newly recognized pancreatic disorder. Recently, International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for AIP (ICDC was published. In this ICDC, AIP was classified into Type 1 and Type 2. Patients with Type 1 AIP have several immunologic and histologic abnormalities specific to the disease, including increased levels of serum IgG4 and storiform fibrosis with infiltration of lymphocytes and IgG4-positive plasmacytes in the involved organs. Among the involved organs showing extrapancreatic lesions, the bile duct is the most common, exhibiting sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC. However, the role of IgG4 is unclear. Recently, it has been reported that regulatory T cells (Tregs are involved in both the development of various autoimmune diseases and the shift of B cells toward IgG4, producing plasmacytes. Our study showed that Tregs were increased in the pancreas with Type 1 AIP and IgG4-SC compared with control. In the patients with Type 1 AIP and IgG4-SC, the numbers of infiltrated Tregs were significantly positively correlated with IgG4-positive plasma cells. In Type 1 AIP, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS+ and IL-10+ Tregs significantly increased compared with control groups. Our data suggest that increased quantities of ICOS+ Tregs may influence IgG4 production via IL-10 in Type 1 AIP.

  3. IL-10-Producing Type 1 Regulatory T Cells and Allergy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui Wu; Yutian Bi; Kun Sun; Changzheng Wang

    2007-01-01

    As an important subset of regulatory T (Treg) cells, IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1), have some different features to thymic-derived naturally occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells(nTreg cells). Similar to nTreg cells, Tr1 also play important roles in the control of allergic inflammation in several ways. There is a fine balance between Tr1 and Th2 responses in healthy subjects. Skewing of allergic-specific effctor T cells to a Tr1 phenotype appears to be a critical event in successful allergen-specific immunotherapy and glucocorticoids and β2-agonists treatment. Tr1 suppress Th2 cells and effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, through producing IL-10, and perhaps TGF-β. Understanding of Tr1 may be helpful in developing new strategies for treatment of allergic diseases.

  4. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside TL

    2015-01-01

    Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well und...

  5. Increase of circulating CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Brimnes, Marie Klinge; thor Straten, Per;

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and may be one of the obstacles of successful tumor immunotherapy. In this study, we analyzed the impact of administration of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2 in ...... in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma on the frequency of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ Treg cells in peripheral blood. We found that the treatment increased the frequency of Treg cells more than 7-fold compared with pretreatment levels (P...

  6. Regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to retinal antigen by local FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While pathogenic CD4 T cells are well known mediators of autoimmune uveoretinitis, CD8 T cells can also be uveitogenic. Since preliminary studies indicated that C57BL/6 mice were minimally susceptible to autoimmune uveoretinitis induction by CD8 T cells, the basis of the retinal disease resistance was sought. Mice that express β-galactosidase (βgal on a retina-specific promoter (arrβgal mice were backcrossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein and diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice, and to T cell receptor transgenic mice that produce βgal specific CD8 T cells (BG1 mice. These mice were used to explore the role of regulatory T cells in the resistance to retinal autoimmune disease. Experiments with T cells from double transgenic BG1 x Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice transferred into Foxp3-DTR/GFP x arrβgal mice confirmed that the retina was well protected from attempts to induce disease by adoptive transfer of activated BG1 T cells. The successful induction of retinal disease following unilateral intraocular administration of diphtheria toxin to deplete regulatory T cells showed that the protective activity was dependent on local, toxin-sensitive regulatory T cells; the opposite, untreated eye remained disease-free. Although there were very few Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the parenchyma of quiescent retina, and they did not accumulate in retina, their depletion by local toxin administration led to disease susceptibility. We propose that these regulatory T cells modulate the pathogenic activity of βgal-specific CD8 T cells in the retinas of arrβgal mice on a local basis, allowing immunoregulation to be responsive to local conditions.

  7. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) monitoring in environmental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mićović, Vladimir; Vojniković, Bozo; Bulog, Aleksandar; Coklo, Miran; Malatestinić, Dulija; Mrakovcić-Sutić, Ines

    2009-09-01

    The prevalence of environmental diseases is increasing worldwide and these diseases are an onerous burden both to the individual and to the public health. Urban air pollution is a grave problem in majority of metropolises, which contain high levels of traffic congestion generating great amounts of genotoxic substances. The contribution of such environmental exposure to increase prevalence of many allergic, environmental diseases and multiple chemical sensitivity or other related syndromes, as a result of an abnormal immune response based on environmental damage of lymphocyte subsets, is marked. Benzene is one of the most important air pollutants that are emitted by oil industry, since they are involved in almost every refinery process. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants and play a crucial role in ecological damages, disturbing the ecosystem and human health. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. The immune system possess a capacity to distinguish between innocuous and harmful foreign antigens and controls this action by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance, where crucial role play regulatory T cells (Tregs). We analyzed the characteristics of human Tregs of inhabitants living near gasoline industry which have assessed moderate spyrometric tests and compared them with those situated in rural areas. Our data demonstrate that the chronic inhalation exposure increases the percentage of Tregs cells, but contrary those of inhabitants with decreased spirometry values have shown diminished number of Tregs, which may contribute to the new therapeutic approach of environmental diseases.

  8. [The role of regulatory T cells in allergic contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecisz, Beata; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulatory mechanisms of immune system. They are responsible for the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. They are also involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and allergic diseases and implicated in transplant rejection and immunopathology of cancers. Treg cells constitute the population of lymphocytes heterogeneous in their phenotype. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells are most important among Treg subsets. Modification of Treg actvity may be useful in the therapy of different diseases, including allergic disorders.

  9. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Stellrecht, K; Sercarz, E

    1996-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the initial encephalitogenic T cells recognize MBP Ac1-9 and predominantly use the TCR V beta 8.2 gene segment. In mice recovering from MBP-induced EAE, regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) specific for a single immunodominant TCR peptide B5 (76-101) from framework region 3 of the V beta 8.2 chain, become primed. We have earlier shown that cloned B5-reactive Treg can specifically downregulate responses to Ac1-9 and also protect mice from EAE. These CD4 Treg clones predominantly use the TCR V beta 14 or V beta 3 gene segments. Here we have directly tested whether deletion/blocking of the Treg from the peripheral repertoire affects the spontaneous recovery from EAE. Treatment of F1 mice with appropriate V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies resulted in an increase in the severity and duration of the disease; even relapses were seen in one-third to one-half of the Treg-deleted mice. Interestingly, chronic disease in treated mice appears to be due to the presence of Ac1-9-specific T cells. Thus, once self-tolerance to MBP is broken by immunization with the antigen in strong adjuvant, TCR peptide-specific CD4 Treg cells participate in reestablishing peripheral tolerance. Thus, a failure to generate Treg may be implicated in chronic autoimmune conditions.

  10. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  11. Immunoevasive pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells preferentially modulate induction of allogeneic regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-10-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127-, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25- T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for allogeneic

  12. MicroRNA 10a marks regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeker, Lukas T; Zhou, Xuyu; Gershberg, Kseniya

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. We report that microRNA-10a (miR-10a) is expressed in Tregs but not in other T cells including individual thymocyte subsets. Expression profiling in inbred mouse strains demonstrated that non-obese diabetic (NOD......) mice with a genetic susceptibility for autoimmune diabetes have lower Treg-specific miR-10a expression than C57BL/6J autoimmune resistant mice. Inhibition of miR-10a expression in vitro leads to reduced FoxP3 expression levels and miR-10a expression is lower in unstable "exFoxP3" T cells. Unstable...... and phenotype of natural Treg nor the capacity of conventional T cells to induce FoxP3 in response to TGFβ, RA, or a combination of the two. Thus, miR-10a is selectively expressed in Treg but inhibition by antagomiRs or genetic ablation resulted in discordant effects on FoxP3....

  13. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  14. Specific recruitment of γδ regulatory T cells in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jian; MA, CHUNLING; Wang, Fang; Hsueh, Eddy C; Toth, Karoly; Huang, Yi; Mo, Wei; Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft,Daniel F; Peng, Guangyong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the role of different subtypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is essential to improving cancer treatment. Enriched γδ1 T cell populations in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) suppress T cell responses and dendritic cell maturation in breast cancer, where their presence is correlated negatively with clinical outcomes. However, mechanism(s) that explain the increase in this class of T regulatory cells (γδ Treg) in breas...

  15. Research advances in association between regulatory T cells and hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Junnan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells are a subset of T cells, and can inhibit the body′s immune response and induce immune tolerance, which has become one of the hot topics in the field of immunological research in recent years. Regulatory T cell dysfunction and the change in the number of regulatory T cells are closely associated with the progression and treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, tumor immune tolerance, transplant rejection, and allergic diseases. This article summarizes the surface markers and immunological mechanism of regulatory T cells, as well as the association of regulatory T cells with the pathogenesis of hepatitis B and antiviral therapy.

  16. Regulatory T-cells have a prominent role in the immune modulated vaccine response by specific oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Schouten, Bastiaan; Boon, Louis; Garssen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells are increasingly important in vaccine strategies. In a Flu-vaccination model the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and the immune modulation by orally supplied prebiotic oligosaccharides consisting of scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS, were assessed using anti-CD25 (PC61) me

  17. Control of experimental inflammatory bowel disease by regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseman, C; Fowler, S; Powrie, F

    2000-10-01

    A helper T cell type 1-mediated colitis driven by enteric bacteria develops in severe combined immunodeficient mice after transfer of CD45RB(high)CD4(+) T cells. Development of disease can be prevented by cotransfer of the reciprocal CD45RB(low) subset. Analysis of the mechanism of immune suppression transferred by CD45RB(low)CD4(+) cells revealed essential roles for both IL-10 and TGF-beta. These data indicate that a functionally specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells exists in normal mice and that these can prevent the development of pathogenic responses toward commensal bacteria. The role of Treg cells in the control of the immune response is discussed.

  18. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: association with disease stage and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Woetmann, A; Odum, Niels

    2007-01-01

    numbers of FOXP3+ Tregs than CTCL unspecified or advanced MF with tumours or transformation to large cell lymphoma. An analysis of all patients demonstrated that increasing numbers of FOXP3+ Tregs were associated with improved survival in both MF and CTCL unspecified. In conclusion, our data indicate......FOXP3 is a unique marker for CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). In solid tumours, high numbers of Tregs are associated with a poor prognosis. Knowledge about the implications of Tregs for the behaviour of haematological malignancies is limited. In this study, skin biopsies from 86 patients...... with mycosis fungoides (MF) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) unspecified were analysed for the expression of FOXP3 on tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating Tregs. Labelling of above 10% of the neoplastic cells was seen in one case classified as an aggressive epidermotropic CD8+ cytotoxic CTCL...

  19. Role of CD8+ regulatory T cells in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyan Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8 + T cells are regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress both alloimmunity and autoimmunity in many animal models. This class of regulatory cells includes the CD8 + CD28 - , CD8 + CD103 + , CD8 + FoxP3 + and CD8 + CD122 + subsets. The mechanisms of action of these regulatory cells are not fully understood; however, the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β as well as the direct killing of target cells via Fas L/Fas and the perforin/granzyme B pathways have been demonstrated in various models. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of Tregs and to provide experimental support for potential clinical trials. We recently observed that CD8 + CD122 + Tregs more potently suppressed allograft rejection compared to their CD4 + CD25 + counterparts, supporting the hypothesis that CD8 + Tregs may represent a new and promising Treg family that can be targeted to prevent allograft rejection in the clinic. In this review, we summarize the progress in the field during the past 7-10 years and discuss CD8 + Treg phenotypes, mechanisms of action, and their potential clinical applications; particularly in composite tissue transplants in burn and trauma patients.

  20. Human regulatory T cell suppressive function is independent of apoptosis induction in activated effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Vercoulen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4(+CD25(+FOXP3(+ Regulatory T cells (Treg play a central role in the immune balance to prevent autoimmune disease. One outstanding question is how Tregs suppress effector immune responses in human. Experiments in mice demonstrated that Treg restrict effector T cell (Teff responses by deprivation of the growth factor IL-2 through Treg consumption, resulting in apoptosis of Teff. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the relevance of Teff apoptosis induction to human Treg function. To this end, we studied naturally occurring Treg (nTreg from peripheral blood of healthy donors, and, to investigate Treg function in inflammation in vivo, Treg from synovial fluid of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA patients (SF-Treg. Both nTreg and SF-Treg suppress Teff proliferation and cytokine production efficiently as predicted. However, in contrast with murine Treg, neither nTreg nor SF-Treg induce apoptosis in Teff. Furthermore, exogenously supplied IL-2 and IL-7 reverse suppression, but do not influence apoptosis of Teff. SIGNIFICANCE: Our functional data here support that Treg are excellent clinical targets to counteract autoimmune diseases. For optimal functional outcome in human clinical trials, future work should focus on the ability of Treg to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of Teff, rather than induction of Teff apoptosis.

  1. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of dietary components on regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    are documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Tregs) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence bearing on the impact of dietary......It is no longer a myth that a balanced diet is fundamental for general health. Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high fat diets...

  3. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  4. Clinical perspectives for regulatory T cells in transplantation tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Hippen, Keli L.; Riley, James L.; June, Carl H.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Three main types of CD4+ regulatory T cells can be distinguished based upon whether they express Foxp3 and differentiate naturally in the thymus (natural Tregs) or are induced in the periphery (inducible Tregs); or whether they are FoxP3 negative but secrete IL-10 in response to antigen (Tregulatory type 1, Tr1 cells). Adoptive transfer of each cell type has proven highly effective in mouse models at preventing graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and autoimmunity. Although clinical application was ...

  5. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei Tang; Trevor RF Smith; Vipin Kumar

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations,suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming.

  6. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells In Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg require activation through the T cell receptor for function. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells are believed to be key players of the immune tolerance network and control the induction and effector phase of the immune system. Although these cells require antigen-specific activation, they are generally able to suppress bystander T cell responses once activated. This raises the possibility that antigen-specific Treg may be useful therapeutically by localizing generalized suppressive activity to tissues expressing select target antigens. Treg can exert a potent suppressive effect on immune effector cells reactive to host antigens and prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Here, we observed that co-transfer of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells derived from donor type along with the donor bone marrow cells could control GVHD-like reactions by suppressing effectors cells of host responding to the donor hematopoietic compartment, and resulted in prevention of autoimmunity and rejection. We further demonstrate that CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells can control immune-based morbidity after allogeneic BMT by suppressing the development of granulocytes cells and increasing the level of B cell expression.

  7. CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-regulatory T cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ effector memory subset are increased in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Fumichika; Saegusa, Jun; Nishimura, Keisuke; Miura, Yasushi; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kumagai, Shunichi; Morinobu, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Increased numbers of regulatory T (Treg) cells are found in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RASF) compared with peripheral blood. However, Treg cells in RASF have been shown to have a decreased capacity to suppress T cells. Here we phenotypically classified CD4+ T cells in RASF into six subsets based on the expression of CD45RA, CCR7, CD27 and CD28, and demonstrated that the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in synovial fluid compared with peripheral blood. In addition, the proportion of Foxp3+ Treg cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in RASF. Furthermore, most of the Foxp3+ Treg cells in RASF were non-suppressive CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-Treg cells, and the frequency of the non-Treg cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in RASF. Our findings suggest that the pro-inflammatory environment in RA joints may induce the increase of CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-Treg cells in synovial fluid.

  8. First insight into the kinome of human regulatory T cells.

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    Sebastian König

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs. Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR, more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4(+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4(+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression.

  9. The split personality of regulatory T cells in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-03

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) participate in responses to various chronic infections including HIV. HIV infection is associated with a progressive CD4 lymphopenia and defective HIV-specific CD8 responses known to play a key role in the control of viral replication. Persistent immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and is involved in disease progression independent of viral load. The consequences of Treg expansion, observed in HIV infection, could be either beneficial, by suppressing generalized T-cell activation, or detrimental, by weakening HIV-specific responses and thus contributing to viral persistence. The resulting balance between Tregs contrasting outcomes might have critical implications in pathogenesis. Topics covered in this review include HIV-induced alterations of Tregs, Treg cell dynamics in blood and tissues, Treg-suppressive function, and the relationship between Tregs and immune activation. This review also provides a focus on the role of CD39(+) Tregs and other regulatory cell subsets. All these issues will be explored in different situations including acute and chronic infection, antiretroviral treatment-mediated viral control, and spontaneous viral control. Results must be interpreted with regard to both the Treg definition used in context and to the setting of the disease in an attempt to draw clearer conclusions from the apparently conflicting results.

  10. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whiteside TL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well understood. This review attempts to provide insights into the importance of Treg subsets in cancer development and its progression. It also considers the role of Treg as potential biomarkers of clinical outcome in cancer. The strategies for monitoring Treg in cancer patients are discussed as is the need for caution in the use of therapies which indiscriminately ablate Treg. A greater understanding of molecular pathways operating in various tumor microenvironments is necessary for defining the Treg impact on cancer and for selecting immunotherapies targeting Treg. Keywords: cancer, regulatory T cells, tumor microenvironment, immune suppression, anti-Treg therapies

  11. Statins as Modulators of Regulatory T-Cell Biology

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    David A. Forero-Peña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are pharmacological inhibitors of the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol. Some recent experimental studies have shown that besides their effects on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, statins may also have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. On the other hand, the induction and activity of regulatory T cells (Treg are key processes in the prevention of pathology during chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Hence, strategies oriented towards the therapeutic expansion of Tregs are gaining special attention among biomedical researchers. The potential effects of statins on the biology of Treg are of particular importance because of their eventual application as in vivo inducers of Treg in the treatment of multiple conditions. In this paper we review the experimental evidence pointing out to a potential effect of statins on the role of regulatory T cells in different conditions and discuss its potential clinical significance.

  12. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  13. Comparative Study of Regulatory T Cell Function of Human CD25+CD4+ T Cells from Thymocytes, Cord Blood, and Adult Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikao Morimoto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells suppress T cell activation and regulate multiple immune reactions in in vitro and in vivo studies. To define the regulatory function of human CD25+CD4+ T cells at various stages of maturity, we investigated in detail the functional differences of CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes, cord blood (CB, and adult peripheral blood (APB. CB CD25+CD4+ T cells displayed low-FOXP3 protein expression level and had no suppressive activity. In contrast, CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes or APB expressed high expression level of FOXP3 protein associated with significant suppressive activity. Although CB CD25+CD4+ T cells exhibited no suppressive activity, striking suppressive activity was observed following expansion in culture associated with increased FOXP3 expression and a shift from the CD45RA+ to the CD45RA− phenotype. These functional differences in CD25+CD4+ T cells from Thy, CB, and APB hence suggest a pathway of maturation for Treg in the peripheral immune system.

  14. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  15. Boosters of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine induce divergent T cell responses related to regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Andreas; Brekke, Kristin; Sommerfelt, Maja; Holmberg, Jens O; Aass, Hans Christian D; Baksaas, Ingebjørg; Sørensen, Birger; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma; Kvale, Dag

    2013-09-23

    Therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines aim to reduce disease progression by inducing HIV-specific T cells. Vacc-4x are peptides derived from conserved domains within HIV-1 p24 Gag. Previously, Vacc-4x induced T cell responses in 90% of patients which were associated with reduced viral loads. Here we evaluate the effects of Vacc-4x boosters on T cell immunity and immune regulation seven years after primary immunization. Twenty-five patients on effective antiretroviral therapy received two Vacc-4x doses four weeks apart and were followed for 16 weeks. Vacc-4x T cell responses were measured by proliferation (CFSE), INF-γ, CD107a, Granzyme B, Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity test (DTH) and cytokines and chemokines (Luminex). Functional regulation of Vacc-4x-specific T cell proliferation was estimated in vitro using anti-IL-10 and anti-TGF-ß monoclonal antibodies. Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased in 80% after either the first (64%) or second (16%) booster. Only 40% remained responders after two boosters with permanently increased Vacc-4x-specific proliferative responses (p=0.005) and improved CD8(+) T cell degranulation, IFN-γ production and DTH. At baseline, responders had higher CD8(+) T cell degranulation (p=0.05) and CD4(+) INF-γ production (p=0.01), whereas non-responders had higher production of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-1ß (p<0.045) and regulatory IL-10 (p=0.07). Notably, IL-10 and TGF-ß mediated downregulation of Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased only in non-responders (p<0.001). Downregulation during the study correlated to higher PD-1 expression on Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cells (r=0.44, p=0.037), but was inversely correlated to changes in Vacc4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation (r=-0.52, p=0.012). These findings show that Vacc-4x boosters can improve T cell responses in selected patients, but also induce vaccine-specific downregulation of T cell responses in others. Broad

  16. Regulatory T cells in health and disease : putting the pieces together

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercoulen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) are indispensable for immune balance. In patients with autoimmunity, Treg are either present in lower numbers or not functioning properly and, therefore, inflammation is not suppressed. In murine models and in human studies increase of Treg frequency or function

  17. Expansion of CD4+CD25+ helper T cells without regulatory function in smoking and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucht Anders

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD by the increased expression of CD25 on helper T cells along with enhanced intracellular expression of FoxP3 and low/absent CD127 expression on the cell surface. Method Regulatory T cells were investigated in BALF from nine COPD subjects and compared to fourteen smokers with normal lung function and nine never-smokers. Results In smokers with normal lung function, the expression of CD25+CD4+ was increased, whereas the proportions of FoxP3+ and CD127+ were unchanged compared to never-smokers. Among CD4+ cells expressing high levels of CD25, the proportion of FoxP3+ cells was decreased and the percentage of CD127+ was increased in smokers with normal lung function. CD4+CD25+ cells with low/absent CD127 expression were increased in smokers with normal lung function, but not in COPD, when compared to never smokers. Conclusion The reduction of FoxP3 expression in BALF from smokers with normal lung function indicates that the increase in CD25 expression is not associated with the expansion of regulatory T cells. Instead, the high CD127 and low FoxP3 expressions implicate a predominantly non-regulatory CD25+ helper T-cell population in smokers and stable COPD. Therefore, we suggest a smoking-induced expansion of predominantly activated airway helper T cells that seem to persist after COPD development.

  18. Programmed cell death-1 deficiency exacerbates T cell activation and atherogenesis despite expansion of regulatory T cells in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Cochain

    Full Text Available T cell activation represents a double-edged sword in atherogenesis, as it promotes both pro-inflammatory T cell activation and atheroprotective Foxp3(+ regulatory T cell (Treg responses. Here, we investigated the role of the co-inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 in T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell polarization towards pro-atherogenic or atheroprotective responses in mice. Mice deficient for both low density lipoprotein receptor and PD-1 (Ldlr(-/-Pd1(-/- displayed striking increases in systemic CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell activation after 9 weeks of high fat diet feeding, associated with an expansion of both pro-atherogenic IFNγ-secreting T helper 1 cells and atheroprotective Foxp3+ Tregs. Importantly, PD-1 deficiency did not affect Treg suppressive function in vitro. Notably, PD-1 deficiency exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion growth and entailed a massive infiltration of T cells in atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, aggravated hypercholesterolemia was observed in Ldlr(-/-Pd1(-/- mice. In conclusion, we here demonstrate that although disruption of PD-1 signaling enhances both pro- and anti-atherogenic T cell responses in Ldlr(-/- mice, pro-inflammatory T cell activation prevails and enhances dyslipidemia, vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  19. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy.

  20. B7-deficient autoreactive T cells are highly susceptible to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Kenneth F; Chang, Xing; Zhang, Huiming; Lute, Kenneth D; Zhou, Penghui; Kocak, Ergun; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immunity to infections and tumors as well as autoimmunity and graft-vs-host disease. Since Tregs constitutively express CTLA-4 and activated T cells express B7-1 and B7-2, it has been suggested that the interaction between CTLA-4 on Tregs and B7-1/2 on the effector T cells may be required for immune suppression. In this study, we report that autopathogenic T cells from B7-deficient mice cause multiorgan inflammation when adoptively transferred into syngeneic RAG-1-deficient hosts. More importantly, this inflammation is suppressed by adoptive transfer of purified wild-type (WT) CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. WT Tregs also inhibited lymphoproliferation and acquisition of activation markers by the B7-deficient T cells. An in vitro suppressor assay revealed that WT and B7-deficient T cells are equally susceptible to WT Treg regulation. These results demonstrate that B7-deficient T cells are highly susceptible to immune suppression by WT Tregs and refute the hypothesis that B7-CTLA-4 interaction between effector T cells and Tregs plays an essential role in Treg function.

  1. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  2. Regulatory T Cells Are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Amanda L; Kapp, Linda M; Wang, Xiaohong; Howie, Heather L; Hudson, Krystalyn E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigens are generated. While the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s) behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved.

  3. Regulatory T cells are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Richards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigens are generated. Whilst the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved.

  4. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell therapy in transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qizhi Tang; Jeffrey A. Bluestone; Sang-Mo Kang

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are long-lived cells that suppress immune responses in vivo in a dominant and antigen-specific manner.Therefore,therapeutic application of Tregs to control unwanted immune responses is an active area of investigation.Tregs can confer long-term protection against auto-inflammatory diseases in mouse models.They have also been shown to be effective in suppressing alloimmunity in models of graft-versus-host disease and organ transplantation.Building on extensive research in Treg biology and preclinical testing of therapeutic efficacy over the past decade,we are now at the point of evaluating the safety and efficacy of Treg therapy in humans.This review focuses on developing therapy for transplantation using CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs,with an emphasis on the studies that have informed clinical approaches that aim to maximize the benefits while overcoming the challenges and risks of Treg cell therapy.

  5. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well understood. This review attempts to provide insights into the importance of Treg subsets in cancer development and its progression. It also considers the role of Treg as potential biomarkers of clinical outcome in cancer. The strategies for monitoring Treg in cancer patients are discussed as is the need for caution in the use of therapies which indiscriminately ablate Treg. A greater understanding of molecular pathways operating in various tumor microenvironments is necessary for defining the Treg impact on cancer and for selecting immunotherapies targeting Treg.

  6. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the i...

  7. Lin28b Regulates Fetal Regulatory T Cell Differentiation through Modulation of TGF-β Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronevetsky, Yelena; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2016-12-01

    Immune tolerance between the fetus and mother represents an active process by which the developing fetus must not mount immune responses to noninherited Ags on chimeric maternal cells that reside in fetal tissue. This is, in part, mediated by the suppressive influence of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Fetal secondary lymphoid organs have an increased frequency of Tregs and, as compared with adult T cells, fetal naive CD4(+) T cells exhibit a strong predisposition to differentiate into Tregs when stimulated. This effect is mediated by the TCR and TGF-β pathways, and fetal T cells show significantly increased Treg differentiation in response to anti-CD3 and TGF-β stimulation. Naive fetal T cells also exhibit increased signaling through the TGF-β pathway, with these cells demonstrating increased expression of the signaling mediators TGF-βRI, TGF-βRIII, and SMAD2, and higher levels of SMAD2/SMAD3 phosphorylation. Increased fetal Treg differentiation is mediated by the RNA-binding protein Lin28b, which is overexpressed in fetal T cells as compared with adult cells. When Lin28b expression is decreased in naive fetal T cells, they exhibit decreased Treg differentiation that is associated with decreased TGF-β signaling and lowered expression of TGF-βRI, TGF-βRIII, and SMAD2. Lin28b regulates the maturation of let-7 microRNAs, and these TGF-β signaling mediators are let-7 targets. We hypothesize that loss of Lin28b expression in fetal T cells leads to increased mature let-7, which causes decreased expression of TGF-βRI, TGF-βRIII, and SMAD2 proteins. A reduction in TGF-β signaling leads to reduced Treg numbers. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Transgenic expression of TGF-beta on thyrocytes inhibits development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis and increases regulatory T cells in thyroids of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiguang; Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic NOD.H-2h4 mice expressing TGF-beta under control of the thyroglobulin promoter were generated to assess the role of TGF-beta in the development of thyrocyte hyperplasia. In contrast to nontransgenic littermates, which develop lymphocytic spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (L-SAT), all TGF-beta transgenic (Tg) mice given NaI water for 2-7 mo developed thyroid lesions characterized by severe thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia and proliferation, with fibrosis and less lymphocyte infiltration than in nontransgenic mice. Most Tg mice produced less anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody than did wild type (WT) mice. T cells from Tg and WT mice were equivalent in their ability to induce L-SAT after transfer to SCID or TCRalpha(-/-) mice. WT lymphocytes could transfer experimental autoimmune thyroiditis or L-SAT to Tg mice, indicating that the transgenic environment did not prevent migration of lymphocytes to the thyroid. Thyroids of Tg mice had higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with nontransgenic WT mice. Transient depletion of Tregs by anti-CD25 resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into thyroids of transgenic mice. Treg depletion also resulted in increased anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses and increased expression of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines in thyroids of Tg mice. The results suggest that spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis is inhibited in mice expressing transgenic TGF-beta on thyrocytes, at least in part, because there is an increased frequency of Tregs in their thyroids.

  9. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    ) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...

  10. Increase of Frequency and Modulation of Phenotype of Regulatory T Cells by Atorvastatin Is Associated with Decreased Lung Inflammatory Cell Infiltration in a Murine Model of Acute Allergic Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquiceth, Yurany; Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Tabares Guevara, Jorge H.; Correa, Luis Alfonso; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ramírez-Pineda, José Robinson; Velilla, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role by controlling allergic inflammation of airways. Recently, it has been shown that statins have immunomodulatory properties, probably mediated by their effects on Tregs. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo effect of atorvastatin (ATV) on Tregs and its association with the inflammatory process in a model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with intranasal OVA. ATV (40 mg/kg) was delivered by daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 or 15 days before each OVA challenge. ATV treatment for 7 days increased the frequency of Tregs in mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) and the interleukin (IL)-10 in lungs. After 15 days of treatment, ATV increased the percentage of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR+) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1+) Tregs in the lung, without enhancing their suppressive activity, but also increased the percentage of conventional T cells expressing GITR+, PD1+, and OX-40 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 4). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum, and type 2 helper (Th2) cytokines in the lungs, there was a significant decrease of peribronchial inflammation that negatively correlated with the Tregs in MLN and the concentration of IL-10 in the lung. These results suggest that ATV has an immunomodulatory role possibly mediated by their effects on Tregs, which could contribute to the control of inflammation during allergic asthma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the contribution of Treg to immunomodulatory action of statins in the context of allergic asthma. PMID:28066430

  11. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25(hi) T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell-cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  12. Transplantation tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宁翰; 吴宏飞; 吴军; 张炜; 眭元庚; 贺厚光; 张春雷; 郑峻松

    2004-01-01

    Background With potent suppressive effect on responder T cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have become the focus of attention only recently and they may play an important role in transplantation tolerance. However, the mechanism of action is not clear. This study was designed to assess the possibility of using CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to induce transplantation tolerance and to investigate their mechanism of action.Methods CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation techniques. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to assess the ability of Treg cells to suppress effector T cells. Before skin transplantation, various numbers of CD4+CD25+Treg cells, which have been induced using complex skin antigens from the donor, were injected into the host mice either intraperitoneally (0.5×105, 1×105, 2×105, 3×105, 4×105, or 5×105) or by injection through the tail vein (5×103, 1×104, 2×104, 5×104, 1×105, 2×105). Skin grafts from two different donor types were used to assess whether the induced Treg cells were antigen-specific. The survival time of the allografts were observed. Single photon emission computed tomography was also used to determine the distribution of Treg cells before and after transplantation.Results Treg cells have suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte reactions. Grafts survived longer in mice receiving CD4+CD25+ Treg cell injections than in control mice. There was a significant difference between groups receiving intraperitoneal injection of either 2×105 or 3×105 CD4+CD25+Treg cells and the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Better results were achieved when Treg cells were injected via the tail vein than when injected intraperitoneally. The transplantation tolerance induced by CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was donor-specific. Analysis of the localization of Treg cells revealed that Treg cells mainly migrated from the liver to the allografts and the spleen.Conclusions CD4+CD25+Treg cells can induce donor

  13. FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells in systemic autoimmune diseases : the delicate balance between true regulatory T cells and effector Th-17 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel H; Boots, Annemieke M H; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Breakdown of tolerance is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. Over the past 10 years, there has been increased interest in the role of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (T-Regs) in maintaining peripheral tolerance. Dysfunction of these cells is considered to play a major role in the development of autoimmu

  14. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor reduces the number of precursor and effector T cells, but preserves thymic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, V.J.; Smit, J.J.; Bol-Schoenmakers, M.; van Duursen, M.B.M.; van den Berg, M.; Pieters, R.H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation suppresses immune responses, including allergic sensitization, by increasing the percentage of regulatory (Treg) cells. Furthermore, AhR activation is known to affect thymic precursor T cells. However, the effect of AhR activation on intrathymic CD4(+)CD25(

  15. Aumento de linfocitos T regulatorios en los ganglios linfoides de ratones mutantes para catepsina L Increase of regulatory T cells in the lymph node of cathepsin L mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camicia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Las células T regulatorias CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (Treg han sido implicadas en el rechazo al trasplante de órganos alogeneicos, en cáncer, infecciones y enfermedades autoinmunes. Así, su modulación posee un enorme potencial para el tratamiento de estas enfermedades. En este trabajo se evaluó la influencia de la catepsina L (CTSL sobre la homeostasis de las células Treg. Los ratones CTSLnkt/nkt -mutantes para CTSLpresentaron una reducción en el número de células Treg en el timo. Contrariamente, en los ganglios linfáticos el número de células Treg y su frecuencia dentro de la población CD4+ se incrementaron. La ausencia de actividad de CTSL en las células CD4+ de los ganglios linfoides -y no en su entorno- incrementó su tasa de proliferación. Las células Treg y las T CD4+ convencionales (CD4+CD25-Foxp3- de los ratones mutantes mostraron aumentos similares en su tasa de proliferación, sugiriendo que la proliferación contribuye al incremento en el número de células Treg, pero el aumento en su frecuencia no derivaría exclusivamente del incremento en su proliferación. Por otra parte, no se observó una disminución en los niveles de apoptosis de células Treg. Teniendo en cuenta que la producción diaria de timocitos CD4+ está disminuida en los ratones CTSLnkt/nkt, estos resultados sugieren que el incremento de células Treg en los ganglios linfoides de estos mutantes no derivaría de una mayor exportación tímica, y permiten hipotetizar que la ausencia de actividad de CTSL favorecería la adquisición del fenotipo CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ a partir de células CD4+CD25-Foxp3- en la periferia.Regulatory CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg have been implicated in different pathologies including cancer, infections and autoimmune diseases and in the rejection of allogeneic organ transplantation. Thus, modulation of Treg activity has a great potential in the treatment of these pathologies. Herein, we evaluated the influence of cathepsin L (CTSL on Treg

  16. Pathogenic T cells persist after reversal of autoimmune disease by immunosuppression with regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eric; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune disease can be prevented with immunosuppressive agents; however, the effectiveness of these treatments in advanced stage of disease and the fate of pathogenic T cells following such treatments are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that a single dose of in vitro-induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) resulted in the functional repair and restitution of stomach tissue that had been severely damaged in advanced autoimmune gastritis. iTreg cells caused depletion or inactivation of autoreactive naïve T cells that were antigen inexperienced, however, autoreactive effector/memory T cells persisted in treated mice, resulting in residual cellular infiltrates within the repaired stomach tissue. The persisting autoreactive T cells were able to rapidly cause autoimmune disease if iTreg cells were removed. Similar data were obtained from mice treated continuously with corticosteroid, in that there was substantial restitution of the gastric mucosa; however, effector T cells persisted and rapidly caused pathology following drug removal. Therefore, iTreg cells or corticosteroid can suppress pathogenic autoreactive cells in advanced autoimmune disease, reversing tissue damage and improving tissue function. However, the persistence of pathogenic T cells represents a disease risk.

  17. Prolonged graft survival in older recipient mice is determined by impaired effector T-cell but intact regulatory T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Denecke

    Full Text Available Elderly organ transplant recipients represent a fast growing segment of patients on the waiting list. We examined age-dependent CD4(+ T-cell functions in a wild-type (WT and a transgenic mouse transplant model and analyzed the suppressive function of old regulatory T-cells. We found that splenocytes of naïve old B6 mice contained significantly higher frequencies of T-cells with an effector/memory phenotype (CD4(+CD44(highCD62L(low. However, in-vitro proliferation (MLR and IFNgamma-production (ELISPOT were markedly reduced with increasing age. Likewise, skin graft rejection was significantly delayed in older recipients and fewer graft infiltrating CD4(+T-cells were observed. Old CD4(+ T-cells demonstrated a significant impaired responsiveness as indicated by diminished proliferation and activation. In contrast, old alloantigen-specific CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ T-cells demonstrated a dose-dependent well-preserved suppressor function. Next, we examined characteristics of 18-month old alloreactive T-cells in a transgenic adoptive transfer model. Adoptively transferred old T-cells proliferated significantly less in response to antigen. Skin graft rejection was significantly delayed in older recipients, and graft infiltrating cells were reduced. In summary, advanced recipient age was associated with delayed acute rejection and impaired CD4(+ T-cell function and proliferation while CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ T-cells (Tregs showed a well-preserved function.

  18. Regulatory T-Cell Augmentation or Interleukin-17 Inhibition Prevents Calcineurin Inhibitor-Induced Hypertension in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L; Pakanati, Abhinandan R; Hernandez, Marcos; Young, Kristina J; Bounds, Kelsey R; Mitchell, Brett M

    2017-07-01

    The immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus alter T-cell subsets and can cause hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and renal toxicity. We and others have reported that cyclosporine A and tacrolimus decrease anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells and increase proinflammatory interleukin-17-producing T cells; therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of these effects using noncellular therapies would prevent the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal glomerular injury induced by calcineurin inhibitor therapy. Daily treatment of mice with cyclosporine A or tacrolimus for 1 week significantly decreased CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in the spleen and lymph nodes, as well as induced hypertension, vascular injury and dysfunction, and glomerular mesangial expansion in mice. Daily cotreatment with all-trans retinoic acid reported to increase regulatory T cells and decrease interleukin-17-producing T cells, prevented all of the detrimental effects of cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. All-trans retinoic acid also increased regulatory T cells and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in genetically modified mice that phenocopy calcineurin inhibitor-treated mice (FKBP12-Tie2 knockout). Treatment with an interleukin-17-neutralizing antibody also increased regulatory T-cell levels and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in cyclosporine A-treated and tacrolimus-treated mice and FKBP12-Tie2 knockout mice, whereas an isotype control had no effect. Augmenting regulatory T cells and inhibiting interleukin-17 signaling using noncellular therapies prevents the cardiovascular and renal toxicity of calcineurin inhibitors in mice. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. A microfluidic platform reveals differential response of regulatory T cells to micropatterned costimulation arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Hyun; Dustin, Michael L; Kam, Lance C

    2015-11-01

    T cells are key mediators of adaptive immunity. However, the overall immune response is often directed by minor subpopulations of this heterogeneous family of cells, owing to specificity of activation and amplification of functional response. Knowledge of differences in signaling and function between T cell subtypes is far from complete, but is clearly needed for understanding and ultimately leveraging this branch of the adaptive immune response. This report investigates differences in cell response to micropatterned surfaces by conventional and regulatory T cells. Specifically, the ability of cells to respond to the microscale geometry of TCR/CD3 and CD28 engagement is made possible using a magnetic-microfluidic device that overcomes limitations in imaging efficiency associated with conventional microscopy equipment. This device can be readily assembled onto micropatterned surfaces while maintaining the activity of proteins and other biomolecules necessary for such studies. In operation, a target population of cells is tagged using paramagnetic beads, and then trapped in a divergent magnetic field within the chamber. Following washing, the target cells are released to interact with a designated surface. Characterization of this system with mouse CD4(+) T cells demonstrated a 50-fold increase in target-to-background cell purity, with an 80% collection efficiency. Applying this approach to CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, it is then demonstrated that these rare cells respond less selectively to micro-scale features of anti-CD3 antibodies than CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, revealing a difference in balance between TCR/CD3 and LFA-1-based adhesion. PKC-θ localized to the distal pole of regulatory T cells, away from the cell-substrate interface, suggests a mechanism for differential regulation of TCR/LFA-1-based adhesion. Moreover, specificity of cell adhesion to anti-CD3 features was dependent on the relative position of anti-CD28 signaling within the cell

  20. T-cell suppression mediated by regulatory T cells infiltrating hepatic tumors can be overcome by GITRL treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pedroza-Gonzalez (Alexander); J. Kwekkeboom (Jaap); D. Sprengers (Dave)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRecently, we reported the accumulation of CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the tumor mass of patients bearing liver cancer. Tumor-infiltrating Tregs (TiTreg) are active and potent suppressors of antitumor immunity. Importantly, treatment with GITR L reduced the immunosuppress

  1. The immunosuppressive tumour network: myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and natural killer T cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindau, D.S.U.; Gielen, P.R.; Kroesen, M.; Wesseling, P.; Adema, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are major components of the immune suppressive tumour microenvironment (TME). Both cell types expand systematically in preclinical tumour models and promote T-cell dysfunction that in turn favours tumour progression. Clinical repo

  2. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  3. Regulatory T cells in inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gy(o)rgyi Müzes; Béla Molnár; Ferenc Sipos

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key elements in immunological self-tolerance.The number of Tregs may alter in both peripheral blood and in colonic mucosa during pathological circumstances.The local cellular,microbiological and cytokine milieu affect immunophenotype and function of Tregs.Forkhead box P3+ Tregs function shows altered properties in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs).This alteration of Tregs function can furthermore be observed between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis,which may have both clinical and therapeutical consequences.Chronic mucosal inflammation may also influence Tregs function,which together with the intestinal bacterial flora seem to have a supporting role in colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.Tregs have a crucial role in the immunoevasion of cancer cells in sporadic colorectal cancer.Furthermore,their number and phenotype correlate dosely with the clinical outcome of the disease,even if their contribution to carcinogenesis has previously been controversial.Despite knowledge of the clinical relationship between IBD and colitis-associated colon cancer,and the growing number of immunological aspects encompassing sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis,the molecular and cellular links amongst Tregs,regulation of the inflammation,and cancer development are still not well understood.In this paper,we aimed to review the current data surrounding the role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of IBD,colitis-associated colon cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer.

  4. Genomic definition of multiple ex vivo regulatory T cell subphenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerer, Markus; Hill, Jonathan A; Kretschmer, Karsten; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2010-03-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the Foxp3 transcription factor are essential for lymphoid homeostasis and immune tolerance to self. Other nonimmunological functions of Treg cells, such as controlling metabolic function in adipose tissue, are also emerging. Treg cells originate primarily in the thymus, but can also be elicited from conventional T cells by in vivo exposure to low-dose antigen or homeostatic expansion or by activation in the presence of TGFbeta in vitro. Treg cells are characterized by a distinct transcriptional signature controlled in part, but not solely, by Foxp3. For a better perspective on transcriptional control in Treg cells, we compared gene expression profiles of a broad panel of Treg cells from various origins or anatomical locations. Treg cells generated by different means form different subphenotypes and were identifiable by particular combinations of transcripts, none of which fully encompassed the entire Treg signature. Molecules involved in Treg cell effector function, chemokine receptors, and the transcription factors that control them were differentially represented in these subphenotypes. Treg cells from the gut proved dissimilar to cells elicited by exposure to TGFbeta in vitro, but instead they resembled a CD103(+)Klrg1(+) subphenotype preferentially generated in response to lymphopenia.

  5. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, J; Yuan, J; Chandrakar, A; Iacomini, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25(low) Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3(+) , CD25(high) , CD4(+) Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3(+) CD25(low) CD4(+) T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance.

  6. Impaired function of regulatory T-cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dino B A; Fernandez, Sonia; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A; Thompson, Philip J; Moodley, Yuben P

    2014-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory pathways affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poorly understood. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are important negative regulators of T-cell activity and hence were investigated in COPD patients in this study. We hypothesised that functional defects in Tregs may promote increased inflammation contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with stable COPD and age-matched non-smoking controls. Treg-mediated suppression of memory non-Treg (Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) T-cell activation was analysed by comparing PBMC responses to staphylococcal enterotoxin-B (SEB) pre- and post-depletion of Tregs (CD25(+)CD127(low)CD4(+) T-cells) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Activation of T-cells was assessed by HLA-DR expression. Levels of secreted cytokines were measured by ELISA. Depletion of Tregs increased SEB-induced activation of Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+) CD4(+) T-cells in samples from 15/15 healthy controls (demonstrating Treg-mediated suppression) and 9/14 COPD patients (Fisher's test, p=0.017). A screen of clinical data associated a failure of Treg-mediated suppression in the remaining five COPD patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) (33-38 kg/m(2)) compared to patients with unimpaired Treg function (20-32 kg/m(2)). In conclusion, we demonstrate impaired Treg-mediated suppression of CD4(+) T-cell activation in a subset of COPD patients, all of whom had high BMI. Obesity and/or perturbed homeostasis of Treg subsets may explain this defect and therefore contribute to increased inflammation observed in COPD.

  7. [Helper T cell paradigm: Th17 and regulatory T cells involved in autoimmune inflammatory disorders, pathogen defense and allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The helper T cell paradigm, divided into two distinct subsets, Th1 and Th2 cells, characterized by distinct cytokine and functions, has been expanded to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Th1 cells producing IFN-γ are involved in delayed-type hypersensitivity, effective in intracellular pathogens defense, while Th2 cells secrete IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-25 and has a central role in IgE production, eosinophilic inflammation, and the protection for helminthic parasite infection. Th17 cell lineages, expressing IL-17 family of cytokines and IL-23-mediated functions on T cells, plays a role in immune response to fungi and extracellular pathogens and autoimmune inflammatory disorders. Th17 cells are required the combination of IL-6 and TGF-β and the transcription factors, RORC2/RORgt (mice) and STAT3 for differentiation, and produce IL-17, IL-22, IL-17F, IL-21 and CCL20. FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells produce TGF-β and IL-10, which regulate effector T cells, and thus maintain peripheral tolerance. Four functionally unique CD4+ T cells, including the regulatory T (Treg) cells are now involved in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens, self-antigens and allergens. Any defect in the entire CD4+T cell population might results in human diseases. In this review, the biology of Th17 cells and Treg cells and their role in immune diseases are presented.

  8. CCR6 marks regulatory T cells as a colon-tropic, interleukin-10-producing phenotype1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kazuya; Farber, Joshua M.; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of CCR6 and its ligand, CCL20, are increased in the colon of humans with inflammatory bowel diseases and mice with experimental colits, however their role in disease pathogenesis remains obscure. Here we demonstrate a role for CCR6 on regulatory T (Treg)3 cells in the T cell-transfer model of colitis. Rag2−/− mice given Ccr6−/− CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells had more severe colitis with increased IFN-γ-producing T cells, compared to the mice given WT cells. While equivalent frequency of induced/acquired Treg (iTreg) cells was observed in mesenteric lymph nodes and colon from both groups, the suppressive capacity of Ccr6−/− iTreg cells was impaired. Co-transfer studies of WT or Ccr6−/− Treg cells with CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells also showed the defect of Ccr6−/− Treg cell suppression. CCR6+ Treg cells were characterized as antigen-activated and IL-10-producing in the steady state, and preferentially migrated to the colon during inflammation. Thus, we concludes that CCR6 expression on Treg cells was required for the full function of Treg cell-mediated suppression in the T cell-transfer model of colitis. CCR6 may contribute to the regulation of colitis via the recruitment of antigen-specific, IL-10-producing iTreg cells to the inflamed colon. PMID:20720211

  9. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

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    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  10. Preferential control of induced regulatory T cell homeostasis via a Bim/Bcl-2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Szymczak-Workman, A L; Gravano, D M; Workman, C J; Green, D R; Vignali, D A A

    2012-02-09

    Apoptosis has an essential role in controlling T cell homeostasis, especially during the contraction phase of an immune response. However, its contribution to the balance between effector and regulatory populations remains unclear. We found that Rag1(-/-) hosts repopulated with Bim(-/-) conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv) resulted in a larger induced regulatory T cell (iTreg) population than mice given wild-type (WT) Tconv. This appears to be due to an increased survival advantage of iTregs compared with activated Tconv in the absence of Bim. Downregulation of Bcl-2 expression and upregulation of Bim expression were more dramatic in WT iTregs than activated Tconv in the absence of IL-2 in vitro. The iTregs generated following Tconv reconstitution of Rag1(-/-) hosts exhibited lower Bcl-2 expression and higher Bim/Bcl-2 ratio than Tconv, which indicates that iTregs were in an apoptosis-prone state in vivo. A significant proportion of the peripheral iTreg pool exhibits low Bcl-2 expression indicating increased sensitivity to apoptosis, which may be a general characteristic of certain Treg subpopulations. In summary, our data suggest that iTregs and Tconv differ in their sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli due to their altered ratio of Bim/Bcl-2 expression. Modulating the apoptosis pathway may provide novel therapeutic approaches to alter the balance between effector T cells and Tregs.

  11. Human mesenchymal stromal cells enhance the immunomodulatory function of CD8+CD28− regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuli; Zheng, Haiqing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Peng, Yanwen; Huang, Weijun; Li, Xiaobo; Li, Gang; Xia, Wenjie; Sun, Qiquan; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2015-01-01

    One important aspect of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-mediated immunomodulation is the recruitment and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, we do not yet know whether MSCs have similar effects on the other subsets of Treg cells. Herein, we studied the effects of MSCs on CD8+CD28− Treg cells and found that the MSCs could not only increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells, but also enhance CD8+CD28−T cells' ability of hampering naive CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation, decreasing the production of IFN-γ by activated CD4+ T cells and inducing the apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells. Mechanistically, the MSCs affected the functions of the CD8+CD28− T cells partially through moderate upregulating the expression of IL-10 and FasL. The MSCs had no distinct effect on the shift from CD8+CD28+ T cells to CD8+CD28− T cells, but did increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells by reducing their rate of apoptosis. In summary, this study shows that MSCs can enhance the regulatory function of CD8+CD28− Treg cells, shedding new light on MSCs-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25482073

  12. SHP-1 phosphatase activity counteracts increased T cell receptor affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeisen, Michael; Baitsch, Lukas; Presotto, Danilo; Baumgaertner, Petra; Romero, Pedro; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Anti-self/tumor T cell function can be improved by increasing TCR-peptide MHC (pMHC) affinity within physiological limits, but paradoxically further increases (K(d) affinity for the tumor antigen HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this high-affinity-associated loss of function. As compared with cells expressing TCR affinities generating optimal function (K(d) = 5 to 1 μM), those with supraphysiological affinity (K(d) = 1 μM to 15 nM) showed impaired gene expression, signaling, and surface expression of activatory/costimulatory receptors. Preferential expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) was limited to T cells with the highest TCR affinity, correlating with full functional recovery upon PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In contrast, upregulation of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1/PTPN6) was broad, with gradually enhanced expression in CD8(+) T cells with increasing TCR affinities. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate augmented the function of all engineered T cells, and this correlated with the TCR affinity-dependent levels of SHP-1. These data highlight an unexpected and global role of SHP-1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation and responsiveness and support the development of therapies inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases to enhance T cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Regulatory T cells in health and disease : putting the pieces together

    OpenAIRE

    Vercoulen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) are indispensable for immune balance. In patients with autoimmunity, Treg are either present in lower numbers or not functioning properly and, therefore, inflammation is not suppressed. In murine models and in human studies increase of Treg frequency or function suppresses autoimmunity. Therefore, Treg are important candidates for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory diseases. In order to develop a safe therapy utilizing Treg, it is important to know h...

  14. Increased sensitivity to interferon-alpha in psoriatic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Lovato, Paola; Skov, Lone

    2005-01-01

    disease characterized by CD8(+)-infiltrating T cells. In this study, we therefore investigate IFN-alpha signaling in T cells isolated from involved skin of psoriatic patients. We show that psoriatic T cells have increased and prolonged responses to IFN-alpha, on the level of signal transducers......Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal epidermal proliferation. Several studies have shown that skin-infiltrating activated T cells and cytokines play a pivotal role during the initiation and maintenance of the disease. Interferon (IFN)-alpha plays an important...... role in host defense against infections, but recent data have also implicated IFN-alpha in psoriasis. Thus, IFN-alpha induces or aggravates psoriasis in some patients, and mice lacking a transcriptional attenuator of IFN-alpha/beta signaling spontaneously develop a psoriasis-like inflammatory skin...

  15. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M.; De Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  16. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M; De Boer, Rob J; Sub Theoretical Biology; Sub Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics; Theoretical Biology and Bioinformatics

    2014-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  17. The Limits of Linked Suppression for Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro eIto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously found that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (T regs can adoptively transfer tolerance after its induction with co-stimulatory blockade in a mouse model of murine cardiac allograft transplantation. In these experiments, we tested an hypothesis with three components: 1 the T regs that transfer tolerance have the capacity for linked suppression, 2 the determinants that stimulate the T regs are expressed by the indirect pathway, and 3 the donor peptides contributing to these indirect determinants are derived from donor MHC antigens. Methods: 1st heart transplants were performed from the indicated donor strain to B10.D2 recipients along with co-stimulatory blockade treatment (250μg i.p. injection of MR1 on day 0 and 250μg i.p. injection of CTLA-4 Ig on day 2. At least 8 weeks later a 2nd heart transplant was performed to a new B10.D2 recipient that had been irradiated with 450 cGy. This recipient was given 40 x 106 naïve B10.D2 spleen cells plus 40 x 106 B10.D2 spleen cells from the first (tolerant recipient. We performed 3 different types of heart transplants with using various donor.Results: 1. T regs suppress the graft rejection in an antigen-specific manner. 2. T regs generated in the face of MHC disparities suppress the rejection of grafts expressing third party MHC along with tolerant MHC. Conclusion:The limits of linkage appear to be quantitative and not universally determined by either the indirect pathway or by peptides of donor MHC antigens.

  18. Regulatory T-cell cytokines in patients with nonsegmental vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidir, Mehtap; Karabulut, Ayse A; Ercin, Mustafa E; Atasoy, Pınar

    2017-05-01

    In the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo, the role of suppressor cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), associated with regulatory T-cells (Treg) is not completely known. In this study, the role of Treg-cell functions in the skin of patients with nonsegmental vitiligo was investigated. Lesional and nonlesional skin samples from 30 adult volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 36 years with nonsegmental vitiligo were compared with normal skin area excision specimens of 30 benign melanocytic nevus cases as controls. All samples were evaluated staining for forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), TGF-β, and IL-10 using the standardized streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase immunohistochemistry method. Foxp3 expression was lower in lesional vitiligo skin specimens compared to controls; it was also lower in lesional vitiligo specimens than nonlesional vitiligo specimens. IL-10 levels were lower in lesional vitiligo specimens compared to the controls, whereas IL-10 expression was significantly lower in lesional specimens compared with nonlesional specimens. TGF-β expression was higher in both lesional and nonlesional skin specimens of patients with vitiligo compared to controls. TGF-β expression was lower in lesional skin specimens than nonlesional skin specimens. In addition, there was no significant correlation between Foxp3 expression with TGF-β and IL-10 expressions in lesional skin specimens in the vitiligo group. In this study, results supporting the contribution of Treg cells and IL-10 deficiency to the autoimmune process were obtained. Therefore, future studies are necessary to demonstrate the definitive role of Treg-cell functions in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo.

  19. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

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    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  20. Regulatory T cell induction during Plasmodium chabaudi infection modifies the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Alessandro S Farias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is used as an animal model for human multiple sclerosis (MS, which is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by activation of Th1 and/or Th17 cells. Human autoimmune diseases can be either exacerbated or suppressed by infectious agents. Recent studies have shown that regulatory T cells play a crucial role in the escape mechanism of Plasmodium spp. both in humans and in experimental models. These cells suppress the Th1 response against the parasite and prevent its elimination. Regulatory T cells have been largely associated with protection or amelioration in several autoimmune diseases, mainly by their capacity to suppress proinflammatory response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we verified that CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells (T regs generated during malaria infection (6 days after EAE induction interfere with the evolution of EAE. We observed a positive correlation between the reduction of EAE clinical symptoms and an increase of parasitemia levels. Suppression of the disease was also accompanied by a decrease in the expression of IL-17 and IFN-γ and increases in the expression of IL-10 and TGF-β1 relative to EAE control mice. The adoptive transfer of CD4(+CD25(+ cells from P. chabaudi-infected mice reduced the clinical evolution of EAE, confirming the role of these T regs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data corroborate previous findings showing that infections interfere with the prevalence and evolution of autoimmune diseases by inducing regulatory T cells, which regulate EAE in an apparently non-specific manner.

  1. [In vitro amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and identification of amplified T cell immunosuppressive function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wen-Jun; Pan, Li; Fang, Jian-Pei; Xu, Lv-Hong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the effect of 3 different cell components for expanding CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg in vitro, and identify their immunosuppressive function. CD4(+) T cells, CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells were isolated from mouse splenocytes by MACS and then expanded in vitro. Phenotype of the T cell lines and expression of the FOXP3 was determined by flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells on CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells was tested by MLR method. The results showed that the Treg cells from all the three groups were expanded significantly after culture for 2 weeks. In the CD4(+) T cells group, the proliferation rate was (77.8 ± 5.32) folds with a percentage of Treg cells increasing from (6.61 ± 1.00)% to (15.33 ± 1.31)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells group was (95.20 ± 7.67) folds, with the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells raising from (0.37 ± 0.13)% to (9.84 ± 0.98)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group was (41.20 ± 6.92) folds, the proportion of Treg cells decreased from (86.75 ± 1.25)% to (85.32 ± 1.62)%, and the expression of Foxp3 decreased from (76.92 ± 1.72)% to (75.33 ± 2.11)% during the culture, there were not significant differences in the cell purity and the expression of Foxp3, compared with pre-amplification. The inhibitory test showed that the expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells could inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells in vitro in a cell dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells is successful in vitro, especially in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group, the cell purity and Foxp3 gene is not obviously changes after amplification.

  2. Resistance of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells to Nur77-induced apoptosis promotes allograft survival.

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    Ran Tao

    Full Text Available The NR4A nuclear receptor family member Nur77 (NR4A1 promotes thymocyte apoptosis during negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes, but may also function in mature extrathymic T cells. We studied the effects of over-expression of Nur77 on the apoptosis of murine peripheral T cells, including thymic-derived Foxp3+ regulatory (Treg cells. Overexpression of Nur77 in the T cell lineage decreased numbers of peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells by approximately 80% compared to wild-type (WT mice. However, the proportions of Treg cells were markedly increased in the thymus (61% of CD4+Foxp3+ singly positive thymocytes vs. 8% in WT and secondary lymphoid organs (40-50% of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells vs. 7-8% in WT of Nur77 transgenic (Nur77Tg mice, and immunoprecipitation studies showed Nur77 was associated with a recently identified HDAC7/Foxp3 transcriptional complex. Upon activation through the T cell receptor in vitro or in vivo, Nur77Tg T cells showed only marginally decreased proliferation but significantly increased apoptosis. Fully allogeneic cardiac grafts transplanted to Nur77Tg mice survived long-term with well-preserved structure, and recipient splenocytes showed markedly enhanced apoptosis and greatly reduced anti-donor recall responses. Allografts in Nur77Tg recipients had significantly increased expression of multiple Treg-associated genes, including Foxp3, Foxp1, Tip60 and HDAC9. Allograft rejection was restored by CD25 monoclonal antibody therapy, indicating that allograft acceptance was dependent upon Treg function in Nur77Tg recipients. These data show that compared to conventional CD4 and CD8 T cells, Foxp3+ Tregs are relatively resistant to Nur77-mediated apoptosis, and that tipping the balance between the numbers of Tregs and responder T cells in the early period post-transplantation can determine the fate of the allograft. Hence, induced expression of Nur77 might be a novel means to achieve long-term allograft survival.

  3. Differential depletion of total T cells and regulatory T cells and prolonged allotransplant survival in CD3Ɛ humanized mice treated with polyclonal anti human thymocyte globulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszko, Maja; Cardini, Benno; Oberhuber, Rupert; Oberhuber, Lukas; Jakic, Bojana; Beierfuss, Anja; Wick, Georg; Cappellano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Thymoglobulin (ATG) is a polyclonal rabbit antibody against human thymocytes used as a T cell-depleting agent to prevent or treat allotransplant rejection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low dose ATG treatment exclusively on T cells using a humanized BALB/c human CD3Ɛ transgenic mouse model expressing both human and murine T cell receptors (TCR). Mice received a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of ATG. Blood and peripheral lymphoid organs were obtained after different time points. We found a significant T cell depletion in this mouse model. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs) proved to be less sensitive to depletion than the rest of T cells and the Treg:non-Treg ratio was therefore increased. Finally, we also investigated the effect of ATG in a heterotopic allogenic murine model of heart transplantation. Survival and transplant function were significantly prolonged in ATG-treated mice. In conclusion, we showed (a) an immunosuppressive effect of ATG in this humanized mouse model which is exclusively mediated by reactivity against human CD3Ɛ; (b) provided evidence for a relative resistance of Tregs against this regimen; and (c) demonstrated the immunomodulatory effect of ATG under these experimental circumstances by prolongation of heart allograft survival. PMID:28257450

  4. The changed balance of regulatory and naive T cells promotes tolerance after TLI and anti-T-cell antibody conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Hongo, D; Baker, J; Yao, Z; Strober, S

    2010-02-01

    The goal of the study was to determine how the changed balance of host naïve and regulatory T cells observed after conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and antithymocyte serum (ATS) promotes tolerance to combined organ and bone marrow transplants. Although previous studies showed that tolerance was dependent on host natural killer T (NKT) cells, this study shows that there is an additional dependence on host CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells. Depletion of the latter cells before conditioning resulted in rapid rejection of bone marrow and organ allografts. The balance of T-cell subsets changed after TLI and ATS with TLI favoring mainly NKT cells and ATS favoring mainly Treg cells. Combined modalities reduced the conventional naïve CD4(+) T cells 2800-fold. The host type Treg cells that persisted in the stable chimeras had the capacity to suppress alloreactivity to both donor and third party cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. In conclusion, tolerance induction after conditioning in this model depends upon the ability of naturally occurring regulatory NKT and Treg cells to suppress the residual alloreactive T cells that are capable of rejecting grafts.

  5. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

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    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  6. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4(+) T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4(+) T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will

  7. Paternal antigen-specific proliferating regulatory T cells are increased in uterine-draining lymph nodes just before implantation and in pregnant uterus just after implantation by seminal plasma-priming in allogeneic mouse pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Tomoko; Inada, Kumiko; Nakashima, Akitoshi; Ushijima, Akemi; Ito, Mika; Yoshino, Osamu; Saito, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    Paternal antigen-specific regulatory T (PA-specific Treg) cells play an important role in feto-maternal tolerance. To detect the PA-specific Tregs, female BALB/c mice were mated with male DBA/2 mice. Mls Ia antigen on DBA/2 mice is recognized by the T-cell receptor Vβ6; thus, CD4(+)Foxp3(+)Vβ6(+) cells are recognized as PA-specific Treg cells. CD4(+)CD25(+)Vβ6(+) cells effectively suppressed the allo-reactive proliferation of lymphocytes compared with that of CD4(+)CD25(+)Vβ6(-) cells. Vβ6(+) PA-specific Treg cells expressed CCR4 and CCR5 on their surface. The frequency of Ki67(+) PA-specific Treg cells among Treg cells was significantly increased in draining lymph nodes on day 3.5 post-coitus (pc; 6.8±1.1%, ppregnant mice compared with that in nonpregnant mice (2.7±0.2%). The frequency of Ki67(+) PA-specific Treg cells in the uterus increased significantly after day 5.5 pc in allogeneic pregnant mice compared with that in nonpregnant mice (8.8±2.8% vs. 1.2±1.3%, puterus in BALB/c×DBA/2 (SVX) allogeneic mating mice. These findings suggest that the priming by seminal fluid is important for the induction of proliferating PA-specific Tregs in uterine-draining lymph nodes just before implantation and pregnant uterus after implantation, resulting in successful implantation and the maintenance of allogeneic pregnancy.

  8. Pretreatment With Inactivated Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Increases CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Function and Decreases Functional and Structural Effects of Asthma Induction in a Rat Asthma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Li, Yun; Tan, Yu-Pin; Li, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to have therapeutic effects on asthma through CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We sought to assess pretreatment with inactivated BCG on CD4+CD25+ Tregs and its functional and structural effects in rat asthma model. The rat asthma model was established using ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge. Ten rats were pretreated with BCG prior to OVA and received continued BCG injections during OVA challenge (BCG+OVA group), 10 rats were treated with OVA alone (OVA group), and 10 rats were treated with saline (control group). After 9 weeks, histamine dihydrochloride effect on airway resistance was measured. Number of CD4+CD25+ Tregs was measured by flow cytometry, expression of Foxp3 and CTLA-4 mRNA was measured, and serum TGF-β levels were determined. Differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined, and lung tissue was processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and alcine blue and periodic acid Schiff's reaction to evaluate inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen deposition, and presence of goblet cells, respectively. BCG treatment led to an increase in CD4+CD25+ Tregs, as well as an increase in Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression and serum TGF-β levels. In addition, we observed a decrease in histamine dihydrochloride-induced airway resistance, a decrease in inflammatory leukocytes in BALF, and a decrease in airway remodeling indicators in BCG+OVA-treated rats compared with OVA-treated rats. Intradermally injected inactivated BCG has the potential to improve airway inflammation, airway resistance, and airway remodeling through a mechanism that may involve CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  10. Trichostatin A Promotes the Generation and Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Doñas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells are a specific subset of lymphocytes that suppress immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. They can be generated in the thymus as well as in the periphery through differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. The forkhead box P3 transcription factor (Foxp3 is a crucial molecule regulating the generation and function of Tregs. Here we show that the foxp3 gene promoter becomes hyperacetylated in in vitro differentiated Tregs compared to naïve CD4+ T cells. We also show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA stimulated the in vitro differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into Tregs and that this induction was accompanied by a global increase in histone H3 acetylation. Importantly, we also demonstrated that Tregs generated in the presence of TSA have phenotypical and functional differences from the Tregs generated in the absence of TSA. Thus, TSA-generated Tregs showed increased suppressive activities, which could potentially be explained by a mechanism involving the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73. Our data show that TSA could potentially be used to enhance the differentiation and suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells.

  11. Avian CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells: properties and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2013-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of T cells that specialize in immune suppression. CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells have been characterized as Tregs and extensively studied in mammals. In the absence of a putative FoxP3 ortholog in avians, CD4(+)CD25(+) cells is characterized as Tregs in avians. Avian CD4(+)CD25(+) cells produce high amounts of IL-10, TGF-β, CTLA-4, and LAG-3 mRNA; lack IL-2 mRNA; and suppress T cell proliferation in vitro through both contact-dependent and -independent pathways. Depleting avian CD4(+)CD25(+) cells increases the proliferation of, IL-2 amount, and IFNγ mRNA amount of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells. Avian CD4(+)CD25(+) cells lose their suppressive properties immediately after inflammation and acquire supersuppressive properties once inflammation subsides. Although Treg activity could be beneficial to the host, Tregs simultaneously inhibit host immunity and cause persistent infections of certain pathogens. Therapy targeted toward alleviating Treg mediated immune suppression can improve host immunity against those persistent pathogens and benefit poultry production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Yuki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Kawamoto, Seiji, E-mail: skawa@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Katayama, Akiko [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Nakano, Toshiaki [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Ohmori, Naoya [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Aki, Tsunehiro [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Goto, Shigeru [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Iwao Hospital, Yufuin (Japan); Chen, Chao-Long [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ono, Kazuhisa [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  13. Reciprocity between Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells: Relevance to Polarized Immunity in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Soumi; Khaitan, Binod Kumar; Joshi, Beenu; Sengupta, Utpal; Nautiyal, Arvind Kumar; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous or borderline lepromatous leprosy (LL/BL) patients in contrast to tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid type (TT/BT) patients. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by strong Th1-type cell response with localized lesions whereas lepromatous leprosy is hallmarked by its selective Mycobacterium leprae specific T cell anergy leading to disseminated and progressive disease. FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases also dampen proinflammatory T cells that include T helper 17 (Th17) cells. This study is aimed at evaluating the role of Treg cells in influencing other effector T cells and its relationship with the cytokine polarized state in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from of BT/TT (n = 15) and BL/LL (n = 15) patients were stimulated with M. leprae antigen (WCL) in presence of golgi transport inhibitor monensin for FACS based intracellular cytokine estimation. The frequency of Treg cells showed >5-fold increase in BL/LL in comparison to BT/TT and healthy contacts. These cells produced suppressive cytokine, IL-10 in BL/LL as opposed to BT/TT (p = 0.0200) indicating their suppressive function. The frequency of Th17 cells (CD4, CD45RO, IL-17) was, however, higher in BT/TT. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) was also found between IL-10 of Treg cells and IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL. Blocking IL-10/TGF-β restored the IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL patients. Simultaneously, presence of Th17 related cytokines (TGF-β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23) decreased the number of FoxP3+ Treg cells concomitantly increasing IL-17 producing CD4+ cells in lepromatous leprosy. Higher frequency of Programmed Death-1/PD-1+ Treg cells and its ligand, PDL-1 in antigen presenting cells (APCs) was found in BL/LL patients. Inhibition of this pathway led to rescue of IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T cells

  14. Virus-specific regulatory T cells ameliorate encephalitis by repressing effector T cell functions from priming to effector stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the presence of pathogen-specific Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg in infected animals, but little is known about where and how these cells affect the effector T cell responses and whether they are more suppressive than bulk Treg populations. We recently showed the presence of both epitope M133-specific Tregs (M133 Treg and conventional CD4 T cells (M133 Tconv in the brains of mice with coronavirus-induced encephalitis. Here, we provide new insights into the interactions between pathogenic Tconv and Tregs responding to the same epitope. M133 Tregs inhibited the proliferation but not initial activation of M133 Tconv in draining lymph nodes (DLN. Further, M133 Tregs inhibited migration of M133 Tconv from the DLN. In addition, M133 Tregs diminished microglia activation and decreased the number and function of Tconv in the infected brain. Thus, virus-specific Tregs inhibited pathogenic CD4 T cell responses during priming and effector stages, particularly those recognizing cognate antigen, and decreased mortality and morbidity without affecting virus clearance. These cells are more suppressive than bulk Tregs and provide a targeted approach to ameliorating immunopathological disease in infectious settings.

  15. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Regulatory T Cell-Mediated DEF6 Dephosphorylation That Affects Cytokine Expression in Human Conventional T Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joshi, Rubin N.

    2017-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control key events of immune tolerance, primarily by suppression of effector T cells. We previously revealed that Tregs rapidly suppress T cell receptor (TCR)-induced calcium store depletion in conventional CD4CD25 T cells (Tcons) independently of IP levels, consequently inhibiting NFAT signaling and effector cytokine expression. Here, we study Treg suppression mechanisms through unbiased phosphoproteomics of primary human Tcons upon TCR stimulation and Treg-mediated suppression, respectively. Tregs induced a state of overall decreased phosphorylation as opposed to TCR stimulation. We discovered novel phosphosites (T595_S597) in the DEF6 (SLAT) protein that were phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation and conversely dephosphorylated upon coculture with Tregs. Mutation of these DEF6 phosphosites abrogated interaction of DEF6 with the IP receptor and affected NFAT activation and cytokine transcription in primary Tcons. This novel mechanism and phosphoproteomics data resource may aid in modifying sensitivity of Tcons to Treg-mediated suppression in autoimmune disease or cancer.

  16. Regulatory T Cells Accumulate in the Lung Allergic Inflammation and Efficiently Suppress T-Cell Proliferation but Not Th2 Cytokine Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Faustino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells are vital for peripheral tolerance and control of tissue inflammation. In this study, we characterized the phenotype and monitored the migration and activity of regulatory T cells present in the airways of allergic or tolerant mice after allergen challenge. To induce lung allergic inflammation, mice were sensitized twice with ovalbumin/aluminum hydroxide gel and challenged twice with intranasal ovalbumin. Tolerance was induced by oral administration of ovalbumin for 5 consecutive days prior to OVA sensitization and challenge. We detected regulatory T cells (Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ T cells in the airways of allergic and tolerant mice; however, the number of regulatory T cells was more than 40-fold higher in allergic mice than in tolerant mice. Lung regulatory T cells expressed an effector/memory phenotype (CCR4highCD62LlowCD44highCD54highCD69+ that distinguished them from naive regulatory T cells (CCR4intCD62LhighCD44intCD54intCD69−. These regulatory T cells efficiently suppressed pulmonary T-cell proliferation but not Th2 cytokine production.

  17. Epigenetic Modification Mediates the Increase of LAG-3(+) T Cells in Chronic Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yicun; Wang, Jun; Meng, Jia; Jiang, Hui; Zhao, Jianning; Qian, Hongbo; Chen, Tao

    2016-12-27

    Immune suppression plays critical roles in the development of chronic osteomyelitis, and the mechanisms underlying the development of immune suppression in chronic osteomyelitis have attracted much attention. LAG-3 is an important suppressor of T cell activation, but the role of LAG-3 in the immune regulation of chronic osteomyelitis is currently unknown. We sought to demonstrate if LAG-3 plays crucial roles in chronic osteomyelitis progression and has effects on immune suppression and exhausting of T cells, and what is the mechanism underlying LAG-3 deregulation in chronic osteomyelitis. We examined the expression of LAG-3 in the T cells of peripheral blood of 50 healthy controls and 50 patients with chronic osteomyelitis by flow cytometry. Clinical data were analyzed to determine the correlation between inflammation index and LAG-3 expression. Moreover, we isolated the CD4(+) T cells from healthy controls and chronic osteomyelitis patients to compare cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were utilized to analyze the epigenetic modification on LAG-3 expression in T cells. We found that LAG-3 was significantly increased in the T cells of peripheral blood from chronic osteomyelitis patients. Subsequently, clinical data analysis suggested that the higher expression of LAG-3 was associated with severer inflammation situation. Consistently, LAG-3(+)CD4(+) T cells exhibited impaired cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Deregulation of histone methylation mediated the increase of LAG-3(+) T cells during chronic osteomyelitis. Taken together, our study demonstrates the increase of LAG-3(+) T cells and its immune regulatory roles in chronic osteomyelitis progression, suggesting new mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets for chronic osteomyelitis.

  18. The clinical correlation of regulatory T cells and cyclic adenosine monophosphate in enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    Full Text Available Brainstem encephalitis (BE and pulmonary edema (PE are notable complications of enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection.This study investigated the immunoregulatory characterizations of EV71 neurological complications by disease severity and milrinone treatment.Patients <18 years with virologically confirmed EV71 infections were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: the hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD or BE group, and the autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation or PE group. Cytokine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels, and the regulatory T cell (Tregs profiles of the patients were determined.Patients with ANS dysregulation or PE exhibited significantly low frequency of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3+ and CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells compared with patients with HFMD or BE. The expression frequency of CD4-CD8- was also significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE. Among patients with ANS dysregulation or PE, the expression frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ increased markedly after milrinone treatment, and was associated with reduction of plasma levels IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Plasma concentrations of cAMP were significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE compared with patients with HFMD or BE; however, cAMP levels increased after milrinone treatment.These findings suggested decreased different regulatory T populations and cAMP expression correlate with increased EV71 disease severity. Improved outcome after milrinone treatment may associate with increased regulatory T populations, cAMP expression and modulation of cytokines levels.

  19. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Grill, Stacy M; Shariat, Nikki; Leelawong, Mindy; Sundrud, Mark S; Haas, David W; Unutmaz, Derya

    2004-07-01

    A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+)CD25(hi) (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells]), was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+) T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+) and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi) T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  20. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Oswald-Richter

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+CD25(hi (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells], was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+ T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+ and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+CD4(+CD25(hi T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  1. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  2. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  3. Characterization of Dendritic Cell and Regulatory T Cell Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Morris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH is a tripeptide that regulates intracellular redox and other vital aspects of cellular functions. GSH plays a major role in enhancing the immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen presenting cells that participate in both innate and acquired immune responses against microbial infections. Regulatory T cells (Tregs play a significant role in immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effects of GSH in enhancing the innate and adaptive immune functions of DCs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection. We also characterized the functions of the sub-populations of CD4+T cells such as Tregs and non-Tregs in modulating the ability of monocytes to control the intracellular M. tb infection. Our results indicate that GSH by its direct antimycobacterial activity inhibits the growth of intracellular M. tb inside DCs. GSH also increases the expressions of costimulatory molecules such as HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 on the cell surface of DCs. Furthermore, GSH-enhanced DCs induced a higher level of T-cell proliferation. We also observed that enhancing the levels of GSH in Tregs resulted in downregulation in the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β and reduction in the fold growth of M. tb inside monocytes. Our studies demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms that favor both innate and adaptive control of M. tb infection.

  4. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  5. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: I. Phenotype and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Nielsen, Janne; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    it has become increasingly clear that regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) play an important role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance, and that this cell subset exerts its function by suppressing the proliferation or function of autoreactive T cells. Based on human and murine...... observations, this review presents a characterization of the phenotype and functions of the Treg cells in vitro and in vivo. An overview of the surface molecules associated with and the cytokines produced by the Treg cells is given and the origin, activation requirements and mode of action of the Treg cells...... are discussed. Finally, we address the possibility that Treg cells may play a central role in immune homeostasis, regulating not only autoimmune responses, but also immune responses toward foreign antigens....

  6. Isolation and identification of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Lü; Feng Zhang; Liyong Pu; Chao Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish a stable and high efficient method for collection of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells from rats in vitro. Methods: CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were isolated from the rat splenic cells through two steps by magic cell sorting (MACS) system. The first step was negative selection of CD4+ T cells by cocktail antibodies and anti-IgG magic microbeads, and the second step was positive selection of CD25+ T cells by anti-CD25 PE and anti-PE magic microbeads. The purity and viability of separated cells were measured by flow cytometry (FACS) and Trypan blue staining. The suppressive ability of seperated cells on the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells was assessed by cell proliferation assay. Results: The purity of negatively enriched CD4+ T cells was 79%-87% (83.6% ± 2.5%) , and the purity of positively enriched CD4+CD25+ T cells was 86%-93% ( 90.2 ± 1.8%) with the viability of 92%-95% (92.8% ± 3.4%). The enriched cells significantly suppressed the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells in mixed lymphocyte culture (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An effective method can be established for enrichment of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in two steps by MACS, with satisfied cell purity, viability and function.

  7. Levels of regulatory and effector t cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianchi, Guillermo; Tsai, Gary; Borges, Lerida; Rodríguez, Vicente; Cova, José Ángel

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and CD4+CD25- effector T cells are crucial in maintaining immune system homeostasis and are thus potential therapeutic targets for autoimmune disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3...

  8. Distribution, characterization, and induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD8+ effector cells often have an antitumor function in patients with cancer. However, CD8+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tcregs and interleukin (IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 cells also derive from the CD8+ T cell lineage. Their role in the antitumor response remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the distribution, characterization, and generation of CD8+ Tcregs and Tc17 cells in NPC patients. Methods Peripheral blood and tumor biopsy tissues from 21 newly diagnosed patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC were collected, along with peripheral blood from 21 healthy donors. The biological characteristics of Tcregs and Tc17 cells from blood and tumor tissues were examined by intracellular staining, tetramer staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The suppressive function of Tcregs was investigated using a proliferation assay that involved co-culture of sorted CD8+CD25+ T cells with naïve CD4+ T cells in vitro. Results We observed an increased prevalence of Tcregs and Tc17 cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs and different distribution among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in NPC patients. Cytokine profiles showed that the Tcregs expressed a high level of IL-10 and low level of transforming growth factor β, whereas Tc17 cells expressed a high level of tumor necrosis factor α. Interestingly, both subsets expressed a high level of interferon γ in TILs, and the Tcregs suppressed naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by a cell contact-dependent mechanism in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrated the existence of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein (LMP 1 and LMP2 antigen-specific Tcregs in NPC. Conclusions Our data provide new insights into the composition and function of CD8+ T-cell subsets in NPC, which may have an important influence on NPC immunotherapy.

  9. Circulating subsets and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cell function in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanvito, Lara; Makowska, Anna; Gregson, Norman; Nemni, Raffaello; Hughes, Richard A C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is probably autoimmune in origin. Different components of the adaptive and innate immunity may be responsible for the aberrant response towards nerve antigens. To investigate this, we examined lymphocyte subsets and regulatory T cell (Treg) function in the blood of CIDP patients, healthy controls (HC) and subjects with non-immune mediated neuropathies (other neuropathies, ON). We used flow cytometry to determine the frequency of monocytes, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NK-T cells, total and activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, effector memory and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treg function was studied after polyclonal stimulation and antigen specific stimulation with myelin protein peptides in CIDP and HC. There was an increased frequency of monocytes (p = 0.02) and decreased frequency of NK cells (p = 0.02) in CIDP compared with HC but not ON. There were no significant differences in other populations. Treg function was impaired in CIDP compared to HC (p = 0.02), whilst T cell proliferation to myelin protein peptides before and after depletion of Tregs was not different between patients and controls. This study shows increased circulating monocytes and reduced NK cells in CIDP. Although Treg frequency was not altered, we confirm that Tregs display a defect of suppressive function. Myelin protein peptides were not the target of the altered peripheral regulation of the immune response. The mechanisms of peripheral immune tolerance in CIDP and their relevance to the pathogenesis deserve further exploration.

  10. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    D. Mesquita Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (TREG cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163. In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  12. Alterations in regulatory T cells induced by specific oligosaccharides improve vaccine responsiveness in mice.

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    Marcel A Schijf

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet(+ (Th1 activated CD69(+CD4(+ T cells (p<0.001 and reduced percentage of Gata-3(+ (Th2 activated CD69(+CD4(+T cells (p<0.001 was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4(+Foxp3(+ could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 (+ /T-bet(+ (Th1-Tregs was significantly reduced (p<0.05 in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response.These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines.

  13. Regulatory T cells negatively affect IL-2 production of effector T cells through CD39/adenosine pathway in HIV infection.

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    Mohammad-Ali Jenabian

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Regulatory T cells suppress IL-2 production of effector CD4+ T cells in pathological conditions are unclear. A subpopulation of human Treg expresses the ectoenzyme CD39, which in association with CD73 converts ATP/ADP/AMP to adenosine. We show here that Treg/CD39+ suppress IL-2 expression of activated CD4+ T-cells more efficiently than Treg/CD39-. This inhibition is due to the demethylation of an essential CpG site of the il-2 gene promoter, which was reversed by an anti-CD39 mAb. By recapitulating the events downstream CD39/adenosine receptor (A2AR axis, we show that A2AR agonist and soluble cAMP inhibit CpG site demethylation of the il-2 gene promoter. A high frequency of Treg/CD39+ is associated with a low clinical outcome in HIV infection. We show here that CD4+ T-cells from HIV-1 infected individuals express high levels of A2AR and intracellular cAMP. Following in vitro stimulation, these cells exhibit a lower degree of demethylation of il-2 gene promoter associated with a lower expression of IL-2, compared to healthy individuals. These results extend previous data on the role of Treg in HIV infection by filling the gap between expansion of Treg/CD39+ in HIV infection and the suppression of CD4+ T-cell function through inhibition of IL-2 production.

  14. Combination Therapy Using IL-2/IL-2 Monoclonal Antibody Complexes, Rapamycin, and Islet Autoantigen Peptides Increases Regulatory T Cell Frequency and Protects against Spontaneous and Induced Type 1 Diabetes in Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manirarora, Jean N; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. In this study, we sought to expand Ag-specific Tregs in vivo and investigate whether the expanded Tregs can prevent or delay the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the NOD mouse model. NOD mice were treated with a combination of IL-2/anti-IL-2 Ab complex, islet Ag peptide, and rapamycin. After the combined treatment, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs were significantly expanded in vivo, they expressed classical Treg markers, exerted enhanced suppressive functions in vitro, and protected against spontaneous development of T1D in NOD mice. Moreover, treated mice were almost completely protected from the adoptively transferred, aggressive form of T1D caused by in vitro-activated cytotoxic islet Ag-specific CD8 T cells. Protection from T1D was transferrable by Tregs and could be attributed to reduced islet infiltration of immune cells as well as the skewing of the immune response toward a Th2 cytokine profile. This new method of peripheral immune regulation could potentially contribute to development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies to prevent the development of T1D or to promote tolerance to islet transplants without using immunosuppressive drugs for long terms.

  15. Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0244 TITLE: Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival... trauma , sepsis/disease, cancer, and congenital defects. In most cases, current reconstructive strategies are sub-optimal or fail to provide optimal

  16. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune process. A better knowledge of the mechanisms determining such impaired homeostasis could contribute significantly to both the understanding and the treatment of the disease. Here we investigated whether autophagy, is dysregulated in CD4(+) T cells of RA patients, resulting in disturbed T-cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that the rate of autophagy is significantly increased in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients, and that increased autophagy is also a feature of in vitro activated CD4(+) T cells. The increased apoptosis resistance observed in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients was significantly reversed upon autophagy inhibition. These mechanisms may contribute to RA pathogenesis, as autophagy inhibition reduced both arthritis incidence and disease severity in a mouse collagen induced arthritis mouse model. Conversely, in Atg5(flox/flox) -CD4-Cre(+) mice, in which all T cells are autophagy deficient, T cells showed impaired activation and proliferation. These data provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of RA and underscore the relevance of autophagy as a promising therapeutic target.

  17. Early Pregnancy Factor Enhances the Generation and Function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quangang; Zhu, Xiaorong; Chen, Renjin; Liu, Jing; Liu, Peng; Hu, Ankang; Wu, Lianlian; Hua, Hui; Yuan, Honghua

    2016-11-01

    The mechanisms of fetal semi-allograft acceptance by the mother's immune system have been the target of many immunological studies. Early pregnancy factor (EPF) is a molecule present in the serum of pregnant mammals soon after conception that has been reported to have immunomodulatory effects. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether immune cells such as CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the suppressive mechanism of EPF. Accordingly, CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells were isolated from spleens of female C57BL/6 mice and stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody, anti-CD28 antibody and IL-2 in the presence or absence of EPF. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the differentiation of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. We thus found a remarkable rise in the Treg ratio in the EPF-treated cells. Higher mRNA and protein levels of fork head box P3 (Foxp3), a marker of the Treg lineage, were also observed in cells treated with EPF. Furthermore, the effect of EPF on Treg immunosuppressive capacity was evaluated. EPF treatment induced the expression of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor β1 in Tregs. The suppressive capacity of Tregs was further measured by their capability to inhibit T cell receptor-mediated proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. We thus found that EPF exposure can enhance the immunosuppressive functions of Tregs. Overall, our data suggest that EPF induces the differentiation of Tregs and increases their immunosuppressive activities, which might be an important mechanism to inhibit immune responses during pregnancy.

  18. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  19. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  20. New tools to expand regulatory T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Mathieu; King, Melanie; Addo, Marylyn Martina

    2013-05-30

    CD4+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are potent immune modulators and serve an important function in human immune homeostasis. Depletion of Tregs has led to measurable increases in antigen-specific T cell responses in vaccine settings for cancer and infectious pathogens. However, their role in HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis remains controversial, as they could either serve to suppress deleterious HIV-1-associated immune activation and thus slow HIV-1 disease progression or alternatively suppress HIV-1-specific immunity and thereby promote virus spread. Understanding and modulating Treg function in the context of HIV-1 could lead to potential new strategies for immunotherapy or HIV vaccines. However, important open questions remain on their role in the context of HIV-1 infection, which needs to be carefully studied. Representing roughly 5% of human CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood, studying the Treg population has proven to be difficult, especially in HIV-1 infected individuals where HIV-1-associated CD4 T cell and with that Treg depletion occurs. The characterization of regulatory T cells in individuals with advanced HIV-1 disease or tissue samples, for which only very small biological samples can be obtained, is therefore extremely challenging. We propose a technical solution to overcome these limitations using isolation and expansion of Tregs from HIV-1-positive individuals. Here we describe an easy and robust method to successfully expand Tregs isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals in vitro. Flow-sorted CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) Tregs were stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 coated beads and cultured in the presence of IL-2. The expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4 and HELIOS compared to conventional T cells and were shown to be highly suppressive. Easier access to large numbers of Tregs will allow researchers to address important questions concerning their role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. We believe answering these questions may provide useful

  1. Regulation of interferon gamma signaling by suppressors of cytokine signaling and regulatory T cells

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    Joseph eLarkin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFN mediated, lethal autoimmunity occurs (in both mice and humans in their absence. In addition, regulatory T cells have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFN signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and LPS mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 deficient (SOCS1-/- mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFN signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFN signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFN signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function.

  2. Super-enhancers delineate disease-associated regulatory nodes in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Kanno, Yuka; Furumoto, Yasuko; Jiang, Kan; Parker, Stephen C J; Erdos, Michael R; Davis, Sean R; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; Gadina, Massimo; Tang, Zhonghui; Ruan, Yijun; Collins, Francis S; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O'Shea, John J

    2015-04-23

    Enhancers regulate spatiotemporal gene expression and impart cell-specific transcriptional outputs that drive cell identity. Super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch-enhancers, are a subset of enhancers especially important for genes associated with cell identity and genetic risk of disease. CD4(+) T cells are critical for host defence and autoimmunity. Here we analysed maps of mouse T-cell SEs as a non-biased means of identifying key regulatory nodes involved in cell specification. We found that cytokines and cytokine receptors were the dominant class of genes exhibiting SE architecture in T cells. Nonetheless, the locus encoding Bach2, a key negative regulator of effector differentiation, emerged as the most prominent T-cell SE, revealing a network in which SE-associated genes critical for T-cell biology are repressed by BACH2. Disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms for immune-mediated disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, were highly enriched for T-cell SEs versus typical enhancers or SEs in other cell lineages. Intriguingly, treatment of T cells with the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib disproportionately altered the expression of rheumatoid arthritis risk genes with SE structures. Together, these results indicate that genes with SE architecture in T cells encompass a variety of cytokines and cytokine receptors but are controlled by a 'guardian' transcription factor, itself endowed with an SE. Thus, enumeration of SEs allows the unbiased determination of key regulatory nodes in T cells, which are preferentially modulated by pharmacological intervention.

  3. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  4. Aire Enforces Immune Tolerance by Directing Autoreactive T Cells into the Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Lee, Victoria; Nishi, Saki; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-05-17

    The promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens in the thymus, driven in part by autoimmune regulator (Aire), is critical for the protection of peripheral tissues from autoimmune attack. Aire-dependent processes are thought to promote both clonal deletion and the development of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, suggesting that autoimmunity associated with Aire deficiency results from two failed tolerance mechanisms. Here, examination of autoimmune lesions in Aire(-/-) mice revealed an unexpected third possibility. We found that the predominant conventional T cell clonotypes infiltrating target lesions express antigen receptors that were preferentially expressed by Foxp3(+) Treg cells in Aire(+/+) mice. Thus, Aire enforces immune tolerance by ensuring that distinct autoreactive T cell specificities differentiate into the Treg cell lineage; dysregulation of this process results in the diversion of Treg cell-biased clonotypes into pathogenic conventional T cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Abnormality of regulatory T cells in common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Hafezi, Nasim; Mohammadi, Hamed; Yazdani, Reza; Alinia, Tina; Tavakol, Marzieh; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2017-05-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) which is defined by recurrent infections, hypogammaglobulinemia and defects in B-cell differentiation into plasma cells and memory B cells. T cell abnormalities have also been described in CVID patients. Several studies reported that Treg frequencies and their functional characteristics are disturbed and might account for the aberrant immune responses observed in CVID patients. The aim of this review is to describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of Treg cells, and to review the literature with respect to the reported Treg defects and its association with the clinical manifestation in CVID. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The role of regulatory T cells in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimar, D; Rosner, I; Slobodin, G; Boulman, N; Toubi, E; Kessel, A; Peri, R; Rozenbaum, M

    2012-05-01

    The role of regulatory T cells (T-regs) in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was never evaluated. Preliminary studies that we have conducted suggested a rise in the number of regulatory T cells after FMF attacks reaching a maximal level at 7 days. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentage and activity of regulatory T cells in FMF. Six patients with refractory FMF and six healthy controls were evaluated. The percentage of T-reg cells and forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) expression was evaluated and compared between four states: FMF in remission, FMF at the first day of an attack, FMF 7 days after the start of the attack, and healthy controls. Four females and two males were included. All patients had FMF with high severity score, 2.8 ± 0.4 (0-3). The mean age was 31.6 ± 6.2. The mean age at onset was 9.3 ± 9.3. The mean colchicine dose was 2.6 mg ± 0.4. The expression of Foxp3 7 days after the attacks was significantly higher than in FMF at the first day of the attack, FMF in remission, and healthy controls 10.08 ± 2.36 vs. 7.005 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 1.06 vs. 4.44 ± 1.8; p FMF. Anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-10 and TGF-β are known to activate T-regs and have been reported to increase in FMF attacks in line with the present findings. It is suggested that T-regs may have a role in terminating FMF attacks.

  7. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, Plactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  8. Cord Blood Derived CD4+CD25high T Cells Become Functional Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Elisabeth; Bannert, Christina; Gruber, Saskia; Klunker, Sven; Spittler, Andreas; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Upon antigen exposure, cord blood derived T cells respond to ubiquitous environmental antigens by high proliferation. To date it remains unclear whether these “excessive” responses relate to different regulatory properties of the putative T regulatory cell (Treg) compartment or even expansion of the Treg compartment itself. Methods: Cord blood (>37 week of gestation) and peripheral blood (healthy controls) were obtained and different Treg cell subsets were isolated. The suppressive potential of Treg populations after antigen exposure was evaluated via functional inhibition assays ([3H]thymidine incorporation assay and CFSE staining) with or without allergen stimulation. The frequency and markers of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ T cells were characterized by mRNA analysis and flow cytometry. Results: Cord blood derived CD4+CD25high cells did not show substantial suppressor capacity upon TCR activation, in contrast to CD4+CD25high cells freshly purified from adult blood. This could not be explained by a lower frequency of FoxP3+CD4+CD25highcells or FOXP3 mRNA expression. However, after antigen-specific stimulation in vitro, these cells showed strong proliferation and expansion and gained potent suppressive properties. The efficiency of their suppressive capacity can be enhanced in the presence of endotoxins. If T-cells were sorted according to their CD127 expression, a tiny subset of Treg cells (CD4+CD25+CD127low) is highly suppressive even without prior antigen exposure. Conclusion: Cord blood harbors a very small subset of CD4+CD25high Treg cells that requires antigen-stimulation to show expansion and become functional suppressive Tregs. PMID:22272233

  9. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Kogut, Michael H; Arsenault, Ryan J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Cole, Kimberly; Reddish, John M; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2015-08-01

    Two studies were conducted to study regulatory T cell [Treg (CD4⁺CD25⁺)] properties during the establishment of a persistent intestinal infection in broiler chickens. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally gavaged with 5 × 10⁶ CFU/mL Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d postinfection. There was a significant (P 0.05) when compared to that of noninfected control birds. At a lower effector/responder cell ratio of 0.25:1, CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of Salmonella-infected birds suppressed T cell proliferation at d 7 and 14 post-S. enteritidis infection, while CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from noninfected control groups did not suppress T cell proliferation. In the second studu, 1-day-old chickens were orally gavaged with PBS (control) or 1.25 × 10⁸ CFU/bird S. enteritidis. At 7 and 21 d post-Salmonella infection, CD25⁺ cells collected from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds and restimulated in vitro with Salmonella antigen had higher (P 0.05) between the Salmonella-infected and control birds. In conclusion, a persistent intestinal S. enteritidis infection increased the Treg percentage, suppressive properties, and IL-10 mRNA amounts in the cecal tonsils of broiler birds.

  10. Inducible Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell development by a commensal bacterium of the intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, June L.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2010-01-01

    To maintain intestinal health, the immune system must faithfully respond to antigens from pathogenic microbes while limiting reactions to self-molecules. The gastrointestinal tract represents a unique challenge to the immune system, as it is permanently colonized by a diverse amalgam of bacterial phylotypes producing multitudes of foreign microbial products. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that inflammatory bowel disease results from uncontrolled inflammation to the intestinal microbiota. However, molecular mechanisms that actively promote mucosal tolerance to the microbiota remain unknown. We report herein that a prominent human commensal, Bacteroides fragilis, directs the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) with a unique “inducible” genetic signature. Monocolonization of germ-free animals with B. fragilis increases the suppressive capacity of Tregs and induces anti-inflammatory cytokine production exclusively from Foxp3+ T cells in the gut. We show that the immunomodulatory molecule, polysaccharide A (PSA), of B. fragilis mediates the conversion of CD4+ T cells into Foxp3+ Treg cells that produce IL-10 during commensal colonization. Functional Foxp3+ Treg cells are also produced by PSA during intestinal inflammation, and Toll-like receptor 2 signaling is required for both Treg induction and IL-10 expression. Most significantly, we show that PSA is not only able to prevent, but also cure experimental colitis in animals. Our results therefore demonstrate that B. fragilis co-opts the Treg lineage differentiation pathway in the gut to actively induce mucosal tolerance. PMID:20566854

  11. Regulatory T cells in human lymphatic filariasis: stronger functional activity in microfilaremics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Wammes

    Full Text Available Infection with filarial parasites is associated with T cell hyporesponsiveness, which is thought to be partly mediated by their ability to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs during human infections. This study investigates the functional capacity of Tregs from different groups of filarial patients to suppress filaria-specific immune responses during human filariasis. Microfilaremic (MF, chronic pathology (CP and uninfected endemic normal (EN individuals were selected in an area endemic for Brugia timori in Flores island, Indonesia. PBMC were isolated, CD4CD25(hi cells were magnetically depleted and in vitro cytokine production and proliferation in response to B. malayi adult worm antigen (BmA were determined in total and Treg-depleted PBMC. In MF subjects BmA-specific T and B lymphocyte proliferation as well as IFN-gamma, IL-13 and IL-17 responses were lower compared to EN and CP groups. Depletion of Tregs restored T cell as well as B cell proliferation in MF-positives, while proliferative responses in the other groups were not enhanced. BmA-induced IL-13 production was increased after Treg removal in MF-positives only. Thus, filaria-associated Tregs were demonstrated to be functional in suppressing proliferation and possibly Th2 cytokine responses to BmA. These suppressive effects were only observed in the MF group and not in EN or CP. These findings may be important when considering strategies for filarial treatment and the targeted prevention of filaria-induced lymphedema.

  12. KLRG1 impairs regulatory T-cell competitive fitness in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinicke, Holger; Bremser, Anna; Brack, Maria; Schrenk, Klaudia; Pircher, Hanspeter; Izcue, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Immune homeostasis requires the tight, tissue-specific control of the different CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell populations. The cadherin-binding inhibitory receptor killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) is expressed by a subpopulation of Treg cells with GATA3(+) effector phenotype. Although such Treg cells are important for the immune balance, especially in the gut, the role of KLRG1 in Treg cells has not been assessed. Using KLRG1 knockout mice, we found that KLRG1 deficiency does not affect Treg cell frequencies in spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes or intestine, or frequencies of GATA3(+) Treg cells in the gut. KLRG1-deficient Treg cells were also protective in a T-cell transfer model of colitis. Hence, KLRG1 is not essential for the development or activity of the general Treg cell population. We then checked the effects of KLRG1 on Treg cell activation. In line with KLRG1's reported inhibitory activity, in vitro KLRG1 cross-linking dampened the Treg cell T-cell receptor response. Consistently, lack of KLRG1 on Treg cells conferred on them a competitive advantage in the gut, but not in lymphoid organs. Hence, although absence of KLRG1 is not enough to increase intestinal Treg cells in KLRG1 knockout mice, KLRG1 ligation reduces T-cell receptor signals and the competitive fitness of individual Treg cells in the intestine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Depletion of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells promotes CCL21-mediated antitumor immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhou

    Full Text Available CCL21 is known to attract dendritic cells (DCs and T cells that may reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression. The massive infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells (Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper immune response. In this study, we investigated whether elimination of CD4(+ CD25(+ Tregs in the tumor microenvironment using anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs was capable of enhancing CCL21-mediated antitumor immunity in a mouse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC model. We found that CCL21 in combination with anti-CD25 mAbs (PC61 resulted in improved antitumor efficacy and prolonged survival, not only inhibited tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation, but also led to significant increases in the frequency of CD4(+, CD8(+ T cells and CD11c(+ DCs within the tumor, coincident with marked induction of tumor-specific CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs at the local tumor site. The intratumoral immune responses were accompanied by the enhanced elaboration of IL-12 and IFN-γ, but reduced release of the immunosuppressive mediators IL-10 and TGF-β1. The results indicated that depletion of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could enhance CCL21-mediated antitumor immunity, and CCL21 combined with anti-CD25 mAbs may be a more effective immunotherapy to promote tumor rejection.

  14. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification. PMID:27668873

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G and Regulatory T Cells during Specific Immunotherapy for Pollen Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Johnsen, Claus R; Dalgaard, Louise Torp;

    2013-01-01

    with pollen extract in vitro and immune factors were evaluated. Results: During SIT, the main changes in the peripheral blood were an increase in CXCR3+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs and a decrease in CCR4+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs, an increase in allergen-specific IgG4, and a decrease in sHLA-G during the first......Background: TH2-biased immune responses are important in allergy pathogenesis. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) might include the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 blocking antibodies, a reduction in the number of effector cells, and skewing...... of the cytokine profile towards a TH1-polarized immune response. We investigated the effects of SIT on T cells, on immunomodulation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, which has been associated with allergy, on regulatory cytokine expression, and on serum allergen-specific antibody subclasses (IgE and IgG4...

  16. Mucosally induced immunological tolerance, regulatory T cells and the adjuvant effect by cholera toxin B subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J-B; Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J

    2010-01-01

    Induction of peripheral immunological tolerance by mucosal administration of selected antigens (Ags) ('oral tolerance') is an attractive, yet medically little developed, approach to prevent or treat selected autoimmune or allergic disorders. A highly effective way to maximize oral tolerance induction for immunotherapeutic purposes is to administer the relevant Ag together with, and preferably linked to the non-toxic B subunit protein of cholera toxin (CTB). Oral, nasal or sublingual administration of such Ag/CTB conjugates or gene fusion proteins have been found to induce tolerance with superior efficiency compared with administration of Ag alone, including the suppression of various autoimmune disorders and allergies in animal models. In a proof-of-concept clinical trial in patients with Behcet's disease, this was extended with highly promising results to prevent relapse of autoimmune uveitis. Tolerization by mucosal Ag/CTB administration results in a strong increase in Ag-specific regulatory CD4(+) T cells, apparently via two separate pathways: one using B cells as APCs and leading to a strong expansion of Foxp3(+) Treg cells which can both suppress and mediate apoptotic depletion of effector T cells, and one being B cell-independent and associated with development of Foxp3(-) regulatory T cells that express membrane latency-associated peptide and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta) and/or IL-10. The ability of CTB to dramatically increase mucosal Ag uptake and presentation by different APCs through binding to GM1 ganglioside (which makes most B cells effective APCs irrespective of their Ag specificity), together with CTB-mediated stimulation of TGF-beta and IL-10 production and inhibition of IL-6 formation may explain the dramatic potentiation of oral tolerance by mucosal Ags presented with CTB.

  17. Amygdalin mediates relieved atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice through the induction of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiagang, Deng; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Hailian; Hao, Erwei; Du, Zhengcai; Bao, Chuanhong; Lv, Jianzhen; Wang, Yi

    2011-08-05

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses in atherosclerosis, a chronic autoimmune-like disease. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of amygdalin on atherosclerosis of apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice, and to explore its immune regulatory function by stimulation of Tregs. To evaluate the anti-atherosclerotic effect of amygdalin and for in vivo Treg expansion/activation analysis, ApoE(-/-) mice received intraperitoneal injections of amygdalin, and this therapy resulted in a comparatively 2-fold decrease in triglyceride (TG), 1.5-fold decrease in total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL). By comparing the vessel areas, lumen areas, plaque areas, and aortic plaque coverage percentage, the effects of amygdalin on pre-existing lesions were assessed. Studies on IL-10 and TGF-β indicated that mice treated with amygdalin had increased expression of Treg-related cytokines. Meanwhile, flow cytometry and real-time PCR data showed that mice treated with amygdalin had higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells than untreated mice and increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) gene. Our data showed amygdalin could attenuate the development of atherosclerosis by suppressing inflammatory responses and promoting the immunomodulation function of Tregs. The effects of amygdalin ultimately resulted in the enlarged lumen area and the loss of atherosclerotic plaque. All these data indicated the therapeutic potential of amygdalin in preventing and/or treating of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high......) , was prospectively analysed in fresh blood, and treatment-associated quantitative and qualitative changes were analysed. By the 4th vaccine, patients showed a marked increase in CD4+ CD25(high) T cell subset from 6% to 22% (P...

  19. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high......) , was prospectively analysed in fresh blood, and treatment-associated quantitative and qualitative changes were analysed. By the 4th vaccine, patients showed a marked increase in CD4+ CD25(high) T cell subset from 6% to 22% (P...

  20. CTLA-4 (CD152) controls homeostasis and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Paula; Knieke, Karin; Hegel, J Kolja E; Quandt, Dagmar; Burmester, Gerd-R; Hoff, Holger; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (known as Treg cells) suppress unwanted and autoreactive T cell responses. Treg cells express the costimulatory molecule CTLA-4 intracellularly, but the mechanisms by which Treg cells exploit CTLA-4 signaling remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of CTLA-4 in controlling the homeostasis and suppressive function of Treg cells. Murine Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for coexpression of CTLA-4 and typical Treg cell-expressed molecules, and the influence of CTLA-4 on T cell proliferation, suppression, and apoptosis was investigated by in vitro assays. To analyze the importance of CTLA-4 in Treg cell-mediated suppression in vivo, wild-type Treg cells were transferred into CTLA-4-deficient mice displaying lymphoproliferation, and survival was monitored over time. A strong correlation between expression of forkhead box P3 and ex vivo expression of CTLA-4 in Treg cells was observed. Inhibition of CTLA-4 signaling in Treg cells during in vitro stimulation increased cell cycling and led to enhanced activation-induced cell death (AICD), which was mediated by CD95/CD95 ligand-induced activation of caspases. Blockade of CTLA-4 signaling resulted in impairment of the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. Despite these effects, high amounts of Treg cells persisted in CTLA-4-deficient mice. Results of transfer experiments in CTLA-4-deficient mice showed that the mice had a significantly prolonged lifespan when CTLA-4-competent Treg cells were injected. Expression of CTLA-4 on Treg cells serves to control T cell proliferation, to confer resistance against AICD, and to maintain the suppressive function of Treg cells.

  1. Altered profile of regulatory T cells and associated cytokines in mild and moderate dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillu, H; Tripathy, A S; Reshmi, P V; Cecilia, D

    2016-03-01

    The pathogenesis of dengue is immune-mediated. Regulatory T cells suppress immune response and may contribute to better prognosis. The present study evaluates Tregs and cytokines in dengue patients in the context of disease severity, time of sampling and immune status. The cohort included 90 patients (51 mild, 39 moderate) and 27 healthy controls. Frequencies of Tregs, CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(+) T cells and CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. Circulating levels of 15 cytokines/chemokines were measured using Luminex technology and mRNA levels of Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-β were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significantly higher frequencies of Tregs were observed in mild cases, especially during post-defervescence. The difference between mild and moderate cases was more evident in secondary infections. Frequencies of T cells were higher in mild cases but during pre-defervescence. On the other hand, the levels of IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10 were significantly higher in moderate cases. IL-6 and IL-8 levels correlated negatively with Treg frequencies during post-defervescence and in secondary infections. Higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-β in moderate cases were not reflected by their corresponding mRNA levels. Platelet counts correlated positively with Treg frequencies and TGF-β levels, and negatively with IL-10 levels. Higher Treg frequencies may favour a beneficial outcome in dengue. Higher cytokine levels may indirectly contribute to disease severity by exerting an inhibitory influence on Tregs. The dichotomy between mRNA and proteins levels for IL-10 and TGF-β is suggestive of increased translational efficiency.

  2. Arecoline suppresses HaCaT cell proliferation through cell cycle regulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhong-Su; Li, Ming; Gao, Feng; Peng, Jie-Ying; Xiao, Hai-Bo; Dai, Li-Xia; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhang, Rui; Jin, Long-Yu

    2013-06-01

    Betel nut chewing is the most common cause of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Arecoline is the main component of the betel nut, and is associated with the occurrence and development of OSF through cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and DNA damage. Similar types of stimuli elicit differential responses in different cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of arecoline on the HaCaT epithelial and Hel fibroblast cell lines. The data showed that arecoline affected HaCaT cell morphology. MTT assay revealed that arecoline suppressed HaCaT cell proliferation. Furthermore, we found that arecoline induced the cell cycle arrest of HaCaT cells. In comparison with the untreated control cells, following treatment with ≥75 µg/ml arecoline an increased percentage of HaCaT cells remained at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by a reduced percentage of cells in the S phase. However, arecoline treatment did not significantly alter Hel cell cycle distribution. In the HaCaT epithelial cells, arecoline downregulated expression of the G1/S phase regulatory proteins cyclin D1, CDK4, CDK2, E2F1 as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis and western blotting. In summary, arecoline inhibits HaCaT epithelial cell proliferation and survival, in a dose-dependent manner, and cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase, while this is not obvious in the Hel fibroblast cells. Potentially, our findings may aid in the prevention of arecoline-associated human OSF.

  3. Regulatory T cell suppression is potentiated by target T cells in a cell contact, IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Pillai, Meenu R; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Vignali, Dario A A

    2009-05-15

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are believed to suppress conventional T cell (T(conv)) proliferation in vitro in a contact-dependent, cytokine-independent manner, based in part on experiments in which T(reg) and T(conv) are separated by a permeable membrane. We show that the production of IL-35, a novel inhibitory cytokine expressed by natural T(reg), increases substantially following contact with T(conv). Surprisingly, T(reg) were able to mediate potent suppression of T(conv) across a permeable membrane when placed in direct contact with T(conv) in the upper chamber of a Transwell plate. Suppression was IL-35 and IL-10 dependent, and T(conv) activation was required for maximal potentiation of T(reg) suppression. These data suggest that it is the induction of suppression, rather than the function of T(reg) that is obligatorily contact dependent.

  4. Assessment of Regulatory T Cells in Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucco, Karina L. M.; Junior, Lauro M.; Lemos, Natália E.; Wieck, Andréa; Pezzi, Annelise; Laureano, Alvaro M.; Amorin, Bruna; Valim, Vanessa; Silla, Lucia; Daudt, Liane E.; Marostica, Paulo J. C.

    2013-01-01

    This study had the objective to assess the frequency of Tregs in children newly diagnosed with ITP and ascertain whether an association exists between Tregs and platelet counts, by means of a comparison with healthy controls. This case-control study included 19 patients newly diagnosed with ITP—whose blood samples were collected at four points in time: before any therapy and 1, 3, and 6 months after diagnosis—and 19 healthy controls. Tregs (CD4+ CD25+Foxp3 T cells) were evaluated by flow cytometry. There was a statistically significant difference in platelet count between the case and control groups. There were no significant differences in Treg counts between cases and controls at any point during the course of the study and no difference in Treg counts between the chronic and nonchronic groups and no significant correlation between Tregs and platelet counts in the case and control groups. The findings of this study did not show any statistically significant correlation between Tregs and number of platelets in the case and control groups. Treg cells did not play a role in the regulation of autoimmunity in children with ITP. PMID:24298390

  5. Generation and Regulation of CD8+ Regulatory T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linrong Lu; Harvey Cantor

    2008-01-01

    Research into the suppressive activity of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) has defined a sublineage of CD4+ cells that contribute to self-tolerance and resistance to autoimmune disease. Much less attention has been given to the potential contribution of regulatory sublineages of CD8+ cells. Analysis of a small fraction of CD8+ cells that target autoreactive CD4+ cells through recognition of the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 in mouse and HLA-E in human has revitalized interest in CD8+ Treg. Here we summarize recent progress and future directions of research into the role of this CD8+ sublineage in resistance to autoimmune disease. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):401-406.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:26745276

  7. Photo(chemotherapy reduces circulating Th17 cells and restores circulating regulatory T cells in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Furuhashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photo(chemotherapy is widely used to treat psoriasis, the pathogenesis of which might be caused by an imbalance of Th17 cells/regulatory T cells (Treg. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of photo(chemotherapy on the Th17/Treg balance and Treg function. METHODS: Peripheral blood was obtained from psoriasis patients treated with bath-psoralen ultraviolet A (UVA, n = 50 or narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB, n = 18, and age-matched healthy volunteers (n = 20. CD3(+CD4(+IL-17A(+ or CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+cells were analyzed to estimate Th17 or Treg number by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, CD4(+ CD25(- T cells from patients treated with PUVA(n = 14 were incubated in CFSE and activated with or without CD4(+ CD25(+T cells, and the suppressive function of CD4(+ CD25(+T cells were analyzed. RESULTS: Photo(chemotherapy significantly reduced Th17 levels from 5.66 ± 3.15% to 2.96 ± 2.89% in patients with increased Th17 (Th17/CD4>3.01% [mean+SD of controls]. In contrast, photo(chemotherapy significantly increased Treg levels from 2.77 ± 0.75 to 3.40 ± 1.88% in patients with less than 4.07% Treg level, defined as the mean of controls. Furthermore, while Treg suppressed the CD4(+CD25(- T cell proliferation to a greater extent in controls (Treg Functional Ratio 94.4 ± 4.28% than in patients (70.3±25.1%, PUVA significantly increased Treg Functional Ratio to 88.1 ± 6.47%. Th17 levels in severe patients (>30 PASI were significantly higher as compared to controls. Th17 levels that were left after treatment in the patients not achieving PASI 50 (3.78 ± 4.18% were significantly higher than those in the patients achieving PASI 75 (1.83±1.87%. Treg levels in patients achieving PASI 90 (4.89 ± 1.70% were significantly higher than those in the patients not achieving PASI 90 (3.90 ± 1.66%. Treg levels prior to treatment with Th17 high decreased group (5.16 ± 2.20% was significantly higher than that with Th17 high increased group

  8. Context and location dependence of adaptive Foxp3+ regulatory T cell formation during immunopathological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Heiber, Joshua F.; Geiger, Terrence L

    2012-01-01

    Circulating Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) may arise in the thymus (natural Treg, nTreg) or through the adaptive upregulation of Foxp3 after T cell activation (induced Treg, iTreg). In this brief review, we explore evidence for the formation and function of iTreg during pathologic conditions. Determining the ontogeny and function of Treg populations has relied on the use of manipulated systems in which either iTreg or nTreg are absent, or lineage tracing of T cell clones through repertoire ...

  9. Double negative regulatory T cells in transplantation and autoimmunity: recent progress and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen C. Juvet; Li Zhang

    2012-01-01

    T lymphocytes bearing the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) but lacking CD4,CD8,and markers of natural killer (NK) cell differentiation are known as ‘double-negative’ (DN) T cells and have been described in both humans and rodent models.We and others have shown that DN T cells can act as regulatory T cells (Tregs) that are able to prevent allograft rejection,graft-versus-host disease,and autoimmune diabetes.In the last few years,new data have revealed evidence of DN Treg function in vivo in rodents and humans.Moreover,significant advances have been made in the mechanisms by which DN Tregs target antigen-specific T cells.One major limitation of the field is the lack of a specific marker that can be used to distinguish truly regulatory DN T cells (DN Tregs) from non-regulatory ones,and this is the central challenge in the coming years.Here,we review recent progress on the role of DN Tregs in transplantation and autoimmunity,and their mechanisms of action.We also provide some perspectives on how DN Tregs compare with Foxp3+ Tregs.

  10. Increase of Circulating CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Regulatory T Cells in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma During Treatment With Dendritic Cell Vaccination and Low-Dose Interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma on the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in peripheral blood. We found that the treatment increased the frequency of Treg cells more than 7-fold compared with pretreatment levels (P Treg cells decreased when patients...... had been off IL-2 treatment for only 8 days, but remained higher than pretreatment levels. A functional assay showed that isolated Treg cells were capable of inhibiting proliferation of responder cells. Also, in vitro studies showed that coculture of mature DCs, autologous T cells and IL-2 leads...... to an increase in the number of Treg cells whereas IL-21 does not stimulate the induction of Treg cells. These findings demonstrate that even low doses of IL-2 in combination with DC vaccination are able to expand CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in vivo in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. Further...

  11. Ncf1 (p47phox is essential for direct regulatory T cell mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Efimova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple mechanisms have been advanced to account for CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg-mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs but none appear to completely explain suppression. Previous data indicates that Tregs may affect the microenvironment redox state. Given the inherent redox sensitivity of T cells, we tested the hypothesis that oxidants may mediate the direct suppression of Teffs by Tregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tregs and Teffs were isolated from the spleens of wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice or Ncf1(p47phox-deficient C57BL/6 mice which lack NADPH oxidase function. Teffs were labeled with CFSE and co-cultured with unlabeled Tregs at varying Treg:Teff ratios in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 coated beads for 3 days in suppression assays. Treg-mediated suppression was quantified by flow cytometric analysis of CFSE dilution in Teffs. The presence of the antioxidants n-acetylcysteine (NAC or 2-mercaptoethanol or inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium and VAS-2870 resulted in reduced WT Treg-mediated suppression. The observed suppression was in part dependent upon TGFβ as it was partially blocked with neutralizing antibodies. The suppression of Teff proliferation induced by exogenous TGFβ treatment could be overcome with NAC. Ncf1-deficient Teff were slightly but significantly less sensitive than WT Teff to suppression by exogenous TGFβ. Ncf1-deficient Tregs suppressed Ncf1-deficient Teff very poorly compared to wild type controls. There was partial but incomplete reconstitution of suppression in assays with WT Tregs and Ncf1-deficient Teff. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We present evidence that NADPH oxidase derived ROS plays a role in the direct Treg mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells in a process that is blocked by thiol-containing antioxidants, NADPH oxidase inhibitors or a lack of Ncf1 expression in Tregs and Teffs. Oxidants may represent a potential new target for therapeutic modulation

  12. Controversies concerning thymus-derived regulatory T cells: fundamental issues and a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2016-01-01

    Thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered to be a distinct T-cell lineage that is genetically programmed and specialised for immunosuppression. This perspective is based on the key evidence that CD25(+) Tregs emigrate to neonatal spleen a few days later than other T cells and that thymectomy of 3-day-old mice depletes Tregs only, causing autoimmune diseases. Although widely believed, the evidence has never been reproduced as originally reported, and some studies indicate that Tregs exist in neonates. Thus we examine the consequences of the controversial evidence, revisit the fundamental issues of Tregs and thereby reveal the overlooked relationship of T-cell activation and Foxp3-mediated control of the T-cell system. Here we provide a new model of Tregs and Foxp3, a feedback control perspective, which views Tregs as a component of the system that controls T-cell activation, rather than as a distinct genetically programmed lineage. This perspective provides new insights into the roles of self-reactivity, T cell-antigen-presenting cell interaction and T-cell activation in Foxp3-mediated immune regulation.

  13. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced regulatory T cells referee inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Sharon M; Chen, Wanjun

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells mediate immune suppression to limit immunopathogenesis associated with chronic inflammation, persistent infections and autoimmune diseases. Their mode of suppression is contact-dependent, antigen-nonspecific and involves a nonredundant contribution from the cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Not only can TGF-beta mediate cell-cell suppression between the regulatory T cells and CD4+CD25- or CD8+ T cells, but new evidence also reveals its role in the conversion of CD4+CD25- T cells, together with TCR antigen stimulation, into the regulatory phenotype. Elemental to this conversion process is induction of expression of the forkhead transcription factor, Foxp3. This context-dependent coercion of naive CD4+ T cells into a powerful subset of regulatory cells provides a window into potential manipulation of these cells to orchestrate therapeutic intervention in diseases characterized by inadequate suppression, as well as a promising means of controlling pathologic situations in which excessive suppression dominates.

  15. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-Cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Rebecca H; Meissler, Joseph J; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2015-06-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability.

  16. Regulatory T cells in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases treated with adacolumn granulocytapheresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emilio Cuadrado; Marta Alonso; Maria Dolores de Juan; Pilar Echaniz; Juan Ignacio Arenas

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate if the clinical efficacy of granulocytes and monocytes by adsorption (GMA) is associated with an increased frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells (Tregs),as these cells have proven to be successful in suppressing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in animal models.METHODS:We report four cases of corticosteroiddependent ulcerative colitis (UC) and two Crohn's disease (CD) cases with severe cutaneous lesions who received GMA therapy.The frequency of CD4+ CD25high(Tregs)in peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry and the expression of FoxP3 and TGF beta in purified CD4+T cells was determined by real time PCR prior to and one month after the last apheresis session,and at the time of endoscopic and clinical assessing.RESULTS:Increased expression of Fox P3 mRNA was found in all five patients who responded to cytapheresis with remission of clinical symptoms,mucosal inflammation and cutaneous lesions,and an increased frequency of circulating Tregs was found in four patients.These changes were not observed in the patient with UC who did no respond to GMA.Variations in TGF-β(mRNA)did not parallel that of FoxP3 mRNA.CONCLUSION:The clinical efficacy of GMA on IBD and related extra intestinal manifestations was associated with an expansion of circulating CD4+CD25+Treqs and higher expression of FoxP3 in CD4+T cells.Accordingly,an elevated CD4+CD25+FoxP3 may be a valuable index of remission in patients with IBD and other chronic relapsing-remitting inflammatory conditions during treatment with GMA.

  17. Clinical Potential of Regulatory T Cell Therapy in Liver Diseases: An Overview and Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Brown, Solomon; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg). The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis, or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients. Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment, and good manufacturing practice facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), chronic rejection, and posttransplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases, and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the AILD for more than three decades; thus, the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior, and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients. PMID:27656181

  18. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  19. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to schistosomiasis vaccination does not enhance the protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Wang

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs do not only influence self-antigen specific immune responses, but also dampen the protective effect induced by a number of vaccines. The impact of CD4(+CD25(+ Tregs on vaccines against schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that is a major public health concern, however, has not been examined. In this study, a DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST was constructed and its potential effects were evaluated by depleting CD25(+ cells prior to pVAX1-Sj26GST immunization. This work shows that removal of CD25(+ cells prior to immunization with the pVAX1-Sj26GST schistosomiasis DNA vaccine significantly increases the proliferation of splenocytes and IgG levels. However, CD25(+ cell-depleted mice immunized with pVAX1-Sj26GST show no improved protection against S. japonicum. Furthermore, depletion of CD25(+ cells causes an increase in both pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IFN-γ, GM-CSF and IL-4 and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (e.g. IL-10, with CD4(+CD25(- T cells being one of the major sources of both IFN-γ and IL-10. These findings indicate that partial CD25(+ cell depletion fails to enhance the effectiveness of the schistosome vaccine, possibly due to IL-10 production by CD4(+CD25(- T cells, or other cell types, after CD25(+ cell depletion during vaccination.

  20. Effect of house dust mite immunotherapy on interleukin-10-secreting regulatory T cells in asthmatic children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; XIANG Li; LIU Yong-ge; WANG Yong-hong; SHEN Kun-ling

    2010-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous specific immunotherapy has been demonstrated to be capable of inducing T-cell regulatory response.Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a crucial role in inducing allergen-specific tolerance.However the reports of the changes of IL-10 in house dust mite (HDM)-specific immunotherapy were varied.The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells in asthma children successfully treated with HDM immunotherapy.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 27 patients following 1.5--2 years of HDM-specific immunotherapy (SIT, SIT group) and from 27 matched treated asthmatic children allergic to HDM (asthmagroup).After 48 hours of in vitro stimulation with HDM extracts, IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells were measured by four colour flow cytometry.Sera were tested for allergen-specific IgG4 and IgE using the Immuno CAP 100 assay.Results PBMCs from children undergoing immunotherapy following HDM extracts stimuli produced significantly more IL-10 compared with the asthma group.The frequency of iTreg cells and aTreg cells increased in SIT group after HDM stimulation, while it was not affected in the asthma group.Among the iTreg cells and aTreg cells, the frequency of CD4+CD25-Foxp3-IL-10+ Treg cells increased the most which was 2 times higher than that in unstimulated cultures in SIT group.The levels of HDM-specific IgG4 of SIT group was significiently higher compared with asthma group, but there was no correlation of the levels of HDM-specific IgG4 and IL-10 secreting Treg cells.Conclusions HDM-specific immunotherapy can successfully upregulate the frequency of IL-10-secreting Treg cells.CD4+CD25-Foxp3-IL-10+ Treg cells may play a key role in inducing the immune tolerance in HDM-specific immunotherapy.

  1. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  2. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ersching

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections.

  3. Involvement of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wen-bo; LI Ying; LIU Xin; ZHANG Ling-yan; WANG Xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoietic activity. However, there is no information about the effect of Treg cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera (PV).Methods In this study, we investigated the percentage and function of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of 21 PV patients and 25 healthy donors. Treg cells were identified and characterized as CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ by flow cytometry.The suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was assessed by the proliferation and cytokine secretion of the co-cultured CD4+CD25- fractions.Results The results showed that the percentage of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of PV patients significantly increased compared to healthy controls ((10.93±4.02)% vs (5.86±1.99)%, P <0.05). Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of FOXP3 was higher in CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Coordinately, when co-cultured with the activated CD4+CD25-cells, the CD4+CD25+ Treg cells showed enhanced suppressive function in PV. Yet, the underlying mechanism for the increased frequency and function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells is still to be clarified.Conclusion Treg cells expansion might account for the abnormal T cell immunity in PV patients and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of PV.

  4. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells are positively correlated with angiogenic status in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hao; Shao, Qian-Qian; Ding, Ke-Jia; Gao, De-Xuan; Lu, Qing-le; Cao, Qing-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Hong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Chun-Huan; Qu, Xun; Lü, Jia-Ju

    2012-06-01

    Immune cells within a tumor microenvironment have shown modulatory effects on tumor angiogenic activity. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a hypervascular tumor that reportedly increases the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor tissues. This study investigated the correlation between Tregs infiltration and angiogenic status in RCC. Thirty-six patients with RCC were enrolled in the present study, and twenty age-matched healthy donors were included as the control. Tregs were defined as CD4(+)CD25(high)CD127(low/-) T cells. The frequency of Tregs in peripheral blood and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were determined by flow cytometry. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in surgical resection specimens were measured with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Microvessel density (MVD) was calculated on slides stained with CD34 antibody. Spearman's rank correlation was performed to evaluate the correlation between the frequencies of Tregs in TILs and VEGF values, as well as between frequencies of Tregs and MVD determinations. Compared to healthy controls, the frequency of peripheral blood Tregs was significantly increased in patients with RCC (P Tregs was higher than that of peripheral blood Tregs in patients with RCC (P Tregs was shown to significantly correlate with the pathological stage (P Tregs and VEGF protein expression (r = 0.51, P Tregs and MVD score (r = 0.39, P Tregs in the local microenvironment. Angiogenesis networks may be connected with immune tolerance units and cooperate with each other to facilitate tumor growth and progression.

  5. Regulatory T cells with superior immunosuppressive capacity emigrate from the inflamed colon to draining lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Y; Ikebuchi, R; Chtanova, T; Kusumoto, Y; Okuyama, H; Moriya, T; Honda, T; Kabashima, K; Watanabe, T; Sakai, Y; Tomura, M

    2017-08-02

    Foxp3(+) Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of colon homeostasis. Here we utilized photoconvertible KikGR mice to track immune cells from the caecum and ascending (proximal) colon in the steady state and DSS-induced colitis. We found that Tregs from the proximal colon (colonic migratory Tregs) migrated exclusively to the distal part of mesenteric lymph nodes (dMLN) in an S1PR1-dependent process. In the steady state, colonic migratory CD25(+) Tregs expressed higher levels of CD103, ICOS, LAG3 and CTLA-4 in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Intestinal inflammation led to accelerated Treg replacement in the colon, bidirectional Treg migration from the colon to dMLN and vice versa, as well as increases in Treg number, proliferation and expression of immunosuppressive molecules. This was especially apparent for CD25 very high Tregs induced in colitis. Furthermore, colonic migratory Tregs from the inflamed colon included more interleukin (IL)-10 producing cells, and demonstrated greater inhibition of T-cell proliferation in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Thus, our results suggest that Tregs with superior immunosuppressive capacity are increased both in the colon and dMLN upon inflammation. These Tregs recirculate between the colon and dMLN, and are likely to contribute to the downregulation of intestinal inflammation.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 2 August 2017. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.64.

  6. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8+ T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4+ T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3+ Tregs and CD4+ T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3+ Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3DTR recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4+ or Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73hiFR4hi phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  7. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8(+) T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3(+) Tregs and CD4(+) T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3(+) Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3(DTR) recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4(+) or Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73(hi)FR4(hi) phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  8. Expression of regulatory receptors on γδ T cells and their cytokine production in Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlakgul, Gunes; Guney, Ekin; Erer, Burak; Kılıcaslan, Zeki; Direskeneli, Haner; Gul, Ahmet; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Guher

    2013-01-21

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic disorder with muco-cutaneous, ocular, arthritic, vascular or central nervous system involvement. The role of γδ T cells is implicated in BD. The activation status of γδ T cells and their cytokine secretion against phosphoantigens are evaluated in BD. NKG2A, NKG2C, NKG2D, CD16 and CCR7 molecules on γδ T cells were analyzed in 70 BD, 27 tuberculosis (TB) patients and 26 healthy controls (HC). Peripheral γδ T cells were expanded with a phosphoantigen (BrHPP) and IL-2, restimulated with BrHPP and a TLR3 ligand, and cytokine production was measured. γδ T cells were not increased in both BD and TB patients, but the proportions of TCRVδ2+ T cells were lower (58.9 and 50.7 vs. 71.7%, P=0.04 and P=0.005) compared to HC. Higher proportion of TCRVδ2+ T cells were CD16+ (26.2 and 33.9 vs. 16.6%, P=0.02 and P=0.001) and CCR7- (32.2 and 27.9 vs. 17.7%, P<0.0001 and P=0.014) in BD and TB patients compared to HC. NKG2C+ γδ+ T cells were relatively increased (0.5 and 0.6 vs. 0.3%, P=0.008 and 0.018), whereas NKG2D positivity was decreased in patients with BD and TB (77.7 and 75.8 vs. 87.5%, P=0.001 and 0.004). Expansion capacity of γδ T cells in BD and TB as well as production of IL-13, IFN-γ, granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), TNF-α, CCL4 and CCL5 in BD was lower compared to HC, when restimulated by TLR3 ligand and BrHPP. The changes on γδ T cells of BD as well as TB patients implicate that γδ T cells have already been exposed to regulatory effects, which changed their activity. Lower cytokine response of γδ T cells implicates down modulation of these cells in BD.

  9. Balancing Inflammation: The Link between Th17 and Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie L. Diller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cell compartments in mouse and man are composed of multiple distinct subsets each possessing unique phenotypic and functional characteristics. IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells represent a distinct subset of the CD4+ T cell lineage. Recent evidence suggests that Th17 cells carry out effector functions similar to cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and play an important role in the clearance of extracellular pathogens and fungi. Th17 cell differentiation and function are closely related to the development and function of regulatory T cells (TREG. The balance between these two cell populations is essential for immune homeostasis and dysregulation of this balance has been implicated in a variety of inflammatory conditions including autoimmunity, allograft rejection, and tumorigenesis. Emerging evidence reports a significant amount of plasticity between the Th17 and regulatory T cell compartments, and the mechanisms by which these cells communicate and influence each other are just beginning to be understood. In this review, we highlight recent findings detailing the mechanisms driving Th17 and TREG plasticity and discuss the biologic consequences of their unique relationship.

  10. Progranulin facilitates conversion and function of regulatory T cells under inflammatory conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanhua Wei

    Full Text Available The progranulin (PGRN is known to protect regulatory T cells (Tregs from a negative regulation by TNF-α, and its levels are elevated in various kinds of autoimmune diseases. Whether PGRN directly regulates the conversion of CD4+CD25-T cells into Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (iTreg, and whether PGRN affects the immunosuppressive function of Tregs, however, remain unknown. In this study we provide evidences demonstrating that PGRN is able to stimulate the conversion of CD4+CD25-T cells into iTreg in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. In addition, PGRN showed synergistic effects with TGF-β1 on the induction of iTreg. PGRN was required for the immunosuppressive function of Tregs, since PGRN-deficient Tregs have a significant decreased ability to suppress the proliferation of effector T cells (Teff. In addition, PGRN deficiency caused a marked reduction in Tregs number in the course of inflammatory arthritis, although no significant difference was observed in the numbers of Tregs between wild type and PGRN deficient mice during development. Furthermore, PGRN deficiency led to significant upregulation of the Wnt receptor gene Fzd2. Collectively, this study reveals that PGRN directly regulates the numbers and function of Tregs under inflammatory conditions, and provides new insight into the immune regulatory mechanism of PGRN in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune-related diseases.

  11. The Qa-1 Dependent CD8+ T Cell Mediated Regulatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The immune system has evolved a variety of regulatory mechanisms to ensure the peripheral self-tolerance as well as the optimal capacity to elicit effective anti-infection immunity. At present, there is no satisfactory conceptual framework to explain how the peripheral immunity is regulated at a biological system level, which enables the immune system to perform its essential functions to mount effective immunity to virtually any foreign antigens but avoid harmful immune responses to self. In this regard, during the past few years, an "affinity/avidity model of peripheral T cell regulation" has been proposed and tested, which opens up a new paradigm to understand how the peripheral immunity, to both self and foreign antigens, is regulated. The paradigm is based on the discovery of a subset CD8+ T cells with TCRs which specifically recognize a unique set of self-peptides presented by the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 differentially expressed on T cells as a function of the affinity/avidity of T cell activation.These Qa-1 restricted CD8+ T cells represent an example of how the immune system utilizes a unified mechanism to regulate adaptive immunity to both self and foreign antigens. Thus, by selectively down-regulating T cells of intermediate affinity/avidity, to any antigens, the immune system controls the adaptive immunity without the necessity to distinguish self from non-self in the periphery at the level of T cell regulation.

  12. Identification of a subset of perpheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, characterized by FOXP3-positive regulatory T-cell phenotype, HTLV-1 negativity and poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Bjerregård; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Bendix, Knud

    2014-01-01

    Identification of a subset of perpheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, characterized by FOXP3-positive regulatory T-cell phenotype, HTLV-1 negativity and poor outcome.......Identification of a subset of perpheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, characterized by FOXP3-positive regulatory T-cell phenotype, HTLV-1 negativity and poor outcome....

  13. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells among tuberculosis patients: impact on prognosis and restoration of antigen specific IFN-γ producing T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Singh

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg and programmed death-1 (PD-1 molecules have emerged as pivotal players in immune suppression of chronic diseases. However, their impact on the disease severity, therapeutic response and restoration of immune response in human tuberculosis remains unclear. Here, we describe the possible role of Treg cells, their M. tuberculosis driven expansion and contribution of PD-1 pathway to the suppressive function of Treg cells among pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients. Multicolor flow cytometry, cell culture, cells sorting and ELISA were employed to execute the study. Our results showed significant increase in frequency of antigen-reactive Treg cells, which gradually declined during successful therapy and paralleled with decline of M. tuberculosis-specific IL-10 along with elevation of IFN-γ production, and raising the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Interestingly, persistence of Treg cells tightly correlated with MDR tuberculosis. Also, we show that blocking PD-1/PD-L1 pathway abrogates Treg-mediated suppression, suggesting that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is required for Treg-mediated suppression of the antigen-specific T cells. Treg cells possibly play a role in dampening the effector immune response and abrogating PD-1 pathway on Treg cells significantly rescued protective T cell response, suggesting its importance in immune restoration among tuberculosis patients.

  14. Induction of regulatory T cells by high-dose gp96 suppresses murine liver immune hyperactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghui Li

    Full Text Available Immunization with high-dose heat shock protein gp96, an endoplasmic reticulum counterpart of the Hsp90 family, significantly enhances regulatory T cell (Treg frequency and suppressive function. Here, we examined the potential role and mechanism of gp96 in regulating immune-mediated hepatic injury in mice. High-dose gp96 immunization elicited rapid and long-lasting protection of mice against concanavalin A (Con A-and anti-CD137-induced liver injury, as evidenced by decreased alanine aminotransaminase (ALT levels, hepatic necrosis, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6, and number of IFN-γ (+ CD4(+ and IFN-γ (+ CD8(+ T cells in the spleen and liver. In contrast, CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Treg frequency and suppressive function were both increased, and the protective effect of gp96 could be generated by adoptive transfer of Treg cells from gp96-immunized mice. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that gp96 stimulation enhanced Treg proliferation and suppressive function, and up-regulation of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β1 induced by gp96 was dependent on TLR2- and TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation. Our work shows that activation of Tregs by high-dose gp96 immunization protects against Con A- and anti-CD137-induced T cell-hepatitis and provides therapeutic potential for the development of a gp96-based anti-immune hyperactivation vaccine against immune-mediated liver destruction.

  15. Dietary gluten reduces the number of intestinal regulatory T cells in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Maria; Josephsen, Jytte; Aasted, Bent

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that gluten-free diet reduces the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, though the mechanism is not known. However, regulatory T cells (Treg) are likely to play an important role. Also, it is known that dietary gluten induces...... an intestinal increase in the bacterium Lactococcus garvieae, but the importance of this phenomenon for T1D development is doubtful. Our hypothesis is that gluten is responsible for mediating its effect on T1D through the influence on Treg development independent of gluten-induced Lactococci. Four groups...... of female NOD and BALB / c mice of 3 week old were fed either a gluten-free diet or a standard diet. Lactococcus garvieae or saline water was administered per oral to one of each dietary group. Spleen and Peyer's patches were sampled from BALB / c mice for flow cytometric monitoring of IL-10 and Treg. NOD...

  16. Regulatory T-Cells in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Rossi, Giovanni; Vannata, Barbara; Deaglio, Silvia; Mansueto, Giovanna; D’Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Simeon, Vittorio; De Martino, Laura; Marandino, Aurelio; Del Poeta8, Giovanni; De Feo, Vincenzo; Musto, Pellegrino

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in cancer and autoimmune disorders, as well. PMID:22973497

  17. Enhanced killing activity of regulatory T cells ameliorates inflammation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are pivotal suppressor elements in immune homeostasis with potential therapeutic applications in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Using Treg as vehicles for targeted immunomodulation, a short-lived Fas-ligand (FasL) chimeric protein (killer Treg) was found efficient in preventing the progression of autoimmune insulitis in NOD mice, and amelioration of chronic colitis and graft versus host disease. The main mechanisms of disease suppression by killer Treg are: a) in the acute phase induction of apoptosis in effector cells at the site of inflammation decreases the pathogenic burden, and b) persistent increase in FoxP3⁺ Treg with variable CD25 co-expression induced by FasL sustains disease suppression over extended periods of time. Reduced sensitivity of Treg to receptor-mediated apoptosis under inflammatory conditions makes them optimal vehicles for targeted immunotherapy using apoptotic agents.

  18. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dons, E M; Raimondi, G; Zhang, H; Zahorchak, A F; Bhama, J K; Lu, L; Ezzelarab, M; Ijzermans, J N M; Cooper, D K C; Thomson, A W

    2013-08-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 expression, binding of alemtuzumab and both complement-mediated killing and Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were compared between freshly isolated and expanded Treg and effector T cells. Monkeys undergoing allogeneic heart transplantation given alemtuzumab were monitored for Treg and serum alemtuzumab activity. Ex vivo-expanded Treg showed progressive downregulation of CD52 expression, absence of alemtuzumab binding, minimal change in complement inhibitory protein (CD46) expression and no complement-dependent killing or ADCC. Infusion of alemtuzumab caused potent depletion of all lymphocytes, but a transient increase in the incidence of circulating Treg. After infusion of alemtuzumab, monkey serum killed fresh PBMC, but not expanded Treg. Thus, expanded cynomolgus monkey Treg are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated, complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, our data suggest that these expanded monkey Treg can be infused into graft recipients given alemtuzumab without risk of complement-mediated killing.

  19. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ruhnau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs. Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient’s peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke.

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are inefficient in activation of human regulatory T cells.

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    Mario Hubo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC play a key role in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC, a small subset of DC, characterized as type-I interferon producing cells, are critically involved in anti-viral immune responses, but also mediate tolerance by induction of regulatory T cells (Treg. In this study, we compared the capacity of human pDC and conventional DC (cDC to modulate T cell activity in presence of Foxp3(+ Treg. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In coculture of T effector cells (Teff and Treg, activated cDC overcome Treg anergy, abrogate their suppressive function and induce Teff proliferation. In contrast, pDC do not break Treg anergy but induce Teff proliferation even in coculture with Treg. Lack of Treg-mediated suppression is independent of proinflammatory cytokines like IFN-α, IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. Phenotyping of pDC-stimulated Treg reveals a reduced expression of Treg activation markers GARP and CTLA-4. Additional stimulation by anti-CD3 antibodies enhances surface expression of GARP and CTLA-4 on Treg and consequently reconstitutes their suppressive function, while increased costimulation with anti-CD28 antibodies is ineffective. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that activated pDC induce Teff proliferation, but are insufficient for functional Treg activation and, therefore, allow expansion of Teff also in presence of Treg.

  1. Regulatory T Cells Resist Cyclosporine-Induced Cell Death via CD44-Mediated Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Ruppert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine A (CSA is an immunosuppressive agent that specifically targets T cells and also increases the percentage of pro-tolerogenic CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg through unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that CD44, a receptor for the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA, promotes Treg stability in IL-2-low environments. Here, we asked whether CD44 signaling also promotes Treg resistance to CSA. We found that CD44 cross-linking promoted Foxp3 expression and Treg viability in the setting of CSA treatment. This effect was IL-2 independent but could be suppressed using sc-355979, an inhibitor of Stat5-phosphorylation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of HA synthesis impairs Treg homeostasis but that this effect could be overcome with exogenous IL-2 or CD44-cross-linking. Together, these data support a model whereby CD44 cross-linking by HA promotes IL-2-independent Foxp3 expression and Treg survival in the face of CSA.

  2. Ionizing radiation selectively reduces skin regulatory T cells and alters immune function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    Full Text Available The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel.

  3. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  4. Homeostatic imbalance of regulatory and effector T cells due to IL-2 deprivation amplifies murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humrich, Jens Y; Morbach, Henner; Undeutsch, Reinmar; Enghard, Philipp; Rosenberger, Stefan; Weigert, Olivia; Kloke, Lutz; Heimann, Juliane; Gaber, Timo; Brandenburg, Susan; Scheffold, Alexander; Huehn, Jochen; Radbruch, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2010-01-05

    The origins and consequences of a regulatory T cell (Treg) disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are poorly understood. In the (NZBxNZW) F(1) mouse model of lupus, we found that CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg failed to maintain a competitive pool size in the peripheral lymphoid organs resulting in a progressive homeostatic imbalance of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg and CD4(+)Foxp3(-) conventional T cells (Tcon). In addition, Treg acquired phenotypic changes that are reminiscent of IL-2 deficiency concomitantly to a progressive decline in IL-2-producing Tcon and an increase in activated, IFN-gamma-producing effector Tcon. Nonetheless, Treg from lupus-prone mice were functionally intact and capable to influence the course of disease. Systemic reduction of IL-2 levels early in disease promoted Tcon hyperactivity, induced the imbalance of Treg and effector Tcon, and strongly accelerated disease progression. In contrast, administration of IL-2 partially restored the balance of Treg and effector Tcon by promoting the homeostatic proliferation of endogenous Treg and impeded the progression of established disease. Thus, an acquired and self-amplifying disruption of the Treg-IL-2 axis contributed essentially to Tcon hyperactivity and the development of murine lupus. The reversibility of this homeostatic Treg disorder provides promising approaches for the treatment of SLE.

  5. Relationship between regulatory T cells and immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients interrupting antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Weiss

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI (ANRS 116. Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12 of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r=-0.519. Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p=0.029; absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p=0.031. At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677.

  6. Subpopulations of Regulatory T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, and Behcet's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Ryong; Chae, Jin-Nyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Ha, Jung-Sook

    2012-01-01

    Recently, subpopulations of regulatory T (Treg) cells, resting Treg (rTreg) and activated Treg (aTreg), have been discovered. The authors investigated the relationship between the change of Treg, aTreg and rTreg and autoimmune diseases. Treg cells and those subpopulations were analyzed by using the human regulatory T cell staining kit and CD45RA surface marker for 42 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 systemic lupus sclerosis (SLE), 7 Behcet's disease (BD), and 22 healthy controls. The proportion ...

  7. Identification of lesional CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Psoriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovenschen, H.J.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M.J.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depletion of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (T(reg)) induces autoimmune phenomena. These cells have not yet been fully characterized in the skin of psoriatic patients. OBJECTIVES: To prove that the Zenon immunofluorescent labeling technique is suitable for the d

  8. Revival of the regulatory T cell: new targets for drug development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Offringa, R.; Melief, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Compelling new evidence supports the idea that regulatory T cells play a major role in our immune system. Several subsets of these regulators have been identified recently. Differences in the phenotypical and functional characteristics of these subsets have immunological implications. From our growi

  9. Aging disturbs the balance between effector and regulatory CD4+T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Tete, Sarah M.; Lorencetti, Pedro G.; Horst, Gerda; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy aging requires an optimal balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. Although CD4+ T cells play an essential role in many immune responses, few studies have directly assessed the effect of aging on the balance between effector T (Teff) cells and regulatory T (Tr

  10. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in autoimmune hepatitis are fully functional and not reduced in frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiseler, M.; Sebode, M.; Franke, B.; Wortmann, F.; Schwinge, D.; Quaas, A.; Baron, U.; Olek, S.; Wiegard, C.; Lohse, A.W.; Weiler-Normann, C.; Schramm, C.; Herkel, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is not understood, but it was suggested that AIH may be related to a numerical or functional impairment of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), which are important mediators of immune tolerance to self-antigens. However, the rol

  11. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  12. Regulatory T cells and toll-like receptors : regulating the regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Garritsen, A.; Adema, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in maintaining control of leucocytes. Several studies have shown that in vivo Treg depletion results in autoimmune syndromes like thyroiditis, gastritis, diabetes mellitus and colitis, but at the same time, may also result in improved anti-tumour vaccina

  13. Aging disturbs the balance between effector and regulatory CD4+T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Tete, Sarah M.; Lorencetti, Pedro G.; Horst, Gerda; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy aging requires an optimal balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. Although CD4+ T cells play an essential role in many immune responses, few studies have directly assessed the effect of aging on the balance between effector T (Teff) cells and regulatory T

  14. Frequencies and role of regulatory T cells in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Nijman, H. W.; Hoogenboom, B.-N.; Jager, P.; van Baarle, D.; Schuuring, E.; Abdulahad, W.; Miedema, F.; van der Zee, A. G.; Daemen, T.

    2007-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is crucial for developing cervical cancer and its precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) might be involved in the failure of the immune system to control the development of HPV-induced cancer. We

  15. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  16. Contribution of regulatory T cells to alleviation of experimental allergic asthma after specific immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maazi, H.; Shirinbak, S.; Willart, M.; Hammad, H. M.; Cabanski, M.; Boon, L.; Ganesh, V.; Baru, A. M.; Hansen, G.; Lambrecht, B. N.; Sparwasser, T.; Nawijn, M. C.; van Oosterhout, A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has been used since 1911, yet its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. There is evidence indicating that CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are induced during SIT in allergic patients. However, the contribution of these cells to SIT h

  17. Frequencies and role of regulatory T cells in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Nijman, H. W.; Hoogenboom, B.-N.; Jager, P.; van Baarle, D.; Schuuring, E.; Abdulahad, W.; Miedema, F.; van der Zee, A. G.; Daemen, T.

    2007-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is crucial for developing cervical cancer and its precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) might be involved in the failure of the immune system to control the development of HPV-induced cancer. We invest

  18. Frequencies and role of regulatory T cells in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Nijman, H. W.; Hoogenboom, B.-N.; Jager, P.; van Baarle, D.; Schuuring, E.; Abdulahad, W.; Miedema, F.; van der Zee, A. G.; Daemen, T.

    2007-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is crucial for developing cervical cancer and its precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) might be involved in the failure of the immune system to control the development of HPV-induced cancer. We invest

  19. Non-human primate regulatory T cells: Current biology and implications for transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Dons (Eefje); G. Raimondi (Giorgio); D.K.C. Cooper (David); A.W. Thomson (Angus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRegulatory T cells (Treg) offer potential for improving long-term outcomes in cell and organ transplantation. The non-human primate model is a valuable resource for addressing issues concerning the transfer of Treg therapy to the clinic. Herein, we discuss the properties of non-human pri

  20. CD4+ FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells Exhibit Impaired Ability to Suppress Effector T Cell Proliferation in Patients with Turner Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ah Lee

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the frequency, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are altered in young TS patients with the 45,X karyotype compared to age-matched controls.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from young TS patients (n = 24, 17.4-35.9 years and healthy controls (n = 16 were stained with various Treg markers to characterize their phenotypes. Based on the presence of thyroid autoimmunity, patients were categorized into TS (- (n = 7 and TS (+ (n = 17. Tregs sorted for CD4+ CD25bright were co-cultured with autologous CD4+ CD25- target cells in the presence of anti-CD3 and -CD28 antibodies to assess their suppressive function.Despite a lower frequency of CD4+ T cells in the TS (- and TS (+ patients (mean 30.8% and 31.7%, vs. 41.2%; P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively, both groups exhibited a higher frequency of FOXP3+ Tregs among CD4+ T cells compared with controls (means 1.99% and 2.05%, vs. 1.33%; P = 0.029 and P = 0.004, respectively. There were no differences in the expression of CTLA-4 and the frequency of Tregs expressing CXCR3+, and CCR4+ CCR6+ among the three groups. However, the ability of Tregs to suppress the in vitro proliferation of autologous CD4+ CD25- T cells was significantly impaired in the TS (- and TS (+ patients compared to controls (P = 0.003 and P = 0.041. Meanwhile, both the TS (- and TS (+ groups had lower frequencies of naïve cells (P = 0.001 for both but higher frequencies of effector memory cells (P = 0.004 and P = 0.002 than did the healthy control group.The Tregs of the TS patients could not efficiently suppress the proliferation of autologous effector T cells, despite their increased frequency in peripheral CD4+ T cells.

  1. Repetitive pertussis toxin promotes development of regulatory T cells and prevents central nervous system autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin S Weber

    Full Text Available Bacterial and viral infections have long been implicated in pathogenesis and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS. Incidence and severity of its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE can be enhanced by concomitant administration of pertussis toxin (PTx, the major virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis. Its adjuvant effect at the time of immunization with myelin antigen is attributed to an unspecific activation and facilitated migration of immune cells across the blood brain barrier into the central nervous system (CNS. In order to evaluate whether recurring exposure to bacterial antigen may have a differential effect on development of CNS autoimmunity, we repetitively administered PTx prior to immunization. Mice weekly injected with PTx were largely protected from subsequent EAE induction which was reflected by a decreased proliferation and pro-inflammatory differentiation of myelin-reactive T cells. Splenocytes isolated from EAE-resistant mice predominantly produced IL-10 upon re-stimulation with PTx, while non-specific immune responses were unchanged. Longitudinal analyses revealed that repetitive exposure of mice to PTx gradually elevated serum levels for TGF-β and IL-10 which was associated with an expansion of peripheral CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg. Increased frequency of Treg persisted upon immunization and thereafter. Collectively, these data suggest a scenario in which repetitive PTx treatment protects mice from development of CNS autoimmune disease through upregulation of regulatory cytokines and expansion of CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ Treg. Besides its therapeutic implication, this finding suggests that encounter of the immune system with microbial products may not only be part of CNS autoimmune disease pathogenesis but also of its regulation.

  2. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  3. Impaired function of regulatory T cells in cord blood of children of allergic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdý, J; Kocourková, I; Prokešová, L

    2012-10-01

    Allergy is one of the most common diseases with constantly increasing incidence. The identification of prognostic markers pointing to increased risk of allergy development is of importance. Cord blood represents a suitable source of cells for searching for such prognostic markers. In our previous work, we described the increased reactivity of cord blood cells of newborns of allergic mothers in comparison to newborns of healthy mothers, which raised the question of whether or not this was due to the impaired function of regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in high-risk children. Therefore, the proportion and functional properties of T(regs) in cord blood of children of healthy and allergic mothers were estimated by flow cytometry. The proportion of T(regs) [CD4(+)CD25(high)CD127(low) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+))] in cord blood of children of allergic mothers tends to be higher while, in contrast, the median of fluorescence intensity of FoxP3 was increased significantly in the healthy group. Intracellular presence of regulatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta was also higher in T(regs) of children of healthy mothers. Although we detected an increased proportion of T(regs) in cord blood of children of allergic mothers, the functional indicators (intracellular presence of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta, median of fluorescence intensity of FoxP3) of those T(regs) were lower in comparison to the healthy group. We can conclude that impaired function of T(regs) in cord blood of children of allergic mothers could be compensated partially by their increased number. Insufficient function of T(regs) could facilitate allergen sensitization in high-risk individuals after subsequent allergen encounter. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  4. The Proportion of Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takayoshi; Shima, Yoshihito; Wing, James Badger; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have important functions in peripheral immune tolerance. Dysfunction of Tregs is considered to be a pivotal cause of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, previous reports describing the proportion of Tregs among CD4+ T cells in RA patients were controversial because a range of markers are used to identify Tregs with little consensus. To clarify the status of Tregs in RA, we investigated the proportion of Tregs with focusing on the definitions of them. Methods We identified the studies reporting the proportion of Tregs in RA patients using PubMed and Google Scholar. We performed a systematic review of them and a meta-analysis to evaluate the proportion of Tregs (FOXP3-positive and/or CD25-positive) among CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients and control subjects. Results A total 31 studies were selected. The proportion of Tregs defined by all definitions among CD4+ T cells in PB was not significantly different between RA patients and control subjects (-0.65, [-1.30, 0.01]). Then we performed sub-analyses based on individual definitions. The proportion of Tregs defined by either CD25 or FOXP3 alone did not differ between RA patients and control subjects. The proportion of Tregs defined by both FOXP3 and CD25 was lower in RA patients than that in control subjects (-2.42 [-3.49, -1.34]). The proportion of Tregs defined by both FOXP3 and CD25 was higher in SF than that in PB among RA patients (3.27 [0.40, 6.14]). Conclusion The status of Tregs varied according to the definition system. The proportion of Tregs defined by stricter and functionally validated methods decreased in PB and increased in SF among RA patients. If the proportion of Tregs differs in RA, accurate and functionally relevant definitions of Tregs are necessary to elucidate their status in RA. PMID:27622457

  5. PKC-theta in regulatory and effector T-cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran eBrezar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teff or regulatory (Tregs T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ to the immunological synapse is instrumental for the formation of signalling complexes, that ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the immunological synapse where its formation induces altered signalling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance.This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs.

  6. Thorax irradiation triggers a local and systemic accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; Cappuccini, Federica; Niazman, Muska; de Leve, Simone; Westendorf, Astrid M; Lüdemann, Lutz; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2014-04-25

    Lymphocyte infiltration is a common feature of radiation-induced pneumonitis and fibrosis, but their contribution to the pathogenic processes is still unclear. Here, we addressed the impact of thorax irradiation on the T cell compartment with a focus on immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). C57BL/6 wild type mice (WT) received anesthesia only (sham controls, 0 Gy) or were exposed to a single dose of whole thorax irradiation (15 Gy). Immune cells from lung tissue, spleen, and cervical lymph nodes were collected 10 to 84 days post-irradiation and phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry. Whole thorax irradiation provoked an increased influx of CD3+ T cells at 42 and 84 days post-irradiation. In contrast, local irradiation caused a sustained reduction in CD3+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, we observed a significant local and systemic increase in the fraction of CD4+ T cells expressing the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), the phenotypic marker for murine Treg, at day 21 post-irradiation. The accumulation of Treg was associated with increased levels of T cells expressing surface proteins characteristic for recruitment and immunosuppressive activity, e.g. CD103, CTLA-4 and CD73. Importantly, Treg isolated at this time point were able to suppress CD4+ effector T cells to a similar extent as Treg isolated from control mice. The response of the adaptive immune system to whole thorax irradiation is characterized by local immunoactivation and systemic immunosuppression. The transient accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg may be required to protect the lung against excessive inflammation-induced tissue damage. Further investigations shall define the mechanisms underlying the accumulation of Treg and their role for the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung disease.

  7. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Minoru [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisafumi, E-mail: yasuda@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Endurance exercise diverts the balance between Th17 cells and regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chava Perry

    Full Text Available Endurance, marathon-type exertion is known to induce adverse changes in the immune system. Increased airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation are well documented in endurance athletes and endurance exercise is considered a major risk factor for asthma in elite athletes. Yet, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still to be deduced. We studied the effect of strenuous endurance exercise (marathon and half-ironman triathlon on CD4+ lymphocyte sub-populations and on the balance between effector and regulatory CD4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of trained athletes, Endurance exercise induced a significant increase in Th17 cells and a sustained decrease in peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Tregs. While interleukin (IL-2 levels remained undetectable, post-race serum IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF β levels were significantly elevated. Treg levels in sedentary controls' decreased in vitro after incubation with athletes' post-exercise serum, an effect that was attenuated by supplements of IL-2 or anti IL-6 neutralizing antibodies. Our data suggest that exercise-induced changes in serum cytokine levels promote alterations in Tregs and Th17 cell populations, which may divert the subtle balance in the immune system towards inflammation. This may explain allergic and autoimmune phenomena previously reported in endurance athletes and contribute to our understanding of exercise-related asthma.

  9. ATP inhibits the generation and function of regulatory T cells through the activation of purinergic P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ursula; Frascoli, Michela; Proietti, Michele; Geffers, Robert; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Buer, Jan; Ricordi, Camillo; Westendorf, Astrid M; Grassi, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are pleiotropic regulators of mammalian cell function. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released from CD4(+) helper T cells upon stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR) contributes in an autocrine manner to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling through purinergic P2X receptors. Increased expression of p2rx7, which encodes the purinergic receptor P2X7, is part of the transcriptional signature of immunosuppressive CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)). Here, we show that the activation of P2X7 by ATP inhibits the suppressive potential and stability of T(regs). The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased ATP synthesis and P2X7-mediated signaling in T(regs), which induced their conversion to IL-17-secreting T helper 17 (T(H)17) effector cells in vivo. Moreover, pharmacological antagonism of P2X receptors promoted the cell-autonomous conversion of naïve CD4(+) T cells into T(regs) after TCR stimulation. Thus, ATP acts as an autocrine factor that integrates stimuli from the microenvironment and cellular energetics to tune the developmental and immunosuppressive program of the T cell in adaptive immune responses.

  10. CD4~+Foxp3~+ regulatory T cells converted by rapamycin from peripheral CD4~+ CD25~-naive T cells display more potent regulatory ability in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-fei; GAO Jie; ZHANG Dong; WANG Zi-han; ZHU Ji-ye

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapamycin (RAPA) is a relatively new immunosuppressant drug that functions as a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. RAPA blocks activation of T-effector (Teff) cells by inhibiting the response to interleukin-2. Recently, RAPA was also shown to selectively expand the T-regulator (Treg) cell population. To date, no studies have examined the mechanism by which RAPA converts Teff cells to Treg cells. Methods Peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T cells were cultivated with RAPA and B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vitro. CD4~+CD25~- T cells were harvested after 6 days and analyzed for expression of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) using flow cytometry. CD4~+CD25~+CD127~- subsets as the converted Tregs were isolated from the mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with CD127 negative selection, followed by CD4 and CD25 positive selection using microbeads and magnetic separation column (MSC). Moreover, mRNA was extracted from converted Tregs and C57BL/6 naive CD4~+CD25~+ T cells and Foxp3 levels were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). A total of 1×10~5 carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells/well from C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with DBA/2 or C3H maturation of dendritic cells (mDCs) (0.25×10~5/well) in 96-well round-bottom plates for 6 days. Then 1×10~5 or 0.25×10~5 converted Treg cells were added to every well as regulatory cells. Cells were harvested after 6 days of culture and analyzed for proliferation of CFSE-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells using flow cytometry. Data were analyzed using CellQuest software.Results We found that RAPA can convert peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T Cells to CD4~+Foxp3~+ Treg cells using B cells as APCs, and this subtype of Treg can potently suppress Teff proliferation and maintain antigenic specificity. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence that RAPA induces Treg cell conversion from Teff cells and

  11. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, Mark [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Murphy, John R. [Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Fred, E-mail: fwang@research.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  12. Thymic versus induced regulatory T cells – who regulates the regulators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Antonio Maria Povoleri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiological health must balance immunological responsiveness against foreign pathogens with tolerance towards self-components and commensals. Disruption of this balance causes autoimmune diseases/chronic inflammation, in case of excessive immune responses, and persistent infection/immunodeficiency if regulatory components are overactive. This homeostasis occurs at two different levels: at a resting state to prevent autoimmune disease, as autoreactive effector T-cells (Teffs are only partially deleted in the thymus, and during inflammation to prevent excessive tissue injury, contract the immune response and enable tissue repair. Adaptive immune cells with regulatory function (regulatory T-cells are essential to control Teffs. Two sets of regulatory T cell are required to achieve the desired control: those emerging de novo from embryonic/neonatal thymus (thymic or tTregs, whose function is to control autoreactive Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, and those induced in the periphery (peripheral or pTregs to acquire regulatory phenotype in response to pathogens/inflammation. The differentiation mechanisms of these cells determine their commitment to lineage and plasticity towards other phenotypes. tTregs, expressing high levels of IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25, and the transcription factor Foxp3, are the most important, since mutations or deletions in these genes cause fatal autoimmune diseases in both mice and men. In the periphery, instead, Foxp3+ pTregs can be induced from naïve precursors in response to environmental signals. Here, we discuss molecular signatures and induction processes, mechanisms and sites of action, lineage stability and differentiating characteristics of both Foxp3+ and Foxp3- populations of regulatory T cells, derived from the thymus or induced peripherally. We relate these predicates to programs of cell-based therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and induction of tolerance to transplants.

  13. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis supports Th17 differentiation and limits de novo regulatory T cell induction by directly interfering with T cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasztoi, Maria; Bonifacius, Agnes; Pezoldt, Joern; Kulkarni, Devesha; Niemz, Jana; Yang, Juhao; Teich, René; Hajek, Janina; Pisano, Fabio; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra; Huehn, Jochen

    2017-04-04

    Adaptive immunity critically contributes to control acute infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; however, the role of CD4(+) T cell subsets in establishing infection and allowing pathogen persistence remains elusive. Here, we assessed the modulatory capacity of Y. pseudotuberculosis on CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Using in vivo assays, we report that infection with Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in enhanced priming of IL-17-producing T cells (Th17 cells), whereas induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was severely disrupted in gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), in line with altered frequencies of tolerogenic and proinflammatory dendritic cell (DC) subsets within mLNs. Additionally, by using a DC-free in vitro system, we could demonstrate that Y. pseudotuberculosis can directly modulate T cell receptor (TCR) downstream signaling within naïve CD4(+) T cells and Tregs via injection of effector molecules through the type III secretion system, thereby affecting their functional properties. Importantly, modulation of naïve CD4(+) T cells by Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in an enhanced Th17 differentiation and decreased induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro. These findings shed light to the adjustment of the Th17-Treg axis in response to acute Y. pseudotuberculosis infection and highlight the direct modulation of CD4(+) T cell subsets by altering their TCR downstream signaling.

  14. Novel insights into the regulatory architecture of CD4+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Adrià Aterido

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most frequent autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease of the joints and it is characterized by the inflammation of the synovial membrane and the subsequent destruction of the joints. In RA, CD4+ T cells are the main drivers of disease initiation and the perpetuation of the damaging inflammatory process. To date, however, the genetic regulatory mechanisms of CD4+ T cells associated with RA etiology are poorly understood. The genome-wide analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL in disease-relevant cell types is a recent genomic integration approach that is providing significant insights into the genetic regulatory mechanisms of many human pathologies. The objective of the present study was to analyze, for the first time, the genome-wide genetic regulatory mechanisms associated with the gene expression of CD4+ T cells in RA. Whole genome gene expression profiling of CD4+ T cells and the genome-wide genotyping (598,258 SNPs of 29 RA patients with an active disease were performed. In order to avoid the excessive burden of multiple testing associated with genome-wide trans-eQTL analysis, we developed and implemented a novel systems genetics approach. Finally, we compared the genomic regulation pattern of CD4+ T cells in RA with the genomic regulation observed in reference lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. We identified a genome-wide significant cis-eQTL associated with the expression of FAM66C gene (P = 6.51e-9. Using our new systems genetics approach we identified six statistically significant trans-eQTLs associated with the expression of KIAA0101 (P<7.4e-8 and BIRC5 (P = 5.35e-8 genes. Finally, comparing the genomic regulation profiles between RA CD4+ T cells and control LCLs we found 20 genes showing differential regulatory patterns between both cell types. The present genome-wide eQTL analysis has identified new genetic regulatory elements that are key to the activity of CD4+ T cells in RA.

  15. Dermal regulatory T cells display distinct migratory behavior that is modulated during adaptive and innate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Zachary; Mueller, Scott N; Deane, James A; Hickey, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in controlling skin inflammation, an effect dependent on their ability to home to this organ. However, little is known regarding their behavior in the skin. In this study, we used multiphoton imaging in Foxp3-GFP mice to examine the behavior of endogenous Tregs in resting and inflamed skin. Although Tregs were readily detectable in the uninflamed dermis, most were nonmotile. Induction of contact sensitivity increased the proportion of motile Tregs, and also induced Treg recruitment. This response was significantly blunted in mice challenged with an irrelevant hapten, or by inhibition of effector cell recruitment, indicating a role for T cell-dependent inflammation in induction of Treg migration. Moreover, induction of Treg migration was inhibited by local injection of a CCR4 antagonist, indicating a role for CCR4 in this response. Exposure of naive mice to hapten also induced an increase in the proportion of migratory Tregs, demonstrating that innate signals can also induce Treg migration. Simultaneous examination of the migration of CD4⁺ effector cells and Tregs in the same region of uninflamed skin demonstrated that effector cells behaved differently, being uniformly highly migratory. These findings indicate that Treg behavior in skin differs from that of CD4⁺ effector cells, in that only a low proportion of Tregs is migratory under resting conditions. However, in response to both adaptive and innate inflammation, the proportion of migratory Tregs increases, raising the possibility that this response is important in multiple forms of skin inflammation.

  16. Role of Regulatory T-cells in Different Clinical Expressions of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection does not disappear and a chronic active gastritis continues if left untreated. It has been shown that the topographical pattern and immune response of gastritis are the main reasons for the bacteria persistence and the clinical outcome. Gastritis due to H. pylori is caused by a complicated interaction among a variety of T cell subsets. Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppressing the immune response of antigen-specific T-cells have recently been demonstrated to play a key role in chronic inflammation by immunologic tolerance. Treg cells have been identified as the major regulatory component of the adaptive immune response and being involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and bacterial persistence. There have been many controversies over the role of Treg cells in H. pylori infection. Many studies have shown that the local Treg response protects the gastric mucosa from intensified inflammation and tissue damage, and the risk of H. pylori-associated diseases has an inverse correlation with Treg accumulation, even if the decrease in the inflammatory response is recognized by Treg it causes increase in bacterial density. This paper reviews the role of Treg in different clinical expressions of H. pylori infection.

  17. T Helper 17/Regulatory T Cell Balance and Experimental Models of Peritoneal Dialysis-Induced Damage

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    Georgios Liappas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is a general complication in many diseases. It is the main complication during peritoneal dialysis (PD treatment, a therapy for renal failure disease. Local inflammation and mesothelial to mesenchymal transition (MMT are well known key phenomena in peritoneal damage during PD. New data suggest that, in the peritoneal cavity, inflammatory changes may be regulated at least in part by a delicate balance between T helper 17 and regulatory T cells. This paper briefly reviews the implication of the Th17/Treg-axis in fibrotic diseases. Moreover, it compares current evidences described in PD animal experimental models, indicating a loss of Th17/Treg balance (Th17 predominance leading to peritoneal damage during PD. In addition, considering the new clinical and animal experimental data, new therapeutic strategies to reduce the Th17 response and increase the regulatory T response are proposed. Thus, future goals should be to develop new clinical biomarkers to reverse this immune misbalance and reduce peritoneal fibrosis in PD.

  18. T Helper 17/Regulatory T Cell Balance and Experimental Models of Peritoneal Dialysis-Induced Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liappas, Georgios; Gónzalez-Mateo, Guadalupe Tirma; Majano, Pedro; Sánchez- Tomero, José Antonio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Martín, Pilar; Sanchez-Díaz, Raquel; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera Peralta, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis is a general complication in many diseases. It is the main complication during peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment, a therapy for renal failure disease. Local inflammation and mesothelial to mesenchymal transition (MMT) are well known key phenomena in peritoneal damage during PD. New data suggest that, in the peritoneal cavity, inflammatory changes may be regulated at least in part by a delicate balance between T helper 17 and regulatory T cells. This paper briefly reviews the implication of the Th17/Treg-axis in fibrotic diseases. Moreover, it compares current evidences described in PD animal experimental models, indicating a loss of Th17/Treg balance (Th17 predominance) leading to peritoneal damage during PD. In addition, considering the new clinical and animal experimental data, new therapeutic strategies to reduce the Th17 response and increase the regulatory T response are proposed. Thus, future goals should be to develop new clinical biomarkers to reverse this immune misbalance and reduce peritoneal fibrosis in PD. PMID:26064907

  19. Functional and Developmental Analysis of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells under the Influence of Streptococcal M Protein in Rheumatic Heart Disease

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    Nidhal Abdul-Auhaimen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the role of streptococcal M protein in naturally-occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs function and development in rheumatic heart disease in Iraqi patients. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated for subsequent M protein extraction. Also, peripheral blood nTregs and CD4+ T cells were isolated by using Magnetic Cell Separation System. Tissue culture for isolated cells was performed in the presence and absence of M protein. Cell count was performed, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-4 (IL-4 were determined in culture supernatant using ELISA system. There was a significant positive correlation (P0.05, association (r=0.353 between the mean number of nTregs and CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein. The M protein stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce IL-4 in very little amount (<4 pg/ml in all samples. Compared to the production of IL4, TNF-α was produced in higher concentrations in the culture supernatants. The findings of the study indicate that streptococcal M protein has an important role in increasing the proliferation of CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells and CD4+ T cells. However, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells have lower suppressive activity against CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein

  20. Functional and Developmental Analysis of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells under the Influence of Streptococcal M Protein in Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Auhaimena, Nidhal; Al-Kaabi, Zaman I. L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of streptococcal M protein in naturally-occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) function and development in rheumatic heart disease in Iraqi patients. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated for subsequent M protein extraction. Also, peripheral blood nTregs and CD4+ T cells were isolated by using Magnetic Cell Separation System. Tissue culture for isolated cells was performed in the presence and absence of M protein. Cell count was performed, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) were determined in culture supernatant using ELISA system. There was a significant positive correlation (P0.05), association (r=0.353) between the mean number of nTregs and CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein. The M protein stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce IL-4 in very little amount (<4 pg/ml) in all samples. Compared to the production of IL4, TNF-α was produced in higher concentrations in the culture supernatants. The findings of the study indicate that streptococcal M protein has an important role in increasing the proliferation of D4+CD25+regulatory T cells and CD4+ T cells. However, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells have lower suppressive activity against CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein. PMID:23359747

  1. Cutting Edge: OX40 agonists can drive regulatory T cell expansion if the cytokine milieu is right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Carl E; Yates, Melissa A; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Chlebeck, Peter; Wolchok, Jedd D; Houghton, Alan N; Offner, Halina; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2009-10-15

    We report that OX40 stimulation drives all lineages of CD4 T cell development, including regulatory T cells (Tregs), and the plasticity of the response is dependant on local cytokines. In TGF-beta1-treated cultures, an OX40 agonist increased IFN-gamma and IL-4 production and diverted T cells from the Treg lineage. However, cytokine blockade in the context of OX40 stimulation promoted enhanced Treg accumulation. This observation was evident in naive mice, as OX40 engagement enhanced Treg proliferation and accumulation in vivo. Lastly, OX40 agonist administration influenced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease severity in opposing directions, depending on the timing of administration. Given during Ag priming, the OX40 agonist drove Treg expansion and inhibited disease, whereas given later it enhanced T cell effector cytokine production in the CNS and exacerbated disease. Hence, OX40 signaling can augment the accumulation of all CD4 T cell lineages; however, its accentuation of immune responses may have vastly different biologic outcomes depending upon the local cytokine milieu.

  2. T-bet regulates differentiation of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells in programmed cell death-1-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, M; Kondo, Y; Yokosawa, M; Tsuboi, H; Takahashi, S; Shibayama, S; Matsumoto, I; Sumida, T

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important role in peripheral T cell tolerance, but whether or not it affects the differentiation of helper T cell subsets remains elusive. Here we describe the importance of PD-1 in the control of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell activation and development of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). PD-1-deficient T cell-specific T-bet transgenic (P/T) mice showed growth retardation, and the majority died within 10 weeks. P/T mice showed T-bet over-expression, increased interferon (IFN)-γ production by CD4+ T cells and significantly low FoxP3+ Treg cell percentage. P/T mice developed systemic inflammation, which was probably induced by augmented Th1 response and low FoxP3+ Treg count. The study identified a unique, previously undescribed role for PD-1 in Th1 and Treg differentiation, with potential implication in the development of Th1 cell-targeted therapy. PMID:25219397

  3. Cutting Edge: memory regulatory t cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Iris K; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2013-05-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self-antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory regulatory T cells (mTregs). mTregs persist in nonlymphoid tissue after cessation of Ag expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. In this study, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic-deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4(+) T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin.

  4. CD4+ natural regulatory T cells prevent experimental cerebral malaria via CTLA-4 when expanded in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraful Haque

    Full Text Available Studies in malaria patients indicate that higher frequencies of peripheral blood CD4(+ Foxp3(+ CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cells correlate with increased blood parasitemia. This observation implies that Treg cells impair pathogen clearance and thus may be detrimental to the host during infection. In C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, depletion of Foxp3(+ cells did not improve parasite control or disease outcome. In contrast, elevating frequencies of natural Treg cells in vivo using IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes resulted in complete protection against severe disease. This protection was entirely dependent upon Foxp3(+ cells and resulted in lower parasite biomass, impaired antigen-specific CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses that would normally promote parasite tissue sequestration in this model, and reduced recruitment of conventional T cells to the brain. Furthermore, Foxp3(+ cell-mediated protection was dependent upon CTLA-4 but not IL-10. These data show that T cell-mediated parasite tissue sequestration can be reduced by regulatory T cells in a mouse model of malaria, thereby limiting malaria-induced immune pathology.

  5. Increased level of both CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells and CD14+HLA-DR⁻/low myeloid-derived suppressor cells and decreased level of dendritic cells in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, M K; Vangsted, Annette Juul; Knudsen, L M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) suffer from a general impaired immunity comprising deficiencies in humoral responses, T-cell responses as well as dendritic cell (DC) function. Thus, to achieve control of tumour growth through immune therapy constitutes a challenge. Careful evaluation...

  6. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  7. Analyses of regulatory CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ T cells and observations from peripheral T cell subpopulation markers during the development of type 1 diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamari, S; Kirveskoski, T; Glumoff, V; Kulmala, P; Simell, O; Knip, M; Veijola, R

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to study whether the aberrant amount or function of regulatory T cells is related to the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children. We also set out to investigate the balance of different T cell subtype markers during the T1D autoimmune process. Treg cells were quantified with flow cytometric assay, and the suppression capacity was analysed with a carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-based T cell suppression assay in children in various phases of T1D disease process and in healthy autoantibody-negative control children. The mRNA expression of different T cell subpopulation markers was analysed with real-time qPCR method. The proportion and suppression capacity of regulatory T cells were similar in seroconverted children at an early stage of beta cell autoimmunity and also in children with T1D when compared to healthy and autoantibody-negative children. Significant differences were observed in the mRNA expression of different T cell subpopulation markers in prediabetic children with multiple (≥ 2) autoantibodies and in children with newly diagnosed T1D when compared to the control children. In conclusion, there were no quantitative or functional differences in regulatory T cells between the case and control groups in any phase of the autoimmune process. Decreased mRNA expression levels of T cell subtype markers were observed in children with multiple islet autoantibodies and in those with newly diagnosed T1D, probably reflecting an exhaustion of the immune system after the strong immune activation during the autoimmune process or a generally aberrant immune response related to the progression of the disease.

  8. Cutting edge: regulatory T cells do not mediate suppression via programmed cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Delgoffe, Greg M; Green, Douglas R; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the immune system to regulate peripheral tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. However, the relative importance of different mechanisms of Treg function remains obscure. In this article, we reveal a limited role for programmed cell death pathways in mediating Treg suppression of conventional T cells. We show that Tregs are able to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells that are resistant to apoptosis (Bim(-/-), Bim(-/-)Puma(-/-), Bcl-2 transgenic) or receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis (also referred to as regulated necrosis or necroptosis) (Ripk3(-/-)) in several in vitro and in vivo assays. These data suggest that programmed cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis, are not required for Treg-mediated suppression.

  9. Intraclonal competition limits the fate determination of regulatory T cells in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Jhoanne L; Lio, Chan-Wang J; Lathrop, Stephanie K; Forbush, Katherine; Liang, Yuqiong; Luo, Jingqin; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Hsieh, Chyi-Song

    2009-06-01

    Because the deletion of self-reactive T cells is incomplete, thymic development of natural Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) is required for preventing autoimmunity. However, the function of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) specificity in thymic Treg cell development remains controversial. To address this issue, we generated a transgenic line expressing a naturally occurring Treg cell-derived TCR. Unexpectedly, we found that efficient thymic Treg cell development occurred only when the antigen-specific Treg cell precursors were present at low clonal frequency (o1%) in a normal thymus. Using retroviral vectors and bone marrow chimeras, we observed similar activity with two other Treg cell-derived TCRs. Our data demonstrate that thymic Treg cell development is a 'TCR-instructive' process involving a niche that can be saturable at much lower clonal frequencies than is the niche for positive selection.

  10. Effects of estrogen on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell in peripheral blood during pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Huan Xiong; Zhen Yuan; Li He

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of estrogen (E2) level on regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral blood during pregnancy. Methods:A total of 30 healthy non-pregnant women were selected as control group, 90 pregnant women of early, middle and late pregnancy and 30 postpartum women at 1 month after parturition were selected as experimental groups including early pregnancy group, middle pregnancy group and late pregnancy group;the proportions of CD4+CD25+Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127-Treg among CD4+T cells were detected by flow cytometry;the serum estrogen content in peripheral blood was detected by electrochemical immune luminescence method. Results: E2 level was coincident with the change of Tregs number during pregnancy. The estrogen content in peripheral blood increased gradually from early pregnancy to late pregnancy, then decreased significantly after parturition, and the level at 1 month after parturition down to the level in non-pregnancy group (P>0.05);the level of E2 in pregnancy groups were significantly higher than those in non-pregnancy group (P0.05);the proportions in middle and late pregnancy groups were significantly higher than those in early pregnancy group (P0.05). There was correlation between Tregs number with estrogen level during pregnancy. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127- Treg were positively correlated with estrogen level. Conclusions:High proportion of CD4+CD25+Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127-Treg is closely related to the high level of E2 during pregnancy. It suggested that high level of estrogen may induce an increase of CD4+CD25+Treg in peripheral blood, and then influence the immune function of pregnant women. The results of this experiment might play an important role of estrogen in immune-modulation during pregnancy.

  11. Impaired coronary microcirculation in type 2 diabetic patients is associated with elevated circulating regulatory T cells and reduced number of IL-21R⁺ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Rosendahl, Alexander; Hasbak, Philip

    2016-01-01

    , increased TLR4 expression on CD8 T cells, increased Treg cell number and Treg maturation and reduced IL-21R expression on CD8 T cells to be functionally associated with impaired CFR. CONCLUSIONS: Our demonstration that HbA1c inversely correlates to several T cell populations suggests that T cells may play...... characterized by reduced overall T cell, Th17, IL-21R(+), Treg's and TLR4(+) T cells, while the monocyte population showed enhanced TLR4 expression. Further, our data revealed reduced M1-like CD11c expression in T2D which was associated with impaired CFR. In contrast, we show, for the first time in T2D...

  12. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(posCD25(high T cells for immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorieke H Peters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the antigen-specificity of the infused Treg population. For the human setting, information is lacking on how to generate Treg with direct antigen-specificity ex vivo to be used for immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that in as little as two stimulation cycles with HLA mismatched allogeneic stimulator cells and T cell growth factors a very high degree of alloantigen-specificity was reached in magnetic bead isolated human CD4(posCD25(high Treg. Efficient increases in cell numbers were obtained. Primary allogeneic stimulation appeared a prerequisite in the generation of alloantigen-specific Treg, while secondary allogeneic or polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies enriched alloantigen-specificity and cell yield to a similar extent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ex vivo expansion protocol that we describe will very likely increase the success of clinical Treg-based immunotherapy, and will help to induce tolerance to selected antigens, while minimizing general immune suppression. This approach is of particular interest for recipients of HLA mismatched transplants.

  13. Human CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells do not constitutively express IL-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardel, Emilie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Charlot-Rabiega, Pascaline; Coulomb-L'Herminé, Aurore; Devergne, Odile

    2008-11-15

    EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) can associate with p28 to form the heterodimeric cytokine IL-27, or with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, recently named IL-35. In mice, IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. In this study, we investigated whether human Treg cells express IL-35. Double-staining analysis of human thymuses showed that neither Foxp3(+) nor CD25(+) cells coexpressed EBI3. Similarly, Foxp3(+) cells present in human lymph nodes, tonsils, spleens, and intestines did not express EBI3. Consistent with these in situ observations, Treg cells purified from blood or tonsils were negative for EBI3 by immunoblotting. Other human T cell subsets, including effector T cells, naive and memory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells also did not constitutively express EBI3, which contrasts with IL-35 expression observed in murine CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells. Furthermore, although CD3/CD28 stimulation consistently induced low levels of EBI3 in various CD4(+) T cell subsets, no EBI3 could be detected in CD3/CD28-stimulated Treg cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that, whereas p35 transcripts were detected in both Teff and Treg cells, EBI3 transcripts were detected only in activated Teff cells, but not in resting or activated Treg cells. Thus, in contrast to their murine counterpart, human Treg cells do not express detectable amounts of IL-35.

  14. Interleukin 2 and interleukin 10 function synergistically to promote CD8(+) T cell cytotoxicity, which is suppressed by regulatory T cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaogang; Lu, Ping; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wanfu; Yang, Rong; Chu, Yan; Luo, Kaiyuan

    2017-03-06

    The precise role of interleukin (IL)-10 in breast cancer is not clear. Previous studies suggested a tumor-promoting role of IL-10 in breast cancer, whereas recent discoveries that IL-10 activated and expanded tumor-resident CD8(+) T cells challenged the traditional view. Here, we investigated the role of IL-10 in HLA-A2-positive breast cancer patients with Grade III, Stage IIA or IIB in-situ and invasive ductal carcinoma, and compared it with that of IL-2, the canonical CD8(+) T cell growth factor. We first observed that breast cancer patients presented higher serum levels of IL-2 and IL-10 than healthy controls. Upon prolonged TCR stimulation, peripheral blood CD8(+) T cells from breast cancer patients tended to undergo apoptosis, which could be prevented by the addition of IL-2 and/or IL-10. The cytotoxicity of TCR-activated CD8(+) T cells was also enhanced by exogenous IL-2 and/or IL-10. Interestingly, IL-2 and IL-10 demonstrated synergistic effects, since the enhancement in CD8(+) T cell function when both cytokines were added was greater than the sum of the improvements mediated by each individual cytokine. IL-10 by itself could not promote the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells but could significantly enhance IL-2-mediated promotion of CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In addition, the cytotoxicity of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in breast tumor was elevated when both IL-2 and IL-10 were present but not when either one was absent. This synergistic effect was stopped by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which depleted IL-2 in a cell number-dependent manner. Together, these results demonstrated that IL-2 and IL-10 could work synergistically to improve the survival, proliferation, and cytotoxicity of activated CD8(+) T cells, an effect suppressible by CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells.

  15. Unexpected Regulatory Role of CCR9 in Regulatory T Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Evans-Marin

    Full Text Available T cells reactive to microbiota regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. As T cell trafficking to intestines is regulated through interactions between highly specific chemokine-chemokine receptors, efforts have been made to develop intestine-specific immunosuppression based on blocking these key processes. CCR9, a gut-trophic chemokine receptor expressed by lymphocytes and dendritic cells, has been implicated in the regulation of IBD through mediating recruitment of T cells to inflamed sites. However, the role of CCR9 in inducing and sustaining inflammation in the context of IBD is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that CCR9 deficiency in effector T cells and Tregs does not affect the development of colitis in a microbiota antigen-specific, T cell-mediated model. However, Treg cells express higher levels of CCR9 compared to those in effector T cells. Interestingly, CCR9 inhibits Treg cell development, in that CCR9-/- mice demonstrate a high level of Foxp3+ Tregs, and ligation of CCR9 by its ligand CCL25 inhibits Treg cell differentiation in vitro. Collectively, our data indicate that in addition to acting as a gut-homing molecule, CCR9 signaling shapes immune responses by inhibiting Treg cell development.

  16. Current status and regulatory perspective of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Kim, Dongyoon; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Park, Zewon; Choi, Min Joung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T) have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potent efficacy against terminal cancers. CAR-Ts are reported to exert higher efficacy than monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates, and act via mechanisms distinct from T cell receptor-engineered T cells. These cells are constructed by transducing genes encoding fusion proteins of cancer antigen-recognizing single-chain Fv linked to intracellular signaling domains of T cell receptors. CAR-Ts are classified as first-, second- and third-generation, depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. This review covers the current status of CAR-T research, including basic proof-of-concept investigations at the cell and animal levels. Currently ongoing clinical trials of CAR-T worldwide are additionally discussed. Owing to the lack of existing approved products, several unresolved concerns remain with regard to safety, efficacy and manufacturing of CAR-T, as well as quality control issues. In particular, the cytokine release syndrome is the major side-effect impeding the successful development of CAR-T in clinical trials. Here, we have addressed the challenges and regulatory perspectives of CAR-T therapy.

  17. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  18. Chloroquine treatment enhances regulatory T cells and reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Thomé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The modulation of inflammatory processes is a necessary step, mostly orchestrated by regulatory T (Treg cells and suppressive Dendritic Cells (DCs, to prevent the development of deleterious responses and autoimmune diseases. Therapies that focused on adoptive transfer of Treg cells or their expansion in vivo achieved great success in controlling inflammation in several experimental models. Chloroquine (CQ, an anti-malarial drug, was shown to reduce inflammation, although the mechanisms are still obscure. In this context, we aimed to access whether chloroquine treatment alters the frequency of Treg cells and DCs in normal mice. In addition, the effects of the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with CQ on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE, an experimental model for human Multiple Sclerosis, was investigated as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55 peptide. C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally treated with chloroquine. Results show that the CQ treatment provoked an increase in Treg cells frequency as well as a decrease in DCs. We next evaluated whether prophylactic CQ administration is capable of reducing the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE. Our results demonstrated that CQ-treated mice developed mild EAE compared to controls that was associated with lower infiltration of inflammatory cells in the central nervous system CNS and increased frequency of Treg cells. Also, proliferation of MOG35-55-reactive T cells was significantly inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Similar results were observed when chloroquine was administrated after disease onset. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that CQ treatment promotes the expansion of Treg cells, corroborating previous reports indicating that chloroquine has immunomodulatory properties. Our results also show that CQ treatment suppress the inflammation in the CNS of

  19. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika;

    2006-01-01

    , the authors found down regulation of the mRNA expression of the inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR1 and CXCR3 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL7. Also the transcripts for CCR9, CCL25, CCL17, and CXCL1 are found down regulated in protected compared with colitic animals. In addition, the authors......' results suggest that CCL20 is used by CCR6 regulatory T cells in the complex process of controlling colitis because transcripts for this chemokine were expressed to a higher level in protected animals. The chemokine pathways identified in the present study may be of importance for the development of new....../chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis...

  20. Timing of in utero malaria exposure influences fetal CD4 T cell regulatory versus effector differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Prahl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malaria-endemic areas, the first exposure to malaria antigens often occurs in utero when the fetal immune system is poised towards the development of tolerance. Children exposed to placental malaria have an increased risk of clinical malaria in the first few years of life compared to unexposed children. Recent work has suggested the potential of pregnancy-associated malaria to induce immune tolerance in children living in malaria-endemic areas. A study was completed to evaluate the effect of malaria exposure during pregnancy on fetal immune tolerance and effector responses. Methods Using cord blood samples from a cohort of mother-infant pairs followed from early in pregnancy until delivery, flow cytometry analysis was completed to assess the relationship between pregnancy-associated malaria and fetal cord blood CD4 and dendritic cell phenotypes. Results Cord blood FoxP3+ Treg counts were higher in infants born to mothers with Plasmodium parasitaemia early in pregnancy (12–20 weeks of gestation; p = 0.048, but there was no association between Treg counts and the presence of parasites in the placenta at the time of delivery (by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP; p = 0.810. In contrast, higher frequencies of activated CD4 T cells (CD25+FoxP3−CD127+ were observed in the cord blood of neonates with active placental Plasmodium infection at the time of delivery (p = 0.035. This population exhibited evidence of effector memory differentiation, suggesting priming of effector T cells in utero. Lastly, myeloid dendritic cells were higher in the cord blood of infants with histopathologic evidence of placental malaria (p < 0.0001. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that in utero exposure to malaria drives expansion of both regulatory and effector T cells in the fetus, and that the timing of this exposure has a pivotal role in determining the polarization of the fetal immune response.

  1. Ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus macaque regulatory T cells are resistant to alemtuzumab-mediated cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (Ab) directed against CD52 that depletes lymphocytes and other leukocytes, mainly by complement-dependent mechanisms. We investigated the influence of alemtuzumab (i) on ex vivo-expanded cynomolgus monkeys regulatory T cells (Treg) generated for prospective use in adoptive cell therapy and (ii) on naturally-occurring Treg following alemtuzumab infusion. Treg were isolated from PBMC and lymph nodes and expanded for two rounds. CD52 ex...

  2. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance ...... in disease models such as autoimmune gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, we will consider some aspects of the therapeutic potential of Treg cells....

  3. Convergences and divergences of thymus- and peripherally-derived regulatory T cells in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ALESSIA eBUROCCHI; MARIO PAOLO COLOMBO; Silvia ePICONESE

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg) is a common event characterizing the vast majority of human and experimental tumors and it is now well established that Treg represent a crucial hurdle for a successful immunotherapy. Treg are currently classified, according to their origin, into thymus-derived (tTreg) or peripherally induced (pTreg) cells. Controversy exists over the prevalent mechanism accounting for Treg expansion in tumors, since both tTreg proliferation and de novo pTreg differe...

  4. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS...

  5. Regulatory T-Cell Therapy for Graft-versus-host Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrichs, Jessica; Bastian, David; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Anasetti, Claudio; Betts, Brain; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a significant cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Existing strategies to prevent and treat GVHD are incomplete, where a significant portion of allo-HCT recipients developed this complication. Despite this, one such therapy has emerged involving the use of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to control GVHD. The use of natural Tregs (nTregs) yielded positive pre-clinical results and are actively under investi...

  6. A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Mika; Gawel, Danuta; Alfredsson, Lars; Baranzini, Sergio; Bjorkander, Janne; Blomgran, Robert; Hellberg, Sandra; Eklund, Daniel; Ernerudh, Jan; KOCKUM, Ingrid; Konstantinell, Aelita; Lahesmaa, Riita; Lentini, Antonio; Liljenström, H. Robert I.; Mattson, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorph...

  7. In vitro TNF blockade enhances ex vivo expansion of regulatory T cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui; Bussel, James; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Summary Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in a number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a bleeding disorder characterized by low platelet counts. In vitro TNF blockade increases expansion of the regulatory T cell (Treg) IKZF2 (also termed Helios) subset in T cell-monocyte cocultures from healthy donors, but its role on proliferative responses of Tregs in ITP patients, who have altered immunoregulatory compartment, remains unclear. TNF in CD4+ T cells from patients with chronic ITP were elevated and negatively correlated with peripheral Treg frequencies, suggesting a possible inhibitory effect of TNF on ITP Tregs. In vitro antibody neutralization with anti-TNF in T cell-monocyte cocultures resulted in a robust expansion of pre-existing ITP Tregs, higher than in healthy controls. Similar to the effects of anti-TNF antibodies, TNF blockade with antibodies against TNFRSF1B (anti-TNFRSF1B, previously termed anti-TNFRII) almost doubled ITP Treg expansion whereas neutralization with anti-TNFRSF1A (anti-TNFRI) antibodies had no effect on proliferative responses of Tregs. In addition, TNFRSF1B levels on ITP Tregs were significantly elevated, which may explain the increased susceptibility of patient Tregs to the actions of TNF blockade. Altogether, these data raise the possibility that TNF blockers, through their ability to increase Treg proliferation, may be efficacious in ITP patients. PMID:25252160

  8. In vitro TNF blockade enhances ex vivo expansion of regulatory T cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui; Bussel, James; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in a number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a bleeding disorder characterized by low platelet counts. In vitro TNF blockade increases expansion of the regulatory T cell (Treg) IKZF2 (also termed Helios) subset in T cell-monocyte cocultures from healthy donors, but its role on proliferative responses of Tregs in ITP patients, who have altered immunoregulatory compartment, remains unclear. TNF in CD4+ T cells from patients with chronic ITP were elevated and negatively correlated with peripheral Treg frequencies, suggesting a possible inhibitory effect of TNF on ITP Tregs. In vitro antibody neutralization with anti-TNF in T cell-monocyte cocultures resulted in a robust expansion of pre-existing ITP Tregs, higher than in healthy controls. Similar to the effects of anti-TNF antibodies, TNF blockade with antibodies against TNFRSF1B (anti-TNFRSF1B, previously termed anti-TNFRII) almost doubled ITP Treg expansion whereas neutralization with anti-TNFRSF1A (anti-TNFRI) antibodies had no effect on proliferative responses of Tregs. In addition, TNFRSF1B levels on ITP Tregs were significantly elevated, which may explain the increased susceptibility of patient Tregs to the actions of TNF blockade. Altogether, these data raise the possibility that TNF blockers, through their ability to increase Treg proliferation, may be efficacious in ITP patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gamma c-signaling cytokines induce a regulatory T cell phenotype in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Zhang, Qian; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that malignant mature CD4(+) T lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) variably display some aspects of the T regulatory phenotype. Whereas seven cell lines representing a spectrum of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoproliferative disorders expressed...... that the T regulatory cell features are induced in CTCL T cells by common gamma chain signaling cytokines such as IL-2 and do not represent a fully predetermined, constitutive phenotype independent of the local environmental stimuli to which these malignant mature CD4(+) T cells become exposed....

  10. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(pos)CD25(high) T cells for immunotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Hilbrands, L.B.; Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg) based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the

  11. Type I IFNs regulate effector and regulatory T cell accumulation and anti-inflammatory cytokine production during T cell-mediated colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Abhisake; He, JianPing; Rivollier, Aymeric; Silveira, Danielle D; Kitamura, Kazuya; Maloy, Kevin J; Kelsall, Brian L

    2013-09-01

    We explored the function of endogenous type I IFNs (IFN-1) in the colon using the T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis. Colon mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) constitutively produced IFN-1 in a Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β-dependent manner. Transfer of CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells from wild-type (WT) or IFN-α/β receptor subunit 1 knockout (IFNAR1(-/-)) mice into RAG(-/-) hosts resulted in similar onset and severity of colitis. In contrast, RAG(-/-) × IFNAR1(-/-) double knockout (DKO) mice developed accelerated severe colitis compared with RAG(-/-) hosts when transferred with WT CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. IFNAR signaling on host hematopoietic cells was required to delay colitis development. MPs isolated from the colon lamina propria of IFNAR1(-/-) mice produced less IL-10, IL-1R antagonist, and IL-27 compared with WT MPs. Accelerated colitis development in DKO mice was characterized by early T cell proliferation and accumulation of CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes, both of which could be reversed by systemic administration of IL-1R antagonist (anakinra). Cotransfer of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) from WT or IFNAR1(-/-) mice prevented disease caused by CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. However, WT CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(GFP+) Tregs cotransferred with CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells into DKO hosts failed to expand or maintain Foxp3 expression and gained effector functions in the colon. To our knowledge, these data are the first to demonstrate an essential role for IFN-1 in the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines by gut MPs and the indirect maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis by both limiting effector T cell expansion and promoting Treg stability.

  12. Regulatory T Cells in Colorectal Cancer: From Biology to Prognostic Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Mougiakakos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were initially described as "suppressive" lymphocytes in the 1980s. However, it took almost 20 years until the concept of Treg-mediated immune control in its present form was finally established. Tregs are obligatory for self-tolerance and defects within their population lead to severe autoimmune disorders. On the other hand Tregs may promote tolerance for tumor antigens and even hamper efforts to overcome it. Intratumoral and systemic accumulation of Tregs has been observed in various types of cancer and is often linked to worse disease course and outcome. Increase of circulating Tregs, as well as their presence in mesenteric lymph nodes and tumor tissue of patients with colorectal cancer de facto suggests a strong involvement of Tregs in the antitumor control. This review will focus on the Treg biology in view of colorectal cancer, means of Treg accumulation and the controversies regarding their prognostic significance. In addition, a concise overview will be given on how Tregs and their function can be targeted in cancer patients in order to bolster an inherent immune response and/or increase the efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches.

  13. Regulatory T Cells in Colorectal Cancer: From Biology to Prognostic Relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougiakakos, Dimitrios [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Immune and Gene Therapy Unit, Cancer Centre Karolinska, CCK R8:01, 17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-03-29

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) were initially described as “suppressive” lymphocytes in the 1980s. However, it took almost 20 years until the concept of Treg-mediated immune control in its present form was finally established. Tregs are obligatory for self-tolerance and defects within their population lead to severe autoimmune disorders. On the other hand Tregs may promote tolerance for tumor antigens and even hamper efforts to overcome it. Intratumoral and systemic accumulation of Tregs has been observed in various types of cancer and is often linked to worse disease course and outcome. Increase of circulating Tregs, as well as their presence in mesenteric lymph nodes and tumor tissue of patients with colorectal cancer de facto suggests a strong involvement of Tregs in the antitumor control. This review will focus on the Treg biology in view of colorectal cancer, means of Treg accumulation and the controversies regarding their prognostic significance. In addition, a concise overview will be given on how Tregs and their function can be targeted in cancer patients in order to bolster an inherent immune response and/or increase the efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches.

  14. Regulatory T cell transfer ameliorates lymphedema and promotes lymphatic vessel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Scholl, Jeannette; Dionyssiou, Dimitris; Demiri, Efterpi; Halin, Cornelia; Dieterich, Lothar C.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common postcancer treatment complication, but the underlying pathological processes are poorly understood and no curative treatment exists. To investigate lymphedema pathomechanisms, a top-down approach was applied, using genomic data and validating the role of a single target. RNA sequencing of lymphedematous mouse skin indicated upregulation of many T cell–related networks, and indeed depletion of CD4+ cells attenuated lymphedema. The significant upregulation of Foxp3, a transcription factor specifically expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs), along with other Treg-related genes, implied a potential role of Tregs in lymphedema. Indeed, increased infiltration of Tregs was identified in mouse lymphedematous skin and in human lymphedema specimens. To investigate the role of Tregs during disease progression, loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies were performed. Depletion of Tregs in transgenic mice with Tregs expressing the primate diphtheria toxin receptor and green fluorescent protein (Foxp3-DTR-GFP) mice led to exacerbated edema, concomitant with increased infiltration of immune cells and a mixed TH1/TH2 cytokine profile. Conversely, expansion of Tregs using IL-2/anti–IL-2 mAb complexes significantly reduced lymphedema development. Therapeutic application of adoptively transferred Tregs upon lymphedema establishment reversed all of the major hallmarks of lymphedema, including edema, inflammation, and fibrosis, and also promoted lymphatic drainage function. Collectively, our results reveal that Treg application constitutes a potential new curative treatment modality for lymphedema. PMID:27734032

  15. Large-Scale Depletion of CD25+ Regulatory T Cells from Patient Leukapheresis Samples

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    Powell, Daniel J.; Parker, Linda L.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The ability to selectively enrich or deplete T lymphocytes of specific phenotype and function holds significant promise for application in adoptive immunotherapy protocols. Although CD4+ T cells can have an impact on CD8+ T-cell effector function, memory, and maintenance, a subset of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg), can regulate peripheral self tolerance and possess the ability to suppress antitumor responses. The authors report the ability to selectively deplete CD25+ Treg cells from patient leukapheresis samples using a clinical-grade, large-scale immunomagnetic system. Using leukapheresis samples containing up to 1.3 × 1010 white blood cells, efficient depletion of Treg cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis of CD25 expression and FOXP3 expression on post-depletion products. Remnant CD25+ cells could not be detected in CD25-depleted products after short-term culture in IL-2 or enriched following secondary immunomagnetic selection for CD25+ cells, confirming that efficient depletion had occurred. In parallel to efficient enrichment of CD25− cells, immunomagnetic selection resulted in the recovery of Treg cells, since CD25+ lymphocytes removed during depletion were primarily composed of CD4+ T cells that expressed high levels of FOXP3 and possessed suppressive activity against autologous TCR-stimulated CD4+ CD25− T cells in vitro. These results show that selective separation of functional CD25+ Treg cells from large-scale samples can be performed in large scale under clinical-grade conditions with sufficient selection, recovery, viability, ability to expand, and function for potential use in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16000960

  16. VEN-120, a Recombinant Human Lactoferrin, Promotes a Regulatory T Cell [Treg] Phenotype and Drives Resolution of Inflammation in Distinct Murine Models of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus, Christopher F; Collins, Colm B; Nguyen, Tom T; Alfano, Randall W; Jedlicka, Paul; de Zoeten, Edwin F

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] is characterised by a disruption of immune homeostasis, which is tightly regulated to protect against harmful pathogens yet not react to commensal antigens. Animal studies indicate that regulatory T cells [Treg] modulate the immune response to prevent IBD development. Lactoferrin [LF] is an endogenous anti-inflammatory pleiotropic protein secreted at high concentrations in colostrum and at mucosal sites. However, the effect of LF on specific T lymphocyte populations has not been studied. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which a recombinant human LF, VEN-120, regulates T cell populations in health and disease. Two murine models of intestinal inflammation, the dextran sodium sulphate colitis model and the TNFΔARE/+ model of ileitis, were used to study the anti-inflammatory and T cell modulating ability of VEN-120. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate T cell populations within the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes, and to evaluate the effect of VEN-120 on CD4+ T cells in vitro. VEN-120 reduced inflammation in both models of IBD, accompanied by increased Tregs in the intestinal lamina propria. Treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro resulted in an upregulation of Treg genes and skewing towards a Treg population. This in vitro T cell skewing translated to an increase of Treg homing to the intestinal lamina propria and associated lymph tissue in healthy mice. These data provide a novel immunological mechanism by which VEN-120 modulates T cells to restrict inflammatory T cell-driven disease.

  17. Morbidly obese human subjects have increased peripheral blood CD4+ T cells with skewing toward a Treg- and Th2-dominated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weerd, Kim; Dik, Willem A; Schrijver, Benjamin; Schweitzer, Dave H; Langerak, Anton W; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Kiewiet, Rosalie M; van Aken, Maarten O; van Huisstede, Astrid; van Dongen, Jacques J M; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Staal, Frank J T; van Hagen, P Martin

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is associated with local T-cell abnormalities in adipose tissue. Systemic obesity-related abnormalities in the peripheral blood T-cell compartment are not well defined. In this study, we investigated the peripheral blood T-cell compartment of morbidly obese and lean subjects. We determined all major T-cell subpopulations via six-color flow cytometry, including CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, CD4+ T-helper (Th) subpopulations, and natural CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Moreover, molecular analyses to assess thymic output, T-cell proliferation (T-cell receptor excision circle analysis), and T-cell receptor-β (TCRB) repertoire (GeneScan analysis) were performed. In addition, we determined plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokines associated with Th subpopulations and T-cell proliferation. Morbidly obese subjects had a selective increase in peripheral blood CD4+ naive, memory, natural CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg, and Th2 T cells, whereas CD8+ T cells were normal. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation was increased, whereas the TCRB repertoire was not significantly altered. Plasma levels of cytokines CCL5 and IL-7 were elevated. CD4+ T-cell numbers correlated positively with fasting insulin levels. The peripheral blood T-cell compartment of morbidly obese subjects is characterized by increased homeostatic T-cell proliferation to which cytokines IL-7 and CCL5, among others, might contribute. This is associated with increased CD4+ T cells, with skewing toward a Treg- and Th2-dominated phenotype, suggesting a more anti-inflammatory set point.

  18. Tumor-localized ligation of CD3 and CD28 with systemic regulatory T-cell depletion induces potent innate and adaptive antitumor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Hsin; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Shih-En; Chong, Chin-Liew; Cheng, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R

    2009-04-15

    Tumor-localized activation of immune cells by membrane-tethered anti-CD3 antibodies (CD3L) is under investigation to treat poorly immunogenic tumors. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanism of antitumor immunity elicited by CD3L. CD3L and CD86 were expressed on poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma cells (B16/3L86 cells) and the effect of various lymphocytes, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, natural killer T (NKT) cells, and regulatory T cells, on antitumor activity was investigated. B16/3L86 cells activated naïve T cells; suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous, peritoneal, and metastasis models; and protected mice from rechallenge with B16 melanoma cells. However, in vivo antitumor activity against primary B16/3L86 tumors unexpectedly depended on NKT cells rather than CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells. Treatment of mice with low-dose cyclophosphamide or anti-CD25 antibody to deplete regulatory T cells unmasked latent T-cell antitumor activity; the number of activated CD8(+) T cells in tumors increased and B16/3L86 tumors were completely rejected in a CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell-dependent fashion. Furthermore, fibroblasts expressing CD3L and CD86 suppressed the growth of neighboring B16 cancer cells in vivo, and direct intratumoral injection of adenoviral vectors expressing CD3L and CD86 or CD3L and a membrane-tethered anti-CD28 antibody significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors. Tumor-located ligation of CD3 and CD28 can activate both innate (NKT cells) and adaptive (CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) responses to create a tumor-destructive environment to control tumor growth, but modulation of regulatory T cells is necessary to unmask local adaptive antitumor responses.

  19. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system.

  20. Trafficking of high avidity HER-2/neu-specific T cells into HER-2/neu-expressing tumors after depletion of effector/memory-like regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian L Weiss

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines are designed to activate and enhance cancer-antigen-targeted T cells that are suppressed through multiple mechanisms of immune tolerance in cancer-bearing hosts. T regulatory cell (Treg suppression of tumor-specific T cells is one barrier to effective immunization. A second mechanism is the deletion of high avidity tumor-specific T cells, which leaves a less effective low avidity tumor specific T cell repertoire available for activation by vaccines. Treg depleting agents including low dose cyclophosphamide (Cy and antibodies that deplete CD25-expressing Tregs have been used with limited success to enhance the potency of tumor-specific vaccines. In addition, few studies have evaluated mechanisms that activate low avidity cancer antigen-specific T cells. Therefore, we developed high and low avidity HER-2/neu-specific TCR transgenic mouse colonies specific for the same HER-2/neu epitope to define the tolerance mechanisms that specifically affect high versus low avidity tumor-specific T cells.High and low avidity CD8(+ T cell receptor (TCR transgenic mice specific for the breast cancer antigen HER-2/neu (neu were developed to provide a purified source of naïve, tumor-specific T cells that can be used to study tolerance mechanisms. Adoptive transfer studies into tolerant FVB/N-derived HER-2/neu transgenic (neu-N mice demonstrated that high avidity, but not low avidity, neu-specific T cells are inhibited by Tregs as the dominant tolerizing mechanism. High avidity T cells persisted, produced IFNγ, trafficked into tumors, and lysed tumors after adoptive transfer into mice treated with a neu-specific vaccine and low dose Cy to deplete Tregs. Analysis of Treg subsets revealed a Cy-sensitive CD4(+Foxp3(+CD25(low tumor-seeking migratory phenotype, characteristic of effector/memory Tregs, and capable of high avidity T cell suppression.Depletion of CD25(low Tregs allows activation of tumor-clearing high avidity T cells. Thus, the development

  1. Regulatory T cells and human myeloid dendritic cells promote tolerance via programmed death ligand-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg has been proposed, yet cellular and molecular mechanisms of human Tregs remain incompletely characterized. Here, we demonstrate that human Tregs promote the generation of myeloid dendritic cells (DC with reduced capacity to stimulate effector T cell responses. In a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, allogeneic human DC conditioned with Tregs suppressed human T cell activation and completely abrogated posttransplant lethality. Tregs induced programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 expression on Treg-conditioned DC; subsequently, Treg-conditioned DC induced PD-L1 expression in vivo on effector T cells. PD-L1 blockade reversed Treg-conditioned DC function in vitro and in vivo, thereby demonstrating that human Tregs can promote immune suppression via DC modulation through PD-L1 up-regulation. This identification of a human Treg downstream cellular effector (DC and molecular mechanism (PD-L1 will facilitate the rational design of clinical trials to modulate alloreactivity.

  2. TSC1 regulates the balance between effector and regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-Seung; Lopez, Justine; Elly, Chris; Kim, Gisen; Murai, Masako; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a crucial role in the control of T cell fate determination; however, the precise regulatory mechanism of the mTOR pathway is not fully understood. We found that T cell–specific deletion of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1), an upstream negative regulator of mTOR, resulted in augmented Th1 and Th17 differentiation and led to severe intestinal inflammation in a colitis model. Conditional Tsc1 deletion in Tregs impaired their suppressive activity and expression of the Treg marker Foxp3 and resulted in increased IL-17 production under inflammatory conditions. A fate-mapping study revealed that Tsc1-null Tregs that lost Foxp3 expression gained a stronger effector-like phenotype compared with Tsc1–/– Foxp3+ Tregs. Elevated IL-17 production in Tsc1–/– Treg cells was reversed by in vivo knockdown of the mTOR target S6K1. Moreover, IL-17 production was enhanced by Treg-specific double deletion of Tsc1 and Foxo3a. Collectively, these studies suggest that TSC1 acts as an important checkpoint for maintaining immune homeostasis by regulating cell fate determination. PMID:24270422

  3. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

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    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid reduces suppressive and migratory functions of CD4CD25 regulatory T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessoufou, Akadiri; Plé, Aude; Moutairou, Kabirou; Hichami, Aziz; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2009-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is one of the fundamental aspects of the immune system. The CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have emerged as key players in the development of tolerance to self and foreign antigens. However, little is known about the endogenous factors and mechanisms controlling their suppressive capacity on immune response. In this study, we observed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, diminished, in a dose-dependent manner, the capacity of Treg cells to inhibit the CD4+CD25− effector T-cell proliferation. DHA not only reduced the migration of Treg cells toward chemokines but also downregulated the mRNA expression of CCR-4 and CXCR-4 in Treg cells. DHA also curtailed ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and downregulated the Smad7 levels in these cells. Contradictorily, DHA upregulated the mRNA expression of Foxp3, CTLA-4, TGF-β, and IL-10; nonetheless, this fatty acid increased the expression of p27KIP1 mRNA, known to be involved in Treg cell unresponsiveness. In Foxp3-immunoprepitated nuclear proteins, DHA upregulated histone desacetylase 7 levels that would again participate in the unresposnsiveness of these cells. Finally, a DHA-enriched diet also diminished, ex vivo, the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. Altogether, these results suggest that DHA, by diminishing Treg cell functions, may play a key role in health and disease. PMID:19561360

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies hypomethylated genes regulated by FOXP3 in human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Naselli, Gaetano; Qian, Junyan; Chopin, Michael; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia; Harrison, Leonard C

    2013-10-17

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) prevent the emergence of autoimmune disease. Prototypic natural Treg (nTreg) can be reliably identified by demethylation at the Forkhead-box P3 (FOXP3) locus. To explore the methylation landscape of nTreg, we analyzed genome-wide methylation in human naive nTreg (rTreg) and conventional naive CD4(+) T cells (Naive). We detected 2315 differentially methylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides (CpGs) between these 2 cell types, many of which clustered into 127 regions of differential methylation (RDMs). Activation changed the methylation status of 466 CpGs and 18 RDMs in Naive but did not alter DNA methylation in rTreg. Gene-set testing of the 127 RDMs showed that promoter methylation and gene expression were reciprocally related. RDMs were enriched for putative FOXP3-binding motifs. Moreover, CpGs within known FOXP3-binding regions in the genome were hypomethylated. In support of the view that methylation limits access of FOXP3 to its DNA targets, we showed that increased expression of the immune suppressive receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT), which delineated Treg from activated effector T cells, was associated with hypomethylation and FOXP3 binding at the TIGIT locus. Differential methylation analysis provides insight into previously undefined human Treg signature genes and their mode of regulation.

  6. The immunology of pregnancy: regulatory T cells control maternal immune tolerance toward the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; Longobardi, Salvatore; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy represents a challenge for the maternal immune system since it has to defend against pathogens and tolerate paternal alloantigens expressed in fetal tissues. Regulatory T (Treg) cells, a subset of suppressor CD4(+) T cells, play a dominant role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by preventing immune and autoimmune responses against self-antigens. Although localized mechanisms contribute to fetal evasion from immune attack, in the last few years it has been observed that Treg cells are essential in promoting fetal survival avoiding the recognition of paternal semi-allogeneic tissues by maternal immune system. Several functional studies have shown that unexplained infertility, miscarriage and pre-clampsia are often associated with deficit in Treg cell number and function while normal pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal forkhead-box-P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) Treg cells with fetal specificity. Some papers have been reported that the number of Treg cells persists at elevated levels long after delivery developing an immune regulatory memory against father's antigens, moreover these memory Treg cells rapidly proliferate during subsequent pregnancies, however, on the other hand, there are several evidence suggesting a clear decline of Treg cells number after delivery. Different factors such as cytokines, adipokines, pregnancy hormones and seminal fluid have immunoregulatory activity and influence the success of pregnancy by increasing Treg cell number and activity. The development of strategies capable of modulating immune responses toward fetal antigens through Treg cell manipulation, could have an impact on the induction of tolerance against fetal antigens during immune-mediated recurrent abortion.

  7. Expression and function of TNF and IL-1 receptors on human regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress immune activation and are critical in preventing autoimmune diseases. While the ability of Tregs to inhibit proliferation of other T cells is well established, it is not yet clear whether Tregs also modulate inflammatory cytokines during an immune response. Here, we show that the expression of inflammatory cytokine receptors IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were higher on resting mature Tregs compared to naïve or memory T cells. While upon activation through the T cell receptor (TCR, expression of IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were upregulated on all T cell subsets, IL-1R1 maintained significantly higher expression on activated Tregs as compared to other T cell subsets. The decoy receptor for IL-1 (IL-1R2 was not expressed by any of the resting T cells but was rapidly upregulated and preferentially expressed upon TCR-stimulation on Tregs. In addition, we found that Tregs also expressed high levels of mRNA for IL-1 antagonist, IL-1RA. TCR-stimulation of naïve T cells in the presence of TGFbeta, which induces FOXP3 expression, however did not result in upregulation of IL-1R1 or IL-1R2. In addition, ectopic expression of FOXP3 in non-Tregs, while causing significant upregulation of IL-1R1 and IL-1R2, did not achieve the levels seen in bona fide Tregs. We also determined that resting human Tregs expressing IL-1R1 did not have higher suppressive capacity compared to IL-1R1- Tregs, suggesting that IL-1R1 does not discriminate suppressive resting Tregs in healthy individuals. Functionally, activated human Tregs displayed a capacity to neutralize IL-1beta, which suggests a physiological significance for the expression of IL-1 decoy receptor on Tregs. In conclusion, our findings that human Tregs preferentially express receptors for TNF and IL-1 suggest a potential function in sensing and dampening local inflammation.

  8. Regulatory T cell number in multiple sclerosis patients: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Bistoon-Beigloo, Sara; Bakhtiyari, Salar; Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Darabi, Shahram; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Abdanipour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), defined as CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells by expression of CD4, high-affinity IL-2 receptor and the transcription factor, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). They play a pivotal role in protecting individuals from autoimmunity and a growing body of evidence suggests their role in the prevention of multiple sclerosis development. However, there are discrepancies about the type of defect in the Treg cells of multiple sclerosis patients and especially whether the Treg number alteration could be contributed to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Indeed, whether low number of Treg cells can be a risk factor contributing to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis is the matter of debate and there is not any comprehensive agreement on it. Thus, the objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to precisely quantify the nature and magnitude of the association between Treg cell number and the risk ratio/odds ratio (OR) of multiple sclerosis in the case-control studies. Hence, medical databases of Embase, PubMed/Medline, PubMed, PubMed Central and SCOPUS were searched for empirical papers using "Regulatory T cell frequency", "Treg frequency" in combination with "multiple sclerosis". In the case-control studies, papers were reviewed for inclusion/exclusion criteria and 8 publications were included. Under random-effect model meta-analysis the data showed that the frequency of Treg cells was not a risk factor in multiple sclerosis using current laboratory methods.

  9. The PD-L1/CD86 ratio is increased in dendritic cells co-infected with porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and the PD-L1/PD-1 axis is associated with anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, O; Cecere, T E; Erdogan, E; Meng, X J; Piñeyro, P; Subramaniam, S; Todd, S M; LeRoith, T

    2015-11-18

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continue to have a negative economic impact on global swine production operations. Host immune modulations that potentiate disease during PCV2 and/or PRRSV infections are important areas of ongoing research. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of PD-L1, CD86, and IL-10 in order to phenotype dendritic cells following viral infection with PCV2b and/or PRRSV. The results showed that the inhibitory marker PD-L1 was significantly increased in monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDC) in both singular PCV2 infection and PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. MoDC expression of stimulatory marker CD86 was significantly increased during singular PCV2 infections, while it was significantly decreased in the treatment groups co-infected with both PCV2 and PRRSV. IL-10 production was highest among MoDCs that were co-infected with PCV2 and PRRSV. These results indicate that dendritic cells develop a regulatory phenotype following PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. We further investigated the role of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in lymphocyte anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine mononuclear cell populations. Lymphocyte populations with normal PD-1 expression had higher percentages of anergic, apoptotic lymphocytes and CD4(+)CD25(HIGH)FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cells when compared to a PD-1 deficient lymphocyte population. These results implicate the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in negative regulation of lymphocyte responses in pigs.

  10. How numbers, nature and immune status of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells shape the early immunological events in tumor development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eDarrasse-Jeze

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs on cancer progression has been demonstrated in a large number of preclinical models and confirmed in several types of malignancies. Neoplastic processes trigger an increase of Treg numbers in draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and tumors, leading to the suppression of anti-tumor responses. Treg depletion before or early in tumor development may lead to complete tumor eradication and extends survival of mice and humans. However this strategy is ineffective in established tumors, highlighting the critical role of the early Treg-tumor encounters. In this review, after discussing old and new concepts of immunological tumor tolerance, we focus on the nature (thymus-derived vs. peripherally-derived and status (naïve or activated / memory of the regulatory T cells at tumor emergence. The recent discoveries in this field suggest that the activation status of Tregs and effector T cells (Teffs at the first encounter with the tumor are essential to shape the fate and speed of the immune response across a variety of tumor models. The relative timing of activation/recruitment of antitumor cells versus tolerogenic cells at tumor emergence appears to be crucial in the identification of tumor cells as friend or foe, which has broad implications for the design of cancer immunotherapies.

  11. Effect of Black Tea Consumption on Intracellular Cytokines, Regulatory T Cells and Metabolic Biomarkers in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Fadia; Haines, David; Al-Ozairi, Ebaa; Dashti, Ali

    2016-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of black tea intake on inflammatory cytokines and metabolic biomarkers in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirty patients with T2DM were randomly assigned either to a High Intake (HI) group, consuming three cups (600 mL) of black tea per day; and a Low Intake (LI) group, administered 1 cup (200 mL) per day, each during a 12-week period. Intracellular cytokine expression, regulatory T cells (Treg), glycemic and lipid profiles were measured at baseline and following the tea intake period. Tea consumption correlated with major effects measured in peripheral blood of subjects that included significantly reduced glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, along with increased regulatory T cells CD3+ CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3, CD3+ CD4+ IL-10+ cells (an immunosuppressive phenotype), reduced (pro-inflammatory) CD3+ CD4+ IL-17+ cells and reduced Th1-associated CD3+ CD4+ IFN-Υ+ cells. Tea consumption was also observed to abolish the significance of an inverse correlation between total serum cholesterol and representation of CD4+ IL-4+ T cells, which may reflect protection against atopy-related oxidative stress. Outcomes of this study describe both advantages and limitations to consumption of black tea as an aid to sustained health maintenance by persons at-risk for TD2M and related obesity-associated metabolic syndromes.

  12. Lymphopenia is detrimental to therapeutic approaches to type 1 diabetes using regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Shifra; Yarkoni, Shai; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    One of the therapeutic approaches to type 1 diabetes (T1D) focuses on enhancement of regulatory T cell (Treg) activity, either by adoptive transfer or supplementation of supporting cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2). In principle, this therapeutic design would greatly benefit of concomitant reduction in pathogenic cell burden. Experimental evidence indicates that physiological recovery from lymphopenia is dominated by evolution of effector and cytotoxic cells, which abolishes the therapeutic efficacy of Treg cells. Targeted and selective depletion of effector T cells has been achieved with killer Treg using Fas ligand protein and a fusion protein composed of IL-2 and caspase-3, which showed remarkable efficacy in modulating the course of inflammatory insulitis in NOD mice. We emphasize a critical consideration in design of therapeutic approaches to T1D, immunomodulation without lymphoreduction to avoid the detrimental consequences of rebound recovery from lymphopenia.

  13. Circulating gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) regulatory T cells have impaired suppressive function in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura; Munier, C Mee Ling; Seddiki, Nabila; van Bockel, David; Ontiveros, Noé; Hardy, Melinda Y; Gillies, Jana K; Levings, Megan K; Reid, Hugh H; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P; Zaunders, John J; Tye-Din, Jason A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-03-08

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by dietary gluten. Although the effector T-cell response in patients with celiac disease has been well characterized, the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the loss of tolerance to gluten remains poorly understood. We sought to define whether patients with celiac disease have a dysfunction or lack of gluten-specific forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) Treg cells. Treated patients with celiac disease underwent oral wheat challenge to stimulate recirculation of gluten-specific T cells. Peripheral blood was collected before and after challenge. To comprehensively measure the gluten-specific CD4(+) T-cell response, we paired traditional IFN-γ ELISpot with an assay to detect antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that does not rely on tetramers, antigen-stimulated cytokine production, or proliferation but rather on antigen-induced coexpression of CD25 and OX40 (CD134). Numbers of circulating gluten-specific Treg cells and effector T cells both increased significantly after oral wheat challenge, peaking at day 6. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 80% of the ex vivo circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells were FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells, which reside within the pool of memory CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)CD45RO(+) Treg cells. Although we observed normal suppressive function in peripheral polyclonal Treg cells from patients with celiac disease, after a short in vitro expansion, the gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells exhibited significantly reduced suppressive function compared with polyclonal Treg cells. This study provides the first estimation of FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cell frequency within circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells after oral gluten challenge of patients with celiac disease. FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells comprised a major proportion of all circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells but had impaired suppressive function, indicating that Treg cell dysfunction might

  14. Regulatory T cell expression of CLA or α4β7 and skin or gut acute GVHD outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt, BG; Jagasia, M; Savani, BN; Bratcher, NL; Greer, JP; Jiang, A.; Kassim, AA; Lu, P.; Schuening, F; Yoder, SM; Rock, MT; Crowe, JE

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a suppressive subset of CD4+ T lymphocytes implicated in the prevention of acute GVHD (aGVHD) after allo-SCT (ASCT). To determine whether increased frequency of Tregs with a skin-homing (cutaneous lymphocyte Ag, CLA+) or a gut-homing (α4β7+) phenotype is associated with reduced risk of skin or gut aGVHD, respectively, we quantified circulating CLA+ or α4β7+ on Tregs at the time of neutrophil engraftment in 43 patients undergoing ASCT. Increased CLA+ Tregs at eng...

  15. In vitro induced regulatory T cells are unique from endogenous regulatory T cells and effective at suppressing late stages of ongoing autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Long M Nguyen

    Full Text Available Strategies to boost the numbers and functions of regulatory T cells (Tregs are currently being tested as means to treat autoimmunity. While Tregs have been shown to be effective in this role, strategies to manipulate Tregs to effectively suppress later stages of ongoing diseases need to be established. In this study, we evaluated the ability of TGF-β-induced Tregs (iTregs specific for the major self-antigen in autoimmune gastritis to suppress established autoimmune gastritis in mice. When transferred into mice during later stages of disease, iTregs demethylated the Foxp3 promoter, maintained Foxp3 expression, and suppressed effector T cell proliferation. More importantly, these iTregs were effective at stopping disease progression. Untreated mice had high numbers of endogenous Tregs (enTregs but these were unable to stop disease progression. In contrast, iTregs, were found in relatively low numbers in treated mice, yet were effective at stopping disease progression, suggesting qualitative differences in suppressor functions. We identified several inhibitory receptors (LAG-3, PD-1, GARP, and TNFR2, cytokines (TGF-β1 and IL12p35, and transcription factors (IRF4 and Tbet expressed at higher levels by iTregs compared to enTregs isolated form mice with ongoing disease, which likely accounts for superior suppressor ability in this disease model. These data support efforts to use iTregs in therapies to treat establish autoimmunity, and show that iTregs are more effective than enTregs at suppressing inflammation in this disease model.

  16. Influence of short-term glucocorticoid therapy on regulatory T cells in vivo.

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    Silviu Sbiera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre- and early clinical studies on patients with autoimmune diseases suggested that induction of regulatory T(T(reg cells may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids (GCs. OBJECTIVE: We readdressed the influence of GC therapy on T(reg cells in immunocompetent human subjects and naïve mice. METHODS: Mice were treated with increasing doses of intravenous dexamethasone followed by oral taper, and T(reg cells in spleen and blood were analyzed by FACS. Sixteen patients with sudden hearing loss but without an inflammatory disease received high-dose intravenous prednisolone followed by stepwise dose reduction to low oral prednisolone. Peripheral blood T(reg cells were analyzed prior and after a 14 day GC therapy based on different markers. RESULTS: Repeated GC administration to mice for three days dose-dependently decreased the absolute numbers of T(reg cells in blood (100 mg dexamethasone/kg body weight: 2.8±1.8×10(4 cells/ml vs. 33±11×10(4 in control mice and spleen (dexamethasone: 2.8±1.9×10(5/spleen vs. 95±22×10(5/spleen in control mice, which slowly recovered after 14 days taper in spleen but not in blood. The relative frequency of FOXP3(+ T(reg cells amongst the CD4(+ T cells also decreased in a dose dependent manner with the effect being more pronounced in blood than in spleen. The suppressive capacity of T(reg cells was unaltered by GC treatment in vitro. In immunocompetent humans, GCs induced mild T cell lymphocytosis. However, it did not change the relative frequency of circulating T(reg cells in a relevant manner, although there was some variation depending on the definition of the T(reg cells (FOXP3(+: 4.0±1.5% vs 3.4±1.5%*; AITR(+: 0.6±0.4 vs 0.5±0.3%, CD127(low: 4.0±1.3 vs 5.0±3.0%* and CTLA4+: 13.8±11.5 vs 15.6±12.5%; * p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Short-term GC therapy does not induce the hitherto supposed increase in circulating T(reg cell frequency, neither in immunocompetent humans nor in

  17. Paricalcitol reduces peritoneal fibrosis in mice through the activation of regulatory T cells and reduction in IL-17 production.

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    Guadalupe T González-Mateo

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice.

  18. Systematic identification of regulatory proteins critical for T-cell activation

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    Kolbinger Frank

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation of T cells, mediated by the T-cell receptor (TCR, activates a battery of specific membrane-associated, cytosolic and nuclear proteins. Identifying the signaling proteins downstream of TCR activation will help us to understand the regulation of immune responses and will contribute to developing therapeutic agents that target immune regulation. Results In an effort to identify novel signaling molecules specific for T-cell activation we undertook a large-scale dominant effector genetic screen using retroviral technology. We cloned and characterized 33 distinct genes from over 2,800 clones obtained in a screen of 7 × 108 Jurkat T cells on the basis of a reduction in TCR-activation-induced CD69 expression after expressing retrovirally derived cDNA libraries. We identified known signaling molecules such as Lck, ZAP70, Syk, PLCγ1 and SHP-1 (PTP1C as truncation mutants with dominant-negative or constitutively active functions. We also discovered molecules not previously known to have functions in this pathway, including a novel protein with a RING domain (found in a class of ubiquitin ligases; we call this protein TRAC-1, transmembrane molecules (EDG1, IL-10Rα and integrin α2, cytoplasmic enzymes and adaptors (PAK2, A-Raf-1, TCPTP, Grb7, SH2-B and GG2-1, and cytoskeletal molecules (moesin and vimentin. Furthermore, using truncated Lck, PLCγ1, EDG1 and PAK2 mutants as examples, we showed that these dominant immune-regulatory molecules interfere with IL-2 production in human primary lymphocytes. Conclusions This study identified important signal regulators in T-cell activation. It also demonstrated a highly efficient strategy for discovering many components of signal transduction pathways and validating them in physiological settings.

  19. Natural and Tumor Induced Regulatory T-cells in Malignant Glioma

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    Maciej eLesniak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmark features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common adult primary brain tumor with a very dismal prognosis, is the accumulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. Regulatory T cells (Tregs segregate into two primary categories: thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs that develop from the interaction between immature T cells and thymic epithelial stromal cells, and inducible Tregs (iTregs that arise from the conversion of CD4+FoxP3- T cells into FoxP3 expressing cells. Normally, these Treg subsets complement one another’s actions by maintaining tolerance of self-antigens, thereby suppressing autoimmunity, while also enabling effective immune responses towards non-self-antigens, thus promoting infectious protection. However, Tregs have also been shown to be associated with the promotion of pathological outcomes, including cancer. In the setting of GBM, nTregs appear to be primary players that contribute to immunotherapeutic failure; ultimately leading to tumor progression. Several attempts have been made to therapeutically target these cells with variable levels of success. The blood brain barrier-crossing chemotherapeutics, temozolomide and cyclophosphamide, vaccination against the Treg transcriptional regulator, FoxP3, as well as mAbs against Treg-associated cell surface molecules CD25, CTLA-4 and GITR are all different therapeutic approaches under investigation. Contributing to the poor success of past approaches is the expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO, a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme overexpressed in GBM and critically involved in regulating tumor-infiltrating Treg levels. Herein, we review the current literature on Tregs in brain cancer, providing a detailed phenotype, causative mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis and strategies that have been used to target this population, therapeutically.

  20. Sequential development of interleukin 2-dependent effector and regulatory T cells in response to endogenous systemic antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knoechel, Birgit; Lohr, Jens; Kahn, Estelle; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Abbas, Abul K

    2005-01-01

    .... Both pathogenic effector cells and protective regulatory cells develop from the same antigen-specific T cell population after activation, and their generation may occur in parallel or sequentially. Interleukin (IL...

  1. IL-35-mediated induction of a potent regulatory T cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L; Giacomin, Paul R; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J; Brown, Scott A; Rehg, Jerold E; Jones, Michael L; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A A

    2010-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) have a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Here we show that treatment of naive human or mouse T cells with IL-35 induced a regulatory population, which we call 'iT(R)35 cells', that mediated suppression via IL-35 but not via the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We found that iT(R)35 cells did not express or require the transcription factor Foxp3, and were strongly suppressive and stable in vivo. T(reg) cells induced the generation of iT(R)35 cells in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro and induced their generation in vivo under inflammatory conditions in intestines infected with Trichuris muris and within the tumor microenvironment (B16 melanoma and MC38 colorectal adenocarcinoma), where they contributed to the regulatory milieu. Thus, iT(R)35 cells constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance and contribute to T(reg) cell-mediated tumor progression. Furthermore, iT(R)35 cells generated ex vivo might have therapeutic utility.

  2. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4+ Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10–producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4+ T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP+ LV-IL-10–transduced human CD4+ T (CD4LV-IL-10) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4LV-IL-10 T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4LV-IL-10 T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4+ T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells. PMID:22692497

  3. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  4. Effect of adoptive transfer or depletion of regulatory T cells on triptolide-induced liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhi eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg in triptolide (TP-induced hepatotoxicity. MethodsFemale C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 hours after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to ALT and AST levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levles of transcription factor FoxP3 and RORγt, IL-10, SOCS and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated.ResultsDuring TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while Th17 cell transcription factor RORγt, SOCS signaling and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1 and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3 and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. ConclusionsThese results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  5. Regulatory T cell frequencies and phenotypes following anti-viral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, A Charlotte M T; van Aalst, Susan; Ludwig, Irene S; Bodinham, Caroline L; Lewis, David J; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) function in the prevention of excessive inflammation and maintenance of immunological homeostasis. However, these cells may also interfere with resolution of infections or with immune reactions following vaccination. Effects of Treg on vaccine responses are nowadays investigated, but the impact of vaccination on Treg homeostasis is still largely unknown. This may be a relevant safety aspect, since loss of tolerance through reduced Treg may trigger autoimmunity. In exploratory clinical trials, healthy adults were vaccinated with an influenza subunit vaccine plus or minus the adjuvant MF59®, an adjuvanted hepatitis B subunit vaccine or a live attenuated yellow fever vaccine. Frequencies and phenotypes of resting (rTreg) and activated (aTreg) subpopulations of circulating CD4+ Treg were determined and compared to placebo immunization. Vaccination with influenza vaccines did not result in significant changes in Treg frequencies and phenotypes. Vaccination with the hepatitis B vaccine led to slightly increased frequencies of both rTreg and aTreg subpopulations and a decrease in expression of functionality marker CD39 on aTreg. The live attenuated vaccine resulted in a decrease in rTreg frequency, and an increase in expression of activation marker CD25 on both subpopulations, possibly indicating a conversion from resting to migratory aTreg due to vaccine virus replication. To study the more local effects of vaccination on Treg in lymphoid organs, we immunized mice and analyzed the CD4+ Treg frequency and phenotype in draining lymph nodes and spleen. Vaccination resulted in a transient local decrease in Treg frequency in lymph nodes, followed by a systemic Treg increase in the spleen. Taken together, we showed that vaccination with vaccines with an already established safe profile have only minimal impact on frequencies and characteristics of Treg over time. These findings may serve as a bench-mark of inter-individual variation of Treg

  6. LPS nephropathy in mice is ameliorated by IL-2 independently of regulatory T cells activity.

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    Roberta Bertelli

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs have been hypothesized to exert a protective role in animal models of spontaneous (Buffalo/Mna and/or drug induced (Adriamycin nephrotic syndrome. In this study, we thought to define whether Tregs can modify the outcome of LPS nephropathy utilizing IL-2 as inducer of tissue and circulating Tregs. LPS (12 mg/Kg was given as single shot in C57BL/6, p2rx7⁻/⁻ and Foxp3EGFP; free IL-2 (18.000 U or, in alternative, IL-2 coupled with JES6-1 mAb (IL-2/anti-IL-2 were injected before LPS. Peripheral and tissue Tregs/total CD4+ cell ratio, urinary parameters and renal histology were evaluated for 15 days. IL-2 administration to wild type mice had no effect on peripheral Tregs number, whereas a significant increase was induced by the IL-2/anti-IL-2 immunocomplex after 5 days. Spleen and lymph nodes Tregs were comparably increased. In p2rx7⁻/⁻ mice, IL-2/anti-IL-2 treatment resulted in increase of peripheral Tregs but did not modify the spleen and lymph nodes quota. LPS induced comparable and transient proteinuria in both wild type and p2rx7⁻/⁻ mice. Proteinuria was inhibited by co-infusion of human IL-2, with reduction at each phase of the disease (24 -48 and 72 hours whereas IL-2/anti-IL-2 produced weaker effects. In all mice (wild type and p2rx7⁻/⁻ and irrespective of treatment (IL-2, IL-2/anti-IL-2, LPS was associated with progressive signs of renal pathologic involvement resulting in glomerulosclerosis. In conclusion, IL-2 plays a transient protective effect on proteinuria induced by LPS independent of circulating or tissue Tregs but does not modify the outcome of renal degenerative renal lesions.

  7. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  8. TLR2 ligation protects effector T cells from regulatory T-cell mediated suppression and repolarizes T helper responses following MVA-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiset, Laurent; Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tania; Rittner, Karola; Duong, Vanessa; Rooke, Ronald; Muller, Sylviane; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Préville, Xavier; Haegel, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is hampered by the immunosuppression maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-bearing hosts. Stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by Pam3Cys is known to affect Treg-mediated suppression. We found that Pam3Cys increases the proliferation of both CD4(+) effector T cells (Teffs) and Tregs co-cultured in vitro, but did not induce the proliferation of Tregs alone upon CD3 and CD28 stimulation. In a mouse model of RMA-MUC1 tumors, Pam3Cys was administered either alone or in combination with a modified vaccinia ankara (MVA)-based mucin 1 (MUC1) therapeutic vaccine. The combination of Pam3Cys with MVA-MUC1 (1) diminished splenic Treg/CD4(+) T-cell ratios to those found in tumor-free mice, (2) stimulated a specific anti-MUC1 interferon γ (IFNγ) response and (3) had a significant therapeutic effect on tumor growth and mouse survival. When CD4(+) Teffs and Tregs were isolated from Pam3Cys-treated mice, Teffs had become resistant to Treg-mediated suppression while upregulating the expression of BclL-x(L). Tregs from Pam3Cys-treated mice were fully suppressive for Teffs from naïve mice. Bcl-x(L) was induced by Pam3Cys with different kinetics in Tregs and Teffs. Teff from Pam3Cys-treated mice produced increased levels of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines and an interleukin (IL)-6-dependent secretion of IL-17 was observed in Teff:Treg co-cultures, suggesting that TLR2 stimulation had skewed the immune response toward a Th17 profile. Our results show for the first time that in a tumor-bearing host, TLR2 stimulation with Pam3Cys affects both Tregs and Teffs, protects Teff from Treg-mediated suppression and has strong therapeutic effects when combined with an MVA-based antitumor vaccine.

  9. Commensal-induced regulatory T cells mediate protection against pathogen-stimulated NF-kappaB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin O'Mahony

    Full Text Available Host defence against infection requires a range of innate and adaptive immune responses that may lead to tissue damage. Such immune-mediated pathologies can be controlled with appropriate T regulatory (Treg activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of gut microbiota composition on Treg cellular activity and NF-kappaB activation associated with infection. Mice consumed the commensal microbe Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 followed by infection with Salmonella typhimurium or injection with LPS. In vivo NF-kappaB activation was quantified using biophotonic imaging. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell phenotypes and cytokine levels were assessed using flow cytometry while CD4+ T cells were isolated using magnetic beads for adoptive transfer to naïve animals. In vivo imaging revealed profound inhibition of infection and LPS induced NF-kappaB activity that preceded a reduction in S. typhimurium numbers and murine sickness behaviour scores in B. infantis-fed mice. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, T cell proliferation, and dendritic cell co-stimulatory molecule expression were significantly reduced. In contrast, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell numbers were significantly increased in the mucosa and spleen of mice fed B. infantis. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells transferred the NF-kappaB inhibitory activity. Consumption of a single commensal micro-organism drives the generation and function of Treg cells which control excessive NF-kappaB activation in vivo. These cellular interactions provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the commensal-host-pathogen trilogue that contribute to host homeostatic mechanisms underpinning protection against aberrant activation of the innate immune system in response to a translocating pathogen or systemic LPS.

  10. CTLA-4 expressed by FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells prevents inflammatory tissue attack and not T-cell priming in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Katrin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Wing, Kajsa

    2017-09-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) -mediated regulation of already tolerized autoreactive T cells is critical for understanding autoimmune responses. Although defects in CTLA-4 contribute to abnormal FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell function in rheumatoid arthritis, its role in autoreactive T cells remains elusive. We studied immunity towards the dominant collagen type II (CII) T-cell epitope in collagen-induced arthritis both in the heterologous setting and in the autologous setting where CII is mutated at position E266D in mouse cartilage. CTLA-4 regulated all stages of arthritis, including the chronic phase, and affected the priming of autologous but not heterologous CII-reactive T cells. CTLA-4 expression by both conventional T (Tconv) cells and Treg cells was required but while Tconv cell expression was needed to control the priming of naive autoreactive T cells, CTLA-4 on Treg cells prevented the inflammatory tissue attack. This identifies a cell-type-specific time window when CTLA-4-mediated tolerance is most powerful, which has important implications for clinical therapy with immune modulatory drugs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Convergences and Divergences of Thymus- and Peripherally Derived Regulatory T Cells in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Burocchi, Alessia; Colombo, Mario P.; Piconese, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg) is a common event characterizing the vast majority of human and experimental tumors and it is now well established that Treg represent a crucial hurdle for a successful immunotherapy. Treg are currently classified, according to their origin, into thymus-derived Treg (tTreg) or peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. Controversy exists over the prevalent mechanism accounting for Treg expansion in tumors, since both tTreg proliferation and de novo pTr...

  12. Regulatory T-cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: actor or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; D’Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Sanzo, Paola Di; Martino, Laura De; Marandino, Aurelio; Sangiorgio, Michele; Musto, Pellegrino; Feo, Vincenzo De

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are now under extensive investigation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This small subset of T-cells has been, in fact, considered to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of CLL. However, whether Treg dysregulation in CLL plays a key role or it rather represents a simple epiphenomenon is still matter of debate. In the former case, Treg cells could be appealing for targeting therapies. Finally, Treg cells have also been proposed as a prognostic indicator of the disease clinical course. PMID:23358515

  13. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were recr...... were found in the percentages of CD4(+) lymphocytes, CD25(high)CD127(low) Tregs, CD45RA(+) naïve Tregs, or CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant Tregs. CONCLUSION: Our data does not indicate an altered state of systemic Treg cells in neovascular AMD....

  14. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonn Mendes Soares Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3 is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance.

  15. Homocysteine activates T cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling and increasing mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Lü, Silin; Ding, Yanhong; Zheng, Ming; Wang, Xian

    2016-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accelerates atherosclerosis by increasing proliferation and stimulating cytokine secretion in T cells. However, whether homocysteine (Hcy)-mediated T cell activation is associated with metabolic reprogramming is unclear. Here, our in vivo and in vitro studies showed that Hcy-stimulated splenic T-cell activation in mice was accompanied by increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium, mitochondrial mass and respiration. Inhibiting mitochondrial ROS production and calcium signals or blocking mitochondrial respiration largely blunted Hcy-induced T-cell interferon γ (IFN-γ) secretion and proliferation. Hcy also enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in T cells, and inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid blocked Hcy-induced T-cell activation. Mechanistically, Hcy increased ER-mitochondria coupling, and uncoupling ER-mitochondria by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole attenuated Hcy-stimulated mitochondrial reprogramming, IFN-γ secretion and proliferation in T cells, suggesting that juxtaposition of ER and mitochondria is required for Hcy-promoted mitochondrial function and T-cell activation. In conclusion, Hcy promotes T-cell activation by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling and regulating metabolic reprogramming.

  16. Promises and paradoxes of regulatory T cells in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, James D

    2015-10-28

    Since their discovery two decades ago, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) have become the subject of intense investigation by immunologists. Unlike other T cells, which promote an immune response, Tregs actively inhibit inflammation when activated by their cognate antigen, thus raising hope that these cells could be engineered into a highly targeted, antigen-specific, immunosuppressant therapy. Although Tregs represent less than 10% of circulating CD4(+)T cells, they have been shown to play an essential role in preventing or limiting inflammation in a variety of animal models and human diseases. In particular, spontaneous intestinal inflammation has been shown to occur in the absence of Tregs, suggesting that there may be a Treg defect central to the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, over the past decade, multiple groups have reported no qualitative or quantitative deficits in Tregs from the intestines and blood of IBD patients to explain why these cells fail to regulate inflammation in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In this review, we will discuss the history of Tregs, what is known about them in IBD, and what progress and obstacles have been seen with efforts to employ them for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Pronounced phenotype in activated regulatory T cells during a chronic helminth infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layland, Laura E; Mages, Jörg; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Hoerauf, Achim; Wagner, Hermann; Lang, Roland; da Costa, Clarissa U Prazeres

    2010-01-15

    Although several markers have been associated with the characterization of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their function, no studies have investigated the dynamics of their phenotype during infection. Since the necessity of Tregs to control immunopathology has been demonstrated, we used the chronic helminth infection model Schistosoma mansoni to address the impact on the Treg gene repertoire. Before gene expression profiling, we first studied the localization and Ag-specific suppressive nature of classically defined Tregs during infection. The presence of Foxp3+ cells was predominantly found in the periphery of granulomas and isolated CD4+CD25(hi)Foxp3+ Tregs from infected mice and blocked IFN-gamma and IL-10 cytokine secretion from infected CD4+CD25- effector T cells. Furthermore, the gene expression patterns of Tregs and effector T cells showed that 474 genes were significantly regulated during schistosomiasis. After k-means clustering, we identified genes exclusively regulated in all four populations, including Foxp3, CD103, GITR, OX40, and CTLA-4--classic Treg markers. During infection, however, several nonclassical genes were upregulated solely within the Treg population, such as Slpi, Gzmb, Mt1, Fabp5, Nfil3, Socs2, Gpr177, and Klrg1. Using RT-PCR, we confirmed aspects of the microarray data and also showed that the expression profile of Tregs from S. mansoni-infected mice is simultaneously unique and comparable with Tregs derived from other infections.

  18. Human secondary lymphoid organs typically contain polyclonally-activated proliferating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jorieke H; Koenen, Hans J P M; Fasse, Esther; Tijssen, Henk J; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Joosten, Irma

    2013-09-26

    Immunomodulating regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy is a promising strategy in autoimmunity and transplantation. However, to achieve full clinical efficacy, better understanding of in vivo human Treg biology is warranted. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to blood and bone marrow Tregs, which showed a resting phenotype, the majority of CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg)FoxP3(pos) Tregs in secondary lymphoid organs were proliferating activated CD69(pos)CD45RA(neg) cells with a hyperdemethylated FOXP3 gene and a broad T-cell receptor-Vβ repertoire, implying polyclonal activation. Activated CD69(pos) Tregs were distributed over both T-cell and B-cell areas, distant from Aire(pos) and CD11c(pos) cells. In contrast to the anergic peripheral blood Tregs, lymphoid organ Tregs had significant ex vivo proliferative capacity and produced cytokines like interleukin-2, while revealing similar suppressive potential. Also, next to Treg-expressing chemokine receptors important for a prolonged stay in lymphoid organs, a significant part of the cells expressed peripheral tissue-associated, functional homing markers. In conclusion, our data suggest that human secondary lymphoid organs aid in the maintenance and regulation of Treg function and homeostasis. This knowledge may be exploited for further optimization of Treg immunotherapy, for example, by ex vivo selection of Tregs with capacity to migrate to lymphoid organs providing an in vivo platform for further Treg expansion.

  19. Development of regulatory T cells requires IL-7Ralpha stimulation by IL-7 or TSLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Renata; Hixon, Julie A; Spolski, Rosanne; Chen, Xin; Li, Wen Qing; Hall, Veronica L; Willette-Brown, Jami; Hurwitz, Arthur A; Leonard, Warren J; Durum, Scott K

    2008-10-15

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7), a cytokine produced by stromal cells, is required for thymic development and peripheral homeostasis of most major subsets of T cells. We examined whether regulatory T (Treg) cells also required the IL-7 pathway by analyzing IL-7Ralpha(-/-) mice. We observed a striking reduction in cells with the Treg surface phenotype (CD4, CD25, GITR (glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-like receptor), CD45RB, CD62L, CD103) or intracellular markers (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4, CTLA-4, and forkhead box transcription factor 3, Foxp3). Foxp3 transcripts were virtually absent in IL-7Ralpha(-/-) lymphoid tissues, and no Treg cell suppressive activity could be detected. There are 2 known ligands for IL-7Ralpha: IL-7 itself and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Surprisingly, mice deficient in IL-7 or the other chain of the TSLP receptor (TSLPR) developed relatively normal numbers of Treg cells. Combined deletion of IL-7 and TSLP receptor greatly reduced Treg cell development in the thymus but was not required for survival of mature peripheral Treg cells. We conclude that Treg cells, like other T cells, require signals from the IL-7 receptor, but unlike other T cells, do not require IL-7 itself because of at least partially overlapping actions of IL-7 and TSLP for development of Treg cells.

  20. Lineage stability and phenotypic plasticity of Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Shohei

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) constitute a unique T-cell lineage committed to suppressive functions. While their differentiation state is remarkably stable in the face of various perturbations from the extracellular environment, they are able to adapt to diverse and fluctuating tissue environments by changing their phenotype. The lineage stability and phenotypic plasticity of Treg cells thus ensure the robustness of self-tolerance and tissue homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested, however, that Treg cells may retain lineage plasticity, the ability to switch their cell fate to various effector T-cell types under certain circumstances such as inflammation, a notion that remains highly contentious. While accumulating evidence indicates that some Treg cells can downregulate Foxp3 expression and/or acquire effector T-helper cell-like phenotypes, results from my laboratory have shown that Treg cells retain epigenetic memory of, and thus remain committed to, Foxp3 expression and suppressive functions despite such phenotypic plasticity. It has also become evident that Foxp3 can be promiscuously and transiently expressed in activated T cells. Here, I argue that the current controversy stems partly from the lack of the lineage specificity of Foxp3 expression and also from the confusion between phenotypic plasticity and lineage plasticity, and discuss implications of our findings in Treg cell fate determination and maintenance.

  1. Suppression of Allogeneic T Cells Proliferation by CD3/CD46-Induced T-regulatory 1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈栋; 张艳; 李明; 张弛; 陈刚; 陈知水; 陈实; 张伟杰

    2010-01-01

    CD46 is not only identified as a complement regulatory protein which protects host cells from complement attack,but also a new co-stimulatory molecule for human T cells.CD3/CD46 co-stimulation can induce a T-regulatory 1 cell(Tr1)-specific cytokine phenotype in human CD4+ T cells.However,the role of CD46 as a co-stimulatory molecule in the modulation of the acquired immunity,such as transplant immunology,remains unclear.In this study,CD4+ T cells were isolated from human CD46-transgenic C57BL/6 mice by magn...

  2. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E.; Highfill, Steven L.; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H.; Levine, Bruce L.; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Weigel, Brenda J.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro–generated, potently lytic anti–AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease bur...

  3. Variability in CRP, regulatory T cells and effector T cells over time in gynaecological cancer patients: a study of potential oscillatory behaviour and correlations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory marker, C reactive protein has been proposed to also be a biomarker for adaptive immune responses in cancer patients with a possible application in time based chemotherapy. Fluxes in serum CRP levels were suggested to be indicative of a cyclical process in which, immune activation is followed by auto-regulating immune suppression. The applicability of CRP as a biomarker for regulatory or effector T cells was therefore investigated in a cohort of patients with gynae...

  4. STAT3 Regulates Proliferation and Survival of CD8+ T Cells: Enhances Effector Responses to HSV-1 Infection, and Inhibits IL-10+ Regulatory CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Rong Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT3 regulates CD4+ T cell survival and differentiation. However, its effects on CD8+ T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that in comparison to WT CD8+ T cells, STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells exhibit a preactivated memory-like phenotype, produce more IL-2, proliferate faster, and are more sensitive to activation-induced cell death (AICD. The enhanced proliferation and sensitivity to AICD correlated with downregulation of class-O forkhead transcription factors (FoxO1, FoxO3A, , , Bcl-2, OX-40, and upregulation of FasL, Bax, and Bad. We examined whether STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells can mount effective response during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 infection and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Compared to WT mice, HSV-1-infected STAT3-deficient mice (STAT3KO produced less IFN- and virus-specific KLRG-1+ CD8+ T cells. STAT3KO mice are also resistant to EAU and produced less IL-17-producing Tc17 cells. Resistance of STAT3KO to EAU correlated with marked expansion of IL-10-producing regulatory CD8+ T cells (CD8-Treg implicated in recovery from autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, increases of IL-6-induced STAT3 activation observed during inflammation may inhibit expansion of CD8-Tregs, thereby impeding recovery from uveitis. These results suggest that STAT3 is a potential therapeutic target for upregulating CD8+ T cell-mediated responses to viruses and suggest the successful therapeutic targeting of STAT3 as treatment for uveitis, derived, in part, from promoting CD8-Treg expansion.

  5. Genome-wide expression profiling during protection from colitis by regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Olsen, Jørgen; Gad, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Chip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array), which enabled an analysis of a complete set of RNA transcript levels in each sample. Array results were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Data were analyzed using combined projections to latent structures and functional...... annotation analysis. The colitic samples were clearly distinguishable from samples from normal mice by a vast number of inflammation- and growth factor-related transcripts. In contrast, the Treg-protected animals could not be distinguished from either the normal BALB/c mice or the normal SCID mice. mRNA......BACKGROUND: In the adoptive transfer model of colitis it has been shown that regulatory T cells (Treg) can hinder disease development and cure already existing mild colitis. The mechanisms underlying this regulatory effect of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs are not well understood. METHODS: To identify...

  6. Evaluation of Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute and Chronic Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Ali; Mosayebi, Ghasem; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; khosravi, Khadije; Zarinfar, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is one of the most common chronic diseases, with widespread distribution. In spite of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) modulated mainly via activated T-helper type 1 (Th1) cells, brucellosis can advance to chronic disease in about 10-30% of cases. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are involved the immune response to brucellosis; however, their role, particularly in the change from the acute to the chronic phase, have not yet been elucidated. The main hypothesis of this study was that Treg cells play critical roles in the progression of brucellosis from the acute to the chronic phase. Methods: Forty-eight unrelated subjects participated in this case-control study. The percentages of CD4+, CD25+, FoxP3+, and CD25/FoxP3+ T cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of acute (AB) and chronic brucellosis (CB) patients and healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. The mean florescence intensities (MFIs) of CD4+, CD25+, and FoxP3+ T cells were also measured. Results: We found a significantly lower percentage of CD25/FoxP3+ Treg cells in CB than in the AB and control groups (p < 0.05). Also, CD4 and CD25 MFIs were significantly less in CB than in AB and controls (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We propose that the reduced number of CD25/FoxP3+ Treg cells in the CB group leads to T cell anergy and this contributes to the development of chronic infection. PMID:28367469

  7. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  8. Regulatory T cells reduce acute lung injury fibroproliferation by decreasing fibrocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Brian T; D'Alessio, Franco R; Mock, Jason R; Files, D Clark; Chau, Eric; Eto, Yoshiki; Drummond, M Bradley; Aggarwal, Neil R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; King, Landon S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Fibroproliferation in ALI results in worse outcomes, but the mechanisms governing fibroproliferation remain poorly understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in lung injury resolution. Their role in fibroproliferation is unknown. We sought to identify the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation, using a murine model of lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-) mice received intratracheal LPS. Fibroproliferation was characterized by histology and the measurement of lung collagen. Lung fibrocytes were measured by flow cytometry. To dissect the role of Tregs in fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice received CD4(+)CD25(+) (Tregs) or CD4(+)CD25(-) Tcells (non-Tregs) at the time of LPS injury. To define the role of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)-CXCR4 pathway in ALI fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 to block fibrocyte recruitment. WT and Rag-1(-/-) mice demonstrated significant collagen deposition on Day 3 after LPS. WT mice exhibited the clearance of collagen, but Rag-1(-/-) mice developed persistent fibrosis. This fibrosis was mediated by the sustained epithelial expression of CXCL12 (or stromal cell-derived factor 1 [SDF-1]) that led to increased fibrocyte recruitment. The adoptive transfer of Tregs resolved fibroproliferation by decreasing CXCL12 expression and subsequent fibrocyte recruitment. Blockade of the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis with AMD3100 also decreased lung fibrocytes and fibroproliferation. These results indicate a central role for Tregs in the resolution of ALI fibroproliferation by reducing fibrocyte recruitment along the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. A dissection of the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation may inform the design of new therapeutic tools for patients with ALI.

  9. Targeting regulatory T cells to improve vaccine immunogenicity in early life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorjoh eNdure

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human newborns and infants are bombarded with multiple pathogens on leaving the sterile intra-uterine environment, and yet have suboptimal innate immunity and limited immunological memory, thus leading to increased susceptibility to infections in early life. They are thus the target age group for a host of vaccines against common bacterial and viral pathogens. They are also the target group for many vaccines in development, including those against tuberculosis (TB, malaria and HIV infection. However, neonatal and infant responses to many vaccines are suboptimal, and in the case of the polysaccharide vaccines, it has been necessary to develop the alternative conjugated formulations in order to induce immunity in early life. Immunoregulatory factors are an intrinsic component of natural immunity necessary to dampen or control immune responses, with the caveat that they may also decrease immunity to infections or lead to chronic infection. This review explores the key immunoregulatory factors at play in early life, with a particular emphasis on regulatory T cells (Tregs. It goes on to explore the role that Tregs play in limting vaccine immunogenicity, and describes animal and human studies in which Tregs have been depleted in order to enhance vaccine responses. A deeper understanding of the role that Tregs play in limiting or controlling vaccine induced immunity would provide strategies to improve vaccine immunogenicity in this critical age group. New adjuvants and drugs are being developed that can transiently suppress Treg function, and their use as part of human vaccination strategies against infections is becoming a real prospect for the future.

  10. Evaluation of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells during treatment of patients with brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanjani Roushan, M R; Bayani, M; Soleimani Amiri, S; Mohammadnia-Afrouzi, M; Nouri, H R; Ebrahimpour, S

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) plays a critical role in the control of brucellosis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a functional character in modulating the balance between host immune response and tolerance, which can eventually lead to chronic infection or relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the alteration of Tregs in cases of brucellosis before and after treatment. Thirty cases of acute brucellosis with the mean age of 41.03±15.15 years (case group) and 30 healthy persons with the mean age of 40.63±13.95 years (control group) were selected and assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood of all individuals. We analyzed the alteration of Treg cell count using flow cytometry for CD4, CD25, and FoxP3 markers. The level of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg cells was increased in active patients compared with controls (2.5±0.99% vs 1.6±0.84%, p= 0.0004), but it had declined in the treated cases (1.83±0.73%, p=0.02). The level of Tregs was elevated in three relapsed cases. The frequency of Tregs and Treg/Teff (effector T cell) ratio was correlated with inverse serum agglutination test (SAT) and, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) titers as markers of treatment in brucellosis. Based on our findings, we suggest that regulatory cells, such as CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg cells, may contribute to the development of infection processes involving immune responses in brucellosis, and evaluation of regulatory T-cell levels may be a potential diagnostic strategy for the treatment outcome in chronic and relapsed cases of brucellosis.

  11. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life.

  12. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/−) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by functional wild-type T reg cells. Spleens of Ets-1−/− mice contained mostly activated T cells, including Th2-polarized CD4+ cells and had reduced percentages of T reg cells. Splenic and thymic Ets-1−/− T reg cells expressed low levels of Foxp3 and displayed the CD103 marker that characterizes antigen-experienced T reg cells. Thymic development of Ets-1−/− T reg cells appeared intrinsically altered as Foxp3-expressing cells differentiate poorly in mixed fetal liver reconstituted chimera and fetal thymic organ culture. Ets-1−/− T reg cells showed decreased in vitro suppression activity and did not protect Rag2−/− hosts from naive T cell–induced inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, in T reg cells, Ets-1 interacted with the Foxp3 intronic enhancer and was required for demethylation of this regulatory sequence. These data demonstrate that Ets-1 is required for the development of natural T reg cells and suggest a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of Foxp3 expression. PMID:20855499

  13. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tuettenberg

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer.

  14. Special regulatory T cell review: The resurgence of the concept of contrasuppression in immunoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The original concept of contrasuppression (CS) is evident in many immunoregulatory mechanisms. Inhibition of suppressor activity--CS--may be critical in microbial infection and autoimmunity. The major cellular interactions involved in suppression are the CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T regulatory cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1) : PD-L1/L2 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) : CD80/86 pathways. These cellular functions are affected by dendritic cells (DC) and a complex array of cytokines of which interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) are especially significant. Inhibition of regulatory cells, suppressor pathways or cytokines, is consistent with CS and can be attributed to IL-6, IL-2, PD-1 or PD-L-1 antibodies, blockade of CTLA-4 : CD80/86 pathway, inhibition of CD40-CD40L pathways, and TGF-beta, IL-10 antibodies. Contrasuppression may regulate innate immunity by Toll-like receptor expressed not only in non-cognate DC, monocytes, natural killer cells and gammadelta T cells but also in adaptive T cells. Furthermore, cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity may be facilitated by contrasuppressor activity. ''What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.'' From Romeo and Juliet (II, 47-8) W. Shakespeare.

  15. The Role of Different Subsets of Regulatory T Cells in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Gol-Ara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common autoimmune disease and a systemic inflammatory disease which is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion and hyperplasia of synovial tissues. Considering the role of autoreactive T cells (particularly Th1 and Th17 cells in pathophysiology of RA, it might be assumed that the regulatory T cells (Tregs will be able to control the initiation and progression of disease. The frequency, function, and properties of various subsets of Tregs including natural Tregs (nTregs, IL-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells, TGF-β-producing Th3 cells, CD8+ Tregs, and NKT regulatory cells have been investigated in various studies associated with RA and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA as experimental model of this disease. In this paper, we intend to submit the comprehensive information about the immunobiology of various subsets of Tregs and their roles and function in immunopathophysiology of RA and its animal model, CIA.

  16. Induction of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+regulatory T cell response by glatiramer acetate in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoliang Cui; Yuebo Zhang; Zhenwei Gong; Jingwu Z Zhang; Ying Qin Zang

    2009-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is an immunomodulatory peptide drug used to treat multiple sclerosis. Its treatment ef-fect has been expanded to other autoimmune conditions such as uveoretinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, graft re-jection and hepatic fibrosis. Here, we report that GA was effective in altering the clinical course of diabetes in cyclo-phosphamide (CY)-potentiated non-obese diabetic (CY-NOD) mice. Treatment with GA significantly reduced the dia-betic rate in the mice and ameliorated insulitis, which coincided with increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cell response in treated mice. GA treatment led to increased expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and elevated production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) both in vivo and in vitro. It was evident that the effect of GA on up-regulation of Foxp3 was me-diated partially through IL-4. IL-4 was found to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study provides new evidence that GA has treatment potential for type 1 diabetes through the induction of Tregs and that increased IL-4 production is partially responsible for the enhanced Treg's function in GA treatment.

  17. Downregulation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells may underlie enhanced Th1 immunity caused by immunization with activated autologous T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cao; Dangsheng Li; Ningli Li; Li Wang; Fang Du; Huiming Sheng; Yan Zhang; Juanjuan Wu; Baihua Shen; Tianwei Shen; Jingwu Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play important roles in immune system homeostasis, and may also be involved in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing Thl immune response which is involved in anti-tumor immunity. We have previously reported that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells leads to enhanced anti-tumor immunity and upregulated Thl responses in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that Treg function was significantly downregulated in mice that received immunization of attenuated activated autologous T cells. We found that Foxp3 expression decreased in CD4+CD25+ T cells from the immunized mice. Moreover, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg obtained from immunized mice exhibited diminished immunosuppression ability compared to those from naive mice. Further analysis showed that the serum of immunized mice contains a high level of anti-CD25 antibody (about 30 ng/ml,/K0.01 vs controls). Consistent with a role of anti-CD25 response in the down-regulation of Treg, adoptive transfer of serum from immunized mice to naive mice led to a significant decrease in Treg population and function in recipient mice. The triggering of anti-CD25 response in immunized mice can be explained by the fact that CD25 was induced to a high level in the ConA activated autologous T cells used for immunization. Our results demonstrate for the first time that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells evokes anti-CD25 antibody production, which leads to impeded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg expansion and function in vivo. We suggest that dampened Treg function likely contributes to enhanced Thl response in immunized mice and is at least part of the mechanism underlying the boosted anti-tumor immunity.

  18. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  19. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T-cell role and development of human diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Julie Massayo Maeda Oda; Bruna Karina Banin Hirata; Roberta Losi Guembarovski; Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2013-04-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes a transcription factor thought to be important for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). These cells are involved in the regulation of T cell activation and therefore are essential for normal immune homeostasis. Signals from microenvironment have a profound influence on the maintenance or progression of diseases. Thus, Tregs have an important marker protein, FOXP3, though it does not necessarily confer a Treg phenotype when expressed. FOXP3 polymorphisms that occur with high frequency in the general populations have been studied in common multifactorial human diseases. Dysfunction of FOXP3 gene product could result in lack of Treg cells and subsequently chronically activated CD4+ T cells which express increased levels of several activation markers and cytokines, resulting in some autoimmune diseases. In contrast, high Treg levels have been reported in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, and tumour specimens from patients with different types of cancer. The present study discusses the polymorphisms located in intron, exon and promoter regions of FOXP3 which have already been investigated by many researchers. FOXP3 has received considerable attention in attempts to understand the molecular aspect of Treg cells. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of FOXP3 in Treg-cell role and in disease development are reviewed considering the interactive effect of genetic factors.

  20. Regulatory T cells are strong promoters of acute ischemic stroke in mice by inducing dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter; Dreykluft, Angela; Hagedorn, Ina; Göbel, Kerstin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Langhauser, Friederike; Helluy, Xavier; Schwarz, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Mayer, Christian T; Brede, Marc; Varallyay, Csanad; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Magnus, Tim; Meuth, Sven G; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Zernecke, Alma; Sparwasser, Tim; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Wiendl, Heinz

    2013-01-24

    We have recently identified T cells as important mediators of ischemic brain damage, but the contribution of the different T-cell subsets is unclear. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generally regarded as prototypic anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. In the present study, we examined the role of Tregs after experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Selective depletion of Tregs in the DEREG mouse model dramatically reduced infarct size and improved neurologic function 24 hours after stroke and this protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarct development. The specificity of this detrimental Treg effect was confirmed by adoptive transfer experiments in wild-type mice and in Rag1(-/-) mice lacking lymphocytes. Mechanistically, Tregs induced microvascular dysfunction in vivo by increased interaction with the ischemic brain endothelium via the LFA-1/ICAM-1 pathway and platelets and these findings were confirmed in vitro. Ablation of Tregs reduced microvascular thrombus formation and improved cerebral reperfusion on stroke, as revealed by ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging at 17.6 Tesla. In contrast, established immunoregulatory characteristics of Tregs had no functional relevance. We define herein a novel and unexpected role of Tregs in a primary nonimmunologic disease state.

  1. Increased memory phenotypes of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leonard Mboera

    CD4+ T cells as well as effector memory CD8+ T cells (21.3% vs. ... indicated increased immune activation (Hibbert et al., 2005; Keikhaei et al., ...... Casanova, J.L., Reynaud, C.A. & Weill, J.C. (2004) Human blood IgM "memory" B cells are.

  2. Effects of in vivo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody on regulatory T cell depletion and CD4+CD25- T cell properties in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2012-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are defined as CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in chickens. This study examined the effects of an anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody injection (0.5 mg/bird) on in vivo depletion of Tregs and the properties of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells in Treg-depleted birds. The CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood was lower at 8 d post injection than at 0 d. Anti-CD25-mediated CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion in blood was maximum at 12 d post injection. The anti-CD25 antibody injection depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the spleen and cecal tonsils, but not in the thymus, at 12 d post antibody injection. CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of birds injected with the anti-chicken CD25 antibody had higher proliferation and higher IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts than the controls at 12 d post injection. At 20 d post injection, CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the blood, spleen and thymus were comparable to that of the 0 d post injection. It could be concluded that anti-chicken CD25 injection temporarily depleted Treg population and increased and IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells at 12d post injection.

  3. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H; Levine, Bruce L; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H; Vallera, Daniel A; Weigel, Brenda J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2009-10-29

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated, potently lytic anti-AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease burden or extend survival. Compared with non-AML-bearing hosts, transferred CTLs had reduced proliferation in AML sites of metastases. Treg depletion by a brief course of interleukin-2 diphtheria toxin (IL-2DT) transiently reduced AML disease burden but did not permit long-term survival. In contrast, IL-2DT prevented anti-AML CTL hypoproliferation, increased the number of transferred CTLs at AML disease sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors that sustained an anti-AML memory response. These data demonstrated that Tregs present at AML disease sites suppress adoptively transferred CTL proliferation, limiting their in vivo expansion, and Treg depletion before CTL transfer can result in therapeutic efficacy in settings of substantial pre-existing tumor burden in which antitumor reactive CTL infusion alone has proven ineffective.

  4. Abnormal phenotypic distribution of regulatory and effector T cells in octogenarian and nonagenarian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson de Melo Cruvinel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SummaryIntroduction:aging is associated with several immunologic changes. Regulatory (Treg and effector T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious, neoplastic, and autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the effects of aging on the frequency and function of these T cell subpopulations.Methods:peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were obtained from 26 young (under 44 years old and 18 elderly (above 80 years old healthy women. T cell subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry.Results:elderly individuals had lower frequency of several activated effector T cell phenotypes as compared with young individuals: CD3+CD4+CD25+ (3.82±1.93 versus 9.53±4.49; p<0.0001; CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127+(2.39±1.19 versus 7.26±3.84; p<0.0001; CD3+CD4+CD25+ (0.41±0.22 versus 1.86±0.85, p<0.0001; and CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127+(0.06±0.038 versus 0.94±0.64, p<0.0001. Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127øFoxp3+ presented lower frequency in elderly individuals as compared to young adults (0.34±0.18 versus 0.76±0.48; p=0.0004 and its frequency was inversely correlated with age in the whole group (r=-0.439; p=0.013. The elderly group showed higher frequency of two undefined CD25øFoxp3+ phenotypes: CD3+CD4+CD25øFoxp3+(15.05±7.34 versus 1.65±1.71; p<0.0001 and CD3+CD4+CD25øCD127øFoxp3+(13.0±5.52 versus 3.51±2.87; p<0.0001.Conclusions:the altered proportion of different T cell subsets herein documented in healthy elderly women may be relevant to the understanding of the immunologic behavior and disease susceptibility patterns observed in geriatric patients.

  5. Monitoring regulatory T cells in clinical samples: consensus on an essential marker set and gating strategy for regulatory T cell analysis by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Dijkgraaf, Eveline M; Battaglia, Alessandra; Beckhove, Philipp; Britten, Cedrik M; Gallimore, Awen; Godkin, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cecile; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Koenen, Hans J P M; Scheffold, Alexander; Shevach, Ethan M; Staats, Janet; Taskén, Kjetil; Whiteside, Theresa L; Kroep, Judith R; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated immunosuppression is considered a major obstacle for successful cancer immunotherapy. The association between clinical outcome and Tregs is being studied extensively in clinical trials, but unfortunately, no consensus has been reached about (a) the markers and (b) the gating strategy required to define human Tregs in this context, making it difficult to draw final conclusions. Therefore, we have organized an international workshop on the detection and functional testing of Tregs with leading experts in the field, and 40 participants discussing different analyses and the importance of different markers and context in which Tregs were analyzed. This resulted in a rationally composed ranking list of "Treg markers". Subsequently, the proposed Treg markers were tested to get insight into the overlap/differences between the most frequently used Treg definitions and their utility for Treg detection in various human tissues. Here, we conclude that the CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, and FoxP3 markers are the minimally required markers to define human Treg cells. Staining for Ki67 and CD45RA showed to provide additional information on the activation status of Tregs. The use of markers was validated in a series of PBMC from healthy donors and cancer patients, as well as in tumor-draining lymph nodes and freshly isolated tumors. In conclusion, we propose an essential marker set comprising antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, Foxp3, Ki67, and CD45RA and a corresponding robust gating strategy for the context-dependent analysis of Tregs by flow cytometry.

  6. Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory T cells during resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliani, Nicola; Amezcua Vesely, Maria Carolina; Iseppon, Andrea; Brockmann, Leonie; Xu, Hao; Palm, Noah W; de Zoete, Marcel R; Licona-Limón, Paula; Paiva, Ricardo S; Ching, Travers; Weaver, Casey; Zi, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Xinghua; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X; Cotton, Matthew J; Drier, Yotam; Bernstein, Bradley; Geginat, Jens; Stockinger, Brigitta; Esplugues, Enric; Huber, Samuel; Flavell, Richard A

    2015-07-09

    Inflammation is a beneficial host response to infection but can contribute to inflammatory disease if unregulated. The Th17 lineage of T helper (Th) cells can cause severe human inflammatory diseases. These cells exhibit both instability (they can cease to express their signature cytokine, IL-17A) and plasticity (they can start expressing cytokines typical of other lineages) upon in vitro re-stimulation. However, technical limitations have prevented the transcriptional profiling of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells ex vivo during immune responses. Thus, it is unknown whether Th17 cell plasticity merely reflects change in expression of a few cytokines, or if Th17 cells physiologically undergo global genetic reprogramming driving their conversion from one T helper cell type to another, a process known as transdifferentiation. Furthermore, although Th17 cell instability/plasticity has been associated with pathogenicity, it is unknown whether this could present a therapeutic opportunity, whereby formerly pathogenic Th17 cells could adopt an anti-inflammatory fate. Here we used two new fate-mapping mouse models to track Th17 cells during immune responses to show that CD4(+) T cells that formerly expressed IL-17A go on to acquire an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The transdifferentiation of Th17 into regulatory T cells was illustrated by a change in their signature transcriptional profile and the acquisition of potent regulatory capacity. Comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells also revealed a role for canonical TGF-β signalling and consequently for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in conversion. Thus, Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory cells, and contribute to the resolution of inflammation. Our data suggest that Th17 cell instability and plasticity is a therapeutic opportunity for inflammatory diseases.

  7. Effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on the differentiation of Th17 T cells and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Hyung, Kyeong Eun; Yoo, Jong-Sun; Jang, Ye Won; Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Do Ik; Lee, Sang Joon; Park, So-Young; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Kwang Woo

    2016-10-01

    The potential risks that electromagnetic fields (EMF) pose to human physiology have been debated for several decades, especially considering that EMF is almost omnipresent and some occupations involve regular exposure to particularly strong fields. In the present study, the effects of 60 Hz 0.3 mT EMF on CD4+ T cells were evaluated. Production of T cell related cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-2, was not altered in CD4+ T cells that were exposed to EMF, and cell proliferation was also unaffected. The expression of genes present in a subset of Th17 cells was upregulated following EMF exposure, and the production of effector cytokines of the IL-17A subset also increased. To determine signaling pathways that underlie these effects, phosphorylation of STAT3 and SMAD3, downstream molecules of cytokines critical for Th17 induction, was analyzed. Increased SMAD3 phosphorylation level in cells exposed to EMF, suggesting that SMAD3 may be at least in part causing the increased Th17 cell production. Differentiation of Treg, another CD4+ T cell subset induced by SMAD3 signaling, was also elevated following EMF exposure. These results suggest that 60 Hz 0.3 mT EMF exposure amplifies TGF-β signaling and increases the generation of specific T cell subsets.

  8. Functional analysis of membrane-bound complement regulatory protein on T-cell immune response in ginbuna crucian carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Indriyani; Abdelkhalek, Nevien K; Motobe, Shiori; Nakamura, Ryota; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2016-02-01

    Complements have long been considered to be a pivotal component in innate immunity. Recent researches, however, highlight novel roles of complements in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Membrane-bound complement regulatory protein CD46, a costimulatory protein for T cells, is a key molecule for T-cell immunomodulation. Teleost CD46-like molecule, termed Tecrem, has been newly identified in common carp and shown to function as a complement regulator. However, it remains unclear whether Tecrem is involved in T-cell immune response. We investigated Tecrem function related to T-cell responses in ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna Tecrem (gTecrem) proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation using anti-common carp Tecrem monoclonal antibody (mAb) and were ubiquitously expressed on blood cells including CD8α(+) and CD4(+) lymphocytes. gTecrem expression on leucocyte surface was enhanced after stimulation with the T-cell mitogen, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Coculture with the anti-Tecrem mAb significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that cross-linking of Tecrems on T-cells interferes with a signal transduction pathway for T-cell activation. These findings indicate that Tecrem may act as a T-cell moderator and imply that the complement system in teleost, as well as mammals, plays an important role for linking adaptive and innate immunity.

  9. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune proce

  10. The inhibitory cytokine IL-35 contributes to regulatory T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Workman, Creg J; Kuo, Timothy T; Boyd, Kelli; Wang, Yao; Vignali, Kate M; Cross, Richard; Sehy, David; Blumberg, Richard S; Vignali, Dario A A

    2007-11-22

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are a critical sub-population of CD4+ T cells that are essential for maintaining self tolerance and preventing autoimmunity, for limiting chronic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and for regulating homeostatic lymphocyte expansion. However, they also suppress natural immune responses to parasites and viruses as well as anti-tumour immunity induced by therapeutic vaccines. Although the manipulation of T(reg) function is an important goal of immunotherapy, the molecules that mediate their suppressive activity remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that Epstein-Barr-virus-induced gene 3 (Ebi3, which encodes IL-27beta) and interleukin-12 alpha (Il12a, which encodes IL-12alpha/p35) are highly expressed by mouse Foxp3+ (forkhead box P3) T(reg) cells but not by resting or activated effector CD4+ T (T(eff)) cells, and that an Ebi3-IL-12alpha heterodimer is constitutively secreted by T(reg) but not T(eff) cells. Both Ebi3 and Il12a messenger RNA are markedly upregulated in T(reg) cells co-cultured with T(eff) cells, thereby boosting Ebi3 and IL-12alpha production in trans. T(reg)-cell restriction of this cytokine occurs because Ebi3 is a downstream target of Foxp3, a transcription factor that is required for T(reg)-cell development and function. Ebi3-/- and Il12a-/- T(reg) cells have significantly reduced regulatory activity in vitro and fail to control homeostatic proliferation and to cure inflammatory bowel disease in vivo. Because these phenotypic characteristics are distinct from those of other IL-12 family members, this novel Ebi3-IL-12alpha heterodimeric cytokine has been designated interleukin-35 (IL-35). Ectopic expression of IL-35 confers regulatory activity on naive T cells, whereas recombinant IL-35 suppresses T-cell proliferation. Taken together, these data identify IL-35 as a novel inhibitory cytokine that may be specifically produced by T(reg) cells and is required for maximal suppressive

  11. IL-21 restricts T follicular regulatory T cell proliferation through Bcl-6 mediated inhibition of responsiveness to IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, Christoph; Liu, Sue M; Cañete, Pablo F; Warren, Joanna; Hughes, William E; Vogelzang, Alexis; Webster, Kylie; Craig, Maria E; Uzel, Gulbu; Dent, Alexander; Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Sprent, Jonathan; King, Cecile

    2017-03-17

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells control the magnitude and specificity of the germinal centre reaction, but how regulation is contained to ensure generation of high-affinity antibody is unknown. Here we show that this balance is maintained by the reciprocal influence of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. The number of IL-2-dependent FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells is increased in the peripheral blood of human patients with loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R). In mice, IL-21:IL-21R interactions influence the phenotype of T follicular cells, reducing the expression of CXCR4 and inhibiting the expansion of Tfr cells after T-cell-dependent immunization. The negative effect of IL-21 on Tfr cells in mice is cell intrinsic and associated with decreased expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25). Bcl-6, expressed in abundance in Tfr cells, inhibits CD25 expression and IL-21-mediated inhibition of CD25 is Bcl-6 dependent. These findings identify a mechanism by which IL-21 reinforces humoral immunity by restricting Tfr cell proliferation.

  12. Reduction in peripheral regulatory T cell population in childhood ocular type myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takafumi; Inaba, Yuji; Nakazawa, Yozo; Omata, Taku; Akasaka, Manami; Shirai, Ikuko; Ichikawa, Motoki

    2015-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T-cell dependent and antibody mediated autoimmune disease. Recent studies of adult patients and animal models have shown that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of MG, but little is known about MG in children. This study evaluated the role of peripheral blood Tregs in childhood ocular MG and assessed if Tregs could be an index for estimating immunological status. Clinical data and peripheral lymphocytes were obtained from 13 children with serum AChR antibody-positive ocular type MG and 18 age-matched controls. Committed cells from MG patients were divided into two clinical stages: active (n=12) and remission (n=11). Tregs and Th17 cells were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis based on CD4(+)CD25(+) intracellular Foxp3(+) and CD4(+) intracellular IL-17A(+) fractions, respectively. The percentage of Tregs among peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells in active stage, remission stage, and control groups was 3.3±1.3%, 4.8±1.7%, and 5.0±0.6%, respectively. The Treg population was significantly lower in the active stage than in the remission stage and controls. Furthermore, Treg percentage was significantly lower during relapse of myasthenia symptoms. We witnessed no remarkable associations between the percentage of Tregs and immune suppressant dosages. A significant reduction in the peripheral Treg population is considered to contribute to the pathophysiology of ocular type childhood MG and may be a marker of immunological state in these patients. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. TRAF6 is essential for maintenance of regulatory T cells that suppress Th2 type autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Muto

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs maintain immune homeostasis by limiting inflammatory responses. TRAF6 plays a key role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity by mediating signals from various receptors including the T-cell receptor (TCR. T cell-specific deletion of TRAF6 has been shown to induce multiorgan inflammatory disease, but the role of TRAF6 in Tregs remains to be investigated. Here, we generated Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient mice using Foxp3-Cre and TRAF6-flox mice. Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient (cKO mice developed allergic skin diseases, arthritis, lymphadenopathy and hyper IgE phenotypes. Although TRAF6-deficient Tregs possess similar in vitro suppression activity compared to wild-type Tregs, TRAF6-deficient Tregs did not suppress colitis in lymphopenic mice very efficiently due to reduced number of Foxp3-positive cells. In addition, the fraction of TRAF6-deficient Tregs was reduced compared with wild-type Tregs in female cKO mice without inflammation. Moreover, adoptive transfer of Foxp3 (+ Tregs into Rag2(-/- mice revealed that TRAF6-deficient Tregs converted into Foxp3(- cells more rapidly than WT Tregs under lymphopenic conditions. Fate-mapping analysis also revealed that conversion of Tregs from Foxp3(+ to Foxp3(- (exFoxp3 cells was accelerated in TRAF6-deficient Tregs. These data indicate that TRAF6 in Tregs plays important roles in the maintenance of Foxp3 in Tregs and in the suppression of pathogenic Th2 type conversion of Tregs.

  14. Imbalance between IL-17A-Producing Cells and Regulatory T Cells during Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses and inflammation are key elements in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke (IS. Although the involvement of IL-17A in IS has been demonstrated using animal models, the involvement of IL-17A and IL-17-secreting T cell subsets in IS patients has not been verified, and whether the balanc