WorldWideScience

Sample records for regulatory system modulates

  1. A systems level approach reveals new gene regulatory modules in the developing ear

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jingchen; Tambalo, Monica; Barembaum, Meyer; Ranganathan, Ramya; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Bronner, Marianne E.; Streit, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The inner ear is a complex vertebrate sense organ, yet it arises from a simple epithelium, the otic placode. Specification towards otic fate requires diverse signals and transcriptional inputs that act sequentially and/or in parallel. Using the chick embryo, we uncover novel genes in the gene regulatory network underlying otic commitment and reveal dynamic changes in gene expression. Functional analysis of selected transcription factors reveals the genetic hierarchy underlying the transition ...

  2. Statistical significance of cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming increasingly important for researchers to be able to scan through large genomic regions for transcription factor binding sites or clusters of binding sites forming cis-regulatory modules. Correspondingly, there has been a push to develop algorithms for the rapid detection and assessment of cis-regulatory modules. While various algorithms for this purpose have been introduced, most are not well suited for rapid, genome scale scanning. Results We introduce methods designed for the detection and statistical evaluation of cis-regulatory modules, modeled as either clusters of individual binding sites or as combinations of sites with constrained organization. In order to determine the statistical significance of module sites, we first need a method to determine the statistical significance of single transcription factor binding site matches. We introduce a straightforward method of estimating the statistical significance of single site matches using a database of known promoters to produce data structures that can be used to estimate p-values for binding site matches. We next introduce a technique to calculate the statistical significance of the arrangement of binding sites within a module using a max-gap model. If the module scanned for has defined organizational parameters, the probability of the module is corrected to account for organizational constraints. The statistical significance of single site matches and the architecture of sites within the module can be combined to provide an overall estimation of statistical significance of cis-regulatory module sites. Conclusion The methods introduced in this paper allow for the detection and statistical evaluation of single transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules. The features described are implemented in the Search Tool for Occurrences of Regulatory Motifs (STORM and MODSTORM software.

  3. Water System Adaptation To Hydrological Changes: Module 8, Regulatory Framework Intersections: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of water system adaptation to hydrological changes, with emphasis on data analysis and interpretation, technical planning, and computational modeling. Starting with real-world scenarios and adaptation needs, the co...

  4. Regulatory authority information system RAIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Mrabit, K.; Miaw, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture the principles of the regulatory authority information system (RAIS) are presented. RAIS is a tool currently being developed by the IAEA for the Regulatory Authorities. It is a part of a set of supporting actions designed to assist member states in achieving the objectives of the Model project on radiation and waste safety infrastructure. RAIS is a tool that provides the management of the Regulatory Authority with the key information needed for the planning and implementation of activities and to ensure confidence that resources are optimally used. The RAIS contains five modules: Inventory of installations and radiation sources; Authorization process; Inspection and follow-up actions; Information on personal dosimetry; Assessment of effectiveness by means of performance indicators

  5. Resolving the composite trait of hypertension into its pharmacogenetic determinants by acute pharmacological modulation of blood pressure regulatory systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ueno, T.; Tremblay, J.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef; Dobešová, Zdenka; Pausova, Z.; Deng, A. Y.; Sun, Y. L.; Jacob, H. J.; Hamet, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2003), s. 51-60 ISSN 0946-2716 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011711 Grant - others:CIHR(CA) MOP-11463; CIHR(CA) MT-12574; CIHR(CA) MOP-36378; AHA(US) AD-12-FMCQ 0140149N Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : genetic analysis * blood pressure * vasoactive system balance Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2003

  6. Increased Expression and Modulated Regulatory Activity of Coinhibitory Receptors PD-1, TIGIT, and TIM-3 in Lymphocytes From Patients With Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Michelle; Belkina, Anna C; Proctor, Elizabeth A; Zammitti, Christopher; Simms, Robert W; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Snyder-Cappione, Jennifer E; Lafyatis, Robert; Dooms, Hans

    2018-04-01

    Immune dysfunction is an important component of the disease process underlying systemic sclerosis (SSc), but the mechanisms contributing to altered immune cell function in SSc remain poorly defined. This study was undertaken to measure the expression and function of the coinhibitory receptors (co-IRs) programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3), and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) in lymphocyte subsets from the peripheral blood of patients with SSc. Co-IR expression levels on subsets of immune cells were analyzed using a 16-color flow cytometry panel. The functional role of co-IRs was determined by measuring cytokine production after in vitro stimulation of SSc and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the presence of co-IR-blocking antibodies. Supernatants from cultures of stimulated PBMCs were added to SSc fibroblasts, and their impact on fibroblast gene expression was measured. Mathematical modeling was used to reveal differences between co-IR functions in SSc patients and healthy controls. Levels of the co-IRs PD-1 and TIGIT were increased, and each was coexpressed, in distinct T cell subsets from SSc patients compared to healthy controls. Levels of TIM-3 were increased in SSc natural killer cells. PD-1, TIGIT, and TIM-3 antibody blockade revealed patient-specific roles of each of these co-IRs in modulating activation-induced T cell cytokine production. In contrast to healthy subjects, blockade of TIGIT and TIM-3, but not PD-1, failed to reverse inhibited cytokine production in SSc patients, indicating that enhanced T cell exhaustion is present in SSc. Finally, cytokines secreted in anti-TIM-3-treated PBMC cultures distinctly changed the gene expression profile in SSc fibroblasts. The altered expression and regulatory capacity of co-IRs in SSc lymphocytes may contribute to disease pathophysiology by modulating the cytokine-mediated cross-talk of

  7. The role of dietary sodium intake on the modulation of T helper 17 cells and regulatory T cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Laura; Barbati, Cristiana; Vomero, Marta; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Riccieri, Valeria; Spagnoli, Alessandra; Alessandri, Cristiano; Desideri, Giovambattista; Conti, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    We aimed at investigating whether the frequency and function of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cells (Treg) are affected by a restriction of dietary sodium intake in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We enrolled RA and SLE patients not receiving drugs known to increase urinary sodium excretion. Patients underwent a dietary regimen starting with a restricted daily sodium intake followed by a normal-sodium daily intake. The timepoints were identified at baseline (T0), after 3 weeks of low-sodium dietary regimen (T3), after 2 weeks of normal-sodium dietary regimen (T5). On these visits, we measured the 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, the frequency and function of Th17 and Treg cells in the peripheral blood, the serum levels of cytokines. Analysis of urinary sodium excretion confirmed adherence to the dietary regimen. In RA patients, a trend toward a reduction in the frequencies of Th17 cells over the low-sodium dietary regimen followed by an increase at T5 was observed, while Treg cells exhibited the opposite trend. SLE patients showed a progressive reduction in the percentage of Th17 cells that reached a significance at T5 compared to T0 (p = 0.01) and an increase in the percentage of Treg cells following the low-sodium dietary regimen at both T1 and T3 compared to T0 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). No significant apoptosis or proliferation modulation was found. In RA patients, we found a reduction at T5 compared to T0 in serum levels of both TGFβ (p = 0.0016) and IL-9 (p = 0.0007); serum IL-9 levels were also reduced in SLE patients at T5 with respect to T0 (p = 0.03). This is the first study investigating the effects of dietary sodium intake on adaptive immunity. Based on the results, we hypothesize that a restricted sodium dietary intake may dampen the inflammatory response in RA and SLE patients. PMID:28877244

  8. Management systems for regulatory authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mpandanyama, Rujeko Lynette

    2015-02-01

    For a regulatory body to fulfil its statutory obligations, there is need to develop and implement a regulatory management system that has the necessary arrangements for achieving and maintaining high quality performance in regulating the safety of nuclear and radiation facilities under its authority. Hence, the regulatory management system needs to fully integrate the human resources, processes and physical resources of the organization. This study sought to provide an understanding of the concept, principles, policies and fundamentals of management systems as they relate to regulatory systems in the field of radiation protection and to make appropriate recommendations to ensure that an effective management system exists for the control of ionizing radiation and radiation sources and addresses all relevant stakeholders in Zimbabwe. A comparative analysis was done on the current management status and the ideal management system, which led to the identification of the gaps existing. The main key that was found to be of significance was lack of linkages between processes and management tools within the institution. (au)

  9. Reconstruction of gene regulatory modules from RNA silencing of IFN-α modulators: experimental set-up and inference method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Angela; Di Camillo, Barbara; Ciccarese, Francesco; Agnusdei, Valentina; Zanovello, Paola; Amadori, Alberto; Finesso, Lorenzo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Toffolo, Gianna Maria

    2016-03-12

    Inference of gene regulation from expression data may help to unravel regulatory mechanisms involved in complex diseases or in the action of specific drugs. A challenging task for many researchers working in the field of systems biology is to build up an experiment with a limited budget and produce a dataset suitable to reconstruct putative regulatory modules worth of biological validation. Here, we focus on small-scale gene expression screens and we introduce a novel experimental set-up and a customized method of analysis to make inference on regulatory modules starting from genetic perturbation data, e.g. knockdown and overexpression data. To illustrate the utility of our strategy, it was applied to produce and analyze a dataset of quantitative real-time RT-PCR data, in which interferon-α (IFN-α) transcriptional response in endothelial cells is investigated by RNA silencing of two candidate IFN-α modulators, STAT1 and IFIH1. A putative regulatory module was reconstructed by our method, revealing an intriguing feed-forward loop, in which STAT1 regulates IFIH1 and they both negatively regulate IFNAR1. STAT1 regulation on IFNAR1 was object of experimental validation at the protein level. Detailed description of the experimental set-up and of the analysis procedure is reported, with the intent to be of inspiration for other scientists who want to realize similar experiments to reconstruct gene regulatory modules starting from perturbations of possible regulators. Application of our approach to the study of IFN-α transcriptional response modulators in endothelial cells has led to many interesting novel findings and new biological hypotheses worth of validation.

  10. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  11. Prioritization of gene regulatory interactions from large-scale modules in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringas Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of groups of co-regulated genes and their transcription factors, called transcriptional modules, has been a focus of many studies about biological systems. While methods have been developed to derive numerous modules from genome-wide data, individual links between regulatory proteins and target genes still need experimental verification. In this work, we aim to prioritize regulator-target links within transcriptional modules based on three types of large-scale data sources. Results Starting with putative transcriptional modules from ChIP-chip data, we first derive modules in which target genes show both expression and function coherence. The most reliable regulatory links between transcription factors and target genes are established by identifying intersection of target genes in coherent modules for each enriched functional category. Using a combination of genome-wide yeast data in normal growth conditions and two different reference datasets, we show that our method predicts regulatory interactions with significantly higher predictive power than ChIP-chip binding data alone. A comparison with results from other studies highlights that our approach provides a reliable and complementary set of regulatory interactions. Based on our results, we can also identify functionally interacting target genes, for instance, a group of co-regulated proteins related to cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we report novel conserved binding sites of a glycoprotein-encoding gene, CIS3, regulated by Swi6-Swi4 and Ndd1-Fkh2-Mcm1 complexes. Conclusion We provide a simple method to prioritize individual TF-gene interactions from large-scale transcriptional modules. In comparison with other published works, we predict a complementary set of regulatory interactions which yields a similar or higher prediction accuracy at the expense of sensitivity. Therefore, our method can serve as an alternative approach to prioritization for

  12. Global Banking System Regulatory Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Mozhovyi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The international and domestic experience shows that the main factors of financial destabilization during the financial crises are in the banking sector. The article reveals that the vulnerability of the financial system is connected with functions, deposit and credit transactions, risks distribution and ensuring liquidity; banks act as a major factor in stabilisation measures in the current context of globalization processes, since the economic stability of banking activities relates directly to all the entities and only stable banking system can withstand the crisis phenomena. Therefore, as a result of the analysis, it is proved that not only reduction of risks of banks is needed, but also introduction of the effective supervision system over implementation of the requirements and standards to prevent these risks. According to modern international approaches, banks use the so-called prudential supervision, which is based on the risk management assessment policy on the part of the Bank’s management, and regulatory bodies contribute to implementation of such policy. The authors have concluded that not only modern specificity of banks, but also the impact of supervision systems and regulation of modern trends in development of the banking should be analysed. Application of the general regulatory principles and banking risks methodology is required. The task of supervision is distribution of reliable risk management practices in the banking system, taking into account national peculiarities of development.

  13. A high throughput amenable Arabidopsis-P. aeruginosa system reveals a rewired regulatory module and the utility to identify potent anti-infectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gopalan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that in a metasystem consisting of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium (in 96 well plates even microbes considered to be innocuous such as laboratory strains of E. coli and B. subtilis can cause potent damage to the host. We further posited that such environment-induced adaptations are brought about by 'system status changes' (rewiring of pre-existing cellular signaling networks and components of the host and the microbe, and that prolongation of such a situation could lead to the emergence of pathogenic states in real-life. Here, using this infection model, we show that the master regulator GacA of the human opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa (strain PA14 is dispensable for pathogenesis, as evidenced by three independent read-outs. The gene expression profile of the host after infection with wild type PA14 or the gacA mutant are also identical. GacA normally acts upstream of the quorum sensing regulatory circuit (that includes the regulator LasR that controls a subset of virulence factors. Double mutants in gacA and lasR behave similar to the lasR mutant, as seen by abrogation of a characteristic cell type specific host cell damage caused by PA14 or the gacA mutant. This indicates that a previously unrecognized regulatory mechanism is operative under these conditions upstream of LasR. In addition, the detrimental effect of PA14 on Arabidopsis seedlings is resistant to high concentrations of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. These data suggest that the Arabidopsis seedling infection system could be used to identify anti-infectives with potentially novel modes of action.

  14. A high throughput amenable Arabidopsis-P. aeruginosa system reveals a rewired regulatory module and the utility to identify potent anti-infectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Suresh; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2011-01-21

    We previously demonstrated that in a metasystem consisting of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium (in 96 well plates) even microbes considered to be innocuous such as laboratory strains of E. coli and B. subtilis can cause potent damage to the host. We further posited that such environment-induced adaptations are brought about by 'system status changes' (rewiring of pre-existing cellular signaling networks and components) of the host and the microbe, and that prolongation of such a situation could lead to the emergence of pathogenic states in real-life. Here, using this infection model, we show that the master regulator GacA of the human opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa (strain PA14) is dispensable for pathogenesis, as evidenced by three independent read-outs. The gene expression profile of the host after infection with wild type PA14 or the gacA mutant are also identical. GacA normally acts upstream of the quorum sensing regulatory circuit (that includes the regulator LasR) that controls a subset of virulence factors. Double mutants in gacA and lasR behave similar to the lasR mutant, as seen by abrogation of a characteristic cell type specific host cell damage caused by PA14 or the gacA mutant. This indicates that a previously unrecognized regulatory mechanism is operative under these conditions upstream of LasR. In addition, the detrimental effect of PA14 on Arabidopsis seedlings is resistant to high concentrations of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. These data suggest that the Arabidopsis seedling infection system could be used to identify anti-infectives with potentially novel modes of action.

  15. Lon protease modulates virulence traits in Erwinia amylovora by direct monitoring of major regulators and indirectly through the Rcs and Gac-Csr regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Ancona, Veronica; Zhao, Youfu

    2018-04-01

    Lon, an ATP-dependent protease in bacteria, influences diverse cellular processes by degrading damaged, misfolded and short-lived regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized the effects of lon mutation and determined the molecular mechanisms underlying Lon-mediated virulence regulation in Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterial pathogen of apple. Erwinia amylovora depends on the type III secretion system (T3SS) and the exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran to cause disease. Our results showed that mutation of the lon gene led to the overproduction of amylovoran, increased T3SS gene expression and the non-motile phenotype. Western blot analyses showed that mutation in lon directly affected the accumulation and stability of HrpS/HrpA and RcsA. Mutation in lon also indirectly influenced the expression of flhD, hrpS and csrB through the accumulation of the RcsA/RcsB proteins, which bind to the promoter of these genes. In addition, lon expression is under the control of CsrA, possibly at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Although mutation in csrA abolished both T3SS and amylovoran production, deletion of the lon gene in the csrA mutant only rescued amylovoran production, but not T3SS. These results suggest that CsrA might positively control both T3SS and amylovoran production partly by suppressing Lon, whereas CsrA may also play a critical role in T3SS by affecting unknown targets. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  16. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miros, Robert H. J. [Fairfax, CA; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham [Oakland, CA; Seery, Martin N [San Rafael, CA; Holland, Rodney H [Novato, CA

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  17. Force Modulator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  18. Living Systems Energy Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  19. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signalling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiatul Akmal Mohd-Radzman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  20. Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page describes the continuing effort to modernize the federal regulatory system for biotechnology products as well as clarify various roles of EPA, FDA and USDA in evaluating new biotechnology products.

  1. Systemic Risk and Optimal Regulatory Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinosa-Vega, M.A.; Kahn, C.; Matta, R.; Sole, J.

    2011-01-01

    Until the recent financial crisis, the safety and soundness of financial institutions was assessed from the perspective of the individual institution. The financial crisis highlighted the need to take systemic externalities seriously when rethinking prudential oversight and the regulatory

  2. CAMAC system test module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, W.K.; Gjovig, A.; Naivar, F.; Potter, J.; Smith, W.

    1981-01-01

    Since the CAMAC Branch Highway is used to both send information to and receive information from a CAMAC crate, faults in this highway can be difficult to recognize and diagnose. Similarly faults caused by a Crate Controller corrupting either instructions or data are difficult to distinguish from faults caused by the modules themselves. The CLIVIT (CAMAC Logic Integrity Via Interactive Testing) module is designed to largely eliminate such difficulties and ambiguities by allowing the verification of Branch Highway and Dataway transactions via an independent data communication path. The principle of operation of the CLIVIT is explained. Described are the prototype construction, testing and use

  3. Regulatory control of physical protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajdeep; Mayya, Y.S.

    2017-01-01

    The safety of facilities in BARC is under the regulatory oversight of BSC. The security architecture for these facilities incorporates multiple layers of Physical Protection Systems. The demands of safety may sometimes conflict with the needs of security. Realizing the need to identify these interfaces and extend the regulatory coverage to Physical Protection Systems, a Standing Committee named Physical Protection System Review Committee (PPSRC) has been constituted as a 2"n"d tier entity of BSC. PPSRC includes experts from various domains concerned with nuclear security, viz. physical protection systems, cyber security, radiation safety, security operations, technical services and security administration

  4. Conserved gene regulatory module specifies lateral neural borders across bilaterians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbin; Zhao, Di; Horie, Takeo; Chen, Geng; Bao, Hongcun; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Weihong; Horie, Ryoko; Liang, Tao; Dong, Biyu; Feng, Qianqian; Tao, Qinghua; Liu, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    The lateral neural plate border (NPB), the neural part of the vertebrate neural border, is composed of central nervous system (CNS) progenitors and peripheral nervous system (PNS) progenitors. In invertebrates, PNS progenitors are also juxtaposed to the lateral boundary of the CNS. Whether there are conserved molecular mechanisms determining vertebrate and invertebrate lateral neural borders remains unclear. Using single-cell-resolution gene-expression profiling and genetic analysis, we present evidence that orthologs of the NPB specification module specify the invertebrate lateral neural border, which is composed of CNS and PNS progenitors. First, like in vertebrates, the conserved neuroectoderm lateral border specifier Msx/vab-15 specifies lateral neuroblasts in Caenorhabditis elegans Second, orthologs of the vertebrate NPB specification module ( Msx/vab-15 , Pax3/7/pax-3 , and Zic/ref-2 ) are significantly enriched in worm lateral neuroblasts. In addition, like in other bilaterians, the expression domain of Msx/vab-15 is more lateral than those of Pax3/7/pax-3 and Zic/ref- 2 in C. elegans Third, we show that Msx/vab-15 regulates the development of mechanosensory neurons derived from lateral neural progenitors in multiple invertebrate species, including C. elegans , Drosophila melanogaster , and Ciona intestinalis We also identify a novel lateral neural border specifier, ZNF703/tlp-1 , which functions synergistically with Msx/vab- 15 in both C. elegans and Xenopus laevis These data suggest a common origin of the molecular mechanism specifying lateral neural borders across bilaterians.

  5. Regulatory systems-based licensing guidance documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delligatti, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed a series of licensing guidance documents based on the regulatory requirements in Part 60 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 60). This regulatory systems-based approach to licensing guidance documentation relies on the definition of the high-level waste repository in 10 CFR Part 60. A document which is important for the frame-work it gives to other programmatic licensing guidance is the Draft Regulatory Guide open-quotes Format and Content for the License Application for the High-Level Waste Repositoryclose quotes (FCRG). The FCRG describes a format and content acceptable to NRC for a high-level waste repository license application pursuant to the requirements of 10 CFR Part 60. Other licensing guidance documents will be compatible with the FCRG

  6. Regulatory networks, legal federalism, and multi-level regulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kerber, Wolfgang; Wendel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Transnational regulatory networks play important roles in multi-level regulatory regimes, as e.g, the European Union. In this paper we analyze the role of regulatory networks from the perspective of the economic theory of legal federalism. Often sophisticated intermediate institutional solutions between pure centralisation and pure decentralisation can help to solve complex tradeoff problems between the benefits and problems of centralised and decentralised solutions. Drawing upon the insight...

  7. Safety assessment of immunomodulatory biologics: the promise and challenges of regulatory T-cell modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Rafael A

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (T(reg)) modulation is developing as an important therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of a number of important diseases, including cancer, autoimmunity, infection, and organ transplant rejection. However, as demonstrated with IL-2 and TGN-1412, our understanding of the complex immunological interactions that occur with T(reg) modulation in both non-clinical models and in patients remains limited and appears highly contextual. This lack of understanding will challenge our ability to identify the patient population who might derive the highest benefit from T(reg) modulation and creates special challenges as we transition these therapeutics from non-clinical models into humans. Thus, in vivo testing in the most representative animal model systems, with careful progress in the clinic, will remain critical in developing therapeutics targeting T(reg) and understanding their clinical utility. Moreover, toxicology models can inform some of the potential liabilities associated with T(reg) modulation, but not all, suggesting a continued need to explore and validate predictive models.

  8. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  9. 78 FR 38053 - Regulatory Systems Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... current state of medical product regulation globally, including challenges, risks, and emerging trends... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0010... product regulation; generation and analysis of evidence of regulatory systems performance; and provision...

  10. Thermal management, systems and modules; Thermomanagement, Systeme und Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flik, M. [Behr GmbH und Co., Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Up till now the individual systems for engine temperature control and air conditioning of the vehicle cabin have to a large extent been viewed independently of one another. With the progress of electronic control systems, however, Behr has adopted an integrative approach to managing all heat and substance flows outside of the engine. This perspective, which is known as thermal management, has significantly boosted the rate of innovation. In a short period of time, new and optimized modules and systems have allowed considerable improvements to be made in relation to passenger comfort and safety, the integration of subsystems and modules into the vehicle and environmental compatibility. This innovation drive, which also extends to the design of major modules, will continue to gain impetus in the future. (orig.) [German] Bisher wurden die verschiedenen Systeme zur Temperierung des Motors und zur Klimatisierung der Fahrzeugkabine weitgehend unabhaengig voneinander betrachtet. Mit dem Vordringen der elektronischen Regelung hat bei Behr jedoch eine gesamtheitliche Betrachtung aller Waerme- und Stoffstroeme ausserhalb des Motors eingesetzt. Diese Sichtweise, Thermomanagement genannt, hat eine erhebliche Innovationsdynamik ermoeglicht. Mit neuen und optimierten Modulen und Systemen konnten in kurzer Zeit betraechtliche Verbesserungen erzielt werden - bei Komfort und Sicherheit der Fahrzeuginsassen, bei der Integration der Subsysteme und Module ins Fahrzeug sowie bei seiner oekologischen Vertraeglichkeit. Diese Innovationsdynamik, die auch die Bildung von Grossmodulen einschliesst, wird in Zukunft noch zunehmen. (orig.)

  11. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenghong; Chi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China's regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined.

  12. National Strategy for Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This National Strategy for Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products sets forth a vision for ensuring that the federal regulatory system is prepared to efficiently assess the risks, if any, of the future products of biotechnology.

  13. Integrated systems approach identifies risk regulatory pathways and key regulators in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Dianming; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Dai, Enyu; Liu, Xinyi; Luo, Shanshun; Jiang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. However, the molecular mechanisms of CAD remain elusive. Regulatory pathways are known to play crucial roles in many pathogenic processes. Thus, inferring risk regulatory pathways is an important step toward elucidating the mechanisms underlying CAD. With advances in high-throughput data, we developed an integrated systems approach to identify CAD risk regulatory pathways and key regulators. Firstly, a CAD-related core subnetwork was identified from a curated transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) regulatory network based on a random walk algorithm. Secondly, candidate risk regulatory pathways were extracted from the subnetwork by applying a breadth-first search (BFS) algorithm. Then, risk regulatory pathways were prioritized based on multiple CAD-associated data sources. Finally, we also proposed a new measure to prioritize upstream regulators. We inferred that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) may be a key regulator in the dysregulation of risk regulatory pathways. This study takes a closer step than the identification of disease subnetworks or modules. From the risk regulatory pathways, we could understand the flow of regulatory information in the initiation and progression of the disease. Our approach helps to uncover its potential etiology. We developed an integrated systems approach to identify risk regulatory pathways. We proposed a new measure to prioritize the key regulators in CAD. PTEN may be a key regulator in dysregulation of the risk regulatory pathways.

  14. Hydrogen mitigation systems - a Canadian regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosla, J.K.; Rizk, M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a discussion paper to examine the regulatory requirements that may be necessary for the design, operation and maintenance of the hydrogen mitigation systems. These systems (if deemed necessary to maintain the containment function), may be considered to be a part of the containment systems. Therefore, these requirements are derived mostly from the AECB Regulatory Document R-7, which specifies the requirements for containment systems for CANDU nuclear power plants. Some additional requirements, which are specific to these systems have also been included. These requirements relate to a systematic examination of the hazards of hydrogen, the design basis for the mitigation systems, their functional and design requirements, analytical support to justify their selection, and operating and testing requirements. The requirements for severe accident have not yet been developed. It is, however, anticipated that the design of the hydrogen mitigation system would be such that future requirement can be accommodated. These requirements are intended for application to the new reactors in Canada. For the existing reactors, their application will be subjected to practicability. (author)

  15. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  16. Earth System Science Education Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Kaufman, C.; Humphreys, R. R.; Colgan, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The College of Charleston is developing several new geoscience-based education modules for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). These three new modules provide opportunities for science and pre-service education students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences. The three new modules will be discussed in this session. Coastal Crisis is a module that analyzes rapidly changing coastlines and uses technology - remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor changes in coastal environments. The beaches near Charleston, SC are undergoing erosion and therefore are used as examples of rapidly changing coastlines. Students will use real data from NASA, NOAA and other federal agencies in the classroom to study coastal change. Through this case study, learners will acquire remotely sensed images and GIS data sets from online sources, utilize those data sets within Google Earth or other visualization programs, and understand what the data is telling them. Analyzing the data will allow learners to contemplate and make predictions on the impact associated with changing environmental conditions, within the context of a coastal setting. To Drill or Not To Drill is a multidisciplinary problem based module to increase students’ knowledge of problems associated with nonrenewable resource extraction. The controversial topic of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) examines whether the economic benefit of the oil extracted from ANWR is worth the social cost of the environmental damage that such extraction may inflict. By attempting to answer this question, learners must balance the interests of preservation with the economic need for oil. The learners are exposed to the difficulties associated with a real world problem that requires trade-off between environmental trust and economic well-being. The Citizen Science module challenges students to translate scientific

  17. Modulation of dynamic modes by interplay between positive and negative feedback loops in gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liu-Suo; Li, Ning-Xi; Chen, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A positive and a negative feedback loop can induce bistability and oscillation, respectively, in biological networks. Nevertheless, they are frequently interlinked to perform more elaborate functions in many gene regulatory networks. Coupled positive and negative feedback loops may exhibit either oscillation or bistability depending on the intensity of the stimulus in some particular networks. It is less understood how the transition between the two dynamic modes is modulated by the positive and negative feedback loops. We developed an abstract model of such systems, largely based on the core p53 pathway, to explore the mechanism for the transformation of dynamic behaviors. Our results show that enhancing the positive feedback may promote or suppress oscillations depending on the strength of both feedback loops. We found that the system oscillates with low amplitudes in response to a moderate stimulus and switches to the on state upon a strong stimulus. When the positive feedback is activated much later than the negative one in response to a strong stimulus, the system exhibits long-term oscillations before switching to the on state. We explain this intriguing phenomenon using quasistatic approximation. Moreover, early switching to the on state may occur when the system starts from a steady state in the absence of stimuli. The interplay between the positive and negative feedback plays a key role in the transitions between oscillation and bistability. Of note, our conclusions should be applicable only to some specific gene regulatory networks, especially the p53 network, in which both oscillation and bistability exist in response to a certain type of stimulus. Our work also underscores the significance of transient dynamics in determining cellular outcome.

  18. Finding cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila using phylogenetic hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Finding the regulatory modules for transcription factors binding is an important step in elucidating the complex molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of gene expression. There are numerous methods available for solving this problem, however, very few of them take advantage of th...

  19. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  20. Health Occupations Module. The Integumentary System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the integumentary system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, objectives (e.g., list and describe the types of glands formed in the skin, and explain the…

  1. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them.

  2. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them. PMID:28497059

  3. Establishing a regulatory value chain model: An innovative approach to strengthening medicines regulatory systems in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Harinder Singh; Kashfipour, Farrah; Susko, Matt; Feachem, Neelam Sekhri; Boyle, Colin

    2016-05-01

    Medicines Regulatory Authorities (MRAs) are an essential part of national health systems and are charged with protecting and promoting public health through regulation of medicines. However, MRAs in resource-constrained settings often struggle to provide effective oversight of market entry and use of health commodities. This paper proposes a regulatory value chain model (RVCM) that policymakers and regulators can use as a conceptual framework to guide investments aimed at strengthening regulatory systems. The RVCM incorporates nine core functions of MRAs into five modules: (i) clear guidelines and requirements; (ii) control of clinical trials; (iii) market authorization of medical products; (iv) pre-market quality control; and (v) post-market activities. Application of the RVCM allows national stakeholders to identify and prioritize investments according to where they can add the most value to the regulatory process. Depending on the economy, capacity, and needs of a country, some functions can be elevated to a regional or supranational level, while others can be maintained at the national level. In contrast to a "one size fits all" approach to regulation in which each country manages the full regulatory process at the national level, the RVCM encourages leveraging the expertise and capabilities of other MRAs where shared processes strengthen regulation. This value chain approach provides a framework for policymakers to maximize investment impact while striving to reach the goal of safe, affordable, and rapidly accessible medicines for all.

  4. Regulatory System of Radiation Protection in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F. T.; Huang, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    After the radioactive contaminated buildings incident occurred in Taiwan in 1993, the competent authority for radiation protection the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) started to review the structured problem of radiation protection regulatory system. Through several years' investigation and study, the AEC has improved two important tools in radiation protection regulatory system, i.e., control regulations and actual practice, and made them more rigorous and efficient. This paper will make a brief introduction of the efforts that Taiwan has made in this respect. Taiwan's radiation protection control was based on the Atomic Energy Law promulgated in 1968, but the control idea and authorization scope were not sufficient to appropriately respond to the highly developed economy and democracy in Taiwan. After several years' legislative process, the Ionizing Radiation Protection Law (IRP Law) was promulgated and entered into force on February 1, 2003. This IRP Law specifically emphasizes categorized risk management of radiation sources, establishment of personnel licenses and training system, enhancement of public safety control, and implementation of quality assurance program for medical exposure. The Legislative Yuan (Congress) fully authorized the competent authority to establish various technological control regulations according to control necessity without prior review by the Legislative Yuan in advance. As to the penalties of the violations of the IRP Law, the AEC adopts high-rated administrative fines and applies the Criminal Law to those who seriously contaminate the environment. In actual practice, the AEC has constructed a Radiation Protection Control Information System compatible with the IRP Law that fully combines the functions of computers and Internet. The information of facility operators who own radiation sources, radiation protection specialists, and operating personnel are entered into this system, starting from the submission of application of the

  5. Assessing the effectiveness of nuclear regulatory system in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhia, Sonal; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima accident brought up the issue of regulatory effectiveness in the fore. One of the causes of the accident has been attributed to the problems in effectiveness of the Japanese regulatory system. Regulatory reform is underway in Japan and in other countries many efforts have also been made to improve the effectiveness and independence of the regulatory bodies. It is important that the regulatory bodies make self-assessment of their weaknesses and strengths, to achieve the ultimate regulatory goal of assuring acceptable level of nuclear safety. In this paper an assessment has been done for the effectiveness of Indian nuclear regulatory system as implemented by the Atomic Energy Regulatory board (AERB). A number of good practices of AERB have been found and some areas have been identified where improvements are necessary

  6. An electronic regulatory document management system for a clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenle; Durkalski, Valerie; Pauls, Keith; Dillon, Catherine; Kim, Jaemyung; Kolk, Deneil; Silbergleit, Robert; Stevenson, Valerie; Palesch, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    A computerized regulatory document management system has been developed as a module in a comprehensive Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) designed for an NIH-funded clinical trial network in order to more efficiently manage and track regulatory compliance. Within the network, several institutions and investigators are involved in multiple trials, and each trial has regulatory document requirements. Some of these documents are trial specific while others apply across multiple trials. The latter causes a possible redundancy in document collection and management. To address these and other related challenges, a central regulatory document management system was designed. This manuscript shares the design of the system as well as examples of it use in current studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction of an integrated gene regulatory network link to stress-related immune system in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdani, Elham; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    The immune system is an important biological system that is negatively impacted by stress. This study constructed an integrated regulatory network to enhance our understanding of the regulatory gene network used in the stress-related immune system. Module inference was used to construct modules of co-expressed genes with bovine leukocyte RNA-Seq data. Transcription factors (TFs) were then assigned to these modules using Lemon-Tree algorithms. In addition, the TFs assigned to each module were confirmed using the promoter analysis and protein-protein interactions data. Therefore, our integrated method identified three TFs which include one TF that is previously known to be involved in immune response (MYBL2) and two TFs (E2F8 and FOXS1) that had not been recognized previously and were identified for the first time in this study as novel regulatory candidates in immune response. This study provides valuable insights on the regulatory programs of genes involved in the stress-related immune system.

  8. Interferon regulatory factor-7 modulates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Mohammad; Mony, Jyothi T; Lobner, Morten

    2011-01-01

    . Furthermore, IRF7-deficient mice developed more severe disease. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the extent of leukocyte infiltration into the CNS was higher in IRF7-deficient mice with significantly higher number of infiltrating macrophages and T cells, and the distribution of infiltrates within......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with unknown etiology. Interferon-beta (IFN-beta), a member of the type I IFN family, is used as a therapeutic for MS and the IFN signaling pathway is implicated in MS susceptibility...... of MS-like disease in mice. Methods The role of IRF7 in development of EAE was studied by immunizing IRF7-KO and C57BL/6 (WT) mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein using a standard protocol for the induction of EAE. We measured leukocyte infiltration and localization in the CNS using flow...

  9. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, Fenghong; CHI, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China’s regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  10. The diabetes type 1 locus Idd6 modulates activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogner, Ute Christine; Lepault, Françoise; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Vallois, David; Morin, Joëlle; Avner, Philip; Boitard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The genetic locus Idd6 confers susceptibility to the spontaneous development of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse. Our studies on disease resistance of the congenic mouse strain NOD.C3H 6.VIII showed that Idd6 influences T-cell activities in the peripheral immune system and suggest that a major mechanism by which the Idd6 locus modifies diabetes development is via modulation of regulatory T-cell activities. Our transfer experiments using total splenocytes and purified T-cells demonstrated that the locus specifically controls the efficiency of disease protection mediated by the regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T-cell subset. Our data also implicate the Idd6 locus in controlling the balance between infiltrating lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells within the pancreatic islet.

  11. Regulatory issues associated with the Multi-Purpose (MPC) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.P.; Desell, L.J.; Birch, M.L.; Morgan, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a Multi-Purpose Canister system to promote compatibility between the waste program elements of storage, transportation, and disposal. The development of a Multi-Purpose Canister system requires meeting various regulatory requirements. These regulatory requirements are set forth in environmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. This paper discusses the more significant regulatory issues that must be addressed in the development of a Multi-Purpose Canister system by the Department of Energy

  12. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis Hani Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF binding sites (TFBSs. Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. Results We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was

  13. Strengthening the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Carly M; Rempel, Benjamin; Krank, Marvin

    2012-05-24

    Research evidence points to harmful effects from alcohol advertising among children and youth. In particular, exposure to alcohol advertising has been associated with adolescents drinking both earlier and heavier. Although current federal and provincial guidelines have addressed advertising practices to prevent underage drinking, practice has not been supported by existing policy. While protective measures such as social marketing campaigns have the potential for counteracting the effects from alcohol advertising, the effectiveness of such measures can be easily drowned out with increasing advertising activities from the alcohol industry, especially without effective regulation. Research reviewed by the European Focus on Alcohol Safe Environment (FASE) Project has identified a set of key elements that are necessary to make alcohol advertising policy measures effective at protecting children and youth from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Using these key elements as an evaluation framework, there are critical components in the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system that clearly require strengthening. To protect impressionable children and youth against the harmful effects of alcohol advertising, 13 recommendations to strengthen current alcohol advertising regulations in Canada are provided for Canadian policy-makers, advertising standard agencies, and public health groups.

  14. Resistin enhances the expansion of regulatory T cells through modulation of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistin, a member of adipokine family, is known to be involved in the modulation of immune responses including inflammatory activity. Interestingly, resistin is secreted by adipocytes in mice and rats whereas it is secreted by leukocytes in humans. However, the mechanism behind the effect of resistin on the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs remains poorly understood. Therefore, we examined regulatory effect of resistin on the induction and cellular modification of Tregs. Results Both protein and mRNA expression of FoxP3, a representative marker of Tregs, increased in a dose-dependent manner when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with resistin. At the same time, resistin had no direct effect on the induction of FoxP3 in CD4+ T cells, suggesting an indirect role through other cells type(s. Since DCs are an important player in the differentiation of T cells, we focused on the role of DCs in the modulation of Tregs by resistin. Resistin suppressed the expression of interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 and its target cytokines, IL-6, IL-23p19 and IL-12p40, in DCs. Furthermore, FoxP3 expression is increased in CD4+ T cells when co-cultured with DCs and concomitantly treated with resistin. Conclusion Our results suggest that resistin induces expansion of functional Tregs only when co-cultured with DCs.

  15. Functional evolution of cis-regulatory modules at a homeotic gene in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C W Ho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules.

  16. Information system fur the management of a regulatory programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Mrabit, K.; Miaw, S.

    1998-01-01

    A Regulatory Programme to monitor safety of activities involving radiation sources, implies the existence of a Regulatory Authority empowered by legislation to issue radiation protection regulations and to monitor compliance with those regulations. The core element of the programme is a system of notification and authorization (registration and licensing), inspection and enforcement. The efficiency of this system is largely dependent on the availability of reliable information on the inventory of radiation sources and installations, the administrative status of the facilities (authorization), prompt processing of inspection reports and follow up of regulatory actions, including monitoring deadlines. Essential data relevant to safety, such as personal dosimetry for occupationally exposed individuals, inspection findings and incident reports would provide, in addition, an insight on the overall safety of the country. A simple but comprehensive Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) linked to the authorization and inspection process will largely facilitate regulatory decisions and actions. A readily available and reliable information from the various regulatory activities will facilitate planning, optimization of resources, monitoring safety related data, disseminating safety information, making decisions and follow up regulatory actions including monitoring dead lines. The implementation of the system in more than 50 countries will contribute to experience exchange and harmonization of regulatory activities. (author)

  17. Endogenous adaptation to low oxygen modulates T-cell regulatory pathways in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Nilufer; Katyshev, Vladimir; Serkin, Zakhar; Katysheva, Svetlana; Dore-Duffy, Paula

    2016-01-19

    In the brain, chronic inflammatory activity may lead to compromised delivery of oxygen and glucose suggesting that therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring metabolic balance may be useful. In vivo exposure to chronic mild normobaric hypoxia (10 % oxygen) leads to a number of endogenous adaptations that includes vascular remodeling (angioplasticity). Angioplasticity promotes tissue survival. We have previously shown that induction of adaptive angioplasticity modulates the disease pattern in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the present study, we define mechanisms by which adaptation to low oxygen functionally ameliorates the signs and symptoms of EAE and for the first time show that tissue hypoxia may fundamentally alter neurodegenerative disease. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG, and some of them were kept in the hypoxia chambers (day 0) and exposed to 10 % oxygen for 3 weeks, while the others were kept at normoxic environment. Sham-immunized controls were included in both hypoxic and normoxic groups. Animals were sacrificed at pre-clinical and peak disease periods for tissue collection and analysis. Exposure to mild hypoxia decreased histological evidence of inflammation. Decreased numbers of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells were found in the hypoxic spinal cords associated with a delayed Th17-specific cytokine response. Hypoxia-induced changes did not alter the sensitization of peripheral T cells to the MOG peptide. Exposure to mild hypoxia induced significant increases in anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels and an increase in the number of spinal cord CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells. Acclimatization to mild hypoxia incites a number of endogenous adaptations that induces an anti-inflammatory milieu. Further understanding of these mechanisms system may pinpoint possible new therapeutic targets to treat neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buer Jan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E

  19. A HLA class I cis-regulatory element whose activity can be modulated by hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B C; Hui, K M

    1994-12-01

    To elucidate the basis of the down-regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene expression and to identify possible DNA-binding regulatory elements that have the potential to interact with class I MHC genes, we have studied the transcriptional regulation of class I HLA genes in human breast carcinoma cells. A 9 base pair (bp) negative cis-regulatory element (NRE) has been identified using band-shift assays employing DNA sequences derived from the 5'-flanking region of HLA class I genes. This 9-bp element, GTCATGGCG, located within exon I of the HLA class I gene, can potently inhibit the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase (TK) gene promoter and the HLA enhancer element. Furthermore, this regulatory element can exert its suppressive function in either the sense or anti-sense orientation. More interestingly, NRE can suppress dexamethasone-mediated gene activation in the context of the reported glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE) in MCF-7 cells but has no influence on the estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation of MCF-7 cells in the context of the reported estrogen-responsive element (ERE). Furthermore, the presence of such a regulatory element within the HLA class I gene whose activity can be modulated by hormones correlates well with our observation that the level of HLA class I gene expression can be down-regulated by hormones in human breast carcinoma cells. Such interactions between negative regulatory elements and specific hormone trans-activators are novel and suggest a versatile form of transcriptional control.

  20. Mode of delivery shapes gut colonization pattern and modulates regulatory immunity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Andersen, Line Sidsel Fisker; Krych, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that both C-section and cross-fostering with a genetically distinct strain influence the gut microbiota composition and immune key markers in mice. Gut microbiota profiling by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing...... electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory...... and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this....

  1. Steady-State-Preserving Simulation of Genetic Regulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqiang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel family of exponential Runge-Kutta (expRK methods are designed incorporating the stable steady-state structure of genetic regulatory systems. A natural and convenient approach to constructing new expRK methods on the base of traditional RK methods is provided. In the numerical integration of the one-gene, two-gene, and p53-mdm2 regulatory systems, the new expRK methods are shown to be more accurate than their prototype RK methods. Moreover, for nonstiff genetic regulatory systems, the expRK methods are more efficient than some traditional exponential RK integrators in the scientific literature.

  2. SLAC modulator system improvements and reliability results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.R.

    1998-06-01

    In 1995, an improvement project was completed on the 244 klystron modulators in the linear accelerator. The modulator system has been previously described. This article offers project details and their resulting effect on modulator and component reliability. Prior to the project, the authors had collected four operating cycles (1991 through 1995) of MTTF data. In this discussion, the '91 data will be excluded since the modulators operated at 60 Hz. The five periods following the '91 run were reviewed due to the common repetition rate at 120 Hz

  3. KIRMES: kernel-based identification of regulatory modules in euchromatic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Sebastian J; Busch, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Jan U; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Rätsch, Gunnar

    2009-08-15

    Understanding transcriptional regulation is one of the main challenges in computational biology. An important problem is the identification of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in promoter regions of potential TF target genes. It is typically approached by position weight matrix-based motif identification algorithms using Gibbs sampling, or heuristics to extend seed oligos. Such algorithms succeed in identifying single, relatively well-conserved binding sites, but tend to fail when it comes to the identification of combinations of several degenerate binding sites, as those often found in cis-regulatory modules. We propose a new algorithm that combines the benefits of existing motif finding with the ones of support vector machines (SVMs) to find degenerate motifs in order to improve the modeling of regulatory modules. In experiments on microarray data from Arabidopsis thaliana, we were able to show that the newly developed strategy significantly improves the recognition of TF targets. The python source code (open source-licensed under GPL), the data for the experiments and a Galaxy-based web service are available at http://www.fml.mpg.de/raetsch/suppl/kirmes/.

  4. Nanoparticle curcumin ameliorates experimental colitis via modulation of gut microbiota and induction of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Ohno

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol derived from turmeric, a traditional Indian spice. Curcumin exhibits various biological functions, but its clinical application is limited due to its poor absorbability after oral administration. A newly developed nanoparticle curcumin shows improved absorbability in vivo. In this study, we examined the effects of nanoparticle curcumin (named Theracurmin on experimental colitis in mice.BALB/c mice were fed with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in water. Mucosal cytokine expression and lymphocyte subpopulation were analyzed by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. The profile of the gut microbiota was analyzed by real-time PCR.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin significantly attenuated body weight loss, disease activity index, histological colitis score and significantly improved mucosal permeability. Immunoblot analysis showed that NF-κB activation in colonic epithelial cells was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Mucosal mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin increased the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and fecal butyrate level. This was accompanied by increased expansion of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and CD103+ CD8α- regulatory dendritic cells in the colonic mucosa.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin suppressed the development of DSS-induced colitis potentially via modulation of gut microbial structure. These responses were associated with induction of mucosal immune cells with regulatory properties. Nanoparticle curcumin is one of the promising candidates as a therapeutic option for the treatment of IBD.

  5. Alignment and prediction of cis-regulatory modules based on a probabilistic model of evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-species comparison has emerged as a powerful paradigm for predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and understanding their evolution. The comparison requires reliable sequence alignment, which remains a challenging task for less conserved noncoding sequences. Furthermore, the existing models of DNA sequence evolution generally do not explicitly treat the special properties of CRM sequences. To address these limitations, we propose a model of CRM evolution that captures different modes of evolution of functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and the background sequences. A particularly novel aspect of our work is a probabilistic model of gains and losses of TFBSs, a process being recognized as an important part of regulatory sequence evolution. We present a computational framework that uses this model to solve the problems of CRM alignment and prediction. Our alignment method is similar to existing methods of statistical alignment but uses the conserved binding sites to improve alignment. Our CRM prediction method deals with the inherent uncertainties of binding site annotations and sequence alignment in a probabilistic framework. In simulated as well as real data, we demonstrate that our program is able to improve both alignment and prediction of CRM sequences over several state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we used alignments produced by our program to study binding site conservation in genome-wide binding data of key transcription factors in the Drosophila blastoderm, with two intriguing results: (i the factor-bound sequences are under strong evolutionary constraints even if their neighboring genes are not expressed in the blastoderm and (ii binding sites in distal bound sequences (relative to transcription start sites tend to be more conserved than those in proximal regions. Our approach is implemented as software, EMMA (Evolutionary Model-based cis-regulatory Module Analysis, ready to be applied in a broad biological context.

  6. What is a comprehensive system of regulatory governance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real diaz, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive evolution and diversification of regulations concerning industrial safety has made their management increasingly complex, requiring more resources of organizations. Therefore, it is advisable that this management be made more efficient through systematization, specialization and the use of computing technologies. This is supported by the implementation of integrated regulatory management systems. This article explain the concept of integrated regulatory management systems, their structure and their advantages. It also includes a model for implementing them in an organization. (Author)

  7. Contribution of a fuzzy expert system to regulatory impact analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antônio da Cunha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA has been consolidating in Brazilian regulatory agencies throughout the last decades. The RIA methodology aims to examine the regulatory process, measure the costs and benefits generated, as well as other effects of social, political or economic nature caused by a new or an existing regulation. By analysing each regulatory option, the expert or regulator faces a myriad of variables, usually of qualitative nature, that are difficult to measure and with a high degree of uncertainty. This research complements the existing literature, given the scarcity of decision support models in RIA that – regardless of the problem treated – incorporate the tacit knowledge of the regulation expert. This paper proposes an exploratory approach using a Fuzzy Expert System, which therefore helps to enrich the decision process in the final stage of comparison of the regulatory options.

  8. Identification of miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules by exploring collective group relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud Karim, S M; Liu, Lin; Le, Thuc Duy; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-01-11

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in the post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants and animals. They regulate a wide range of biological processes by targeting messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Evidence suggests that miRNAs and mRNAs interact collectively in gene regulatory networks. The collective relationships between groups of miRNAs and groups of mRNAs may be more readily interpreted than those between individual miRNAs and mRNAs, and thus are useful for gaining insight into gene regulation and cell functions. Several computational approaches have been developed to discover miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules (MMRMs) with a common aim to elucidate miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. However, most existing methods do not consider the collective relationships between a group of miRNAs and the group of targeted mRNAs in the process of discovering MMRMs. Our aim is to develop a framework to discover MMRMs and reveal miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships from the heterogeneous expression data based on the collective relationships. We propose DIscovering COllective group RElationships (DICORE), an effective computational framework for revealing miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. We utilize the notation of collective group relationships to build the computational framework. The method computes the collaboration scores of the miRNAs and mRNAs on the basis of their interactions with mRNAs and miRNAs, respectively. Then it determines the groups of miRNAs and groups of mRNAs separately based on their respective collaboration scores. Next, it calculates the strength of the collective relationship between each pair of miRNA group and mRNA group using canonical correlation analysis, and the group pairs with significant canonical correlations are considered as the MMRMs. We applied this method to three gene expression datasets, and validated the computational discoveries. Analysis of the results demonstrates that a large portion of the regulatory relationships discovered by

  9. Phase-Modulated Optical Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Keang-Po

    2005-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication systems have revolutionized our telecommunication infrastructures – currently, almost all telephone land-line, cellular, and internet communications must travel via some form of optical fibers. In these transmission systems, neither the phase nor frequency of the optical signal carries information – only the intensity of the signal is used. To transmit more information in a single optical carrier, the phase of the optical carrier must be explored. As a result, there is renewed interest in phase-modulated optical communications, mainly in direct-detection DPSK signals for long-haul optical communication systems. When optical amplifiers are used to maintain certain signal level among the fiber link, the system is limited by amplifier noises and fiber nonlinearities. Phase-Modulated Optical Communication Systems surveys this newly popular area, covering the following topics: The transmitter and receiver for phase-modulated coherent lightwave systems Method for performance analysis o...

  10. USNRC regulatory guidance for engineered safety feature air cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    The need for clear, technically appropriate, and easily implementable guidance for the design, testing, and maintenance of nuclear air cleaning systems has long been recognized. Numerous industry consensus standards have been issued and revised over the last 30 years. Guidance has also been published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the form of regulations, regulatory guides, standard review plans, NUREG documents, and information notices. This paper will summarize the latest revisions to these documents and emphasize Regulatory Guide 1.52, Design, Testing, and Maintenance Criteria for Post-Accident Engineered-Safety-Feature Atmosphere Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants, which was last revised in 1978. The USNRC has undertaken a project to revise this regulatory guide, and the status of that revision is highlighted

  11. Bioattractors: dynamical systems theory and the evolution of regulatory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Monk, Nick

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we illustrate how dynamical systems theory can provide a unifying conceptual framework for evolution of biological regulatory systems. Our argument is that the genotype–phenotype map can be characterized by the phase portrait of the underlying regulatory process. The features of this portrait – such as attractors with associated basins and their bifurcations – define the regulatory and evolutionary potential of a system. We show how the geometric analysis of phase space connects Waddington's epigenetic landscape to recent computational approaches for the study of robustness and evolvability in network evolution. We discuss how the geometry of phase space determines the probability of possible phenotypic transitions. Finally, we demonstrate how the active, self-organizing role of the environment in phenotypic evolution can be understood in terms of dynamical systems concepts. This approach yields mechanistic explanations that go beyond insights based on the simulation of evolving regulatory networks alone. Its predictions can now be tested by studying specific, experimentally tractable regulatory systems using the tools of modern systems biology. A systematic exploration of such systems will enable us to understand better the nature and origin of the phenotypic variability, which provides the substrate for evolution by natural selection. PMID:24882812

  12. Acquisition system for the CLIC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Vilalte, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The status of R&D activities for CLIC module acquisition are discussed [1]. LAPP is involved in the design of the local CLIC module acquisition crate, described in the document Study of the CLIC Module Front-End Acquisition and Evaluation Electronics [2]. This acquisition system is a project based on a local crate, assigned to the CLIC module, including several mother boards. These motherboards are foreseen to hold mezzanines dedicated to the different subsystems. This system has to work in radiation environment. LAPP is involved in the development of Drive Beam stripline position monitors read-out, described in the document Drive Beam Stripline BPM Electronics and Acquisition [3]. LAPP also develops a generic acquisition mezzanine that allows to perform all-around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out.

  13. Review of regulatory requirements for digital I and C systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Lee, Cheol Kwon; Lee, Jang Soo [and others

    2001-11-01

    This work analyzed and summarized systematically various regulatory requirements that are necessary to develop digital nuclear instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, especially safety systems. The requirements are categorized into system, hardware, software, and quality assurance aspects. This report provides the explanations of terms and abbreviations to help readers understand. Furthermore, appendices of this report summarize the code and standards corresponding to each principal regulatory requirement. The hierarchical structure of regulatory requirements has Nuclear Energy Laws, Enforcement Regulations of Nuclear Energy Laws, and Notifications of Ministry of Science and Technology as utmost level requirements [In case of the US, 10 CFR 50 Appendix A, 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, 10 CFR 50.55a(h), 10 CFR 50.49, etc.]. The requirements include the Draft Regulatory Guidelines for Digital I and C Systems [In case of the US, Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), Regulatory Guide, Branch Technical Position (BTP)], KEPIC as standards [In case of the US, IEEE Standards, IEC Standards, ISA, Military Standard, etc.], and various reports issued by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety [In case of the US, NUREG reports, EPRI reports, etc.]. This report can be referred for the development of safety grade control equipment, plant protection system, and engineered safety feature actuation system.

  14. Review of regulatory requirements for digital I and C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Lee, Cheol Kwon; Lee, Jang Soo

    2001-11-01

    This work analyzed and summarized systematically various regulatory requirements that are necessary to develop digital nuclear instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, especially safety systems. The requirements are categorized into system, hardware, software, and quality assurance aspects. This report provides the explanations of terms and abbreviations to help readers understand. Furthermore, appendices of this report summarize the code and standards corresponding to each principal regulatory requirement. The hierarchical structure of regulatory requirements has Nuclear Energy Laws, Enforcement Regulations of Nuclear Energy Laws, and Notifications of Ministry of Science and Technology as utmost level requirements [In case of the US, 10 CFR 50 Appendix A, 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, 10 CFR 50.55a(h), 10 CFR 50.49, etc.]. The requirements include the Draft Regulatory Guidelines for Digital I and C Systems [In case of the US, Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), Regulatory Guide, Branch Technical Position (BTP)], KEPIC as standards [In case of the US, IEEE Standards, IEC Standards, ISA, Military Standard, etc.], and various reports issued by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety [In case of the US, NUREG reports, EPRI reports, etc.]. This report can be referred for the development of safety grade control equipment, plant protection system, and engineered safety feature actuation system

  15. Validation of Skeletal Muscle cis-Regulatory Module Predictions Reveals Nucleotide Composition Bias in Functional Enhancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Andrew T.; Chou, Alice Yi; Arenillas, David J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions. PMID:22144875

  16. Validation of skeletal muscle cis-regulatory module predictions reveals nucleotide composition bias in functional enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kwon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions.

  17. TransDetect Identifies a New Regulatory Module Controlling Phosphate Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sikander; Kisko, Mushtak; Dubos, Christian; Lacombe, Benoit; Berthomieu, Pierre; Krouk, Gabriel; Rouached, Hatem

    2017-10-01

    Identifying transcription factor (TFs) cooperation controlling target gene expression is still an arduous challenge. The accuracy of current methods at genome scale significantly drops with the increase in number of genes, which limits their applicability to more complex genomes, like animals and plants. Here, we developed an algorithm, TransDetect, able to predict TF combinations controlling the expression level of a given gene. TransDetect was used to identify novel TF modules regulating the expression of Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) phosphate transporter PHO1;H3 comprising MYB15, MYB84, bHLH35, and ICE1. These TFs were confirmed to interact between themselves and with the PHO1;H3 promoter. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of TF mutants enable the organization of these four TFs and PHO1;H3 in a new gene regulatory network controlling phosphate accumulation in zinc-dependent manner. This demonstrates the potential of TransDetect to extract directionality in nondynamic transcriptomes and to provide a blueprint to identify gene regulatory network involved in a given biological process. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Lmx1b-targeted cis-regulatory modules involved in limb dorsalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Endika; Watson, Billy A; Feenstra, Jennifer M; Tegeler, Luke; Pira, Charmaine U; Mohan, Subburaman; Oberg, Kerby C

    2017-06-01

    Lmx1b is a homeodomain transcription factor responsible for limb dorsalization. Despite striking double-ventral (loss-of-function) and double-dorsal (gain-of-function) limb phenotypes, no direct gene targets in the limb have been confirmed. To determine direct targets, we performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation against Lmx1b in mouse limbs at embryonic day 12.5 followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Nearly 84% ( n =617) of the Lmx1b-bound genomic intervals (LBIs) identified overlap with chromatin regulatory marks indicative of potential cis -regulatory modules (PCRMs). In addition, 73 LBIs mapped to CRMs that are known to be active during limb development. We compared Lmx1b-bound PCRMs with genes regulated by Lmx1b and found 292 PCRMs within 1 Mb of 254 Lmx1b-regulated genes. Gene ontological analysis suggests that Lmx1b targets extracellular matrix production, bone/joint formation, axonal guidance, vascular development, cell proliferation and cell movement. We validated the functional activity of a PCRM associated with joint-related Gdf5 that provides a mechanism for Lmx1b-mediated joint modification and a PCRM associated with Lmx1b that suggests a role in autoregulation. This is the first report to describe genome-wide Lmx1b binding during limb development, directly linking Lmx1b to targets that accomplish limb dorsalization. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Comparing genomes to computer operating systems in terms of the topology and evolution of their regulatory control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Fang, Gang; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Alexander, Roger P; Gerstein, Mark

    2010-05-18

    The genome has often been called the operating system (OS) for a living organism. A computer OS is described by a regulatory control network termed the call graph, which is analogous to the transcriptional regulatory network in a cell. To apply our firsthand knowledge of the architecture of software systems to understand cellular design principles, we present a comparison between the transcriptional regulatory network of a well-studied bacterium (Escherichia coli) and the call graph of a canonical OS (Linux) in terms of topology and evolution. We show that both networks have a fundamentally hierarchical layout, but there is a key difference: The transcriptional regulatory network possesses a few global regulators at the top and many targets at the bottom; conversely, the call graph has many regulators controlling a small set of generic functions. This top-heavy organization leads to highly overlapping functional modules in the call graph, in contrast to the relatively independent modules in the regulatory network. We further develop a way to measure evolutionary rates comparably between the two networks and explain this difference in terms of network evolution. The process of biological evolution via random mutation and subsequent selection tightly constrains the evolution of regulatory network hubs. The call graph, however, exhibits rapid evolution of its highly connected generic components, made possible by designers' continual fine-tuning. These findings stem from the design principles of the two systems: robustness for biological systems and cost effectiveness (reuse) for software systems.

  20. PReMod: a database of genome-wide mammalian cis-regulatory module predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Vincent; Poitras, Christian; Bergeron, Dominique; Coulombe, Benoit; Robert, François; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2007-01-01

    We describe PReMod, a new database of genome-wide cis-regulatory module (CRM) predictions for both the human and the mouse genomes. The prediction algorithm, described previously in Blanchette et al. (2006) Genome Res., 16, 656-668, exploits the fact that many known CRMs are made of clusters of phylogenetically conserved and repeated transcription factors (TF) binding sites. Contrary to other existing databases, PReMod is not restricted to modules located proximal to genes, but in fact mostly contains distal predicted CRMs (pCRMs). Through its web interface, PReMod allows users to (i) identify pCRMs around a gene of interest; (ii) identify pCRMs that have binding sites for a given TF (or a set of TFs) or (iii) download the entire dataset for local analyses. Queries can also be refined by filtering for specific chromosomal regions, for specific regions relative to genes or for the presence of CpG islands. The output includes information about the binding sites predicted within the selected pCRMs, and a graphical display of their distribution within the pCRMs. It also provides a visual depiction of the chromosomal context of the selected pCRMs in terms of neighboring pCRMs and genes, all of which are linked to the UCSC Genome Browser and the NCBI. PReMod: http://genomequebec.mcgill.ca/PReMod.

  1. Environment Modules on the Peregrine System | High-Performance Computing |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Environment Modules on the Peregrine System Environment Modules on the Peregrine System Peregrine uses environment modules to easily manage software environments. Environment modules facilitate modules commands set up a basic environment for the default compilers, tools and libraries, such as the

  2. Nuclear knowledge management system in the regulatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Klevtsov, A.L.; Kravchenko, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Important issues on collection, storage and spread of knowledge among organisation dealing with the use of nuclear technologies, role of close cooperation between enterprises and organizations in developing knowledge management, general requirements for creating a nuclear knowledge management system are considered. Recommendations and the main mechanisms are identified to create the knowledge management system in technical support organizations of the regulatory authority.

  3. Regulatory control analysis and design for sewer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Ane Loft; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Thornberg, Dines

    2015-01-01

    A systematic methodology for regulatory control analysis and design is adapted for sewer system operation and evaluated. The main challenge with adapting the methodology is the handling of the stochastic and transient nature of the rainfall disturbances, inherent to sewer system operation...

  4. Improvement of the regulatory system by implementation new safety demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, R.; Alfonso, C.

    1996-01-01

    The work describes in broad terms, the analysis that is being performed aiming at the adoption of a regulatory system that could meet the current safety demands, but which, at the same time, could be a general system that might allow different safety assessments to be done by making use of more specific technical standards of the technology supplier

  5. Development of the module inspection system for new standardized radiation monitoring modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Masami; Shimizu, Kazuaki; Hiruta, Toshihito; Mizugaki, Toshio; Ohi, Yoshihiro; Chida, Tooru.

    1994-10-01

    This report mentions about the module inspection system which does the maintenance check of the monitoring modules adapted the new monitoring standard, as well as the result of the verification of the modules. The module inspection system is the automatic measurement system with the computer. The system can perform the functional and the characteristic examination of the monitoring modules, the calibration with radiation source and inspection report. In the verification of the monitoring module, three major items were tested, the adaptability for the new monitoring standard, the module functions and each characteristics. All items met the new monitoring standard. (author)

  6. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  7. Tissue-specific expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and putative developmental regulatory modules in Baltic salmon yolk-sac fry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, Kristiina A. [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)], E-mail: kristiina.vuori@utu.fi; Nordlund, Eija [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kallio, Jenny [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Salakoski, Tapio [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Nikinmaa, Mikko [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2008-04-08

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an ancient protein that is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, indicating its important function throughout evolution. AhR has been studied largely because of its role in toxicology-gene expression via AhR is induced by many aromatic hydrocarbons in mammals. Recently, however, it has become clear that AhR is involved in various aspects of development such as cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell motility and migration. The mechanisms by which AhR regulates these various functions remain poorly understood. Across-species comparative studies of AhR in invertebrates, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals may help to reveal the multiple functions of AhR. Here, we have studied AhR during larval development of Baltic salmon (Salmon salar). Our results indicate that AhR protein is expressed in nervous system, liver and muscle tissues. We also present putative regulatory modules and module-matching genes, produced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning and in silico analysis, which may be associated with evolutionarily conserved functions of AhR during development. For example, the module NFKB-AHRR-CREB found from salmon ChIP sequences is present in human ULK3 (regulating formation of granule cell axons in mouse and axon outgrowth in Caernohabditis elegans) and SRGAP1 (GTPase-activating protein involved in the Slit/Robo pathway) promoters. We suggest that AhR may have an evolutionarily conserved role in neuronal development and nerve cell targeting, and in Wnt signaling pathway.

  8. Tissue-specific expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and putative developmental regulatory modules in Baltic salmon yolk-sac fry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, Kristiina A.; Nordlund, Eija; Kallio, Jenny; Salakoski, Tapio; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an ancient protein that is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, indicating its important function throughout evolution. AhR has been studied largely because of its role in toxicology-gene expression via AhR is induced by many aromatic hydrocarbons in mammals. Recently, however, it has become clear that AhR is involved in various aspects of development such as cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell motility and migration. The mechanisms by which AhR regulates these various functions remain poorly understood. Across-species comparative studies of AhR in invertebrates, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals may help to reveal the multiple functions of AhR. Here, we have studied AhR during larval development of Baltic salmon (Salmon salar). Our results indicate that AhR protein is expressed in nervous system, liver and muscle tissues. We also present putative regulatory modules and module-matching genes, produced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning and in silico analysis, which may be associated with evolutionarily conserved functions of AhR during development. For example, the module NFKB-AHRR-CREB found from salmon ChIP sequences is present in human ULK3 (regulating formation of granule cell axons in mouse and axon outgrowth in Caernohabditis elegans) and SRGAP1 (GTPase-activating protein involved in the Slit/Robo pathway) promoters. We suggest that AhR may have an evolutionarily conserved role in neuronal development and nerve cell targeting, and in Wnt signaling pathway

  9. CAMAC interface module for PACE ADC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, C G; Mischke, R E [Los Alamos Scientific Lab., N.Mex. (USA); Scott, D T

    1977-03-15

    This report describes a CAMAC module designed to buffer and transfer data from the Tennelec multiplexed ADC system called PACE to a computer. It can be operated in either of two modes: as an eight-deep, first-in-first-out (FIFO) circular buffer, or in channel mode with a single buffer reserved for each PACE channel.

  10. Cathode follower RF system with frequency modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Y.; Yano, Y.; Kaneko, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A model RF system with a cathode follower was tested under frequency modulation in the 1-3.5 MHz range. The repetition rate was 40 Hz. The oscillation was stable, and the output impedance was measured to be around 20 ohm. (author)

  11. Advanced reactor systems: safety and regulatory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1994-01-01

    Safety features which are desirable in futuristic reactor systems have been the subject of several studies over the past decade by different expert groups. When one discusses this subject, therefore, in a somewhat non-specific and qualitative manner, it is best to make use of the already available collective wisdom and literature on the matter. (author). 3 refs

  12. Processing module operating methods, processing modules, and communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven Harvey; Derr, Kurt W.; Moore, Troy

    2014-09-09

    A processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a wireless communications device, requesting that the wireless communications device retrieve encrypted code from a web site and receiving the encrypted code from the wireless communications device. The wireless communications device is unable to decrypt the encrypted code. The method further includes using the processing module, decrypting the encrypted code, executing the decrypted code, and preventing the wireless communications device from accessing the decrypted code. Another processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a host device, executing an application within the processing module, allowing the application to exchange user interaction data communicated using a user interface of the host device with the host device, and allowing the application to use the host device as a communications device for exchanging information with a remote device distinct from the host device.

  13. System for Automated Calibration of Vector Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James; Boas, Amy; Li, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Vector modulators are used to impose baseband modulation on RF signals, but non-ideal behavior limits the overall performance. The non-ideal behavior of the vector modulator is compensated using data collected with the use of an automated test system driven by a LabVIEW program that systematically applies thousands of control-signal values to the device under test and collects RF measurement data. The technology innovation automates several steps in the process. First, an automated test system, using computer controlled digital-to-analog converters (DACs) and a computer-controlled vector network analyzer (VNA) systematically can apply different I and Q signals (which represent the complex number by which the RF signal is multiplied) to the vector modulator under test (VMUT), while measuring the RF performance specifically, gain and phase. The automated test system uses the LabVIEW software to control the test equipment, collect the data, and write it to a file. The input to the Lab - VIEW program is either user-input for systematic variation, or is provided in a file containing specific test values that should be fed to the VMUT. The output file contains both the control signals and the measured data. The second step is to post-process the file to determine the correction functions as needed. The result of the entire process is a tabular representation, which allows translation of a desired I/Q value to the required analog control signals to produce a particular RF behavior. In some applications, corrected performance is needed only for a limited range. If the vector modulator is being used as a phase shifter, there is only a need to correct I and Q values that represent points on a circle, not the entire plane. This innovation has been used to calibrate 2-GHz MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) vector modulators in the High EIRP Cluster Array project (EIRP is high effective isotropic radiated power). These calibrations were then used to create

  14. Identifying cis-regulatory modules by combining comparative and compositional analysis of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierstorff, Nora; Bergman, Casey M; Wiehe, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in higher eukaryotes is a challenging computational task. Commonly used methods to predict CRMs based on the signal of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are limited by prior information about transcription factor specificity. More general methods that bypass the reliance on TFBS models are needed for comprehensive CRM prediction. We have developed a method to predict CRMs called CisPlusFinder that identifies high density regions of perfect local ungapped sequences (PLUSs) based on multiple species conservation. By assuming that PLUSs contain core TFBS motifs that are locally overrepresented, the method attempts to capture the expected features of CRM structure and evolution. Applied to a benchmark dataset of CRMs involved in early Drosophila development, CisPlusFinder predicts more annotated CRMs than all other methods tested. Using the REDfly database, we find that some 'false positive' predictions in the benchmark dataset correspond to recently annotated CRMs. Our work demonstrates that CRM prediction methods that combine comparative genomic data with statistical properties of DNA may achieve reasonable performance when applied genome-wide in the absence of an a priori set of known TFBS motifs. The program CisPlusFinder can be downloaded at http://jakob.genetik.uni-koeln.de/bioinformatik/people/nora/nora.html. All software is licensed under the Lesser GNU Public License (LGPL).

  15. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  16. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Greitzer, Frank L; Hampton, Shawn D

    2014-03-04

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  17. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Hampton, Shawn D.

    2016-08-23

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  18. Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Hampton, Shawn D.

    2015-08-18

    Information processing systems, reasoning modules, and reasoning system design methods are described. According to one aspect, an information processing system includes working memory comprising a semantic graph which comprises a plurality of abstractions, wherein the abstractions individually include an individual which is defined according to an ontology and a reasoning system comprising a plurality of reasoning modules which are configured to process different abstractions of the semantic graph, wherein a first of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a first classification type of the ontology and a second of the reasoning modules is configured to process a plurality of abstractions which include individuals of a second classification type of the ontology, wherein the first and second classification types are different.

  19. Selected legal and regulatory concerns affecting domestic energy transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, C.R.

    1979-07-01

    This report provides assessments of eight legal and regulatory concerns that may affect energy material transportation in the US during the rest of the century: state authority to regulate nuclear materials transport, divestiture of petroleum pipelines from major integrated oil companies, problems affecting the natural gas transportation system, capabilities of energy transportation systems during emergencies, Federal coal pipeline legislation, ability of Federal agencies to anticipate railroad difficulties, abandonment of uneconomic railroad lines, and impact of the Panama Canal treaty upon US energy transportation

  20. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, three objectives (e.g., define the skeletal system and list its functions), and three learning…

  1. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system.

  2. Modulation of anxiety circuits by serotonergic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowry, Christopher A; Johnson, Philip L; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2005-01-01

    of emotionally salient events, often when both rewarding and aversive outcomes are possible. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the neural circuits regulating anxiety states and anxiety-related behavior with an emphasis on the role of brainstem serotonergic systems in modulating...... anxiety-related circuits. In particular, we explore the possibility that the regulation of anxiety states and anxiety-related behavior by serotonergic systems is dependent on a specific, topographically organized mesolimbocortical serotonergic system that originates in the mid-rostrocaudal and caudal...

  3. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot TEM, the actual heat flow through the module, and its mechanical load, which can be varied during the measurement. Key components of our testing setup are (i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  4. Integration of metabolic and gene regulatory networks modulates the C. elegans dietary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Arda, H Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2013-03-28

    Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network composed of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation of Regulatory Systems in Schoolchildren, Residing in Industrial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman E. Konkabaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study of heart rate variability (HRT in apparently healthy volunteers of both sexes without bad habits, aged 16-18, residing in industrial region (Temirtau and the ones, studying under innovative technologies. HRT was registered with the help of computer-controlled devices “Varikard” (Russia. The changes of HRT spectral indexes towards integral impact of vegetative regulation mechanisms and parasympathetic activity decrease and regulatory systems overexertion, demanding correction methods implementation

  6. Sociotechnical systems as a framework for regulatory system design and evaluation: Using Work Domain Analysis to examine a new regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Tony; Goode, Natassia; Read, Gemma J M; Salmon, Paul M

    2017-03-15

    Like most work systems, the domain of adventure activities has seen a series of serious incidents and subsequent calls to improve regulation. Safety regulation systems aim to promote safety and reduce accidents. However, there is scant evidence they have led to improved safety outcomes. In fact there is some evidence that the poor integration of regulatory system components has led to adverse safety outcomes in some contexts. Despite this, there is an absence of methods for evaluating regulatory and compliance systems. This article argues that sociotechnical systems theory and methods provide a suitable framework for evaluating regulatory systems. This is demonstrated through an analysis of a recently introduced set of adventure activity regulations. Work Domain Analysis (WDA) was used to describe the regulatory system in terms of its functional purposes, values and priority measures, purpose-related functions, object-related processes and cognitive objects. This allowed judgement to be made on the nature of the new regulatory system and on the constraints that may impact its efficacy following implementation. Importantly, the analysis suggests that the new system's functional purpose of ensuring safe activities is not fully supported in terms of the functions and objects available to fulfil them. Potential improvements to the design of the system are discussed along with the implications for regulatory system design and evaluation across the safety critical domains generally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transportation of radioactive materials: the legislative and regulatory information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.

    1982-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is carrying out a national program to assure the safe shipment of radioactive materials. As part of this overall effort, the Hazardous Materials Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the comprehensive Legislative and Regulatory Information System, which contains information on federal-, state-, and local-level legislative and regulatory actions pertaining primarily to the shipment of radioactive materials. Specific subject areas chosen to highlight particular transportation restrictions include: (1) identification of state agency responsible for regulating transportation, (2) type of escorts required, (3) areas requiring prior notification, (4) areas requiring permits or licenses, and (5) areas totally banning transportation of all radioactive materials. Other legislative information being categorized and of immediate relevance to the transportation issues is covered under the areas of disposal, storage, and management of radioactive materials; establishment of additional regulations; emergency response regulations; moratoriums on power plant construction and siting; radiation safety and control studies; and remedial action studies. The collected information is abstracted, indexed, and input into one of the two data bases developed under this information system - Current Legislation Data Base and Historical Legislation Data Base. An appendix is included which provides a summary of the state and local laws affecting the transportation of radioactive materials throughout the United States. The Legislative and Regulatory Information System is supported by the Transportation Technology Center located at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

  8. Transportation of radioactive materials: the legislative and regulatory information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, C.S.

    1982-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is carrying out a national program to assure the safe shipment of radioactive materials. As part of this overall effort, the Hazardous Materials Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the comprehensive Legislative and Regulatory Information System, which contains information on federal-, state-, and local-level legislative and regulatory actions pertaining primarily to the shipment of radioactive materials. Specific subject areas chosen to highlight particular transportation restrictions include: (1) identification of state agency responsible for regulating transportation, (2) type of escorts required, (3) areas requiring prior notification, (4) areas requiring permits or licenses, and (5) areas totally banning transportation of all radioactive materials. Other legislative information being categorized and of immediate relevance to the transportation issues is covered under the areas of disposal, storage, and management of radioactive materials; establishment of additional regulations; emergency response regulations; moratoriums on power plant construction and siting; radiation safety and control studies; and remedial action studies. The collected information is abstracted, indexed, and input into one of the two data bases developed under this information system - Current Legislation Data Base and Historical Legislation Data Base. An appendix is included which provides a summary of the state and local laws affecting the transportation of radioactive materials throughout the United States. The Legislative and Regulatory Information System is supported by the Transportation Technology Center located at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  9. Defense Travel System: an analysis of the system's reservation module

    OpenAIRE

    Logan, Anita Guevara

    2008-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The purpose of this project is to determine if the DTS reservation module is in compliance based with the standards set by the DOD. By examining flights given in DTS and comparing them to a commercial online travel company (Expedia) will determine whether the implementation of ITA software in 2007, as part of the renovation process is effective and that the reservation module currently meeting standards. Another purpose is to determine if the system has improved...

  10. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H - linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H - beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems

  11. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  12. Regulatory T-Cell-Associated Cytokines in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and immune complex deposition, resulting in tissue and organ damage. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for homeostatic control of inflammation, which involve both innate and adoptive immune responses, will enable the development of novel therapies for SLE. Regulatory T cells (Treg play critical roles in the induction of peripheral tolerance to self- and foreign antigens. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg, which characteristically express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3, have been intensively studied because their deficiency abrogates self-tolerance and causes autoimmune disease. Moreover, regulatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10 also play a central role in controlling inflammatory processes. This paper focuses on Tregs and Treg-associated cytokines which might regulate the pathogenesis of SLE and, hence, have clinical applications.

  13. Computational Genetic Regulatory Networks Evolvable, Self-organizing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Johannes F

    2013-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) in biological organisms are primary engines for cells to enact their engagements with environments, via incessant, continually active coupling. In differentiated multicellular organisms, tremendous complexity has arisen in the course of evolution of life on earth. Engineering and science have so far achieved no working system that can compare with this complexity, depth and scope of organization. Abstracting the dynamics of genetic regulatory control to a computational framework in which artificial GRNs in artificial simulated cells differentiate while connected in a changing topology, it is possible to apply Darwinian evolution in silico to study the capacity of such developmental/differentiated GRNs to evolve. In this volume an evolutionary GRN paradigm is investigated for its evolvability and robustness in models of biological clocks, in simple differentiated multicellularity, and in evolving artificial developing 'organisms' which grow and express an ontogeny starting fr...

  14. An active cooling system for photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, H.G.; Lee, P.S.; Hawlader, M.N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The electrical efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) cell is adversely affected by the significant increase of cell operating temperature during absorption of solar radiation. A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar system was designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated in this work. To actively cool the PV cells, a parallel array of ducts with inlet/outlet manifold designed for uniform airflow distribution was attached to the back of the PV panel. Experiments were performed with and without active cooling. A linear trend between the efficiency and temperature was found. Without active cooling, the temperature of the module was high and solar cells can only achieve an efficiency of 8–9%. However, when the module was operated under active cooling condition, the temperature dropped significantly leading to an increase in efficiency of solar cells to between 12% and 14%. A heat transfer simulation model was developed to compare to the actual temperature profile of PV module and good agreement between the simulation and experimental results is obtained.

  15. Food safety regulatory systems in Europe and China:A study of how co-regulation can improve regulatory effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin Chen; WANG Xin-xin; SONG Hai-ying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety has received a great deal of attention in both developed and developing countries in recent years. In China, the numerous food scandals and scares that have struck over the past decade have spurred signiifcant food safety regulatory reform, which has been increasingly oriented towards the public-private partnership model adopted by the Europe Union’s (EU) food safety regulatory system. This paper analyzes the development of both the EU’s and China’s food safety regu-latory systems, identiifes the current chalenges for China and additionaly considers the role of public-private partnership. The success of co-regulation in the food regulatory system would bring signiifcant beneifts and opportunities for China. Finaly, this paper recommends additional measures like training and grants to improve the private’s sector effectiveness in co-regulating China’s food safety issues.

  16. Modulating the immune system through nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacoba, Tamara G; Olivera, Ana; Torres, Dolores; Crecente-Campo, José; Alonso, María José

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, nanotechnology-based modulation of the immune system is presented as a cutting-edge strategy, which may lead to significant improvements in the treatment of severe diseases. In particular, efforts have been focused on the development of nanotechnology-based vaccines, which could be used for immunization or generation of tolerance. In this review, we highlight how different immune responses can be elicited by tuning nanosystems properties. In addition, we discuss specific formulation approaches designed for the development of anti-infectious and anti-autoimmune vaccines, as well as those intended to prevent the formation of antibodies against biologicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A system-level model for the microbial regulatory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aaron N; Reiss, David J; Allard, Antoine; Wu, Wei-Ju; Salvanha, Diego M; Plaisier, Christopher L; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Pan, Min; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-07-15

    Microbes can tailor transcriptional responses to diverse environmental challenges despite having streamlined genomes and a limited number of regulators. Here, we present data-driven models that capture the dynamic interplay of the environment and genome-encoded regulatory programs of two types of prokaryotes: Escherichia coli (a bacterium) and Halobacterium salinarum (an archaeon). The models reveal how the genome-wide distributions of cis-acting gene regulatory elements and the conditional influences of transcription factors at each of those elements encode programs for eliciting a wide array of environment-specific responses. We demonstrate how these programs partition transcriptional regulation of genes within regulons and operons to re-organize gene-gene functional associations in each environment. The models capture fitness-relevant co-regulation by different transcriptional control mechanisms acting across the entire genome, to define a generalized, system-level organizing principle for prokaryotic gene regulatory networks that goes well beyond existing paradigms of gene regulation. An online resource (http://egrin2.systemsbiology.net) has been developed to facilitate multiscale exploration of conditional gene regulation in the two prokaryotes. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Regulatory requirements for replacement of analog systems with digital upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeser, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the regulatory guidelines which must be met in order to replace analog systems in nuclear power plants with digital systems. There is a move to do such replacements for a number of reasons: analog systems are aging, and showing considerable drift; few vendors manufacture analog systems today; support and parts are hard to get; digital systems provide flexibility. There is a safety concern however about undesirable and unpredictable effects to digital safety equipment due to plant transients, accidents, post-accident condition, and EMI/RF environmental interferences. License holders must comply with the requirements of 10 C.F.R. 50.59, which deals with safety concerns with respect to any changes to operating plants which may have an impact on the safety of the plant. NRC staff is taking the position that all digital upgrades will require an evaluation under this regulation

  19. Module-level DC/DC conversion for photovoltaic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, H.J.; Büthker, D.; Castello, C.; Doorn, T.S.; Jong, de A.; van Otten, R.; Waal, de K.

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are increasingly used to generate electrical energy from solar irradiance incident on PV modules. Each PV module is formed by placing a large amount of PV cells, typically 60, in series. The PV system is then formed by placing a number, typically 10–12, of PV modules in

  20. Antioxidant and Ex Vivo Immune System Regulatory Properties of Boswellia serrata Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Beghelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boswellia serrata (BS is an important traditional medicinal plant that currently represents an interesting topic for pharmaceutical research since it possesses several pharmacological properties (e.g., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitumour. The safety and versatility of this dietary supplement should allow for its use in numerous pathological conditions; however the quality of the extracts needs to be standardized to increase the clinical success rate resulting from its use. In the present study, different commercially available B. serrata extracts were employed to compare their AKBA content and in vitro antioxidant power. Furthermore, their ability to modulate the immune system regulatory properties was investigated. Our results showed that the AKBA content varied from 3.83±0.10 to 0.03±0.004%, with one sample in which it was not detectable. The highest antioxidant power and phenolic content were shown by the same extract, which also exhibited the highest AKBA concentration. Finally, the BS extracts showed the ability to influence the regulatory and effector T-cell compartments. Our results suggest that frankincense should be further investigated for its promising potentiality to modulate not only inflammation/oxidative stress but also immune dysregulation, but attention should be paid to the composition of the commercial extracts.

  1. Computational and molecular dissection of an X-box cis-Regulatory module

    OpenAIRE

    Warrington, Timothy Burton

    2015-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a class of human diseases marked by dysfunction of the cellular organelle, cilia. While many of the molecular components that make up cilia have been identified and studied, comparatively little is understood about the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding these components. The conserved transcription factor Regulatory Factor X (RFX)/DAF-19, which acts through binding to the cis-regulatory motif known as X-box, has been shown to regulate ciliary genes in many animals f...

  2. Integrated analysis of microRNA and gene expression profiles reveals a functional regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Wenshan; Yang, Aiting; Xu, Anjian; Wang, Huan; Cong, Min; Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; You, Hong

    2017-12-15

    Liver fibrosis, characterized with the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, represents the final common pathway of chronic liver inflammation. Ever-increasing evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) dysregulation has important implications in the different stages of liver fibrosis. However, our knowledge of miRNA-gene regulation details pertaining to such disease remains unclear. The publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets of patients suffered from cirrhosis were extracted for integrated analysis. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and genes (DEGs) were identified using GEO2R web tool. Putative target gene prediction of DEMs was carried out using the intersection of five major algorithms: DIANA-microT, TargetScan, miRanda, PICTAR5 and miRWalk. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory network (FMGRN) was constructed based on the computational target predictions at the sequence level and the inverse expression relationships between DEMs and DEGs. DAVID web server was selected to perform KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory module was generated based on the biological interpretation. Internal connections among genes in liver fibrosis-related module were determined using String database. MiRNA-gene regulatory modules related to liver fibrosis were experimentally verified in recombinant human TGFβ1 stimulated and specific miRNA inhibitor treated LX-2 cells. We totally identified 85 and 923 dysregulated miRNAs and genes in liver cirrhosis biopsy samples compared to their normal controls. All evident miRNA-gene pairs were identified and assembled into FMGRN which consisted of 990 regulations between 51 miRNAs and 275 genes, forming two big sub-networks that were defined as down-network and up-network, respectively. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that up-network was prominently involved in several KEGG pathways, in which "Focal adhesion", "PI3K-Akt signaling pathway" and "ECM

  3. cisMEP: an integrated repository of genomic epigenetic profiles and cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Chung-Ching; Hung, Po-Cheng; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), or the DNA sequences required for regulating gene expression, play the central role in biological researches on transcriptional regulation in metazoan species. Nowadays, the systematic understanding of CRMs still mainly resorts to computational methods due to the time-consuming and small-scale nature of experimental methods. But the accuracy and reliability of different CRM prediction tools are still unclear. Without comparative cross-analysis of the results and combinatorial consideration with extra experimental information, there is no easy way to assess the confidence of the predicted CRMs. This limits the genome-wide understanding of CRMs. It is known that transcription factor binding and epigenetic profiles tend to determine functions of CRMs in gene transcriptional regulation. Thus integration of the genome-wide epigenetic profiles with systematically predicted CRMs can greatly help researchers evaluate and decipher the prediction confidence and possible transcriptional regulatory functions of these potential CRMs. However, these data are still fragmentary in the literatures. Here we performed the computational genome-wide screening for potential CRMs using different prediction tools and constructed the pioneer database, cisMEP (cis-regulatory module epigenetic profile database), to integrate these computationally identified CRMs with genomic epigenetic profile data. cisMEP collects the literature-curated TFBS location data and nine genres of epigenetic data for assessing the confidence of these potential CRMs and deciphering the possible CRM functionality. cisMEP aims to provide a user-friendly interface for researchers to assess the confidence of different potential CRMs and to understand the functions of CRMs through experimentally-identified epigenetic profiles. The deposited potential CRMs and experimental epigenetic profiles for confidence assessment provide experimentally testable hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms

  4. System control module diagnostic Expert Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Luis M.; Hansen, Roger F.

    1990-01-01

    The Orbiter EXperiments (OEX) Program was established by NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) to accomplish the precise data collection necessary to support a complete and accurate assessment of Space Transportation System (STS) Orbiter performance during all phases of a mission. During a mission, data generated by the various experiments are conveyed to the OEX System Control Module (SCM) which arranges for and monitors storage of the data on the OEX tape recorder. The SCM Diagnostic Expert Assistant (DEA) is an expert system which provides on demand advice to technicians performing repairs of a malfunctioning SCM. The DEA is a self-contained, data-driven knowledge-based system written in the 'C' Language Production System (CLIPS) for a portable micro-computer of the IBM PC/XT class. The DEA reasons about SCM hardware faults at multiple levels; the most detailed layer of encoded knowledge of the SCM is a representation of individual components and layouts of the custom-designed component boards.

  5. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, A; Brown, J M; Williams, J S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of a clinically relevant interplay between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory systems. Classically, the former is considered a key regulator of sodium and volume homeostasis, while the latter is most often associated with skeletal health. However, emerging evidence suggests an overlap in regulatory control. Hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism represent pathophysiologic conditions that may contribute to or perpetuate each other; aldosterone regulates parathyroid hormone and associates with adverse skeletal complications, and parathyroid hormone regulates aldosterone and associates with adverse cardiovascular complications. As dysregulation in both systems is linked to poor cardiovascular and skeletal health, it is increasingly important to fully characterize how they interact to more precisely understand their impact on human health and potential therapies to modulate these interactions. This review describes the known clinical interactions between these two systems including observational and interventional studies. Specifically, we review studies describing the inhibition of renin activity by calcium and vitamin D, and a potentially bidirectional and stimulatory relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone. Deciphering these relationships might clarify variability in outcomes research, inform the design of future intervention studies and provide insight into the results of prior and ongoing intervention studies. However, before these opportunities can be addressed, more effort must be placed on shifting observational data to the proof of concept phase. This will require reallocation of resources to conduct interventional studies and secure the necessary talent.

  6. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  7. Modular and coordinated expression of immune system regulatory and signaling components in the developing and adult nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Crampton, Sean; McKelvey, Laura; Nolan, Aoife; O'Keeffe, Gerard; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    During development, the nervous system (NS) is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signaling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult NS. While the involvement of individual immune-related signaling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune-related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the NS. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the NS, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system (IS) genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the NS.

  8. Energy detection UWB system based on pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new energy detection ultra-wideband system based on pulse width modulation is proposed. The bit error rate (BER performance of this new system is slightly worst than that of a pulse position modulation (PPM system in additive white Gaussian noise channels. In multipath channels, this system does not suffer from cross-modulation interference as PPM, so it can achieve better BER performance than PPM when cross-modulation interference occurs. In addition, when synchronisation errors occur, this system is more robust than PPM.

  9. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  10. An evaluation model for the definition of regulatory requirements on spent fuel pool cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation model is presented for establishing regulatory requirements in the SFPCS System. The major design factors, regulatory and design limits and key parameters are discussed. A regulatory position for internal use is proposed. Finally, associated problems and experience are presented. (author)

  11. ESP8266 WI-FI MODULE FOR MONITORING SYSTEM APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tae-Gue Oh; Chung-Hyuk Yim; Gyu-Sik Kim

    2017-01-01

    The ESP8266 Wi-Fi module is a self-contained system-on-chip (SOC) with integrated TCP/IP protocol stacks that can give any microcontroller access to a Wi-Fi network. In this paper, the interface between the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module and arduino MCU is studied for monitoring system application. Through some experimental studies, we believe that the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module is very useful for monitoring system application.

  12. Implementation of a Quality Management System in regulatory inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires do Rio, Monica; Ferreira, Paulo Roberto; Cunha, Paulo G. da; Acar, Maria Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD -, of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, started in 2001, the implementation of a quality management system (SGQ), in the inspection, testing and calibration activities. The SGQ was an institutional guideline and is inserted in a larger system of management of the IRD started in 1999, with the adoption of the National Quality Award criteria - PNQ, within the Project for Excellence in Technological Research of Associacao Brasileira das Instituicoes de Pesquisas Tecnologicas - ABIPTI (Brazilian Association of Technological Research institutions). The proposed quality management system and adopted at the IRD was developed and implemented in accordance with the requirements of NBR ISO/IEC 17025 - General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories, and ISO/IEC 17020 - General criteria for operation of various types of bodies performing inspections. For regulatory inspection activities, the quality system was implemented on three program inspection services of radiological protection led, respectively, by clinics and hospitals that operate radiotherapy services; industries that use nuclear gauges in their control or productive processes and power reactor operators (CNAAA) - just the environmental part. It was formed a pioneering team of inspectors for standardizing the processes, procedures and starting the implementation of the system in the areas. This work describes the implementation process steps, including difficulties, learning and advantages of the adoption of a quality management system in inspection activities

  13. Safety system upgrades to a research reactor: A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, G.B.; Martin, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) reactor, located at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), first achieved criticality November 3, 1957. AECL continues to operate NRU for research to support safety and reliability studies for CANDU reactors and as a major supplier of medical radioisotopes. Following a detailed systematic review and assessment of NRU's design and the condition of its primary systems, AECL formally notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) predecessor - the Atomic Energy Control Board - in 1992 of its intention to upgrade NRU's safety systems. AECL proposed seven major upgrades to provide improvements in shutdown capability, heat removal, confinement, and reactor monitoring, particularly during and after a seismic event. From a CNSC perspective, these upgrades were necessary to meet modern safety standards. From the start of the upgrades project, the CNSC provided regulatory oversight aimed at ensuring that AECL maintained a structured approach to the upgrades. The elements of the approach include, but are not limited to, the determination of project milestones and target dates; the formalization of the design process and project quality assurance requirements; the requirements for updated documentation, including safety reports, safety notes and commissioning reports; and the approval and authorization process. This paper details, from a regulatory perspective, the structured approach used in approving the design, construction, commissioning and subsequent operation of safety system upgrades for an existing and operating research reactor, including the many challenges faced when attempting to balance the requirements of the upgrades project with AECL's need to keep NRU operating to meet its important research and production objectives. (author)

  14. A design of optical modulation system with pixel-level modulation accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiwei; Qu, Xinghua; Feng, Wei; Liang, Baoqiu

    2018-01-01

    Vision measurement has been widely used in the field of dimensional measurement and surface metrology. However, traditional methods of vision measurement have many limits such as low dynamic range and poor reconfigurability. The optical modulation system before image formation has the advantage of high dynamic range, high accuracy and more flexibility, and the modulation accuracy is the key parameter which determines the accuracy and effectiveness of optical modulation system. In this paper, an optical modulation system with pixel level accuracy is designed and built based on multi-points reflective imaging theory and digital micromirror device (DMD). The system consisted of digital micromirror device, CCD camera and lens. Firstly we achieved accurate pixel-to-pixel correspondence between the DMD mirrors and the CCD pixels by moire fringe and an image processing of sampling and interpolation. Then we built three coordinate systems and calculated the mathematic relationship between the coordinate of digital micro-mirror and CCD pixels using a checkerboard pattern. A verification experiment proves that the correspondence error is less than 0.5 pixel. The results show that the modulation accuracy of system meets the requirements of modulation. Furthermore, the high reflecting edge of a metal circular piece can be detected using the system, which proves the effectiveness of the optical modulation system.

  15. Connect Global Positioning System RF Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Garth W.; Young, Lawrence E.; Ciminera, Michael A.; Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Gorelik, Jacob; Okihiro, Brian Bachman; Koelewyn, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    The CoNNeCT Global Positioning System RF Module (GPSM) slice is part of the JPL CoNNeCT Software Defined Radio (SDR). CoNNeCT is the Communications, Navigation, and Net working reconfigurable Testbed project that is part of NASA's Space Communication and Nav igation (SCaN) Program. The CoNNeCT project is an experimental dem onstration that will lead to the advancement of SDRs and provide a path for new space communication and navigation systems for future NASA exploration missions. The JPL CoNNeCT SDR will be flying on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2012 in support of the SCaN CoNNeCT program. The GPSM is a radio-frequency sampler module (see Figure 1) that directly sub-harmonically samples the filtered GPS L-band signals at L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.6 MHz), and L5 (1176.45 MHz). The JPL SDR receives GPS signals through a Dorne & Margolin antenna mounted onto a choke ring. The GPS signal is filtered against interference, amplified, split, and fed into three channels: L1, L2, and L5. In each of the L-band channels, there is a chain of bandpass filters and amplifiers, and the signal is fed through each of these channels to where the GPSM performs a one-bit analog-to-digital conversion (see Figure 2). The GPSM uses a sub-harmonic, single-bit L1, L2, and L5 sampler that samples at a clock rate of 38.656 MHz. The new capability is the down-conversion and sampling of the L5 signal when previous hardware did not provide this capability. The first GPS IIF Satellite was launched in 2010, providing the new L5 signal. With the JPL SDR flying on the ISS, it will be possible to demonstrate navigation solutions with 10-meter 3-D accuracy at 10-second intervals using a field-program mable gate array (FPGA)-based feedback loop running at 50 Hz. The GPS data bits will be decoded and used in the SDR. The GPSM will also allow other waveforms that are installed in the SDR to demonstrate various GNSS tracking techniques.

  16. Continuous measurements on a modulating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariod, R.; Tournier, E.

    1963-01-01

    We have developed a number of measuring and testing instruments for which interesting characteristics have been obtained through modulation. In this paper, we would like to emphasize the interest of using the synchronous demodulation when a previous modulation has been used in the device. We give the fundamentals of some embodiments applied to nuclear and physical parameters measurements. (authors) [fr

  17. WDM Phase-Modulated Millimeter-Wave Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Prince, Kamau; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one of the lat......This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one...... of the latest research efforts in the rapidly emerging Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) application space for in-house access networks....

  18. Development of control system for the electron gun modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nagasawa, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Hanaki, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing a compact and inexpensive electron gun modulator for the SPring-8 Linac. The modulator was redesigned and manufactured to achieve good maintainability and high controllability. A control system of the modulator and a high voltage station is composed mainly of PLCs as a controller and touch panels for human interface. This simplified construction will result in enhancement of its reliability. The rich graphical user interface on the touch panels greatly extends the function of the control system. (author)

  19. Identification of fractional order systems using modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Gibaru, O.; Perruquetti, Wilfrid

    2013-01-01

    can be transferred into the ones of the modulating functions. By choosing a set of modulating functions, a linear system of algebraic equations is obtained. Hence, the unknown parameters of a fractional order system can be estimated by solving a linear

  20. Lunar Module Electrical Power System Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the design and redesign considerations of the Apollo lunar module electrical power system. Included in the work are graphics showing the lunar module power system. It describes the in-flight failures, and the lessons learned from these failures.

  1. Tritium module for ITER/Tiber system code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Willms, S.; Busigin, A.; Kalyanam, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    A tritium module was developed for the ITER/Tiber system code to provide information on capital costs, tritium inventory, power requirements and building volumes for these systems. In the tritium module, the main tritium subsystems/emdash/plasma processing, atmospheric cleanup, water cleanup, blanket processing/emdash/are each represented by simple scaleable algorithms. 6 refs., 2 tabs

  2. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Anaís Castaldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy.

  3. Nuclear whistleblower protection system in U.S. and its implication to Japanese regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear whistleblower protection system in U.S.A consists of two programs: 1) allegation program and 2) whistleblower protection system. The former is explained by basic act, definition of allegation, anonymous allegation, direct allegation to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission), number of allegation from 1997 to 2001, procedure and period of investigation and notice of allegation to licensees. The latter is explained by basis act, outline of the system, enforcement by NRC and DOL (Department of Labor), number of discrimination compliant and anxiety of licensees. The system is good conditions in U.S.A depend on 1) prevent of illegal act and increase, 2) preparation of procedure and its transparency and 3) enforcement system. However, a hostile act to licensees is found in the whistleblower protection system. There are many problems in Japanese regulatory system. The improvement points of Japanese system are proposed. (S.Y.)

  4. Modulation of redox regulatory molecules and electron transport chain activity in muscle of air breathing fish Heteropneustes fossilis under air exposure stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Responses of redox regulatory system to long-term survival (>18 h) of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis in air are not yet understood. Lipid and protein oxidation level, oxidant (H2O2) generation, antioxidative status (levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl) and activities of respiratory complexes (I, II, III and IV) in mitochondria were investigated in muscle of H. fossilis under air exposure condition (0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h at 25 °C). The increased levels of both H2O2 and tissue oxidation were observed due to the decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes in muscle under water deprivation condition. However, ascorbic acid and non-protein thiol groups were the highest at 18 h air exposure time. A linear increase in complex II activity with air exposure time and an increase up to 12 h followed by a decrease in activity of complex I at 18 h were observed. Negative correlation was observed for complex III and V activity with exposure time. Critical time to modulate the above parameters was found to be 3 h air exposure. Dehydration induced oxidative stress due to modulation of electron transport chain and redox metabolizing enzymes in muscle of H. fossilis was clearly observed. Possible contribution of redox regulatory system in muscle tissue of the fish for long-term survival in air is elucidated. Results of the present study may be useful to understand the redox metabolism in muscle of fishes those are exposed to air in general and air breathing fishes in particular.

  5. Bright luminescence of Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutants reveals a connection between citrate and the Gac/Csr regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Whistler, Cheryl; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    The Gac/Csr regulatory system is conserved throughout the γ-proteobacteria and controls key pathways in central carbon metabolism, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence in important plant and animal pathogens. Here we show that elevated intracellular citrate levels in a Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutant correlate with activation of the Gac/Csr cascade and induction of bright luminescence. Spontaneous or directed mutations in the gene that encodes citrate synthase reversed the bright luminescence of aconitase mutants, eliminated their citrate accumulation and reversed their elevated expression of CsrB. Our data elucidate a correlative link between central metabolic and regulatory pathways, and they suggest that the Gac system senses a blockage at the aconitase step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either through elevated citrate levels or a secondary metabolic effect of citrate accumulation, and responds by modulating carbon flow and various functions associated with host colonization, including bioluminescence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Estrogen protection against EAE modulates the microbiota and mucosal-associated regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Gil; Zhang, Jun; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Seifert, Hilary A; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Offner, Halina

    2017-09-15

    Sex hormones promote immunoregulatory effects on multiple sclerosis. In the current study we evaluated the composition of the gut microbiota and the mucosal-associated regulatory cells in estrogen or sham treated female mice before and after autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction. Treatment with pregnancy levels of estrogen induces changes in the composition and diversity of gut microbiota. Additionally, estrogen prevents EAE-associated changes in the gut microbiota and might promote the enrichment of bacteria that are associated with immune regulation. Our results point to a possible cross-talk between the sex hormones and the gut microbiota, which could promote neuroprotection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A microRNA-mediated regulatory loop modulates NOTCH and MYC oncogenic signals in B- and T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M; Bhatnagar, H; Lin, A-P; Wang, L; Aster, J C; Sill, H; Aguiar, R C T

    2015-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) facilitate the cross-talk between transcriptional modules and signal transduction pathways. MYC and NOTCH1 contribute to the pathogenesis of lymphoid malignancies. NOTCH induces MYC, connecting two signaling programs that enhance oncogenicity. Here we show that this relationship is bidirectional and that MYC, via a miRNA intermediary, modulates NOTCH. MicroRNA-30a (miR-30a), a member of a family of miRNAs that are transcriptionally suppressed by MYC, directly binds to and inhibits NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 expression. Using a murine model and genetically modified human cell lines, we confirmed that miR-30a influences NOTCH expression in a MYC-dependent fashion. In turn, through genetic modulation, we demonstrated that intracellular NOTCH1 and NOTCH2, by inducing MYC, suppressed miR-30a. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of NOTCH decreased MYC expression and ultimately de-repressed miR-30a. Examination of genetic models of gain and loss of miR-30a in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells suggested a tumor-suppressive role for this miRNA. Finally, the activity of the miR-30a-NOTCH-MYC loop was validated in primary DLBCL and T-ALL samples. These data define the presence of a miRNA-mediated regulatory circuitry that may modulate the oncogenic signals originating from NOTCH and MYC.

  8. Excavation of attractor modules for nasopharyngeal carcinoma via integrating systemic module inference with attract method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T; Jiang, C-Y; Shu, J-H; Xu, Y-J

    2017-07-10

    The molecular mechanism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is poorly understood and effective therapeutic approaches are needed. This research aimed to excavate the attractor modules involved in the progression of NPC and provide further understanding of the underlying mechanism of NPC. Based on the gene expression data of NPC, two specific protein-protein interaction networks for NPC and control conditions were re-weighted using Pearson correlation coefficient. Then, a systematic tracking of candidate modules was conducted on the re-weighted networks via cliques algorithm, and a total of 19 and 38 modules were separately identified from NPC and control networks, respectively. Among them, 8 pairs of modules with similar gene composition were selected, and 2 attractor modules were identified via the attract method. Functional analysis indicated that these two attractor modules participate in one common bioprocess of cell division. Based on the strategy of integrating systemic module inference with the attract method, we successfully identified 2 attractor modules. These attractor modules might play important roles in the molecular pathogenesis of NPC via affecting the bioprocess of cell division in a conjunct way. Further research is needed to explore the correlations between cell division and NPC.

  9. Enhancing quantum effects via periodic modulations in optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Alessandro; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2012-07-01

    Parametrically modulated optomechanical systems have been recently proposed as a simple and efficient setting for the quantum control of a micromechanical oscillator: relevant possibilities include the generation of squeezing in the oscillator position (or momentum) and the enhancement of entanglement between mechanical and radiation modes. In this paper we further investigate this modulation regime, considering an optomechanical system with one or more parameters being modulated over time. We first apply a sinusoidal modulation of the mechanical frequency and characterize the optimal regime in which the visibility of purely quantum effects is maximal. We then introduce a second modulation on the input laser intensity and analyze the interplay between the two. We find that an interference pattern shows up, so that different choices of the relative phase between the two modulations can either enhance or cancel the desired quantum effects, opening new possibilities for optimal quantum control strategies.

  10. Violacein Treatment Modulates Acute and Chronic Inflammation through the Suppression of Cytokine Production and Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Verinaud

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a necessary process to control infection. However, exacerbated inflammation, acute or chronic, promotes deleterious effects in the organism. Violacein (viola, a quorum sensing metabolite from the Gram-negative bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum, has been shown to protect mice from malaria and to have beneficial effects on tumors. However, it is not known whether this drug possesses anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated whether viola administration is able to reduce acute and chronic autoimmune inflammation. For that purpose, C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 μg of LPS and were treated with viola (3.5mg/kg via i.p. at the same time-point. Three hours later, the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the sera and phenotypical characterization of leukocytes were determined. Mice treated with viola presented a significant reduction in the production of inflammatory cytokines compared with untreated mice. Interestingly, although viola is a compound derived from bacteria, it did not induce inflammation upon administration to naïve mice. To test whether viola would protect mice from an autoimmune inflammation, Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE-inflicted mice were given viola i.p. at disease onset, at the 10th day from immunization. Viola-treated mice developed mild EAE disease in contrast with placebo-treated mice. The frequencies of dendritic cells and macrophages were unaltered in EAE mice treated with viola. However, the sole administration of viola augmented the levels of splenic regulatory T cells (CD4+Foxp3+. We also found that adoptive transfer of viola-elicited regulatory T cells significantly reduced EAE. Our study shows, for the first time, that violacein is able to modulate acute and chronic inflammation. Amelioration relied in suppression of cytokine production (in acute inflammation and stimulation of regulatory T cells (in chronic inflammation. New studies must be

  11. Direct activation of a notochord cis-regulatory module by Brachyury and FoxA in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamaneck, Yale J; Katikala, Lavanya; Perrone, Lorena; Dunn, Matthew P; Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2009-11-01

    The notochord is a defining feature of the chordate body plan. Experiments in ascidian, frog and mouse embryos have shown that co-expression of Brachyury and FoxA class transcription factors is required for notochord development. However, studies on the cis-regulatory sequences mediating the synergistic effects of these transcription factors are complicated by the limited knowledge of notochord genes and cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) that are directly targeted by both. We have identified an easily testable model for such investigations in a 155-bp notochord-specific CRM from the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. This CRM contains functional binding sites for both Ciona Brachyury (Ci-Bra) and FoxA (Ci-FoxA-a). By combining point mutation analysis and misexpression experiments, we demonstrate that binding of both transcription factors to this CRM is necessary and sufficient to activate transcription. To gain insights into the cis-regulatory criteria controlling its activity, we investigated the organization of the transcription factor binding sites within the 155-bp CRM. The 155-bp sequence contains two Ci-Bra binding sites with identical core sequences but opposite orientations, only one of which is required for enhancer activity. Changes in both orientation and spacing of these sites substantially affect the activity of the CRM, as clusters of identical sites found in the Ciona genome with different arrangements are unable to activate transcription in notochord cells. This work presents the first evidence of a synergistic interaction between Brachyury and FoxA in the activation of an individual notochord CRM, and highlights the importance of transcription factor binding site arrangement for its function.

  12. Adaptive Modulation for a Downlink Multicast Channel in OFDMA Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haibo; Schwefel, Hans-Peter; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we focus on adaptive modulation strategies for multicast service in orthogonal frequency division multiple access systems. A reward function has been defined as the optimization target, which includes both the average user throughput and bit error rate. We also developed an adaptive...... modulation strategy, namely local best reward strategy, to maximize this reward function. The performance of different modulation strategies are compared in different SNR distribution scenarios, and the optimum strategy in each scenario is suggested....

  13. Challenges posed to the European pharmaceutical regulatory system by highly personalized medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D; Feldschreiber, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The European pharmaceutical regulatory system has not yet been challenged by issues related to highly personalized medicines such as those to be found with active substances that affect RNA biochemistry. We review the current status of RNA-based pharmacology and present three possible case histories. The implications for the European pharmaceutical regulatory system are discussed. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Regulatory issues resolved through design certification on the System 80+trademark standard plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.; Brinkman, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has completed its review of the System 80+trademark Standard Plant Design, approving advanced design features and closing severe accident licensing issues. Final Design Approval was granted in July 1994. The NRC review was extensive, requiring written responses to over 4,950 questions and formal printing of over 50,000 Safety Analysis Report pages. New safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere had to be resolved with detailed analysis and evaluation of design features. the System 80+ review demonstrated that regulatory issues can be firmly resolved only through presentation of a detailed design and completion of a comprehensive regulatory review

  15. Circuitry linking the Csr and stringent response global regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Patterson-Fortin, Laura M; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Vinella, Daniel; Camacho, Martha I; Fields, Joshua A; Thompson, Stuart A; Georgellis, Dimitris; Cashel, Michael; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2011-06-01

    CsrA protein regulates important cellular processes by binding to target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or stability. In Escherichia coli, CsrA binds to sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester CsrA and antagonize its activity. Here, mRNAs for relA, spoT and dksA of the stringent response system were found among 721 different transcripts that copurified with CsrA. Many of the transcripts that copurified with CsrA were previously determined to respond to ppGpp and/or DksA. We examined multiple regulatory interactions between the Csr and stringent response systems. Most importantly, DksA and ppGpp robustly activated csrB/C transcription (10-fold), while they modestly activated csrA expression. We propose that CsrA-mediated regulation is relieved during the stringent response. Gel shift assays confirmed high affinity binding of CsrA to relA mRNA leader and weaker interactions with dksA and spoT. Reporter fusions, qRT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that CsrA repressed relA expression, and (p)ppGpp accumulation during stringent response was enhanced in a csrA mutant. CsrA had modest to negligible effects on dksA and spoT expression. Transcription of dksA was negatively autoregulated via a feedback loop that tended to mask CsrA effects. We propose that the Csr system fine-tunes the stringent response and discuss biological implications of the composite circuitry. © Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Toxin-antitoxin systems and regulatory mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayden, Richard A; Dawson, Clinton C; Cummings, Jason E

    2018-06-01

    There has been a significant reduction in annual tuberculosis incidence since the World Health Organization declared tuberculosis a global health threat. However, treatment of M. tuberculosis infections requires lengthy multidrug therapeutic regimens to achieve a durable cure. The development of new drugs that are active against resistant strains and phenotypically diverse organisms continues to present the greatest challenge in the future. Numerous phylogenomic analyses have revealed that the Mtb genome encodes a significantly expanded repertoire of toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci that makes up the Mtb TA system. A TA loci is a two-gene operon encoding a 'toxin' protein that inhibits bacterial growth and an interacting 'antitoxin' partner that neutralizes the inhibitory activity of the toxin. The presence of multiple chromosomally encoded TA loci in Mtb raises important questions in regard to expansion, regulation and function. Thus, the functional roles of TA loci in Mtb pathogenesis have received considerable attention over the last decade. The cumulative results indicate that they are involved in regulating adaptive responses to stresses associated with the host environment and drug treatment. Here we review the TA families encoded in Mtb, discuss the duplication of TA loci in Mtb, regulatory mechanism of TA loci, and phenotypic heterogeneity and pathogenesis.

  17. Regulatory system for control of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    All human activities have associated risks. Nuclear programme is no exception. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), constituted in February 1973 through the promulgation of the Presidential order 15 of 1973. Functions of BAEC include research and development in peaceful application of atomic energy, generation of electricity and promotion of international relations congenial to implementation of its programmes and projects. In 1993 the Government of Bangladesh promulgated the law on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control. Considering the human resources, expertise and facilities needed for implementation of the provisions of the NSRC law, BAEC was entrusted with the responsibility to enforce it. The responsibilities of the BAEC cover nuclear and radiological safety within the installations of BAEC and radiological safety in the manifold applications of radioisotopes and radiation sources within the country. An adequate and competent infrastructure has been built to cater to the diverse nuclear and radiation protection requirements of all nuclear facilities in Bangladesh, arising at different stages from site selection to day-to-day operation. In addition, periodic inspections of the nuclear facilities are carried out. The licensing and regulatory inspection systems for controlling of nuclear installations and radiation sources are established. The paper describes the legal provisions, responsibilities and organization of BAEC with special emphasis on nuclear safety and radiation protection of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh. (author)

  18. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Thorpe

    Full Text Available Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC. Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  19. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Nagel, Thomas; Carroll, Simon F; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin) deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  20. The antiphasic regulatory module comprising CDF5 and its antisense RNA FLORE links the circadian clock to photoperiodic flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Rossana; Wang, Huan; Liu, Jun; Boix, Marc; Huang, Li-Fang; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2017-11-01

    Circadian rhythms of gene expression are generated by the combinatorial action of transcriptional and translational feedback loops as well as chromatin remodelling events. Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are natural antisense transcripts (NATs) to transcripts encoding central oscillator components were proposed as modulators of core clock function in mammals (Per) and fungi (frq/qrf). Although oscillating lncRNAs exist in plants, their functional characterization is at an initial stage. By screening an Arabidopsis thaliana lncRNA custom-made array we identified CDF5 LONG NONCODING RNA (FLORE), a circadian-regulated lncRNA that is a NAT of CDF5. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed the circadian regulation of FLORE, whereas GUS-staining and flowering time evaluation were used to determine its biological function. FLORE and CDF5 antiphasic expression reflects mutual inhibition in a similar way to frq/qrf. Moreover, whereas the CDF5 protein delays flowering by directly repressing FT transcription, FLORE promotes it by repressing several CDFs (CDF1, CDF3, CDF5) and increasing FT transcript levels, indicating both cis and trans function. We propose that the CDF5/FLORE NAT pair constitutes an additional circadian regulatory module with conserved (mutual inhibition) and unique (function in trans) features, able to fine-tune its own circadian oscillation, and consequently, adjust the onset of flowering to favourable environmental conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. A Yin-Yang 1/miR-30a regulatory circuit modulates autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuang; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Peng, Yun-Peng; Zhu, Yi; Yin, Ling-Di; Wei, Ji-Shu; Gao, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Kui-Rong; Miao, Yi

    2017-10-19

    Autophagy is a highly regulated biological process that mediates the degradation of intracellular components. It is required for tumor cell metabolism and homeostasis. Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) has been reported to be involved in autophagy in several carcinomas. However, its role in autophagy in pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of YY1 in pancreatic cancer cells autophagy and its mechanisms of action. The activity of cells undergoing autophagy was assessed using transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. A luciferase activity assay, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) were also used to identify putative downstream targets of YY1. YY1 was confirmed to regulate autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. It was found to directly regulate the expression of miR-30a, a known modulator of autophagy-associated genes. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-30a attenuated the pro-autophagic effects of YY1. Cumulatively, our data suggest that miR-30a acts in a feedback loop to modulate the pro-autophagic activities of YY1. Thus, autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells may be regulated, in part, by a tightly coordinated YY1/miR-30a regulatory circuit. These findings provide a potential druggable target for the development of treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Strengthening the regulatory system through the implementation and use of a quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Eisner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Quality management systems (QMS, based on ISO 9001 requirements, are applicable to government service organizations such as Health Canada’s Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD. This communication presents the process that the BGTD followed since the early 2000s to implement a quality management system and describes how the regulatory system was improved as a result of this project. BGTD undertook the implementation of a quality management system based on ISO 9001 and containing aspects of ISO 17025 with the goal of strengthening the regulatory system through improvements in the people, processes, and services of the organization. We discuss the strategy used by BGTD to implement the QMS and the benefits that were realized from the various stages of implementation. The eight quality principals upon which the QMS standards of the ISO 9000 series are based were used by senior management as a framework to guide QMS implementation.

  3. Test system for thermoelectric modules and materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Jiří; Knížek, Karel; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2014), s. 3726-3732 ISSN 0361-5235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17538S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermoelectric power module * automatic thermoelectric testing setup * heat flow measurement * power generation * heat recovery Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.798, year: 2014

  4. High extinction ratio integrated optical modulator for quantum telecommunication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronev, A.; Parfenov, M.; Agruzov, P.; Ilichev, I.; Shamray, A.

    2018-01-01

    A method for increasing the extinction ratio of integrated optical Mach-Zehnder modulators based on LiNbO3 via the photorefractive effect is proposed. The influence of the photorefractive effect on the X- and Y-splitters of intensity modulators is experimentally studied. An increase in the modulator extinction ratio by 17 dB (from 30 to 47 dB) is obtained. It is shown that fabricated modulators with a high extinction ratio are important for quantum key distribution systems.

  5. A burn-up module coupling to an AMPX system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore Duque, M.; Gomez, S.E.; Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Reactors and Neutrons Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center uses the AMPX system for the study of high conversion reactors (HCR). Such system allows to make neutronic calculations from the nuclear data library (ENDF/B-IV). The Nuclear Engineering career of the Balseiro Institute developed and implemented a burn-up module at a μ-cell level (BUM: Burn-up Module) which agrees with the requirement to be coupled to the AMPX system. (Author) [es

  6. Ex vivo modulation of the Foxo1 phosphorylation state does not lead to dysfunction of T regulatory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Kelley Penberthy

    Full Text Available Peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg cells prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens. Treg cell dysfunction has been linked to many inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway inflammation. Glucocorticoids that are used to treat allergic airway inflammation and asthma are thought to work in part by promoting Treg cell differentiation; patients who are refractory to these drugs have defective induction of anti-inflammatory Treg cells. Previous observations suggest that Treg cells deficient in the transcription factor FoxO1 are pro-inflammatory, and that FoxO1 activity is regulated by its phosphorylation status and nuclear localization. Here, we asked whether altering the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 through modulation of a regulatory phosphatase might affect Treg cell function. In a mouse model of house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation, we observed robust recruitment of Treg cells to the lungs and lymph nodes of diseased mice, without an apparent increase in the Treg cytokine interleukin-10 in the airways. Intriguingly, expression of PP2A, a serine/threonine phosphatase linked to the regulation of FoxO1 phosphorylation, was decreased in the mediastinal lymph nodes of HDM-treated mice, mirroring the decreased PP2A expression seen in peripheral blood monocytes of glucocorticoid-resistant asthmatic patients. When we asked whether modulation of PP2A activity alters Treg cell function via treatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, we observed increased phosphorylation of FoxO1 and decreased nuclear localization. However, dysregulation of FoxO1 did not impair Treg cell differentiation ex vivo or cause Treg cells to adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity did not affect the suppressive function of Treg cells ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 via PP2A inhibition does not modify Treg cell function ex

  7. Development of an air-operated actuator performance monitoring system for regulatory usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. Y.; Kwon, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    The performance monitoring system of air-operated actuators for regulatory usage has been being developed. Essential elements and operating parameters affecting the actuator performance have been investigated to provide basic information for system development. The monitoring system including an air-operated actuator testing facility and analysis softwares for monitoring and evaluation are also introduced in this paper. As a result of simulated tests, it was known that the system could be a useful tool for the effective monitoring of actuator performance change and fault conditions. This system would be applied to regulatory inspection for utility's data validation and to the training of regulatory staff in future after some modification and expansion

  8. Defining regulatory requirements for water supply systems in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deryushev Leonid Georgiyevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors offer their suggestions for improving the reliability of the standardization requirements for water supply facilities in Vietnam, as an analog of building regulations of Russia 31.13330.2012. In Russia and other advanced countries the reliability of the designed water supply systems is usual to assess quantitatively. Guidelines on the reliability assessment of water supply systems and facilities have been offered by many researchers, but these proposals are not officially approved. Some methods for assessing the reliability of water supply facilities are informally used in practice when describing their quality. These evaluation methods are simple and useful. However, the given estimations defy common sense and regulatory requirements used by all the organizations, ministries and departments, for example, of Russia, in the process of allowances for restoration and repair of water supply facilities. Inadequacy of the water supply facilities assessment is shown on the example of assessing the reliability of pipeline system. If we take MTBF of specific length of the pipeline as reliability index for a pipeline system, for example, 5 km, a pipeline of the similar gauge, material and working conditions with the length of 5 m, according to the estimation on the basis of non-official approach, must have a value of MTBF 1000 times greater than with the length of 5 km. This conclusion runs counter to common sense, for the reason that all the pipes in the area of 5 km are identical, have the same load and rate of wear (corrosion, fouling, deformation, etc.. It was theoretically and practically proved that products of the same type in the same operating conditions (excluding determined impact of a person, work as an entity, which MTBF is equal to the average lifetime. It is proposed to take the average service life as a reliability indicator of a pipeline. Durability, but not failsafety of the pipe guarantees pipeline functioning

  9. Electroacoustic verification of frequency modulation systems in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidêncio, Vanessa Luisa Destro; Jacob, Regina Tangerino de Souza; Tanamati, Liége Franzini; Bucuvic, Érika Cristina; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari

    2017-12-26

    The frequency modulation system is a device that helps to improve speech perception in noise and is considered the most beneficial approach to improve speech recognition in noise in cochlear implant users. According to guidelines, there is a need to perform a check before fitting the frequency modulation system. Although there are recommendations regarding the behavioral tests that should be performed at the fitting of the frequency modulation system to cochlear implant users, there are no published recommendations regarding the electroacoustic test that should be performed. Perform and determine the validity of an electroacoustic verification test for frequency modulation systems coupled to different cochlear implant speech processors. The sample included 40 participants between 5 and 18 year's users of four different models of speech processors. For the electroacoustic evaluation, we used the Audioscan Verifit device with the HA-1 coupler and the listening check devices corresponding to each speech processor model. In cases where the transparency was not achieved, a modification was made in the frequency modulation gain adjustment and we used the Brazilian version of the "Phrases in Noise Test" to evaluate the speech perception in competitive noise. It was observed that there was transparency between the frequency modulation system and the cochlear implant in 85% of the participants evaluated. After adjusting the gain of the frequency modulation receiver in the other participants, the devices showed transparency when the electroacoustic verification test was repeated. It was also observed that patients demonstrated better performance in speech perception in noise after a new adjustment, that is, in these cases; the electroacoustic transparency caused behavioral transparency. The electroacoustic evaluation protocol suggested was effective in evaluation of transparency between the frequency modulation system and the cochlear implant. Performing the adjustment of

  10. The Location GNSS Modules for the Components of Proteus System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostowski, K.; Darakchiev, R.; Foks-Ryznar, A.; Sitek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Proteus system - the Integrated Mobile System for Counterterrorism and Rescue Operations is a complex innovative project. To assure the best possible localization of mobile components of the system, many different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) modules were taken into account. In order to chose the best solution many types of tests were done. Full results and conclusions are presented in this paper. The idea of measurements was to test modules in GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) with EGNOS system specification according to certain algorithms. The tests had to answer the question: what type of GNSS modules should be used on different components with respect to specific usage of Proteus system. The second goal of tests was to check the solution quality of integrated GNSS/INS (Inertial Navigation System) and its possible usage in some Proteus system components.

  11. Interplay of the modified nucleotide phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) with global regulatory proteins in Escherichia coli: modulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent gene expression and interaction with the HupA regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Francesca; Motta, Sara; Mauri, Pierluigi; Landini, Paolo; Rossi, Elio

    2016-11-25

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, some intermediates of the sulfate assimilation and cysteine biosynthesis pathway can act as signal molecules and modulate gene expression. In addition to sensing and utilization of sulphur sources, these signaling mechanisms also impact more global cell processes, such as resistance to antimicrobial agents and biofilm formation. In a recent work, we have shown that inactivation of the cysH gene, encoding phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase, and the consequent increase in intracellular PAPS concentration, strongly affect production of several cell surface-associated structures, enhancing surface adhesion and cell aggregation. In order to identify the molecular mechanism relaying intracellular PAPS concentration to regulation of cell surface-associated structures, we looked for mutations able to suppress the effects of cysH inactivation. We found that mutations in the adenylate cyclase-encoding cyaA gene abolished the effects of PAPS accumulation; consistent with this result, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent gene expression appears to be increased in the cysH mutant. Experiments aimed at the direct identification of proteins interacting with either CysC or CysH, i.e. the PAPS-related proteins APS kinase and PAPS reductase, allowed us to identify several regulators, namely, CspC, CspE, HNS and HupA. Protein-protein interaction between HupA and CysH was confirmed by a bacterial two hybrid system, and inactivation of the hupA gene enhanced the effects of the cysH mutation in terms of production of cell surface-associated factors. Our results indicate that PAPS can modulate different regulatory systems, providing evidence that this molecule acts as a global signal molecule in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SMAD regulatory networks construct a balanced immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Nidhi; Kang, Joonsoo

    2013-05-01

    A balanced immune response requires combating infectious assaults while striving to maintain quiescence towards the self. One of the central players in this process is the pleiotropic cytokine transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), whose deficiency results in spontaneous systemic autoimmunity in mice. The dominant function of TGF-β is to regulate the peripheral immune homeostasis, particularly in the microbe-rich and antigen-rich environment of the gut. To maintain intestinal integrity, the epithelial cells, myeloid cells and lymphocytes that inhabit the gut secrete TGF-β, which acts in both paracrine and autocrine fashions to activate its signal transducers, the SMAD transcription factors. The SMAD pathway regulates the production of IgA by B cells, maintains the protective mucosal barrier and promotes the balanced differentiation of CD4(+) T cells into inflammatory T helper type 17 cells and suppressive FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells. While encounters with pathogenic microbes activate SMAD proteins to evoke a protective inflammatory immune response, SMAD activation and synergism with immunoregulatory factors such as the vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid enforce immunosuppression toward commensal microbes and innocuous food antigens. Such complementary context-dependent functions of TGF-β are achieved by the co-operation of SMAD proteins with distinct dominant transcription activators and accessory chromatin modifiers. This review highlights recent advances in unravelling the molecular basis for the multi-faceted functions of TGF-β in the gut that are dictacted by fluid orchestrations of SMADs and their myriad partners. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  14. Dermal regulatory T cells display distinct migratory behavior that is modulated during adaptive and innate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Zachary; Mueller, Scott N; Deane, James A; Hickey, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in controlling skin inflammation, an effect dependent on their ability to home to this organ. However, little is known regarding their behavior in the skin. In this study, we used multiphoton imaging in Foxp3-GFP mice to examine the behavior of endogenous Tregs in resting and inflamed skin. Although Tregs were readily detectable in the uninflamed dermis, most were nonmotile. Induction of contact sensitivity increased the proportion of motile Tregs, and also induced Treg recruitment. This response was significantly blunted in mice challenged with an irrelevant hapten, or by inhibition of effector cell recruitment, indicating a role for T cell-dependent inflammation in induction of Treg migration. Moreover, induction of Treg migration was inhibited by local injection of a CCR4 antagonist, indicating a role for CCR4 in this response. Exposure of naive mice to hapten also induced an increase in the proportion of migratory Tregs, demonstrating that innate signals can also induce Treg migration. Simultaneous examination of the migration of CD4⁺ effector cells and Tregs in the same region of uninflamed skin demonstrated that effector cells behaved differently, being uniformly highly migratory. These findings indicate that Treg behavior in skin differs from that of CD4⁺ effector cells, in that only a low proportion of Tregs is migratory under resting conditions. However, in response to both adaptive and innate inflammation, the proportion of migratory Tregs increases, raising the possibility that this response is important in multiple forms of skin inflammation.

  15. [Research on Spectral Polarization Imaging System Based on Static Modulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-bo; Li, Huan; Lin, Xu-ling; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    The main disadvantages of traditional spectral polarization imaging system are: complex structure, with moving parts, low throughput. A novel method of spectral polarization imaging system is discussed, which is based on static polarization intensity modulation combined with Savart polariscope interference imaging. The imaging system can obtain real-time information of spectral and four Stokes polarization messages. Compared with the conventional methods, the advantages of the imaging system are compactness, low mass and no moving parts, no electrical control, no slit and big throughput. The system structure and the basic theory are introduced. The experimental system is established in the laboratory. The experimental system consists of reimaging optics, polarization intensity module, interference imaging module, and CCD data collecting and processing module. The spectral range is visible and near-infrared (480-950 nm). The white board and the plane toy are imaged by using the experimental system. The ability of obtaining spectral polarization imaging information is verified. The calibration system of static polarization modulation is set up. The statistical error of polarization degree detection is less than 5%. The validity and feasibility of the basic principle is proved by the experimental result. The spectral polarization data captured by the system can be applied to object identification, object classification and remote sensing detection.

  16. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Calcium Binding Properties and Allosteric Regulation of Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Craig, Theodore A; Kumar, Rajiv; Gross, Michael L

    2017-07-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is an EF-hand Ca 2+ -binding protein that also binds to a specific DNA sequence, downstream regulatory elements (DRE), and thereby regulates transcription in a calcium-dependent fashion. DREAM binds to DRE in the absence of Ca 2+ but detaches from DRE under Ca 2+ stimulation, allowing gene expression. The Ca 2+ binding properties of DREAM and the consequences of the binding on protein structure are key to understanding the function of DREAM. Here we describe the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the Ca 2+ binding properties and the subsequent conformational changes of full-length DREAM. We demonstrate that all EF-hands undergo large conformation changes upon calcium binding even though the EF-1 hand is not capable of binding to Ca 2+ . Moreover, EF-2 is a lower-affinity site compared to EF-3 and -4 hands. Comparison of HDX profiles between wild-type DREAM and two EF-1 mutated constructs illustrates that the conformational changes in the EF-1 hand are induced by long-range structural interactions. HDX analyses also reveal a conformational change in an N-terminal leucine-charged residue-rich domain (LCD) remote from Ca 2+ -binding EF-hands. This LCD domain is responsible for the direct interaction between DREAM and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and regulates the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB-binding protein. These long-range interactions strongly suggest how conformational changes transmit the Ca 2+ signal to CREB-mediated gene transcription.

  17. Microsystem enabled photovoltaic modules and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat

    2017-09-12

    A photovoltaic (PV) module includes an absorber layer coupled to an optic layer. The absorber layer includes an array of PV elements. The optic layer includes a close-packed array of Keplerian telescope elements, each corresponding to one of an array of pupil elements. The Keplerian telescope substantially couple radiation that is incident on their objective surfaces into the corresponding pupil elements. Each pupil element relays radiation that is coupled into it from the corresponding Keplerian telescope element into the corresponding PV element.

  18. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  19. Histone methylation mediates plasticity of human FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells by modulating signature gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiqi; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yanke; Liu, Zhengwen; Yang, Xiaomei; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Yong

    2014-03-01

    CD4(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a heterogeneous and plastic T-cell lineage that plays a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and immune tolerance. However, the fate of human Treg cells after loss of FOXP3 expression and the epigenetic mechanisms contributing to such a phenotype switch remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrate that human CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low/-) Treg cells convert to two subpopulations with distinctive FOXP3(+) and FOXP3(-) phenotypes following in vitro culture with anti-CD3/CD28 and interleukin-2. Digital gene expression analysis showed that upon in vitro expansion, human Treg cells down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4, ICOS, IKZF2 and LRRC32, but up-regulated a set of T helper lineage-associated genes, especially T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated, such as GATA3, GFI1 and IL13. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing of these subpopulations yielded genome-wide maps of their H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 profiles. Surprisingly, reprogramming of Treg cells was associated with differential histone modifications, as evidenced by decreased abundance of permissive H3K4me3 within the down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4 and LRRC32 loci, and increased abundance of H3K4me3 within the Th2-associated genes, such as IL4 and IL5; however, the H3K27me3 modification profile was not significantly different between the two subpopulations. In conclusion, this study revealed that loss of FOXP3 expression from human Treg cells during in vitro expansion can induce reprogramming to a T helper cell phenotype with a gene expression signature dominated by Th2 lineage-associated genes, and that this cell type conversion may be mediated by histone methylation events. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Histone methylation mediates plasticity of human FOXP3+ regulatory T cells by modulating signature gene expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiqi; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yanke; Liu, Zhengwen; Yang, Xiaomei; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a heterogeneous and plastic T-cell lineage that plays a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and immune tolerance. However, the fate of human Treg cells after loss of FOXP3 expression and the epigenetic mechanisms contributing to such a phenotype switch remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrate that human CD4+ CD25high CD127low/− Treg cells convert to two subpopulations with distinctive FOXP3+ and FOXP3− phenotypes following in vitro culture with anti-CD3/CD28 and interleukin-2. Digital gene expression analysis showed that upon in vitro expansion, human Treg cells down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4, ICOS, IKZF2 and LRRC32, but up-regulated a set of T helper lineage-associated genes, especially T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated, such as GATA3, GFI1 and IL13. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing of these subpopulations yielded genome-wide maps of their H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 profiles. Surprisingly, reprogramming of Treg cells was associated with differential histone modifications, as evidenced by decreased abundance of permissive H3K4me3 within the down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4 and LRRC32 loci, and increased abundance of H3K4me3 within the Th2-associated genes, such as IL4 and IL5; however, the H3K27me3 modification profile was not significantly different between the two subpopulations. In conclusion, this study revealed that loss of FOXP3 expression from human Treg cells during in vitro expansion can induce reprogramming to a T helper cell phenotype with a gene expression signature dominated by Th2 lineage-associated genes, and that this cell type conversion may be mediated by histone methylation events. PMID:24152290

  1. [Individual, community, regulatory, and systemic approaches to tobacco control interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    During the 60s and the 70s strategies for decreasing initiation or quitting have been developed, in order to find those with high success rates. Unfortunately, interventions with an individual approach involved few smokers, so their impact in decreasing smoking prevalence was limited. The socio-ecological model offers a theoretical framework to community interventions for smoking cessation developed during the 80s, in which smoking was considered not only an individual, but also a social problem. In the 80s and the 90s smoking cessation community trials were developed, such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT). Afterwards, policy interventions (price policy; smoking bans in public places; advertising bans; bans of sales to minors) were developed, such as the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention (ASSIST). California has been the first State all over the world to develop a comprehensive Tobacco Control Program in 1988, becoming the place for an ever-conducted natural experiment. All policy interventions in tobacco control have been finally grouped together in the World Health Organization - Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC), the first Public Health Treaty. Study designs have changed, according to the individual, community, or regulatory approaches: the classical randomized controlled trials (RCTs), in which the sampling unit is the individual, have been carried out for the evaluation of smoking cessation treatments, whereas cluster RCTs, in which the sampling unit is the community, have been conducted for evaluating community interventions, such as COMMIT. Finally, quasi-experimental studies (before/after study; prospective cohorts, both with a control group), in which the observational unit is a State, have been used for evaluating tobacco control policies, such as ASSIST and the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project. Although the successes of the last 20 years, tobacco

  2. Development Perspective of Regulatory Audit Code System for SFR Nuclear Safety Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Moo Hoon; Lee, Gil Soo; Shin, An Dong; Suh, Nam Duk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) in Korea is based on the KALIMER-600 concept developed by KAERI. Based on 'Long-term R and D Plan for Future Reactor Systems' which was approved by the Korea Atomic Energy Commission in 2008, the KAERI designer is scheduled to apply the design certification of the prototype SFR in 2017. In order to establish regulatory infrastructure for the licensing of a prototype SFR, KINS has develop the regulatory requirements for the demonstration SFR since 2010, and are scheduled to develop the regulatory audit code systems in regard to core, fuel, and system, etc. since 2012. In this study, the domestic code systems used for core design and safety evaluation of PWRs and the nuclear physics and code system for SFRs were briefly reviewed, and the development perspective of regulatory audit code system for SFR nuclear safety evaluation were derived

  3. Module-based analysis of robustness tradeoffs in the heat shock response system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kurata

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems have evolved complex regulatory mechanisms, even in situations where much simpler designs seem to be sufficient for generating nominal functionality. Using module-based analysis coupled with rigorous mathematical comparisons, we propose that in analogy to control engineering architectures, the complexity of cellular systems and the presence of hierarchical modular structures can be attributed to the necessity of achieving robustness. We employ the Escherichia coli heat shock response system, a strongly conserved cellular mechanism, as an example to explore the design principles of such modular architectures. In the heat shock response system, the sigma-factor sigma32 is a central regulator that integrates multiple feedforward and feedback modules. Each of these modules provides a different type of robustness with its inherent tradeoffs in terms of transient response and efficiency. We demonstrate how the overall architecture of the system balances such tradeoffs. An extensive mathematical exploration nevertheless points to the existence of an array of alternative strategies for the existing heat shock response that could exhibit similar behavior. We therefore deduce that the evolutionary constraints facing the system might have steered its architecture toward one of many robustly functional solutions.

  4. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  5. Regulatory network analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies functional modules and hub genes involved in infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorebrahim, Mansour; Salarian, Ali; Najafi, Saeideh; Abazari, Mohammad Foad; Aleagha, Maryam Nouri; Dadras, Mohammad Nasr; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad; Ataei, Atousa; Poortahmasebi, Vahdat

    2017-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and establishes lifetime infection associated with a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to develop an integrative gene regulatory network (GRN) approach and overlying gene expression data to identify the representative subnetworks for IM and EBV latent infection (LI). After identifying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in both IM and LI gene expression profiles, functional annotations were applied using gene ontology (GO) and BiNGO tools, and construction of GRNs, topological analysis and identification of modules were carried out using several plugins of Cytoscape. In parallel, a human-EBV GRN was generated using the Hu-Vir database for further analyses. Our analysis revealed that the majority of DEGs in both IM and LI were involved in cell-cycle and DNA repair processes. However, these genes showed a significant negative correlation in the IM and LI states. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) - a hub gene with the highest centrality score - appeared to be the key player in cell cycle regulation in IM disease. The most significant functional modules in the IM and LI states were involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively. Human-EBV network analysis revealed several direct targets of EBV proteins during IM disease. Our study provides an important first report on the response to IM/LI EBV infection in humans. An important aspect of our data was the upregulation of genes associated with cell cycle progression and proliferation.

  6. Development of digital library system on regulatory documents for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. H.; Kim, K. J.; Yoon, Y. H.; Kim, M. W.; Lee, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to establish nuclear regulatory document retrieval system based on internet. With the advancement of internet and information processing technology, information management patterns are going through a new paradigm. Getting along the current of the time, it is general tendency to transfer paper-type documents into electronic-type documents through document scanning and indexing. This system consists of nuclear regulatory documents, nuclear safety documents, digital library, and information system with index and full text

  7. Human factors in annunciation systems - Recommendations for a Canadian regulatory framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, J D; Rochford, S; Vicente, K J [Humansystems Inc., ON (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    Under a contract with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, brief reviews were conducted of the annunciation systems in Canadian nuclear power plant control rooms; of regulatory practices in other countries and relevant international guidelines; and of the human factors literature related to annunciation systems. Based on these reviews, a framework is proposed for regulatory criteria which could be applied to new annunciation system designs. (author). 29 refs.

  8. Human factors in annunciation systems - Recommendations for a Canadian regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, J.D.; Rochford, S.; Vicente, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    Under a contract with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada, brief reviews were conducted of the annunciation systems in Canadian nuclear power plant control rooms; of regulatory practices in other countries and relevant international guidelines; and of the human factors literature related to annunciation systems. Based on these reviews, a framework is proposed for regulatory criteria which could be applied to new annunciation system designs. (author). 29 refs

  9. Microsystem enabled photovoltaic modules and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sweatt, William C; Okandan, Murat

    2015-05-12

    A microsystem enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) module including: an absorber layer; a fixed optic layer coupled to the absorber layer; a translatable optic layer; a translation stage coupled between the fixed and translatable optic layers; and a motion processor electrically coupled to the translation stage to controls motion of the translatable optic layer relative to the fixed optic layer. The absorber layer includes an array of photovoltaic (PV) elements. The fixed optic layer includes an array of quasi-collimating (QC) micro-optical elements designed and arranged to couple incident radiation from an intermediate image formed by the translatable optic layer into one of the PV elements such that it is quasi-collimated. The translatable optic layer includes an array of focusing micro-optical elements corresponding to the QC micro-optical element array. Each focusing micro-optical element is designed to produce a quasi-telecentric intermediate image from substantially collimated radiation incident within a predetermined field of view.

  10. Jimena: efficient computing and system state identification for genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2013-10-11

    Boolean networks capture switching behavior of many naturally occurring regulatory networks. For semi-quantitative modeling, interpolation between ON and OFF states is necessary. The high degree polynomial interpolation of Boolean genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) in cellular processes such as apoptosis or proliferation allows for the modeling of a wider range of node interactions than continuous activator-inhibitor models, but suffers from scaling problems for networks which contain nodes with more than ~10 inputs. Many GRNs from literature or new gene expression experiments exceed those limitations and a new approach was developed. (i) As a part of our new GRN simulation framework Jimena we introduce and setup Boolean-tree-based data structures; (ii) corresponding algorithms greatly expedite the calculation of the polynomial interpolation in almost all cases, thereby expanding the range of networks which can be simulated by this model in reasonable time. (iii) Stable states for discrete models are efficiently counted and identified using binary decision diagrams. As application example, we show how system states can now be sampled efficiently in small up to large scale hormone disease networks (Arabidopsis thaliana development and immunity, pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and modulation by cytokinins and plant hormones). Jimena simulates currently available GRNs about 10-100 times faster than the previous implementation of the polynomial interpolation model and even greater gains are achieved for large scale-free networks. This speed-up also facilitates a much more thorough sampling of continuous state spaces which may lead to the identification of new stable states. Mutants of large networks can be constructed and analyzed very quickly enabling new insights into network robustness and behavior.

  11. SCT module testing system at Charles University in Prague

    CERN Document Server

    Broklova, Z; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Kubik, P; Reznicek, P

    2003-01-01

    Detector control system (DCS) is built up to ensure adequate environment conditions during mass testing of silicon strip modules for ATLAS Inner Detector. DCS protects modules against damage and simplifies the whole testing procedure as well. In the automatic mode, the system measures several environmental parameters and checks them. In case of accident or unexpected situation, it alerts operator of the system (for example via email). It can safely stop all testing. The system also contains components for remote observation plus control of the testing status.

  12. Unveiling combinatorial regulation through the combination of ChIP information and in silico cis-regulatory module detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Guns, Tias; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Thorrez, Lieven; Nijssen, Siegfried; Marchal, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Computationally retrieving biologically relevant cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is not straightforward. Because of the large number of candidates and the imperfection of the screening methods, many spurious CRMs are detected that are as high scoring as the biologically true ones. Using ChIP-information allows not only to reduce the regions in which the binding sites of the assayed transcription factor (TF) should be located, but also allows restricting the valid CRMs to those that contain the assayed TF (here referred to as applying CRM detection in a query-based mode). In this study, we show that exploiting ChIP-information in a query-based way makes in silico CRM detection a much more feasible endeavor. To be able to handle the large datasets, the query-based setting and other specificities proper to CRM detection on ChIP-Seq based data, we developed a novel powerful CRM detection method ‘CPModule’. By applying it on a well-studied ChIP-Seq data set involved in self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells, we demonstrate how our tool can recover combinatorial regulation of five known TFs that are key in the self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we make a number of new predictions on combinatorial regulation of these five key TFs with other TFs documented in TRANSFAC. PMID:22422841

  13. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  14. A European regulatory perspective on cystic fibrosis: current treatments, trends in drug development and translational challenges for CFTR modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzano, Stefano; Nigrelli, Giulia; Fregonese, Laura; Eichler, Irmgard; Bertozzi, Fabio; Bandiera, Tiziano; Galietta, Luis J V; Papaluca, Marisa

    2018-06-30

    In this article we analyse the current authorised treatments and trends in early drug development for cystic fibrosis (CF) in the European Union for the time period 2000-2016. The analysis indicates a significant improvement in the innovation and development of new potential medicines for CF, shifting from products that act on the symptoms of the disease towards new therapies targeting the cause of CF. However, within these new innovative medicines, results for CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators indicate that one major challenge for turning a CF concept product into an actual medicine for the benefit of patients resides in the fact that, although pre-clinical models have shown good predictability for certain mutations, a good correlation to clinical end-points or biomarkers ( e.g. forced expiratory volume in 1 s and sweat chloride) for all mutations has not yet been achieved. In this respect, the use of alternative end-points and innovative nonclinical models could be helpful for the understanding of those translational discrepancies. Collaborative endeavours to promote further research and development in these areas as well as early dialogue with the regulatory bodies available at the European competent authorities are recommended. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  15. Broadcast Communication by System Frequency Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; You, Shi; Heussen, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Load controllers available today can measure AC system frequency and react to frequency deviations. A system operator can communicate to frequency sensitive loads by changing the set-points of the system’s dispatchable frequency regulation resources. Explicitly signaling system state by generating...... off-nominal system frequency values is a novel narrowband broadcast communications channel between system operators and frequency sensitive distributed energy resources (FS-DER). The feasibility of the proposed system is evaluated on an existing island power system in Denmark. This study shows...... that within standard frequency quality constraints, 4 distinct symbols are feasible on the island. However, the overarching imperative of system stability prevents the symbols from having arbitrary meanings. Higher frequency values must translate into greater consumption from loads, and vice versa. Within...

  16. Apollo Lunar Module Electrical Power System Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Describe LM Electrical System original specifications; b) Describe the decision to change from fuel cells to batteries and other changes; c) Describe the Electrical system; and d) Describe the Apollo 13 failure from the LM perspective.

  17. Periodic orbits from Δ-modulation of stable linear systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, X.; Zinober, A.

    2004-01-01

    The �-modulated control of a single input, discrete time, linear stable system is investigated. The modulation direction is given by cTx where c �Rn/{0} is a given, otherwise arbitrary, vector. We obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of periodic points of a finite order. Some concrete results about the existence of a certain order of periodic points are also derived. We also study the relationship between certain polyhedra and the periodicity of the �-modulated orb...

  18. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  19. Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competences (SARCON) V18a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Why Competence Management? • Arrangements for competence management is a key factor to: • Support the implementation of article 8 of CNS (Convention on Nuclear Safety – “regulatory body with adequate competence and human resources”); • Support the implementation of Modules 3 and 4 of the IRRS and other IAEA Safety Standards (Module 3: “Responsibilities and functions of the regulatory body”, Module 4: “Management system of the regulatory body”); • Identify gaps between regulatory required competences and the existing resources; • Develop and implement tools and programmes to fill the gaps; • Review periodically the competence needs and training programmes

  20. Regulatory landscape of AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis and its modulation by PPARγ activation in high fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Luca; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Savi, Federica; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Saethang, Thammakorn; Carini, Marina; Payne, D Michael; Pisitkun, Trairak; Aldini, Giancarlo; Leelahavanichkul, Asada

    2017-01-01

    The AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress (AROS) axis is involved in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome induced by a high-fructose diet (HFD). PPARγ activation is known to modulate metabolic syndrome; however a systems-level investigation looking at the protective effects of PPARγ activation as related to the AROS axis has not been performed. The aim of this work is to simultaneously characterize multiple molecular parameters within the AROS axis, using samples taken from different body fluids and tissues of a rat model of HFD-induced metabolic syndrome, in the presence or absence of a PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone (RGZ). Rats were fed with 60% HFD for the first half of the treatment duration (21 days) then continued with either HFD alone or HFD plus RGZ for the second half. Rats receiving HFD alone showed metabolic syndrome manifestations including hypertension, dyslipidemia, increased glucose levels and insulin resistance, as well as abnormal kidney and inflammatory parameters. Systolic blood pressure, plasma triglyceride and glucose levels, plasma creatinine, and albuminuria were significantly improved in the presence of RGZ. The following molecular parameters of the AROS axis were significantly upregulated in our rat model: carboxymethyl lysine (CML) in urine and liver; carboxyethyl lysine (CEL) in urine; advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in plasma; receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in liver and kidney; advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) in plasma; and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in plasma, liver, and kidney. Conversely, with RGZ administration, the upregulation of AOPP and AGEs in plasma, CML and CEL in urine, RAGE in liver as well as HNE in plasma and liver was significantly counteracted/prevented. Our data demonstrate (i) the systems-level regulatory landscape of HFD-induced metabolic syndrome involving multiple molecular parameters, including HNE, AGEs and their receptor RAGE, and (ii) attenuation of metabolic syndrome by

  1. Regulatory monitoring systems of fortified salt and wheat flour in selected ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaart, Annoek; Bégin, France; Codling, Karen; Randall, Philip; Johnson, Quentin W

    2013-06-01

    Considerable efforts have been made over the past decade to address vitamin and mineral deficiencies. An increasing number of countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are adopting mandatory food fortification as one of the primary strategies to overcome these deficiencies. Experience shows that fortified foods can reach large parts of the population, including the poor, if the fortification is done on a mandatory rather than a voluntary basis and if the food vehicle is widely consumed. To review the importance of regulatory monitoring as an essential component of food fortification efforts in selected ASEAN countries, with special focus on the available information on regulatory monitoring systems for iodized salt and fortified wheat flour. The role of regulatory monitoring in strengthening food fortification programs was discussed during a joint regional meeting of the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the Flour Fortification Initiative, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition, the Micronutrient Initiative, and the World Bank on regulatory monitoring of salt and wheat flour fortification programs in Asia, which took place in Manila, Philippines, on 27-29 September 2011. This paper reviews the regulatory monitoring systems of selected ASEAN countries that participated in this meeting. Problems and challenges in regulatory monitoring systems for iodized salt and fortified wheat flour in selected ASEAN countries are identified, and a description of the role of regulatory monitoring in strengthening food fortification initiatives, particularly of salt and flour, and highlights of areas for improvement are presented. Regulatory monitoring consists of monitoring activities conducted at the production level, at customs warehouses, and at retail stores by concerned regulatory authorities, and at the production level by producers themselves, as part of quality control and assurance efforts. Unless there are appropriate enforcement and quality

  2. Regulatory issues of digital instrumentation and control system in Lungmen project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, C.F.; Chou, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Station (LNPS) is currently under construction in Taiwan, which consists of 2 advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) units. The instrumentation and control (IC) systems of the LNPS are based on the state-of-the-art modernized fully integrated digital design. These IC systems possess many advantages and distinguished features comparing to traditional analog IC systems, they enjoy set-point stability, self-diagnostic and automatic testing ability, fault tolerance and avoidance, low power requirements, data handling and storage capability, as well as enhanced human-machine interfaces. This paper presents regulatory overviews, regulatory requirements, current major regulatory issues, as well as the areas of regulatory concerns and the lessons learned on the digital IC systems in the Lungmen Project

  3. Development of the personnel training and qualification system of the Russian Federation Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapralov, E.; Kapralov, Y.; Kozlov, V.

    2006-01-01

    The new personnel training and qualification system is being developed for russian regulatory body, having a very big number of employees and invited experts and widly territorially distributed structure. (author)

  4. Development of Regulatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis System (RETAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Seung-Hoon; Kim, In-Goo; Kim, Hho-Jung; Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    A review is provided of the reasons why the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety needs improvement of the existing codes employed for a regulatory audit. The proposed new organization of the codes, developed or to be developed, is presented together with illustrative applications. Inspection of the quality assurance activities is planned to ensure the robustness of MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis for Reactor Safety) code, served as a pivot of the organization.

  5. Development of Regulatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis System (RETAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung-Hoon; Kim, In-Goo; Kim, Hho-Jung; Cho, Yong Jin

    2007-01-01

    A review is provided of the reasons why the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety needs improvement of the existing codes employed for a regulatory audit. The proposed new organization of the codes, developed or to be developed, is presented together with illustrative applications. Inspection of the quality assurance activities is planned to ensure the robustness of MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis for Reactor Safety) code, served as a pivot of the organization

  6. Interacting Brain Systems Modulate Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Christa K.; McGaugh, James L.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    Emotional arousal influences the consolidation of long-term memory. This review discusses experimental approaches and relevant findings that provide the foundation for current understanding of coordinated interactions between arousal activated peripheral hormones and the brain processes that modulate memory formation. Rewarding or aversive experiences release the stress hormones epinephrine (adrenalin) and glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands into the bloodstream. The effect of these hormones on memory consolidation depends upon binding of norepinephrine to beta-adrenergic receptors in the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). Much evidence indicates that the stress hormones influence release of norepinephrine in the BLA through peripheral actions on the vagus nerve which stimulates, through polysynaptic connections, cells of the locus coeruleus to release norepinephrine. The BLA influences memory storage by actions on synapses, distributed throughout the brain, that are engaged in sensory and cognitive processing at the time of amygdala activation. The implications of the activation of these stress-activated memory processes are discussed in relation to stress-related memory disorders. PMID:22085800

  7. Defect design of insulation systems for photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A defect-design approach to sizing electrical insulation systems for terrestrial photovoltaic modules is presented. It consists of gathering voltage-breakdown statistics on various thicknesses of candidate insulation films where, for a designated voltage, module failure probabilities for enumerated thickness and number-of-layer film combinations are calculated. Cost analysis then selects the most economical insulation system. A manufacturing yield problem is solved to exemplify the technique. Results for unaged Mylar suggest using fewer layers of thicker films. Defect design incorporates effects of flaws in optimal insulation system selection, and obviates choosing a tolerable failure rate, since the optimization process accomplishes that. Exposure to weathering and voltage stress reduces the voltage-withstanding capability of module insulation films. Defect design, applied to aged polyester films, promises to yield reliable, cost-optimal insulation systems.

  8. What is a comprehensive system of regulatory governance?; Que es un sistema Integral de Gestion Reglamentaria?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real diaz, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The progressive evolution and diversification of regulations concerning industrial safety has made their management increasingly complex, requiring more resources of organizations. Therefore, it is advisable that this management be made more efficient through systematization, specialization and the use of computing technologies. This is supported by the implementation of integrated regulatory management systems. This article explain the concept of integrated regulatory management systems, their structure and their advantages. It also includes a model for implementing them in an organization. (Author)

  9. Aberration design of zoom lens systems using thick lens modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinkai; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong; Wu, Zhuoqi

    2014-12-20

    A systematic approach for the aberration design of a zoom lens system using a thick lens module is presented. Each component is treated as a thick lens module at the beginning of the design. A thick lens module refers to a thick lens component with a real lens structure, like lens materials, lens curvatures, lens thicknesses, and lens interval distances. All nine third-order aberrations of a thick lens component are considered during the design. The relationship of component aberrations in different zoom positions can be approximated from the aberration shift. After minimizing the aberrations of the zoom lens system, the nine third-order aberrations of every lens component can be determined. Then the thick lens structure of every lens component can be determined after optimization according to their first-order properties and third-order aberration targets. After a third optimization for minimum practical third-order aberrations of a zoom lens system, the aberration design using the thick lens module is complete, which provides a practical zoom lens system with thick lens structures. A double-sided telecentric zoom lens system is designed using the thick lens module in this paper, which shows that this method is practical for zoom lens design.

  10. Demazure Modules, Fusion Products and Q-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Vyjayanthi; Venkatesh, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a family of indecomposable finite-dimensional graded modules for the current algebra associated to a simple Lie algebra. These modules are indexed by an -tuple of partitions , where α varies over a set of positive roots of and we assume that they satisfy a natural compatibility condition. In the case when the are all rectangular, for instance, we prove that these modules are Demazure modules in various levels. As a consequence, we see that the defining relations of Demazure modules can be greatly simplified. We use this simplified presentation to relate our results to the fusion products, defined in (Feigin and Loktev in Am Math Soc Transl Ser (2) 194:61-79, 1999), of representations of the current algebra. We prove that the Q-system of (Hatayama et al. in Contemporary Mathematics, vol. 248, pp. 243-291. American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1998) extends to a canonical short exact sequence of fusion products of representations associated to certain special partitions .Finally, in the last section we deal with the case of and prove that the modules we define are just fusion products of irreducible representations of the associated current algebra and give monomial bases for these modules.

  11. Modulation of systemic immune responses through commensal gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Schachtschneider

    Full Text Available Colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI tract is initiated during birth and continually seeded from the individual's environment. Gastrointestinal microorganisms play a central role in developing and modulating host immune responses and have been the subject of investigation over the last decades. Animal studies have demonstrated the impact of GI tract microbiota on local gastrointestinal immune responses; however, the full spectrum of action of early gastrointestinal tract stimulation and subsequent modulation of systemic immune responses is poorly understood. This study explored the utility of an oral microbial inoculum as a therapeutic tool to affect porcine systemic immune responses. For this study a litter of 12 pigs was split into two groups. One group of pigs was inoculated with a non-pathogenic oral inoculum (modulated, while another group (control was not. DNA extracted from nasal swabs and fecal samples collected throughout the study was sequenced to determine the effects of the oral inoculation on GI and respiratory microbial communities. The effects of GI microbial modulation on systemic immune responses were evaluated by experimentally infecting with the pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Coughing levels, pathology, toll-like receptors 2 and 6, and cytokine production were measured throughout the study. Sequencing results show a successful modulation of the GI and respiratory microbiomes through oral inoculation. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses were stronger (p = 0.07, and the average coughing levels and respiratory TNF-α variance were significantly lower in the modulated group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.0153, respectively. The M. hyopneumoniae infection study showed beneficial effects of the oral inoculum on systemic immune responses including antibody production, severity of infection and cytokine levels. These results suggest that an oral microbial inoculation can be used to modulate microbial communities, as well as

  12. Development of the integrated system reliability analysis code MODULE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.H.; Yoo, K.J.; Kim, T.W.

    1987-01-01

    The major components in a system reliability analysis are the determination of cut sets, importance measure, and uncertainty analysis. Various computer codes have been used for these purposes. For example, SETS and FTAP are used to determine cut sets; Importance for importance calculations; and Sample, CONINT, and MOCUP for uncertainty analysis. There have been problems when the codes run each other and the input and output are not linked, which could result in errors when preparing input for each code. The code MODULE was developed to carry out the above calculations simultaneously without linking input and outputs to other codes. MODULE can also prepare input for SETS for the case of a large fault tree that cannot be handled by MODULE. The flow diagram of the MODULE code is shown. To verify the MODULE code, two examples are selected and the results and computation times are compared with those of SETS, FTAP, CONINT, and MOCUP on both Cyber 170-875 and IBM PC/AT. Two examples are fault trees of the auxiliary feedwater system (AFWS) of Korea Nuclear Units (KNU)-1 and -2, which have 54 gates and 115 events, 39 gates and 92 events, respectively. The MODULE code has the advantage that it can calculate the cut sets, importances, and uncertainties in a single run with little increase in computing time over other codes and that it can be used in personal computers

  13. GSM module for wireless radiation monitoring system via SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Hisyam Ibrahim, Noor; Lombigit, Lojius; Azman, Azraf; Jaafar, Zainudin; Arymaswati Abdullah, Nor; Hadzir Patai Mohamad, Glam

    2018-01-01

    A customised Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) module is designed for wireless radiation monitoring through Short Messaging Service (SMS). This module is able to receive serial data from radiation monitoring devices such as survey meter or area monitor and transmit the data as text SMS to a host server. It provides two-way communication for data transmission, status query, and configuration setup. The module hardware consists of GSM module, voltage level shifter, SIM circuit and Atmega328P microcontroller. Microcontroller provides control for sending, receiving and AT command processing to GSM module. The firmware is responsible to handle task related to communication between device and host server. It process all incoming SMS, extract, and store new configuration from Host, transmits alert/notification SMS when the radiation data reach/exceed threshold value, and transmits SMS data at every fixed interval according to configuration. Integration of this module with radiation survey/monitoring device will create mobile and wireless radiation monitoring system with prompt emergency alert at high-level radiation.

  14. System engineering in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process: Program architecture process and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romine, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The overall mission of the center is to provide a sustained level of high-quality research and technical assistance in support of NRC regulatory responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). A key part of that mission is to assist the NRC in the development of the program architecture - the systems approach to regulatory analysis for the NRC high-level waste repository licensing process - and the development and implementation of the computer-based Program Architecture Support System (PASS). This paper describes the concept of program architecture, summarizes the process and basic structure of the PASS relational data base, and describes the applications of the system

  15. Outdoor thermal and electrical characterisation of photovoltaic modules and systems

    OpenAIRE

    Herteleer, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Current and future investors in photovoltaic systems are interested in how well the system performs, and how predictable this is over the expected lifetime. To do so, models have been developed and measurements of photovoltaic systems have been done. This dissertation presents the outdoor measurement set-up that has been developed for thermal and electrical characterisation of photovoltaic modules and systems, aimed at measuring transient effects and changes. The main design decisions and ...

  16. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... Associations § 249.821 Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all self-regulatory...

  17. A PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module links Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Falke, Joseph J

    2018-01-01

    The leukocyte chemosensory pathway detects attractant gradients and directs cell migration to sites of inflammation, infection, tissue damage, and carcinogenesis. Previous studies have revealed that local Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized leukocytes play central roles in positive feedback loop essential to cell polarization and chemotaxis. These prior studies showed that stimulation of the leading edge Ca2+ signal can strongly activate PI3K, thereby triggering a larger PIP3 signal, but did not elucidate the mechanistic link between Ca2+ and PIP3 signaling. A hypothesis explaining this link emerged, postulating that Ca2+-activated PKC displaces the MARCKS protein from plasma membrane PIP2, thereby releasing sequestered PIP2 to serve as the target and substrate lipid of PI3K in PIP3 production. In vitro single molecule studies of the reconstituted pathway on lipid bilayers demonstrated the feasibility of this PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking Ca2+ and PIP3 signals in the reconstituted system. The present study tests the model predictions in live macrophages by quantifying the effects of: (a) two pathway activators-PDGF and ATP that stimulate chemoreceptors and Ca2+ influx, respectively; and (b) three pathway inhibitors-wortmannin, EGTA, and Go6976 that inhibit PI3K, Ca2+ influx, and PKC, respectively; on (c) four leading edge activity sensors-AKT-PH-mRFP, CKAR, MARCKSp-mRFP, and leading edge area that report on PIP3 density, PKC activity, MARCKS membrane binding, and leading edge expansion/contraction, respectively. The results provide additional evidence that PKC and PI3K are both essential elements of the leading edge positive feedback loop, and strongly support the existence of a PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking the leading edge Ca2+ and PIP3 signals. As predicted, activators stimulate leading edge PKC activity, displacement of MARCKS from the leading edge membrane and increased leading edge PIP3 levels, while inhibitors

  18. A PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module links Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Ziemba

    Full Text Available The leukocyte chemosensory pathway detects attractant gradients and directs cell migration to sites of inflammation, infection, tissue damage, and carcinogenesis. Previous studies have revealed that local Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized leukocytes play central roles in positive feedback loop essential to cell polarization and chemotaxis. These prior studies showed that stimulation of the leading edge Ca2+ signal can strongly activate PI3K, thereby triggering a larger PIP3 signal, but did not elucidate the mechanistic link between Ca2+ and PIP3 signaling. A hypothesis explaining this link emerged, postulating that Ca2+-activated PKC displaces the MARCKS protein from plasma membrane PIP2, thereby releasing sequestered PIP2 to serve as the target and substrate lipid of PI3K in PIP3 production. In vitro single molecule studies of the reconstituted pathway on lipid bilayers demonstrated the feasibility of this PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking Ca2+ and PIP3 signals in the reconstituted system. The present study tests the model predictions in live macrophages by quantifying the effects of: (a two pathway activators-PDGF and ATP that stimulate chemoreceptors and Ca2+ influx, respectively; and (b three pathway inhibitors-wortmannin, EGTA, and Go6976 that inhibit PI3K, Ca2+ influx, and PKC, respectively; on (c four leading edge activity sensors-AKT-PH-mRFP, CKAR, MARCKSp-mRFP, and leading edge area that report on PIP3 density, PKC activity, MARCKS membrane binding, and leading edge expansion/contraction, respectively. The results provide additional evidence that PKC and PI3K are both essential elements of the leading edge positive feedback loop, and strongly support the existence of a PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking the leading edge Ca2+ and PIP3 signals. As predicted, activators stimulate leading edge PKC activity, displacement of MARCKS from the leading edge membrane and increased leading edge PIP3 levels, while

  19. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yanjun; Li, Chunquan; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Chunlong; Su, Fei; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it i...

  20. Modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opland, Darren M; Leinninger, Gina M; Myers, Martin G

    2010-09-02

    Nutritional status modulates many forms of reward-seeking behavior, with caloric restriction increasing the drive for drugs of abuse as well as for food. Understanding the interactions between the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system (which mediates the incentive salience of natural and artificial rewards) and the neural and hormonal systems that sense and regulate energy balance is thus of significant importance. Leptin, which is produced by adipocytes in proportion to fat content as a hormonal signal of long-term energy stores, acts via its receptor (LepRb) on multiple populations of central nervous system neurons to modulate neural circuits in response to body energy stores. Leptin suppresses feeding and plays a central role in the control of energy balance. In addition to demonstrating that leptin modulates hypothalamic and brainstem circuits to promote satiety, recent work has begun to explore the mechanisms by which leptin influences the mesolimbic DA system and related behaviors. Indeed, leptin diminishes several measures of drug and food reward, and promotes a complex set of changes in the mesolimbic DA system. While many of the details remain to be worked out, several lines of evidence suggest that leptin regulates the mesolimbic DA system via multiple neural pathways and processes, and that distinct sets of LepRb neurons each modulate unique aspects of the mesolimbic DA system and behavior in response to leptin. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  2. HELIAS module development for systems codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmer, F., E-mail: Felix.Warmer@ipp.mpg.de; Beidler, C.D.; Dinklage, A.; Egorov, K.; Feng, Y.; Geiger, J.; Schauer, F.; Turkin, Y.; Wolf, R.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-02-15

    In order to study and design next-step fusion devices such as DEMO, comprehensive systems codes are commonly employed. In this work HELIAS-specific models are proposed which are designed to be compatible with systems codes. The subsequently developed models include: a geometry model based on Fourier coefficients which can represent the complex 3-D plasma shape, a basic island divertor model which assumes diffusive cross-field transport and high radiation at the X-point, and a coil model which combines scaling aspects based on the HELIAS 5-B reactor design in combination with analytic inductance and field calculations. In addition, stellarator-specific plasma transport is discussed. A strategy is proposed which employs a predictive confinement time scaling derived from 1-D neoclassical and 3-D turbulence simulations. This paper reports on the progress of the development of the stellarator-specific models while an implementation and verification study within an existing systems code will be presented in a separate work. This approach is investigated to ultimately allow one to conduct stellarator system studies, develop design points of HELIAS burning plasma devices, and to facilitate a direct comparison between tokamak and stellarator DEMO and power plant designs.

  3. Integrated microwave photonics for phase modulated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2012-01-01

    For the last 25 years, microwave photonic (MWP) systems and links have relied almost exclusively on discrete optoelectronic devices, standard optical fibers and fiber-based components. With this concept, various functionalities like RF signal generation, distribution, processing and analysis have

  4. SU-F-P-10: A Web-Based Radiation Safety Relational Database Module for Regulatory Compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, C; Ramsay, B; Konerth, S; Roller, D; Ramsay, A [Dade Moeller Health Group, Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Maintaining compliance with Radioactive Materials Licenses is inherently a time-consuming task requiring focus and attention to detail. Staff tasked with these responsibilities, such as the Radiation Safety Officer and associated personnel must retain disparate records for eventual placement into one or more annual reports. Entering results and records in a relational database using a web browser as the interface, and storing that data in a cloud-based storage site, removes procedural barriers. The data becomes more adaptable for mining and sharing. Methods: Web-based code was written utilizing the web framework Django, written in Python. Additionally, the application utilizes JavaScript for front-end interaction, SQL, HTML and CSS. Quality assurance code testing is performed in a sequential style, and new code is only added after the successful testing of the previous goals. Separate sections of the module include data entry and analysis for audits, surveys, quality management, and continuous quality improvement. Data elements can be adapted for quarterly and annual reporting, and for immediate notification of user determined alarm settings. Results: Current advances are focusing on user interface issues, and determining the simplest manner by which to teach the user to build query forms. One solution has been to prepare library documents that a user can select or edit in place of creation a new document. Forms are being developed based upon Nuclear Regulatory Commission federal code, and will be expanded to include State Regulations. Conclusion: Establishing a secure website to act as the portal for data entry, storage and manipulation can lead to added efficiencies for a Radiation Safety Program. Access to multiple databases can lead to mining for big data programs, and for determining safety issues before they occur. Overcoming web programming challenges, a category that includes mathematical handling, is providing challenges that are being overcome.

  5. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, C. Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan Dejin; You Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Liu Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process

  6. A novel method for predicting activity of cis-regulatory modules, based on a diverse training set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Sinha, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid emergence of technologies for locating cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide, the next pressing challenge is to assign precise functions to each CRM, i.e. to determine the spatiotemporal domains or cell-types where it drives expression. A popular approach to this task is to model the typical k-mer composition of a set of CRMs known to drive a common expression pattern, and assign that pattern to other CRMs exhibiting a similar k-mer composition. This approach does not rely on prior knowledge of transcription factors relevant to the CRM or their binding motifs, and is thus more widely applicable than motif-based methods for predicting CRM activity, but is also prone to false positive predictions. We present a novel strategy to improve the above-mentioned approach: to predict if a CRM drives a specific gene expression pattern, assess not only how similar the CRM is to other CRMs with similar activity but also to CRMs with distinct activities. We use a state-of-the-art statistical method to quantify a CRM's sequence similarity to many different training sets of CRMs, and employ a classification algorithm to integrate these similarity scores into a single prediction of the CRM's activity. This strategy is shown to significantly improve CRM activity prediction over current approaches. Our implementation of the new method, called IMMBoost, is freely available as source code, at https://github.com/weiyangedward/IMMBoost CONTACT: sinhas@illinois.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. SU-F-P-10: A Web-Based Radiation Safety Relational Database Module for Regulatory Compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, C; Ramsay, B; Konerth, S; Roller, D; Ramsay, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Maintaining compliance with Radioactive Materials Licenses is inherently a time-consuming task requiring focus and attention to detail. Staff tasked with these responsibilities, such as the Radiation Safety Officer and associated personnel must retain disparate records for eventual placement into one or more annual reports. Entering results and records in a relational database using a web browser as the interface, and storing that data in a cloud-based storage site, removes procedural barriers. The data becomes more adaptable for mining and sharing. Methods: Web-based code was written utilizing the web framework Django, written in Python. Additionally, the application utilizes JavaScript for front-end interaction, SQL, HTML and CSS. Quality assurance code testing is performed in a sequential style, and new code is only added after the successful testing of the previous goals. Separate sections of the module include data entry and analysis for audits, surveys, quality management, and continuous quality improvement. Data elements can be adapted for quarterly and annual reporting, and for immediate notification of user determined alarm settings. Results: Current advances are focusing on user interface issues, and determining the simplest manner by which to teach the user to build query forms. One solution has been to prepare library documents that a user can select or edit in place of creation a new document. Forms are being developed based upon Nuclear Regulatory Commission federal code, and will be expanded to include State Regulations. Conclusion: Establishing a secure website to act as the portal for data entry, storage and manipulation can lead to added efficiencies for a Radiation Safety Program. Access to multiple databases can lead to mining for big data programs, and for determining safety issues before they occur. Overcoming web programming challenges, a category that includes mathematical handling, is providing challenges that are being overcome.

  8. Identification of fractional order systems using modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2013-06-01

    The modulating functions method has been used for the identification of linear and nonlinear systems. In this paper, we generalize this method to the on-line identification of fractional order systems based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. First, a new fractional integration by parts formula involving the fractional derivative of a modulating function is given. Then, we apply this formula to a fractional order system, for which the fractional derivatives of the input and the output can be transferred into the ones of the modulating functions. By choosing a set of modulating functions, a linear system of algebraic equations is obtained. Hence, the unknown parameters of a fractional order system can be estimated by solving a linear system. Using this method, we do not need any initial values which are usually unknown and not equal to zero. Also we do not need to estimate the fractional derivatives of noisy output. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed estimators are robust against high frequency sinusoidal noises and the ones due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, the efficiency and the stability of the proposed method is confirmed by some numerical simulations.

  9. Regulatory systems for the control of land remediation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, J.; Vijgen, J.; Summersgill, M.

    2003-07-01

    One of the recurring themes in looking at land remediation over the last decade has been identifying and overcoming barriers to the use of innovative, sustainable technologies, whilst still ensuring that there are no adverse environmental impacts from their use. In parallel with this, the regeneration of brownfield sites has increasingly needed effective and economic solutions that leave the site without the stigma of being associated with contamination and waste disposal. Regulatory controls are often identified as one of the main barriers to both of these objectives. Previously, the focus of attention in the study of regulatory controls relating to land contamination has largely been on regimes that trigger the need for clean-up. These may be pollution control legislation or land-use planning controls. However, the focus of this paper will be on the controls on the selection and implementation of the remediation technologies and processes themselves. It will look in particular at the European-wide controls on waste management, pollution prevention and environmental impact assessment. The UK work is being carried out by a working group involving: landowners; developers; public sector regeneration agencies; house-builders; industry; insurers; technology providers; professional advisers; local government authorities; and national government regulators and policy-makers. This multi-stakeholder approach has facilitated the identification of practical, legal, financial and administrative issues to assist in developing new solutions. (orig.)

  10. Genetic control of mammalian T-cell proliferation with synthetic RNA regulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Y.; Jensen, Michael C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecules perform diverse regulatory functions in natural biological systems, and numerous synthetic RNA-based control devices that integrate sensing and gene-regulatory functions have been demonstrated, predominantly in bacteria and yeast. Despite potential advantages of RNA-based genetic control strategies in clinical applications, there has been limited success in extending engineered RNA devices to mammalian gene-expression control and no example of their application to functional res...

  11. Sympathetic neural modulation of the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    One route by which the central nervous system communicates with lymphoid organs in the periphery is through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To study SNS regulation of immune activity in vivo, selective removal of peripheral noradrenergic nerve fibers was achieved by administration of the neurotoxic drug, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), to adult mice. To assess SNS influence on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, uptake of 125 iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR), a DNA precursor, was measured following 6-OHDA treatment. Sympathectomy prior to epicutaneous immunization with TNCB did not alter draining lymph nodes (LN) cell proliferation, whereas 6-OHDA treatment before footpad immunization with KLH reduced DNA synthesis in popliteal LN by 50%. In mice which were not deliberately immunized, sympathectomy stimulated 125 IUdR uptake inguinal and axillary LN, spleen, and bone marrow. In vitro, these LN and spleen cells exhibited decreased proliferation responses to the T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IgG secretion was enhanced. Studies examining 51 Cr-labeled lymphocyte trafficking to LN suggested that altered cell migration may play a part in sympathectomy-induced changes in LN cell function

  12. [Modulation of the cholinergic system during inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Vladykin, A L; Sapronov, N S

    2008-01-01

    This review describes the effects of realization of the central and peripheral "cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway" in a model of endotoxic and anaphylactic shock. Under endotoxic shock conditions, a pharmacological correction by means of the central m-cholinomimetic action (electrical stimulation of the distal ends of nervus vagus after bilateral cervical vagotomy, surgical implantation of the stimulant devise, activation of efferent vagal neurons by means of muscarinic agonist) is directed toward the elimination of LPS-induced hypotension. During the anaphylaxis, peripheral effects of the cholinergic system induced by blocking m-AChR on the target cells (neuronal and non-neuronal lung cells) and acetylcholinesterase inhibition are related to suppression of the bronchoconstrictor response. The role of immune system in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock is associated with the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages, increase in IgM concentration, and complement activation, while the role in the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock is associated with IgE, IgG1 augmentation. Effects of B cell stimulation may be important in hypoxia and in the prophylaxis of stress ulcers and other diseases. Plasma proteins can influence the effects of the muscarinic antagonist methacine: IgG enhance its action while albumin and CRP abolish it.

  13. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H.; Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security

  14. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security.

  15. National system for regulatory body in the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.

    2001-01-01

    The status of radiation protection infrastructures varies from one region to another, and from one country to another in the same region. Some countries are very well advanced, others at an intermediate level, and others way behind. The Syrian Arab Republic is one of the countries using radiation generating machines, and sealed and unsealed radionuclide sources. The Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS) has the direct responsibility of assuring proper safety for handling such sources on the basis of a solid regulatory infrastructure and conforming with the international standards. The AECS was approached by the IAEA to assist other countries in the area participating in the interregional Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Safety and Radiation Safety and Waste Management Infrastructure by providing them with the available facilities and experience in radiation safety. (author)

  16. International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems: Sustaining Improvements Globally. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this conference is to review and assess ways of further improving the effectiveness of regulatory systems for nuclear facilities and activities for both nuclear safety and nuclear security. The action items in the summary presented by the President of the conference held in 2013 in Ottawa, the lessons of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the discussions at other international conferences and at international experts’ meetings conducted within the framework of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, as well as the CNS and the principles outlined in the Vienna Declaration on Nuclear Safety, will continue to have a significant impact on regulatory systems. All the aforementioned need to be taken into account to sustain improvements to regulatory systems. The expected outcomes of the conference are: - Enhanced safety and security of nuclear installations worldwide; - Challenges in regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste addressed; - Enhanced international cooperation for sustaining regulatory effectiveness; - Strengthened and sustained regulatory competence for nuclear safety and security; and - Strategies and actions for the future identified, as well as issues for consideration by governments, regulatory bodies and international organizations.

  17. Improvement and amplification of the I modulate CDSM (control sub device modulates) of the system DECADES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turtos Carbonell, Leonor

    1999-01-01

    The present work consists on the improvement and amplification of the module CDSM of the one System DECADES starting from the experience acquired in the use of the same one. It was implemented The calculation for all the Technologies of Reduction of Emissions (TRE) included in the one System for all the levels of foreseen analysis (it plants, chain and Electroenergetic Systems ), a case of test was evaluated with all the TRE and those were validated results obtained with available data in the reference bibliography

  18. Regulatory Concerns on the In-Containment Water Storage System of the Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Jae-Hun; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, Hho-Jung

    2002-01-01

    The in-containment water storage system (IWSS) is a newly adopted system in the design of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It consists of the in-containment refueling water storage tank, holdup volume tank, and cavity flooding system (CFS). The IWSS has the function of steam condensation and heat sink for the steam release from the pressurizer and provides cooling water to the safety injection system and containment spray system in an accident condition and to the CFS in a severe accident condition. With the progress of the KNGR design, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has been developing Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidances for safety review of the KNGR. In this paper, regarding the IWSS of the KNGR, the major contents of the General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements, Safety Regulatory Guides, and Safety Review Procedures were introduced, and the safety review items that have to be reviewed in-depth from the regulatory viewpoint were also identified

  19. Safety Justification of Software Systems. Software Based Safety Systems. Regulatory Inspection Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahll, Gustav; Liwang, Bo; Wainwright, Norman

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new software based technology in the safety systems in nuclear power plants also makes it necessary to develop new strategies for regulatory review and assessment of these new systems that is more focused on reviewing the processes at the different phases in design phases during the system life cycle. It is a general requirement that the licensee shall perform different kinds of reviews. From a regulatory point of view it is more cost effective to assess that the design activities at the suppliers and the review activities within the development project are performed with good quality. But the change from more technical reviews over to the development process oriented approach also cause problems. When reviewing development and quality aspects there are no 'hard facts' that can be judged against some specified criteria, the issues are more 'soft' and are more to build up structure of arguments and evidences that the requirements are met. The regulatory review strategy must therefore change to follow the development process over the whole life cycle from concept phase until installation and operation. Even if we know what factors that is of interest we need some guidance on how to interpret and judge the information.For that purpose SKl started research activities in this area at the end of the 1990s. In the first phase, in co-operation with Gustav Dahll at the Halden project, a life cycle model was selected. For the different phases a qualitative influence net was constructed of the type that is used in Bayesian Believe Network together with a discussion on different issues involved. In the second phase of the research work, in co-operation with Norman Wainwright, a former NII inspector, information from a selection of the most important sources as guidelines, IAEA and EC reports etc, was mapped into the influence net structure (the total list on used sources are in the report). The result is presented in the form of questions (Q) and a

  20. Safety Justification of Software Systems. Software Based Safety Systems. Regulatory Inspection Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahll, Gustav (OECD Halden Project, Halden (NO)); Liwaang, Bo (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); Wainwright, Norman (Wainwright Safety Advice (GB))

    2006-07-01

    The introduction of new software based technology in the safety systems in nuclear power plants also makes it necessary to develop new strategies for regulatory review and assessment of these new systems that is more focused on reviewing the processes at the different phases in design phases during the system life cycle. It is a general requirement that the licensee shall perform different kinds of reviews. From a regulatory point of view it is more cost effective to assess that the design activities at the suppliers and the review activities within the development project are performed with good quality. But the change from more technical reviews over to the development process oriented approach also cause problems. When reviewing development and quality aspects there are no 'hard facts' that can be judged against some specified criteria, the issues are more 'soft' and are more to build up structure of arguments and evidences that the requirements are met. The regulatory review strategy must therefore change to follow the development process over the whole life cycle from concept phase until installation and operation. Even if we know what factors that is of interest we need some guidance on how to interpret and judge the information.For that purpose SKl started research activities in this area at the end of the 1990s. In the first phase, in co-operation with Gustav Dahll at the Halden project, a life cycle model was selected. For the different phases a qualitative influence net was constructed of the type that is used in Bayesian Believe Network together with a discussion on different issues involved. In the second phase of the research work, in co-operation with Norman Wainwright, a former NII inspector, information from a selection of the most important sources as guidelines, IAEA and EC reports etc, was mapped into the influence net structure (the total list on used sources are in the report). The result is presented in the form of

  1. Coherent Structures and Entropy in Constrained, Modulationally Unstable, Nonintegrable Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, Benno; Newell, Alan C.

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have shown that nonintegrable systems with modulational instabilities constrained by more than one conservation law exhibit universal long time behavior involving large coherent structures in a sea of small fluctuations. We show how this behavior can be explained in detail by simple thermodynamic arguments

  2. A review of module inverter topologies suitable for photovoltaic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Variath, Reshmi C; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Nielsen, Ole Neis

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates eight module inverter topologies and provides an overview of the merits and demerits of each on the basis of circuit level Pspice simulation. The complete system is modeled in Pspice and the model is made as realistic as possible by including the parasitic elements. Only...

  3. Development of ultracapacitor modules for 42-V automotive electrical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Do Yang; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Sun Wook; Lee, Suck-Hyun

    Two types of ultracapacitor modules have been developed for use as energy-storage devices for 42-V systems in automobiles. The modules show high performance and good reliability in terms of discharge and recharge capability, long-term endurance, and high energy and power. During a 42-V system simulation test of 6-kW power boosting/regenerative braking, the modules demonstrate very good performance. In high-power applications such as 42-V and hybrid vehicle systems, ultracapacitors have many merits compared with batteries, especially with respect to specific power at high rate, thermal stability, charge-discharge efficiency, and cycle-life. Ultracapacitors are also very safe, reliable and environmentally friendly. The cost of ultracapacitors is still high compared with batteries because of the low production scale, but is decreasing very rapidly. It is estimated that the cost of ultracapacitors will decrease to US$ 300 per 42-V module in the near future. Also, the maintenance cost of the ultracapacitor is nearly zero because of its high cycle-life. Therefore, the combined cost of the capacitor and maintenance will be lower than that of batteries in the near future. Overall, comparing performance, price and other parameters of ultracapacitors with batteries, ultracapacitors are the most likely candidate for energy-storage in 42-V systems.

  4. System on chip module configured for event-driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Kevin; Brady, Charles E.; Ashlock, Tad A.

    2017-10-17

    A system on chip (SoC) module is described herein, wherein the SoC modules comprise a processor subsystem and a hardware logic subsystem. The processor subsystem and hardware logic subsystem are in communication with one another, and transmit event messages between one another. The processor subsystem executes software actors, while the hardware logic subsystem includes hardware actors, the software actors and hardware actors conform to an event-driven architecture, such that the software actors receive and generate event messages and the hardware actors receive and generate event messages.

  5. A regulatory perspective on design and performance requirements for engineered systems in high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    For engineered systems, this paper gives an overview of some of the current activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), with the intent of elucidating how the regulatory process works in the management of high-level waste (HLW). Throughout the waste management cycle, starting with packaging and transportation, and continuing to final closure of a repository, these activities are directed at taking advantage of the prelicensing consultation period, a period in which the NRC, DOE and others can interact in ways that will reduce regulatory, technical and institutional uncertainties, and open the path to development and construction of a deep geologic repository for permanent disposal of HLW. Needed interactions in the HLW program are highlighted. Examples of HLW regulatory activities are given in discussions of a multipurpose-cask concept and of current NRC work on the meaning of the term substantially complete containment

  6. Mixing chaos modulations for secure communications in OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Chatura; Leung, Henry

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a novel chaotic OFDM communication scheme is to improve the physical layer security. By secure communication we refer to physical layer security that provides low probability of detection (LPD)/low probability of intercept (LPI) transmission. A mixture of chaotic modulation schemes is used to generate chaotically modulated symbols for each subcarrier of the OFDM transmitter. At the receiver, different demodulators are combined together for the different modulation schemes for enhanced security. Time domain, frequency domain and statistical randomness tests show that transmit signals are indistinguishable from background noise. BER performance comparison shows that the physical layer security of the proposed scheme comes with a slight performance degradation compared to conventional OFDM communication systems.

  7. A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2008-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) is building a new long-range (to 2050) forecasting model for use in budgetary and management applications called the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS), which explicitly incorporates uncertainty through its development within the Analytica(R) platform of Lumina Decision Systems. SEDS is designed to be a fast running (a few minutes), user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual programming interface. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is responsible for implementing the SEDS Buildings Module. The initial Lite version of the module is complete and integrated with a shared code library for modeling demand-side technology choice developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lumina. The module covers both commercial and residential buildings at the U.S. national level using an econometric forecast of floorspace requirement and a model of building stock turnover as the basis for forecasting overall demand for building services. Although the module is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies, it differs from standard energy forecasting models by including considerations of passive building systems, interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains), and on-site power generation.

  8. An Integrated Simulation Module for Cyber-Physical Automation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ferracuti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The integration of Wireless Sensors Networks (WSNs into Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs is an important research problem to solve in order to increase the performances, safety, reliability and usability of wireless automation systems. Due to the complexity of real CPSs, emulators and simulators are often used to replace the real control devices and physical connections during the development stage. The most widespread simulators are free, open source, expandable, flexible and fully integrated into mathematical modeling tools; however, the connection at a physical level and the direct interaction with the real process via the WSN are only marginally tackled; moreover, the simulated wireless sensor motes are not able to generate the analogue output typically required for control purposes. A new simulation module for the control of a wireless cyber-physical system is proposed in this paper. The module integrates the COntiki OS JAva Simulator (COOJA, a cross-level wireless sensor network simulator, and the LabVIEW system design software from National Instruments. The proposed software module has been called “GILOO” (Graphical Integration of Labview and cOOja. It allows one to develop and to debug control strategies over the WSN both using virtual or real hardware modules, such as the National Instruments Real-Time Module platform, the CompactRio, the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA, etc. To test the proposed solution, we decided to integrate it with one of the most popular simulators, i.e., the Contiki OS, and wireless motes, i.e., the Sky mote. As a further contribution, the Contiki Sky DAC driver and a new “Advanced Sky GUI” have been proposed and tested in the COOJA Simulator in order to provide the possibility to develop control over the WSN. To test the performances of the proposed GILOO software module, several experimental tests have been made, and interesting preliminary results are reported. The GILOO module has been

  9. An Integrated Simulation Module for Cyber-Physical Automation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracuti, Francesco; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Prist, Mariorosario

    2016-05-05

    The integration of Wireless Sensors Networks (WSNs) into Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) is an important research problem to solve in order to increase the performances, safety, reliability and usability of wireless automation systems. Due to the complexity of real CPSs, emulators and simulators are often used to replace the real control devices and physical connections during the development stage. The most widespread simulators are free, open source, expandable, flexible and fully integrated into mathematical modeling tools; however, the connection at a physical level and the direct interaction with the real process via the WSN are only marginally tackled; moreover, the simulated wireless sensor motes are not able to generate the analogue output typically required for control purposes. A new simulation module for the control of a wireless cyber-physical system is proposed in this paper. The module integrates the COntiki OS JAva Simulator (COOJA), a cross-level wireless sensor network simulator, and the LabVIEW system design software from National Instruments. The proposed software module has been called "GILOO" (Graphical Integration of Labview and cOOja). It allows one to develop and to debug control strategies over the WSN both using virtual or real hardware modules, such as the National Instruments Real-Time Module platform, the CompactRio, the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), etc. To test the proposed solution, we decided to integrate it with one of the most popular simulators, i.e., the Contiki OS, and wireless motes, i.e., the Sky mote. As a further contribution, the Contiki Sky DAC driver and a new "Advanced Sky GUI" have been proposed and tested in the COOJA Simulator in order to provide the possibility to develop control over the WSN. To test the performances of the proposed GILOO software module, several experimental tests have been made, and interesting preliminary results are reported. The GILOO module has been applied to a smart home

  10. The development of regulatory expectations for computer-based safety systems for the UK nuclear programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P. J. [HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate Marine Engineering Submarines Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator Serco Assurance Redgrave Court, Merton Road, Bootle L20 7HS (United Kingdom); Westwood, R.N; Mark, R. T. [FLEET HQ, Leach Building, Whale Island, Portsmouth, PO2 8BY (United Kingdom); Tapping, K. [Serco Assurance,Thomson House, Risley, Warrington, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the UK's Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has completed a review of their Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) for Nuclear Installations recently. During the period of the SAPs review in 2004-2005 the designers of future UK naval reactor plant were optioneering the control and protection systems that might be implemented. Because there was insufficient regulatory guidance available in the naval sector to support this activity the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator (DNSR) invited the NII to collaborate with the production of a guidance document that provides clarity of regulatory expectations for the production of safety cases for computer based safety systems. A key part of producing regulatory expectations was identifying the relevant extant standards and sector guidance that reflect good practice. The three principal sources of such good practice were: IAEA Safety Guide NS-G-1.1 (Software for Computer Based Systems Important to Safety in Nuclear Power Plants), European Commission consensus document (Common Position of European Nuclear Regulators for the Licensing of Safety Critical Software for Nuclear Reactors) and IEC nuclear sector standards such as IEC60880. A common understanding has been achieved between the NII and DNSR and regulatory guidance developed which will be used by both NII and DNSR in the assessment of computer-based safety systems and in the further development of more detailed joint technical assessment guidance for both regulatory organisations. (authors)

  11. Unsolved problems in applying U.S. regulatory guides to control system equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stade, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Two current problems encountered when designing control systems to the United States Regulatory Guide requirements are discussed. They are: 1) Level of surge voltages that should be specified when procuring solid state control and instrumentation systems and equipment. 2) The approach to be used qualifying equipment that must meet the aging requirements. (author)

  12. Integrated systems and modules for engine cooling and vehicle air-conditioning; Integrierte Systeme und Module zur Motorkuehlung und Innenraumklimatisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, M.; Kern, J.; Kampf, H. [Behr GmbH (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    The high level of function and quality achieved today in modern vehicles cannot be simply increased by the isolated development of advanced single components alone. By contrast, the holistic optimization of systems opens up new potential. Modern cooling modules and integrated HVAC systems by Behr GmbH and Co. combine several components to form a single compact module whose integrated parts are perfectly matched to each other. Developing complete cockpits at such a high level of integration is another step towards advancing the system concept. Understanding a holistic system allows engineers to develop concepts for an efficient thermal management in the cooling system and to improve ecological compatibility of the vehicle air-conditioning system by using suitable simulation tools. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die gesamtheitliche Optimierung von Systemen eroeffnet neue Potentiale in der Automobilentwicklung. Moderne Kuehlmodule und integrierte Heiz-/Klimageraete der Behr GmbH and Co. fassen zahlreiche Komponenten zu einem kompakten Modul zusammen, dessen Einzelteile aufeinander abgestimmt sind. Die Entwicklung vollstaendiger Cockpits mit einem hohen Integrationsgrad fuehrt den Systemgedanken konsequent weiter. Das Verstaendnis des gesamten Systems erlaubt im Verbund mit geeigneten Simulationswerkzeugen die Entwicklung von Konzepten fuer ein effizientes Thermomanagement im Kuehlsystem und fuer die Verbesserung der Umweltvertraeglichkeit der Kaelteanlage. (orig.)

  13. Regulatory Coordination between Two Major Intracellular Homeostatic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah Nathaniel; Mandell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    whether there are interactions between these homeostatic systems, one universally operational in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and the other one (autophagy) is limited to eukaryotes. We found that heat shock response regulates autophagy. The interaction between the two systems was demonstrated......The eukaryotic cell depends on multitiered homeostatic systems ensuring maintenance of proteostasis, organellar integrity, function and turnover, and overall cellular viability. At the two opposite ends of the homeostatic system spectrum are heat shock response and autophagy. Here, we tested...... of the homeostatic systems in the eukaryotic cell....

  14. Transportation of radioactive materials: legislative and regulatory information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.; Heiskell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    The transportation of radioactive materials, as well as hazardous materials in general, has been an issue of ever-increasing concern and an object of numerous regulations and legislative actions worldwide. The Transportation Technology Center of the US Department of Energy's Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is currently involved in developing a national program to assure the safe shipment of radioactive materials. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this overall effort is being supported in a specialized manner. As part of the Logistics Modeling program at ORNL, the Ecological Sciences Information Center has developed comprehensive data bases containing legislative and regulatory actions relevant to the transportation of hazardous materials. The data bases are separated according to status level of the legislation. The Current Legislation Data Base includes all new legislative actions introduced during the present year (1980) or those bills carried over from the previous year's sessions. The second data file, Historical Legislation Data Base, consists of all legislative actions since 1976 that have passed and become public laws, as well as those actions that were unsuccessful and were classified as denied by law. Currently the data bases include state-, local-, and federal, level legislation, with emphasis on the transportation of radioactive materials. Because of their relevance to the transportation issues, actions involving related subject areas such as, disposal and storage of radioactive wastes, moratoriums on power plant construction, and remedial actions studies, special agencies to regulate shipment of radioactive materials, and requirements of advanced notification, permits and escorts are also included in the data bases

  15. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  16. Sharing regulatory data as tools for strengthening health systems in the Region of the Americas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varley Dias Sousa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Regulatory transparency is an imperative characteristic of a reliable National Regulatory Authority. In the region of the Americas, the process of building an open government is still fragile and fragmented across various Health Regulatory Agencies (HRAs and Regional Reference Authorities (RRAs. This study assessed the transparency status of RRAs, focusing on various medicine life-cycle documents (the Medicine Dossier, Clinical Trial Report, and Inspection Report as tools for strengthening health systems. Based on a narrative (nonsystematic review of RRA regulatory transparency, transparency status was classified as one of two types: public disclosure of information (intra-agency data and data- and work-sharing (inter-agency data. The risks/benefits of public disclosure of medicine-related information were assessed, taking into account 1 the involvement and roles of multiple stakeholders (health care professionals, regulators, industry, community, and academics and 2 the protection of commercial and personal confidential data. Inter-agency data- and work-sharing was evaluated in the context of harmonization and cooperation projects that focus on regulatory convergence. Technical and practical steps for establishing an openness directive for the pharmaceutical regulatory environment are proposed to improve and strengthen health systems in the Americas. Addressing these challenges requires leadership from entities such as the Pan American Health Organization to steer and support collaborative regional alliances that advance the development and establishment of a trustworthy regulatory environment and a sustainable public health system in the Americas, using international successful initiatives as reference and taking into account the domestic characteristics and experiences of each individual country.

  17. Sharing regulatory data as tools for strengthening health systems in the Region of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Varley Dias; Ramalho, Pedro I; Silveira, Dâmaris

    2016-05-01

    Regulatory transparency is an imperative characteristic of a reliable National Regulatory Authority. In the region of the Americas, the process of building an open government is still fragile and fragmented across various Health Regulatory Agencies (HRAs) and Regional Reference Authorities (RRAs). This study assessed the transparency status of RRAs, focusing on various medicine life-cycle documents (the Medicine Dossier, Clinical Trial Report, and Inspection Report) as tools for strengthening health systems. Based on a narrative (nonsystematic) review of RRA regulatory transparency, transparency status was classified as one of two types: public disclosure of information (intra-agency data) and data- and work-sharing (inter-agency data). The risks/benefits of public disclosure of medicine-related information were assessed, taking into account 1) the involvement and roles of multiple stakeholders (health care professionals, regulators, industry, community, and academics) and 2) the protection of commercial and personal confidential data. Inter-agency data- and work-sharing was evaluated in the context of harmonization and cooperation projects that focus on regulatory convergence. Technical and practical steps for establishing an openness directive for the pharmaceutical regulatory environment are proposed to improve and strengthen health systems in the Americas. Addressing these challenges requires leadership from entities such as the Pan American Health Organization to steer and support collaborative regional alliances that advance the development and establishment of a trustworthy regulatory environment and a sustainable public health system in the Americas, using international successful initiatives as reference and taking into account the domestic characteristics and experiences of each individual country.

  18. AEC Regulatory view of the reliability of air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities can be divided into three categories: ventilation exhaust systems, containment atmosphere cleanup systems, and process offgas systems. These systems have been the subject of numerous reports, regulatory guides, discussions, and meetings. Some of the analyses have been critical of the operation and design of these air cleaning systems--in particular, the engineered safety features containment atmosphere cleanup systems. Although for the most part the criticism is applicable, and recognizing that there are a number of unresolved issues pertaining to gaseous waste management systems, there are data to show that air cleaning systems in use in nuclear facilities are performing their intended function. (U.S.)

  19. Study of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Appellate System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickwit, L.; Malsch, M.; Ostrach, S.; Christenson, K.

    1979-12-01

    At the Chairman's request the Office of the General Counsel studied the Commission's appellate system. The study included examination of the development of the study, analysis of the current workload, investigation of the practices of other agencies, and consideration of alternatives to the present system. The study recommends retention of the present system with some limited modifications to enable the Commission to more effectively use its existing appellate powers

  20. The global regulatory system Csr senses glucose through the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-02-01

    A novel connection between two regulatory systems controlling crucial biological processes in bacteria, the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system and the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS), is reported by Leng et al. in this issue. This involves the interaction of unphosphorylated EIIA(Glc), a component of the glucose-specific PTS, with the CsrD protein, which accelerates the decay of the CsrB and CsrC small RNAs via RNase E in Escherichia coli. As unphosphorylated EIIA(G) (lc) is generated in the presence of glucose, the PTS thus acts as a sensor of glucose for the Csr system. Interestingly, another pathway can operate for communication between the Csr system and the glucose-specific PTS. The absence of glucose generates phosphorylated EIIA(Glc) , which activates the enzyme adenylate cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that, in turn, binds to the regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Leng et al. show that the complex cAMP-CRP modestly reduces CsrB decay independently of CsrD. On the other hand, a previous study indicates that the complex cAMP-CRP positively regulates the transcription of CsrB and CsrC in Salmonella enterica. Therefore, EIIA(G) (lc) could work as a molecular switch that regulates the activity of the Csr system, in response to its phosphorylation state determined by the presence or absence of glucose, in order to control gene expression. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Study on Design of Control Module and Fuzzy Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Kyu; Sohn, Chang Ho; Kim, Jung Seon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Performance of control unit is improved by introduction of fuzzy control theory and compensation for input of control unit as FLC(Fuzzy Logic Controller). Here, FLC drives thermal control system by linguistic rule-base. Hence, In case of using compensative PID control unit, it doesn't need to revise or compensate for PID control unit. Consequently, this study shows proof that control system which implements H/W module and then uses fuzzy algorism in this system is stable and has reliable performance

  2. On modulated complex non-linear dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, G.M.; Mohamed, A.A.; Rauh, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an approximate analytical method to investigate periodic solutions and their stability in the case of modulated non-linear dynamical systems whose equation of motion is describe. Such differential equations appear, for example, in problems of colliding particle beams in high-energy accelerators or one-mass systems with two or more degrees of freedom, e.g. rotors. The significance of periodic solutions lies on the fact that all non-periodic responses, if convergent, would approach to periodic solutions at the steady-state conditions. The example shows a good agreement between numerical and analytical results for small values of ε. The effect of the periodic modulation on the stability of the 2π-periodic solutions is discussed

  3. Intensity position modulation for free-space laser communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangjoo, Alireza; Faghihi, F.

    2004-12-01

    In this research a novel modulation technique for free-space laser communication system called Intensity Position Modulation (IPM) is carried out. According to TEM00 mode of a laser beam and by linear fitting on the Gaussian function as an approximation, the variation of linear part on the reverse biased pn photodiode produced alternating currents which contain the information. Here, no characteristic property of the beam as intensity or frequency is changed and only the beam position moves laterally. We demonstrated that in this method no bandwidth is required, so it is possible to reduce the background radiation noise by narrowband filtering of the carrier. The fidelity of the analog voice communication system which is made upon the IPM is satisfactory and we are able to transmit the audio signals up to 1Km.

  4. Modulation of the mirror system by social relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, James M; Marchant, Jennifer L; Frith, Chris D

    2006-09-01

    When we observe the actions of others, certain areas of the brain are activated in a similar manner as to when we perform the same actions ourselves. This 'mirror system' includes areas in the ventral premotor cortex and the inferior parietal lobule. Experimental studies suggest that action observation automatically elicits activity in the observer, which precisely mirrors the activity observed. In this case we would expect this activity to be independent of observer's viewpoint. Here we use whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record cortical activity of human subjects whilst they watched a series of videos of an actor making a movement recorded from different viewpoints. We show that one cortical response to action observation (oscillatory activity in the 7-12 Hz frequency range) is modulated by the relationship between the observer and the actor. We suggest that this modulation reflects a mechanism that filters information into the 'mirror system', allowing only socially relevant information to pass.

  5. Deliberations on nuclear safety regulatory system in a changing industrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear safety concern, which may accompany such external environmental factors as privatization and restructuring of the electric power industry, is emerging as an international issue. In order to cope with the concern about nuclear safety, it is important to feedback valuable experiences of advanced countries that restructured their electric power industries earlier and further to reflect the current safety issues, which are raised internationally, fully into the nuclear safety regulatory system. This paper is to review the safety issues that might take place in the process of increasing competition in the nuclear power industry, and further to present a basic direction and effective measures for ensuring nuclear safety in response thereto from the viewpoint of safety regulation. It includes a political direction for a regulatory body's efforts to rationalize and enforce efficiently its regulation. It proposes to ensure that regulatory specialty and regulatory cost are stably secured. Also, this paper proposes maintaining a sound nuclear safety regulatory system to monitor thoroughly the safety management activities of the industry, which might be neglected as a result of focusing on reduction of the cost for producing electric power. (author)

  6. The regulatory system of nuclear safety in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    This article explains what type of mechanism the nuclear system has and how nuclear safety is regulated in Russia. There are two main organizations in this system : ROSATOM and ROSTEKHADZOR. ROSATOM, which was founded in 2007, incorporates all the nuclear industries in Russia, including civil nuclear companies as well as nuclear weapons complex facilities. ROSTEKHNADZOR is the federal body that secures and supervises the safety in using atomic energy. This article also reviews three laws on regulating nuclear safety. (author)

  7. International Nuclear Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Korea's Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety experts concluded today a two-week mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear safety in the Republic of Korea. The team identified good practices and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of Korea, while the final report will be submitted by the end of summer 2011. At the request of the Korean Government, the IAEA assembled a team of 16 senior regulatory experts from 14 nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission involving the Korean Ministry for Education, Science and Technology (MEST) and the Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety (KINS). The mission is a peer-review based on the IAEA Safety Standards. ''This was the first IRRS mission organized after Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident and it included a review of the regulatory implications of that event,' explains Denis Flory, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. William Borchardt, Executive Director of Operations from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Team Leader of this mission commended the Korean authorities for their openness and commitment to sharing their experience with the world's nuclear safety community. ''IRRS missions such as the one that was just concluded here in the Republic of Korea are crucial to the enhancement of nuclear safety worldwide,'' he said. The IRRS team reviewed Korea's current regulatory framework while acknowledging the fact that the country's Government has already decided to establish, as of October 2011, a new independent regulatory body to be called Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC). As a consequence, KINS role will be as a regulatory expert organization reporting to the NSC, while MEST's role will be restricted to promoting the utilization of nuclear energy. The IRRS team identified particular strengths in the Korean regulatory system

  8. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 3: The Legislative and Regulatory Processes. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The third of a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration, this module offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act to novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel. It teaches the administrator to…

  9. Objective of the regulatory system for the physical protection of facilities and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polo, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    During the work that is developed in our country in order to have a regulatory system, recommendation on the issue have been considered. Such recommendation are gathered in the informative regulation 225 rev, 3 of the IAEA and the requirements are collected in the Informative Regulation 274 rev 1 of the IAEA, as well as the good national and international practices

  10. Organic Coasts? Regulatory Challenges of Certifying Integrated Shrimp-Mangrove Production Systems in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tran Thi Thu; Bush, Simon R.; Mol, Arthur P. J.; van Dijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    The Vietnamese government aims to expand the scale of Naturland certified organic production in integrated shrimp-mangrove farming systems across the coast of Ca Mau province by 2015. In doing so the division between public and private regulation has become blurred. We analyze the government's goal by examining the regulatory challenges of using…

  11. Legitimacy challenges of intermediary gatekeeping in the Chinese internet regulatory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Lulu

    2018-01-01

    Legitimacy Challenges of Intermediary Gatekeeping in the Chinese Internet Regulatory System In the Chinese legal and political framework, in order for the government to maintain control over information posted on social media platforms, commercial internet intermediaries are assigned the role of

  12. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Australia -- The challenges of a federal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.; Colgan, P.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the challenges that Australia is facing, as a federal nation having a Commonwealth Government and six States and two territories, in establishing appropriate regulatory control of radiation sources. Information on the national inventory of radiation sources and existing regulatory infrastructure, including the system of notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement, is explained in the report. The national provisions for the management of disused sources; the planning, preparedness and response to abnormal events and emergencies; the recovery of control over orphan sources; and education and training; are specifically emphasized. (author)

  13. Information system of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, G.

    1982-09-01

    On the basis of legal regulations the U.S. NRC maintain a far-reaching information system by means of which their documents are easily made available to the interested public. The essential parts of the information system are - the central Public Document Room in Washington, D.C., - the National Technical Information Center in the Department of Commerce, - the co-operation with the Government Printing Office, - the Nuclear Safety Information Center in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and - the National Energy Software Center in the Argonne National Laboratory. Via these facilities the NRC provide all interested institutions with information on the activities in connection with their statutory tasks. Accordingly numerous documents concerning of approval and monitoring of nuclear facilities as well as the use, transport and storage of fissionable material, are granted for perusion. (orig.) [de

  14. The Regulatory Review Process in South Africa: Challenges and Opportunities for a New Improved System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyter, Andrea; Gouws, Joey; Salek, Sam; Walker, Stuart

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the regulatory review process in South Africa from 2015 to 2017, identify the key milestones and timelines; evaluate the effectiveness of measures to ensure consistency, transparency, timeliness, and predictability in the review process; and to provide recommendations for enhanced regulatory practices. A questionnaire was completed by the Medicines Control Council (MCC) to describe the organization of the authority, record key milestones and timelines in the review process and to identify good review practices (GRevPs). Currently, the MCC conducts a full assessment of quality, efficacy, and safety data in the review of all applications. The overall regulatory median approval time decreased by 14% in 2017 (1411 calendar days) compared with that of 2016, despite the 27% increase in the number of applications. However, the MCC has no target for overall approval time of new active substance applications and no targets for key review milestones. Guidelines, standard operating procedures, and review templates are in place, while the formal implementation of GRevPs and the application of an electronic document management system are planned for the near future. As the MCC transitions to the newly established South Africa Health Products Regulatory Authority, it would be crucial for the authority to recognize the opportunities for an enhanced regulatory review and should consider models such as abridged assessment, which encompass elements of risk stratification and reliance. It is hoped that resource constraints may then be alleviated and capacity developed to meet target timelines.

  15. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  16. International nuclear safety experts complete IAEA peer review of German regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An international expert team has today completed a two-week IAEA review of Germany's nuclear regulatory system. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for further improvement. The IAEA has conveyed the initial findings to German authorities but the final report will be submitted within two months. At the request of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of 14 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This is a peer review based on IAEA Standards. It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of nuclear power plants. Experts from Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Republic of Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the UK, the US and from the IAEA took part in the mission, which was conducted from 7 to 19 September in Bonn, Stuttgart and Berlin. The main basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment made by the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Ministry of Environment of the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (UM BW). 'The team members were impressed by the extensive preparation and dedication of the staff both at BMU and UM BW to excellence in nuclear safety,' said Mike Weightman, IRRS Team Leader and Chief Inspector of the UK nuclear regulatory body, the Nuclear Directorate of the Health and Safety Executive. 'We hope the IRRS mission will facilitate further improvements in the safety regulation of nuclear power in Germany and throughout the world.' 'Germany's invitation to undergo such a detailed review is a clear demonstration of its openness and commitment to continuously improve nuclear safety regulation,' said Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. Among the particular strengths of BMU and UM BW associated with their

  17. Microfluidic hubs, systems, and methods for interface fluidic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Michael S; Claudnic, Mark R; Kim, Hanyoup; Patel, Kamlesh D; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L

    2015-01-27

    Embodiments of microfluidic hubs and systems are described that may be used to connect fluidic modules. A space between surfaces may be set by fixtures described herein. In some examples a fixture may set substrate-to-substrate spacing based on a distance between registration surfaces on which the respective substrates rest. Fluidic interfaces are described, including examples where fluid conduits (e.g. capillaries) extend into the fixture to the space between surfaces. Droplets of fluid may be introduced to and/or removed from microfluidic hubs described herein, and fluid actuators may be used to move droplets within the space between surfaces. Continuous flow modules may be integrated with the hubs in some examples.

  18. Sinusoidal modulation analysis for optical system MTF measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Yu, T; Seibert, J A

    1996-12-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a commonly used metric for defining the spatial resolution characteristics of imaging systems. While the MTF is defined in terms of how an imaging system demodulates the amplitude of a sinusoidal input, this approach has not been in general use to measure MTFs in the medical imaging community because producing sinusoidal x-ray patterns is technically difficult. However, for optical systems such as charge coupled devices (CCD), which are rapidly becoming a part of many medical digital imaging systems, the direct measurement of modulation at discrete spatial frequencies using a sinusoidal test pattern is practical. A commercially available optical test pattern containing spatial frequencies ranging from 0.375 cycles/mm to 80 cycles/mm was sued to determine the MRF of a CCD-based optical system. These results were compared with the angulated slit method of Fujita [H. Fujita, D. Tsia, T. Itoh, K. Doi, J. Morishita, K. Ueda, and A. Ohtsuka, "A simple method for determining the modulation transfer function in digital radiography," IEEE Trans. Medical Imaging 11, 34-39 (1992)]. The use of a semiautomated profiled iterated reconstruction technique (PIRT) is introduced, where the shift factor between successive pixel rows (due to angulation) is optimized iteratively by least-squares error analysis rather than by hand measurement of the slit angle. PIRT was used to find the slit angle for the Fujita technique and to find the sine-pattern angle for the sine-pattern technique. Computer simulation of PIRT for the case of the slit image (a line spread function) demonstrated that it produced a more accurate angle determination than "hand" measurement, and there is a significant difference between the errors in the two techniques (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, p < 0.001). The sine-pattern method and the Fujita slit method produced comparable MTF curves for the CCD camera evaluated.

  19. Phase Modulation Method for Control Systems of Rotary Machine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sychev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, vibration-based diagnostics takes the main place in a large complex of technical control means of rotary machine operation. It allows us to control the onset of extreme limit states of operating construction and its elements. However, vibration-based diagnostics is incapable to provide differentiated information about the condition of particular units, type of fault and point of its occurrence.From the practical experience of optoelectronic sensors development, methods of phase coding information about the behavior of the investigated object are known. They allow us to overcome the abovementioned disadvantage of vibration-based diagnostics through the modulation of the reflected radiation from the object. This phase modulation is performed with the image analyzers, in which the modulating raster (alternating transparent and nontransparent sectors is designed so, that the carrier frequency of oscillations is absent (suppressed in frequency spectrum, and all useful information can be found in the side frequencies.Carrier frequency suppression appears for two complete turns of the modulating raster. Each time during this process oscillations have a 180° phase shift (hop relatively to the initial oscillation on the boundary of each turn. It leads to a substantial increase in signal/noise ratio and possibility to conduct high-accuracy diagnostics.The principle of the pseudo inversion is used for measurements to suppress an adverse effect of various factors in dynamic control system. For this principle the leaving and returned beams practically go on the same way with small spatial shift. This shift occurs then the leaving beam reflects from a basic surface and the reflected – from the measured surface of the object. Therefore the measurements become insensitive to any other errors of system, except relative position of system «model-object».The main advantages of such measurements are the following:- system steadiness to error

  20. Full system test of module to DAQ for ATLAS IBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behpour, Rouhina; Mattig, Peter; Wensing, Marius [Wuppertal University (Germany); Bindi, Marcello [Goettingen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    IBL (Insertable B Layer) as the inner most layer in the ATLAS detector at the LHC has been successfully integrated to the system last June 2014. IBL system reliability and consistency is under investigation during ongoing milestone runs at CERN. Back of Crate card (BOC) and Read out Driver (ROD) as two of the main electronic cards act as an interface between the IBL modules and the TDAQ chain. The detector data will be received and processed and then formatted by an interaction between these two electronic cards. The BOC takes advantage of using S-Link implementation inside the main FPGAs. The S-Link protocol as a standard high performance data acquisition link between the readout electronic cards and the TDAQ system is developed and used at CERN. It is based on the idea that detector formatted data will be transferred through optical fibers to the ROS (Read out System) PC for being stored via the ROBIN (Read out Buffer) cards. This talk presents the results that confirm a stable and good performance of the system, from the modules to the read out electronic cards and then to the ROS PCs via S-Link.

  1. The design and test of VME clock distribution module of the Daya Bay RPC readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Heng; Liang Hao; Zhou Yongzhao

    2011-01-01

    It describes the design of the VME Clock Distribution module of the Daya Bay RPC readout system, including the function and the hardware structure of the module and the logic design of the FPGA on the module. After the building and debugging of the module, a series of tests have been made to check its function and stability. (authors)

  2. DNA methylation affects the lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers - Evidence for a regulatory module that involves vitellogenin expression but is independent of juvenile hormone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos A M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina R; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The canonic regulatory module for lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers involves a mutual repressor relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and vitellogenin (Vg). Compared to vertebrates, however, little is known about a possible role of epigenetic factors. The full genomic repertoire of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) makes the honey bee an attractive emergent model for studying the role of epigenetics in the aging process of invertebrates, and especially so in social insects. We first quantified the transcript levels of the four DNMTs encoding genes in the head thorax and abdomens of workers of different age, showing that dnmt1a and dnmt3 expression is up-regulated in abdomens of old workers, whereas dnmt1b and dnmt2 are down-regulated in heads of old workers. Pharmacological genome demethylation by RG108 treatment caused an increase in worker lifespan. Next, we showed that the genomic DNA methylation status indirectly affects vitellogenin gene expression both in vitro and in vivo in young workers, and that this occurs independent of caloric restriction or JH levels, suggesting that a non-canonical circuitry may be acting in parallel with the JH/Vg module to regulate the adult life cycle of honey bee workers. Our data provide evidence that epigenetic factors play a role in regulatory networks associated with complex life history traits of a social insect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exhaust, Dust Collection and Ventilation Systems. Module SH-44. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on exhaust, dust collection, and ventilation systems is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module discusses the types of contaminants that can be controlled by ventilation, the types of ventilation systems, and the component parts of local exhaust systems. Following the introduction, 10 objectives…

  4. Development of regulatory guidance for risk-informing digital system reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Policy Statement, which encourages the increased use of PRA and associated analyses in all regulatory matters to the extent supported by the state-of-the-art in PRA and the data. This policy applies, in part, to the review of digital systems, which offer the potential to improve plant safety and reliability through such features as increased hardware reliability and stability and improved failure detection capability. However, there are presently no universally accepted methods for modeling digital systems in current-generation PRAs. Further, there are ongoing debates among the PRA technical community regarding the level of detail that any digital system reliability model must have to adequately model the complex system interactions that can contribute to digital system failure modes. Moreover, for PRA modeling of digital reactor protection and control systems, direct interactions between system components and indirect interactions through controlled/supervised plant processes may necessitate the use of dynamic PRA methodologies. This situation has led the NRC to consider developing performance based rather than prescriptive regulatory guidance in this area. This paper will discuss the development of this guidance and some preliminary concepts. (authors)

  5. Description of Multimedia Environment Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) version 3.2 modification for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, J.W.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.

    1997-11-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to allow DOE to conduct human health risk analyses nation-wide. This report describes modifications to the MEPAS to meet the requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in their analyses of Site Decommissioning Management Plan sites. In general, these modifications provide the MEPAS, Version 3.2, with the capability of calculating and reporting annual dose/risk information. Modifications were made to the exposure pathway and health impact modules and the water and atmospheric transport modules. Several example cases used to test the MEPAS, Version 3.2, are also presented. The MEPAS, Version 3.2, also contains a new source-term release component that includes models for estimating contaminant loss from three different types of source zones (contaminated aquifer, contaminated pond/surface impoundment, and contaminated vadose zone) due to decay/degradation, leaching, wind suspension, water erosion, overland flow, and/or volatilization. When multiple loss routes are assumed to occur simultaneously, the models account for their interaction and calculate an appropriate pollutant mass budget to each loss route over time

  6. Recent Status of Indonesian Nuclear Regulatory System Development in Responding the Results of IRRS Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramono, Y.

    2016-01-01

    BAPETEN as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia faces challenges in performing its tasks for assuring the safety, security, and safeguards in nuclear energy utilization through the regulatory system. Based on the recent IRRS mission to Indonesia, hosted by BAPETEN, several recommendations and suggestions shall require special attention to provide strategic action plans in following them up. Some of the recommendations include the necessity of the Government to develop and document a national policy and strategy for safety, to provide BAPETEN with human and financial resources to ensure adequate discharge of its statutory regulatory obligations, to ensure that prime responsibility of safety is assigned to the person or organization responsible for a facility or an activity through the legal framework, to ensure appropriate coordination and liaison between BAPETEN and other relevant authorities in the areas of medical application of radiation and transport of radioactive material. The suggestions cover, among others, the need of having a graded approach policy in implementing all regulatory functions, clarifying the responsibility of the individual reporting on the performance of the management system to senior management, establishing procedures for assessing the safety and appropriateness of the working environment and enhancing the implementation of self-assessments by including safety culture aspects. As part of the action plans, BAPETEN is currently drafting the national policy and strategy on nuclear and radiation safety. Furthermore, BAPETEN is revising the existing act on nuclear energy in order to assign the prime responsibility of safety to be borne by the licensees, to ensure the adequacy of its human and financial resources, and to provide clearer distinction of responsibilities between BAPETEN and other relevant authorities in the areas of medical application of radiation and transport of radioactive material. To counter the issue on

  7. Systemic Approach to Safety from a Regulatory Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edland, A.

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden and especially in the Swedish oversight of nuclear power plants there has been a strong commitment to the interactions between Man-Technology-Organization (MTO) for many years. Safety issues and the importance of working with these issues have often been highlighted in specific oversight actions. Since 30 years there has been a tradition and a development of experience in Sweden taking a systemic MTO approach to safety. Inspection teams have been created with both psychologists and technical expertise in order to cover the whole MTO perspective during oversight inspections at the nuclear power plants. Safety is based on preventive actions where both technology and human behaviour are taken into account. To do this, it is important to have knowledge about the different factors that influence the performance of individuals, groups and organizations. However, it is also important to remember to not only discuss humans, management and organizations in terms of their limitations, errors and shortcomings but also in terms of their strengths in stopping a chain of events, in learning, inventing and improving. Having an integrated view of safety, focussing on the relations between human, technology and organization (MTO) refers to a systemic perspective on how radiation safety are affected by the relationship between: Human’s abilities and limitations; Technical equipment and the surrounding environment; The organization and the opportunities this provides. The Section of Man-Technology-Organization in the Swedish authority consist today of 12 Human factors specialists with behaviour science education. The section is responsible for the oversight at nuclear power plants in many areas; safety management, leadership and organization, safety culture, competence assurance, fitness for duty, suitability, education and staffing, knowledge management, working conditions, MTO perspective/ergonomics of control room work and plant modification, incident analysis and risk

  8. The phenotypic and molecular assessment of the non-conserved Arabidopsis MICRORNA163/S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE regulatory module during biotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litholdo, Celso Gaspar; Eamens, Andrew Leigh; Waterhouse, Peter Michael

    2018-04-01

    In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) have evolved in parallel to the protein-coding genes that they target for expression regulation, and miRNA-directed gene expression regulation is central to almost every cellular process. MicroRNA, miR163, is unique to the Arabidopsis genus and is processed into a 24-nucleotide (nt) mature small regulatory RNA (sRNA) from a single precursor transcript transcribed from a single locus, the MIR163 gene. The MIR163 locus is a result of a recent inverted duplication event of one of the five closely related S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE genes that the mature miR163 sRNA targets for expression regulation. Currently, however, little is known about the role of the miR163/S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE regulatory module in response to biotic stress. Here, we document the expression domains of MIR163 and the S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE target genes following fusion of their putative promoter sequences to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and subsequent in planta expression. Further, we report on our phenotypic and molecular assessment of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with altered miR163 accumulation, namely the mir163-1 and mir163-2 insertion knockout mutants and the miR163 overexpression line, the MIR163-OE plant. Finally, we reveal miR163 accumulation and S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE target gene expression post treatment with the defence elicitors, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, and following Fusarium oxysporum infection, wounding, and herbivory attack. Together, the work presented here provides a comprehensive new biological insight into the role played by the Arabidopsis genus-specific miR163/S-ADENOSYL-METHYLTRANSFERASE regulatory module in normal A. thaliana development and during the exposure of A. thaliana plants to biotic stress.

  9. Characterization of modulated integrate-and-fire systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alstroem, P.; Christiansen, B.; Levinsen, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The phase locking structure in threshold modulated integrate-and-fire systems is explored. The existence of a smooth critical line where the Poincare map has an infinite slope inflection point is emphasized. At and below this line the system is related to circle map systems. Especially, this allows realization of systems with higher order scaling structures, qualitatively distinct from ordinary third order circle map structures. Hourglass patterns develop in parameter space and at small modulation amplitudes the behavior of the phase-locking regions (Arnold tongues) change dramatically. Above the critical line the Arnold tongues complete the parameter space, leaving along any line a zero-dimensional Cantor set of points associated with irrational rotation numbers. The critical line is not associated with a transition to chaos. In particular non-chaotic regions with complete phase-locking exist. In the supercritical region a gap is present in the Poincare map. The features at this gap are examined. Also local hysteresis may occur. We discuss the applicability of the local approximation. (orig.)

  10. Module-based quality system functionality evaluation in production logistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabbazi, M.R.; Wikander, J.; Onori, M.; Maffei, A.; Chen, D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses a comprehensive modeling and functionality evaluation of a module-based quality system in production logistics at the highest domain abstract level of business processes. All domain quality business processes and quality data transactions are modeled using BPMN and UML tools and standards at the business process and data modeling. A modular web-based prototype is developed to evaluate the models addressing the quality information system functionality requirements and modularity in production logistics through data scenarios and data queries. Using the object-oriented technique in design at the highest domain level, the proposed models are subject further development in the lower levels for the implementing case. The models are specifically able to manipulate all quality operations including remedy and control in a lot-based make-to-order production logistics system as an individual module. Due to the specification of system as domain design structure, all proposed BPMs, data models, and the actual database prototype are seen referential if not a solution as a practical “to-be” quality business process re-engineering template. This paper sets out to provide an explanatory approach using different practical technique at modeling steps as well as the prototype implementation. (Author)

  11. The design of automatic software testing module for civil aviation information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qi; Sun, Yang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the practical innovation design is carried out according to the urgent needs of the automatic testing module of civil aviation information system. Firstly, the background and significance of the automatic testing module of civil aviation information system is expounded, and the current research status of automatic testing module and the advantages and disadvantages of related software are analyzed. Then, from the three aspects of macro demand, module functional requirement and module nonfunctional demand, we further study the needs of automatic testing module of civil aviation information system. Finally, from the four aspects of module structure, module core function, database and security, we have made an innovative plan for the automatic testing module of civil aviation information system.

  12. Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    Distributed Solar PV systems have the potential of increasing the grid's resiliency to unforeseen events, such as extreme weather events and attacks. This paper presents the role that distributed PV can play in electric grid resiliency, introduces basic system design requirements and options, and discusses the regulatory and policy options for supporting the use of distributed PV for the purpose of increased electricity resiliency.

  13. Regulatory use the classification security systems of I and C in VVER type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilizastegui Perez, F.

    1998-01-01

    Presently work the author proposes a classification to the system I and C to the VVER 440 type reactor in categories the regulatory control with a view to establishing the degree to the attention that the regulator should pay to these systems, leaving the importance that have the same ones for the security the installation, during the execution the works that are carried out with this equipment in the stages construction, setting in service and exploitation

  14. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Zhang, Ru [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); School of Ethnic Minority Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Chuan, E-mail: wangchuan@bupt.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  15. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  16. Phase transitions in spin systems with modulated order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho Filho, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Spin systems which may display modulated structures are treated. A layered Ising model with competing interactions between nearest and next-nearest layers in the presence of a magnetic field is studied. In the context of a mean-field approximation, the high-temperature region of the phase diagram is studied analytically. The Λ surface, separating the paramagnetic and the modulated phases, is bounded by two lines of tricritical points which join smoothly at the Lifshitz point and terminate at multicritical points, beyond which lines of critical and double critical end points are expected to appear. The low-temperature region is studied numerically. T-H phase diagrams, which exhibit a variety of modulated phases, for various values of the ratio of the strength of the competing interactions are constructed. A theoretical interpretation for the occurrence of a Lifshitz point in the field-temperature phase diagram of MnP is presented. These results, which are based on a X-Y localized spin Hamiltonian, are in qualitative agreement with recently reported experiments. In particular, asymptotic expressions are obtained for the phase boundaries, which meet tangentially at the Lifshitz point, and for some other thermodynamic quantities of interest, such as the longitudinal and transverse susceptibilities. (Author) [pt

  17. The regulatory function of self-esteem: testing the epistemic and acceptance signaling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Danu Anthony; Logel, Christine; Holmes, John G; Wood, Joanne V; Forest, Amanda L; Gaucher, Danielle; Fitzsimons, Grainné M; Kath, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    The authors draw on sociometer theory (e.g., Leary, 2004) and self-verification theory (e.g., Swann, 1997) to propose an expanded model of the regulatory function of self-esteem. The model suggests that people not only possess an acceptance signaling system that indicates whether relational value is high or low but also possess an epistemic signaling system that indicates whether social feedback is consistent or inconsistent with chronic perceived relational value (i.e., global self-esteem). One correlational study and 5 experiments, with diverse operationalizations of social feedback, demonstrated that the epistemic signaling system responds to self-esteem consistent or inconsistent relational-value feedback with increases or deceases in epistemic certainty. Moreover, Studies 3-6 demonstrated that the acceptance and epistemic signaling systems respond uniquely to social feedback. Finally, Studies 5 and 6 provide evidence that the epistemic signaling system is part of a broader self-regulatory system: Self-esteem inconsistent feedback caused cognitive efforts to decrease the discrepancy between self-views and feedback and caused depleted self-regulatory capacity on a subsequent self-control task. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Development of 30-pin connectors for electronic modules of C and I systems for NPP's confirming to customized MIL STD-1344 requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marathe, P.P.; Madala, Kalyan C.; Ramakrishna, P.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical connectors form an important constituent of C and I system where customized circuits and hardware is required to be configured meeting the Nuclear Power Plant regulatory requirements. C and I hardware has to handle multiple hundreds of I/O's and the system architectures are made in modular construction having C and I system hardware packaged in plug-in electronic modules in the required form factors. In addition if the system has to satisfy customized JSS 55555 requirements meeting stringent shock, vibration and environmental specifications, the connectors used for the electronic modules shall meet the customized MIL STD-1344 requirements and meet reliability target for the system. 30-pin type special connectors for electronic modules and 2x30 (60) pin field cabling connectors were developed meeting the required qualification specifications. (author)

  19. The NJOY nuclear data processing system: The MICROR module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, D.R.; Stepanek, J.; Pelloni, S.; Higgs, C.E.

    1984-12-01

    The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup neutron and photon cross sections and related nuclear parameters from ENDF/B-IV and V evaluated nuclear data. The MICROR overlay is a reformatting module that produces cross sections library files for the MICROX, MICROX-2 and MICROBURN postprocessor codes. Using the data on the pointwise and groupwise NJOY tapes, MICROR produces the tapes containing basic nuclear data, FDTAPE, GAR and GGTAPE used by two-region spectrum codes MICROX and MICROX-2 and by two-region spectrum burn-up code MICROBURN. (author)

  20. Network monitoring module of BES III system environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liwen; Zhao Jingwei; Zhang Bingyun

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of the complicated network architecture of BES III (Beijing Spectrometer III) and make sure normal online running in the future, it is necessary to develop a multi-platforms Network Monitoring Tool which can help system administrator monitor and manage BES III network. The author provides a module that can monitor not only the traffic of switch-router's ports but also the performance status of key devices in the network environment, meanwhile it can also give warning to manager and submit the related reports. the great sense, the theory basis, the implementing method and the graph in formation of this tool will be discussed

  1. Multicompartment Drug Release System for Dynamic Modulation of Tissue Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aaron H; Mahal, Rajwant S; Udell, Jillian; Wu, Michelle; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-10-01

    Pharmacological modulation of responses to injury is complicated by the need to deliver multiple drugs with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, a novel controlled delivery system containing three separate compartments with each releasing its contents over different timescales is fabricated. Core-shell electrospun fibers create two of the compartments in the system, while electrosprayed spheres create the third. Utility is demonstrated by targeting the foreign body response to implants because it is a dynamic process resulting in implant failure. Sequential delivery of a drug targeting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and an antifibrotic is characterized in in vitro experiments. Specifically, macrophage fusion and p65 nuclear translocation in the presence of releasate or with macrophages cultured on the surfaces of the constructs are evaluated. In addition, releasate from pirfenidone scaffolds is shown to reduce transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced pSMAD3 nuclear localization in fibroblasts. In vivo, drug eluting constructs successfully mitigate macrophage fusion at one week and fibrotic encapsulation in a dose-dependent manner at four weeks, demonstrating effective release of both drugs over different timescales. Future studies can employ this system to improve and prolong implant lifetimes, or load it with other drugs to modulate other dynamic processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of China's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior experts on nuclear safety regulation today completed a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) review of the governmental and regulatory framework for nuclear safety in the People's Republic of China. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of the People's Republic of China. The final report will be submitted to China by Autumn 2010. At the request of Chinese authorities, the IAEA assembled a team of 22 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards . It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The experts came from 15 different countries: Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Japan, Pakistan, the Republic of Korea, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ukraine and the United States. Mike Weightman, the United Kingdom's Head of Nuclear Directorate, HSE and HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations said: ''I was honoured and pleased to lead such a team of senior regulatory experts from around the world, and I was impressed by their commitment, experience and hard work to provide their best advice possible. We had very constructive interactions with the Chinese authority to maximize the beneficial impact of the mission.'' The scope of the mission included the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety of the facilities and activities regulated by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). The mission was conducted from 18 to 30 July, mainly in Beijing. To observe Chinese regulatory activities, the IRRS team visited several nuclear facilities, including a nuclear power plant, a manufacturer of safety components for nuclear power plants, a research reactor, a fuel cycle facility, a waste management facility

  3. Promoting tissue regeneration by modulating the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, Ziad; Park, Anthony J; Briquez, Priscilla S; Martino, Mikaël M

    2017-04-15

    The immune system plays a central role in tissue repair and regeneration. Indeed, the immune response to tissue injury is crucial in determining the speed and the outcome of the healing process, including the extent of scarring and the restoration of organ function. Therefore, controlling immune components via biomaterials and drug delivery systems is becoming an attractive approach in regenerative medicine, since therapies based on stem cells and growth factors have not yet proven to be broadly effective in the clinic. To integrate the immune system into regenerative strategies, one of the first challenges is to understand the precise functions of the different immune components during the tissue healing process. While remarkable progress has been made, the immune mechanisms involved are still elusive, and there is indication for both negative and positive roles depending on the tissue type or organ and life stage. It is well recognized that the innate immune response comprising danger signals, neutrophils and macrophages modulates tissue healing. In addition, it is becoming evident that the adaptive immune response, in particular T cell subset activities, plays a critical role. In this review, we first present an overview of the basic immune mechanisms involved in tissue repair and regeneration. Then, we highlight various approaches based on biomaterials and drug delivery systems that aim at modulating these mechanisms to limit fibrosis and promote regeneration. We propose that the next generation of regenerative therapies may evolve from typical biomaterial-, stem cell-, or growth factor-centric approaches to an immune-centric approach. Most regenerative strategies have not yet proven to be safe or reasonably efficient in the clinic. In addition to stem cells and growth factors, the immune system plays a crucial role in the tissue healing process. Here, we propose that controlling the immune-mediated mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration may support

  4. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  5. Next Generation Space Telescope Integrated Science Module Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Richard G.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Jurotich, Matthew M.; Whitley, Raymond; Kalinowski, Keith J.; Love, Bruce W.; Travis, Jeffrey W.; Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The Data system for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Module (ISIM) is the primary data interface between the spacecraft, telescope, and science instrument systems. This poster includes block diagrams of the ISIM data system and its components derived during the pre-phase A Yardstick feasibility study. The poster details the hardware and software components used to acquire and process science data for the Yardstick instrument compliment, and depicts the baseline external interfaces to science instruments and other systems. This baseline data system is a fully redundant, high performance computing system. Each redundant computer contains three 150 MHz power PC processors. All processors execute a commercially available real time multi-tasking operating system supporting, preemptive multi-tasking, file management and network interfaces. These six processors in the system are networked together. The spacecraft interface baseline is an extension of the network, which links the six processors. The final selection for Processor busses, processor chips, network interfaces, and high-speed data interfaces will be made during mid 2002.

  6. Nuclear Experts Complete IAEA Follow-up Review of German Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety experts concluded a seven-day mission to review the German Regulatory System, conducted from 4-10 September in Bonn, Stuttgart and Berlin. At the request of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the International Atomic Energy Agency assembled a peer-review team of six high-level regulatory experts from six nations (Finland, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the UK, the US and three IAEA senior staff members) to conduct a follow-up assessment of an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission conducted in 2008. This follow-up IRRS mission examined the progress in acting upon the recommendations and suggestions made during the 2008 IRRS mission and reviewed the areas of significant regulatory changes since that review at both the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Ministry of Environment of the federal state of Baden-Wurttemberg (UM BW). The first mission reviewed Germany's regulatory framework against IAEA Safety Standards and fostered the exchange of information and experience on safety regulation. This is a peer review based on IAEA Standards. It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of nuclear power plants. IRRS team leader, Mr. McCree, of the US Nuclear Safety Commission (USNRC), said, ''This was an important IRRS mission, particularly given the recent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and the related insights which underscore the importance of having an independent, credible nuclear safety regulator.'' ''The IRRS team identified several strengths of the German nuclear safety regulators, including the prompt and coordinated incident response activities of BMU and UM BW to the Fukushima accident. Some suggestions were also made to further strengthen nuclear safety regulations concerning the future work of BMU,'' he said. The review team found that important progress has been made toward

  7. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules F1-F8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with eight of the functional modules in the code. Those are: BONAMI - resonance self-shielding by the Bondarenko method; NITAWL-II - SCALE system module for performing resonance shielding and working library production; XSDRNPM - a one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code for transport analysis; XSDOSE - a module for calculating fluxes and dose rates at points outside a shield; KENO IV/S - an improved monte carlo criticality program; COUPLE; ORIGEN-S - SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms; ICE

  8. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules F1-F8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with eight of the functional modules in the code. Those are: BONAMI - resonance self-shielding by the Bondarenko method; NITAWL-II - SCALE system module for performing resonance shielding and working library production; XSDRNPM - a one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code for transport analysis; XSDOSE - a module for calculating fluxes and dose rates at points outside a shield; KENO IV/S - an improved monte carlo criticality program; COUPLE; ORIGEN-S - SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms; ICE.

  9. Risk undermined in the bilateral pharmaceutical regulatory system in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Po; Wang, Chun-Li

    2018-04-01

    The concept of Pharmacovigilance Planning and Risk Minimization Planning (PVP/RMP), initiated by the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), addressed an important conceptual change from monitoring the safety of individual medicine to proactively conducting risk prevention for the minimization of medication error. However, the implementation of PVP/RMP is a challenge in societies like Taiwan where irrational medication and co-medication is prevalent. It is even more difficult in Taiwan where two regulatory bodies are governing pharmaceutical affairs, namely Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) in charge of Western Medicine (WM) and the Department of Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy (DCMP) in charge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). There are thus dual-tract drug approval panels, two GMP controls and two independent adverse drug event reporting systems. This rendered irrational co-medication of WM and TCM undetectable and the standard tools for monitoring pharmacovigilance inapplicable. The bilateral regulatory system is conceptually unscientific in accordance with PVP/RMP and unethical from humanity point of view. The first part of this review delivers (1) social aspects of polypharmacy in Taiwan; (2) regulatory aspects of pharmaceutical administration; (3) risks undermined in the bilateral regulatory system and (4) pharmacoepidemiology in relation to the risk of polypharmacy. As evidence-based medicine (EBM) forms the fundamental risk-benefit assessment on medication, the second part of this review delivers (1) the scientific aspects of the beauty and the odds of biological system that governs host-xenobiotics interaction; (2) conceptual evolution from product management (pharmacovigilance) to risk management (PVP/RMP); (3) non-biased due process is essential for risk-benefit assessment on medicinal products and (4) the opinion of the authors on system building for safe medication. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Career Planning Modules for the Officer Career Information and Planning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan D.; And Others

    This discussion of the modules in an experimental computer-aided system for officer career information and planning system (OCIPS) includes the reasons for its development, a description of the seven modules, and the findings of a preliminary test of four of the modules for feasibility and credibility. Initially developed in response to a need…

  11. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  12. Module-level DC/DC conversion for photovotaic systems : the delta-conversion concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, H.J.; Büthker, D.; Castello, C.; Doorn, T.S.; Jong, de A.; van Otten, R.; Waal, de K.

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are increasingly used to generate electrical energy from solar irradiation incident on PV modules. PV modules are formed by placing many PV cells in series. The PV system is then formed by placing a number of PV modules in series in a string. In practical cases, differences

  13. Preparation of safety regulatory requirements for new technology like digital system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The current regulatory requirements on digital instrumentation and control system have been reviewed by JNES, considering international trend discussed in DICWG of MDEP. MDEP DICWG held in OECD/NEA gives the opportunity to identify the convergence of applicable standards. The working group's activities include: identifying and prioritising the member countries' challenges, practices, and needs regarding standards and regulatory guidance on digital instrumentation and control; identifying areas of importance and needs for convergence of existing standards and guidance or development of new standards; sharing of information; and identifying common positions among the member countries for areas of particular importance and need. The DICWG drafted common positions on specific issues which are based on the existing standards, national regulatory guidance, best practices, and group inputs using an agreed process and framework. The following four general common positions have been discussed in this fiscal year. The Treatment of Common Cause Failure Resulting from Software within Digital Safety Systems, The Treatment of Hardware Description Language(HDL) Programmed Devices for Use in Nuclear Safety System, Factory Acceptance Test and Site Acceptance Test, The Use of Automatic Tests to Perform Surveilance for Digital Systems. (author)

  14. Modulation of multiple memory systems: from neurotransmitters to metabolic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Paul E; Newman, Lori A; Scavuzzo, Claire J; Korol, Donna L

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews evidence showing that neurochemical modulators can regulate the relative participation of the hippocampus and striatum in learning and memory tasks. For example, relative release of acetylcholine increases in the hippocampus and striatum reflects the relative engagement of these brain systems during learning of place and response tasks. Acetylcholine release is regulated in part by available brain glucose levels, which themselves are dynamically modified during learning. Recent findings suggest that glucose acts through astrocytes to deliver lactate to neurons. Brain glycogen is contained in astrocytes and provides a capacity to deliver energy substrates to neurons when needed, a need that can be generated by training on tasks that target hippocampal and striatal processing mechanisms. These results integrate an increase in blood glucose after epinephrine release from the adrenal medulla with provision of brain energy substrates, including lactate released from astrocytes. Together, the availability of peripheral and central energy substrates regulate the processing of learning and memory within and across multiple neural systems. Dysfunctions of the physiological steps that modulate memory--from hormones to neurotransmitters to metabolic substrates--may contribute importantly to some of the cognitive impairments seen during normal aging and during neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO 2 -fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  16. Regulatory T cells (Treg and Their Roles in Immune System with Respect to Immunopathological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kondělková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress immune response, thereby maintaining homeostasis and self-tolerance. It has been shown that Tregs are able to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytokine production and play a critical role in preventing autoimmunity. Different subsets with various functions of Treg cells exist. Tregs can be usually identified by flow cytometry. The most specific marker for these cells is FoxP3, which is localized intracellulary. Selected surface markers such as CD25high (high molecular density and CD127low (low molecular density could serve as surrogate markers to detect Tregs in a routine clinical practice. Dysregulation in Treg cell frequency or functions may lead to the development of autoimmune disease. Therapeutical Treg modulation is considered to be a promising therapeutical approach to treat some selected disorders, such as allergies, and to prevent allograft rejection.

  17. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  18. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries

  19. International Nuclear and Radiation Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Slovenia's Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety experts today concluded a 10-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia. The team identified good practices and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of Slovenia and a final report will be submitted by the end of 2011. At the request of the Slovenian Government, the IAEA assembled a team of 10 senior regulatory experts from nine nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission involving the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA). The mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards. Andrej Stritar, Director of Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration, stressed ''how important it is for a small country like Slovenia to tightly follow international standards in the area of nuclear safety.'' He also expressed his gratitude to the IAEA, and the countries from which team members came, for their support and for their intensive work during the last ten days. Mission Team Leader Colin Patchett, Deputy Chief Inspector from the UK's Office for Nuclear Regulation commended ''the Slovenian authorities for their commitment to nuclear and radiation safety regulation and for sharing their experience.'' The IRRS team reviewed Slovenia's current regulatory framework and all SNSA-regulated facilities and activities, as well as the regulatory implications of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi accident. The IRRS team identified particular strengths in the Slovenian regulatory system, including: Through its legal framework, the Slovenian government has appointed SNSA to regulate its nuclear safety program and SNSA has in place an effective process for carrying out this responsibility; and Slovenia's response to the accident at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi power plant has been prompt and effective. Communications with the public, development of actions for improvement

  20. Module and electronics developments for the ATLAS ITK pixel system

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for an extensive modification of its detectors in the course of the planned HL-LHC accelerator upgrade around 2025. The ATLAS upgrade includes the replacement of the entire tracking system by an all-silicon detector (Inner Tracker, ITk). The five innermost layers of ITk will be a pixel detector built of new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the severe HL-LHC environment in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total area of the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in 2017. In this paper an overview of the ongoing R\\&D activities on modules and electronics for the ATLAS ITk is given including the main developments and achievements in silicon planar and 3D sensor technologies, readout and power challenges.

  1. A balance of activity in brain control and reward systems predicts self-regulatory outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Richard B.; Chen, Pin-Hao A.; Huckins, Jeremy F.; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Kelley, William M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous neuroimaging work has shown that increased reward-related activity following exposure to food cues is predictive of self-control failure. The balance model suggests that self-regulation failures result from an imbalance in reward and executive control mechanisms. However, an open question is whether the relative balance of activity in brain systems associated with executive control (vs reward) supports self-regulatory outcomes when people encounter tempting cues in daily lif...

  2. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set II: Major Body Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the second part of a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following body systems: integumentary system; skeletal system; muscular system; nervous system;…

  3. Intensity modulated operating mode of the rotating gamma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar; Gulyas, Laszlo; Medlin, Donald; Koroknai, Tibor; Takacs, David; Filep, Gyorgy; Panko, Peter; Godo, Bence; Hollo, Tamas; Zheng, Xiao Ran; Fedorcsak, Imre; Dobai, Jozsef; Bognar, Laszlo; Takacs, Endre

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore two novel operation modalities of the rotating gamma systems (RGS) that could expand its clinical application to lesions in close proximity to critical organs at risk (OAR). The approach taken in this study consists of two components. First, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolkit is used to model the dosimetric properties of the RGS Vertex 360™ for the normal, intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS), and speed modulated radiosurgery (SMRS) operation modalities. Second, the RGS Vertex 360™ at the Rotating Gamma Institute in Debrecen, Hungary is used to collect experimental data for the normal and IMRS operation modes. An ion chamber is used to record measurements of the absolute dose. The dose profiles are measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films positioned within a spherical water equivalent phantom. A strong dosimetric agreement between the measured and simulated dose profiles and penumbra was found for both the normal and IMRS operation modes for all collimator sizes (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm diameter). The simulated falloff and maximum dose regions agree better with the experimental results for the 4 and 8 mm diameter collimators. Although the falloff regions align well in the 14 and 18 mm collimators, the maximum dose regions have a larger difference. For the IMRS operation mode, the simulated and experimental dose distributions are ellipsoidal, where the short axis aligns with the blocked angles. Similarly, the simulated dose distributions for the SMRS operation mode also adopt an ellipsoidal shape, where the short axis aligns with the angles where the orbital speed is highest. For both modalities, the dose distribution is highly constrained with a sharper penumbra along the short axes. Dose modulation of the RGS can be achieved with the IMRS and SMRS modes. By providing a highly constrained dose distribution with a sharp penumbra, both modes could be clinically applicable for the treatment of lesions in close

  4. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  5. Preparation of safety regulatory requirements for new technology like digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Juichiro; Takita, Masami

    2011-01-01

    The current regulatory requirements on digital instrumentation and control system have been reviewed by JNES, considering international trend discussed in DICWG (Digital Instrumentation and Control Working Group) of MDEP (Multinational Design Evaluation Program). MDEP DICWG held in OECD/NEA (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency) gives the opportunity to identify the convergence of applicable standards. The working group's activities include: identifying and prioritising the member countries' challenges, practices, and needs regarding standards and regulatory guidance regarding digital instrumentation and control; identifying areas of importance and needs for convergence of existing standards and guidance or development of new standards; sharing of information; and identifying common positions among the member countries for areas of particular importance and need. The DICWG drafted common positions on specific issues which are based on the existing standards, national regulatory guidance, best practices, and group inputs using an agreed upon process and framework. Five general common positions are under discussion in this fiscal year. Simplicity in Design, Software Common Cause Failures, Software Tools, Data communication, Verification and Validation throughout the life cycle of safety systems using digital computers. In addition, the technical evaluation of standards of the Japan Electric Association about digital system for safety was made to support NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency). (author)

  6. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  7. Multiple Regulatory Systems Coordinate DNA Replication with Cell Growth in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes. PMID:25340815

  8. Preparation of safety regulatory requirements for new technology like digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The current regulatory requirements on digital instrumentation and control system have been reviewed by JNES, considering international trend discussed in DICWG of MDEP. MDEP DICWG held in OECD/NEA gives the opportunity to identify the convergence of applicable standards. The working group's activities include: identifying and prioritising the member countries' challenges, practices, and needs regarding standards and regulatory guidance on digital instrumentation and control; identifying areas of importance and needs for convergence of existing standards and guidance or development of new standards; sharing of information; and identifying common positions among the member countries for areas of particular importance and need. The DICWG drafted common positions on specific issues which are based on the existing standards, national regulatory guidance, best practices, and group inputs using an agreed process and framework. The following two general common positions are discussed and to be issued in this fiscal year. Verification and Validation throughout the life cycle of safety systems using digital computers. The Impact of Cyber Security Features on Digital I and C Safety Systems. (author)

  9. EPICS device support module as ATCA system manager for the ITER fast plant system controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Paulo F., E-mail: pricardofc@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Bruno; Gonçalves, Bruno; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Sousa, Jorge; Rodrigues, A.P.; Batista, António J.N.; Correia, Miguel; Combo, Álvaro [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, Carlos M.B.A. [Centro de Instrumentação, Departamento de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Varandas, Carlos A.F. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► In Nuclear Fusion, demanding security and high-availability requirements call for redundancy to be available. ► ATCA based Nuclear Fusion Systems are composed by several electronic and mechanical component. ► Control and monitoring of ATCA electronic systems are recommended. ► ITER Fast Plant System Controller Project CODAC system prototype. ► EPICS device support module as External ATCA system manager solution. -- Abstract: This paper presents an Enhanced Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) device support module for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Fast Plant System Controller (FPSC) project based in Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) specification. The developed EPICS device support module provides an External System Manager (ESM) solution for monitoring and control the ITER FPSC ATCA shelf system and data acquisition boards in order to take proper action and report problems to a control room operator or high level management unit in case of any system failure occurrence. EPICS device support module acts as a Channel Access (CA) server to report problems and publish ATCA system data information to the control room operator, high level management unit or other CA network clients such as Control System Studio Operator Interfaces (CSS OPIs), Best Ever Alarm System Toolkit (BEAST), Best Ever Archive Utility (BEAUTY) or other CA client applications. EPICS device support module communicates with the ATCA Shelf manager (ShM) using HTTP protocol to send and receive commands through POST method in order to get and set system and shelf components properties such as fan speeds measurements, temperatures readings, module status and ATCA boards acquisition and configuration parameters. All system properties, states, commands and parameters are available through the EPICS device support module CA server in EPICS Process Variables (PV) and signals format. ATCA ShM receives the HTTP protocol

  10. Introduction of regulatory guide on cyber security of L and C systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.; Jeong, C. H.; Kim, D. I.

    2008-01-01

    In the case of unauthorized individuals, systems and entities or process threatening the instrumentation and control systems of nuclear facilities using the intrinsic vulnerabilities of digital based technologies, those systems may lose their own required functions. The loss of required functions of the systems can seriously affect the safety of nuclear facilities. Consequently, digital instrumentation and control systems, which perform functions important to safety, should be designed and operated to respond to cyber threats capitalizing on the vulnerabilities of digital based technologies. To make it possible, the developers and licensees of nuclear facilities should perform appropriate cyber security activities throughout the whole life cycle of digital instrumentation and control systems. Under the goal of securing the safety of nuclear facilities, this paper presents the regulatory on cyber security activities to remove the cyber threats that exploit the vulnerabilities of digital instrumentation and control systems and to mitigate the effect of such threats. Presented regulatory guide includes establishing the cyber security policy and plan, analyzing and classifying the cyber threats and cyber security assessment of digital instrumentation and control systems. (authors)

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  12. Modulation of the semantic system by word imageability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabsevitz, D S; Medler, D A; Seidenberg, M; Binder, J R

    2005-08-01

    A prevailing neurobiological theory of semantic memory proposes that part of our knowledge about concrete, highly imageable concepts is stored in the form of sensory-motor representations. While this theory predicts differential activation of the semantic system by concrete and abstract words, previous functional imaging studies employing this contrast have provided relatively little supporting evidence. We acquired event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants performed a semantic similarity judgment task on a large number of concrete and abstract noun triads. Task difficulty was manipulated by varying the degree to which the words in the triad were similar in meaning. Concrete nouns, relative to abstract nouns, produced greater activation in a bilateral network of multimodal and heteromodal association areas, including ventral and medial temporal, posterior-inferior parietal, dorsal prefrontal, and posterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, abstract nouns produced greater activation almost exclusively in the left hemisphere in superior temporal and inferior frontal cortex. Increasing task difficulty modulated activation mainly in attention, working memory, and response monitoring systems, with almost no effect on areas that were modulated by imageability. These data provide critical support for the hypothesis that concrete, imageable concepts activate perceptually based representations not available to abstract concepts. In contrast, processing abstract concepts makes greater demands on left perisylvian phonological and lexical retrieval systems. The findings are compatible with dual coding theory and less consistent with single-code models of conceptual representation. The lack of overlap between imageability and task difficulty effects suggests that once the neural representation of a concept is activated, further maintenance and manipulation of that information in working memory does not further increase neural activation in

  13. Modulation of biosynthesis and regulatory action of 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (S-EC) in cultured cells by progesterone (PG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, S.R.; Gupta, A.K.; Sexton, R.C.; Parish, E.J.; Rudney, H.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of IEC-6 cells with PG caused a strong inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis at the level of desmosterol reductase. In addition, two new products were observed in PG-treated cells. The first compound was designated as cholesta-5,7,24-trien-3β-ol based on its HPLC chromatographic properties. The second compound was identified as S-EC based on (1) a comparison of its chromatographic properties with those of authentic EC and (2) by its conversion to 25-hydroxycholesterol (HC) upon reduction with LiAlH 4 . In spite of cellular accumulation of S-EC in the presence of PG, the activity of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) which is known to be sensitive to oxysterols, was elevated rather than suppressed. On the other hand, when PG-treated cells were refed fresh medium without PG, HMGR activity was suppressed. Exogenous S-EC was a potent suppressor of HMGR in untreated IEC-6 cells. Suppression of HMGR by S-EC but not by HC could be prevented by progesterone. Exogenous [ 3 H]S-EC was not metabolized by IEC-6 cells. These results support the hypothesis that S-EC plays a normal regulatory role in sterol biosynthesis and indicate that enhanced S-EC synthesis observed in the presence of PG may be due to interference with this regulatory action

  14. Computational exploration of cis-regulatory modules in rhythmic expression data using the "Exploration of Distinctive CREs and CRMs" (EDCC) and "CRM Network Generator" (CNG) programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiaris, Pavlos Stephanos; Tekath, Tobias; Staiger, Dorothee; Danisman, Selahattin

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the effect of cis-regulatory elements (CRE) and clusters of CREs, which are called cis-regulatory modules (CRM), in eukaryotic gene expression is a challenge of computational biology. We developed two programs that allow simple, fast and reliable analysis of candidate CREs and CRMs that may affect specific gene expression and that determine positional features between individual CREs within a CRM. The first program, "Exploration of Distinctive CREs and CRMs" (EDCC), correlates candidate CREs and CRMs with specific gene expression patterns. For pairs of CREs, EDCC also determines positional preferences of the single CREs in relation to each other and to the transcriptional start site. The second program, "CRM Network Generator" (CNG), prioritizes these positional preferences using a neural network and thus allows unbiased rating of the positional preferences that were determined by EDCC. We tested these programs with data from a microarray study of circadian gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analyzing more than 1.5 million pairwise CRE combinations, we found 22 candidate combinations, of which several contained known clock promoter elements together with elements that had not been identified as relevant to circadian gene expression before. CNG analysis further identified positional preferences of these CRE pairs, hinting at positional information that may be relevant for circadian gene expression. Future wet lab experiments will have to determine which of these combinations confer daytime specific circadian gene expression.

  15. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Finland: A Systemic Approach to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Väisäsvaara, J.

    2016-01-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK specifies detailed regulatory requirements for good safety culture. Both the requirements and the practical safety culture oversight activities reflect a systemic approach to safety: the interconnections between the technical, human and organizational factors receive special attention. The conference paper aims to show how the oversight of safety culture can be integrated into everyday oversight activities. The paper also emphasises that the scope of the safety culture oversight is not specific safety culture activities of the licencees, but rather the overall functioning of the licence holder or the new build project organization from safety point of view. The regulatory approach towards human and organizational factors and safety culture has evolved throughout the years of nuclear energy production in Finland. Especially the recent new build projects have highlighted the need to systematically pay attention to the non-technical aspects of safety as it has become obvious how the HOF issues can affect the design processes and quality of construction work. Current regulatory guides include a set of safety culture related requirements. The requirements are binding to the licence holders and they set both generic and specific demands on the licencee to understand, monitor and to develop safety culture of their own organization but also that of their supplier network. The requirements set for the licence holders has facilitated the need to develop the regulator’s safety culture oversight practices towards a proactive and systemic approach.

  16. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Resch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS, the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response.

  17. Regulatory review and barriers for the electricity supply system for distributed generation in EU-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Skytte, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    When distributed electricity supply surpasses a particular level, it can no longer be ignored in planning and operation of the electricity networks. Therefore, improvements of the regulatory framework of the electricity networks are required along with the growth of the electricity supply from di...... distributed generation. This paper reviews the current regulation of the grids with respect to distributed generation in EU-15 Member States and compares the different systems. Several barriers are identified.......When distributed electricity supply surpasses a particular level, it can no longer be ignored in planning and operation of the electricity networks. Therefore, improvements of the regulatory framework of the electricity networks are required along with the growth of the electricity supply from...

  18. Phase ambiguity resolution for offset QPSK modulation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A demodulator for Offset Quaternary Phase Shift Keyed (OQPSK) signals modulated with two words resolves eight possible combinations of phase ambiguity which may produce data error by first processing received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data in an integrated carrier loop/symbol synchronizer using a digital Costas loop with matched filters for correcting four of eight possible phase lock errors, and then the remaining four using a phase ambiguity resolver which detects the words to not only reverse the received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data channels, but to also invert (complement) the I(sub R) and/or Q(sub R) data, or to at least complement the I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data for systems using nontransparent codes that do not have rotation direction ambiguity.

  19. A readout system for the wavelength-shifting optical module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foesig, Carl-Christian; Boeser, Sebastian [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The success of IceCube and the plans for an IceCube-Gen2 stimulate the development of new photo sensors. The approach of the Wavelength-shifting Optical Module is to provide a device which has a low dark noise rate combined with a high detection efficiency. A small PMT is used to detect red shifted photons guided in a coated PMMA tube, originally emitted by a wavelength shifting coating that absorbs photons in the UV Region. We have studied several PMTs for their usability with the IceCube-Gen2 readout system. Relevant parameters are the pulse widths in relation to the bandwidth of the IceCube-Gen2 readout electronics and the dark noise rates.

  20. Digital measurement system for the LHC klystron high voltage modulator.

    CERN Document Server

    Mikkelsen, Anders

    Accelerating voltage in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is created by a means of 16 superconducting standing wave RF cavities, each fed by a 400MHz/300kW continuous wave klystron amplifier. Part of the upgrade program for the LHC long shutdown one is to replace the obsolete analogue current and voltage measurement circuitry located in the high voltage bunkers by a new, digital system, using ADCs and optical fibres. A digital measurement card is implemented and integrated into the current HV modulator oil tank (floating at -58kV) and interfaced to the existing digital VME boards collecting the data for several klystrons at the ground potential. Measured signals are stored for the logging, diagnostics and post-mortem analysis purposes.

  1. Optical filtering in directly modulated/detected OOFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C; Ortega, B; Wei, J L; Capmany, J

    2013-12-16

    This work presents a theoretical investigation on the performance of directly modulated/detected (DM/DD) optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OOFDM) systems subject to optical filtering. The impact of both linear and nonlinear distortion effects are taken into account to calculate the effective signal-to-noise ratio of each subcarrier. These results are then employed to optimize the design parameters of two simple optical filtering structures: a Mach Zehnder interferometer and a uniform fiber Bragg grating, leading to a significant optical power budget improvement given by 3.3 and 3dB, respectively. These can be further increased to 5.5 and 4.2dB respectively when balanced detection configurations are employed. We find as well that this improvement is highly dependent on the clipping ratio.

  2. Evaluation of Geometrical Modulation Transfer Function in Optical Lens System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Mu Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ray tracing algorithms to evaluate the geometrical modulation transfer function (GMTF of optical lens system. There are two kinds of ray tracings methods that can be applied to help simulate the point spread function (PSF in the image plane, for example, paraxial optics and real ray tracings. The paraxial optics ray tracing is used to calculate the first-order properties such as the effective focal length (EFL and the entrance pupil position through less cost of computation. However, the PSF could have a large tolerance by only using paraxial optics ray tracing for simulation. Some formulas for real ray tracing are applied in the sagittal and tangential line spread function (LSF. The algorithms are developed to demonstrate the simulation of LSF. Finally, the GMTF is evaluated after the fast Fourier transform (FFT of the LSF.

  3. Control technologies for soil vapor extraction at petroleum hydrocarbon impacted sites -- Regulatory challenges to system operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacossa, K.F.; Campbell, G.E.; Devine, K.

    1995-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is frequently used to remediate soils impacted by petroleum hydrocarbons. Four technologies have proven to be viable methods to control the off-gas emissions from SVE systems, namely, internal combustion, thermal oxidation, catalytic oxidation, and granular activated carbon adsorption. The optimal range of influent vapor concentrations for system operation differs for each of the technologies. Over the past several years the authors have worked proactively with the state regulatory community to develop general, all inclusive air pollution control permits which allow for the potential use of all four technologies over the life of the permit. Private industry has similarly worked with the state regulators to develop a less labor intensive sampling/monitoring procedure. Actual system performances, which were monitored using summa canisters and field equipment, provided the basis for the new procedure. System performance data indicated that field sampling with portable hydrocarbon analyzers, such as flame ionization detectors (FID), was preferable over the use of summa canister sampling. In addition, to reduce the costs associated with the analysis of samples, the new SVE monitoring protocol also reduced the number of system monitoring visits. These reductions equated into a cost effective, yet environmentally sound SVE system monitoring programs. Finally, the authors have worked with the regulatory community to establish permit limitations which allow operational flexibility

  4. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-12-06

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well.

  5. Quality Management System Improves Effectiveness and Quality of Activities of Radiation Protection Regulatory Body in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Processes of creation of quality management system (QMS) in regulatory body in radiation protection field – Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) and the benefit of this system to ensure the quality of the performance of functions are described. RPC QMS compliant with ISO 9001:2008 standard and in line with the requirements of the IAEA GSR- 3 document. It allowed achieving a new quality of works carried out by RPC. Because creation and introduction of the QMS is a continuous process, the QMS of RPC is continually renewed and new procedures are developed.

  6. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well

  7. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by the Csr Global Regulatory System in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; 鈴木, 一史

    2007-01-01

    In many species of bacteria, the Csr (carbon storage regulator) global regulatory system coordinates the expression of various genes. In Escherichia coli, the central component of this system, CsrA, is a RNA-binding protein. The CsrA is a homodimer and binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC. These RNAs contain multiple CsrA-binding sequences and act by sequestering CsrA. In thi...

  8. Improving the security of optoelectronic delayed feedback system by parameter modulation and system coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingfeng; Miao, Suoxia; Cheng, Mengfan; Gao, Xiaojing

    2016-02-01

    A coupled system with varying parameters is proposed to improve the security of optoelectronic delayed feedback system. This system is coupled by two parameter-varied optoelectronic delayed feedback systems with chaotic modulation. Dynamics performance results show that this system has a higher complexity compared to the original one. Furthermore, this system can conceal the time delay effectively against the autocorrelation function and delayed mutual information method and can increase the dimension space of secure parameters to resist brute-force attack by introducing the digital chaotic systems.

  9. An AML1-ETO/miR-29b-1 regulatory circuit modulates phenotypic properties of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Perez, Andrew W; White, Elizabeth S; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-06-20

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by an aggressive clinical course and frequent cytogenetic abnormalities that include specific chromosomal translocations. The 8;21 chromosomal rearrangement disrupts the key hematopoietic RUNX1 transcription factor, and contributes to leukemia through recruitment of co-repressor complexes to RUNX1 target genes, altered subnuclear localization, and deregulation of the myeloid gene regulatory program. However, a role of non-coding microRNAs (miRs) in t(8;21)-mediated leukemogenesis is minimally understood. We present evidence of an interplay between the tumor suppressor miR-29b-1 and the AML1-ETO (also designated RUNX1-RUNX1T1) oncogene that is encoded by the t(8;21). We find that AML1-ETO and corepressor NCoR co-occupy the miR-29a/b-1 locus and downregulate its expression in leukemia cells. Conversely, re-introduction of miR-29b-1 in leukemia cells expressing AML1-ETO causes significant downregulation at the protein level through direct targeting of the 3' untranslated region of the chimeric transcript. Restoration of miR-29b-1 expression in leukemia cells results in decreased cell growth and increased apoptosis. The AML1-ETO-dependent differentiation block and transcriptional program are partially reversed by miR-29b-1. Our findings establish a novel regulatory circuit between the tumor-suppressive miR-29b-1 and the oncogenic AML1-ETO that controls the leukemic phenotype in t(8;21)-carrying acute myeloid leukemia.

  10. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 7.0: Endocrine System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the endocrine system is the seventh of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory epxerience. Module objectives are for students to…

  11. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 4.0: Skeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the skeletal system is the fourth of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skill training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop…

  12. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 6.0: Muscular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the muscular system is the sixth of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop…

  13. Module type plant system dynamics analysis code (MSG-COPD). Code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takaaki

    2002-11-01

    MSG-COPD is a module type plant system dynamics analysis code which involves a multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulics calculation module to analyze pool type of fast breeder reactors. Explanations of each module and the methods for the input data are described in this code manual. (author)

  14. A systems biology approach to construct the gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation via microarray and databases mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Chung-Yu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is a hallmark of many human diseases. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying systemic inflammation has long been an important topic in basic and clinical research. When primary pathogenetic events remains unclear due to its immense complexity, construction and analysis of the gene regulatory network of inflammation at times becomes the best way to understand the detrimental effects of disease. However, it is difficult to recognize and evaluate relevant biological processes from the huge quantities of experimental data. It is hence appealing to find an algorithm which can generate a gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation from high-throughput genomic studies of human diseases. Such network will be essential for us to extract valuable information from the complex and chaotic network under diseased conditions. Results In this study, we construct a gene regulatory network of inflammation using data extracted from the Ensembl and JASPAR databases. We also integrate and apply a number of systematic algorithms like cross correlation threshold, maximum likelihood estimation method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC on time-lapsed microarray data to refine the genome-wide transcriptional regulatory network in response to bacterial endotoxins in the context of dynamic activated genes, which are regulated by transcription factors (TFs such as NF-κB. This systematic approach is used to investigate the stochastic interaction represented by the dynamic leukocyte gene expression profiles of human subject exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (bacterial endotoxin. Based on the kinetic parameters of the dynamic gene regulatory network, we identify important properties (such as susceptibility to infection of the immune system, which may be useful for translational research. Finally, robustness of the inflammatory gene network is also inferred by analyzing the hubs and "weak ties" structures of the gene network

  15. Single or combined treatment with L-DOPA and quinpirole differentially modulate expression and phosphorylation of key regulatory kinases in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzzati-Armentero, Marie Therese; Ghezzi, Cristina; Nisticò, Robert; Oda, Adriano; Blandini, Fabio

    2013-09-27

    In the past decades, the clinical use of dopamine agonists has expanded from adjunct therapy in patients with a deteriorating response to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) to monotherapy for the treatment of early PD. Dopamine agonists provide their antiparkinsonian benefit through stimulation of brain postsynaptic type 2 dopamine receptors that exert their effect through classical cAMP-dependent mechanisms, as well as cAMP-independent cellular signaling cascades, including the Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) pathway. Alterations of Akt/GSK3 have been observed and may contribute to the neurodegenerative processes and the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. The effects L-DOPA and quinpirole, a dopamine agonist, on the two key regulatory kinases, Akt and GSK3, were evaluated in neuroblastoma cell line. L-DOPA and dopamine agonist dose-dependently and differentially modulated Akt and GSK3 expression and phosphorylation when added alone or combined. The combined treatment inverted or potentiated the modulatory properties of the single compound. The drug- and concentration-dependent balance of dopamine receptor stimulation over auto-oxidation may distinctively modulate GSK3 isoforms and Akt. Our results indicate that particular attention must be given to drug concentration and combination when multiple therapies are applied for the clinical treatment of PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlling a Chaotic System through Control Parameter Self-Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, I.

    1994-01-01

    A method for obtaining active control of a chaotic system based on the modulation of a control parameter by adding to it a small perturbation proportional to one output signal is proposed. From a theoretical point of view, chaos can be stabilized in the framework of this method because small modifications of the vector field controlling the dynamics are allowed, and thus some of the previously existing unstable periodic trajectories can be made stable. The method is much inspired on recent treatments of some related problems, and it is compared with them. One of its most attractive features is that it should be very easy to implement it on real experiments. The method is tested on a system of ordinary differential equations modelling the coupling of two self-oscillating electronic circuits (van der Pol oscillators). Some brief comments are made on the possibility that it could be applied to complex spatio-temporal systems where multiple chaotic structures can coexist for some values of the control parameters

  17. Controlling a Chaotic System through Control Parameter Self-Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, I.

    1994-01-01

    A method for obtaining active control of a chaotic system based on the modulation of a control parameter by adding to it a small perturbation proportional to one output signal is proposed. From a theoretical point of view, chaos can be stabilized in the framework of this method because small modifications of the vector field controlling the dynamics are allowed, and thus some of the previously oxi sting unstable periodic trajectories can be made stable. The method is much inspired on recent treatments of some related problems, and i t is compared with them. One of its most attractive features is that is should be very easy to implement it on real experiments. The method is tested on a system of ordinary differential equations model ling the coupling of two se If - oscillating electronic circuits (van der Pol oscillators). Some brief comments are made on the no possibility that it could be applied to complex spatio-temporal systems where multiple chaotic structures can coexist for some values of the control parameters. (Author) 28 refs

  18. Module and electronics developments for the ATLAS ITK pixel system

    CERN Document Server

    Nellist, Clara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Summary ATLAS is preparing for an extensive modification of its detector in the course of the planned HL‐ LHC accelerator upgrade around 2025 which includes a replacement of the entire tracking system by an all‐silicon detector (Inner Tracker, ITk). A revised trigger and data taking system is foreseen with triggers expected at lowest level at an average rate of 1 MHz. The five innermost layers of ITk will comprise of a pixel detector built of new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the severe HL‐LHC environment in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total area of the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice that is expected to take place in early 2017. A new on‐detector readout chip is designed in the context of the RD53 collaboration in 65 nm CMOS technology. This paper will present the on‐going R&D within the ATLAS ITK project towards the new pixel modules and the off‐detector electronics. Pla...

  19. Considerations on an automatic computed tomography tube current modulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L.; Panizza, D.; D'Ambrosio, D.; Carne, I.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the effects on radiation output and image noise varying the acquisition parameters with an automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) system in computed tomography (CT). Chest CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired using a GE LightSpeed VCT 64-slice tomograph. Acquisitions were performed using different pitch, slice thickness and noise index (NI) values and varying the orientation of the scanned projection radiograph (SPR). The radiation output was determined by the CT dose index (CTDI vol ). Image noise was evaluated measuring the standard deviation of CT numbers in several regions of interest. The radiation output was lower if the SPR was acquired in the anterior-posterior projection. The radiation dose with the posterior-anterior SPR was higher, because the divergence of the X-ray beam magnifies the anatomical structures closest to the tube, especially the spinal column, and this leads the ATCM system to estimate higher patient attenuation values and, therefore, to select higher tube current values. The NI was inversely proportional to the square root of the CTDI vol and, with fixed NI, the CTDI vol increased as the slice thickness decreased. This study suggests some important issues to use the GE ATCM system efficiently. (authors)

  20. Controlling a Chaotic System through Control Parameter Self-Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, I

    1994-07-01

    A method for obtaining active control of a chaotic system based on the modulation of a control parameter by adding to it a small perturbation proportional to one output signal is proposed. From a theoretical point of view, chaos can be stabilized in the framework of this method because small modifications of the vector field controlling the dynamics are allowed, and thus some of the previously oxi sting unstable periodic trajectories can be made stable. The method is much inspired on recent treatments of some related problems, and i t is compared with them. One of its most attractive features is that is should be very easy to implement it on real experiments. The method is tested on a system of ordinary differential equations model ling the coupling of two se If - oscillating electronic circuits (van der Pol oscillators). Some brief comments are made on the no possibility that it could be applied to complex spatio-temporal systems where multiple chaotic structures can coexist for some values of the control parameters. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. Regulatory perspective on digital instrumentation and control systems for future advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiramal, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the question of using digital technology in instrumentation and control systems for modern nuclear power reactors. The general opinion in the industry and among NRC staff is that such technology provides the opportunity for enhanced safety and reliable reactor operations. The major concern is the safe application of this technology so as to avoid common mode or common cause failures in systems. There are great differences between digital and analog system components. SECY-91-292 identifies some general regulatory concerns with regard to digital systems. There is clearly a lack of adequate regulatory direction on the application of digital equipment at this time, but the issue is being addressed by the industry, outside experts, and NRC staff. NRC staff presents a position on the issue of defense-in-depth and diversity with regard to insuring plant safety. Independent manual controls and readouts must be available to allow safe shutdown and monitoring of the plant in the event of safety system failures

  2. Regulatory System for Stem/Progenitor Cell Niches in the Adult Rodent Pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue composed of five types of endocrine cells. Although the turnover rate of pituitary endocrine cells is as low as about 1.6% per day, recent studies have demonstrated that Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2)+-cells exist as pituitary stem/progenitor cells in the adult anterior lobe and contribute to cell regeneration. Notably, SOX2+-pituitary stem/progenitor cells form two types of niches in this tissue: the marginal cell layer (MCL-niche) and the dense cell clusters scattering in the parenchyma (parenchymal-niche). However, little is known about the mechanisms and factors for regulating the pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches, as well as the functional differences between the two types of niches. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms in the niches might enable us to understand the cell regeneration system that acts in accordance with physiological demands in the adult pituitary. In this review, so as to reveal the regulatory mechanisms of the two types of niche, we summarize the regulatory factors and their roles in the adult rodent pituitary niches by focusing on three components: soluble factors, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrixes. PMID:26761002

  3. Regulatory System for Stem/Progenitor Cell Niches in the Adult Rodent Pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saishu Yoshida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue composed of five types of endocrine cells. Although the turnover rate of pituitary endocrine cells is as low as about 1.6% per day, recent studies have demonstrated that Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2+-cells exist as pituitary stem/progenitor cells in the adult anterior lobe and contribute to cell regeneration. Notably, SOX2+-pituitary stem/progenitor cells form two types of niches in this tissue: the marginal cell layer (MCL-niche and the dense cell clusters scattering in the parenchyma (parenchymal-niche. However, little is known about the mechanisms and factors for regulating the pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches, as well as the functional differences between the two types of niches. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms in the niches might enable us to understand the cell regeneration system that acts in accordance with physiological demands in the adult pituitary. In this review, so as to reveal the regulatory mechanisms of the two types of niche, we summarize the regulatory factors and their roles in the adult rodent pituitary niches by focusing on three components: soluble factors, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrixes.

  4. Information management systems for integrating the technical data and regulatory requirements of environmental restoration activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffen, C.A.; Garrett, B.A.; Walter, M.B.

    1990-03-01

    Current environmental regulations require that comprehensive planning be conducted before remediating a hazardous waste site to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination, calculate the risk to the public, and assess the effectiveness of various remediation technologies. Remediation of Department of Energy (DOE) sites contaminated with hazardous or mixed wastes will require the effective integration of scientific and engineering data with regulatory and institutional requirements. The information management challenge presented by waste site cleanup activities goes beyond merely dealing with the large quantity of data that will be generated. The information must be stored, managed, and presented in a way that provides some consistency in approach across sites, avoids duplication of effort, and facilitates responses to requests for information from the regulators and the public. This paper provides background information on the regulatory requirements for data gathering and analysis for environmental restoration activities, and outlines the data and information management requirements for completing the pre-remediation phases of an environmental restoration project. Information management systems for integrating the regulatory and institutional requirements of the environmental restoration process with the technical data and analysis requirements are also described. 7 refs

  5. Key Regulatory Issues for Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2008-01-01

    To help reduce the uncertainty associated with application of digital instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology in nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued six Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) documents that address the current regulatory positions on what are considered the significant digital I and C issues. These six documents address the following topics: Cyber Security, Diversity and Defense-in-Depth, Risk Informed Digital I and C Regulation, Communication issues, Human Factors and the Digital I and C Licensing Process (currently issued as Draft). After allowing for further refinement based on additional technical insight gathered by NRC staff through near-term research and detailed review of relevant experience, it is expected that updated positions ultimately will be incorporated into regulatory guides and staff review procedures. This paper presents an overview of the guidance provided by the NRC-issued ISGs on key technology considerations (i.e., the first five documents above) for safety-related digital I and C systems.

  6. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  7. Experience and regulatory activities on advanced instrumentation and control systems applied to nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the status for applying microprocessor-based systems to nuclear power plants in Korea and the regulatory activities performed by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). And this presents the development of safety and regulatory technology for advanced I and C systems that has been carried out as a part of the next generation reactor development program in Korea. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  8. Social insect colony as a biological regulatory system: modelling information flow in dominance networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Anjan K; Sumana, Annagiri; Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2014-12-06

    Social insects provide an excellent platform to investigate flow of information in regulatory systems since their successful social organization is essentially achieved by effective information transfer through complex connectivity patterns among the colony members. Network representation of such behavioural interactions offers a powerful tool for structural as well as dynamical analysis of the underlying regulatory systems. In this paper, we focus on the dominance interaction networks in the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata-a species where behavioural observations indicate that such interactions are principally responsible for the transfer of information between individuals about their colony needs, resulting in a regulation of their own activities. Our research reveals that the dominance networks of R. marginata are structurally similar to a class of naturally evolved information processing networks, a fact confirmed also by the predominance of a specific substructure-the 'feed-forward loop'-a key functional component in many other information transfer networks. The dynamical analysis through Boolean modelling confirms that the networks are sufficiently stable under small fluctuations and yet capable of more efficient information transfer compared to their randomized counterparts. Our results suggest the involvement of a common structural design principle in different biological regulatory systems and a possible similarity with respect to the effect of selection on the organization levels of such systems. The findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that dominance behaviour has been shaped by natural selection to co-opt the information transfer process in such social insect species, in addition to its primal function of mediation of reproductive competition in the colony. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Photovoltaic module quality in the Kenyan solar home systems market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, R.D.; Jacobson, A.; Kammen, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    As one of the largest unsubsidized markets for solar home systems (SHSs) in the world, Kenya represents a promising model for rural electrification based on private purchases of clean decentralized photovoltaic technologies. Small amorphous-silicon modules dominate the market and most brands provide high quality and affordable service. Product quality varies widely, however, and the public has limited capacity to distinguish among competing brands. This imposes direct hardships on households with the misfortune to purchase low-quality equipment, and it constrains sales as some customers refrain from purchasing solar equipment due to the associated performance uncertainty. This article analyzes market failure associated with photovoltaic module quality in the Kenyan SHS market and develops strategies to address the problem - emphasizing that similar quality problems may exist for other SHS components and in other markets. The principal conclusion is that domestic product testing with public disclosure represents an inexpensive low-risk strategy, but it may prove inadequate. Mandatory product quality standards based on international testing regimes (e.g. IEC standards), augmented with a basic domestic testing option, would provide stronger assurance, but the risks associated with this intervention suggest caution. An emerging multilateral SHS market support effort (PVMTI) should ensure quality for the credit-based sales it promotes in Kenya; however, the long-term impact of this approach is not yet clear and it is unlikely to address quality problems associated with the unsubsidized sales-based markets for SHSs. Finally, fee-for-service models would decisively address quality problems, but launching this model in the Kenyan market would likely require large subsidies. (author)

  10. Criteria adopted by the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority for assessing digital systems related to safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrado, Carlos A.; Chiossi, Carlos E.; Felizia, Eduardo R.; Roca, Jose L.; Sajaroff, Pedro M.

    2004-01-01

    Following the technological evolution in Instrumentation and Control (I and C) design, analog components are replaced by digital in almost every industry. Due to growing challenges of obsolescence and increasing maintenance costs, licensees of nuclear and radioactive installations are increasingly upgrading or replacing their existing I and C analog systems and components. In existing installations, this involves analog to digital replacements. In new installations design, the use of digital I and C systems is being considered from the very beginning, becoming a good alternative, even in safety applications. Up to now, in Argentina, there is no specific rules for safety-related digital systems, every safety system, analog or digital, must comply with the same generic regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority is now developing criteria to assess digital systems related to safety in nuclear and radioactive installations. In this paper some of those criteria, based on local research and the recognized state of the art, are explained. From a regulatory point of view, the use of digital technology often raises new technical and licensing issues, particularly for safety-related applications. Examples include new failure modes, the potential for common-cause failure of redundant components, electromagnetic interference (EMI), software verification and validation, configuration management and a more exhaustive quality assurance system. The mentioned criteria comprehend the design, operation, maintenance and acquisition of digital systems and components important to safety. The main topics covered are: requirements specifications for digital systems, planning and documentation for digital system development, effectiveness of a digital system, commercial off the shelf (COTS) treatment and considerations involving tools for software development. (author)

  11. System and method of modulating electrical signals using photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductors as variable resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Richardson; Caporaso, George J; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2013-10-22

    A system and method for producing modulated electrical signals. The system uses a variable resistor having a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material construction whose conduction response to changes in amplitude of incident radiation is substantially linear throughout a non-saturation region to enable operation in non-avalanche mode. The system also includes a modulated radiation source, such as a modulated laser, for producing amplitude-modulated radiation with which to direct upon the variable resistor and modulate its conduction response. A voltage source and an output port, are both operably connected to the variable resistor so that an electrical signal may be produced at the output port by way of the variable resistor, either generated by activation of the variable resistor or propagating through the variable resistor. In this manner, the electrical signal is modulated by the variable resistor so as to have a waveform substantially similar to the amplitude-modulated radiation.

  12. Finding trans-regulatory genes and protein complexes modulating meiotic recombination hotspots of human, mouse and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Li, Xiaoli; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-11

    The regulatory mechanism of recombination is one of the most fundamental problems in genomics, with wide applications in genome wide association studies (GWAS), birth-defect diseases, molecular evolution, cancer research, etc. Recombination events cluster into short genomic regions called "recombination hotspots". Recently, a zinc finger protein PRDM9 was reported to regulate recombination hotspots in human and mouse genomes. In addition, a 13-mer motif contained in the binding sites of PRDM9 is found to be enriched in human hotspots. However, this 13-mer motif only covers a fraction of hotspots, indicating that PRDM9 is not the only regulator of recombination hotspots. Therefore, the challenge of discovering other regulators of recombination hotspots becomes significant. Furthermore, recombination is a complex process. Hence, multiple proteins acting as machinery, rather than individual proteins, are more likely to carry out this process in a precise and stable manner. Therefore, the extension of the prediction of individual trans-regulators to protein complexes is also highly desired. In this paper, we introduce a pipeline to identify genes and protein complexes associated with recombination hotspots. First, we prioritize proteins associated with hotspots based on their preference of binding to hotspots and coldspots. Second, using the above identified genes as seeds, we apply the Random Walk with Restart algorithm (RWR) to propagate their influences to other proteins in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Hence, many proteins without DNA-binding information will also be assigned a score to implicate their roles in recombination hotspots. Third, we construct sub-PPI networks induced by top genes ranked by RWR for various species (e.g., yeast, human and mouse) and detect protein complexes in those sub-PPI networks. The GO term analysis show that our prioritizing methods and the RWR algorithm are capable of identifying novel genes associated with

  13. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of Canada's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed a two-week IAEA review of the regulatory framework and effectiveness of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for improvement. The IAEA has conveyed initial findings to Canadian authorities; the final report will be submitted by autumn. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of nuclear, radiation, and waste safety experts at the request of the Government of Canada, to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The mission from 31 May to 12 June was a peer review based on IAEA Standards, not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission included sources, facilities and activities regulated by the CNSC: the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs), research reactors and fuel cycle facilities; the refurbishment or licensing of new NPPs; uranium mining; radiation protection and environmental protection programmes; and the implementation of IAEA Code of Conduct on Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. The 21-member team from 13 IAEA States and from the IAEA itself reviewed CNSC's work in all relevant areas: legislative and governmental responsibilities; responsibilities and functions; organization; activities of the regulatory body, including the authorization process, review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, the development of regulations, as well as guides and its the management system of CNSC. The basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment by the CNSC, including an evolution of its strengths and proposed actions to improve its regulatory effectiveness. Mr. Shojiro Matsuura, IRRS Team Leader and President of the Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Association, said the team 'was impressed by the extensive preparation at all CNSC staff levels.' 'We identified a number of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions

  14. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  15. State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources: Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowart, R.; Harrington, C.; Moskovitz, D.; Shirley, W.; Weston, F.; Sedano, R.

    2002-10-01

    Designing and implementing credit-based pilot programs for distributed resources distribution is a low-cost, low-risk opportunity to find out how these resources can help defer or avoid costly electric power system (utility grid) distribution upgrades. This report describes implementation options for deaveraged distribution credits and distributed resource development zones. Developing workable programs implementing these policies can dramatically increase the deployment of distributed resources in ways that benefit distributed resource vendors, users, and distribution utilities. This report is one in the State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources series developed under contract to NREL (see Annual Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance Project: September 2000-September 2001, NREL/SR-560-32733). Other titles in this series are: (1) Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets, NREL/SR-560-32497; (2) Distributed Resources and Electric System Re liability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (3) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR-560-32501.

  16. Module and electronics developments for the ATLAS ITK pixel system

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ATLAS is preparing for an extensive modification of its detector in the course of the planned HL-LHC accelerator upgrade around 2025 which includes a replacement of the entire tracking system by an all-silicon detector (Inner Tracker, ITk). The five innermost layers of ITk will comprise of a pixel detector built of new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the severe HL-LHC environment in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total area of the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice that is expected to take place in 2017. A new on-detector readout chip is designed in the context of the RD53 collaboration in 65 nm CMOS technology. This paper will present the on-going R&D within the ATLAS ITK project towards the new pixel modules and the off-detector electronics. Planar and 3D sensors are being re-designed with cell sizes of 50x50 or 25x100 μm2, compatible with the RD53 chip. A sensor thickness equal or less th...

  17. Energy Projects, Social Licence, Public Acceptance and Regulatory Systems in Canada: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Colton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly difficult in Canada to gain and sustain public acceptance of energy projects. Increased levels of protest, combined with traditional media and social media coverage of opposition, combine to suggest decreased public acceptance of energy projects. Decision-makers have responded accordingly, and a variety of energy projects have either been delayed or put on hold indefinitely. This is true for both conventional and renewable energy projects and in many different regions across the country. A number of proposed energy projects have recently faced opposition from various stakeholder groups. For instance, the decision of the Joint Review Panel for the Northern Gateway Pipeline is being challenged in Canada’s court system. First Nations groups have issued an ultimatum to the Federal Government that it must choose between Site C (a proposed hydro dam and liquefied natural gas development in B.C. Rapid expansion of wind energy projects in Ontario has engendered lengthy and costly appeals and the rise of an anti-wind social movement. In Nova Scotia, tidal energy development is being positioned as a new renewable energy option; gaining public acceptance is critical in light of recent opposition to wind energy development. As these experiences suggest, not only has the regulatory process become more contentious, but also an apparently new concept — social licence — has had popular appeal. This white paper reports on the results of a year-long interdisciplinary collaboration aimed at identifying and summarizing extant research regarding social licence and related concepts, with a particular emphasis on understanding its implications for public acceptance of energy projects in Canada, and their related regulatory processes. In particular, this research addressed the following questions: 1. What is the history and scope of the term ‘social licence’, both in the context of energy project development and more generally? What

  18. Construction and development of an auto-regulatory gene expression system in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chengran; Cui, Wenjing; Cheng, Jintao; Zhou, Li; Guo, Junling; Hu, Xu; Xiao, Guoping; Zhou, Zhemin

    2015-09-21

    Bacillus subtilis is an all-important Gram-positive bacterium of valuable biotechnological utility that has been widely used to over-produce industrially and pharmaceutically relevant proteins. There are a variety of expression systems in terms of types of transcriptional patterns, among which the auto-inducible and growth-phase-dependent promoters are gaining increasing favor due to their inducer-independent feature, allowing for the potential to industrially scale-up. To expand the applicability of the auto-inducible expression system, a novel auto-regulatory expression system coupled with cell density was constructed and developed in B. subtilis using the quorum-sensing related promoter srfA (PsrfA). The promoter of the srf operon was used to construct an expression plasmid with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of PsrfA. The expression displayed a cell-density-dependent pattern in that GFP had a fairly low expression level at the early exponential stage and was highly expressed at the late exponential as well as the stationary stages. Moreover, the recombinant system had a similar expression pattern in wild-type B. subtilis 168, WB600, and WB800, as well as in B. subtilis 168 derivative strain 1681, with the complete deletion of PsrfA, indicating the excellent compatibility of this system. Noticeably, the expression strength of PsrfA was enhanced by optimizing the -10 and -35 core sequence by substituting both sequences with consensus sequences. Importantly, the expression pattern was successfully developed in an auto-regulatory cell-density coupling system by the simple addition of glucose in which GFP could not be strongly expressed until glucose was depleted, resulting in a greater amount of the GFP product and increased cell density. The expression system was eventually tested by the successful over-production of aminopeptidase to a desired level. The auto-regulatory cell density coupling system that is mediated by PsrfA is a novel expression

  19. Software requirements specification for the program analysis and control system risk management module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAEFER, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    TWR Program Analysis and Control System Risk Module is used to facilitate specific data processes surrounding the Risk Management program of the Tank Waste Retrieval environment. This document contains the Risk Management system requirements of the database system

  20. Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Sarah R. [J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Rodemeyer, Michael [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Garfinkel, Michele S. [EMBO, Heidelberg (Germany); Friedman, Robert M. [J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as “synthetic biology” has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDA’s authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic

  1. A Story of Three Bank-Regulatory Legal Systems: Contract, Financial Management Regulation and Fiduciary Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Frankel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available How should banks be regulated to avoid their failure? Banks must control the risks they take with depositors' money. If depositors lose their trust in their banks, and demand their money, the banks will fail. This article describes three legal bank regulatory systems: Contract with depositors (U.S.; a mix of contract and trust law, but going towards trust (Japan and a full trust-fiduciary law regulating banks (Israel. The article concludes that bank regulation, which limits the banks' risks and conflicts of interest, helps create trustworthy banks that serve their country best.

  2. Research on Retro-reflecting Modulation in Space Optical Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifeng; Wang, Guannan

    2018-01-01

    Retro-reflecting modulation space optical communication is a new type of free space optical communication technology. Unlike traditional free space optical communication system, it applys asymmetric optical systems to reduce the size, weight and power consumption of the system and can effectively solve the limits of traditional free space optical communication system application, so it can achieve the information transmission. This paper introduces the composition and working principle of retro-reflecting modulation optical communication system, analyzes the link budget of this system, reviews the types of optical system and optical modulator, summarizes this technology future research direction and application prospects.

  3. Module Ten: Transformers; Basic Electricity and Electronics Individualized Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The module introduces a very important electrical device, the transformer. The module is divided into six lessons: transformer construction, transformer theory and operation, turns and voltage ratios, power and current, transformer efficiency, and semiconductor rectifiers. Each lesson consists of an overview, a list of study resources, lesson…

  4. Development of Regulatory Documents for Creation (Upgrade) of Physical Protection Systems under the Russian/American MPC and A Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmaylov, Alexandr V.; Babkin, Vladimir; Kurov, Valeriy; Piskarev, Alexander; O'Brien, Patricia E.; Wright, Troy L.; Schlegel, Stephen C.; Hazel, Michael J.; Miller, Daniel R.; Tuttle, John D.; Kovchegin, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    The development of new or the upgrade of existing physical protection systems (PPS) for nuclear facilities involves a multi-step and multidimensional process. The process consists of conceptual design, design, and commissioning stages. The activities associated with each of these stages are governed by Russian government and agency regulations. To ensure a uniform approach to development or upgrading of PPS at Russian nuclear facilities, the development of a range of regulatory and methodological documents is necessary. Some issues of PPS development are covered by the regulatory documents developed by Rosatom, as well as other Russian agencies with nuclear facilities under their control. This regulatory development has been accomplished as part of the U.S.-Russian MPC and A cooperation or independently by the Russian Federation. While regulatory coverage is extensive, there are a number of issues such as vulnerability analysis, effectiveness assessment, upgrading PPS, and protection of information systems for PPS that require additional regulations be developed. This paper reports on the status of regulatory coverage for PPS development or upgrade, and outlines a new approach to regulatory document development. It describes the evolutionary process of regulatory development through experience gained in the design, development and implementation of PPS as well as experience gained through the cooperative efforts of Russian and U.S. experts involved the development of MPC and A regulations.

  5. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Y. C. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage.

  7. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage

  8. A NAP-AAO3 Regulatory Module Promotes Chlorophyll Degradation via ABA Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Leaves[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Chlorophyll degradation is an important part of leaf senescence, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. Excised leaves of an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) transcription factor mutant (nap) exhibited lower transcript levels of known chlorophyll degradation genes, STAY-GREEN1 (SGR1), NON-YELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), PHEOPHYTINASE (PPH), and PHEIDE a OXYGENASE (PaO), and higher chlorophyll retention than the wild type during dark-induced senescence. Transcriptome coexpression analysis revealed that abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism/signaling genes were disproportionately represented among those positively correlated with NAP expression. ABA levels were abnormally low in nap leaves during extended darkness. The ABA biosynthetic genes 9-CIS-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE2, ABA DEFICIENT3, and ABSCISIC ALDEHYDE OXIDASE3 (AAO3) exhibited abnormally low transcript levels in dark-treated nap leaves. NAP transactivated the promoter of AAO3 in mesophyll cell protoplasts, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NAP can bind directly to a segment (−196 to −162 relative to the ATG start codon) of the AAO3 promoter. Exogenous application of ABA increased the transcript levels of SGR1, NYC1, PPH, and PaO and suppressed the stay-green phenotype of nap leaves during extended darkness. Overexpression of AAO3 in nap leaves also suppressed the stay-green phenotype under extended darkness. Collectively, the results show that NAP promotes chlorophyll degradation by enhancing transcription of AAO3, which leads to increased levels of the senescence-inducing hormone ABA. PMID:25516602

  9. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules, F9-F11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with three of the functional modules in the code. Those are the Morse-SGC for the SCALE system, Heating 7.2, and KENO V.a. The manual describes the latest released versions of the codes.

  10. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules, F9-F11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with three of the functional modules in the code. Those are the Morse-SGC for the SCALE system, Heating 7.2, and KENO V.a. The manual describes the latest released versions of the codes

  11. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Willett, Jonathan W; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2016-04-01

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of GSR-regulated genes

  12. Fusobacterium nucleatum binding to complement regulatory protein CD46 modulates the expression and secretion of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases by oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtout, Hayette; Chandad, Fatiha; Rojo, Jose M; Grenier, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth. Gingival epithelial cells are an important mechanical barrier and participate in the host inflammatory response to periodontopathogens. The aim of the present study is to investigate the capacity of Fusobacterium nucleatum to bind to the complement regulatory protein CD46 expressed by oral epithelial cells and to determine the impact of the binding on the gene expression and protein secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 by oral epithelial cells. Binding of recombinant human CD46 to the surface of F. nucleatum was demonstrated by immunologic assays. After stimulation of oral epithelial cells with F. nucleatum, gene expression was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis while protein secretion was monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Heat and protease treatments of bacterial cells reduced CD46 binding. F. nucleatum-bound CD46 mediated the cleavage of C3b in the presence of factor I. Stimulating oral epithelial cells with F. nucleatum at a multiplicity of infection of 50 resulted in a significant upregulation of the gene expression and protein secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-9 by oral epithelial cells. However, pretreating the epithelial cells with an anti-CD46 polyclonal antibody attenuated the production of IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-9 in response to F. nucleatum. Such an inhibitory effect was not observed with non-specific antibodies. The present study demonstrates that F. nucleatum can bind the complement regulatory protein CD46. The interaction of F. nucleatum with epithelial cell surface CD46 may contribute to increasing the levels of proinflammatory mediators and MMPs in periodontal sites and consequently modulate tissue destruction.

  13. Conserved regulatory modules in the Sox9 testis-specific enhancer predict roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Harley, Vincent R

    2010-03-01

    While the primary sex determining switch varies between vertebrate species, a key downstream event in testicular development, namely the male-specific up-regulation of Sox9, is conserved. To date, only two sex determining switch genes have been identified, Sry in mammals and the Dmrt1-related gene Dmy (Dmrt1bY) in the medaka fish Oryzias latipes. In mice, Sox9 expression is evidently up-regulated by SRY and maintained by SOX9 both of which directly activate the core 1.3 kb testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TESCO). How Sox9 expression is up-regulated and maintained in species without Sry (i.e. non-mammalian species) is not understood. In this study, we have undertaken an in-depth comparative genomics approach and show that TESCO contains an evolutionarily conserved region (ECR) of 180 bp which is present in marsupials, monotremes, birds, reptiles and amphibians. The ECR contains highly conserved modules that predict regulatory roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination/differentiation. Our data suggest that tetrapods share common aspects of Sox9 regulation in the testis, despite having different sex determining switch mechanisms. They also suggest that Sox9 autoregulation is an ancient mechanism shared by all tetrapods, raising the possibility that in mammals, SRY evolved by mimicking this regulation. The validation of ECR regulatory sequences conserved from human to frogs will provide new insights into vertebrate sex determination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy reduction for a dual circuit cooling water system using advanced regulatory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, C.J.; Craig, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potentially reduce energy required by a dual circuit cooling water system by 30%. • Accomplished using an advanced regulatory control and switching strategy. • No formal process model is required. • Can be implemented on control system hardware commonly used in industry. - Abstract: Various process utilities are used in the petrochemical industry as auxiliary variables to facilitate the addition/removal of energy to/from the process, power process equipment and inhibit unwanted reaction. Optimisation activities usually focus on the process itself or on the utility consumption though the generation and distribution of these utilities are often overlooked in this regard. Many utilities are prepared or generated far from the process plant and have to be transported or transmitted, giving rise to more losses and potential inefficiencies. To illustrate the potential benefit of utility optimisation, this paper explores the control of a dual circuit cooling water system with focus on energy reduction subject process constraints. This is accomplished through the development of an advanced regulatory control (ARC) and switching strategy which does not require the development of a system model, only rudimentary knowledge of the behaviour of the process and system constraints. The novelty of this manuscript lies in the fact that it demonstrates that significant energy savings can be obtained by applying ARC to a process utility containing both discrete and continuous dynamics. Furthermore, the proposed ARC strategy does not require a plant model, uses only existing plant equipment, and can be implemented on control system hardware commonly used in industry. The simulation results indicate energy saving potential in the region of 30% on the system under investigation.

  15. A developmental systems perspective on epistasis: computational exploration of mutational interactions in model developmental regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayson Gutiérrez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the information contained in genotypes is translated into complex phenotypic traits (i.e. embryonic expression patterns depends on its decoding by a multilayered hierarchy of biomolecular systems (regulatory networks. Each layer of this hierarchy displays its own regulatory schemes (i.e. operational rules such as +/- feedback and associated control parameters, resulting in characteristic variational constraints. This process can be conceptualized as a mapping issue, and in the context of highly-dimensional genotype-phenotype mappings (GPMs epistatic events have been shown to be ubiquitous, manifested in non-linear correspondences between changes in the genotype and their phenotypic effects. In this study I concentrate on epistatic phenomena pervading levels of biological organization above the genetic material, more specifically the realm of molecular networks. At this level, systems approaches to studying GPMs are specially suitable to shed light on the mechanistic basis of epistatic phenomena. To this aim, I constructed and analyzed ensembles of highly-modular (fully interconnected networks with distinctive topologies, each displaying dynamic behaviors that were categorized as either arbitrary or functional according to early patterning processes in the Drosophila embryo. Spatio-temporal expression trajectories in virtual syncytial embryos were simulated via reaction-diffusion models. My in silico mutational experiments show that: 1 the average fitness decay tendency to successively accumulated mutations in ensembles of functional networks indicates the prevalence of positive epistasis, whereas in ensembles of arbitrary networks negative epistasis is the dominant tendency; and 2 the evaluation of epistatic coefficients of diverse interaction orders indicates that, both positive and negative epistasis are more prevalent in functional networks than in arbitrary ones. Overall, I conclude that the phenotypic and fitness effects of

  16. Thermal and optical performance of encapsulation systems for flat-plate photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minning, C. P.; Coakley, J. F.; Perrygo, C. M.; Garcia, A., III; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    The electrical power output from a photovoltaic module is strongly influenced by the thermal and optical characteristics of the module encapsulation system. Described are the methodology and computer model for performing fast and accurate thermal and optical evaluations of different encapsulation systems. The computer model is used to evaluate cell temperature, solar energy transmittance through the encapsulation system, and electric power output for operation in a terrestrial environment. Extensive results are presented for both superstrate-module and substrate-module design schemes which include different types of silicon cell materials, pottants, and antireflection coatings.

  17. Increasing the bit rate in OCDMA systems using pulse position modulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Vahid R; Saghari, Poorya; Haghi, Mahta; Ebrahimi, Paniz; Willner, Alan E

    2007-09-17

    We have experimentally demonstrated two novel pulse position modulation techniques, namely Double Pulse Position Modulation (2-PPM) and Differential Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) in Time-Wavelength OCDMA systems that will operate at a higher bit rate compared to traditional OOK-OCDMA systems with the same bandwidth. With 2-PPM technique, the number of active users will be more than DPPM while their bit rate is almost the same. Both techniques provide variable quality of service in OCDMA networks.

  18. Amplitude modulator of radio frequency system for 1.3 GeV Electron Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1977-01-01

    The amplitude modulator for the 8F68 VHF high power tetrode tube has been designed and constructed. The modulator was constructed with solid components such as transistors and integrated circuits. In case of changing circuit elements of the modulator to solid components from tubes, many attentions are paid for preventing the noise and the over load, due to connection between the low power circuits (modulator) and high power circuits (VHF amplifier). The new modulator is constructed with taking careful consideration into selection of the method of the power control and the protection system. (auth.)

  19. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  20. Roselle Polyphenols Exert Potent Negative Inotropic Effects via Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Regulatory Channels in Isolated Rat Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yi-Cheng; Budin, Siti Balkis; Othman, Faizah; Latip, Jalifah; Zainalabidin, Satirah

    2017-07-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.) calyces have demonstrated propitious cardioprotective effects in animal and clinical studies; however, little is known about its action on cardiac mechanical function. This study was undertaken to investigate direct action of roselle polyphenols (RP) on cardiac function in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. We utilized RP extract which consists of 12 flavonoids and seven phenolic acids (as shown by HPLC profiling) and has a safe concentration range between 125 and 500 μg/ml in this study. Direct perfusion of RP in concentration-dependent manner lowered systolic function of the heart as shown by lowered LVDP and dP/dt max , suggesting a negative inotropic effect. RP also reduced heart rate (negative chronotropic action) while simultaneously increasing maximal velocity of relaxation (positive lusitropic action). Conversely, RP perfusion increased coronary pressure, an indicator for improvement in coronary blood flow. Inotropic responses elicited by pharmacological agonists for L-type Ca 2+ channel [(±)-Bay K 8644], ryanodine receptor (4-chloro-m-cresol), β-adrenergic receptor (isoproterenol) and SERCA blocker (thapsigargin) were all abolished by RP. In conclusion, RP elicits negative inotropic, negative chronotropic and positive lusitropic responses by possibly modulating calcium entry, release and reuptake in the heart. Our findings have shown the potential use of RP as a therapeutic agent to treat conditions like arrhythmia.

  1. The OsSPL16-GW7 regulatory module determines grain shape and simultaneously improves rice yield and grain quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaokui; Li, Shan; Liu, Qian; Wu, Kun; Zhang, Jianqing; Wang, Shuansuo; Wang, Yi; Chen, Xiangbin; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Caixia; Wang, Feng; Huang, Haixiang; Fu, Xiangdong

    2015-08-01

    The deployment of heterosis in the form of hybrid rice varieties has boosted grain yield, but grain quality improvement still remains a challenge. Here we show that a quantitative trait locus for rice grain quality, qGW7, reflects allelic variation of GW7, a gene encoding a TONNEAU1-recruiting motif protein with similarity to C-terminal motifs of the human centrosomal protein CAP350. Upregulation of GW7 expression was correlated with the production of more slender grains, as a result of increased cell division in the longitudinal direction and decreased cell division in the transverse direction. OsSPL16 (GW8), an SBP-domain transcription factor that regulates grain width, bound directly to the GW7 promoter and repressed its expression. The presence of a semidominant GW7(TFA) allele from tropical japonica rice was associated with higher grain quality without the yield penalty imposed by the Basmati gw8 allele. Manipulation of the OsSPL16-GW7 module thus represents a new strategy to simultaneously improve rice yield and grain quality.

  2. Exercise training modulates the hepatic renin-angiotensin system in fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Eliete Dalla Corte; Medeiros, Renata Frauches; Giori, Isabele Gomes; Lima, Juliana Bittencourt Silveira; Bento-Bernardes, Thais; Gaique, Thaiane Gadioli; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Fernandes, Tiago; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Vieira, Carla Paulo; Conte-Junior, Carlos Adam; Oliveira, Karen Jesus; Nobrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? What are the effects of exercise training on the hepatic renin-angiotensin system and their contribution to damage resulting from fructose overload in rats? What is the main finding and its importance? Exercise training attenuated the deleterious actions of the angiotensin-converting enzyme/angiotensin II/angiotensin II type 1 receptor axis and increased expression of the counter-regulatory (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin (1-7)/Mas receptor) axis in the liver. Therefore, our study provides evidence that exercise training modulates the hepatic renin-angiotensin system, which contributes to reducing the progression of metabolic dysfunction and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in fructose-fed rats. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome. We investigated whether the hepatic RAS is modulated by exercise training and whether this modulation improves the deleterious effects of fructose overload in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into (n = 8 each) control (CT), exercise control (CT-Ex), high-fructose (HFr) and exercise high-fructose (HFr-Ex) groups. Fructose-drinking rats received d-fructose (100 g l -1 ). After 2 weeks, CT-Ex and HFr-Ex rats were assigned to a treadmill training protocol at moderate intensity for 8 weeks (60 min day -1 , 4 days per week). We assessed body mass, glucose and lipid metabolism, hepatic histopathology, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity, the angiotensin concentration and the expression profile of proteins affecting the hepatic RAS, gluconeogenesis and inflammation. Neither fructose overload nor exercise training influenced body mass gain and serum ACE and ACE2 activity. The HFr group showed hyperinsulinaemia, but exercise training normalized this parameter. Exercise training was effective in preventing hepatic steatosis and in preventing triacylglycerol and

  3. The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

    1995-09-01

    One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

  4. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12432.001 PMID:26705699

  5. Quality Management System at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husarcek, J.; Novak, S.

    2008-01-01

    The process-oriented quality management system (QMS) implemented at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in compliance with the EN ISO 9001:2001 standard is described. The history of the establishment and development of the QMS is given. The main, managerial and supporting processes with respect to defined activities are specified, and a scheme of their interactions is presented. The contents of the Quality Manual content and the structure of the system documentation are briefly described. The responsibilities for the operation and improvements of the QMS are described along with the methods applied (internal and external audits, self-assessment - Common Assessment Framework (CAF)). Examples of established quality objectives and indicators for some processes are provided. A future development of the QMS is expected in accordance with the relevant ISO Standard and IAEA recommendations and based on evaluation of the effectiveness of the critical system. (orig.)

  6. Sex modulates approach systems and impulsivity in substance dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robert I; Krmpotich, Theodore; Thompson, Laetitia L; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K; Banich, Marie T; Tanabe, Jody

    2013-11-01

    Personality traits such as pathological engagement in approach behaviors, high levels of impulsivity and heightened negative affect are consistently observed in substance dependent individuals (SDI). The clinical course of addiction has been shown to differ between sexes. For example, women increase their rates of consumption of some drugs of abuse more quickly than men. Despite the potential influence of personality and sex on features of addiction, few studies have investigated the interaction of these factors in substance dependence. Fifty-one SDI (26 males, 25 females) and 66 controls (41 males, 25 females) completed the Behavioral Inhibition/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) Scales, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS-X). Data were analyzed with 2×2 ANCOVAs testing for main effects of group, sex and group by sex interactions, adjusting for education level. Significant group by sex interactions were observed for BAS scores [F(1,116)=7.03, pImpulsiveness [F(1,116)=6.11, pimpulsivity followed by male SDI, male controls, and finally female controls. SDI scored higher on negative affect [F(1,116)=25.23, pwomen than men [F(1,116)=14.03, pimpulsivity in SDI women relative to SDI men and control women suggest that personality traits that have been previously associated with drug use may be modulated by sex. These factors may contribute to differences in the disease course observed in male compared to female drug users. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Status Report on NEAMS System Analysis Module Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fanning, T. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yu, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Under the Reactor Product Line (RPL) of DOE-NE’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, an advanced SFR System Analysis Module (SAM) is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The goal of the SAM development is to provide fast-running, improved-fidelity, whole-plant transient analyses capabilities. SAM utilizes an object-oriented application framework MOOSE), and its underlying meshing and finite-element library libMesh, as well as linear and non-linear solvers PETSc, to leverage modern advanced software environments and numerical methods. It also incorporates advances in physical and empirical models and seeks closure models based on information from high-fidelity simulations and experiments. This report provides an update on the SAM development, and summarizes the activities performed in FY15 and the first quarter of FY16. The tasks include: (1) implement the support of 2nd-order finite elements in SAM components for improved accuracy and computational efficiency; (2) improve the conjugate heat transfer modeling and develop pseudo 3-D full-core reactor heat transfer capabilities; (3) perform verification and validation tests as well as demonstration simulations; (4) develop the coupling requirements for SAS4A/SASSYS-1 and SAM integration.

  8. Experimental and theoretical analysis of cell module output performance for a thermophotovoltaic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiaojie; Ye, Hong; Xu, Yexin; Shen, Mingrong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wu, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An accurate theoretical model for thermophotovoltaic system is constructed. • Parallel connected module is superior if radiator temperature is uneven. • Series connected module is superior if cell temperature is uneven. • Short circuit current of series module rises when the shunt resistance decreases. • Fill factor is not always accurate to evaluate the module performance. - Abstract: An experimental thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system with a cylindrical-geometry radiator was established to test the output performances of modules under different conditions. The results demonstrate that the output performance of a cell module decreases when the combustion power increases because of the uneven temperature of the radiator or cells. On this basis, a theoretical model for a TPV system was constructed to compare the performance under different conditions of the series-connected (SC) module and the parallel-connected (PC) module, and was verified by the experimental results. The influences of the temperature gradient of the radiator or the cell module, and the series and shunt resistance of the TPV cell on the module performance were analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the PC module can effectively reduce the mismatch loss of output power caused by the uneven radiator temperature. The PC module, for instance, has a maximum output power of 2.54 times higher than that of the SC module when the radiator temperature difference is 500 K. However, the output performance of the module connected in series is superior to the PC module while the cell temperature is non-uniform. The output power of the SC module is 9.93% higher than that of the PC module at the cell temperature difference of 125 K. The short circuit current of the SC module is sensitive to the series and shunt resistance if the radiator temperature distribution is non-uniform. As the shunt resistance falls from ∞ to 0.5 Ω, the current varies from 1.757 A to 4.488 A when the

  9. Emission Spectrum Property of Modulated Atom-Field Coupling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yun-Feng; Feng Jian; Li Yue-Ke

    2013-01-01

    The emission spectrum of a two-level atom interacting with a single mode radiation field in the case of periodic oscillation coupling coefficient is investigated. A general expression for the emission spectrum is derived. The numerical results for the initial field in pure number stare are calculated. It is found that the effect of the coupling coefficient modulation on the spectral structure is very obvious in the case of a low modulation frequency and larger amplitude when the initial field is vacuum, which is potentially useful for exploring a modulated light source. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. The biometric-based module of smart grid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Ermoshkina, A.

    2015-10-01

    Within Smart Grid concept the flexible biometric-based module base on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and selective Neural Network is developed. The formation of the selective Neural Network the biometric-based module uses the method which includes three main stages: preliminary processing of the image, face localization and face recognition. Experiments on the Yale face database show that (i) selective Neural Network exhibits promising classification capability for face detection, recognition problems; and (ii) the proposed biometric-based module achieves near real-time face detection, recognition speed and the competitive performance, as compared to some existing subspaces-based methods.

  11. A balance of activity in brain control and reward systems predicts self-regulatory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Richard B; Chen, Pin-Hao A; Huckins, Jeremy F; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Kelley, William M; Heatherton, Todd F

    2017-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging work has shown that increased reward-related activity following exposure to food cues is predictive of self-control failure. The balance model suggests that self-regulation failures result from an imbalance in reward and executive control mechanisms. However, an open question is whether the relative balance of activity in brain systems associated with executive control (vs reward) supports self-regulatory outcomes when people encounter tempting cues in daily life. Sixty-nine chronic dieters, a population known for frequent lapses in self-control, completed a food cue-reactivity task during an fMRI scanning session, followed by a weeklong sampling of daily eating behaviors via ecological momentary assessment. We related participants' food cue activity in brain systems associated with executive control and reward to real-world eating patterns. Specifically, a balance score representing the amount of activity in brain regions associated with self-regulatory control, relative to automatic reward-related activity, predicted dieters' control over their eating behavior during the following week. This balance measure may reflect individual self-control capacity and be useful for examining self-regulation success in other domains and populations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Modulation of hepatic reticuloendothelial system phagocytosis by pancreatic hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, R P; McClellan, C C

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin on reticuloendothelial system (RES) phagocytosis both in vivo and in the isolated perfused livers of rats. Chronic pancreatic hormonal treatment consisted of twice daily injections SC of NPH insulin with doses ranging from 0.75 U on day 1 to 9.0 U on day 13 and unchanged doses of glucagon (200 micrograms) and somatostatin (50 micrograms). Chronic treatment with insulin significantly depressed by 48% intravascular phagocytosis of colloidal carbon administered IV at a dose of 8 mg/100 g, while glucagon and somatostatin stimulated macrophage endocytic function by 32% and 26%, respectively, compared to the control value. Acute treatment with the three pancreatic hormones at 30 min prior to carbon administration similarly produced insulin depression as well as glucagon and somatostatin stimulation of RES phagocytosis. Addition of the three hormones at near physiologic concentrations (20 ng/ml for insulin, 10 ng/ml for glucagon, and 5 ng/ml for somatostatin) to the recirculating perfusate of isolated perfused rat livers simultaneous with 24 mg of colloidal carbon likewise resulted in phagocytic reduction after insulin and enhancement after glucagon and somatostatin. Experiments involving insulin in vitro with isolated perfused livers as well as glucose replacement therapy concomitant with insulin in vivo demonstrated that hypoglycemia is not necessary for phagocytic depression by insulin while severe hypoglycemia in the perfusion medium is sufficient to depress carbon uptake by isolated perfused livers independent of insulin. Both pancreatic hormones and the level of glycemia seem to be important in modulating hepatic reticuloendothelial system phagocytosis.

  13. Distal loop flexibility of a regulatory domain modulates dynamics and activity of C-terminal SRC kinase (csk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulyman Barkho

    Full Text Available The Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs regulate numerous aspects of cell growth and differentiation and are under the principal control of the C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk. Csk and SFKs share a modular design with the kinase domain downstream of the N-terminal SH2 and SH3 domains that regulate catalytic function and membrane localization. While the function of interfacial segments in these multidomain kinases are well-investigated, little is known about how surface sites and long-range, allosteric coupling control protein dynamics and catalytic function. The SH2 domain of Csk is an essential component for the down-regulation of all SFKs. A unique feature of the SH2 domain of Csk is the tight turn in place of the canonical CD loop in a surface site far removed from kinase domain interactions. In this study, we used a combination of experimental and computational methods to probe the importance of this difference by constructing a Csk variant with a longer SH2 CD loop to mimic the flexibility found in homologous kinase SH2 domains. Our results indicate that while the fold and function of the isolated domain and the full-length kinase are not affected by loop elongation, native protein dynamics that are essential for efficient catalysis are perturbed. We also identify key motifs and routes through which the distal SH2 site might influence catalysis at the active site. This study underscores the sensitivity of intramolecular signaling and catalysis to native protein dynamics that arise from modest changes in allosteric regions while providing a potential strategy to alter intrinsic activity and signaling modulation.

  14. Cost-effective bidirectional digitized radio-over-fiber systems employing sigma delta modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Woon; Jung, HyunDo; Park, Jung Ho

    2016-11-01

    We propose a cost effective digitized radio-over-fiber (D-RoF) system employing a sigma delta modulation (SDM) and a bidirectional transmission technique using phase modulated downlink and intensity modulated uplink. SDM is transparent to different radio access technologies and modulation formats, and more suitable for a downlink of wireless system because a digital to analog converter (DAC) can be avoided at the base station (BS). Also, Central station and BS share the same light source by using a phase modulation for the downlink and an intensity modulation for the uplink transmission. Avoiding DACs and light sources have advantages in terms of cost reduction, power consumption, and compatibility with conventional wireless network structure. We have designed a cost effective bidirectional D-RoF system using a low pass SDM and measured the downlink and uplink transmission performance in terms of error vector magnitude, signal spectra, and constellations, which are based on the 10MHz LTE 64-QAM standard.

  15. Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    7 5 T H A I R B A S E W I N G Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module 2009 Environment...Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  16. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  17. Design of secure digital communication systems using chaotic modulation, cryptography and chaotic synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, T.-I.; Liao, T.-L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a secure digital communication system based on chaotic modulation, cryptography, and chaotic synchronization techniques. The proposed system consists of a Chaotic Modulator (CM), a Chaotic Secure Transmitter (CST), a Chaotic Secure Receiver (CSR) and a Chaotic Demodulator (CDM). The CM module incorporates a chaotic system and a novel Chaotic Differential Peaks Keying (CDPK) modulation scheme to generate analog patterns corresponding to the input digital bits. The CST and CSR modules are designed such that a single scalar signal is transmitted in the public channel. Furthermore, by giving certain structural conditions of a particular class of chaotic system, the CST and the nonlinear observer-based CSR with an appropriate observer gain are constructed to synchronize with each other. These two slave systems are driven simultaneously by the transmitted signal and are designed to synchronize and generate appropriate cryptography keys for encryption and decryption purposes. In the CDM module, a nonlinear observer is designed to estimate the chaotic modulating system in the CM. A demodulation mechanism is then applied to decode the transmitted input digital bits. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated through the numerical simulation of an illustrative communication system. Synchronization between the chaotic circuits of the transmitter and receiver modules is guaranteed through the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, the security features of the proposed system in the event of attack by an intruder in either the time domain or the frequency domain are discussed

  18. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Control modules C4, C6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume is part of the manual related to the control modules for the newest updated version of this computational package.

  19. Greenhouse Module for Space System: A Lunar Greenhouse Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeidler Conrad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the next 10 to 20 years humankind will return to the Moon and/or travel to Mars. It is likely that astronauts will eventually build permanent settlements there, as a base for long-term crew tended research tasks. It is obvious that the crew of such settlements will need food to survive. With current mission architectures the provision of food for longduration missions away from Earth requires a significant number of resupply flights. Furthermore, it would be infeasible to provide the crew with continuous access to fresh produce, specifically crops with high water content such as tomatoes and peppers, on account of their limited shelf life. A greenhouse as an integrated part of a planetary surface base would be one solution to solve this challenge for long-duration missions. Astronauts could grow their own fresh fruit and vegetables in-situ to be more independent from supply from Earth. This paper presents the results of the design project for such a greenhouse, which was carried out by DLR and its partners within the framework of the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA program. The consortium performed an extensive system analysis followed by a definition of system and subsystem requirements for greenhouse modules. Over 270 requirements were defined in this process. Afterwards the consortium performed an in-depth analysis of illumination strategies, potential growth accommodations and shapes for the external structure. Five different options for the outer shape were investigated, each of them with a set of possible internal configurations. Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process, the different concept options were evaluated and ranked against each other. The design option with the highest ranking was an inflatable outer structure with a rigid inner core, in which the subsystems are mounted. The inflatable shell is wrapped around the core during launch and transit to the lunar surface. The paper provides an overview of the

  20. E3Net: a system for exploring E3-mediated regulatory networks of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngwoong; Lee, Hodong; Park, Jong C; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) is a key enzyme targeting specific substrates in diverse cellular processes for ubiquitination and degradation. The existing findings of substrate specificity of E3 are, however, scattered over a number of resources, making it difficult to study them together with an integrative view. Here we present E3Net, a web-based system that provides a comprehensive collection of available E3-substrate specificities and a systematic framework for the analysis of E3-mediated regulatory networks of diverse cellular functions. Currently, E3Net contains 2201 E3s and 4896 substrates in 427 organisms and 1671 E3-substrate specific relations between 493 E3s and 1277 substrates in 42 organisms, extracted mainly from MEDLINE abstracts and UniProt comments with an automatic text mining method and additional manual inspection and partly from high throughput experiment data and public ubiquitination databases. The significant functions and pathways of the extracted E3-specific substrate groups were identified from a functional enrichment analysis with 12 functional category resources for molecular functions, protein families, protein complexes, pathways, cellular processes, cellular localization, and diseases. E3Net includes interactive analysis and navigation tools that make it possible to build an integrative view of E3-substrate networks and their correlated functions with graphical illustrations and summarized descriptions. As a result, E3Net provides a comprehensive resource of E3s, substrates, and their functional implications summarized from the regulatory network structures of E3-specific substrate groups and their correlated functions. This resource will facilitate further in-depth investigation of ubiquitination-dependent regulatory mechanisms. E3Net is freely available online at http://pnet.kaist.ac.kr/e3net.

  1. Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Casper; Chen, Min; Schaltz, Erik

    Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) modules are often connected in a series and/or parallel system in order to match the TEG system voltage with the load voltage. However, in order to be able to control the power production of the TEG system a DC/DC converter is inserted between the TEG system...... and the load. The DC/DC converter is under the control of a Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) which insures that the TEG system produces the maximum possible power to the load. However, if the conditions, e.g. temperature, health, etc., of the TEG modules are different each TEG module will not produce its...

  2. A 'V' shaped superconducting levitation module for lift and guidance of a magnetic transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ovidio, G.; Crisi, F.; Lanzara, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel, YBCO based, magnetic transportation system (MagTranS) is presented and described. The feasibility of this system has been successfully tested and confirmed in a laboratory using a scaled demonstrator system. The MagTranS levitation system uses a stable, self-balancing 'V' shaped superconducting module for both lift and guidance of vehicles. The work concept of the MagTranS levitation module is described and differences with regards to the maglev current systems are highlighted. The results of levitation tests performed using a measurement set-up are presented and discussed. Lastly, levitation module performance studies are also carried out using numerical finite element analysis

  3. Root Systems Biology: Integrative Modeling across Scales, from Gene Regulatory Networks to the Rhizosphere1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kristine; Porco, Silvana; Lobet, Guillaume; Zappala, Susan; Mooney, Sacha; Draye, Xavier; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and genomic approaches in model organisms have advanced our understanding of root biology over the last decade. Recently, however, systems biology and modeling have emerged as important approaches, as our understanding of root regulatory pathways has become more complex and interpreting pathway outputs has become less intuitive. To relate root genotype to phenotype, we must move beyond the examination of interactions at the genetic network scale and employ multiscale modeling approaches to predict emergent properties at the tissue, organ, organism, and rhizosphere scales. Understanding the underlying biological mechanisms and the complex interplay between systems at these different scales requires an integrative approach. Here, we describe examples of such approaches and discuss the merits of developing models to span multiple scales, from network to population levels, and to address dynamic interactions between plants and their environment. PMID:24143806

  4. The regulatory system of monitoring workers in Germany for intakes of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalheimer, A.; Henrichs, K.

    1996-01-01

    In Germany, the working group 'Incorporation Monitoring' of the German-Swiss Radiation Protection Association defined a new standard for the monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to radioactive material. During the last two years this draft has been accepted by the German government in the form of three guidelines. The purpose of the approach was the installation of a consistent state-of-the-art system: defining clear criteria for the necessity of routine and special monitoring programs, giving guidelines for monitoring programs ensuring that dose assessments are as reliable as necessary with the lowest possible expenses, standardizing as far as possible the procedures of dose assessments, and guaranteeing the necessary quality standards. The scientific basis of this regulatory system are the publications 30 and 54 of lCRP. (author)

  5. Onset of secondary flow in the modulated Taylor-Couette system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.; Swift, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The critical Reynolds number for the linear instability of primary flow is calculated for a Taylor-Couette system in which the rotation rate of either cylinder is modulated sinusoidally in time. The method used is based on that of Hall [J. Fluid Mech. 67, 29 (1975)] and is restricted to small amplitudes of modulation but allows for a finite gap. For the case of outer-cylinder modulation, we find that the critical Reynolds number is larger than that for the unmodulated system, while, if the inner cylinder is modulated, it is smaller

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis α-Actinin 2 Modulates Host Immune Responses by Inducing Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells via IL-10 Production from Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Juri; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Park, Soon-Jung

    2017-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a pathogen that triggers severe immune responses in hosts. T. vaginalis α-actinin 2, Tvα-actinin 2, has been used to diagnose trichomoniasis. This study was undertaken to examine the role of Tvα-actinin 2 as an antigenic molecule to induce immune responses from humans. Western blot analysis using anti-Tvα-actinin 2 antibodies indicated its presence in the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis. ELISA was employed to measure cytokine production by vaginal epithelial cells, prostate cells, mouse dendritic cells (DCs), or T cells stimulated with T. vaginalis or Tvα-actinin 2 protein. Both T. vaginalis and rTvα-actinin 2 induced cytokine production from epithelial cell lines, including IL-10. Moreover, CD4+CD25- regulatory T cells (Treg cells) incubated with rTvα-actinin 2-treated DCs produced high levels of IL-10. These data indicate that Tvα-actinin 2 modulates immune responses via IL-10 production by Treg cells.

  7. The PP2A Regulatory Subunit Tap46, a Component of the TOR Signaling Pathway, Modulates Growth and Metabolism in Plants[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Han, Jeong-A; Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Semi; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Tap42/α4, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, is a downstream effector of the target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase, which regulates cell growth in coordination with nutrient and environmental conditions in yeast and mammals. In this study, we characterized the functions and phosphatase regulation of plant Tap46. Depletion of Tap46 resulted in growth arrest and acute plant death with morphological markers of programmed cell death. Tap46 interacted with PP2A and PP2A-like phosphatases PP4 and PP6. Tap46 silencing modulated cellular PP2A activities in a time-dependent fashion similar to TOR silencing. Immunoprecipitated full-length and deletion forms of Arabidopsis thaliana TOR phosphorylated recombinant Tap46 protein in vitro, supporting a functional link between Tap46 and TOR. Tap46 depletion reproduced the signature phenotypes of TOR inactivation, such as dramatic repression of global translation and activation of autophagy and nitrogen mobilization, indicating that Tap46 may act as a positive effector of TOR signaling in controlling those processes. Additionally, Tap46 silencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells caused chromatin bridge formation at anaphase, indicating its role in sister chromatid segregation. These findings suggest that Tap46, in conjunction with associated phosphatases, plays an essential role in plant growth and development as a component of the TOR signaling pathway. PMID:21216945

  8. Viral RNA-Unprimed Rig-I Restrains Stat3 Activation in the Modulation of Regulatory T Cell/Th17 Cell Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Guo, He-Zhou; Li, Xian-Yang; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Wu; Zhao, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Chen, Sai-Juan; Chen, Zhu; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Innate immunity activation by viral RNA-primed retinoid acid inducible gene-I (Rig-I) in CD4 + T cells antagonizes TGFβ signaling to suppress the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, how viral RNA-unliganded Rig-I (apo-Rig-I) modulates Treg generation remains unclear. In this article, we show that, in the absence of viral infection, Treg differentiation of Rig-I -/- CD4 + T cells was compromised, in the presence of increased generation of Th17 cells and overactivation of Stat3, a critical regulator tilting the Treg/Th17 cell balance. Mechanistically, apo-Rig-I physically associates with Stat3, thereby inhibiting Jak1's association with Stat3 while facilitating Shp2's association to inhibit p-Stat3 levels. Interestingly, inhibition of Stat3 ameliorates the Treg/Th17 imbalance and the colitis observed in Rig-I -/- mice. Collectively, these results uncover an independent functional contribution of the apo-Rig-I/Stat3 interaction in the maintenance of Treg/Th17 cell balance. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Analysis of a Plant Transcriptional Regulatory Network Using Transient Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Triviño, Sara; Long, Yuchen; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2017-01-01

    In plant biology, transient expression systems have become valuable approaches used routinely to rapidly study protein expression, subcellular localization, protein-protein interactions, and transcriptional activity prior to in vivo studies. When studying transcriptional regulation, luciferase reporter assays offer a sensitive readout for assaying promoter behavior in response to different regulators or environmental contexts and to confirm and assess the functional relevance of predicted binding sites in target promoters. This chapter aims to provide detailed methods for using luciferase reporter system as a rapid, efficient, and versatile assay to analyze transcriptional regulation of target genes by transcriptional regulators. We describe a series of optimized transient expression systems consisting of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts, infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, and human HeLa cells to study the transcriptional regulations of two well-characterized transcriptional regulators SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT-ROOT (SHR) on one of their targets, CYCLIN D6 (CYCD6).Here, we illustrate similarities and differences in outcomes when using different systems. The plant-based systems revealed that the SCR-SHR complex enhances CYCD6 transcription, while analysis in HeLa cells showed that the complex is not sufficient to strongly induce CYCD6 transcription, suggesting that additional, plant-specific regulators are required for full activation. These results highlight the importance of the system and suggest that including heterologous systems, such as HeLa cells, can provide a more comprehensive analysis of a complex gene regulatory network.

  10. An immune-modulating diet increases the regulatory T cells and reduces T helper 1 inflammatory response in Leishmaniosis affected dogs treated with standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Laura; Annunziatella, Mariangela; Palatucci, Anna Teresa; Lanzilli, Sarah; Rubino, Valentina; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Centenaro, Sara; Guidetti, Gianandrea; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-03

    Clinical appearance and evolution of Canine Leishmaniosis (CL) are the consequence of complex interactions between the parasite and the genetic and immunological backgrounds. We investigated the effect of an immune-modulating diet in CL. Dogs were treated with anti- Leishmania pharmacological therapy combined with standard diet (SD Group) or with the immune-modulating diet (IMMD Group). CD3+ CD4+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) and CD3+ CD4+ IFN-γ + T helper 1 (Th1) were analyzed by flow cytometry. All sick dogs showed low platelet number at diagnosis (T0). A platelet increase was observed after six months (T6) SD Group, with still remaining in the normal range at twelve months (T12). IMMD Group showed an increase in platelet number becoming similar to healthy dogs at T6 and T12. An increase of CD4/CD8 ratio was revealed in SD Group after three months (T3), while at T6 and at T12 the values resembled to T0. The increase in CD4/CD8 ratio at T3 was maintained at T6 and T12 in IMMD Group. A reduction in the percentage of Treg of all sick dogs was observed at T0. A recovery of Treg percentage was observed only at T3 in SD Group, while this effect disappeared at T6 and T12. In contrast, Treg percentage became similar to healthy animals in IMDD Group at T3, T6 and T12. Sick dogs showed an increase of Th1 cells at T0 as compared with healthy dogs. We observed the occurrence of a decrease of Th1 cells from T3 to T12 in SD Group, although a trend of increase was observed at T6 and T12. At variance, IMMD Group dogs showed a progressive decrease of Th1 cells, whose levels became similar to healthy controls at T6 and T12. The immune-modulating diet appears to regulate the immune response in CL during the standard pharmacological treatment. The presence of nutraceuticals in the diet correlates with the decrease of Th1 cells and with the increase of Treg in sick dogs. Therefore, the administration of the specific dietary supplement improved the clinical response to the

  11. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 3. Coupling core module with primary heat transport system module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    1998-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including inter-wrapper flow under various reactor operation conditions. In this work, the core module as a main part of the ACT developed last year, which simulates thermal-hydraulics in the subassemblies and the inter-subassembly gaps, was coupled with an one dimensional plant system thermal-hydraulic analysis code LEDHER to simulate transients in the primary heat transport system and to give appropriate boundary conditions to the core model. The effective algorithm to couple these two calculation modules was developed, which required minimum modification of them. In order to couple these two calculation modules on the computing system, parallel computing technique using PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) programming environment was applied. The code system was applied to analyze an out-of-pile sodium experiment simulating core with 7 subassemblies under transient condition for code verification. It was confirmed that the analytical results show a similar tendency of experimental results. (author)

  12. Regulatory activities; Actividades regulatorias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information.

  13. Time Reversal UWB Communication System: A Novel Modulation Scheme with Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleghi A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new modulation scheme is proposed for a time reversal (TR ultra wide-band (UWB communication system. The new modulation scheme uses the binary pulse amplitude modulation (BPAM and adds a new level of modulation to increase the data rate of a TR UWB communication system. Multiple data bits can be transmitted simultaneously with a cost of little added interference. Bit error rate (BER performance and the maximum achievable data rate of the new modulation scheme are theoretically analyzed. Two separate measurement campaigns are carried out to analyze the proposed modulation scheme. In the first campaign, the frequency responses of a typical indoor channel are measured and the performance is studied by the simulations using the measured frequency responses. Theoretical and the simulative performances are in strong agreement with each other. Furthermore, the BER performance of the proposed modulation scheme is compared with the performance of existing modulation schemes. It is shown that the proposed modulation scheme outperforms QAM and PAM for in an AWGN channel. In the second campaign, an experimental validation of the proposed modulation scheme is done. It is shown that the performances with the two measurement campaigns are in good agreement.

  14. Optimised dispersion management and modulation formats for high speed optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tokle, Torger

    2004-01-01

    both narrow spectral width and good transmission properties. The cost of an optical communication system can be lowered by using longer span lengths to reduce the number of amplifier stations. We experimentally study optimum dispersion compensation schemes for systems with 160 km fibre spans made...... modulated signals. In summary, we show that dispersion management using recently developed fibres in combination with advanced modulation formats significantly improves the transmission performance compared to traditional systems. Multi-level phase modulation is demonstrated at bit rates up to 80 Gbit......This thesis studies dispersion management and modulation formats for optical communication systems using per channel bit rates at and above 10 Gbit/s. Novel modulation formats—including recently proposed multilevel phase modulation—are investigated and demonstrated at bit rates up to 80 Gbit/s. New...

  15. Understanding of phase modulation in two-level systems through inverse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfeld, A.; Hammes, S.L.; Warren, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical and numerical calculations describe the effects of shaped radiation pulses on two-level systems in terms of quantum-mechanical scattering. Previous results obtained in the reduced case of amplitude modulation are extended to the general case of simultaneous amplitude and phase modulation. We show that an infinite family of phase- and amplitude-modulated pulses all generate rectangular inversion profiles. Experimental measurements also verify the theoretical analysis

  16. The NJOY nuclear data processing system: Volume 2, The NJOY, RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Boicourt, R.M.

    1982-05-01

    The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing cross sections and related nuclear parameters from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This volume provides detailed descriptions of the NJOY module, which contains the executive program and utility subroutines used by the other modules, and it discusses the theory and computational methods of four of the modules used for producing pointwise cross sections: RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR

  17. Lithium test module on ITER: engineering design of the tritium recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The design presented is an overview of the tritium recovery system for a lithium module on an ITER type reactor. The design of a tritium recovery system for larger blanket units, sectors, etc. could use the information developed in this report. A goal of this design was to ensure that a reliable, integrated performance of the tritium recovery system could be demonstrated. An equally important goal was to measure and account for the tritium in the liquid lithium blanket module and its recovery system in order to validate the operation of the blanket module

  18. Rational modulation of the innate immune system for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eAmantea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage and has also been implicated in ischemic tolerance produced by different conditioning stimuli. Early after ischemia, perivascular astrocytes release cytokines and activate metalloproteases (MMPs that contribute to blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vasogenic oedema; whereas at later stages, they provide extracellular glutamate uptake, BBB regeneration and neurotrophic factors release. Similarly, early activation of microglia contributes to ischemic brain injury via the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin (IL-1, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and proteases. Nevertheless, microglia also contributes to the resolution of inflammation, by releasing IL-10 and tumor growth factor (TGF-beta, and to the late reparative processes by phagocytic activity and growth factors production. Indeed, after ischemia, microglia/macrophages differentiate towards several phenotypes: the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype is classically activated via toll-like receptors or interferon-γ, whereas M2 phenotypes are alternatively activated by regulatory mediators, such as ILs 4, 10, 13 or TGF-beta. Thus, immune cells exert a dualistic role on the evolution of ischemic brain damage, since the classic phenotypes promote injury, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages or N2 neutrophils prompt tissue remodeling and repair.Moreover, a subdued activation of the immune system has been involved in ischemic tolerance, since different preconditioning stimuli act via modulation of inflammatory mediators, including toll-like receptors and cytokine signaling pathways. This further underscores that the immuno-modulatory approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke should be aimed at blocking the detrimental effects, while promoting the beneficial responses of the immune reaction.

  19. COMET Multimedia modules and objects in the digital library system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, T. C.; Lamos, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Over the past ten years of developing Web- and CD-ROM-based training materials, the Cooperative Program for Operational Meteorology, Education and Training (COMET) has created a unique archive of almost 10,000 multimedia objects and some 50 web based interactive multimedia modules on various aspects of weather and weather forecasting. These objects and modules, containing illustrations, photographs, animations,video sequences, audio files, are potentially a valuable resource for university faculty and students, forecasters, emergency managers, public school educators, and other individuals and groups needing such materials for educational use. The COMET Modules are available on the COMET educational web site http://www.meted.ucar.edu, and the COMET Multimedia Database (MMDB) makes a collection of the multimedia objects available in a searchable online database for viewing and download over the Internet. Some 3200 objects are already available at the MMDB Website: http://archive.comet.ucar.edu/moria/

  20. Estimating the Effects of Module Area on Thin-Film Photovoltaic System Costs: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Kelsey A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Silverman, Timothy J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Woodhouse, Michael A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Xingshu [Purdue University; Alam, Muhammad A [Purdue University

    2018-03-29

    We investigate the potential effects of module area on the cost and performance of photovoltaic systems. Applying a bottom-up methodology, we analyzed the costs associated with thin-film modules and systems as a function of module area. We calculate a potential for savings of up to 0.10 dollars/W and 0.13 dollars/W in module manufacturing costs for CdTe and CIGS respectively, with large area modules. We also find that an additional 0.04 dollars/W savings in balance-of-systems costs may be achieved. Sensitivity of the dollar/W cost savings to module efficiency, manufacturing yield, and other parameters is presented. Lifetime energy yield must also be maintained to realize reductions in the levelized cost of energy; the effects of module size on energy yield for monolithic thin-film modules are not yet well understood. Finally, we discuss possible non-cost barriers to adoption of large area modules.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components).

  2. Leptin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus inversely correlate with regulatory T cell frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Qiao, Y; Yang, L; Song, S; Han, Y; Tian, Y; Ding, M; Jin, H; Shao, F; Liu, A

    2017-11-01

    Leptin levels are increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but little is known on how this correlates with several disease characteristics including the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we compared serum leptin levels with frequency of circulating Tregs in 47 lupus patients vs. 25 healthy matched controls. Correlations with lupus disease activity were also analyzed, as well as Treg proliferation potential. It was found that leptin was remarkably increased in SLE patients as compared to controls, particularly in SLE patients with moderate and severe active SLE, and the increase correlated with disease activity. Importantly, increased leptin in lupus patients inversely correlated with the frequency of Tregs but not in controls, and leptin neutralization resulted in the expansion of Tregs ex vivo. Thus, hyperleptinemia in lupus patients correlates directly with disease activity and inversely with Treg frequency. The finding that leptin inhibition expands Tregs in SLE suggests possible inhibition of this molecule for an enhanced Treg function in the disease.

  3. WhatsApp in Stroke Systems: Current Use and Regulatory Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Castillo, Juan M; Gonzalez-Calderon, Gina

    2018-01-01

    Smartphone use is extremely common. Applications such as WhatsApp have billions of users and physicians are no exception. Stroke Medicine is a field where instant communication among fairly large groups is essential. In developing countries, economic limitations preclude the possibility of acquiring proper communication platforms. Thus, WhatsApp has been used as an organizational tool, for sharing clinical data, and for real time guidance of clinical care decisions. It has evolved into a cheap, accessible tool for telemedicine. Nevertheless, regulatory and privacy issues must be addressed. Some countries have implemented legislation to address this issue, while others lag behind. In this article, we present an overview on the different roles WhatsApp has acquired as a clinical tool in stroke systems and the potential privacy concerns of its use.

  4. WhatsApp in Stroke Systems: Current Use and Regulatory Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Calleja-Castillo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone use is extremely common. Applications such as WhatsApp have billions of users and physicians are no exception. Stroke Medicine is a field where instant communication among fairly large groups is essential. In developing countries, economic limitations preclude the possibility of acquiring proper communication platforms. Thus, WhatsApp has been used as an organizational tool, for sharing clinical data, and for real time guidance of clinical care decisions. It has evolved into a cheap, accessible tool for telemedicine. Nevertheless, regulatory and privacy issues must be addressed. Some countries have implemented legislation to address this issue, while others lag behind. In this article, we present an overview on the different roles WhatsApp has acquired as a clinical tool in stroke systems and the potential privacy concerns of its use.

  5. GIS-assisted spatial analysis for urban regulatory detailed planning: designer's dimension in the Chinese code system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zeng, Zheng

    2009-10-01

    By discussing the causes behind the high amendments ratio in the implementation of urban regulatory detailed plans in China despite its law-ensured status, the study aims to reconcile conflict between the legal authority of regulatory detailed planning and the insufficient scientific support in its decision-making and compilation by introducing into the process spatial analysis based on GIS technology and 3D modeling thus present a more scientific and flexible approach to regulatory detailed planning in China. The study first points out that the current compilation process of urban regulatory detailed plan in China employs mainly an empirical approach which renders it constantly subjected to amendments; the study then discusses the need and current utilization of GIS in the Chinese system and proposes the framework of a GIS-assisted 3D spatial analysis process from the designer's perspective which can be regarded as an alternating processes between the descriptive codes and physical design in the compilation of regulatory detailed planning. With a case study of the processes and results from the application of the framework, the paper concludes that the proposed framework can be an effective instrument which provides more rationality, flexibility and thus more efficiency to the compilation and decision-making process of urban regulatory detailed plan in China.

  6. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

  7. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR

  8. The Database Management Module of the Splice System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    standardization is the only wise chocs . E. FUNCTIONS OF THE EATABASE MkNAGEMENT MODULE As a result of onqoing research in thmc impl1msntaticn of SPLICE, thns...u an e-v Offset by one or mc--l orders of ma#-inuIs inorcvesnnt --L tue execution time cf user transacdrioas. Purthermore, ’is s-toraqe requlrement

  9. Project of an information integrated system to provide support to the regulatory control of the radioactive waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christovao, Marilia Tavares

    2005-05-01

    Sources and radioactive waste deriving from industry activities, medical practice and other areas are collected, received, and stored as waste on Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Institutes, that also generate, treat and store their own radioactive waste. The object of this project is to present an Integrated Information System named SICORR, having as guidelines, the referred processes to the radioactive waste regulatory control, under the responsibility of the Radioactive Waste Division (DIREJ), the General Coordination of Licensing and Control (CGLC), the Directorate of Safety and Radiation Protection (DRS) and the CNEN. The main objective of the work was reached, once the project SICORR modeling considers the radioactive waste control inventory, enclosing the treatment and integration of the radioactive waste and the radionuclides data and processes; the installations that produce, use, transport or store radiation sources data; and, CNEN Institutes responsible for the radioactive waste management data. The SICORR functions or essential modules involve the data treatment, integration, standardization and consistency between the processes. The SICORR specification and the analysis results are registered in documents, Software Specification Proposal (PESw) and Software Requirements Specification (ERSw), and are presented in text, in diagrams and user interfaces. Use cases have been used in the SICORR context diagram. The user interfaces for each use case have been detailed, defining the graphical layout, the relationships description with other interfaces, the interface details properties and the commands and the product entrances and exits. For objects radioactive waste and radionuclides, states diagrams have been drawn. The activities diagram represents the business model process. The class diagram represents the static objects and relationships that exist between them, under the specification point of view. The class diagram have been determined

  10. Design of robotic cells based on relative handling modules with use of SolidWorks system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponenko, E. V.; Anciferov, S. I.

    2018-05-01

    The article presents a diagramed engineering solution for a robotic cell with six degrees of freedom for machining of complex details, consisting of the base with a tool installation module and a detail machining module made as parallel structure mechanisms. The output links of the detail machining module and the tool installation module can move along X-Y-Z coordinate axes each. A 3D-model of the complex is designed in the SolidWorks system. It will be used further for carrying out engineering calculations and mathematical analysis and obtaining all required documentation.

  11. Development Modules for Specification of Requirements for a System of Verification of Parallel Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy Yu. Meltsov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the development of one of the modules of the system verification of parallel algorithms that are used to verify the inference engine. This module is designed to build the specification requirements, the feasibility of which on the algorithm is necessary to prove (test.

  12. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidert, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module

  13. A Matlab/Simulink-Based Interactive Module for Servo Systems Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliane, N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive module for learning both the fundamental and practical issues of servo systems. This module, developed using Simulink in conjunction with the Matlab graphical user interface (Matlab-GUI) tool, is used to supplement conventional lectures in control engineering and robotics subjects. First, the paper introduces the…

  14. Transmission modulation system for mobile phone reduces battery consumption without increasing bit error rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, M.; Janssen, G.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The transmission modulation system minimizes the wasted 'out of band' power. The digital data (1) to be transmitted is fed via a pulse response filter (2) to a mixer (4) where it modulates a carrier wave (4). The digital data is also fed via a delay circuit (5) and identical filter (6) to a second

  15. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 115, enhancement of the reliability of the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdekas, D.L.

    1989-05-01

    Generic Issue 115 addresses a concern related to the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor protection system for plants using the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System (SSPS). Several options for improving the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor trip function for these plants and their effect on core damage frequency (CDF) and overall risk were evaluated. This regulatory analysis includes a quantitative assessment of the costs and benefits associated with the various options for enhancing the reliability of the Westinghouse SSPS and provides insights for consideration and industry initiatives. No new regulatory requirements are proposed. 25 refs., 11 tabs

  16. Frequency Properties Research of Elevator Drive System with Direct Torque Control-Pulse with Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Koval

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article problems of frequency properties research for electric drive system with direct torque control and pulse width modulator are described. The mathematical description of elevator is present. Simplified mathematical description of direct torque control - pulse width modulator electric drive system is shown. Transfer functions for torque and speed loops are determined. Logarithmic frequency characteristics are computed. Damping properties of elevator drive system are estimated.

  17. Smart grids and power systems efficiency: regulatory tools and demand-side management impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergaentzle, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The physical architecture of electricity grids and the organizational structure of power systems implemented after the reforms have traditionally be achieved according to the characteristics of the transmission infrastructures and power mixes. However, the new challenges related to energy transition favor a greater participation of decentralized generation and final consumers to system exploitation and competitive markets. This latter participation is made possible thanks to recent innovations in the fields of communication and remote control technologies. Significant evolutions are expected in power industries that share common characteristics. First, these evolutions suppose massive capital investments to modernize and adapt current power distribution grids. Second, it is expected the activation of distribution grids and final consumers will unleash substantial unexploited economic efficiency gains as well as impose new constraints. Taking these simple facts as a starting point, the objective of the thesis is twofold. In the first place, we provide a theoretical analysis of the regulatory instruments that monitor the system operators' expenses. Relying on the literature, we aim at characterizing what regulatory tools and incitation are suitable for investing in smart grids technologies. Since it is necessary to compare theoretical formulation to facts, we use an empirical approach that allows us to designate key benefits pursued by the development of smart grids and to compare our theoretical results with practical regulatory applications. Our findings eventually allow us to formulate recommendations. In the second place, the thesis focuses on the impacts of demand-side management during peak periods. We structure our approach around two general observations. Large benefits should be generated in lowering substantially peak demand. However, such situation also creates losses of profit for generators. We provide an estimation of efficiency gains and revenue losses

  18. A regulatory perspective on appropriate seismic loading stress criteria for advanced light water reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the foregoing sections, the author has discussed the NRC staff's perspective on the evolving seismic design criteria for piping systems. He also addressed the need for developing seismic loading stress criteria and provided several recommendations and considerations for ensuring piping functional capability, pressure integrity, and structural integrity. Overall, the general consensus in the NRC staff is that in the past several years, many initiatives have been developed and implemented by the industry and the NRC staff to reduce the excessive conservatisms that might have existed in nuclear piping system design criteria. The regulations, regulatory guides, and Standard Review Plan have been (or are currently in the process of being) revised to reflect these initiatives in an effort to produce requirements and guidelines that will continue to result in a safe and practical design of piping systems. However, further proposals to reduce margins are continually being submitted to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the NRC for review and approval. Improvements to the piping seismic design criteria are always encouraged, but there is a point at which the benefits might be outweighed by drawbacks. Because of this rapidly evolving situation the need exists for the industry and the NRC staff to develop a course of action to ensure that piping seismic design criteria for future ALWR plants will result in piping system designs that provide adequate safety margins and practical designs at a reasonable cost

  19. Development of a diagnostic system for Klystron modulators using a neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutoh, M.; Oonuma, T.; Shibasaki, Y.; Abe, I.; Nakahara, K.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic system for klystron modulators using a neural network has been developed. Large changes in the voltage and current of the main circuit in a klystron modulator were observed just several ten milli-seconds before the modulator experienced trouble. These changes formed a peculiar pattern that depended on the parts with problems. Diagnosis was possible by means of pattern recognition. The recognition test of patterns using a neutral network has shown good results. This system, which is built in a linac control system, is presently being operated so as to collect new trouble patterns and to carry out tests for practical use. (author)

  20. A simple system for 160GHz optical terahertz wave generation and data modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihan; He, Jingsuo; Sun, Xueming; Shi, Zexia; Wang, Ruike; Cui, Hailin; Su, Bo; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    A simple system based on two cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulators, which can generate 160GHz optical terahertz waves from 40GHz microwave sources, is simulated and tested in this paper. Fiber grating filter is used in the system to filter out optical carrier. By properly adjusting the modulator DC bias voltages and the signal voltages and phases, 4-tupling optical terahertz wave can be generated with fiber grating. This notch fiber grating filter is greatly suitable for terahertz over fiber (TOF) communication system. This scheme greatly reduces the cost of long-distance terahertz communication. Furthermore, 10Gbps digital signal is modulated in the 160GHz optical terahertz wave.

  1. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann–Mangold organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann–Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer. PMID:22492356

  2. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann-Mangold organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-05-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann-Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer.

  3. Phosphatase and tensin homolog-β-catenin signaling modulates regulatory T cells and inflammatory responses in mouse liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiang; Li, Changyong; Wang, Kunpeng; Yue, Shi; Jiang, Longfeng; Ke, Michael; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Zhang, Feng; Lu, Ling; Ke, Bibo

    2017-06-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deleted on chromosome 10 plays an important role in regulating T cell activation during inflammatory response. Activation of β-catenin is crucial for maintaining immune homeostasis. This study investigates the functional roles and molecular mechanisms by which PTEN-β-catenin signaling promotes regulatory T cell (Treg) induction in a mouse model of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). We found that mice with myeloid-specific phosphatase and tensin homolog knockout (PTEN M-KO ) exhibited reduced liver damage as evidenced by decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, intrahepatic macrophage trafficking, and proinflammatory mediators compared with the PTEN-proficient (floxed phosphatase and tensin homolog [PTEN FL/FL ]) controls. Disruption of myeloid PTEN-activated b-catenin promoted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ)-mediated Jagged-1/Notch signaling and induced forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)1 Tregs while inhibiting T helper 17 cells. However, blocking of Notch signaling by inhibiting γ-secretase reversed myeloid PTEN deficiency-mediated protection in ischemia/reperfusion-triggered liver inflammation with reduced FOXP3 + and increased retinoid A receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t-mediated interleukin 17A expression in ischemic livers. Moreover, knockdown of β-catenin or PPARγ in PTEN-deficient macrophages inhibited Jagged-1/Notch activation and reduced FOXP3 + Treg induction, leading to increased proinflammatory mediators in macrophage/T cell cocultures. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that PTEN-β-catenin signaling is a novel regulator involved in modulating Treg development and provides a potential therapeutic target in liver IRI. Liver Transplantation 23 813-825 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. Sinomenine suppresses collagen-induced arthritis by reciprocal modulation of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Bei; Yu, Juntao; Wang, Ting; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-05-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) has long been used as a therapeutic agent of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. However, the discrepancy between low oral bioavailability and higher minimal effective concentration made its action mode mysterious. The present study aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms by which SIN suppressed collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats in view of Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cell balance. SIN was orally administered, and the clinical symptoms of CIA rats were monitored; inflammatory cytokines levels in serum were measured by ELISA; pharmacokinetic studies were performed in normal and CIA rats; Th17 and Treg cell frequencies were analyzed by flow cytometry. The data showed that SIN treatment resulted in a dramatic decrease of arthritis scores and paw volume of CIA rats, which was accompanied by down-regulation of IL-17A and up-regulation of IL-10 in rat serum. The frequency of Treg cells was increased and the frequency of Th17 cells was decreased in the gut lymphoid tissues of SIN-treated rats. Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated that more α4β7-positive cells were detained in joint tissues after SIN treatment. Moreover, the anti-arthritis efficacy of SIN disappeared when it was given by intraperitoneal injection, further confirming the action of SIN was gut-dependent. In conclusion, SIN exerts anti-RA action probably through modulating the frequencies of Treg cells and Th17 cells in intestinal lymph nodes and yielding a trafficking of lymphocytes (especially Treg cells) from gut to joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehensive meta-analysis of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT genomic binding patterns discerns cell-specific cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Keunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine-activated transcription factors from the STAT (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription family control common and context-specific genetic programs. It is not clear to what extent cell-specific features determine the binding capacity of seven STAT members and to what degree they share genetic targets. Molecular insight into the biology of STATs was gained from a meta-analysis of 29 available ChIP-seq data sets covering genome-wide occupancy of STATs 1, 3, 4, 5A, 5B and 6 in several cell types. Results We determined that the genomic binding capacity of STATs is primarily defined by the cell type and to a lesser extent by individual family members. For example, the overlap of shared binding sites between STATs 3 and 5 in T cells is greater than that between STAT5 in T cells and non-T cells. Even for the top 1,000 highly enriched STAT binding sites, ~15% of STAT5 binding sites in mouse female liver are shared by other STATs in different cell types while in T cells ~90% of STAT5 binding sites are co-occupied by STAT3, STAT4 and STAT6. In addition, we identified 116 cis-regulatory modules (CRM, which are recognized by all STAT members across cell types defining a common JAK-STAT signature. Lastly, in liver STAT5 binding significantly coincides with binding of the cell-specific transcription factors HNF4A, FOXA1 and FOXA2 and is associated with cell-type specific gene transcription. Conclusions Our results suggest that genomic binding of STATs is primarily determined by the cell type and further specificity is achieved in part by juxtaposed binding of cell-specific transcription factors.

  6. BPM-CUL3 E3 ligase modulates thermotolerance by facilitating negative regulatory domain-mediated degradation of DREB2A in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kyoko; Ohama, Naohiko; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Mizoi, Junya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Todaka, Daisuke; Mogami, Junro; Sato, Hikaru; Qin, Feng; Kim, June-Sik; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2017-10-03

    DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN 2A (DREB2A) acts as a key transcription factor in both drought and heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis and induces the expression of many drought- and heat stress-inducible genes. Although DREB2A expression itself is induced by stress, the posttranslational regulation of DREB2A, including protein stabilization, is required for its transcriptional activity. The deletion of a 30-aa central region of DREB2A known as the negative regulatory domain (NRD) transforms DREB2A into a stable and constitutively active form referred to as DREB2A CA. However, the molecular basis of this stabilization and activation has remained unknown for a decade. Here we identified BTB/POZ AND MATH DOMAIN proteins (BPMs), substrate adaptors of the Cullin3 (CUL3)-based E3 ligase, as DREB2A-interacting proteins. We observed that DREB2A and BPMs interact in the nuclei, and that the NRD of DREB2A is sufficient for its interaction with BPMs. BPM -knockdown plants exhibited increased DREB2A accumulation and induction of DREB2A target genes under heat and drought stress conditions. Genetic analysis indicated that the depletion of BPM expression conferred enhanced thermotolerance via DREB2A stabilization. Thus, the BPM-CUL3 E3 ligase is likely the long-sought factor responsible for NRD-dependent DREB2A degradation. Through the negative regulation of DREB2A stability, BPMs modulate the heat stress response and prevent an adverse effect of excess DREB2A on plant growth. Furthermore, we found the BPM recognition motif in various transcription factors, implying a general contribution of BPM-mediated proteolysis to divergent cellular responses via an accelerated turnover of transcription factors.

  7. Low cost solar array project production process and equipment task. A Module Experimental Process System Development Unit (MEPSDU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Technical readiness for the production of photovoltaic modules using single crystal silicon dendritic web sheet material is demonstrated by: (1) selection, design and implementation of solar cell and photovoltaic module process sequence in a Module Experimental Process System Development Unit; (2) demonstration runs; (3) passing of acceptance and qualification tests; and (4) achievement of a cost effective module.

  8. An Analysis of the Cost and Performance of Photovoltaic Systems as a Function of Module Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Kelsey A.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fu, Ran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Silverman, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Woodhouse, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Xingshu [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Alam, Mohammed A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-04-07

    We investigate the potential effects of module area on the cost and performance of photovoltaic systems. Applying a bottom-up methodology, we analyzed the costs associated with mc-Si and thin-film modules and systems as a function of module area. We calculate a potential for savings of up to $0.04/W, $0.10/W, and $0.13/W in module manufacturing costs for mc-Si, CdTe, and CIGS respectively, with large area modules. We also find that an additional $0.05/W savings in balance-of-systems costs may be achieved. However, these savings are dependent on the ability to maintain efficiency and manufacturing yield as area scales. Lifetime energy yield must also be maintained to realize reductions in the levelized cost of energy. We explore the possible effects of module size on efficiency and energy production, and find that more research is required to understand these issues for each technology. Sensitivity of the $/W cost savings to module efficiency and manufacturing yield is presented. We also discuss non-cost barriers to adoption of large area modules.

  9. Interferon regulatory factor 5 gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, A; Mossad, Y M; Nasef, N; Eid, R

    2017-07-01

    Background Increased expression of interferon-inducible genes is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the transcription factors regulating interferon and was proved to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE in different populations. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and SLE susceptibility in a cohort of Egyptian children and to investigate their association with clinico-pathological features, especially lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods Typing of interferon regulatory factor 5 rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714 polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for 100 children with SLE and 100 matched healthy controls. Results Children with SLE had more frequent T allele and TT genotype of rs2004640 ( P c  = 0.003 and 0.024, respectively) compared to controls. Patients with nephritis had more frequent T allele of rs2004640 compared to controls ( P c  = 0.003). However the allele and genotype frequencies of the three studied polymorphisms did not show any difference in patients with nephritis in comparison to those without nephritis. Haplotype GTA of rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714, respectively, was more frequent in lupus patients in comparison to controls ( p = 0.01) while the haplotype GGG was more frequent in controls than lupus patients ( p = 0.011). Conclusion The rs2004640 T allele and TT genotype and GTA haplotype of rs rs10954213, rs2004640, and rs2280714, respectively, can be considered as risk factors for the development of SLE. The presence of the rs2004640 T allele increases the risk of nephritis development in Egyptian children with SLE.

  10. Changes to Regulatory Systems for more Efficient Nuclear Energy Deployment: An Industry Viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelin, H.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear energy is required to play a much larger role in the energy mix in most credible energy scenarios that address climate change (680 GW additional capacity by 2050 according to IEA, 1000 GW according to World Nuclear Association). To reach these ambitious targets, a concerted effort will be required involving industry, governments and regulators. Changes to regulatory systems and processes – including licensing (design, site, operation), export control, security and waste - is one important area that can stimulate faster and more cost effective development of nuclear capacity. In the past, regulators were mainly concerned with authorizing a limited number of reactors from a limited number of designs under a national standard. Today regulators need resources to assess a wider range of designs, while each licensee needs to complete a thorough safety assessment even if the design has been assessed and approved elsewhere. These developments are the inevitable consequence of globalization and competition within the industry. This paper examines the current state of nuclear regulation in relation to the main attributes of good regulation as defined by the OECD. It further looks at ongoing efforts among regulators to share experience or harmonize requirements, such as within MDEP, or to agree common safety levels, such as in WENRA, in order to reach common positions and improve their regulatory approaches. Finally, it will assess the work of industry to demonstrate the benefits – both in terms of efficiency as well as safety – of harmonised regulations notably through the activities of the World Nuclear Association/CORDEL Working Group. (author)

  11. Construction of multi-functional open modulized Matlab simulation toolbox for imaging ladar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long; Zhao, Yuan; Tang, Meng; He, Jiang; Zhang, Yong

    2011-06-01

    Ladar system simulation is to simulate the ladar models using computer simulation technology in order to predict the performance of the ladar system. This paper presents the developments of laser imaging radar simulation for domestic and overseas studies and the studies of computer simulation on ladar system with different application requests. The LadarSim and FOI-LadarSIM simulation facilities of Utah State University and Swedish Defence Research Agency are introduced in details. This paper presents the low level of simulation scale, un-unified design and applications of domestic researches in imaging ladar system simulation, which are mostly to achieve simple function simulation based on ranging equations for ladar systems. Design of laser imaging radar simulation with open and modularized structure is proposed to design unified modules for ladar system, laser emitter, atmosphere models, target models, signal receiver, parameters setting and system controller. Unified Matlab toolbox and standard control modules have been built with regulated input and output of the functions, and the communication protocols between hardware modules. A simulation based on ICCD gain-modulated imaging ladar system for a space shuttle is made based on the toolbox. The simulation result shows that the models and parameter settings of the Matlab toolbox are able to simulate the actual detection process precisely. The unified control module and pre-defined parameter settings simplify the simulation of imaging ladar detection. Its open structures enable the toolbox to be modified for specialized requests. The modulization gives simulations flexibility.

  12. Design and development of an informatics management system as a support for the Regulatory Authority in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Ramos, Maryzury; Prendes Alonso, Miguel; Jova Sed, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory activity in the country is carried out by the National Center for Nuclear Safety (CNSN) according to the international recommendations. To develop this, CNSN is supported by the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) which it's in charged of guaranteeing the technical scientific support for this activity. These centers have been working in the last years in the design and development of a computing tool that allows the management of all important information, which should be controlled by the Regulatory Authority. The authorization processes of the practices and the inspection program require the use, register and evaluation of an important volume of information that grows as the number of practices and facilities are increases. Consequently the systematizing of this information needs an automated management system. The objective of this work is to show the level of automation reached by the National Regulatory Authority using RASSYN program. This program allows an efficient management of the information related to the radiation sources nationwide, the practices ascribed to these sources, the personnel involved in these practices and the dose received, the equipment measuring and detecting of radiations, the generated waste, the occurred radiological incidents, the conditions and requisites of the granted authorizations and the results of the inspection program, among others. The possibilities of RASSYN system to process the information given by the users and the ones produced by the regulatory authority are described. The automatic generation of the annual inspections plan, according to the previously defined criteria and the system of alerts on the state of fulfillment of radiological protection requirements make RASSYN a useful tool to optimize the functioning of the regulatory system. The versatility of the statistical reports allows to guarantees not only the requirements of the regulatory authority but also the expectations coming

  13. Localized modulated wave solutions in diffusive glucose–insulin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mvogo, Alain, E-mail: mvogal_2009@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Biophysics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon); Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Tambue, Antoine [The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) and Stellenbosch University, 6-8 Melrose Road, Muizenberg 7945 (South Africa); Center for Research in Computational and Applied Mechanics (CERECAM), and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa); Ben-Bolie, Germain H. [Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Laboratory of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon); Kofané, Timoléon C. [Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2016-06-03

    We investigate intercellular insulin dynamics in an array of diffusively coupled pancreatic islet β-cells. The cells are connected via gap junction coupling, where nearest neighbor interactions are included. Through the multiple scale expansion in the semi-discrete approximation, we show that the insulin dynamics can be governed by the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation. The localized solutions of this equation are reported. The results suggest from the biophysical point of view that the insulin propagates in pancreatic islet β-cells using both temporal and spatial dimensions in the form of localized modulated waves. - Highlights: • The dynamics of an array of diffusively coupled pancreatic islet beta-cells is investigated. • Through the multiple scale expansion, we show that the insulin dynamics can be governed by the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation. • Localized modulated waves are obtained for the insulin dynamics.

  14. Adoptive regulatory T-cell therapy preserves systemic immune homeostasis after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiying; Mao, Leilei; Zhou, Guoqing; Leak, Rehana K; Sun, Bao-Liang; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia has been shown to result in peripheral inflammatory responses followed by long-lasting immunosuppression. Our recent study demonstrated that intravenous delivery of regulatory T cells (Tregs) markedly protected against transient cerebral ischemia by suppressing neutrophil-derived matrix metallopeptidase 9 production in the periphery. However, the effect of Tregs on systemic inflammatory responses and immune status has not been fully characterized. Cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes in mice or 120 minutes in rats. Tregs were isolated from donor animals by CD4 and CD25 double selection and transferred intravenously to ischemic recipients at 2 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Animals were euthanized on different days after reperfusion. The effects of Tregs on systemic inflammation and immune status were evaluated using flow cytometry, ELISAs, and immunohistochemistry. Systemic administration of purified Tregs raises functional Tregs in the blood and peripheral organs, including spleen and lymph nodes. These exogenous Tregs remain in the blood and peripheral organs for ≥12 days. Functionally, Treg adoptive transfer markedly inhibits middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α) in the blood. Furthermore, Treg treatment corrects long-term lymphopenia and improves cellular immune functions after ischemic brain injury. As a result, Treg-treated animals exhibit decreased bacterial loads in the blood during recovery from cerebral ischemic attack. Treg treatment did not exacerbate poststroke immunosuppression. On the contrary, Treg-treated animals displayed improved immune status after focal cerebral ischemia.

  15. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  16. The Insulin Regulatory Network in Adult Hippocampus and Pancreatic Endocrine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanao Machida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a very strong correlation between the insulin-mediated regulatory system of the central nervous system and the pancreatic endocrine system. There are many examples of the same transcriptional factors being expressed in both regions in their embryonic development stages. Hormonal signals from the pancreatic islets influence the regulation of energy homeostasis by the brain, and the brain in turn influences the secretions of the islets. Diabetes induces neuronal death in different regions of the brain especially hippocampus, causes alterations on the neuronal circuits and therefore impairs learning and memory, for which the hippocampus is responsible. The hippocampus is a region of the brain where steady neurogenesis continues throughout life. Adult neurogenesis from undifferentiated neural stem cells is greatly decreased in diabetic patients, and as a result their learning and memory functions decline. Might it be possible to reactivate stem cells whose functions have deteriorated and that are present in the tissues in which the lesions occur in diabetes, a lifestyle disease, which plagues modern humans and develops as a result of the behavior of insulin-related factor? In this paper we summarize research in regard to these matters based on examples in recent years.

  17. Modulational instability and nonlocality management in coupled NLS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, Evgeny V; Molchan, Maxim A

    2007-01-01

    The modulational instability of two interacting waves in a nonlocal Kerr-type medium is considered analytically and numerically. For a generic choice of wave amplitudes, we give a complete description of stable/unstable regimes for zero group-velocity mismatch. It is shown that nonlocality suppresses considerably the growth rate and bandwidth of instability. For nonzero group-velocity mismatch we perform a geometrical analysis of a nonlocality management which can provide stability of waves otherwise unstable in a local medium

  18. Estimation of Multiple Point Sources for Linear Fractional Order Systems Using Modulating Functions

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an estimation algorithm for the characterization of multiple point inputs for linear fractional order systems. First, using polynomial modulating functions method and a suitable change of variables the problem of estimating

  19. Evaluation of faciocutaneous clues to systemic diseases: A learning module for Chinese undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Shen

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Introducing this additional learning module may offer an early opportunity to explore systemic diseases from a dermatological view and is likely to lay the foundations for interdisciplinary collaboration in the future practice for medical students.

  20. MTR2: a discriminator and dead-time module used in counting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.

    2000-01-01

    In the field of radioactivity measurement, there is a constant need for highly specialized electronic modules such as ADCs, amplifiers, discriminators, dead-time modules, etc. But sometimes it is almost impossible to find on the market the modules having the performances corresponding to our needs. The purpose of the module presented here, called MTR2 (Module de Temps-mort Reconductible), is to process, in terms of pulse height discrimination and dead-time corrections, the pulses delivered by the detectors used in counting systems. This dead-time, of the extendible type, is triggered by both the positive and negative parts of the incoming pulse and the dead-time corrections are made according to the live-time method. This module, which has been developed and tested at LPRI, can be used alone in simple counting channels or in more complex systems such as coincidence systems. The philosophy governing the choice and the implementation of this type of dead-time as well as the system used for the dead-time corrections is presented. The electronic scheme and the performances are also presented. This module is available in the NIM standard

  1. Modulation classification for MIMO systems: State of the art and research directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahloul, Mohammad Rida; Yusoff, Mohd Zuki; Abdel-Aty, Abdel-Haleem; Saad, M. Naufal M.; Al-Jemeli, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Blind techniques and algorithms for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) signals interception have recently attracted a great deal of research efforts. This is due to their important applications in the military and civil telecommunications domains. One essential step in the signal interception process is to blindly recognize the modulation scheme of the MIMO signals. This process is formally called Modulation Classification (MC). This paper discusses the modulation classification for MIMO systems and presents a comprehensive and critical literature review of the existing MC algorithms for MIMO systems; where possible, gaps in the knowledge base are identified and future directions for the research work are suggested.

  2. Acousto-plasmofluidics: Acoustic modulation of surface plasmon resonance in microfluidic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We acoustically modulated the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs of metal nanostructures integrated within microfluidic systems. An acoustically driven micromixing device based on bubble microstreaming quickly and homogeneously mixes multiple laminar flows of different refractive indices. The altered refractive index of the mixed fluids enables rapid modulation of the LSPRs of gold nanodisk arrays embedded within the microfluidic channel. The device features fast response for dynamic operation, and the refractive index within the channel is tailorable. With these unique features, our “acousto-plasmofluidic” device can be useful in applications such as optical switches, modulators, filters, biosensors, and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  3. Phase Modulation for postcompensation of dispersion in 160-Gb/s systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahlo, Andrei; Clausen, A. T.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2005-01-01

    Tunable postcompensation of second-order dispersion by sinusoidal phase modulation is realized for a 160-Gb/s optical transmission system. Accumulated dispersions with magnitudes up to 4 ps/nm are compensated in the receiver end.......Tunable postcompensation of second-order dispersion by sinusoidal phase modulation is realized for a 160-Gb/s optical transmission system. Accumulated dispersions with magnitudes up to 4 ps/nm are compensated in the receiver end....

  4. Photovoltaic module with integrated power conversion and interconnection system - the European project PV-MIPS

    OpenAIRE

    Henze, N.; Engler, A.; Zacharias, P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the 6th framework program funded by the European Commission the project PV-MIPS (Photovoltaic Module with Integrated Power Conversion System) was launched in November 2004. Together with eleven European partners from Germany, Austria, Greece and the Netherlands a solar module with integrated in-verter shall be developed that can feed solar electricity directly into the grid. The challenging objective of the project is to reduce the total costs of a PV system. At the same time lifetime ...

  5. Rearrangeable and exchangeable optical module with system-on-chip for wearable functional near-infrared spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Numata, Takashi; Sato, Hiroki; Hiraizumi, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Kuwabara, Hidenobu; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    We developed a system-on-chip (SoC)-incorporated light-emitting diode (LED) and avalanche photodiode (APD) modules to improve the usability and flexibility of a fiberless wearable functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system. The SoC has a microprocessing unit and programmable circuits. The time division method and the lock-in method were used for separately detecting signals from different positions and signals of different wavelengths, respectively. Each module autonomously works for this time-divided-lock-in measurement with a high sensitivity for haired regions. By supplying [Formula: see text] of power and base and data clocks, the LED module emits both 730- and 855-nm wavelengths of light, amplitudes of which are modulated in each lock-in frequency generated from the base clock, and the APD module provides the lock-in detected signals synchronizing with the data clock. The SoC provided many functions, including automatic-power-control of the LED, automatic judgment of detected power level, and automatic-gain-control of the programmable gain amplifier. The number and the arrangement of modules can be adaptively changed by connecting this exchangeable modules in a daisy chain and setting the parameters dependent on the probing position. Therefore, users can configure a variety of arrangements (single- or multidistance combinations) of them with this module-based system.

  6. Investigating relationship between self- and co-regulatory learning processes in a workplace e-learning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, E.; Tampinongkol, S.; Sedighi, M.; Van den Berg, J.; Veen, W.

    2014-01-01

    While supporting regulatory learning processes in work environments is increasingly becoming important, there is not a clear picture of the interaction between self- and coregulatory processes performed by learners in workplace e-learning systems. In this paper, by following a design-based research

  7. Research and development of peripheral technology for photovoltaic power systems. Research and development of photovoltaic modules integrated with construction materials (detachable plane panel); Shuhen gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu. Kenzai ittaigata module no kenkyu kaihatsu (chakudatsushiki heiban panel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuta, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the study results on R and D of photovoltaic modules integrated with construction materials in fiscal 1994. (1) On development of technology for module structures, specifications of the horizontal muntin system module were newly determined in addition to the improved muntin system module, and the prototype pseudo-module integrated with construction material was prepared. The comparison results of the basic performance of both system modules clarified superior waterproofing and module temperature uniformity of the horizontal muntin system. Based on this specifications, integration technology of modules with back metal plates was studied. Formation of the integrated module close to final specifications was ascertained to be possible by use of passivation equipment to irregular form. (2) On development of construction and installation methods of modules, improvement of the waterproofing and workability of both system modules was studied. (3) On the study on practical use of modules, their design and ventilation/cooling structure were studied. 38 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Modelling the regulatory system for diabetes mellitus with a threshold window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    Piecewise (or non-smooth) glucose-insulin models with threshold windows for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are proposed and analyzed with a view to improving understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. For glucose-insulin models with a single threshold, the existence and stability of regular, virtual, pseudo-equilibria and tangent points are addressed. Then the relations between regular equilibria and a pseudo-equilibrium are studied. Furthermore, the sufficient and necessary conditions for the global stability of regular equilibria and the pseudo-equilibrium are provided by using qualitative analysis techniques of non-smooth Filippov dynamic systems. Sliding bifurcations related to boundary node bifurcations were investigated with theoretical and numerical techniques, and insulin clinical therapies are discussed. For glucose-insulin models with a threshold window, the effects of glucose thresholds or the widths of threshold windows on the durations of insulin therapy and glucose infusion were addressed. The duration of the effects of an insulin injection is sensitive to the variation of thresholds. Our results indicate that blood glucose level can be maintained within a normal range using piecewise glucose-insulin models with a single threshold or a threshold window. Moreover, our findings suggest that it is critical to individualise insulin therapy for each patient separately, based on initial blood glucose levels.

  9. The regulatory regime for gas: a system in danger of coming off the rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nangle, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Australian Gas Association (AGA) and its members are getting restless as it becomes more apparent the promised benefits of deregulation are imposing more costs and controls on an industry that owns and operates infrastructure valued at $15bn in heavily regulated markets. AGA Chief Executive Bill Nable used the Northern Territory Electricity and Gas Review in Darwin to examine the state of the gas regulatory regime. The pure reform model envisaged: 1. Multiple producers dealing often directly with large customers and retailers; 2. Open and transparent third party access to transmission (high pressure pipelines) and distribution (local low pressure pipeline networks) systems; and 3. A greater number of energy retailers competing for customers who are free to choose who they purchase their gas from. Energy sector reforms were generally pursued in a coordinated fashion through Commonwealth and State leaders forum - COAG. For gas, as with electricity, this meant separating out (unbundling) previously integrated gas utilities to engender competition and to lower prices - initially for major export and import competing sectors and eventually residential and small business customers. Although the reforms are laudable and have industry support, senior gas industry executives spoke about their concerns and caution about the negative impact the 'Third Party Access Code for Natural Gas and Pipeline Systems' may have for the gas supply industry

  10. Two negative regulatory systems of root nodule symbiosis - how are symbiotic benefits and costs balanced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hanna; Suzaki, Takuya

    2018-05-30

    Root nodule symbiosis is one of the best-characterized mutualistic relationships between plants-microbes symbiosis, where mainly leguminous species can obtain nitrogen sources fixed by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia through the formation of symbiotic organs root nodules. In order to drive this symbiotic process, plants need to provide carbon sources that should be used for their growth. Therefore, a balance between the benefits of obtaining nitrogen sources and the costs of losing carbon sources needs to be maintained during root nodule symbiosis. Plants have developed at least two negative regulatory systems of root nodule symbiosis. One strategy involves the regulation of nodule number in response to rhizobial infection. For this regulation, a systemic long-range signaling between roots and shoots called autoregulation of nodulation has a pivotal role. Another strategy involves the regulation of root nodule symbiosis in response to nitrate, the most abundant form of nitrogen nutrients in the soil. Recent studies indicate that a long-distance signaling is shared between the two strategies, where NIN and NRSYM1, two paralogous RWP-RK transcription factors, can activate the production of nodulation-related CLE peptides in response to different inputs. Here, we give an overview of such progress in our understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to the control of the symbiotic balance, including their biological significance.

  11. Identification of genes for small non-coding RNAs that belong to the regulon of the two-component regulatory system CiaRH in Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakenbeck Regine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria is now recognized as a wide-spread regulatory mechanism modulating a variety of physiological responses including virulence. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, the first sRNAs to be described were found in the regulon of the CiaRH two-component regulatory system. Five of these sRNAs were detected and designated csRNAs for cia-dependent small RNAs. CiaRH pleiotropically affects β-lactam resistance, autolysis, virulence, and competence development by yet to be defined molecular mechanisms. Since CiaRH is highly conserved among streptococci, it is of interest to determine if csRNAs are also included in the CiaRH regulon in this group of organisms consisting of commensal as well as pathogenic species. Knowledge on the participation of csRNAs in CiaRH-dependent regulatory events will be the key to define the physiological role of this important control system. Results Genes for csRNAs were predicted in streptococcal genomes and data base entries other than S. pneumoniae by searching for CiaR-activated promoters located in intergenic regions that are followed by a transcriptional terminator. 61 different candidate genes were obtained specifying csRNAs ranging in size from 51 to 202 nt. Comparing these genes among each other revealed 40 different csRNA types. All streptococcal genomes harbored csRNA genes, their numbers varying between two and six. To validate these predictions, S. mitis, S. oralis, and S. sanguinis were subjected to csRNA-specific northern blot analysis. In addition, a csRNA gene from S. thermophilus plasmid pST0 introduced into S. pneumoniae was also tested. Each of the csRNAs was detected on these blots and showed the anticipated sizes. Thus, the method applied here is able to predict csRNAs with high precision. Conclusions The results of this study strongly suggest that genes for small non-coding RNAs, csRNAs, are part of

  12. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-01-01

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm 2 and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO 2 lasers

  13. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-10-18

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm{sup 2} and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO{sub 2} lasers.

  14. From trial to triumph: How Canada’s past financial crises helped shape a superior regulatory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrie Savage

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As anyone paying attention during the 2008–2009 financial crisis is aware, the Canadian financial system weathered the storm uniquely well. Exactly why Canada’s system remained so comparatively stable, while so many other foreign systems broke down, is a question that remains largely unsettled. One explanation may be that the regulatory system that emerged from a very specific history of prior crises had both prepared Canada well for such a crisis, and responded effectively as the crisis unfolded. But the very regulatory system that provided stability in recent years may also be at risk of becoming warped by its own success, with regulators so emboldened by the acclaim for their recent achievements that they overreach to ensure their track record remains unblemished in the future. The stunning collapse of a pair of western Canadian banks, a number of major Canadian trust companies and several insurance companies, as well as some other precarious near misses in the 1980s and 1990s, were a shock to the financial regulatory system, highlighting deficiencies that would be addressed with new regulations and, most notably, the creation of the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI. Canada’s centralized regulatory approach, through the OSFI and just four other major regulatory bodies, has proved both more elegant and effective than, for instance, the more complicated, more convoluted and more decentralized American financial-oversight system. But some regulated companies, insurers in particular, have long maintained that the concentration of power in Canada’s large banks has resulted in a one-size-fits-all regulatory approach that does not offer a relatively lighter burden for smaller institutions, potentially stifling growth. In other words, an over-emphasis on stability may be hampering market efficiency. Nor is there any economic evidence to shed light on whether those and other costs of regulating stability are

  15. From Trial to Triumph: How Canada’s Past Financial Crises Helped Shape a Superior Regulatory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrie Savage

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As anyone paying attention during the 2008–2009 financial crisis is aware, the Canadian financial system weathered the storm uniquely well. Exactly why Canada’s system remained so comparatively stable, while so many other foreign systems broke down, is a question that remains largely unsettled. One explanation may be that the regulatory system that emerged from a very specific history of prior crises had both prepared Canada well for such a crisis, and responded effectively as the crisis unfolded. But the very regulatory system that provided stability in recent years may also be at risk of becoming warped by its own success, with regulators so emboldened by the acclaim for their recent achievements that they overreach to ensure their track record remains unblemished in the future. The stunning collapse of a pair of western Canadian banks, a number of major Canadian trust companies and several insurance companies, as well as some other precarious near misses in the 1980s and 1990s, were a shock to the financial regulatory system, highlighting deficiencies that would be addressed with new regulations and, most notably, the creation of the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI. Canada’s centralized regulatory approach, through the OSFI and just four other major regulatory bodies, has proved both more elegant and effective than, for instance, the more complicated, more convoluted and more decentralized American financial-oversight system. But some regulated companies, insurers in particular, have long maintained that the concentration of power in Canada’s large banks has resulted in a one-size-fits-all regulatory approach that does not offer a relatively lighter burden for smaller institutions, potentially stifling growth. In other words, an over-emphasis on stability may be hampering market efficiency. Nor is there any economic evidence to shed light on whether those and other costs of regulating stability are

  16. Design of detection module for smart ligthting system

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev, I. G.; Goponenko, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers a smart lighting system based on Beaglebone microcomputer. The analysis of existing motion and presence sensors was carried out and then used as a basis for design of a detection system. The detection system and the corresponding connection solution for a smart lighting system were developed. Using the designed smart lighting system, experimental studies were carried out.