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Sample records for regulatory strategies workshop

  1. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, Barbara [Melber Consulting, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Nancy E. [Nancy E. Durbin Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Tael, Irene (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy

  2. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, Barbara; Durbin, Nancy E.; Tael, Irene

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy and a

  3. Highlights of the EPA innovative regulatory strategies workshop: Market-based incentives and other innovations for air pollution control. Summary of workshop discussion sessions. Held in Washington, DC on January 15-17, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 allow, and in some cases require, States to adopt market-based strategies or other innovative types of air pollution control. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) innovative regulatory strategies program seeks to encourage and facilitate, as appropriate, the development, demonstration, and implementation of a wide range of innovative regulatory air pollution programs, including market-based, informational, and pollution prevention approaches. The 3-day national workshop, attended by over two hundred people from Federal, State, and local agencies, industry, environmental and public interest groups, and the academic community highlighted issues associated with a variety of innovative, market-based strategies which are currently being developed or used by State and local authorities around the country

  4. Workshop on acceleration of the validation and regulatory acceptance of alternative methods and implementation of testing strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piersma, A. H.; Burgdorf, T.; Louekari, K.

    2018-01-01

    concerning the regulatory acceptance and implementation of alternative test methods and testing strategies, with the aim to develop feasible solutions. Classical validation of alternative methods usually involves one to one comparison with the gold standard animal study. This approach suffers from...... the reductionist nature of an alternative test as compared to the animal study as well as from the animal study being considered as the gold standard. Modern approaches combine individual alternatives into testing strategies, for which integrated and defined approaches are emerging at OECD. Furthermore, progress......-focused hazard and risk assessment of chemicals requires an open mind towards stepping away from the animal study as the gold standard and defining human biologically based regulatory requirements for human hazard and risk assessment....

  5. Industry Presentation to Regulatory Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treasure, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Mr. Mark Treasure from EDF NGL gave a presentation on industry perspectives on safety culture oversight. Mr. Treasure is the Nuclear Inspection and Oversight Manager within the Safety and Regulation Division. The presentation started with an explanation of the role of the nuclear inspection and oversight group (internal regulator), and their current approach to internal oversight of safety culture. A key element of the current internal regulatory oversight program is Management and Leadership Assessments. These are carried out by a team including management peers from other plants to enhance credibility. Findings can be linked to safety performance, and typically identify issues in areas such as accountability arrangements and strategic focus of the leadership team. Safety indicators have also been introduced to show trends in safety management and safety performance for each EDF UK nuclear power plant. A periodic nuclear safety culture survey is also carried out to identify focus areas and progress. The presentation included discussion on views of the role of the nuclear regulator. Important aspects were identified as: - Supporting the internal regulator by seeking to understand before taking enforcement action, maintaining an open dialogue and recognising that this area is complex and that there is rarely a 'silver bullet' solution. - Communication: being visible and actively discussing safety improvement, and use of language which emphasises nuclear safety rather than legal compliance. - Positive reinforcement to recognise efforts and encourage further improvement

  6. Iterative Prototyping of Strategy Implementation Workshop Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a strategy implementation workshop design can be developed and tested while minimizing the time spent on developing the design. Design/methodology/approach: This multiple case study at a diesel engine company shows how iterative prototyping...... can be used to structure the design process of a strategy implementation workshop. Findings: Strategy implementation workshop design can be developed in resource-constrained environments through iterative prototyping of the workshop design. Each workshop iteration can generate value in its own right...... draw on his/her experience as well as add to his/her knowledge base. Originality/value: Introducing iterative prototyping in an organizational context can facilitate fast yet structured development of a rigorous workshop design. Strategy consultants are provided with empirical examples of how...

  7. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  8. Workshop on Regulatory Review and Safety Assessment Issues in Repository Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, Roger D.

    2011-02-01

    The workshop described here was organised to address more general issues regarding regulatory review of SKB's safety assessment and overall review strategy. The objectives of the workshop were: - to learn from other programmes' experiences on planning and review of a license application for a nuclear waste repository, - to offer newly employed SSM staff an opportunity to learn more about selected safety assessment issues, and - to identify and document recommendations and ideas for SSM's further planning of the licensing review

  9. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-07-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. The workshop, held March 20–21, 2014, in Golden, Colorado, discussed and detailed the research and development needs for biomass indirect liquefaction. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols or acids) and further synthesize those intermediates to liquid hydrocarbons that are compatible as either a refinery feed or neat fuel.

  10. Workshop on rules for exemption from regulatory control: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This conference report documents the proceedings of an International Workshop on the subject of exempting radiation sources and practices from regulatory control. The purpose of the workshop was to provide national regulatory authorities an opportunity to exchange information on their respective approaches and practices involving exemptions and to enhance international understanding and cooperation on the derivation and practical application of the underlying principles. In addition, input from the workshop was intended to assist the NRC in the development of a policy statement on this issue. The workshop was divided into five sessions. During the first four sessions, papers were presented which defined the relative terms and concepts, outlined the national situations and approaches to the establishment and development of exemption rules, identified and discussed the existing issues, and gave the status of the international guidelines on exemption rules. The fifth session was devoted to summarizing the workshop and identifying the areas of consensus, the outstanding issues and the areas for future work. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  11. Workshop on Regulatory Review and Safety Assessment Issues in Repository Licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, Roger D. (Galson Sciences Limited (United Kingdom))

    2011-02-15

    The workshop described here was organised to address more general issues regarding regulatory review of SKB's safety assessment and overall review strategy. The objectives of the workshop were: - to learn from other programmes' experiences on planning and review of a license application for a nuclear waste repository, - to offer newly employed SSM staff an opportunity to learn more about selected safety assessment issues, and - to identify and document recommendations and ideas for SSM's further planning of the licensing review

  12. 75 FR 18202 - Notice of Indo-U.S. Regulatory Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... regulatory challenges faced by commissioners from both nations. The FERC Commissioners, along with other... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Indo-U.S. Regulatory Workshop April 1, 2010. Commissioner Philip D. Moeller will convene a workshop at the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  13. Biopower Technical Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    Biopower is electricity produced from a wide range of biomass (organic materials found in wood, plants, agricultural waste and other materials). Biomass is a base load renewable energy source with high availability for electricity production. To explore opportunities for biopower in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program conducted the Biopower Technical Strategy Workshop in Denver, Colorado, on December 2–3, 2009. This report summarizes the results of the workshop, which focused on challenges to the expanded use of biopower and the possible solutions, including technology research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) as well as policies and other market transformation mechanisms.

  14. Skills training workshops as a viable strategy for improving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skills training workshops as a viable strategy for improving smallholder and cooperative agribusiness management: A case study of Vhembe District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. ... South African Journal of Agricultural Extension ... Empirical evidence from this study shows that six months after attending the workshops, ...

  15. 78 FR 61999 - Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Supplemental Notice of Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD13-9-000] Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Supplemental Notice of Workshop As announced in the Notices issued on September 3, 2013 and September 18, 2013, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission...

  16. 78 FR 49530 - Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ...] Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... for Drug Evaluation and Research, in cosponsorship with the American College of Gastroenterology, the... American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, and the Pediatric IBD...

  17. ENSI’s regulatory framework strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    This short brochure issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI defines the organisation’s regulatory framework strategy. Six guiding principles are declared and discussed: Comprehensive harmonisation with relevant international requirements, basing the regulatory framework on existing, tried-and-tested regulations, issuing of its own guidelines only when it is necessary to do so, guidelines to be drawn up transparently and with the involvement of all stakeholders and basing the level of detail of its regulatory framework on hazard potential and risk

  18. 77 FR 9273 - WORKSHOP Sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute on the Treatment of Probabilistic Risk Assessment.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), will hold a joint workshop on the Treatment of...

  19. 78 FR 58535 - Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Supplemental Notice of Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD13-9-000] Hydropower... license for hydropower development at non-powered dams and closed-loop pumped storage projects in compliance with section 6 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013. The workshop will be held in...

  20. A waste package strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. 7 refs., 1 fig

  1. Proceedings of a high temperature superconductivity strategy workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzfeld, A.

    1987-07-01

    The paper contains the proceedings of a high temperature superconductivity strategy workshop, held at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1987. The purpose of the meeting was to consider the U.K. strategy to be adopted for the high Tsub(c) superconductors and their application. The notes are presented of five Working Groups examining the following subjects: materials preparation, structural evaluation, physical properties, theoretical studies, and applications. (UK)

  2. National Strategy for Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This National Strategy for Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products sets forth a vision for ensuring that the federal regulatory system is prepared to efficiently assess the risks, if any, of the future products of biotechnology.

  3. Development of goods movement strategic transportation directions : Workshop on opportunities and strategies : final workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advokaat, E. [Lura Consulting, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a newly developed strategy for the movement of goods that will support economic development and competitiveness in Central Ontario. The strategy was developed at a workshop which examined current and emerging conditions that influence the movement of goods in Central Ontario along with the challenges and opportunities for goods movement. Possible short-term actions and long-term directions that can be incorporated into a strategy were also discussed. Attendees included representatives from all levels of government as well as shippers, trucking firms, rail, air and marine carriers, and port authorities. The study area included the Greater Toronto Area, Hamilton, the Regional Municipality of Niagara, the Regional Municipality of Waterloo and surrounding counties. It was recommended that any movement of goods strategy should consider population increases, land use planning, cross-border issues, the Kyoto Protocol, traffic issues, rail transport, e-commerce and market competition. The workshop also provided a forum to discuss coordination efforts, intergovernmental complexity, lack of funding, data gaps, marine transport, travel demand management, the problem with 'business-as-usual' scenarios, and inconsistent support from the province of Ontario. Participants expressed the need for an institution such as the Freight Council which is dedicated to issues regarding the movement of goods. The notion of expanding and maintaining a rail network was also supported by many participants.

  4. VI International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Otero, Fernando; Masegosa, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Biological and other natural processes have always been a source of inspiration for computer science and information technology. Many emerging problem solving techniques integrate advanced evolution and cooperation strategies, encompassing a range of spatio-temporal scales for visionary conceptualization of evolutionary computation. This book is a collection of research works presented in the VI International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for Optimization (NICSO) held in Canterbury, UK. Previous editions of NICSO were held in Granada, Spain (2006 & 2010), Acireale, Italy (2007), Tenerife, Spain (2008), and Cluj-Napoca, Romania (2011). NICSO 2013 and this book provides a place where state-of-the-art research, latest ideas and emerging areas of nature inspired cooperative strategies for problem solving are vigorously discussed and exchanged among the scientific community. The breadth and variety of articles in this book report on nature inspired methods and applications such as Swarm In...

  5. Regulation for continuous improvements - the new regulatory strategy of SKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.; Svensson, G.; Viktorsson, C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the new regulatory objectives and strategy of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. Factors that have influenced the development of the regulatory strategy, including an international peer review, are discussed. In addition to general technical requirements for a defence in depth, the new strategy strongly focuses on the quality of plant safety management processes, to be monitored by process-oriented inspections. Also, quality assurance of regulatory activities is stressed. Experience gained so far shows that the regulatory approach chosen in Sweden promotes utility self assessment, quality of safety management and ownership of safety work within the utility staff. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the 13. International Workshop on Inspection Practices. 13. International Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Workshop - Appendix of Responses, 17-21 April 2016, Bruges, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This appendix provides the complete compilation of responses received to the questionnaire issued in conjunction with the workshop announcements. The responses are provided as received, with changes made only to the formatting. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) sponsored the 13. International Workshop on Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Activities. The workshop was hosted by the Bel V and FANC, in Bruges, Belgium on 17 -21 April 2016. The three workshop topics that were addressed were as follows: - Inspection Activities During the Transition from an Operating Reactor to a De-fueled Status with a Commitment to Cease Power Operation; - Inspection of Modifications; - The Inspectors' Role in the Enforcement Process. Each of the respondents was given the following instructions in relation to their response: - Only one response per country is required. If more than one person from your country is participating, please co-ordinate the responses accordingly. - Responses must be provided on separate sheet with clear identification of the questionnaire part and topic. For preparation of the workshop, participants were invited to supply their national inspection approaches used in inspection of events and incidents according to the surveys. Actual issues that were discussed during the workshop were generated by the topic leaders based on the responses submitted by participants with their registration forms. This formats helped to ensure that issues considered most important by the workshop participants were covered during the group discussions

  7. Regulatory policy issues and the Clean Air Act: Issues and papers from the state implementation workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K. [ed.; Burns, R.E.

    1993-07-01

    The National Regulatory Research Institute (NRRI), with funding from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted four regional workshops` on state public utility commission implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The workshops had four objectives: (1) to discuss key issues and concerns on CAAA implementation, (2) to encourage a discussion among states on issues of common interests, (3) to attempt to reach consensus, where possible, on key issues, and (4) to provide the workshop participants with information and materials to assist in developing state rules, orders, and procedures. From the federal perspective, a primary goal was to ensure that workshop participants return to their states with a comprehensive background and understanding of how state commission actions may affect implementation of the CAAA and to be able to provide guidance to their jurisdictional utilities. It was hoped that this would reduce some of the uncertainty utilities face and assist in the development of an efficient allowance market. This report is divided into two main sections. In Section II, eleven principal issues are identified and discussed. These issues were chosen because they were either the most frequently discussed or they were related to the questions asked in response to the speakers` presentations. This section does not cover all the issues relevant to state implementation nor all the issues discussed at the workshops; rather, Section II is intended to provide an overview of the,planning, ratemaking, and multistate issues. Part III is a series of workshop papers presented by some of the speakers. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  8. Application of omics data in regulatory toxicology: report of an international BfR expert workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx-Stoelting, P; Braeuning, A; Buhrke, T; Lampen, A; Niemann, L; Oelgeschlaeger, M; Rieke, S; Schmidt, F; Heise, T; Pfeil, R; Solecki, R

    2015-11-01

    Advances in omics techniques and molecular toxicology are necessary to provide new perspectives for regulatory toxicology. By the application of modern molecular techniques, more mechanistic information should be gained to support standard toxicity studies and to contribute to a reduction and refinement of animal experiments required for certain regulatory purposes. The relevance and applicability of data obtained by omics methods to regulatory purposes such as grouping of chemicals, mode of action analysis or classification and labelling needs further improvement, defined validation and cautious expert judgment. Based on the results of an international expert workshop organized 2014 by the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Berlin, this paper is aimed to provide a critical overview of the regulatory relevance and reliability of omics methods, basic requirements on data quality and validation, as well as regulatory criteria to decide which effects observed by omics methods should be considered adverse or non-adverse. As a way forward, it was concluded that the inclusion of omics data can facilitate a more flexible approach for regulatory risk assessment and may help to reduce or refine animal testing.

  9. 76 FR 66078 - Notice of Industry Workshop on Technical and Regulatory Challenges in Deep and Ultra-Deep Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...-0087] Notice of Industry Workshop on Technical and Regulatory Challenges in Deep and Ultra-Deep Outer... discussions expected to help identify Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) challenges and technologies associated... structured venue for consultation among offshore deepwater oil and gas industry and regulatory experts in...

  10. Regulatory controls for NORM contamination: Emerging issues and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennerberg, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NORM) faces the increasing likelihood of federal or state regulatory control. Public concern and limited preliminary survey data fuel the debate over the necessity, approach, and jurisdiction of a NORM regulatory strategy. This debate requires the resolution of technical controversies and potentially competing state and federal agency interests. An additional facet of the debate is the impact of regulation upon traditionally non-nuclear industries, such as oil and gas production. Regulatory response has been initiated in several states, such as Louisiana's controls on equipment used in oil and gas production, to control specific industrial activities which generate NORM. A more comprehensive, generic federal strategy to control NORM contamination is also under review by the Environmental Protection Agency. This paper will detail the emerging technical issues, federal and state regulatory strategies under consideration, and evaluate the efficacy of selected regulatory approaches. (author)

  11. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Binnebeek, J. J. [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear - AVN, Avenue du Roi, 157, B-1060 Brussels (Belgium); Aubrey, Richard; Grandame, Melvyn [Atomic Energy Control Board - AECB, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada); Aro, Ilari [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety - STUK, P.O. Box 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Balloffet, Yves [DRIRE Rhone Alpes, 146, rue Pierre Corneille, 69426 Lyon CEDEX 03 (France); Klonk, Hartmut [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Postbox 10 01 49, 38201 Salzgitter 1 (Germany); Manzella, Pietro [A.N.P.A., Via V. Brancati, 48, 1-00144 Roma EUR (Italy); Koizumi, Hiroyoshi [Tech. Stan. Dept. - JAPEIC, Shin-Toranomon Bldg., 1-5-11, Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107 (Japan); Bouvrie, E.C. des [Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment, Nuclear Safety Dept. KFD, P.O. Box 90804, 2509 LV The Hague (Netherlands); Forsberg, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate - SKI, Klarabergsviadukten 90, S-10658 Stockholm (Sweden); Lang, Hans-Guenter [Section Plant Coordination and Inspection, Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - HSK, CH-5232 Villigen-HSK (Switzerland); Mehew, Robert; Warren, Thomas; Woodhouse, Paul [Health and Safety Executive - NII, St. Peter' s House, Balliol Road, Bootle, Merseyside L20 3LZ (United Kingdom); Gallo, Robert M. [Special Inspection Branch, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - US NRC, Mail Stop 0-9A1, Washington, DC 20555 (United States); Campbell, Rob [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA))

    1997-07-01

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities.

  12. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Binnebeek, J.J.; Aubrey, Richard; Grandame, Melvyn; Aro, Ilari; Balloffet, Yves; Klonk, Hartmut; Manzella, Pietro; Koizumi, Hiroyoshi; Bouvrie, E.C. des; Forsberg, Staffan; Lang, Hans-Guenter; Mehew, Robert; Warren, Thomas; Woodhouse, Paul; Gallo, Robert M.; Campbell, Rob; )

    1997-01-01

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities

  13. Proceedings of the 13. International Workshop on Inspection Practices. 13. International Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Workshop, 17-21 April 2016, Bruges, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bens, Jan; De Boeck, Benoit; Wertelaers, An; Van Haesendonck, Michel; Barras, Pierre; Leblanc, Alexandre; Regan, Christopher; Smith, Paul; Kupila, Jukka; Crespo, Julio; Meskens, Gaston; Schneider, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for information exchange on the regulatory inspection activities. Participants had the opportunity to meet with their counterparts from other countries and organisations to discuss current and future issues on the selected topics. They developed conclusions regarding these issues and identified methods that may help to improve their own inspection programmes. The CNRA believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established working groups and groups of experts in specialised topics. The Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) was formed in 1990 with the mandate '...to concentrate on the conduct of inspections and how the effectiveness of inspections could be evaluated..'. The WGIP facilitates the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA member countries. These proceedings cover the 13. International Nuclear Regulatory Inspection Workshop held by WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. This workshop, which is the 13. in a series, along with many other activities performed by the working group, is directed towards this goal. The consensus from participants at previous workshops noted that the value of meeting with people from other inspection organisations was one of the most important achievements. The focus of this workshop was on experience gained from regulatory inspection activities in three areas: - experience from the inspection activities during the transition from an operating reactor to a de-fueled status with a commitment to permanently cease power operations; - inspection of modifications; - the inspectors' role in the enforcement process. As part of the registration, participants were asked to respond to a questionnaire describing practices within their own countries on these topics

  14. Workshop as a Pedagogical Strategy for Printmaking: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In May 2009, the sixth printmaking workshop was held at the Department of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. This paper is a review of this creative workshop. Critically evaluating the demonstration of drypoint and collagraphy techniques in the exercise, effort is made to highlight the effectiveness of ...

  15. Splitting Strategy for Simulating Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The splitting approach is developed for the numerical simulation of genetic regulatory networks with a stable steady-state structure. The numerical results of the simulation of a one-gene network, a two-gene network, and a p53-mdm2 network show that the new splitting methods constructed in this paper are remarkably more effective and more suitable for long-term computation with large steps than the traditional general-purpose Runge-Kutta methods. The new methods have no restriction on the choice of stepsize due to their infinitely large stability regions.

  16. The Dessau workshop on bioaccumulation: state of the art, challenges and regulatory implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Gabriele; Drost, Wiebke; Jöhncke, Ulrich; Rauert, Caren; Schlechtriem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Bioaccumulation plays a vital role in understanding the fate of a substance in the environment and is key to the regulation of chemicals in several jurisdictions. The current assessment approaches commonly use the octanol-water partition coefficient (log K OW ) as an indicator for bioaccumulation and the bioconcentration factor (BCF) as a standard criterion to identify bioaccumulative substances show limitations. The log K OW does not take into account active transport phenomena or special structural properties (e.g., amphiphilic substances or dissociating substances) and therefore additional screening criteria are required. Regulatory BCF studies are so far restricted to fish and uptake through the gills. Studies on (terrestrial) air-breathing organisms are missing. Though there are alternative tests such as the dietary exposure bioaccumulation fish test described in the recently revised OECD test guideline 305, it still remains unclear how to deal with results of alternative tests in regulatory decision-making processes. A substantial number of bioaccumulation fish tests are required in regulation. The development of improved test systems following the 3R principles, namely to replace, reduce and refine animal testing, is thus required. All these aspects stress the importance to further develop the assessment of bioaccumulation. The Dessau Workshop on Bioaccumulation which was held from June 26th to 27th 2014, in Dessau, Germany, provided a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of bioaccumulation assessment, provided insights into the problems and challenges addressed by the regulatory authorities and described new research concepts and their regulatory implications. The event was organised by UBA (Dessau, Germany) and Fraunhofer IME (Schmallenberg, Germany). About 50 participants from industry, regulatory bodies and academia listened to 14 lectures on selected topics and joined the plenary discussions.

  17. Advancing the use of noncoding RNA in regulatory toxicology: Report of an ECETOC workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Achim; Buesen, Roland; Gant, Tim; Gooderham, Nigel; Greim, Helmut; Hackermüller, Jörg; Hubesch, Bruno; Laffont, Madeleine; Marczylo, Emma; Meister, Gunter; Petrick, Jay S; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Sauer, Ursula G; Schmidt, Kerstin; Seitz, Hervé; Slack, Frank; Sukata, Tokuo; van der Vies, Saskia M; Verhaert, Jan; Witwer, Kenneth W; Poole, Alan

    2016-12-01

    The European Centre for the Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) organised a workshop to discuss the state-of-the-art research on noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) as biomarkers in regulatory toxicology and as analytical and therapeutic agents. There was agreement that ncRNA expression profiling data requires careful evaluation to determine the utility of specific ncRNAs as biomarkers. To advance the use of ncRNA in regulatory toxicology, the following research priorities were identified: (1) Conduct comprehensive literature reviews to identify possibly suitable ncRNAs and areas of toxicology where ncRNA expression profiling could address prevailing scientific deficiencies. (2) Develop consensus on how to conduct ncRNA expression profiling in a toxicological context. (3) Conduct experimental projects, including, e.g., rat (90-day) oral toxicity studies, to evaluate the toxicological relevance of the expression profiles of selected ncRNAs. Thereby, physiological ncRNA expression profiles should be established, including the biological variability of healthy individuals. To substantiate the relevance of key ncRNAs for cell homeostasis or pathogenesis, molecular events should be dose-dependently linked with substance-induced apical effects. Applying a holistic approach, knowledge on ncRNAs, 'omics and epigenetics technologies should be integrated into adverse outcome pathways to improve the understanding of the functional roles of ncRNAs within a regulatory context. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge sharing to facilitate regulatory decision-making in regard to alternatives to animal testing: Report of an EPAA workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Beken, Sonja; Chlebus, Magda; Ellis, Graham; Griesinger, Claudius; De Jonghe, Sandra; Manou, Irene; Mehling, Annette; Reisinger, Kerstin; Rossi, Laura H; van Benthem, Jan; van der Laan, Jan Willem; Weissenhorn, Renate; Sauer, Ursula G

    2015-10-01

    The European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA) convened a workshop Knowledge sharing to facilitate regulatory decision-making. Fifty invited participants from the European Commission, national and European agencies and bodies, different industry sectors (chemicals, cosmetics, fragrances, pharmaceuticals, vaccines), and animal protection organizations attended the workshop. Four case studies exemplarily revealed which procedures are in place to obtain regulatory acceptance of new test methods in different sectors. Breakout groups discussed the status quo identifying the following facilitators for regulatory acceptance of alternatives to animal testing: Networking and communication (including cross-sector collaboration, international cooperation and harmonization); involvement of regulatory agencies from the initial stages of test method development on; certainty on prerequisites for test method acceptance including the establishment of specific criteria for regulatory acceptance. Data sharing and intellectual property issues affect many aspects of test method development, validation and regulatory acceptance. In principle, all activities should address replacement, reduction and refinement methods (albeit animal testing is generally prohibited in the cosmetics sector). Provision of financial resources and education support all activities aiming at facilitating the acceptance and use of alternatives to animal testing. Overall, workshop participants recommended building confidence in new methodologies by applying and gaining experience with them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Algal Biofuels Strategy. Proceedings from the March 26-27, 2014, Workshop, Charleston, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-06-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s Algal Biofuel Strategy Workshop on March 26-27, 2014, in Charleston, South Carolina. The workshop objective was to convene stakeholders to engage in discussion on strategies over the next 5 to 10 years to achieve affordable, scalable, and sustainable algal biofuels.

  20. OECD/NEA WGFCS Workshop: Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is produced, processed, and stored mainly in industrial-scale facilities. Uranium ores are processed and refined to produce a pure uranium salt stream, Uranium is converted and enriched, nuclear fuel is fabricated (U fuel and U/Pu fuel for the closed cycle option); and spent fuel is stored and reprocessed in some countries (close cycle option). Facilities dedicated to the research and development of new fuel or new processes are also considered as Fuel Cycle Facilities. The safety assessment of nuclear facilities has often been led by the methodology and techniques initially developed for Nuclear Power Plants. As FCFs cover a wide diversity of installations the various approaches of national regulators, and their technical support organizations, for the Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities are also diverse, as are the approaches by their industries in providing safety justifications for their facilities. The objective of the Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety is to advance the understanding for both regulators and operators of relevant aspects of nuclear fuel cycle safety in member countries. A large amount of experience is available in safety assessment of FCFs, which should be shared to develop ideas in this field. To contribute to this task, the Workshop on 'Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives' was held in Toronto, on 27 - 29 September 2011. The workshop was hosted by Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The current proceedings provide summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  1. Oversight and Influencing of Licensee Leadership and Management for Safety, Including Safety Culture - Regulatory Approaches and Methods. Proceedings of an NEA/IAEA Workshop, Chester, United Kingdom, 26-28 September 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognise the need for licensees to develop a strong, positive safety culture to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. A number of reports have been issued by the IAEA and the NEA on the role of the regulator in relation to oversight of safety culture (References 1 to 5). There has been less clarity on how this should be achieved - in particular, with regard to strategies and practical approaches for maintaining oversight of, and influencing, those facets of licensee leadership and management which have a profound influence on safety culture. In recognition of this, the CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (WGHOF), together with the CNRA Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) and the IAEA, organised a workshop in Chester, United Kingdom, in May 2007 to provide a forum for gathering and sharing international experience, including good practices and learning points. The results of the workshop are reported in Reference 6. Workshop participants agreed that, in view of the rapidly developing approaches in this area, it would be sensible to hold a further workshop ('Chester 2') in 3-5 years in order to discuss how regulatory approaches have moved on and to share lessons learned from their application. In 2010, the WGIP hosted a workshop which included regulatory approaches for the assessment of licensee safety culture as a discussion topic. The outputs of the workshop included a list of commendable practices for monitoring and evaluating licensee safety culture (Reference 7). The 'Chester 2' workshop took place in September 2011. This report sets out the findings of the workshop, organised by the UK Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) on behalf of the CSNI/WGHOF and the IAEA. The workshop was attended by over 40 representatives of nuclear regulatory bodies and licensees from 15 countries plus IAEA and NEA. The workshop featured keynote papers on learning from major events, and from

  2. Ecological Models in Support of Regulatory Risk Assessments of Pesticides: Developing a Strategy for the Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, V.E.; Hommen, U.; Thorbek, P.; Heimbach, F.; Brink, van den P.J.; Wogram, J.; Thulke, H.H.; Grimm, V.

    2009-01-01

    This brief communication reports on the main findings of the LEMTOX workshop, held from 9 to 12 September 2007, at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in Leipzig, Germany. The workshop brought together a diverse group of stakeholders from academia, regulatory authorities, contract

  3. Pedagogical workshops as a teaching and learning strategy: the hydrographic basic as a theme

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Brumato Regina Fornazari; Ana Tiyomi Obara

    2017-01-01

    Current research investigates the ideas and practices of a team of teachers of the Natural Sciences working in schools in the state of Paraná, Brazil, with regard to pedagogical workshops as teaching and learning strategies on Hydrographic Basin as theme. A continuous formation course was conducted on the theme, with data retrieved by a questionnaire applied prior to the course and after the development of workshops by the teachers. Films, recordings and descriptive memorials were analyzed ac...

  4. First update to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulatory strategy for the high-level waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Linehan, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has updated its initial regulatory strategy for the High-Level Waste Repository Licensing Program. The update describes changes to the initial strategy and summarizes progress and future activities. This paper summarizes the first update of the regulatory strategy. In general the overall strategy of identifying and reducing uncertainties is unchanged. Identifying regulatory and institutional uncertainties is essentially complete, and therefore, the current and future emphasis is on reducing those regulatory and institutional uncertainties identified to date. The NRC staff has improved the methods of reducing regulatory uncertainties by (1) enhancing the technical basis preparation process for potential rulemakings and guidance and (2) designing a new guidance document, called a staff position, for clarifying regulatory uncertainties. For guiding the US DOE's reduction of technical uncertainties, the NRC staff will give more emphasis to prelicense application reviews and less emphasis on preparing staff technical positions

  5. Waste package for Yucca Mountain repository: Strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloninger, M.; Short, D.; Stahl, D.

    1989-02-01

    This document summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan (1) for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. This strategy involves an iterative process designed to achieve compliance with the requirements for substantially complete containment and EBS release. The strategy will be implemented in such a manner that sufficient evidence will be provided for presentation to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) so that it may make a finding that there is ''reasonable assurance'' that these performance requirements will indeed be met. In implementing the strategy, DOE recognizes four fundamental goals: (1) protect public health and safety; (2) minimize financial and other resource commitments; (3) comply with applicable laws and regulations; and (4) maintain an aggressive schedule. The strategy is intended to be a reasonable balance of these competing goals. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Modeling Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (2010 - part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this workshop Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis. focused on conceptual and methodological issues - integrated assessment modeling and valuation.

  7. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Modeling Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (2011 - part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this workshop Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis. focused on conceptual and methodological issues - estimating impacts and valuing damages on a sectoral basis.

  8. Workshop Builds Strategies to Address Global Positioning System Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Genene

    2011-01-01

    When we examine the impacts of space weather on society, do we really understand the risks? Can past experiences reliably predict what will happen in the future? As the complexity of technology increases, there is the potential for it to become more fragile, allowing for a single point of failure to bring down the entire system. Take the Global Positioning System (GPS) as an example. GPS positioning, navigation, and timing have become an integral part of daily life, supporting transportation and communications systems vital to the aviation, merchant marine, cargo, cellular phone, surveying, and oil exploration industries. Everyday activities such as banking, mobile phone operations, and even the control of power grids are facilitated by the accurate timing provided by GPS. Understanding the risks of space weather to GPS and the many economic sectors reliant upon it, as well as how to build resilience, was the focus of a policy workshop organized by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and held on 13-14 October 2010 in Washington, D. C. The workshop brought together a select group of policy makers, space weather scientists, and GPS experts and users.

  9. Optimizing noise control strategy in a forging workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Hamideh; Ramazanifar, Ehsan; Bagherzadeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computer program based on a genetic algorithm is developed to find an economic solution for noise control in a forging workshop. Initially, input data, including characteristics of sound sources, human exposure, abatement techniques, and production plans are inserted into the model. Using sound pressure levels at working locations, the operators who are at higher risk are identified and picked out for the next step. The program is devised in MATLAB such that the parameters can be easily defined and changed for comparison. The final results are structured into 4 sections that specify an appropriate abatement method for each operator and machine, minimum allowance time for high-risk operators, required damping material for enclosures, and minimum total cost of these treatments. The validity of input data in addition to proper settings in the optimization model ensures the final solution is practical and economically reasonable.

  10. Sexuality Workshop For Adolescents: Participative Strategy For Collective Knowledge Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Silva Marques Ferreira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This is a quali- quantitative research  and was conducted in a basic health unit aiming to investigate female adolescents’ knowledge, practices and attitudes concerning sexuality. Methodology: The action-research methodology was used to develop workshop activities because it is a participative methodology. The workshop was performed in two modules with the participation of 29 female adolescents, and data were collected by questionnaires addressing two groups of adolescents who had or had not begun sexual activity. Results: The representations about sexuality were related to sexual relationships and showed erroneous information concerning sexually transmitted infections, which makes the adolescents vulnerable. Many of them reported not to know anything about infections or contraceptive methods, to know about contraceptive pills and condoms and to have doubts about condom use, and when experiencing sexuality, gender manifestation was present in the adolescents’ descriptions. Conclusion: Strict gender roles and a patriarchal and a chauvinistic social structure determine adolescents’ behaviors that make them believe in two opposing worlds, the masculine and the feminine worlds. With this regard, identities are constructed in multiple institutions that produce and reproduce differences. Among such institutions, schools, families and the media are noteworthy, since, despite social and individual resistance movements, they impose behavioral models according to prevailing social practices and to the objectives of the consumer and producer market. It is important to reflect about the inclusion of sexual diversity in order to act in this reality by understanding sexuality in the perspective of human rights. Key words: Sexuality, Adolescent, Health.

  11. Harmonization of measurement strategies for exposure to manufactured nano-objects; Report of a workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.; Berges, M.; Virji, M.A.; Fransman, W.; Bello, D.; Hodson, L.; Gabriel, S.; Tielemans, E.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the outcome of the discussions at the First International Scientific Workshop on Harmonization of Strategies to Measure and Analyze Exposure to (Manufactured) Nano-objects in Workplace Air that was organized and hosted by the Netherlands Organization for Applied

  12. Evaluating environmental and economic consequences of alternative pest management strategies: results of modeling workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard L.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.L.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.; McNamee, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs a comprehensive method to evaluate the human health and environmental effects of alternative agricultural pest management strategies. This project explored the utility of Adaptive Environmental Assessment (AEA) techniques for meeting this need. The project objectives were to produce models for environmental impact analysis, improve communications, identify research needs and data requirements, and demonstrate a process for resolving conflicts. The project was structured around the construction (in an initial 2 1/2-day workshop) and examination (in a second 2 1/2-day workshop) of a simulation model of a corn agroecosystem.

  13. Strategies for environmental restoration in an evolving regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Geffen, C.A.

    1990-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with the immense challenge of effectively implementing a program to mitigate and manage the environmental impacts created by past and current operations at its facilities. Such a program must be developed and administered in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. These regulations are extremely complex, burdening the environmental restoration process with a number of planning and public interaction requirements that must be met before remediation of a site may begin. Existing regulatory and institutional requirements for environmental restoration dictate that extensive planning, characterization and assessment activities be conducted. An important part of the process is the involvement of regulators and the public in the site characterization and assessment activities and in developing reasonable solutions for cleanup. This paper identifies the regulatory requirements and highlights implementation strategies for key aspects of the environmental restoration process for DOE. Trends in legislation and policy relevant to the DOE environmental restoration process are highlighted, with strategies identified for dealing with the evolution of the regulations while maintaining continuity in the technical activities required for cleaning up the DOE hazardous and mixed waste sites. 10 refs

  14. Pedagogical workshops as a teaching and learning strategy: the hydrographic basic as a theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Brumato Regina Fornazari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Current research investigates the ideas and practices of a team of teachers of the Natural Sciences working in schools in the state of Paraná, Brazil, with regard to pedagogical workshops as teaching and learning strategies on Hydrographic Basin as theme. A continuous formation course was conducted on the theme, with data retrieved by a questionnaire applied prior to the course and after the development of workshops by the teachers. Films, recordings and descriptive memorials were analyzed according to content analysis. Results showed that teachers endeavored to problematize in the pedagogical workshops, coupled to teachers´ mediation to go beyond common sense. Students´ participation was the great progress mediated by workshops. On the other hand, interdisciplinarity and the problematization of teaching were the limiting presuppositions for their execution. The undertaking enhanced a better understanding of pedagogical workshops in the teaching of the sciences, with the need for greater investments in teachers´ continuous formation to enhance the development of teaching practices that attend to current demands in science teaching.

  15. Achievements and challenges in nuclear regulatory communication with the public. Outcome from the CNRA Workshops held in 2000, 2004 and 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerle, Anders; Besenyei, Elisabeth; Calvo, Marina; Hah, Yeon-Hee; Hayden, Elizabeth; Herwig, Laurel; Kaliberda, Elena; Ostreng, Anne Marit; Robinson, Felicity; Storey, Peter; Yano, Mari; Zemanova, Dagmar; Chanial, Luc; Degueldre, Didier; Isaksson, Risto; Van Nuffelen, Dominique; Treier, Anton; Yoshimura, Uichiro; Gauvain, Jean

    2008-06-01

    the Public. NRO communication practices show that more and more common principles and practices for public communication about nuclear regulatory activity are now shared by OECD countries' nuclear regulators. Public Communication of NROs is clearly an area where the experience of the more advanced has been used to help the less advanced. Most OECD NRO have now a communication department or at least press officers, which reflects the fact that public communication is identified as integral part of the NROs mission. To this purpose NRO Communication Plans have been developed in many countries, which define the mission statement of the organisations, their communication strategy, their communication objectives and their communication targets. Conclusions of workshops and WGPC discussions have identified Stakeholder Involvement in nuclear safety as a necessary practice which helps enhance safety and support public confidence. It requires establish communication mechanisms and tools for discussions between the interested parties and those responsible for decision making. It has been highlighted that such a stakeholder involvement policy need dedicated resources to be efficiently implement. The use of the Internet has dramatically changed the audience of original documents and papers in allowing direct access to the public. In this respect, the development of Nuclear Regulators' web sites which have dramatically improved during this decade, allows that the interpretation and transfer of decisions and technical documents for the public are not only left to the media. This is a radical change in the possibility for directly communicating with the public and the ways to build confidence. Some challenges remain for the NROs such as how to develop an efficient and timely communication towards the public in case of a crisis, for instance when an event occurs in a nuclear facility. Another challenge is to set a proper balance between the need to strive for transparency and the

  16. Regulatory Strategy to Control Radon Exposure in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younus, Irfan; Cho, Kun Woo

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) was established in 2001 with one of the objectives to ensure the protection of workers, general public and the environment from the harmful effects of naturally occurring and artificially produced ionizing radiations by formulating and implementing the effective regulations. Radon is a naturally occurring odorless, colorless, tasteless, imperceptible to senses and chemically inert radioactive gas which is produced continuously from the natural decay of U-238, U-235 and Th-232 in most soils, rocks and water all over the earth. High levels of radon in the soil and rock are primarily responsible for indoor radon problems. Therefore when inhaled with air, there much probability that radon decay products will stay and decay in the lungs. If stayed in the lungs, the radiation may damage the cells causing lung cancer. Hence the radon problems have been taken seriously in most of the developed countries of the world. Radon reference levels for dwellings and workplaces have been set and the general public has been made alert of radon through newspapers and electronic media. In Pakistan, neither publicity campaign nor radon measurement and control programmes have been started countrywide. Rather small individual efforts for the sake of interest have been done to investigate the radon in some specific area or institution. This paper presents the regulatory strategy to control radon exposure for the sake of radiation protection of public and workers in Pakistan

  17. Skin sensitisation--moving forward with non-animal testing strategies for regulatory purposes in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Alépée, Nathalie; Casati, Silvia; Crozier, Jonathan; Eigler, Dorothea; Griem, Peter; Hubesch, Bruno; de Knecht, Joop; Landsiedel, Robert; Louekari, Kimmo; Manou, Irene; Maxwell, Gavin; Mehling, Annette; Netzeva, Tatiana; Petry, Thomas; Rossi, Laura H

    2013-12-01

    In a previous EPAA-Cefic LRI workshop in 2011, issues surrounding the use and interpretation of results from the local lymph node assay were addressed. At the beginning of 2013 a second joint workshop focused greater attention on the opportunities to make use of non-animal test data, not least since a number of in vitro assays have progressed to an advanced position in terms of their formal validation. It is already recognised that information produced from non-animal assays can be used in regulatory decision-making, notably in terms of classifying a substance as a skin sensitiser. The evolution into a full replacement for hazard identification, where the decision is not to classify, requires the generation of confidence in the in vitro alternative, e.g. via formal validation, the existence of peer reviewed publications and the knowledge that the assay(s) are founded on key elements of the Adverse Outcome Pathway for skin sensitisation. It is foreseen that the validated in vitro assays and relevant QSAR models can be organised into formal testing strategies to be applied for regulatory purposes by the industry. To facilitate progress, the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to animal testing (EPAA) provided the platform for cross-industry and regulatory dialogue, enabling an essential and open debate on the acceptability of an in vitro based integrated strategy. Based on these considerations, a follow up activity was agreed upon to explore an example of an Integrated Testing Strategy for skin sensitisation hazard identification purposes in the context of REACH submissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New Strategies and Challenges in Lung Proteomics and Metabolomics. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Russell P; Wendt, Chris H; Fessler, Michael B; Foster, Matthew W; Kelly, Rachel S; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Rogers, Angela J; Stringer, Kathleen A; Winston, Brent W

    2017-12-01

    This document presents the proceedings from the workshop entitled, "New Strategies and Challenges in Lung Proteomics and Metabolomics" held February 4th-5th, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. It was sponsored by the National Heart Lung Blood Institute, the American Thoracic Society, the Colorado Biological Mass Spectrometry Society, and National Jewish Health. The goal of this workshop was to convene, for the first time, relevant experts in lung proteomics and metabolomics to discuss and overcome specific challenges in these fields that are unique to the lung. The main objectives of this workshop were to identify, review, and/or understand: (1) emerging technologies in metabolomics and proteomics as applied to the study of the lung; (2) the unique composition and challenges of lung-specific biological specimens for metabolomic and proteomic analysis; (3) the diverse informatics approaches and databases unique to metabolomics and proteomics, with special emphasis on the lung; (4) integrative platforms across genetic and genomic databases that can be applied to lung-related metabolomic and proteomic studies; and (5) the clinical applications of proteomics and metabolomics. The major findings and conclusions of this workshop are summarized at the end of the report, and outline the progress and challenges that face these rapidly advancing fields.

  19. 77 FR 46444 - Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics (GREAT); Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... discussion of a single relevant disease area. The goal of the workshop day dedicated to eosinophilic... day dedicated to pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is to discuss issues related to the extrapolation of efficacy data from adult to pediatric patients, the definition and measurement of treatment...

  20. 78 FR 55251 - Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Notice of Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD13-9-000] Hydropower... hydropower development at non-powered dams and closed-loop pumped storage projects in compliance with section 6 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013. Participants should be prepared to discuss...

  1. Culinary workshop as a strategy for Occupational Therapy intervention with adolescents in situation of social vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Coelho Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the role of occupational therapy with adolescents in vulnerable situations, using a cooking workshop as intervention strategy. Methods: A culinary workshop was carried out in a philanthropic institution that attends adolescents in situations of social vulnerability, located in the municipality of Uberaba, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The workshop participants were of both sexes, 12 and 16 years old, divided into two groups. There were six meetings of approximately 90 minutes aiming to promote friendly relationships between adolescents; strengthen youth leadership and self-esteem; promote empowerment, citizenship, social participation and the development social skills; express emotions and feelings; motivate proactivity, autonomy and the process of collective creation, discussion and reflection on the everyday activities and universe of adolescents. Results: We realized the importance of establishing a link to identify the needs of the target population, so that they can be involved in the intervention and achieve the objectives proposed. At the end of the meetings, the communication between teenagers became more subtle, contributing to cooperativeness within the group, recognition of skills and capabilities, and consequent strengthening of self-esteem, autonomy and elaboration of life projects. Conclusions: We highlight the importance of strategies such as these, which promote the rights, participation, and citizenship of specific social groups, such as adolescents in situations of social vulnerability

  2. PRODUCTION WORKSHOP AT HOME: CULTURAL ELEMENT AND SURVIVAL STRATEGY IN THE REGION P'URHEPECHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Sandoval-Contreras

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze, characterize and give a definition of home workshop production from wood craft activities performed by residents of San Juan Pamatácuaro, Michoacán. For its realization, from an ethnographic perspective had to live for a time in the community study and thus directly observe workspaces artisans and learn in their own words of their organization in different ways, as the establishment of a workshop is given in the domestic space, the tools that are used have certain peculiarities, labor usually takes familiar, coupled required part marketing or networking. Furthermore, learning from each of the trades is through socialization and observation. Thus the formation of these productive activities turn out to be a survival strategy just for families to meet their needs because they do not generate surpluses.

  3. Risk Assessment and Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Strategies, Nordic Workshop, Vedbæk 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poll, Christian

    At a Nordic workshop on Product-oriented Environmental Strategies the roles of risk and hazard assessment and life cycle assessment of products in the future regulation of chemicals were discussed by participants representing administration, academia and industry from the Nordic countries....... This report compiles the papers and presentations given at the workshop. The papers present and discuss the different assessment tools and procedures - for individual chemicals through hazard and risk assessments and for products, materials and services through life-cycle assessment. The report also contains......, consultants and private enterprises to consider these well-established tools as individually necessary for the future regulation of the chemical pressure on the environment and to accept them as complementary to each other. Together with other process- or chain oriented tools like Substance or Material Flow...

  4. LOW-INCOME, MINORITY FATHERS’ CONTROL STRATEGIES AND THEIR CHILDREN'S REGULATORY SKILLS

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, Jenessa L.; Cabrera, Natasha J.; Karberg, Elizabeth; Aldoney, Daniela; Rowe, Meredith Lee

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the bidirectional association of children's individual characteristics, fathers' control strategies at 24-months and children's regulatory skills at pre-kindergarten (pre-K). Using a sample of low-income minority families with 2-year-olds from the Early Head Start Evaluation Research Program (n = 71) we assessed the association between child gender and vocabulary skills, fathers' control strategies at 24-months (e.g., regulatory behavior and regulatory language), an...

  5. The Interaction of Motivation, Self-Regulatory Strategies, and Autonomous Learning Behavior in Different Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Judit; Csizér, Kata

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous learning and effective self-regulatory strategies are increasingly important in foreign language learning; without these, students might not be able to exploit learning opportunities outside language classrooms. This study investigated the influence of motivational factors and self-regulatory strategies on autonomous learning behavior.…

  6. Allergic contact dermatitis: epidemiology, molecular mechanisms, in vitro methods and regulatory aspects : Current knowledge assembled at an international workshop at BfR, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiser, M; Tralau, T; Heidler, J

    2012-01-01

    potential contact allergens. However, the local lymph node assay (LLNA) presently remains the validated method of choice for hazard identification and characterisation. At the workshop the use of the LLNA for regulatory purposes and for quantitative risk assessment was also discussed....

  7. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  8. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  9. ENSI’s regulatory framework strategy; Regelwerksstrategie des ENSI -- Stratégie réglementaire de l’IFSN -- ENSI’s regulatory framework strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-03-15

    This short brochure issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI defines the organisation’s regulatory framework strategy. Six guiding principles are declared and discussed: Comprehensive harmonisation with relevant international requirements, basing the regulatory framework on existing, tried-and-tested regulations, issuing of its own guidelines only when it is necessary to do so, guidelines to be drawn up transparently and with the involvement of all stakeholders and basing the level of detail of its regulatory framework on hazard potential and risk.

  10. Regulatory framework, strategy and radioactive waste management in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Zambia is involved in the peaceful application in Nuclear Science and Technology which cover the agriculture, human health, industry, research and education sectors. In the execution of the projects various radioactive sources and radioisotopes are used. The data from the Radiation Protection Board show that there are 136 organizations and 971 Radiation workers benefit from the regulatory control and personnel Dosimetry service that is provided by the Board. The radiation user institutions are broken down as follows: medical (106), industrial (18), research (10) and (2) in teaching. The radioactive waste generated and spent sources are managed, in several ways depending on the type . In addition to radioactive waste generated by various application there are new developments concerning the management of spent sources mainly brought into control by the detection of illicit trade or trafficking activities by the Police, Drug Enforcement Commission, and the vigilant people of the community. The challenge for Zambia is to set-up a Radioactive Waste Management Facility preferably under the National Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research (NISIR). The RPB should legally designate NISIR for this function and assist to have the Government provide support that is required to have an operation and effective facility. One Radioactive Waste Interim Storage Shed at Kalulushi. This shed was put up by a copper mining conglomerate which now has been privatized. It is hoped that this facility can be licensed by Radiation Protection Board to be run by private enterprise for storage of prescribed spent radioactive sources and materials. This shed should be technically competent persons and should have good equipment for the purpose. The application in industry (NDT, mining, radiation sterilization, pipeline and construction, human health (nuclear medicine, radioimmunoassay and radiotherapy practices) and agriculture (use of P-32) required that a National Strategy

  11. Assessment of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies in Oncology: Summary of the Oncology Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, James N.; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Vogel, Wendy H.; Griffith, Niesha; Wariabharaj, Darshan; Garg, Rekha; Zon, Robin; Stephens, Cyntha L.; Bialecki, Alison M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Allen, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    To address oncology community stakeholder concerns regarding implementation of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) program, ASCO sponsored a workshop to gather REMS experiences from representatives of professional societies, patient organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Stakeholder presentations and topical panel discussions addressed REMS program development, implementation processes, and practice experiences, as well as oncology drug safety processes. A draft REMS decision tool prepared by the ASCO REMS Steering Committee was presented for group discussion with facilitated, goal-oriented feedback. The workshop identified several unintended consequences resulting from current oncology REMS: (1) the release of personal health information to drug sponsors as a condition for gaining access to a needed drug; (2) risk information that is not tailored—and therefore not accessible—to all literacy levels; (3) exclusive focus on drug risk, thereby affecting patient-provider treatment discussion; (4) REMS elements that do not consider existing, widely practiced oncology safety standards, professional training, and experience; and (5) administrative burdens that divert the health care team from direct patient care activities and, in some cases, could limit patient access to important therapies. Increased provider and professional society participation should form the basis of ongoing and future REMS standardization discussions with the FDA to work toward overall improvement of risk communication. PMID:23814522

  12. Ecological models in support of regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: developing a strategy for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Valery E; Hommen, Udo; Thorbek, Pernille; Heimbach, Fred; Van den Brink, Paul J; Wogram, Jörn; Thulke, Hans-Hermann; Grimm, Volker

    2009-01-01

    This brief communication reports on the main findings of the LEMTOX workshop, held from 9 to 12 September 2007, at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in Leipzig, Germany. The workshop brought together a diverse group of stakeholders from academia, regulatory authorities, contract research organizations, and industry, representing Europe, the United States, and Asia, to discuss the role of ecological modeling in risk assessments of pesticides, particularly under the European regulatory framework. The following questions were addressed: What are the potential benefits of using ecological models in pesticide registration and risk assessment? What obstacles prevent ecological modeling from being used routinely in regulatory submissions? What actions are needed to overcome the identified obstacles? What recommendations should be made to ensure good modeling practice in this context? The workshop focused exclusively on population models, and discussion was focused on those categories of population models that link effects on individuals (e.g., survival, growth, reproduction, behavior) to effects on population dynamics. The workshop participants concluded that the overall benefits of ecological modeling are that it could bring more ecology into ecological risk assessment, and it could provide an excellent tool for exploring the importance of, and interactions among, ecological complexities. However, there are a number of challenges that need to be overcome before such models will receive wide acceptance for pesticide risk assessment, despite having been used extensively in other contexts (e.g., conservation biology). The need for guidance on Good Modeling Practice (on model development, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, documentation, and communication), as well as the need for case studies that can be used to explore the added value of ecological models for risk assessment, were identified as top priorities. Assessing recovery potential of exposed

  13. Ecological models for regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: Developing a strategy for the future.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorbek, P.; Forbes, V.; Heimbach, F.; Hommen, U.; Thulke, H.H.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological Models for Regulatory Risk Assessments of Pesticides: Developing a Strategy for the Future provides a coherent, science-based view on ecological modeling for regulatory risk assessments. It discusses the benefits of modeling in the context of registrations, identifies the obstacles that

  14. Implementation Strategies for Gender-Sensitive Public Health Practice: A European Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine; Dalibert, Lucie; Verdonk, Petra; Stutz, Elisabeth Zemp; Klinge, Ineke

    2017-11-01

    Providing a robust scientific background for the focus on gender-sensitive public health and a systematic approach to its implementation. Within the FP7-EUGenMed project ( http://eugenmed.eu ) a workshop on sex and gender in public health was convened on February 2-3, 2015. The experts participated in moderated discussion rounds to (1) assemble available knowledge and (2) identify structural influences on practice implementation. The findings were summarized and analyzed in iterative rounds to define overarching strategies and principles. The participants discussed the rationale for implementing gender-sensitive public health and identified priorities and key stakeholders to engage in the process. Communication strategies and specific promotion strategies with distinct stakeholders were defined. A comprehensive list of gender-sensitive practices was established using the recently published taxonomy of the Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) project as a blueprint. A clearly defined implementation strategy should be mandated for all new projects in the field of gender-sensitive public health. Our tool can support researchers and practitioners with the analysis of current and past research as well as with the planning of new projects.

  15. Assessment of in vitro COPD models for tobacco regulatory science: Workshop proceedings, conclusions and paths forward for in vitro model use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrsing, Holger; Raabe, Hans; Manuppello, Joseph; Bombick, Betsy; Curren, Rodger; Sullivan, Kristie; Sethi, Sanjay; Phipps, Richard; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Yan, Sherwin; D'Ruiz, Carl; Tarran, Robert; Constant, Samuel; Phillips, Gary; Gaça, Marianna; Hayden, Patrick; Cao, Xuefei; Mathis, Carole; Hoeng, Julia; Braun, Armin; Hill, Erin

    2016-05-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 established the Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products (FDA-CTP), and gave it regulatory authority over the marketing, manufacture and distribution of tobacco products, including those termed 'modified risk'. On 8-10 December 2014, IIVS organised a workshop conference, entitled Assessment of In Vitro COPD Models for Tobacco Regulatory Science, to bring together stakeholders representing regulatory agencies, academia, industry and animal protection, to address the research priorities articulated by the FDA-CTP. Specific topics were covered to assess the status of current in vitro technologies as they are applied to understanding the adverse pulmonary events resulting from tobacco product exposure, and in particular, the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The four topics covered were: a) Inflammation and Oxidative Stress; b) Ciliary Dysfunction and Ion Transport; c) Goblet Cell Hyperplasia and Mucus Production; and d) Parenchymal/Bronchial Tissue Destruction and Remodelling. The 2.5 day workshop included 18 expert speakers, plus poster sessions, networking and breakout sessions, which identified key findings and provided recommendations to advance the in vitro technologies and assays used to evaluate tobacco-induced disease etiologies. The workshop summary was reported at the 2015 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, and the recommendations led to an IIVS-organised technical workshop in June 2015, entitled Goblet Cell Hyperplasia, Mucus Production, and Ciliary Beating Assays, to assess these assays and to conduct a proof-of-principle multi-laboratory exercise to determine their suitability for standardisation. Here, we report on the proceedings, recommendations and outcomes of the December 2014 workshop, including paths forward to continue the development of non-animal methods to evaluate tissue responses that model the disease processes that may lead to COPD, a

  16. Firms dealing with regulatory change: innovation and political influence strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, Joeri; Farla, Jacco; Hekkert, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Firm-level strategies, particularly political strategies, are overlooked in transition studies. Therefore, we study how car manufacturers combine and change their innovation and political influence strategies in response to a technology-forcing regulation that attempts to drive transition. We use

  17. Different regulatory strategies in regulation of nuclear power projects: An Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sohail Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory strategy needed for management of safety and safety culture involves careful planning and use of engineering concepts keeping in mind feasibility to implement certain safety requirements. It also requires adequate attention on working environment and mental conditions of designers, operating and maintenance staff and regulators. Different strategies followed during safety review and regulatory inspection of nuclear power projects for improving status of safety management and safety cultures have given certain results. The present paper brings out certain experience gained during regulation of Indian Nuclear Power Projects by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board of India in the area of management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  18. Discourse-voice regulatory strategies in the psychotherapeutic interaction: a state-space dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomicic, Alemka; Martínez, Claudio; Pérez, J Carola; Hollenstein, Tom; Angulo, Salvador; Gerstmann, Adam; Barroux, Isabelle; Krause, Mariane

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed in a sample of 153 relevant episodes taken from 164 sessions of five psychotherapies using the state space grid (SSG) method, a graphical tool based on the dynamic systems theory (DST). The results showed eight recurrent and stable discourse-voice regulatory strategies of the patients and three of the therapists. Also, four specific groups of these discourse-voice strategies were identified. The latter were interpreted as regulatory configurations, that is to say, as emergent self-organized groups of discourse-voice regulatory strategies constituting specific interactional systems. Both regulatory strategies and their configurations differed between two types of relevant episodes: Change Episodes and Rupture Episodes. As a whole, these results support the assumption that speaking and listening, as dimensions of the interaction that takes place during therapeutic conversation, occur at different levels. The study not only shows that these dimensions are dependent on each other, but also that they function as a complex and dynamic whole in therapeutic dialog, generating relational offers which allow the patient and the therapist to regulate each other and shape the psychotherapeutic process that characterizes each type of relevant episode.

  19. WORKSHOP ON NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS FROM COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY AND RELATED SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Stephen G. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    1998-08-22

    The power of combinatorial chemistry and related high throughput synthetic strategies is currently being pursued as a fruitful way to develop molecules and materials with new properties. The strategy is motivated, for example in the pharmaceutical industry, by the difficulty of designing molecules to bind to specific sites on target biomolecules. By synthesizing a variety of similar structures, and then finding the one that has the most potent activity, new so-called lead structures will be found rapidly. Existing lead structures can be optimized. This relatively new approach has many implications for separation science. The most obvious is the call for more separations power: higher resolution, lower concentrations, higher speed. This pressure butresses the traditional directions of research into the development of more useful separations. The advent of chip-based, electroosmotically pumped systems1 will certainly accelerate progress in this traditional direction. The progress in combinatorial chemistry and related synthetic strategies gives rise to two other, broadly significant possibilities for large changes in separation science. One possibility results from the unique requirements of the synthesis of a huge number of products simultaneously. Can syntheses and separations be designed to work together to create strategies that lead to mixtures containing only desired products but without side products? The other possibility results from the need for molecular selectivity in separations. Can combinatorial syntheses and related strategies be used in the development of better separations media? A workshop in two parts was held. In one half-day session, pedagogical presentations educated across the barriers of discipline and scale. In the second half-day session, the participants broke into small groups to flesh out new ideas. A panel summarized the breakout discussions.

  20. Low-income minority fathers' control strategies and children's regulatory skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jenessa L.; Cabrera, Natasha J.; Karberg, Elizabeth; Aldoney, Daniela; Rowe, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The current study explored the bidirectional association of children's individual characteristics, fathers' control strategies at 24-months and children's regulatory skills at pre-kindergarten (pre-K). Using a sample of low-income minority families with 2-year-olds from the Early Head Start Evaluation Research Program (n = 71) we assessed the association between child gender and vocabulary skills, fathers' control strategies at 24-months (e.g., regulatory behavior and regulatory language), and children's sustained attention and emotion regulation at pre-kindergarten. There were three main findings. First, fathers' overwhelmingly use commands (e.g., do that) to promote compliance in their 24-month old children. Second, children's vocabulary skills predict fathers' regulatory behaviors during a father-child interaction, whereas children's gender predicts fathers' regulatory language during an interaction. Third, controlling for maternal supportiveness, fathers' regulatory behaviors at 24-months predict children's sustained attention at pre-kindergarten whereas fathers' regulatory language at 24-months predicts children's emotion regulation at pre-kindergarten. Our findings highlight the importance of examining paternal contributions to children's regulatory skills. PMID:25798496

  1. Low-income, minority fathers' control strategies and their children's regulatory skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jenessa L; Cabrera, Natasha J; Karberg, Elizabeth; Aldoney, Daniela; Rowe, Meredith L

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the bidirectional association of children's individual characteristics, fathers' control strategies at 24 months, and children's regulatory skills at prekindergarten (pre-K). Using a sample of low-income, minority families with 2-year-olds from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (n = 71), we assessed the association between child gender and vocabulary skills, fathers' control strategies at 24 months (e.g., regulatory behavior and regulatory language), and children's sustained attention and emotion regulation at prekindergarten. There were three main findings. First, fathers overwhelmingly used commands (e.g., "Do that.") to promote compliance in their 24-month-old children. Second, children's vocabulary skills predicted fathers' regulatory behaviors during a father-child interaction whereas children's gender predicted fathers' regulatory language during an interaction. Third, controlling for maternal supportiveness, fathers' regulatory behaviors at 24 months predicted children's sustained attention at pre-K whereas fathers' regulatory language at 24 months predicted children's emotion regulation at pre-K. Our findings highlight the importance of examining paternal contributions to children's regulatory skills. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  2. The tone from above: The effect of communicating a supportive regulatory strategy on reporting quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duin, S.R.; Dekker, Henri; Mendoza Rodriguez, J.P.; Wielhouwer, J.L.

    2018-01-01

    As part of their regulatory strategy, authorities may request firms to periodically submit mandatory self-assessments. The effectiveness of such strategies depends on the quality of the information that firms provide. We conduct a field experiment to assess how official communications reflecting a

  3. Validation of innovative technologies and strategies for regulatory safety assessment methods: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William S; Wind, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Advances in science and innovative technologies are providing new opportunities to develop test methods and strategies that may improve safety assessments and reduce animal use for safety testing. These include high throughput screening and other approaches that can rapidly measure or predict various molecular, genetic, and cellular perturbations caused by test substances. Integrated testing and decision strategies that consider multiple types of information and data are also being developed. Prior to their use for regulatory decision-making, new methods and strategies must undergo appropriate validation studies to determine the extent that their use can provide equivalent or improved protection compared to existing methods and to determine the extent that reproducible results can be obtained in different laboratories. Comprehensive and optimal validation study designs are expected to expedite the validation and regulatory acceptance of new test methods and strategies that will support improved safety assessments and reduced animal use for regulatory testing.

  4. Joint IAEA/NEA workshop proceedings on regulatory review of plant safety analysis - Abstracts, Summary and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, Derek; Drozd, Andrzej; Husarcek, Jan; Modro, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Based on the final discussion, the seminar was a valuable exchange of information and helpful in understanding the safety analysis and regulatory review issues. It gave a chance for some countries to see 'where they are' regulatory-wise with respect to other countries. There was a strong support for a follow-up workshop within the next two years. A general opinion expressed by most of the participants was that the suggested next seminar should be based more on an 'overall safety analysis' review rather than on very detailed presentations on specific issues. Also, there should be more discussions on Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) and emergency planning. In addition, to establish a 'common language', the development of a glossary of terms would be most helpful. In general, all of the participating countries are adapting regulatory and licensing practices previously developed by other countries. Such an approach allows to utilise and rely on a broad experience of countries with a well established nuclear power industry, strong regulatory organisation and licensing practices. Since there are obvious differences in engineering traditions and in countries' legal/regulatory frameworks, questions arise about how to reconcile these differences in adapting and developing practices suitable for a given country. It was advised as a good practice to identify from the very beginning what needs to be done and the goals to be accomplished not only in the perspective of safety and technical requirements but also in the context of the economical, political, legal and regulatory situation in a given country. There has to be a consistency in any approach, but one can never follow 'blindly' the others. It became quite obvious that the needs of countries with a big nuclear program are very different from those of 'small' countries. Adaptation of other countries' rules is a big effort in itself (e.g., Romania applying Canadian regulations). In addition, the French-German co

  5. Controlling fuel costs: Procurement strategies and regulatory standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, H.A.; Levi, B.I.

    1992-01-01

    Since the oil price shocks and inflation of the 1970s, regulatory authorities and utilities have devoted considerable attention to controlling energy costs while maintaining reliable service. Although much of this concern has been directed towards capital cost containment, increasing scrutiny has been applied to a broad range of variable costs, especially to fuel procurement expenditures. With some 40% to 65% of the electric utility industry's annual operation and maintenance expenses paid to secure fuel supplies, even a small difference in fuel costs could have a substantial impact on costs to ratepayers. This increased attention to fuel cost containment can be expected to intensify as implementation of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act affects fuel purchase decisions. To assure that fuel is purchased in a responsible and cost-effective manner, some state jurisdictions have initiated periodic reviews (audits) of the procurement practices that electric utilities follow when purchasing fuel. While a utility must demonstrate how it purchases fuel, there is wide variation in interest and scope of audits among jurisdictions. In this paper, the authors review: (1) the regulatory environment within which fuel procurement and audits occur, and (2) some particularly controversial issues that will receive increasing attention as the practice of conducting fuel procurement audits spreads

  6. Generic antibiotic industries: Challenges and implied strategies with regulatory perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of antibiotics, the quality of human life greatly improved in the 20 th century. The discovery of penicillin transformed the medicine industry and initiated a search for a better antibiotic every time resulting in several synthetic and semi-synthetic antibiotics. Beginning with the 1937 sulfa drug tragedy, the drug regulations had a parallel growth along with the antibiotics and the antibiotic-based generic Pharma industries. This review article is focused on the scenario depicting current global Pharma industries based on generic antibiotics. Several regulatory aspects involved with these industries have been discussed along with the complexity of the market, issues that could affect their growth, their struggle for quality, and their compliance with the tightened regulations. With the skyrocketing commercialization of antibiotics through generics and the leveraging technologic renaissance, generic industries are involved in providing maximum safer benefits for the welfare of the people, highlighting its need today.

  7. Generic antibiotic industries: Challenges and implied strategies with regulatory perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, M.; Bairavi, V. G.; Sasikumar, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of antibiotics, the quality of human life greatly improved in the 20th century. The discovery of penicillin transformed the medicine industry and initiated a search for a better antibiotic every time resulting in several synthetic and semi-synthetic antibiotics. Beginning with the 1937 sulfa drug tragedy, the drug regulations had a parallel growth along with the antibiotics and the antibiotic-based generic Pharma industries. This review article is focused on the scenario depicting current global Pharma industries based on generic antibiotics. Several regulatory aspects involved with these industries have been discussed along with the complexity of the market, issues that could affect their growth, their struggle for quality, and their compliance with the tightened regulations. With the skyrocketing commercialization of antibiotics through generics and the leveraging technologic renaissance, generic industries are involved in providing maximum safer benefits for the welfare of the people, highlighting its need today.. PMID:21430959

  8. Exploring self-regulatory strategies for eating behaviour in Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nureeva, Liliya; Brunsø, Karen; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    – Focusing on improving adolescents’ self-regulatory skills in the domain of eating behaviour is a promising approach in developing future interventions. Originality/value – The present article explores self-regulatory strategies for eating behaviour in adolescence and discusses their relevance.......Purpose – Healthy eating behaviour in adolescence may be negatively affected by lack of self-regulation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategies for regulating eating behaviour as formulated by adolescents themselves. Design/methodology/approach – Self-regulatory strategies were elicited...... with concept mapping, which is a group-based method. Three meetings were conducted with each of four school classes in Denmark. Participants in the 12-15-year age group were recruited for the study. At the first meeting, participants had to complete the phrase “Things I can do to ensure my healthy eating are...

  9. An Analysis of Regulatory Strategies for Recycling and Re-Use of Metals in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Gumley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article considers regulatory strategies that promote more efficient use of material inputs within the Australian economy, with particular focus on recycling and recovery of metals, drawing upon the concept of a “circular economy”. It briefly reviews the nature of regulation and trends in regulatory strategies within changing policy contexts, and then examines the regulatory framework applicable to the various phases in the life cycle of metals, ranging from extraction of minerals to processing and assimilation of metals into finished products, through to eventual disposal of products as waste. Discussion focuses upon the regulatory strategies applied in each phase and the changing roles of government and business operators within global distribution networks. It is concluded that the prevailing political agenda favoring deregulation and reduced taxation may be a major barrier to development of new styles of regulation and more effective use of taxation powers that is needed to support a more circular economy in metals. The implication for future research is the need to substantiate the outcomes of reflexive regulatory strategies with well-designed empirical studies.

  10. 76 FR 29195 - National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) Governance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) Governance Workshop AGENCY: National Institute of Standards... for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) Governance Workshop to be held on Thursday, June 9, 2011... discuss various governance models to administer the process for policy and standards adoption for the...

  11. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY: Fuel Cell Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and... the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the Hydrogen Storage team of the EERE... hydrogen storage in the Washington, DC metro area. DATES: The workshops will be held on Monday, February 14...

  12. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... questions related to patient risk and product characteristics. The workshop has been planned in partnership... questions related to patient risk and product characteristics. The first day of this workshop will include...-associated hemolysis; (2) patient risk factors; and (3) possible product risk factors, including the presence...

  13. Challenges and opportunities in establishing scientific and regulatory standards for determining therapeutic equivalence of modified-release products: Workshop summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Shah, Vinod P; Ganes, Derek; Midha, Kamal K; Caro, James; Nambiar, Prabu; Rocci, Mario L; Thombre, Avinash G; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Conner, Dale; Davit, Barbara; Fackler, Paul; Farrell, Colm; Gupta, Suneel; Katz, Russell; Mehta, Mehul; Preskorn, Sheldon H; Sanderink, Gerard; Stavchansky, Salomon; Temple, Robert; Wang, Yaning; Winkle, Helen; Yu, Lawrence

    2010-09-01

    Modified-release (MR) products are complex dosage forms designed to release drug in a controlled manner to achieve the desired efficacy and safety profiles. Inappropriate control of drug release from such products may result in reduced efficacy or increased toxicity. This paper is a summary report of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, International Pharmaceutical Federation, and Product Quality Research Institute workshop titled "Challenges and Opportunities in Establishing Scientific and Regulatory Standards for Assuring Therapeutic Equivalence of Modified Release Products", held October 1-2, 2009, in Baltimore, Maryland. The workshop provided an opportunity for pharmaceutical scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to discuss current regulatory expectations and industry practices for evaluating the pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence of oral MR products. In the case of conventional monophasic MR formulations, the current regulatory approaches and criteria for bioequivalence evaluation were considered adequate for the assessment of therapeutic equivalence and inter-changeability of drug products. Additional measures may occasionally be needed to determine the bioequivalence of multiphasic MR products. The metric of partial AUC proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration received broad support as an additional measure for evaluating bioequivalence of multiphasic MR products designed to have a rapid onset of drug action followed by sustained response. The cutoff for partial AUCs may be based on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic/ response characteristics of the products under examination. If the new metric is highly variable, the bioequivalence limits may be set based on the known within-subject variability for the reference product. The current regulatory approaches and criteria for bioequivalence evaluation were considered adequate for the assessment of therapeutic equivalence and

  14. Discourse-Voice Regulatory Strategies in the Psychotherapeutic Interaction: A State-Space Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemka eTomicic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed in a sample of 153 relevant episodes taken from 164 sessions of five psychotherapies using the State Space Grid (SSG method, a graphical tool based on the Dynamic Systems Theory (DST. The results showed eight recurrent and stable discourse-voice regulatory strategies of the patients and three of the therapists. Also, four specific groups of these discourse-voice strategies were identified. The latter were interpreted as regulatory configurations, that is to say, as emergent self-organized groups of discourse-voice regulatory strategies constituting specific interactional systems. Both regulatory strategies and their configurations differed between two types of relevant episodes: Change Episodes and Rupture Episodes. As a whole, these results support the assumption that speaking and listening, as dimensions of the interaction that takes place during therapeutic conversation, occur at different levels. The study not only shows that these dimensions are dependent on each other, but also that they function as a complex and dynamic whole in therapeutic dialogue, generating relational offers which allow the patient and the therapist to regulate each other and shape the psychotherapeutic process that characterizes each type of relevant episode.

  15. Finnish workshop on the restoration of contaminated residential areas after a nuclear accident: strategy generation and impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammann, M.

    2006-01-01

    Scenario-focused workshops on the restoration of contaminated residential areas are planned in a number of European countries within the EVATECH project of the EU's Fifth Framework Programme. The intention is to identify factors driving decision-making, explore the kinds of strategies that might be appropriate, develop methods for stakeholder involvement, and reveal information needs. The scenario of the Finnish workshop is presented. A policy generation scheme is proposed that yields a manageable but feature-rich set of strategies that is not constraint by lack of feasibility, justification, or public acceptability. The scheme rests on the premise that the affected area is divided into zones according to the level of contamination and that clean-up actions are applied in any combination and in combination with relocation

  16. Overall review strategy for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's High-Level Waste Repository Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    The Overall Review Strategy gives general guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for conducting it's license application and pre-license application reviews. These reviews are in support of the Commission's construction authorization decision for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Objectives and strategies are defined that focus the staff's reviews on determining compliance with requirements of 10 CFR Part 60. These strategies define how the staff prioritizes its reviews on those key technical uncertainties considered to be most important to repository performance. Strategies also give guidance for developing, in an integrated way, the License Application Review Plan together with supporting performance assessments, analyses, and research

  17. Advanced Accelerator Development Strategy Report: DOE Advanced Accelerator Concepts Research Roadmap Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-03

    Over a full two day period, February 2–3, 2016, the Office of High Energy Physics convened a workshop in Gaithersburg, MD to seek community input on development of an Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) research roadmap. The workshop was in response to a recommendation by the HEPAP Accelerator R&D Subpanel [1] [2] to “convene the university and laboratory proponents of advanced acceleration concepts to develop R&D roadmaps with a series of milestones and common down selection criteria towards the goal for constructing a multi-TeV e+e– collider” (the charge to the workshop can be found in Appendix A). During the workshop, proponents of laser-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (LWFA), particle-beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), and dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWFA), along with a limited number of invited university and laboratory experts, presented and critically discussed individual concept roadmaps. The roadmap workshop was preceded by several preparatory workshops. The first day of the workshop featured presentation of three initial individual roadmaps with ample time for discussion. The individual roadmaps covered a time period extending until roughly 2040, with the end date assumed to be roughly appropriate for initial operation of a multi-TeV e+e– collider. The second day of the workshop comprised talks on synergies between the roadmaps and with global efforts, potential early applications, diagnostics needs, simulation needs, and beam issues and challenges related to a collider. During the last half of the day the roadmaps were revisited but with emphasis on the next five to ten years (as specifically requested in the charge) and on common challenges. The workshop concluded with critical and unanimous endorsement of the individual roadmaps and an extended discussion on the characteristics of the common challenges. (For the agenda and list of participants see Appendix B.)

  18. Acupuncture Research: Strategies for Clinical Evaluation: Workshop Report, York, July 5–8, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val Hopwood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes a ground-breaking workshop on the strategic direction of acupuncture research which was held in York in early July 2006. Three days were spent discussing the history, the philosophy and the practicalities of researching acupuncture. Attending the workshop were an international group of researchers with varied backgrounds, including acupuncturists, physicians, physiotherapists, sociologists and anthropologists. Supported by the Medical Research Council's Health Services Research Collaboration, Elsevier and others, this workshop was an opportunity to brainstorm the issues and to the concerns in the field and set out directions for research that would tackle some of the major challenges facing the acupuncture research community.

  19. Motivational and Affective Determinants of Self-Regulatory Strategy Use in Elementary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistamatiou, Mariza; Dermitzaki, Irini; Efklides, Anastasia; Leondari, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between elementary students' reported use of self-regulatory strategies in mathematics and their motivational and affective determinants. Participants of the study were 344 fifth- and sixth-grade Greek students. Students were asked to complete self-reported measures regarding the strategies…

  20. Self-Regulatory Strategies in Daily Life: Selection, Optimization, and Compensation and Everyday Memory Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stephanie A.; Rickenbach, Elizabeth H.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2016-01-01

    The effective use of self-regulatory strategies, such as selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) requires resources. However, it is theorized that SOC use is most advantageous for those experiencing losses and diminishing resources. The present study explored this seeming paradox within the context of limitations or constraints due to…

  1. Report of the European Society of Cardiology Cardiovascular Round Table regulatory workshop update of the evaluation of new agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bueno, Héctor; de Graeff, Pieter; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    syndrome (ACS) to achieve consistency with current knowledge in the field. This manuscript summarizes the key output from a collaborative workshop, organized by the Cardiovascular Round Table and the European Affairs Committee of the European Society of Cardiology, involving clinicians, academic...... researchers, trialists, European and US regulators, and pharmaceutical industry researchers. Specific questions in four key areas were selected as priorities for changes in regulatory guidance: patient selection, endpoints, methodologic issues and issues related to the research for novel agents. Patients......Regulatory authorities interpret the results of randomized controlled trials according to published principles. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is planning a revision of the 2000 and 2003 guidance documents on clinical investigation of new medicinal products for the treatment of acute coronary...

  2. Which emotional regulatory strategy makes Chinese adolescents happier? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Biao; Deng, Xinmei; Luan, Ziyan

    2014-12-01

    Growing interest in emotion regulation is reflected in the studies of cognitive and social development. However, the extant studies mainly highlight how emotion regulation develops based on a western value system. This study utilised a longitudinal design to examine the development of emotion regulation and explored the contributions of different regulatory strategies to emotion experience regarding the early adolescent development period in a Chinese population. A total of 303 Chinese adolescents (age range = 10-14 years) were followed up in a three-phase longitudinal study for 3 years. In each phase of the study, participants completed Adolescents Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and Daily Emotion Scale. Results of hierarchical linear regressions revealed that Chinese adolescents reported more down-regulation. Down-regulation is more effective than up-regulation in enhancing desirable emotion experience and reducing undesirable emotion experience during adolescents' development. Also, the adaptive functions of emotional regulatory strategies in Chinese background were discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. Regulatory strategies for selected Member States (Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, the UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieuwenhout, F.D.J.; Jansen, J.C.; Van der Welle, A.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Olmos, L.; Cossent, R.; Gomez, T. [Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid (Spain); Poot, J.; Bongaerts, M. [Liander, Duiven (Netherlands); Trebolle, D. [Union Fenosa Distribucion, Madrid (Spain); Doersam, B. [MVV Energie, Mannheim (Germany); Bofinger, S.; Lichtner, P.; Gerhardt, N. [Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology, IWES, Bremerhaven (Germany); Jacobsen, H.; Ropenus, S.; Schroeder, S. [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark DTU, Roskilde (Denmark); Auer, H.; Weissensteiner, L.; Prueggler, W.; Obersteiner, C.; Zach, K. [Energy Economics Group EEG, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    This Work Package 6 report of the IMPROGRES project provides an overview of regulatory strategies and incentives, conducive to (1) network integration of increasing levels of distributed generation including notably intermittent renewable technology such as wind power and solar photovoltaics (PV) as well as (2) options for reducing impacts on surging network integration costs. Similar to the IMPROGRES project in general, this report focuses on European distribution networks. It includes specific country studies of Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK.

  4. Workshop objectives and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim of the Workshop was to create a platform in order to better understand different approaches to managing uncertainty in post-closure safety cases and regulatory approaches in different national waste management programmes. The principal objectives of the Workshop were to: - To identify common elements in different approaches for managing uncertainty. - To facilitate information exchange and to promote discussion on different technical approaches to the management and characterisation of uncertainty and on the role of risk. - To explore the merits of alternative approaches to risk-informed decision making. - To identify the potential for further developments of methods or strategies to support the management of uncertainties. The workshop was organised into plenary sessions and working group discussions: The first plenary session focused on establishing a framework for understanding the management of uncertainties and the use of risk. It comprised oral presentations drawing on a range of experience from both active participants in the development and assessment of safety cases and keynotes presentations by external participants involved in risk management in other sectors. The working group discussions covered three technical themes: Risk management and decision making. Regulatory requirements and review of uncertainty and risk in safety cases. Practical approaches and tools for the management of uncertainties and the assignment of probabilities, the use of expert judgements, and the presentation of information on uncertainties and risk were examined. The aim of the working groups was to develop an understanding of the specific issues, and to identify any further activities that will support the development and/or evaluation of safety cases. The round up plenary session brought together information and conclusions from each of the working groups. Common elements in the different approaches to treating uncertainty and risk were identified, along with

  5. Pedagogic workshops: assembling strategies for academician action – experience of report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Santos Nascimento

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of professional nurses requests the most efficient teaching which confers him competence in achievement of activities of aid, managing, teaching and investigation. In this perspective the pedagogic workshops consist of alternative forms of approach in the construction of space for the exercise of position and critic. It has as its goal to give a subsidy to the disciples in the adjustment of knowledge and the promotion of exchange of knowledge. This study consists in a description of experience of academicians of the discipline Probation Course Supervised I from the gradation scale in nursery of the Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, campus Jequié between January 2003 and 2007 with the purpose to socialize experiences in the realization of pedagogic workshops. First the dayclass with representation of instructors and disciples, discussion of the memorandum, objects and methodology of the matter. After that, we discussed the organization and introduction and dramatization of health. We began activities at the field of probation and the disciples had opportunity to develop their actions with participation of instructor and preceptors. Finally there were some meetings of valuation. From the given results we realize that the pedagogic workshops made it possible that the activities of probation are ruled in previously discussed and socialized knowledge, the preceptors began to have more facility in accompany the students and related that they acted with a more adequate ethic position. The students affirmed that these workshops are primordial and valid for the consolidation of necessary knowledge for a good fulfillment and consequently for their professional formation. We found that the pedagogic workshops made it possible to act, know and execute nursing, which must be worked out continuously, because they are not an end in itself but a process in construction.

  6. PEDAGOGIC WORKSHOPS: ASSEMBLING STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMICIAN ACTION – EXPERIENCE OF REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Santos Nascimento

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of professional nurses requests the most efficient teaching which confers him competence in achievement of activitie of aid, managing, teaching and investigation. In this perspective the pedagogic workshops consist of alternative forms of approach in the construction of space for the exercise of position and critic. It has as its goal to give a subsidy to the disciples in the adjustment of knowledge and the promotion of exchange of knowledge. This study consists in a description of experience of academicians of the discipline Probation Course Supervised I from the gradation scale in nursery of the Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, campus Jequié between January 2003 and 2007 with the purpose to socialize experiences in the realization of pedagogic workshops. First the dayclass with representation of instructors and disciples, discussion of the memorandum, objects and methodology of the matter. After that, we discussed the organization and introduction and dramatization of health. We began activities at the field of probation and the disciples had opportunity to develop their actions with participation of instructor and preceptors. Finally there were some meetings of valuation. From the given results we realize that the pedagogic workshops made it possible that the activities of probation are ruled in previously discussed and socialized knowledge, the preceptors began to have more facility in accompany the students and related that they acted with a more adequate ethic position. The students affirmed that these workshops are primordial and valid for the consolidation of necessary knowledge for a good fulfillment and consequently for their professional formation. We found that the pedagogic workshops made it possible to act, know and execute nursing, which must be worked out continuously, because they are not an end in itself but a process in construction.

  7. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  8. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatkin, J. A. [Vireo Advisors, Boston MA USA; Ong, Kimberly J. [Vireo Advisors, Boston MA USA; Beaudrie, Christian [Compass RM, Vancouver CA USA; Clippinger, Amy J. [PETA International Science Consortium Ltd, London UK; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham NC USA; Haber, Lynne T. [TERA, Cincinnati OH USA; Hill, Myriam [Health Canada, Ottawa Canada; Holden, Patricia [UC Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, ERI, and UC CEIN, University of California, Santa Barbara CA USA; Kennedy, Alan J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg MS USA; Kim, Baram [Independent, Somerville MA USA; MacDonell, Margaret [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, Argonne IL USA; Powers, Christina M. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Ann Arbor MI USA; Sharma, Monita [PETA International Science Consortium Ltd, London UK; Sheremeta, Lorraine [Alberta Ingenuity Labs, Edmonton Alberta Canada; Stone, Vicki [John Muir Building Gait 1 Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Scotland UK; Sultan, Yasir [Environment Canada, Gatineau QC Canada; Turley, Audrey [ICF International, Durham NC USA; White, Ronald H. [RH White Consultants, Silver Spring MD USA

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.

  9. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  10. The Effect of Self-Regulatory and Metacognitive Strategy Instruction on Impoverished Students' Assessment Achievement in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Jaunine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this nonequivalent control group design study was to evaluate the effectiveness of metacognitive and self-regulatory strategy use on the assessment achievement of 215 9th-grade, residential physics students from low socioeconomic status (low-SES) backgrounds. Students from low-SES backgrounds often lack the self-regulatory habits…

  11. Pedagogic workshops: assembling strategies for academician action – experience of report

    OpenAIRE

    Maristella Santos Nascimento; Flávia Pedro dos Anjos Santos; Vanda Palmarella Rodrigues; Valéria Alves da Silva Nery

    2007-01-01

    The formation of professional nurses requests the most efficient teaching which confers him competence in achievement of activitie of aid, managing, teaching and investigation. In this perspective the pedagogic workshops consist of alternative forms of approach in the construction of space for the exercise of position and critic. It has as its goal to give a subsidy to the disciples in the adjustment of knowledge and the promotion of exchange of knowledge. This study consists in a descript...

  12. A strategy for regulatory action when new adverse effects of a licensed product emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Price, Deirdre; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory agencies grant product licences (marketing authorizations) for medicinal products in the light of evidence that the balance between benefit and harm in the population is favourable. Here we consider a framework for allowing regulatory agencies to make rational decisions when reviewing product licences in the light of new information about harms that change that balance. The regulator can revoke the product licence, restrict the product's availability or change the 'label' in different ways. We examine the features of the adverse effect that may be relevant in making the decision: namely, individual differences in susceptibility; the possibility of monitoring; and the availability of protective strategies. The balance of benefit and harm, and the time-course and dose relation of the adverse effect play important roles in the decision-making process. We set out how these factors can help determine the logical response to new information on the balance between benefit and harm, and provide a series of relevant examples. We believe that when regulatory agencies have to decide how to amend the product licence of a drug when new serious adverse effects cause concern, they would find it useful to adopt a framework of this kind, using different strategies for different cases. Our proposed framework could also be useful in risk management planning during drug development.

  13. Proposed Methodology for Developing a National Strategy for Human Resource Development: Lessons Learned from a NNSA Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhamri, Oksana O.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Essner, Jonathan; Vergino, Eileen; Bissani, Mo; Apt, Kenneth E.; McClelland-Kerr, John; Mininni, Margot; VanSickle, Matthew; Kovacic, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a recent National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) workshop on Human Resource Development, which was focused on the potential methodology for developing a National Human Resource strategy for nuclear power in emerging nuclear states. The need for indigenous human resource development (HRD) has been singled out as a key milestone by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its 2007 Milestones document. A number of countries considering nuclear energy have reiterated this need for experts and specialists to support a national nuclear program that is sustainable and secure. Many have expressed concern over how best to assure the long-term availability of crucial human resource, how to approach the workforce planning process, and how to determine the key elements of developing a national strategy.

  14. Regulatory strategies for high-level radioactive waste management in nine countries: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report provides information on the regulatory strategies being developed or implemented in nine countries for the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The study was performed by International Energy Associates Limited on behalf of Pacific Northwest Laboratories and the US Department of Energy. IEAL obtained information for this report from the regulatory authorities in each country, who also later reviewed drafts of the respective country sections of the report. The nine countries surveyed were Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. These countries were selected for study because they are among the largest producers of nuclear energy in the world today and have aggressive programs for spent fuel management and waste disposal

  15. Best practice guidance for the use of strategies to improve retention in randomized trials developed from two consensus workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueton, Valerie; Stenning, Sally P; Stevenson, Fiona; Tierney, Jayne; Rait, Greta

    2017-08-01

    To develop best practice guidance for the use of retention strategies in randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Consensus development workshops conducted at two UK Clinical Trials Units. Sixty-six statisticians, clinicians, RCT coordinators, research scientists, research assistants, and data managers associated with RCTs participated. The consensus development workshops were based on the consensus development conference method used to develop best practice for treatment of medical conditions. Workshops commenced with a presentation of the evidence for incentives, communication, questionnaire format, behavioral, case management, and methodological retention strategies identified by a Cochrane review and associated qualitative study. Three simultaneous group discussions followed focused on (1) how convinced the workshop participants were by the evidence for retention strategies, (2) barriers to the use of effective retention strategies, (3) types of RCT follow-up that retention strategies could be used for, and (4) strategies for future research. Summaries of each group discussion were fed back to the workshop. Coded content for both workshops was compared for agreement and disagreement. Agreed consensus on best practice guidance for retention was identified. Workshop participants agreed best practice guidance for the use of small financial incentives to improve response to postal questionnaires in RCTs. Use of second-class post was thought to be adequate for postal communication with RCT participants. The most relevant validated questionnaire was considered best practice for collecting RCT data. Barriers identified for the use of effective retention strategies were: the small improvements seen in questionnaire response for the addition of monetary incentives, and perceptions among trialists that some communication strategies are outdated. Furthermore, there was resistance to change existing retention practices thought to be effective. Face-to-face and electronic follow

  16. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    An investigation was made of the high-level radioactive waste immobilization technology programs in the U.S. and Europe, and of the associated regulatory programs and waste management perspectives in the countries studied. Purpose was to assess the ability of those programs to satisfy DOE waste management needs and U.S. regulatory requirements. This volume includes: introduction, immobilization strategies in the context of waste isolation program needs, high-level waste management as an integrated system, regulatory goals, engineered-barrier characteristics, barrier technology, high-level waste disposal programs, analysis of HLW immobilization technology in the context of policy and regulatory requirements, and waste immobilization program option

  17. Nuclear regulatory organisations: Learning from stakeholders to enhance communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorin, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Since its creation 15 years ago, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Public Communication of Nuclear Regulatory Organisations (WGPC) has been addressing a broad range of communication issues, with two reports recently issued on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations, the Internet and Social Media: The What, How and Why of Their Use as Communication Tools and on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations and Communication Strategies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011, nuclear regulatory organisations around the world reaffirmed the need to strengthen stakeholder outreach and communication, and to create more robust avenues for stakeholder involvement in regulatory matters. The WGPC proposed a means for stakeholders to play a more active role in the group by holding one-day workshops in conjunction with regular meetings. These workshops offer a platform for stakeholder exchange with communication experts from nuclear regulatory organisations (NROs). The objective is to stimulate co-operation and improve communication by better understanding stakeholder perceptions, needs and expectations, and by discussing how to use traditional and social media more effectively. While nuclear regulatory organisations may have a common willingness to improve their communication methods and to build constructive relationships with stakeholders, every country has its own practices and cultural background, and thus its own challenges. Following the first workshop in Paris, which brought together European stakeholders, and the second in North America, the NEA is now organising a third workshop in Asia (Japan) to be held in April 2016. This third workshop will enable the NEA to gather stakeholder views from a third continent. A report on the workshops' findings will be issued after the completion of this third workshop, thus giving a broader idea of how to improve the overall communication methods of nuclear regulatory

  18. A Review on the Regulatory Strategy of Human Factors Engineering Consideration in Pakistan Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohail, Sabir [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Nam [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the legal and regulatory infrastructure available in Pakistan for HFE requirements is assessed, and the methodology for strengthening of legal infrastructure is presented. The regulatory strategy on evaluation of HFE consideration should provide reviewers with guidance on review process. Therefore, the suggested methodology is based on preparation of guidance documents such as checklist, working procedures, S and Gs etc.; incorporation of PRM elements in regulatory system; and finally the development of PRM implementation criteria. Altogether, the scheme provide the enhancement in regulatory infrastructure and also the effective and efficient review process. The Three Mile Island (TMI) accident brought the general consensus among the nuclear community on the integration of human factors engineering (HFE) principles in all phases of nuclear power. This notion has further strengthened after the recent Fukushima nuclear accident. Much effort has been put over to incorporate the lesson learned and continuous technical evolution on HFE to device different standards. The total of 174 ergonomics standards are alone identified by Dul et al. (2004) published by International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and number of standards and HFE guidelines (S and Gs) are also published by organizations like Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), etc. The ambition of effective review on HFE integration in nuclear facility might be accomplished through the development of methodology for systematic implementation of S and Gs. Such kind of methodology would also be beneficial for strengthening the regulatory framework and practices for countries new in the nuclear arena and with small scale nuclear program. The objective of paper is to review the

  19. Reduction of use of animals in regulatory genotoxicity testing : Identification and implementation opportunities-Report from an ECVAM workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfuhler, S.; Kirkland, D.; Kasper, P.; Hayashi, M.; Vanparys, P.; Carmichael, P.; Dertinger, S.; Eastmond, D.; Elhajouji, A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Rothfuss, A.; Schoening, G.; Smith, A.; Speit, G.; Thomas, C.; Benthem, J. van; Corvi, R.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo genetic toxicology tests measure direct DNA damage or the formation of gene or chromosomal mutations, and are used to predict the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of compounds for regulatory purposes and/or to follow-up positive results from in vitro testing. These tests are widely used

  20. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-12-06

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well.

  1. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well

  2. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  3. Regulatory strategy and status for the Y2K readiness program of the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Choong Heui; Ji, Seong Hyon; Oh, Soung Hun; Shin, Won Ki

    1999-01-01

    KINS established a Regulatory Strategy for Y2K Readiness Program of the Nuclear Power Plants in May 1998. On July 29, 1998, the Regulatory Action was enforced on licensees to setup the Y2K Readiness Program and report the stepwise Implementation Results of the Program. KEPCO established the Y2K Readiness Program and finished the Detailed Assessment following the Program. The Assessment showed that 108 out of 726 assets are Non-Compliant. KINS has performed the evaluation for Initial and Detailed Assessment Reports and the site audit for the Wolsong Site Division. Through those regulatory activities, we have gotten much assurance that no Y2K problem will impact on safety-related systems. And considering the progress forwarded by the licensee, we expect that all Y2K issues can be resolved before July 1999. However, to obtain the perfect assurance of the safety against the challenge of Year 2000, we will perform a thorough Audit for Validation Tests at Sites, perform a proper review for the major issues, and complete an in-depth evaluation of Submittals including Contingency Plan

  4. The relationship between Iranian EFL learners’ self-regulatory vocabulary strategy use and their vocabulary size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Reza Amirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation is referred to as learners’ self-generated ideas and actions which are systematically directed towards achieving educational goals and require learners’ active participation in the learning process (Zimmerman & Bandura, 1994. The present study investigated the relationship between Iranian EFL students’ self-regulation capacity for vocabulary learning and their vocabulary size. For this purpose, the researchers made use of two main instruments: the self-regulation capacity in vocabulary learning scale developed by Tseng et al. (2006 consisting of five subscales of commitment, metacognitive, emotion, satiation and environment control, and a bilingual vocabulary size test developed and validated by Karami (2012. The results of the data analysis revealed no significant relationship between the two variables measured by these instruments. However, the results of the multiple regressions indicated that the metacognitive control compared to the other subscales made a better contribution to the prediction of learners’ vocabulary size. In addition, based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA, which examined and compared the self-regulatory strategy use of learners in different experience groups, the first year students had a higher mean score in their self-regulation capacity, which can possibly be attributed to the strategies they have learnt in their Study Skills courses. Finally, it was suggested that teachers must try to develop self-regulatory power in the learners because their creative effort and informed decisions in trying to improve their own learning are highly important.

  5. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran; Ram

    2012-09-01

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  6. Testing strategies for embryo-fetal toxicity of human pharmaceuticals. Animal models vs. in vitro approaches: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Chapin, Robert E; Haenen, Bert; Jacobs, Abigail C; Piersma, Aldert

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive toxicity testing is characterized by high animal use. For registration of pharmaceutical compounds, developmental toxicity studies are usually conducted in both rat and rabbits. Efforts have been underway for a long time to design alternatives to animal use. Implementation has lagged, partly because of uncertainties about the applicability domain of the alternatives. The reproductive cycle is complex and not all mechanisms of development can be mimicked in vitro. Therefore, efforts are underway to characterize the available alternative tests with regard to the mechanism of action they include. One alternative test is the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST), which has been studied since the late 1990s. It is a genuine 3R "alternative" assay as it is essentially animal-free. A meeting was held to review the state-of-the-art of various in vitro models for prediction of developmental toxicity. Although the predictivity of individual assays is improving, a battery of several assays is likely to have even higher predictivity, which is necessary for regulatory acceptance. The workshop concluded that an important first step is a thorough survey of the existing rat and rabbit studies, to fully characterize the frequency of responses and the types of effects seen. At the same time, it is important to continue the optimization of in vitro assays. As more experience accumulates, the optimal conditions, assay structure, and applicability of the alternative assays are expected to emerge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulatory mechanisms for absenteeism in the health sector: a systematic review of strategies and their implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakye, Angela N; Tweheyo, Raymond; Ssengooba, Freddie; Pariyo, George W; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Kiwanuka, Suzanne N

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was undertaken to identify regulatory mechanisms aimed at mitigating health care worker absenteeism, to describe where and how they have been implemented as well as their possible effects. The goal was to propose potential policy options for managing the problem of absenteeism among human resources for health in low- and middle-income countries. Mechanisms described in this review are at the local workplace and broader national policy level. A comprehensive online search was conducted on EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar, Google, and Social Science Citation Index using MEDLINE search terms. Retrieved studies were uploaded onto reference manager and screened by two independent reviewers. Only publications in English were included. Data were extracted and synthesized according to the objectives of the review. Twenty six of the 4,975 published articles retrieved were included. All were from high-income countries and covered all cadres of health workers. The regulatory mechanisms and possible effects include 1) organizational-level mechanisms being reported as effective in curbing absenteeism in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); 2) prohibition of private sector activities in LMICs offering benefits but presenting a challenge for the government to monitor the health workforce; 3) contractual changes from temporary to fixed posts having been associated with no reduction in absenteeism and not being appropriate for LMICs; 4) multifaceted work interventions being implemented in most settings; 5) the possibility of using financial and incentive regulatory mechanisms in LMICs; 6) health intervention mechanisms reducing absenteeism when integrated with exercise programs; and 7) attendance by legislation during emergencies being criticized for violating human rights in the United States and not being effective in curbing absenteeism. Most countries have applied multiple strategies to mitigate health care worker absenteeism. The success of these

  8. Regulatory mechanisms for absenteeism in the health sector: a systematic review of strategies and their implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakye, Angela N; Tweheyo, Raymond; Ssengooba, Freddie; Pariyo, George W; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Kiwanuka, Suzanne N

    2016-01-01

    Background A systematic review was undertaken to identify regulatory mechanisms aimed at mitigating health care worker absenteeism, to describe where and how they have been implemented as well as their possible effects. The goal was to propose potential policy options for managing the problem of absenteeism among human resources for health in low- and middle-income countries. Mechanisms described in this review are at the local workplace and broader national policy level. Methods A comprehensive online search was conducted on EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar, Google, and Social Science Citation Index using MEDLINE search terms. Retrieved studies were uploaded onto reference manager and screened by two independent reviewers. Only publications in English were included. Data were extracted and synthesized according to the objectives of the review. Results Twenty six of the 4,975 published articles retrieved were included. All were from high-income countries and covered all cadres of health workers. The regulatory mechanisms and possible effects include 1) organizational-level mechanisms being reported as effective in curbing absenteeism in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); 2) prohibition of private sector activities in LMICs offering benefits but presenting a challenge for the government to monitor the health workforce; 3) contractual changes from temporary to fixed posts having been associated with no reduction in absenteeism and not being appropriate for LMICs; 4) multifaceted work interventions being implemented in most settings; 5) the possibility of using financial and incentive regulatory mechanisms in LMICs; 6) health intervention mechanisms reducing absenteeism when integrated with exercise programs; and 7) attendance by legislation during emergencies being criticized for violating human rights in the United States and not being effective in curbing absenteeism. Conclusion Most countries have applied multiple strategies to mitigate health care

  9. [Future Regulatory Science through a Global Product Development Strategy to Overcome the Device Lag].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchii, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Environment that created "medical device lag (MDL)" has changed dramatically, and currently that term is not heard often. This was mainly achieved through the leadership of three groups: government, which determined to overcome MDL and took steps to do so; medical societies, which exhibited accountability in trial participation; and MD companies, which underwent a change in mindset that allowed comprehensive tripartite cooperation to reach the current stage. In particular, the global product development strategy (GPDS) of companies in a changing social environment has taken a new-turn with international harmonization trends, like Global Harmonization Task Force and International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. As a result, this evolution has created opportunities for treatment with cutting-edge MDs in Japanese society. Simultaneously, it has had a major impact on the planning process of GPDS of companies. At the same time, the interest of global companies has shifted to emerging economies for future potential profit since Japan no longer faces MDL issue. This economic trend makes MDLs a greater problem for manufacturers. From the regulatory science viewpoint, this new environment has not made it easy to plan a global strategy that will be adaptable to local societies. Without taking hasty action, flexible thinking from the global point of view is necessary to enable the adjustment of local strategies to fit the situation on the ground so that the innovative Japanese medical technology can be exported to a broad range of societies.

  10. Next steps generation III+/IV - Presentation at ACRS workshop 'Regulatory challenges for future nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R. Shane

    2001-01-01

    Near-term actions concerned with deployment of advanced reactors discussed are: to complete report on recommended DOE activities, report will reflect generic and design specific issues, it should be issued by September 30, 2001. Significant activities are expected to include: Development of Regulatory Framework for Gas Reactor Technologies, Early Site Permit Demonstration, Combined Construction/Operating License Demonstration, and Design Certification of Advanced Reactors. Near-term actions concerned with technology road map are: to evaluate the most viable concepts, to compare concept performance to technology goals, to identify technology gaps, to identify R and D needed to close technology gaps and to prepare comprehensive report on most promising concepts including detailed R and D plan

  11. US decommissioning strategy in today's regulatory, technical, political, and economic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvin, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The United States commercial nuclear power industry is nearly forty years old. Soon after the turn of the century, the United States expects to see a significant rise in the number of plants requiring decommissioning. This, coupled with recent economic pressures which are impacting the U.S. electrical generation industry and have resulted in the premature shutdown of some nuclear power plants, heighten the need for clear regulations and standards addressing facility closure and decommissioning. Since the issue of decommissioning involves public health and safety, technical, environmental and financial aspects, this complex regulatory environment poses a major challenge to the industry in this area. There are three fundamental issues facing utilities as they develop strategies for the eventual decommissioning of their nuclear power plants. These issues are the regulatory approach to decommissioning, the question of the availability of adequate funding, including the uncertainty resulting from the uncertainty of waste disposal options, and the need to meet environmental standards for the protection of health and safety. Futhermore, these issues, in particular the economic-related issues, are magnified in the event of prematurely shut down nuclear power plant. (Author)

  12. Recommendations for harmonization of data collection and analysis of developmental neurotoxicity endpoints in regulatory guideline studies: Proceedings of workshops presented at Society of Toxicology and joint Teratology Society and Neurobehavioral Teratology Society meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Abby A; Sheets, Larry P; Raffaele, Kathleen; Moser, Virginia; Hofstra, Angela; Hoberman, Alan; Makris, Susan L; Garman, Robert; Bolon, Brad; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Auer, Roland; Lau, Edmund; Vidmar, Thomas; Bowers, Wayne J

    2017-09-01

    The potential for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) of environmental chemicals may be evaluated using specific test guidelines from the US Environmental Protection Agency or the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). These guidelines generate neurobehavioral, neuropathological, and morphometric data that are evaluated by regulatory agencies globally. Data from these DNT guideline studies, or the more recent OECD extended one-generation reproductive toxicity guideline, play a pivotal role in children's health risk assessment in different world areas. Data from the same study may be interpreted differently by regulatory authorities in different countries resulting in inconsistent evaluations that may lead to inconsistencies in risk assessment decisions internationally, resulting in regional differences in public health protection or in commercial trade barriers. These issues of data interpretation and reporting are also relevant to juvenile and pre-postnatal studies conducted more routinely for pharmaceuticals and veterinary medicines. There is a need for development of recommendations geared toward the operational needs of the regulatory scientific reviewers who apply these studies in risk assessments, as well as the scientists who generate DNT data sets. The workshops summarized here draw upon the experience of the authors representing government, industry, contract research organizations, and academia to discuss the scientific issues that have emerged from diverse regulatory evaluations. Although various regulatory bodies have different risk management decisions and labeling requirements that are difficult to harmonize, the workshops provided an opportunity to work toward more harmonized scientific approaches for evaluating DNT data within the context of different regulatory frameworks. Five speakers and their coauthors with neurotoxicology, neuropathology, and regulatory toxicology expertise discussed issues of variability, data reporting

  13. Regulatory and institutional issues for development of remedial action strategies at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses a number of unresolved regulatory and institutional issues of fundamental importance to the development of strategies for cleanup of sites contaminated by the radioactive materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These issues include the development of criteria for limiting radiation exposures of the public from remedial action sites, the time period to be assumed for active institutional controls over contaminated sites and the location at which such controls will be maintained, and the applicability of current standards for radioactivity in drinking water to surface waters and ground waters on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Proposals for resolution of these issues emphasize the need to protect public health, but in a cost-effective manner. 21 refs

  14. Joint US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission workshop on research related to low-level radioactive waste disposal, May 4-6, 1993, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Peter R.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains papers presented at the "Joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Technical Workshop on Research Related to Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal" that was held at the USGS National Center Auditorium, Reston, Virginia, May 4-6, 1993. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for exchange of information, ideas, and technology in the geosciences dealing with LLW disposal. This workshop was the first joint activity under the Memorandum of Understanding between the USGS and NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research signed in April 1992.Participants included invited speakers from the USGS, NRC technical contractors (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories and universities) and NRC staff for presentation of research study results related to LLW disposal. Also in attendance were scientists from the DOE, DOE National Laboratories, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State developmental and regulatory agencies involved in LLW disposal facility siting and licensing, Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), private industry, Agricultural Research Service, universities, USGS and NRC.

  15. Regulatory mechanisms for absenteeism in the health sector: a systematic review of strategies and their implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisakye AN

    2016-11-01

    in LMICs; 6 health intervention mechanisms reducing absenteeism when integrated with exercise programs; and 7 attendance by legislation during emergencies being criticized for violating human rights in the United States and not being effective in curbing absenteeism. Conclusion: Most countries have applied multiple strategies to mitigate health care worker absenteeism. The success of these interventions is heavily influenced by the context within which they are applied. Keywords: absenteeism, health workers, regulatory mechanisms, systematic review

  16. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy - development of new strategies: Report from an expert workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might co...

  17. Proactive Public Disclosure: A new regulatory strategy for creating tax compliance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boll Karen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses proactive public disclosure of taxpayer information and how this may form a new strategy for securing tax compliance by tax administrators. It reports a case study from the Danish Customs and Tax Administration in which consumers of services-over a short period of time-were informed about businesses’ lack of value-added tax (VAT registration. Our approach to the case is twofold: First, the article lays out a legal analysis of the disclosure practice, and second, the article presents an organizational analysis of why the practice was initiated. The analyses show that using proactive public disclosure is compatible with the Duty of Confidentiality, but incompatible with Good Public Governance. Furthermore, the analyses show that there are a number of strong organizational rationales for using proactive public disclosure, despite its apparent incompatibility with Good Public Governance. The article is innovative in that it combines a legal and organizational approach to analyse a new regulatory strategy within tax administration.

  18. Self-Regulatory Strategies as Correlates of Physical Activity Behavior in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Katie L; Balto, Julia M; Motl, Robert W

    2018-05-01

    To examine self-regulation strategies as correlates of physical activity in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional, or survey, study. University-based research laboratory. Convenience sample of persons with MS (N=68). Not applicable. Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (EXSE), 12-item Physical Activity Self-Regulation Scale (PASR-12), and Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ). Correlation analyses indicated that GLTEQ scores were positively and significantly associated with overall self-regulation (r=.43), self-monitoring (r=.45), goal-setting (r=.27), reinforcement (r=.30), time management (r=.41), and relapse prevention (r=.53) PASR-12 scores. Regression analyses indicated that relapse prevention (B=5.01; SE B=1.74; β=.51) and self-monitoring (B=3.65; SE B=1.71; β=.33) were unique predictors of physical activity behavior, and relapse prevention demonstrated a significant association with physical activity behavior that was accounted for by EXSE. Our results indicate that self-regulatory strategies, particularly relapse prevention, may be important correlates of physical activity behavior that can inform the design of future behavioral interventions in MS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  20. Cracking the regulatory code of biosynthetic gene clusters as a strategy for natural product discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigali, Sébastien; Anderssen, Sinaeda; Naômé, Aymeric; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2018-01-05

    The World Health Organization (WHO) describes antibiotic resistance as "one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today", as the number of multi- and pan-resistant bacteria is rising dangerously. Acquired resistance phenomena also impair antifungals, antivirals, anti-cancer drug therapy, while herbicide resistance in weeds threatens the crop industry. On the positive side, it is likely that the chemical space of natural products goes far beyond what has currently been discovered. This idea is fueled by genome sequencing of microorganisms which unveiled numerous so-called cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs), many of which are transcriptionally silent under laboratory culture conditions, and by the fact that most bacteria cannot yet be cultivated in the laboratory. However, brute force antibiotic discovery does not yield the same results as it did in the past, and researchers have had to develop creative strategies in order to unravel the hidden potential of microorganisms such as Streptomyces and other antibiotic-producing microorganisms. Identifying the cis elements and their corresponding transcription factors(s) involved in the control of BGCs through bioinformatic approaches is a promising strategy. Theoretically, we are a few 'clicks' away from unveiling the culturing conditions or genetic changes needed to activate the production of cryptic metabolites or increase the production yield of known compounds to make them economically viable. In this opinion article, we describe and illustrate the idea beyond 'cracking' the regulatory code for natural product discovery, by presenting a series of proofs of concept, and discuss what still should be achieved to increase the rate of success of this strategy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serbian oil sector: A new energy policy regulatory framework and development strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karovic Maricic, Vesna; Danilovic, Dusan; Lekovic, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Serbia has established a great part of new legislative and institutional framework as a basis for all energy sub-sectors' development in compliance with EU energy acquis. Main objectives of Serbian energy policy outlined in the new Energy Law are focused to increasing the energy supply security, energy efficiency, competitiveness of the energy market, use of renewable energy sources and environmental protection. Further steps of Serbia toward full EU membership concerning the new energy policy regulatory framework involve implementing and enforcing legislation. Besides considering the issue of Serbian energy policy and degree of its framework's alignment with the EU acquis, this paper provides an overview of new development strategies in the oil sector. The aim of Gazprom neft, a majority owner of the Petroleum industry of Serbia, is to increase crude oil production to 3 million tonnes, refining and sales volume of petroleum products to 5 million tonnes by 2020. Strategic development projects in crude oil and petroleum products transportation are: petroleum product pipeline construction in Serbia and Pan-European oil pipeline. The basic prerequisites for oil supply security, regarding the future high dependency of Serbian economy on imported oil, are establishment of the emergency oil stocks and diversification of supply sources. - Highlight: ► New energy policy regulatory framework significantly complied with EU acquis. ► Full EU membership requires implementing and enforcing new energy legislation. ► NIS-Gazpromneft has defined ambitious oil sector's development programmes to 2020. ► Supply security requires mandatory oil stocks and supply source diversification.

  2. Variability of Self-Regulatory Strategies in Children with Intellectual Disability and Typically Developing Children in Pretend Play Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader-Grosbois, N.; Vieillevoye, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study has examined whether or not self-regulatory strategies vary depending on pretend play situations in 40 children with intellectual disability and 40 typically developing children. Method: Their cognitive, linguistic and individual symbolic play levels were assessed in order to match the children of the two groups. During two…

  3. A Review of the Environmental Impacts for Marine and Hydrokinetic Projects to Inform Regulatory Permitting: Summary Findings from the 2015 Workshop on Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christol, Corrie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); LiVecchi, Al [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kramer, Sharon [H.T. Harvey and Associates, Los Gatos, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns & West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated efforts to develop and implement technology- and application-focused marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) workshops to share the global experience and knowledge base on evolving MHK technologies, observed and not-observed impacts, monitoring and measurement methods, and regulatory needs. The resulting MHK Regulator Workshops engaged resource managers and other decision makers at key regulatory organizations, scientists, researchers, facilitators, and technical experts and provided an opportunity to examine the risks of single-device and small-scale deployments, explore what can be learned and observed from single devices and small-scale arrays, and consider requirements for projects at varying scales of deployment. Experts and stakeholders identified key remaining information gaps. Initial discussions focused on differentiating between monitoring required for single or small-scale deployments and MHK impact research that, although important, goes beyond what is feasible or should be needed to meet specific project regulatory requirements but is appropriate for broader research and development. Four areas of identified potential environmental impacts provided the focus for the workshop: acoustic output impacts, electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions, physical interactions, and environmental effects of MHK energy development on the physical environment. Discussions also focused on the regulatory process and experience, adaptive management, industry drivers, and lessons that can be learned from the wind energy industry. The discussion was set in the context of the types of MHK technologies that are currently proposed or planned in the United States. All presentations and the following discussions are summarized in this document.

  4. Proceedings of the 2010 renewable energy infrastructure workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This workshop provided a forum for electric power industry leaders and key stakeholders to discuss Canada's renewable energy infrastructure needs. The workshop was held to provide practical solutions for meeting the increased demand for renewable energy as well as to offer a range of marketplace options and funding opportunities. Participants in the workshop examined the regulatory framework of the Green Energy Act and its potential impact on organizations. Approval process procedures for renewable energy projects were reviewed, and methods of ensuring the integration of renewable energy projects with current business strategies were discussed. Communications strategies for managing the public perception of energy project were presented. Policy barriers to infrastructure development were outlined. Methods of developing partnerships with Aboriginal communities were also discussed. The conference featured 16 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  5. Elements of a regulatory strategy for the consideration of future human actions in safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Wickham, S.M.; Galson, D.A.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this report is to discuss issues that should be considered in the development of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in any forthcoming license application for a deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden and for sites of other repositories. The report comprises an outline of key issues concerning the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, reviews of regulatory developments, recent safety assessments and supporting studies, and international initiatives on the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, and the principal elements of a regulatory strategy. Performance assessments (PAs) are generally accepted as providing illustrations of system performance under given sets of assumptions. The results of PAs are clearer and easier to understand if certain large uncertainties are accounted for by determining performance under several different sets of assumptions or scenarios, each of which defines a possible evolution of the disposal system. A number of assumptions can be made that would restrict the scope of an assessment without reducing the credibility of the corresponding safety case. Reducing speculation about technological development, by assuming that the techniques used in future human activities are similar to those currently in use in the region or at similar sites, will simplify the assessment. A distinction is generally made between inadvertent and intentional intrusion, with intentional activities excluded because society cannot protect future populations from their own actions if they understand the potential consequences. A division of human activities into 'recent and ongoing' and 'future' activities considers not only the timing of the activities but also the degree of control or influence that can be imposed on them. Recent and ongoing human activities are those that affect an area beyond the immediate vicinity of the disposal facility and which neither the proponent nor the regulator

  6. Elements of a regulatory strategy for the consideration of future human actions in safety assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Wickham, S.M.; Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this report is to discuss issues that should be considered in the development of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in any forthcoming license application for a deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden and for sites of other repositories. The report comprises an outline of key issues concerning the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, reviews of regulatory developments, recent safety assessments and supporting studies, and international initiatives on the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, and the principal elements of a regulatory strategy. Performance assessments (PAs) are generally accepted as providing illustrations of system performance under given sets of assumptions. The results of PAs are clearer and easier tounderstand if certain large uncertainties are accounted for by determining performance under several different sets of assumptions or scenarios, each of which defines a possible evolution of the disposal system. A number of assumptions can be made that would restrict the scope of an assessment without reducing the credibility of the corresponding safety case. Reducing speculation about technological development, by assuming that the techniques used in future human activities are similar to those currently in use in the region or at similar sites, will simplify the assessment. A distinction is generally made between inadvertent and intentional intrusion, with intentional activities excluded because society cannot protect future populations from their own actions if they understand the potential consequences. A division of human activities into 'recent and ongoing' and 'future' activities considers not only the timing of the activities but also the degree of control or influence that can be imposed on them. Recent and ongoing human activities are those that affect an area beyond the immediate vicinity of the disposal facility and which neither the proponent

  7. NASA's Agency-Wide Strategy for Environmental Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Sharon; Duda, Kristen

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA's risk analysis communication programs associated with changing environmental policies. The topics include: 1) NASA Program Transition; 2) Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC); and 3) Regulatory Tracking and Communication Process.

  8. Strategy for communicating benefit-risk decisions: a comparison of regulatory agencies' publicly available documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong Wai Yeen, James; Salek, Sam; Walker, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The assessment report formats of four major regulatory reference agencies, US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration were compared to a benefit-risk (BR) documentation template developed by the Centre for Innovation in Regulatory Science and a four-member Consortium on Benefit-Risk Assessment. A case study was also conducted using a US FDA Medical Review, the European Public Assessment Report and Australia's Public Assessment Report for the same product. Compared with the BR Template, existing regulatory report formats are inadequate regarding the listing of benefits and risks, the assigning of relative importance and values, visualization and the utilization of a detailed, systematic, standardized structure. The BR Template is based on the principles of BR assessment common to major regulatory agencies. Given that there are minimal differences among the existing regulatory report formats, it is timely to consider the feasibility of a universal template.

  9. Social support influences on eating awareness in children and adolescents: the mediating effect of self-regulatory strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Palmeira, Antonio L; Gaspar, Tania; De Wit, John B F; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the social environment on healthy eating awareness results from complex interactions among physical, economic, cultural, interpersonal and individual characteristics. This study investigated the impact of social support and social influence on healthy eating awareness, controlling for socio-economic status, gender and age. Additionally, the mediating effect of self-regulation strategies was examined. A total of 2764 children and adolescents aged 10-17 from four European countries completed self-report measures on healthy eating awareness, social influence and the use of self-regulation strategies. Healthy eating awareness and the use of self-regulation strategies were more likely to occur among younger participants. An interaction between gender and age was related to the use of some self-regulation strategies; compared to girls, boys decreased the use of self-regulation strategies more from pre-adolescence to adolescence. Peer social influence was associated with more unhealthy eating in older participants. Results suggest a need to promote self-regulatory competences among young people in order to assist them with regulating their eating behaviours, especially in the presence of peers. Both school-based interventions and family-based interventions, focusing on self-regulation cognitions and social (peer) influence, could help children and adolescents to use self-regulatory strategies which are essential to eat healthier.

  10. Safety assessment and regulatory strategy for NPP I and C modernization projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manners, S.; Blocquel, Ch

    1999-10-01

    IPSN is the technical support for the French nuclear safety authority (DSIN), but also acts independently. Through our participation at this IAEA meeting we wish to further our appreciation of the industry position for I and C modernization projects. We will present some of the concerns of the safety assessor and safety authority for such projects. We hope to share our experiences and views concerning current strategies for I and C modernization and licensing from. In our experience with NPP I and C programmes, the need for modification is most often not directly linked to safety. For our safety assessment we have to identify clearly and, as far as possible, categorize the safety relevance of the specified modifications and all safety impact in its implementation. Modernization can be simply for reasons of replacement of obsolete existing equipment or it can be linked to functional evolutions; safety functions may be directly or indirectly affected. The state of the art I and C solutions proposed by today's modernization programs have many benefits, but also pose a certain number of difficulties for the safety demonstration. On the implementation side, the safety assessment for a modernization project has to take into consideration specific issues compared with that for new plant. These include interface and compatibility with the existing installation, issues relating to 'on line' installation and commissioning, as well as operational issues concerning the changeover and trail periods. A further subject for discussion concerns how our regulatory requirements apply to modernization. We must as a minima comply with the requirements of the period. To what measure must we apply current or future (under development or for future reactor designs) standards? How can we tie in with requirements and legislation for new projects? Do we make a special case for back-fits? (authors)

  11. Safety assessment and regulatory strategy for NPP I and C modernization projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manners, S.; Blocquel, Ch.

    1999-10-01

    IPSN is the technical support for the French nuclear safety authority (DSIN), but also acts independently. Through our participation at this IAEA meeting we wish to further our appreciation of the industry position for I and C modernization projects. We will present some of the concerns of the safety assessor and safety authority for such projects. We hope to share our experiences and views concerning current strategies for I and C modernization and licensing from. In our experience with NPP I and C programmes, the need for modification is most often not directly linked to safety. For our safety assessment we have to identify clearly and, as far as possible, categorize the safety relevance of the specified modifications and all safety impact in its implementation. Modernization can be simply for reasons of replacement of obsolete existing equipment or it can be linked to functional evolutions; safety functions may be directly or indirectly affected. The state of the art I and C solutions proposed by today's modernization programs have many benefits, but also pose a certain number of difficulties for the safety demonstration. On the implementation side, the safety assessment for a modernization project has to take into consideration specific issues compared with that for new plant. These include interface and compatibility with the existing installation, issues relating to 'on line' installation and commissioning, as well as operational issues concerning the changeover and trail periods. A further subject for discussion concerns how our regulatory requirements apply to modernization. We must as a minima comply with the requirements of the period. To what measure must we apply current or future (under development or for future reactor designs) standards? How can we tie in with requirements and legislation for new projects? Do we make a special case for back-fits? (authors)

  12. Evolution of ITER tritium confinement strategy and adaptation to Cadrache site conditions and French regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER Nuclear Buildings include the Tokamak, Tritium and Diagnostic Buildings (Tokamak Complex) and the Hot Cell and Low Level Radioactive Waste Buildings. The Tritium Confinement Strategy of the Nuclear Buildings comprises key features of the Atmosphere and Vent Detritiation Systems (ADS/VDS) and the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Systems. The designs developed during the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activities) for these systems need to be adapted to the specific conditions of the Cadarache site and modified to conform with the regulatory requirements applicable to Installations Nucleaires de Base (INB) - Basic Nuclear Installations - in France. The highest priority for such adaptation has been identified as the Tritium Confinement of the Tokamak Complex and the progress in development of a robust, coherent design concept compliant with French practice is described in the paper. The Tokamak Complex HVAC concept for generic conditions was developed for operational cost minimisation under more extreme climatic conditions (primarily temperature) than those valid for Cadarache, and incorporated recirculation of a large fraction of the air flow through the HVAC systems to achieve this objective. Due to the impracticality of precluding the spread of contamination from areas of higher activity to less contaminated areas, this concept has been abandoned in favour of a once-through configuration, which requires a complete redesign, with revised air change rates, module sizes, layout, redundancy provisions and other features. The ADS/VDS concept developed for the generic design of the ITER Tokamak Complex is undergoing a radical revision in which the system architecture, module sizing and basic process are being optimised for the Cadarache conditions. Investigation is being launched into the implementation of a wet stripper concept to replace the molecular sieve (MS) beds incorporated in the generic design, where concerns have been raised over low

  13. A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Finch, Meghan; Williams, Amanda; Dodds, Pennie; Gillham, Karen; Wyse, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, χ2=34.3; Pstaff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. SO WHAT?: Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services.

  14. Examination of a Strategy for Maximizing Teacher Implementation of Workshop Learning Experiences through the Use of Electronic Conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell Univ., MA.

    This research project was designed to evaluate the synergistic effects of linking workshops for science teachers with electronic conferencing. The rationale for this study was that these two methods of professional development and communication would have an impact beyond that which either would have alone. Included are the abstract, a description…

  15. Selecting effective persuasive strategies in behavior change support systems: Third International Workshop on Behavior Change Support Systems (BCSS 2015)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelders, Saskia Marion; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Kelders, Saskia; Kulyk, Olga; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri

    2015-01-01

    The Third International Workshop on Behavior Change Support Systems provides a place to discuss recent advances in BCSS research. The selected papers show that research into behavior change support systems is expanding: not only by trying to reach more and other people, but also by expanding the

  16. On the effectiveness of regulatory vs voluntary vs strategies for increasing the share of renewable in electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Reinhard; Huber, Claus; Resch, Gustav; Faber, Thomas [Vienna Univ. of Technology, Energy Economics Group, Vienna (Austria)

    2003-09-01

    The promotion of electricity generation from renewable energy sources (RES-E) has a high priority in the energy policy strategies of many countries world-wide. To meeting this objective in recent years a wide variety of deployment strategies and dissemination programmes for RES-E has been launched by quite different organizations and institutions. The core focus of this paper is to extract under which conditions various strategies are effective for substantially boosting RES in the future. Moreover, it is analysed what are the most important regulatory conditions for implementing voluntary (Green Pricing, voluntary green electricity trade) and regulatory (TGC-based quotas, bidding feed-in tariffs) promotion strategies for RES-E. The most important results and conclusions of this analysis are: Regardless which instrument is chosen the careful design of a strategy is of paramount importance; Focus on new capacities: It is of paramount importance that a promotional system does not mix existing (at least fully depreciated) and new capacities. Hence, Green Pricing strategies as well as regulatory approaches should have a strong focus on new capacity; Credibility: To provide confidence among the industry and investors it must be guaranteed by highly credible sources that a strategy survives a certain planning horizon; Feed-in tariffs are an effective instrument if a policy is introduced on a national level and if the rates are optimally designed e.g. using a stepped feed-in tariff; Of high relevance for quotas based on tradable certificates is that the penalty for not purchasing a certificate is higher than the worst case of investment; With respect to voluntary strategies -e.g. Green Power Marketing- the minimum requirement for a label is that it guarantees at least that the proportional increase in total electricity demand is provided by new capacities; With respect to international trading of Green electricity at least one of the following conditions must be fulfilled

  17. Space Physics Strategy-Implementation Study. Volume 1. Goals, objectives, strategy. Report of Workshop 1. Held in Baltimore, Maryland on January 22-26, 1990 (second edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This is the report of Workshop 1, January 22-26, 1990, Baltimore, Maryland. The document includes the Report of the Cosmic and Heliospheric Panel, Report of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere Panel, Report of the Magnetospheric Physics Panel, Report of the Solar Physics Panel, Report of the Theory Panel

  18. Developmental Risk and Young Children's Regulatory Strategies: Predicting Behavior Problems at Age Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Emily D.; Pedersen y Arbona, Anita; Crnic, Keith A.; Ryu, Ehri; Baker, Bruce L.; Blacher, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Children with early developmental delays are at heightened risk for behavior problems and comorbid psychopathology. This study examined the trajectories of regulatory capabilities and their potentially mediating role in the development of behavior problems for children with and without early developmental delays. A sample of 231 children comprised…

  19. Maternal Depression, Locus of Control, and Emotion Regulatory Strategy as Predictors of Preschoolers' Internalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Lisa W.; Thompson, Alysha D.

    2011-01-01

    Childhood internalizing problems may occur as early as preschool, tend to be stable over time, and undermine social and academic functioning. Parent emotion regulatory behaviors may contribute to child internalizing problems and may be especially important during the preschool years when parents model emotion coping and regulation for their…

  20. Self-regulation as a regulatory strategy:
    The Italian legal framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Rodriquez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide an overview of the evolution of self-regulatory mechanisms in Italy. A brief overview of the Italian system of sources of law has showed that the model of the sources of law rooted in the Italian constitution is typically positivistic and centred on the pivotal role of Parliament, the only body empowered to legislate, either directly or by delegating its normative powers to the Government, within expressly specified limits. What room, if any, is there for self-regulatory rules? If one of the most interesting aims of the research was to analyse to what extent the self-regulatory phenomenon is compatible with Parliament’s undisputed sovereignty and with the linked principle of the rule of law, it should be clear that rules made by private actors (i.e. self-regulatory rules, which pretend to have external effects (binding erga omnes, can be considered as law and, as such, as sources of law, as long as they can be ‘incorporated’ into and recognized in some of the formal sources of Italian law. This seems the only possible and constitutionally compatible interpretation of a phenomenon (self-regulation which, instead, could potentially be able to place the formal hierarchy of sources of law in jeopardy. On the other hand, the results of the study make clear that, even when Parliament confers its normative powers on any other bodies (i.e. either independent administrative authorities or professional orders, or, more in general, any self-regulatory associations, it is unlikely that it will give up determining the limits within which those normative powers have to be exercised. Some authors actually consider this sort of ‘delegated legislation’ to be a means for the State to reassert its sovereignty. Anyway, this new pluralistic ‘architecture’ will undoubtedly allow the legislator to retain some exclusive duties: first and foremost, the power to prescribe the institutional conditions which underlie the basis of

  1. Generation of intervention strategy for a genetic regulatory network represented by a family of Markov Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip

    2011-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) are frequently modeled as Markov Chains providing the transition probabilities of moving from one state of the network to another. The inverse problem of inference of the Markov Chain from noisy and limited experimental data is an ill posed problem and often generates multiple model possibilities instead of a unique one. In this article, we address the issue of intervention in a genetic regulatory network represented by a family of Markov Chains. The purpose of intervention is to alter the steady state probability distribution of the GRN as the steady states are considered to be representative of the phenotypes. We consider robust stationary control policies with best expected behavior. The extreme computational complexity involved in search of robust stationary control policies is mitigated by using a sequential approach to control policy generation and utilizing computationally efficient techniques for updating the stationary probability distribution of a Markov chain following a rank one perturbation.

  2. Fuel utilization experience in Bohunice NPP and regulatory requirements for implementation of progressive fuel management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patenyi, V [Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Bratislava (Slovakia); Darilek, P; Majercik, J [Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1994-12-31

    The experience gained in fuel utilization and the basic requirements for fuel licensing in the Slovak NPPs is described. The original project of WWER-440 reactors supposes 3-year fuel cycle with cycle length of about 320 full power days (FPD). Since 1984 it was reduced to 290 FPD. Based on the experience of other countries, a 4-year fuel cycle utilization started in 1987. It is illustrated with data from the Bohunice NPP units. Among 504 fuel assemblies left for the fourth burnup cycle no leakage was observed. The mean burnup achieved in the different units varied from 33.1 to 38.5 Mwd/kg U. The new fuel assemblies used are different from the recent ones in construction, thermohydraulics, water-uranium ratio, enrichment and material design. To meet the safety criteria, regulatory requirements for exploitation of new fuel in WWER-440 were formulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic. 1 tab., 5 refs.

  3. Strategy in Regulatory Decision-Making for Management of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Segec, A; Keller-Stanislawski, B; Vermeer, N S

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been observed after the use of several medicines, including monoclonal antibodies. As these drugs play important roles in the therapeutic armamentarium, it is important to address the challenges that this severe adverse reaction poses to the safe...... use of medicines. Considering the need for consistent outcomes of regulatory decisions, the European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) used PML as an example to develop a systematic approach to labeling and risk minimization....

  4. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  5. Strategy in Regulatory Decision-Making for Management of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segec, A; Keller-Stanislawski, B; Vermeer, N S; Macchiarulo, C; Straus, S M; Hidalgo-Simon, A; De Bruin, M L

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been observed after the use of several medicines, including monoclonal antibodies. As these drugs play important roles in the therapeutic armamentarium, it is important to address the challenges that this severe adverse reaction poses to the safe use of medicines. Considering the need for consistent outcomes of regulatory decisions, the European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) used PML as an example to develop a systematic approach to labeling and risk minimization. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  6. Strategy for Addressing the Retail Sector under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act's Regulatory Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Retail Strategy lays out a cohesive and effective plan to address the unique challenges the retail sector has with complying with the hazardous waste regulations while reducing burden and protecting human health and the environment.

  7. Una estrategia de diseminación en la psicología: los talleres interactivos Interactive workshops as a dissemination strategy in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Isela Martínez-Martínez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar los talleres interactivos como una estrategia de diseminación de un modelo de intervención psicológica para el tratamiento de los bebedores problema, en profesionales de la salud del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se trabajó con 206 profesionales de la salud de siete clínicas del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, en el periodo 1999-2000. Los sujetos fueron seleccionados por las autoridades de las clínicas. El tipo de estudio utilizado fue cuasi-experimental con un diseño pre-test/pos-test. Inicialmente se aplicó a los participantes el cuestionario de actitudes, intereses y conocimientos, luego se impartieron los talleres interactivos, y al final de éstos nuevamente se aplicó el cuestionario para identificar cambios. El análisis estadístico se realizó a través de una prueba t de student de muestras pareadas. RESULTADOS: Se encontraron diferencias estadísticas significativas en los conocimientos de los participantes sobre alcoholismo t (206, 205, y en los intereses de los mismos t (206, 205=2.318, p=0.021. CONCLUSIONES: El taller interactivo es una herramienta efectiva para diseminar el programa de Auto-Cambio Dirigido en los escenarios de las clínicas del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, por lo que los profesionales de la salud pueden convertirse en agentes de cambio de las innovaciones psicológicas.OBJECTIVE: To assess whether interactive workshops are an effective strategy for promoting a psychological intervention model among healthcare providers, to treat problem drinkers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted between the years 1999 and 2000, among 206 healthcare providers at seven Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (Mexican Institute of Social Security, IMSS clinics. Study subjects were selected by hospital executive officers. The study design is a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test study. Data on providers' attitudes, interests, and knowledge were collected

  8. Workshop introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  9. Results from two workshops: Developing and amending regulations and funding state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.

    1993-09-01

    The first section of this document presents the results of a technical workshop on the process of regulations development and amendment sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop focused on methods for reducing the time it takes to promulgate regulations to help those States that are having difficulty meeting the three-year deadline for adopting new NRC regulations. Workshop participants responded to six questions, reviewed the procedures used by various States for revising and adopting changes to their regulations, and reviewed the time-flow charts used by various States. This workshop was designed to provide guidance to States that are promulgating and revising regulations. The second section of this document summarizes the proceedings of a technical workshop, also sponsored by the NRC, on funding radiation control programs that emphasized fee schedules and effective strategies for the 1990s. This workshop focused on determining the true costs of running a program, on setting realistic fees for the various categories of licenses, and on the most efficient methods for sending invoices, recording receipts, depositing money received, and issuing licenses. Workshop participants responded to seven questions; reviewed the methods various States use to determine true costs; reviewed the procedure that the various States use to produce invoices and licenses; reviewed the procedures that the States are required to abide by when they receive money; and reviewed the method used by the NRC to determine the cost of its various programs

  10. WIPP Regulatory Compliance Strategy and Management Plan for demonstrating compliance to long-term disposal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The primary purpose of this document is to provide a strategy by which the WIPP will demonstrate its ability to perform as a deep geologic repository. The document communicates the DOE's understanding of the regulations related to long-term repository performance; and provides the most efficient strategy that intergrates WIPP Project elements, ensures the sufficiency of information, and provides flexibility for changes in the TRU waste generation system to facilitate the disposal of defense-generated TRU wastes. In addition, this document forms a focal point between the DOE and its various external regulators as well as other stakeholders for the purpose of arriving at compliance decisions that consider all relevant input

  11. Decision Making and Behavioral Strategy: The role of regulatory focus in corporate innovation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Tunçdoğan (Aybars)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This dissertation makes use of the behavioral strategy perspective in order to examine a number of constructs pertaining to innovation in corporate settings. In particular, the dissertation consists of four studies; one conceptual and three empirical. The conceptual

  12. Generative Learning Strategy Use and Self-Regulatory Prompting in Digital Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Alan J.; Morrison, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    The digital revolution is shifting print-based textbooks to digital text, and it has afforded the opportunity to incorporate meaningful learning strategies and otherwise separate metacognitive activities directly into these texts as embedded support. A sample of 89 undergraduates read a digital, expository text on the basics of photography. The…

  13. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... health: report of first EQUIST training workshop in Nigeria .... The difference between the before and after measurements was ... After the administration of the pre-workshop questionnaire the ... represent Likert rating scale of 1-5 points, where 1point = grossly .... Procedures Manual for the "Evaluating.

  14. INDICO Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The INtegrated DIgital COnferencing EU project has finished building a complete software solution to facilitate the MANAGEMENT OF CONFERENCES, workshops, schools or simple meetings from their announcement to their archival. Everybody involved in the organization of events is welcome to join this workshop, in order to understand the scope of the project and to see demonstrations of the various features.

  15. Workshop approach for developing climate change adaptation strategies and actions for natural resource management agencies in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica E. Halofsky; David L Peterson; Michael J. Furniss; Linda A. Joyce; Constance I. Millar; Ronald P. Neilson

    2011-01-01

    Concrete ways to adapt to climate change are needed to help land-management agencies take steps to incorporate climate change into management and take advantage of opportunities to balance the negative effects of climate change. Because the development of adaptation tools and strategies is at an early stage, it is important that ideas and strategies are disseminated...

  16. State/Federal Regulatory Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008, regarding State/Federal Regulatory Considerations.

  17. An intersectional gene regulatory strategy defines subclass diversity of C. elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Kerk, Sze Yen; Catela, Catarina; Liang, Joseph; Vidal, Berta; Bayer, Emily A; Feng, Weidong; De La Cruz, Estanisla Daniel; Croci, Laura; Consalez, G Giacomo; Mizumoto, Kota; Hobert, Oliver

    2017-07-05

    A core principle of nervous system organization is the diversification of neuron classes into subclasses that share large sets of features but differ in select traits. We describe here a molecular mechanism necessary for motor neurons to acquire subclass-specific traits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans . Cholinergic motor neuron classes of the ventral nerve cord can be subdivided into subclasses along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis based on synaptic connectivity patterns and molecular features. The conserved COE-type terminal selector UNC-3 not only controls the expression of traits shared by all members of a neuron class, but is also required for subclass-specific traits expressed along the A-P axis. UNC-3, which is not regionally restricted, requires region-specific cofactors in the form of Hox proteins to co-activate subclass-specific effector genes in post-mitotic motor neurons. This intersectional gene regulatory principle for neuronal subclass diversification may be conserved from nematodes to mice.

  18. Increasing Minority Enrollment Onto Clinical Trials: Practical Strategies and Challenges Emerge From the NRG Oncology Accrual Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Sandra E.; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Robinson, William; Walker, Eleanor M.; Yeager, Kate; Cook, Elise D.; Friedman, Sue; Somkin, Carol P.; Brown, Carol Leslie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    US clinical research programs must generate and embrace new ideas and pilot test novel recruitment strategies if they are to maintain their historic role as world leaders in cancer care innovation and delivery.

  19. Workshop Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , the main focus there is on spoken languages in their written and spoken forms. This series of workshops, however, offers a forum for researchers focussing on sign languages. For the third time, the workshop had sign language corpora as its main topic. This time, the focus was on the interaction between...... corpus and lexicon. More than half of the papers presented contribute to this topic. Once again, the papers at this workshop clearly identify the potentials of even closer cooperation between sign linguists and sign language engineers, and we think it is events like this that contribute a lot to a better...

  20. Modeling in the quality by design environment: Regulatory requirements and recommendations for design space and control strategy appointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuris, Jelena; Djuric, Zorica

    2017-11-30

    Mathematical models can be used as an integral part of the quality by design (QbD) concept throughout the product lifecycle for variety of purposes, including appointment of the design space and control strategy, continual improvement and risk assessment. Examples of different mathematical modeling techniques (mechanistic, empirical and hybrid) in the pharmaceutical development and process monitoring or control are provided in the presented review. In the QbD context, mathematical models are predominantly used to support design space and/or control strategies. Considering their impact to the final product quality, models can be divided into the following categories: high, medium and low impact models. Although there are regulatory guidelines on the topic of modeling applications, review of QbD-based submission containing modeling elements revealed concerns regarding the scale-dependency of design spaces and verification of models predictions at commercial scale of manufacturing, especially regarding real-time release (RTR) models. Authors provide critical overview on the good modeling practices and introduce concepts of multiple-unit, adaptive and dynamic design space, multivariate specifications and methods for process uncertainty analysis. RTR specification with mathematical model and different approaches to multivariate statistical process control supporting process analytical technologies are also presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeraphan Laomettachit

    Full Text Available To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a "standard component" modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with "standard components" can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

  2. Workshop on Developing Safe Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23, 1992, at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was learned from the workshop

  3. Workshop on developing safe software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23 at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was teamed from the workshop

  4. Pharma Opportunities and Risks Multiply as Regulatory Reform Remakes APAC: Expanded Accelerated Pathways Challenge Developer Value Story, Evidence Collection, and Market Access Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignolo, Alberto; Mingping, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Sweeping reforms in the largest markets of the Asia-Pacific region are transforming the regulatory and commercial landscape for foreign pharmaceutical companies. Japan, South Korea, and China are leading the charge, establishing mechanisms and infrastructure that both reflect and help drive international regulatory convergence and accelerate delivery of needed, innovative products to patients. In this rapidly evolving regulatory and commercial environment, drug developers can benefit from reforms and proliferating accelerated pathway (AP) frameworks, but only with regulatory and evidence-generation strategies tailored to the region. Otherwise, they will confront significant pricing and reimbursement headwinds. Although APAC economies are at different stages of development, they share a common imperative: to balance pharmaceutical innovation with affordability. Despite the complexity of meeting these sometimes conflicting demands, companies that focus on demonstrating and delivering value for money, and that price new treatments reasonably and sustainably, can succeed both for their shareholders and the region's patient population.

  5. Effects of Self-Regulatory Strategy on Prospective Science Teachers' Chemistry Self Efficacy According to Class Level and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Hatice Güngör

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the self-regulatory strategies and the chemistry self-efficacies of a total of one hundred and eighty-nine prospective science teachers in a state university in Turkey while studying the chemistry lesson according to the class level and gender factors. An additional goal was to examine the relationship level between…

  6. Regulation and the nuclear option: Summary of a workshop on long-range nuclear power regulatory issues, August 20-21, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear reactor regulation is discussed in the light of institutional and technological changes and analytical tools for failure and risk analysis. It is suggested that distinctions be drawn between higher risk and lower risk reactor operations and that lower-risk operations be afforded more autonomy. Discussion of public acceptability emphasized political accommodation entailing development of a future generation of inherently safe reactors and a commitment to fix existing reactors and increase solar energy research. Several statements on regulatory reform are appended as well as the NRC's advanced reactor policy

  7. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy—development of new strategies: report from an expert workshop1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme P; Mortimer, Elissa K; Gopalsamy, Geetha L; Alpers, David H; Binder, Henry J; Manary, Mark J; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S; Brown, Ian L; Brewer, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might complement the current recommendation and what research was needed to develop these approaches. Several key points were identified. The design of novel zinc interventions would be facilitated by a better understanding of how disturbed gut function, such as environmental (or tropical) enteropathy, affects zinc absorption, losses, and homeostasis. Because only 10% of zinc stores are able to be rapidly turned over, and appear to be rapidly depleted by acute intestinal illness, they are probably best maintained by complementary regular supplementation in a primary prevention strategy rather than secondary prevention triggered by acute diarrhea. The assessment of zinc status is challenging and complex without simple, validated measures to facilitate field testing of novel interventions. Zinc bioavailability may be a crucial factor in the success of primary prevention strategies, and a range of options, all still inadequately explored, might be valuable in improving zinc nutrition. Some therapeutic actions of zinc on diarrhea seem attributable to pharmacologic effects, whereas others are related to the reversal of deficiency (ie, nutritional). The distinction between these 2 mechanisms cannot be clarified given the insensitivity of serum zinc to identify subclinical deficiency states. Why zinc seems to be less effective than expected at all ages, and ineffective for secondary prevention of diarrhea in children zinc and whether to provide a complementary public health primary prevention zinc strategy. This requires careful consideration of the zinc product to be used as well as strategies for its delivery. PMID:25240082

  8. Contents of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in the safety evaluation of a repository for spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Wickham, S.M.; Galson, D.A.

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this report is to discuss issues that should be considered in the development of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in any forthcoming license application for a deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden and for sites of other repositories. The report comprises an outline of key issues concerning the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, reviews of regulatory developments, recent safety assessments and supporting studies, and international initiatives on the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, and the principal elements of a regulatory strategy. Performance assessments (PAs) are generally accepted as providing illustrations of system performance under given sets of assumptions. The results of PAs are clearer and easier to understand if certain large uncertainties are accounted for by determining performance under several different sets of assumptions or scenarios, each of which defines a possible evolution of the disposal system. A number of assumptions can be made that would restrict the scope of an assessment without reducing the credibility of the corresponding safety case. Reducing speculation about technological development, by assuming that the techniques used in future human activities are similar to those currently in use in the region or at similar sites, will simplify the assessment. A distinction is generally made between inadvertent and intentional intrusion, with intentional activities excluded because society cannot protect future populations from their own actions if they understand the potential consequences. A division of human activities into 'recent and ongoing' and 'future' activities considers not only the timing of the activities but also the degree of control or influence that can be imposed on them. Recent and ongoing human activities are those that affect an area beyond the immediate vicinity of the disposal facility and which neither the proponent nor the regulator

  9. From Threat to Relief: Expressing Prejudice toward Atheists as a Self-Regulatory Strategy Protecting the Religious Orthodox from Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowska, Małgorzata; Szwed, Paulina; Czernatowicz-Kukuczka, Aneta; Sekerdej, Maciek; Wyczesany, Miroslaw

    2017-01-01

    We claim that religious orthodoxy is related to prejudice toward groups that violate important values, i.e., atheists. Moreover, we suggest that expressing prejudice may efficiently reduce the threat posed by this particular group among people who hold high levels, but not low levels, of orthodox belief. We tested these assumptions in an experimental study in which, after being exposed to atheistic worldviews (value-threat manipulation), high and low orthodox participants were allowed (experimental condition) or not (control condition) to express prejudice toward atheists. Threat was operationalized by cardiovascular reactivity, i.e., heart rate (HR); the higher the HR index, the higher the threat. The results found that people who hold high (vs. low) levels of orthodox belief responded with increased HR after the threat manipulation. However, we observed decreased HR after the expression of prejudice toward atheists among highly orthodox participants compared to the control condition. We did not find this effect among people holding low levels of orthodox belief. Thus, we conclude that expressing prejudice toward this particular group may be an efficient strategy to cope with the threat posed by this group for highly orthodox people. The results are discussed in light of previous findings on religious beliefs and the self-regulatory function of prejudice. PMID:28611715

  10. Cooperative strategies for forest science management and leadership in an increasingly complex and globalized world: Proceedings of a workshop; 23- 26 August 1998; Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane G. Eskew; David R. DeYoe; Denver P. Burns; Jean-Claude Mercier

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to develop organizational networks to help achieve best practices in management and leadership of forest research and foster continuous learning toward that goal through organizational benchmarking. The papers and notes herein document the presentations and discussions of the workshop.

  11. 78 FR 72673 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice of Staff Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426. The workshop will be led by Commission... persons to listen to the workshop, but not participate. Anyone with Internet access who wants to listen...

  12. Workshop meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veland, Oeystein

    2004-04-01

    1-2 September 2003 the Halden Project arranged a workshop on 'Innovative Human-System Interfaces and their Evaluation'. This topic is new in the HRP 2003-2005 programme, and it is important to get feedback from member organizations to the work that is being performed in Halden. It is also essential that relevant activities and experiences in this area from the member organizations are shared with the Halden staff and other HRP members. Altogether 25 persons attended the workshop. The workshop had a mixture of presentations and discussions, and was chaired by Dominique Pirus of EDF, France. Day one focused on the HRP/IFE activities on Human-System Interface design, including Function-oriented displays, Ecological Interface Design, Task-oriented displays, as well as work on innovative display solutions for the oil and gas domain. There were also presentations of relevant work in France, Japan and the Czech Republic. The main focus of day two was the verification and validation of human-system interfaces, with presentations of work at HRP on Human-Centered Validation, Criteria-Based System Validation, and Control Room Verification and Validation. The chairman concluded that it was a successful workshop, although one could have had more time for discussions. The Halden Project got valuable feedback and viewpoints on this new topic during the workshop, and will consider all recommendations related to the future work in this area. (Author)

  13. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data....... These include student relations and interactions and epistemic and linguistic networks of words, concepts and actions. Network methodology has already found use in science education research. However, while networks hold the potential for new insights, they have not yet found wide use in the science education...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...

  14. N Reactor Lessons Learned workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaberlin, S.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes a workshop designed to introduce participants to a process, or model, for adapting LWR Safety Standards and Analysis Methods for use on rector designs significantly different than LWR. The focus of the workshop is on the ''Lessons Learned'' from the multi-year experience in the operation of N Reactor and the efforts to adapt the safety standards developed for commercial light water reactors to a graphite moderated, water cooled, channel type reactor. It must be recognized that the objective of the workshop is to introduce the participants to the operation of a non-LWR in a LWR regulatory world. The total scope of this topic would take weeks to provide a through overview. The objective of this workshop is to provide an introduction and hopefully establish a means to develop a longer term dialogue for technical exchange. This report provides outline of the workshop, a proposed schedule of the workshop, and a description of the tasks will be required to achieve successful completion of the project

  15. Regulatory and institutional issues impending cleanup at US Department of Energy sites: Perspectives gained from an office of environmental restoration workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, W E; Gephart, J M; Gephart, R E; Quinn, R D; Stevenson, L A

    1991-05-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons and energy operations are conducted across a nation-wide industrial complex engaged in a variety of manufacturing, processing, testing, and research and development activities. The overall mission of DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is to protect workers, the public, and the environment from waste materials generated by past, current, and future DOE activities and to bring the DOE complex into compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and agreements related to health, safety, and the environment. EM addresses this broad mandate through related and interdependent programs that include corrective actions, waste operations, environmental restoration, and technology development. The EM Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) recognizes the importance of implementing a complex-wide process to identify and resolve those issues that may impede progress towards site cleanup. As a first step in this process, FM-40 sponsored an exercise to identify and characterize major regulatory and institutional issues and to formulate integrated action steps towards their resolution. This report is the first product of that exercise. It is intended that the exercise described here will mark the beginning of an ongoing process of issue identification, tracking, and resolution that will benefit cleanup activities across the DOE complex.

  16. Virtual Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    In relation to the Tutor course in the Mediterranean Virtual University (MVU) project, a virtual workshop “Getting experiences with different synchronous communication media, collaboration, and group work” was held with all partner institutions in January 2006. More than 25 key-tutors within MVU...

  17. Summary of the Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    The summary session of the LHC Performance Workshop in Chamonix, 6-10 February 2012, synthesized one week of presentations and intense discussions on the near-, medium- and long-term strategy for the LHC and LHC upgrades. In particular, Chamonix’12 discussed the lessons from 2011, the strategy, beam energy and beam parameters for 2012, the planning for the Long Shutdown no. 1 (LS1), the measures and schemes for improving or maintaining the machine availability at higher beam energy, the injector performance and injector upgrade schedule, the HL-LHC project as well as possible additional or future LHC upgrades like LHeC and HELHC. Key workshop themes included the risk associated with 4 TeV beam energy in 2012, the beam energy after LS1, the turnaround time, the physics goal and optimized running schedule for 2012, the achievements and plans for Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions, beam-beam effects, electron-cloud phenomena and UFOs. We report the proposals for decisions which have emerged at the Chamonix’12 workshop. (author)

  18. Summary of the Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S; Zimmermann, F [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The summary session of the LHC Performance Workshop in Chamonix, 6-10 February 2012, synthesized one week of presentations and intense discussions on the near-, medium- and long-term strategy for the LHC and LHC upgrades. In particular, Chamonix’12 discussed the lessons from 2011, the strategy, beam energy and beam parameters for 2012, the planning for the Long Shutdown no. 1 (LS1), the measures and schemes for improving or maintaining the machine availability at higher beam energy, the injector performance and injector upgrade schedule, the HL-LHC project as well as possible additional or future LHC upgrades like LHeC and HELHC. Key workshop themes included the risk associated with 4 TeV beam energy in 2012, the beam energy after LS1, the turnaround time, the physics goal and optimized running schedule for 2012, the achievements and plans for Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions, beam-beam effects, electron-cloud phenomena and UFOs. We report the proposals for decisions which have emerged at the Chamonix’12 workshop. (author)

  19. The role of research-article writing motivation and self-regulatory strategies in explaining research-article abstract writing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Chia; Cheng, Yuh-Show; Lin, Sieh-Hwa; Hsieh, Pei-Jung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of research-article writing motivation and use of self-regulatory writing strategies in explaining second language (L2) research-article abstract writing ability, alongside the L2 literacy effect. Four measures were administered: a L2 literacy test, a research abstract performance assessment, and inventories of writing motivation and strategy. Participants were L2 graduate students in Taiwan (N=185; M age=25.8 yr., SD=4.5, range=22-53). Results of structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of motivation on research-article writing ability, but no direct effect of strategy or indirect effect of motivation via strategy on research-article writing ability, with L2 literacy controlled. The findings suggest research-article writing instruction should address writing motivation, besides L2 literacy.

  20. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  1. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop

  2. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop.

  3. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. AFRA IV-19 (RAF/8/024). Radiation Processing of Food and Industrial Products. Report of the Workshop on Food Irradiation Regulation in Nigeria held at the Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. Wed 4 Nov 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesanmi, C.A.

    1998-11-01

    A one-day workshop on food irradiation regulations for Nigeria was held at the Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife, Nigeria on November 4 1998. The workshop was declared open by the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) and Chairman of the Governing Board of the CERD, Prof. A. E. Akingbohungbe. The workshop attracted many participants from Government, Universities, Research Institutions, Regulatory Agencies and the Industry. There were two technical sessions which were well attended. A strategy meeting followed between the national steering group and the staff of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC)

  5. Workshops som forskningsmetode

    OpenAIRE

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learnin...

  6. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colbert, Rachel S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gupta, Vipin P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hibbs, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); West, Roger Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  7. Desnarrativas: workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivânia Marques

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a teacher workshop. It was an encounter among dialogues, pictures and possibilities of deconstruction in multiple directions. It enables studies inspiring debate in favor of images. Images are loaded with clichés and they risk breaking with the documentary/real character of photography. It leads us to think of the non-neutrality of an image and how the place is hegemonically imposed on us. It does away with blocking forces in a playful experimentation. The experimentation is extended into compositions with photographs, monotype printing, and different ways of perceiving space, dialogues, exchanges, poems and art.

  8. Workshop experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Holt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The setting for the workshop was a heady mix of history, multiculturalism and picturesque riverscapes. Within the group there was, as in many food studies, a preponderance of female scientists (or ethnographers, but the group interacted on lively, non-gendered terms - focusing instead on an appreciation of locals food and enthusiasm for research shared by all, and points of theoretical variance within that.The food provided by our hosts was of the very highest eating and local food qualities...

  9. Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  10. Corporate Political Strategies related to Decisions of European Competition Commission on Regulatory Issues in the European Telecommunications Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, H.L. van; Ross, T.

    2014-01-01

    The European regulatory institution has the tasks to protect fair competition and equal opportunities for all companies in the European telecommunications industry and to protect the welfare of the consumers. This regulator is responsible for the adherence of telecommunications companies to

  11. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  12. Recent Workshops

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F. J.

    Since the previous edition of ATLAS e-news, the NIKHEF Institute in Amsterdam has hosted not just one but two workshops related to ATLAS TDAQ activities. The first in October was dedicated to the Detector Control System (DCS). Just three institutes, CERN, NIKHEF and St Petersburg, provide the effort for the central DCS services, but each ATLAS sub-detector provides effort for their own controls. Some 30 people attended, including representatives for all of the ATLAS sub-detectors, representatives of the institutes working on the central services and the project leader of JCOP, which brings together common aspects of detector controls across the LHC experiments. During the three-day workshop the common components were discussed, and each sub-detector described their experiences and plans for their future systems. Whilst many of the components to be used are standard commercial components, a key custom item for ATLAS is the ELMB (Embedded Local Monitor Board). Prototypes for this have now been extensively test...

  13. 76 FR 70721 - Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Staff Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD12-5-000] Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Staff Workshop Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Workshop on Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids on Thursday, December 1, 2011...

  14. MICCAI Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Venkataraman, Archana; O'Donnell, Lauren; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings from two closely related workshops: Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’13) and Mathematical Methods from Brain Connectivity (MMBC’13), held under the auspices of the 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, which took place in Nagoya, Japan, September 2013. Inside, readers will find contributions ranging from mathematical foundations and novel methods for the validation of inferring large-scale connectivity from neuroimaging data to the statistical analysis of the data, accelerated methods for data acquisition, and the most recent developments on mathematical diffusion modeling. This volume offers a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational diffusion MRI and mathematical methods for brain connectivity as well as offers new perspectives and insights on current research challenges for those currently in the field. It will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in computer science, ...

  15. Second Annual Transformative Vertical Flight Concepts Workshop: Enabling New Flight Concepts Through Novel Propulsion and Energy Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael R. (Editor); Duffy, Michael; Hirschberg, Michael; Moore, Mark; German, Brian; Goodrich, Ken; Gunnarson, Tom; Petermaier,Korbinian; Stoll, Alex; Fredericks, Bill; hide

    2015-01-01

    On August 3rd and 4th, 2015, a workshop was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, located at the Moffett Federal Airfield in California to explore the aviation communities interest in Transformative Vertical Flight (TVF) Concepts. The Workshop was sponsored by the AHS International (AHS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and hosted by the NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). This second annual workshop built on the success and enthusiasm generated by the first TVF Workshop held in Washington, DC in August of 2014. The previous Workshop identified the existence of a multi-disciplinary community interested in this topic and established a consensus among the participants that opportunities to establish further collaborations in this area are warranted. The desire to conduct a series of annual workshops augmented by online virtual technical seminars to strengthen the TVF community and continue planning for advocacy and collaboration was a direct outcome of the first Workshop. The second Workshop organizers focused on four desired action-oriented outcomes. The first was to establish and document common stakeholder needs and areas of potential collaborations. This includes advocacy strategies to encourage the future success of unconventional vertiport capable flight concept solutions that are enabled by emerging technologies. The second was to assemble a community that can collaborate on new conceptual design and analysis tools to permit novel configuration paths with far greater multi-disciplinary coupling (i.e., aero-propulsive-control) to be investigated. The third was to establish a community to develop and deploy regulatory guidelines. This community would have the potential to initiate formation of an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F44 Committee Subgroup for the development of consensus-based certification standards for General Aviation scale vertiport

  16. Workshop on environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.C.

    1982-07-01

    Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs

  17. Developing regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lars Axelsson presented SSM progress on oversight of LMfS/SC since the Chester 1 Workshop in 2007. Current SSM approaches for safety culture oversight include targeted safety management and safety culture inspections, compliance inspections which cover aspects of safety management/safety culture and multi-disciplinary team inspections. Examples of themes for targeted inspections include management of ambiguous operational situations or other weak signals, understanding of and attitudes to Human Performance tools, the Safety Department's role and authority and Leadership for safety. All regulatory activities provide inputs for the SSM yearly safety evaluation of each licensee. A form has been developed to capture safety culture observations from inspections and other interactions with licensees. Analysis will be performed to identify patterns and provide information to support planning of specific Safety Culture activities. Training has been developed for regulatory staff to enhance the quality of regulatory interventions on safety culture. This includes a half-day seminar to provide an overview of safety culture, and a workshop which provides more in-depth discussion on cultural issues and how to capture those during regulatory activities. Future plans include guidance for inspectors, and informal seminars on safety culture with licensees

  18. 78 FR 14532 - Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RM13-2-000] Small Generator... Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426. Members of the Commission may attend the...-generator-03-27-13-form.asp . The purpose of this workshop is to discuss certain topics related to the...

  19. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  20. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Using equitable impact sensitive tool (EQUIST) and knowledge translation to promote .... used by the World Bank) and on globally available data including ..... Optimizing community case management strategies to achieve.

  1. Mars exploration study workshop 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Michael B.; Budden, Nancy Ann

    1993-11-01

    A year-long NASA-wide study effort has led to the development of an innovative strategy for the human exploration of Mars. The latest Mars Exploration Study Workshop 2 advanced a design reference mission (DRM) that significantly reduces the perceived high costs, complex infrastructure, and long schedules associated with previous Mars scenarios. This surface-oriented philosophy emphasizes the development of high-leveraging surface technologies in lieu of concentrating exclusively on space transportation technologies and development strategies. As a result of the DRM's balanced approach to mission and crew risk, element commonality, and technology development, human missions to Mars can be accomplished without the need for complex assembly operations in low-Earth orbit. This report, which summarizes the Mars Exploration Study Workshop held at the Ames Research Center on May 24-25, 1993, provides an overview of the status of the Mars Exploration Study, material presented at the workshop, and discussions of open items being addressed by the study team. The workshop assembled three teams of experts to discuss cost, dual-use technology, and international involvement, and to generate a working group white paper addressing these issues. The three position papers which were generated are included in section three of this publication.

  2. WORKSHOP: Stable particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro G.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Particle beam stability is crucial to any accelerator or collider, particularly big ones, such as Brookhaven's RHIC heavy ion collider and the larger SSC and LHC proton collider schemes. A workshop on the Stability of Particle Motion in Storage Rings held at Brookhaven in October dealt with the important issue of determining the short- and long-term stability of single particle motion in hadron storage rings and colliders, and explored new methods for ensuring it. In the quest for realistic environments, the imperfections of superconducting magnets and the effects of field modulation and noise were taken into account. The workshop was divided into three study groups: Short-Term Stability in storage rings, including chromatic and geometric effects and correction strategies; Long-Term Stability, including modulation and random noise effects and slow varying effects; and Methods for determining the stability of particle motion. The first two were run in parallel, but the third was attended by everyone. Each group considered analytical, computational and experimental methods, reviewing work done so far, comparing results and approaches and underlining outstanding issues. By resolving conflicts, it was possible to identify problems of common interest. The workshop reaffirmed the validity of methods proposed several years ago. Major breakthroughs have been in the rapid improvement of computer capacity and speed, in the development of more sophisticated mathematical packages, and in the introduction of more powerful analytic approaches. In a typical storage ring, a particle may be required to circulate for about a billion revolutions. While ten years ago it was only possible to predict accurately stability over about a thousand revolutions, it is now possible to predict over as many as one million turns. If this trend continues, in ten years it could become feasible to predict particle stability over the entire storage period. About ninety participants

  3. Regulatory and licensee surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the workshop two CSNI/WGHOF surveys were distributed. One survey was directed at regulatory bodies and the other was directed at plant licensees. The surveys were: 1 - Regulatory Expectations of Licensees' Arrangements to Ensure Suitable Organisational Structure, Resources and Competencies to Manage Safety (sent to WGHOF regulatory members). The survey requested that the respondents provide a brief overview of the situation related to plant organisations in their country, their regulatory expectations and their formal requirements. The survey addressed three subjects: the demonstration and documentation of organisational structures, resources and competencies, organisational changes, issues for improvement (for both current and new plants). Responses were received from eleven regulatory bodies. 2 - Approaches to Justify Organisational Suitability (sent to selected licensees). The purpose of the survey to was to gain an understanding of how licensees ensure organisational suitability, resources and competencies. This information was used to assist in the development of the issues and subjects that were addressed at the group discussion sessions. Responses were received from over fifteen licensees from nine countries. The survey requested that the licensees provide information on how they ensure effective organisational structures at their plants. The survey grouped the questions into the following four categories: organisational safety functions, resource and competence, decision-making and communication, good examples and improvement needs. The findings from these surveys were used in conjunction with other factors to identify the key issues for the workshop discussion sessions. The responses from these two surveys are discussed briefly in Sections 4 and 5 of this report. More extensive reviews of the regulatory and licensee responses are provided in Appendix 1

  4. Implementing the Marine Strategy Framework Directive: A policy perspective on regulatory, institutional and stakeholder impediments to effective implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.; Raakjaer, J.; Hoof, van L.J.W.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.; Long, R.; Ounanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of the European Union (EU) Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requires EU Member States to draft a program of measures to achieve Good Environmental Status (GES). Central argument of this paper, based on an analysis of the unique, holistic character of the MSFD, is that

  5. TANK FARM CLOSURE - A NEW TWIST ON REGULATORY STRATEGIES FOR CLOSURE OF WASTE TANK RESIDUALS FOLLOWING NUREG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEHMAN LL

    2008-01-01

    Waste from a number of single-shell tanks (SST) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site has been retrieved by CH2M HILL Hanford Group to fulfill the requirements of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) [1]. Laboratory analyses of the Hanford tank residual wastes have provided concentration data which will be used to determine waste classification and disposal options for tank residuals. The closure of tank farm facilities remains one of the most challenging activities faced by the DOE. This is due in part to the complicated regulatory structures that have developed. These regulatory structures are different at each of the DOE sites, making it difficult to apply lessons learned from one site to the next. During the past two years with the passage of the Section 3116 of the 'Ronald Reagan Defense Authorization Act of 2005' (NDAA) [2] some standardization has emerged for Savannah River Site and the Idaho National Laboratory tank residuals. Recently, with the issuance of 'NRC Staff Guidance for Activities Related to US. Department of Energy Waste Determinations' (NUREG-1854) [3] more explicit options may be considered for Hanford tank residuals than are presently available under DOE Orders. NUREG-1854, issued in August 2007, contains several key pieces of information that if utilized by the DOE in the tank closure process, could simplify waste classification and streamline the NRC review process by providing information to the NRC in their preferred format. Other provisions of this NUREG allow different methods to be applied in determining when waste retrieval is complete by incorporating actual project costs and health risks into the calculation of 'technically and economically practical'. Additionally, the NUREG requires a strong understanding of the uncertainties of the analyses, which given the desire of some NRC/DOE staff may increase the likelihood of using probabilistic approaches to uncertainty analysis. The purpose

  6. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  7. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Thorpe

    Full Text Available Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC. Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  8. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site - 8422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Wieland; V Yucel; L Desotell; G Shott; J Wrapp

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators

  9. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Nagel, Thomas; Carroll, Simon F; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin) deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  10. Strategies for patient empowerment through the promotion of medicines in Israel: regulatory framework for the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Eyal; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Grotto, Itamar; Marom, Eli

    2017-09-29

    The correct and rational use of medications can have a positive direct impact on disease outcomes, as well on the utilization of the health system resources. Unfortunately, 50% of the patients do not take their medications as prescribed, largely due to lack of patients' understanding of their medical condition, as well as the lack of reliable medicine information.There are multiple strategies implemented in many countries to tackle this challenge including: disease awareness campaigns (DAC) to raise the public awareness to specific diseases, direct-to-consumer advertisement (DTCA) to raise the public awareness to prescription medicines, specific treatments and over-the-counter (OTC) products to improve the accessibility of patients to specific medicines.Prior to 2013, the Israeli policy prohibited prescribing medication advertising and prevented the flow of information from pharmaceutical companies to the patient. In the last five years, the Pharmaceutical division in the Israeli Ministry of Health, as part of the "empowering the patient" agenda, has taken new innovative approaches to raise public awareness to diseases, medications and appropriate usage, as well as promotion of information to improve patient adherence to the prescribed medication.This paper elaborates on the aforementioned strategies implemented in developed countries, and specifically focuses on newly implemented strategies and regulations in Israel regarding pre- and post-prescription information, to improve patient appropriate utilization and adherence to medication.

  11. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on…

  12. Regulatory Strategies To Minimize Generation Of Regulated Wastes From Cleanup, Continued Use Or Decommissioning Of Nuclear Facilities Contaminated With Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBS) - 11198

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, N.

    2010-01-01

    . Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

  13. ICP-MS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  14. Opening Session - Introductory remarks for Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuel. OECD/NEA Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuels, Workshop Expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim; Massara, Simone; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The workshop opened with the welcome address from Th. Dujardin (OECD/NEA), NEA Deputy Director. Th. Dujardin recalled the integrated NEA response to the dramatic Fukushima-Daiichi events performed by three standing technical committees: the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). J. Gulliford (OECD/NEA) placed the workshop in the context of the activities of the Nuclear Science Committee within the framework of the NEA response to Fukushima- Daiichi. K. Pasamehmetoglu (INL, US) explained the main goals of the workshop oriented towards defining requirements for selection among various options during the feasibility phase of the development process, and not towards identifying and proposing design solutions

  15. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  16. Policy and strategy of the Cuban Regulatory Organization for the establishment of the legal and regulation frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnau F, A.; Alonso G, I.; Sarabia M, I.

    2006-01-01

    The National Center of Nuclear Security, Cuban entity authorized to exercise the regulation functions and control of the security of the use of the nuclear energy and the accounting and control of the nuclear materials, has among its functions, to elaborate and to propose for its approval to the corresponding instances, the juridical, technical dispositions and of procedure in its competition sphere, what demands that in this sense clear guidelines exist to carry out this social mission. The fact of assuming this function demands the necessity of a Politics for the establishment of the legal and regulation frame that expresses in a coherent way the general lines on those that it behaves the elaboration of the standards that govern this activity, to reach the end in an efficient and effective way and consequently the adoption of a Strategy that frames the necessary actions that assure the one execution and development of the politics and the pursuit of the precise rules for an optimal result. The Politics for the establishment of the legal and regulation frame of the National Center of Nuclear Security is based on a group of general principles that mark the guidelines so that this activity is chord to the national juridical system, to the good ones international practices and the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency appropriated to the national experience and the daily reality, being this a transparent and reconciled process in such a way that the addressee of these standards can contribute their recommendations to the ends of achieving an effective applicability of the legal and regulation frame that governs this activity in the country. The development and pursuit of these principles is sustained in a group of actions to the help of the strategy for the establishment of the legal and regulation frame, embracing the actions so much during the process of elaboration of the legal frame, its systematic revision, the publication and distribution

  17. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2004-12-01

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  18. Applied antineutrino physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river

  19. State regulatory issues in acid rain compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, B.D.; Brick, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a US EPA workshop for state regulators and commission staff on acid rain compliance concerns. The topics of the article include the results of market-based emissions control, how emissions trading is expected to reduce emissions, public utility commissions approval of compliance plans, the purposes of the workshop, market information, accounting issues, regulatory process and utility planning, multi-state compliance planning, and relationship to other compliance issues

  20. Proceedings of the 1991 Windsor workshop on alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A workshop was held to exchange information among engine and vehicle manufacturers, fuel suppliers, research organizations, and academic and regulatory bodies on various aspects of alternative transportation fuels development. Papers were presented on alternative fuels policies and programs, zero-emission vehicles, emission control technologies, field evaluations of alternative fuel systems, and heavy duty alternate-fuel engines. Separate abstracts have been prepared for nine papers from this workshop

  1. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, dreissenid mussels have yet to be detected in the northwestern part of the United States and western Canada. Infestation of one of the jurisdictions within the mussel-free Pacific Northwest would likely have significant economic, soci­etal and environmental implications for the entire region. Understanding the biology and environmental tolerances of dreissenid mussels, and effectiveness of various man­agement strategies, is key to prevention.On November 4-5, 2015, the Aquatic Bioinvasion Research and Policy Institute and the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs at Portland State University, the US Geological Survey, and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, convened a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of the workshop was to review dreissenid research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters, reassess those priorities, incorporate new information and emerging trends, and develop priorities to strategically focus research efforts on zebra and quagga mussels in the Pacific Northwest and ensure that future research is focused on the highest priorities. It is important to note that there is some repetition among dreissenid research priority categories (e.g., prevention, detection, control, monitoring, and biology).Workshop participants with research experience in dreissenid mussel biology and management were identified by a literature review. State and federal agency managers were also invited to the workshop to ensure relevancy and practicality of the work­shop outcomes. A total of 28 experts (see sidebar) in mussel biology, ecology, and management attended the workshop.

  2. Neutron radiobiology. Summary of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report is a summary of a workshop held in June 1977 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the progress of research in the field of neutron radiobiology. The participants reviewed the results of current research and identified unresolved questions and areas of uncertainty. They then defined areas in which additional research should be undertaken, and, finally, they reviewed ways in which results from current and projected research could be applied to inform and influence regulatory decisions

  3. Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A. [eds.] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

  4. 77 FR 2556 - Ethical and Regulatory Challenges in the Development of Pediatric Medical Countermeasures; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ...] Ethical and Regulatory Challenges in the Development of Pediatric Medical Countermeasures; Public Workshop... Administration (FDA), Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Ethical and... provide a forum for careful consideration of scientific, ethical, and regulatory issues confronting FDA...

  5. Advanced Grid Control Technologies Workshop Series | Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Smart Grid and Beyond John McDonald, Director, Technical Strategy and Policy Development, General Control Technologies Workshop Series In July 2015, NREL's energy systems integration team hosted workshops the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) and included a technology showcase featuring projects

  6. Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    The Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report summarizes a workshop hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office on May 23–24, 2017, in Orlando, Florida. The event gathered stakeholder input through facilitated discussions focused on innovative technologies and business strategies for growing algae on waste carbon dioxide resources.

  7. Systems Engineering Workshops | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workshops Systems Engineering Workshops The Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop is a biennial topics relevant to systems engineering and the wind industry. The presentations and agendas are available for all of the Systems Engineering Workshops: The 1st NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

  8. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation biology and clinical applications: a molecular approach towards innovations in applied radiobiology and a workshop on strategies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Innovations in radiotherapy approaches to cancer and radiation biology research is of growing interest in radiation researchers to conduct preclinical studies at their centers and translating the results as soon as possible to clinical radiotherapy practice. Recent papers have greatly enriched the current knowledge of radiation oncology, especially radiobiology and molecular oncology, and this has radically changed the oncology practice in radiation therapy in just a few years. The conference theme highlights the molecular and cellular responses within tissue and higher levels of mammalian biological organization. New experimental radiobiology research to underpin current and future regulatory decisions setting workplace exposure limits. To develop rapid, high-precision analytical methods that assess radiation exposure doses from clinical samples and thus aid in the triage and medical management of radiological casualties. Innovative approaches to improve the accuracy, dose range, ease of use, and speed of classical biodosimetry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... presentations, including the privacy compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance... Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Privacy Compliance Workshop.'' DATES: The...

  10. A systematic review of the effectiveness of smartphone applications that encourage dietary self-regulatory strategies for weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, H M; Povey, R; Clark-Carter, D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to systematically review the evidence to explore whether smartphone applications that use self-regulatory strategies are beneficial for weight loss in overweight and obese adults over the age of 18 years. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for articles published up to April 2015 including MEDLINE, OVID, Ingenta, PSYCARTICLES and PSYCINFO, CINAHL, Sportdiscus, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, JSTOR, EBSCO, Proquest, Wiley and Google Scholar. Twenty nine eligible studies were retrieved of which six studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies that recruited participants under the age of 18 years, adults with a chronic condition or did not report weight loss outcomes were excluded. Study findings were combined using a narrative synthesis. Overall, evidence suggests that smartphone applications may be a useful tool for self-regulating diet for weight loss as participants in the smartphone application group in all studies lost at least some bodyweight. However, when compared to other self-monitoring methods, there was no significant difference in the amount of weight lost. Findings should be interpreted with caution based on the design of the studies and the comparator groups used. Future research needs to be more methodologically rigorous and incorporate measures of whether eating habits become healthier in addition to measuring weight and BMI. © 2016 World Obesity.

  11. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop

  12. Innovative confinement concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop occurred in California during the week preceding the Second Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. An informal report was made to the Second Symposium. A summary of the Workshop concluded that some very promising ideas were presented, that innovative concept development is a central element of the restructured US DOE. Fusion Energy Sciences program, and that the Workshop should promote real scientific progress in fusion

  13. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  14. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached

  15. MOOC Design Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Mor, Yishay; Warburton, Steven

    2016-01-01

    For the last two years we have been running a series of successful MOOC design workshops. These workshops build on previous work in learning design and MOOC design patterns. The aim of these workshops is to aid practitioners in defining and conceptualising educational innovations (predominantly......, but not exclusively MOOCs) which are based on an empathic user-centered view of the target learners and teachers. In this paper, we share the main principles, patterns and resources of our workshops and present some initial results for their effectiveness...

  16. Drunk Driving. Surgeon General's Workshop. Proceedings (Washington, D.C., December 14-16, 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus Associates.

    This volume presents solutions, recommendations, and strategies in eleven interrelated areas considered at the Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving held in Washington, D.C. in December of 1988. Lists of the members of the Workshop Planning Committee and members of the federal advisory group on follow-up activities for the workshop are…

  17. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON UNCERTAINTY, SENSITIVITY, AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING. EPA/600/R-04/117, NUREG/CP-0187, ERDC SR-04-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An International Workshop on Uncertainty, Sensitivity, and Parameter Estimation for Multimedia Environmental Modeling was held August 1921, 2003, at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, USA. The workshop was organized and convened by the Fe...

  19. How are things going. Obtaining feedback in a regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.V.; Walsh, M.E.; Boegel, A.J.; Morisseau, D.S.; Persendky, J.J.

    1984-08-01

    This study tested two procedures to gather feedback for a federal agency about its regulatory actions and its licensees' practices. The procedures, a workshop and a mailed survey, targeted a data source new to the agency. Results to date find the feedback workshop useful and the new data source cooperative and valuable. Participation in the workshops is surprising, given their historical backdrop, structure, and psychological literatures. These findings suggest that agencies may be ignoring important data sources for ill-informed reasons. Also, the findings suggest a possible need to restructure existing channels of communication between a regulatory agency and its licensees

  20. Genetic Engineering Workshop Report, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J; Slezak, T

    2010-11-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies (TMT) program. The high-level goal of TMT is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve this goal, there is a need to assess the genetic engineering (GE) approaches, potential application as well as detection and mitigation strategies. LLNL was tasked to coordinate a workshop to determine the scope of investments that DTRA should make to stay current with the rapid advances in genetic engineering technologies, so that accidental or malicious uses of GE technologies could be adequately detected and characterized. Attachment A is an earlier report produced by LLNL for TMT that provides some relevant background on Genetic Engineering detection. A workshop was held on September 23-24, 2010 in Springfield, Virginia. It was attended by a total of 55 people (see Attachment B). Twenty four (44%) of the attendees were academic researchers involved in GE or bioinformatics technology, 6 (11%) were from DTRA or the TMT program management, 7 (13%) were current TMT performers (including Jonathan Allen and Tom Slezak of LLNL who hosted the workshop), 11 (20%) were from other Federal agencies, and 7 (13%) were from industries that are involved in genetic engineering. Several attendees could be placed in multiple categories. There were 26 attendees (47%) who were from out of the DC area and received travel assistance through Invitational Travel Orders (ITOs). We note that this workshop could not have been as successful without the ability to invite experts from outside of the Beltway region. This workshop was an unclassified discussion of the science behind current genetic engineering capabilities. US citizenship was not required for attendance. While this may have limited some discussions concerning risk, we felt that it was more important for this first workshop to focus on the scientific state of

  1. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  2. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... tools move everything from homework assignments to testing into the cloud. The workshop will explore possible strategies to connect virtually all of our students to next-generation broadband in a timely, cost-effective way. It will also share promising practices, from NTIA's Broadband Technology Opportunities...

  3. Workshop of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This event was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentine Republic from 14 th. through 18 th. November, 1988. A great part of the physicians in the area of medical physics participated in this workshop. This volume includes the papers presented at this Workshop of Medical Physics [es

  4. Workshops on Writing Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... hands-on practice, feedback, mentoring and highly interactive sessions. The focus will be on work done as individuals and in teams. Maximum number of participants for the workshop is limited. The workshop is compulso- rily residential. Boarding and lodging free for selected candidates. Re-imbursement ...

  5. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  6. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    2013-01-01

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  7. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  8. NEA/IAEA Workshop on Leadership and Management for Safety. ONR approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Paul Harvey summarised the progress made by the UK ONR on oversight of LMfS since the previous workshop in 2007. The ONR approach is based on published Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) on Leadership and Management for Safety. The four principles cover Leadership, Capable Organisation, Decision Making and Learning. Safety culture is embodied within the LMfS SAPs/strategy rather than being treated as a specific topic. The ONR LMfS strategy draws on the lessons from major events (e.g., Texas City, Davis Besse, Columbia) and includes integration of LMfS into existing types of regulatory interventions. Key elements of the strategy include more attention to organisational and cultural factors, increased focus on Board/Director/Executive Team levels in licensees, more focus on how licensees oversee themselves, and improving ONR ability to identify precursors and influencing in combination with regulation. Guidance on Leadership and Management for safety has been produced and is undergoing trial use by ONR inspectors. The guidance is structured around the four LMfS safety assessment principles. It provides help on what to look for during interactions with licensees. ONR staff record significant points (both potential concerns and good practices) in their Intervention Reports under the 'LMfS' heading. This should enable ONR to build up a picture of strengths and weaknesses and plan interventions. Workshops on LMfS have been held for inspectors and managers. These cover organisational and cultural lessons from a range of major events and relate these to ONR LMfS strategy and draft guidance. Other interventions which form part of the strategy include 'deep slice' inspections on specific LMfS topics, and interactions with some licensee Company Boards on lessons from major events and the ONR LMfS strategy. These have been received positively by licensees. It was concluded that ongoing effort is needed to fully implement and embed the ONR LMfS strategy

  9. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: Utilization of Oral Medicine-specific software for support of clinical care, research, and education: current status and strategy for broader implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailo, Vlaho; Firriolo, Francis John; Tanaka, Takako Imai; Varoni, Elena; Sykes, Rosemary; McCullough, Michael; Hua, Hong; Sklavounou, Alexandra; Jensen, Siri Beier; Lockhart, Peter B; Mattsson, Ulf; Jontell, Mats

    2015-08-01

    To assess the current scope and status of Oral Medicine-specific software (OMSS) utilized to support clinical care, research, and education in Oral Medicine and to propose a strategy for broader implementation of OMSS within the global Oral Medicine community. An invitation letter explaining the objectives was sent to the global Oral Medicine community. Respondents were interviewed to obtain information about different aspects of OMSS functionality. Ten OMSS tools were identified. Four were being used for clinical care, one was being used for research, two were being used for education, and three were multipurpose. Clinical software was being utilized as databases developed to integrate of different type of clinical information. Research software was designed to facilitate multicenter research. Educational software represented interactive, case-orientated technology designed for clinical training in Oral Medicine. Easy access to patient data was the most commonly reported advantage. Difficulty of use and poor integration with other software was the most commonly reported disadvantage. The OMSS presented in this paper demonstrate how information technology (IT) can have an impact on the quality of patient care, research, and education in the field of Oral Medicine. A strategy for broader implementation of OMSS is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oficinas de boas práticas de fabricação: construindo estratégias para garantir a segurança alimentar Workshops for good manufacturing practices: building strategies for ensuring food security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisio da Silva Costa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A comercialização de alimentos tradicionais resgata a história e a cultura presentes nos alimentos. Os pescadores artesanais são os principais responsáveis pelo abastecimento do mercado nacional. Considerando-se a importância da adoção de procedimentos de Boas Práticas de Fabricação em toda cadeia produtiva, o presente trabalho visa a socializar uma experiência construtiva de uma oficina de Boas Práticas de Fabricação para pescadoras. Diante disso, realizou-se um levantamento de conceitos e atitudes voltadas para produção segura de alimentos, utilizando-se como instrumento entrevistas, além da observação de seus hábitos e atitudes. Os resultados evidenciam que estas pescadoras percebem as Boas Práticas de Fabricação como sinônimo de higiene e de poder comercializar o pescado sem reclamações; porém, as mesmas não têm noção dos procedimentos de Boas Práticas de Fabricação na sua atividade. O processo formativo se constitui como uma das estratégias de base para consolidação dos grupos, sendo as oficinas alternativas eficientes, de fácil execução e baixo custo.The marketing of traditional foods recalls the history and culture in feeding. The fishermen are primarily responsible for supplying the domestic market. Considering the importance of adopting procedures for Good Manufacturing Practices throughout the production chain, this paper aims to socialize a constructive experience of a Good Manufacturing Practices workshop for fishers. Therefore, we carried out a survey of concepts and attitudes towards safe food production, using interviews as an instrument, and are observed their habits and attitudes. The results show that these Good Manufacturing Practices perceive as synonymous with health and able to market the fish without complaint, but they are not aware of the procedures for Good Manufacturing Practices activities. The training process is constituted as one of the basic strategies for strengthening

  11. Regulatory guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  12. Workshop Report on Managing Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Lee (Compiler); Caldeira, Ken (Compiler); Chatfield, Robert (Compiler); Langhoff, Stephanie (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The basic concept of managing Earth's radiation budget is to reduce the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the Earth so as to counterbalance the heating of the Earth that would otherwise result from the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The workshop did not seek to decide whether or under what circumstances solar radiation management should be deployed or which strategies or technologies might be best, if it were deployed. Rather, the workshop focused on defining what kinds of information might be most valuable in allowing policy makers more knowledgeably to address the various options for solar radiation management.

  13. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  14. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  15. Contents of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in the safety evaluation of a repository for spent fuels; Innehaallet i en strategi foer myndighetsbedoemning av framtida maenskligt handlande vid vaerdering av saekerheten for slutfoervar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Wickham, S.M.; Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Ltd., Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this report is to discuss issues that should be considered in the development of a regulatory strategy for assessing future human actions in any forthcoming license application for a deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden and for sites of other repositories. The report comprises an outline of key issues concerning the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, reviews of regulatory developments, recent safety assessments and supporting studies, and international initiatives on the treatment of future human actions in safety assessment, and the principal elements of a regulatory strategy. Performance assessments (PAs) are generally accepted as providing illustrations of system performance under given sets of assumptions. The results of PAs are clearer and easier to understand if certain large uncertainties are accounted for by determining performance under several different sets of assumptions or scenarios, each of which defines a possible evolution of the disposal system. A number of assumptions can be made that would restrict the scope of an assessment without reducing the credibility of the corresponding safety case. Reducing speculation about technological development, by assuming that the techniques used in future human activities are similar to those currently in use in the region or at similar sites, will simplify the assessment. A distinction is generally made between inadvertent and intentional intrusion, with intentional activities excluded because society cannot protect future populations from their own actions if they understand the potential consequences. A division of human activities into 'recent and ongoing' and 'future' activities considers not only the timing of the activities but also the degree of control or influence that can be imposed on them. Recent and ongoing human activities are those that affect an area beyond the immediate vicinity of the disposal facility and which neither the

  16. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  17. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW

  18. PV radiometrics workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents presentations and discussions held at the Photovoltaics Radiometeric Measurements Workshop conducted at Vail, Colorado, on July 24 and 25, 1995. The workshop was sponsored and financed by the Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project managed by Richard DeBlasio, Principal Investigator. That project is a component of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic Research and Development Program, conducted by NREL for the US Department of Energy, through the NREL Photovoltaic Engineering and Applications Branch, managed by Roland Hulstrom. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this workshop.

  19. Workshop on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This workshop was organized by the NEA Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRISK). The key objective of the workshop was to share the current state-of-the art on the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) applied for new reactors and advanced reactors. Fifty experts from 13 countries and one international organization (IAEA) participated in the present workshop, and 35 technical papers were presented. The main topics of interest, discussed during the workshop, included the followings: regulatory aspects, risk-informed methods, technical aspects of the PSA for new and advanced reactors, hazards of PSA (internal and external), severe accident/source term/Level 2 PSA, and consequence analysis/Level 3 PSA. Among the technical aspects of the PSA, the assessment of the reliability of passive safety systems appears to be a recurrent issue

  20. Workshop on radiation protection of patient. Workshop on radiation protection of worker in nuclear medicine and biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In these workshops, information on the following subjects was presented: biological and prenatal effects of ionizing radiation, excretion of radiopharmaceuticals in human breast milk, fetal doses assessment, final disposal of radioactive waste in medical applications, regulatory functions for installations in nuclear medicine, workers doses in nuclear medicine and biomedicine, radioprotection of their nuclear installations, programs of quality assurance, etc

  1. Transparency of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    One of the main missions of nuclear regulators is to protect the public, and this cannot be completely achieved without public confidence. The more a regulatory process is transparent, the more such confidence will grow. Despite important cultural differences across countries, a number of common features characterise media and public expectations regarding any activity with an associated risk. A common understanding of transparency and main stakeholders' expectations in the field of nuclear safety were identified during this workshop, together with a number of conditions and practices aimed at improving the transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. These conditions and practices are described herein, and will be of particular interest to all those working in the nuclear regulatory field. Their implementation may, however, differ from one country to another depending on national context. (authors)

  2. The 2008 ICOH Workshop on Skin Notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sartorelli, P; Ahlers, H W; Cherrie, J W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On 29 March 2008 the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committee on Occupational and Environmental Dermatoses organized a Skin Notation Workshop hosted by the 11th International Percutaneous Penetration Perspectives Conference (La Grande Motte, France...... assignment criteria and the attempts to improve the S system made by various international and governmental agencies. A position paper was subsequently published. OBJECTIVES: The workshop in France was a continuation of this activity with the aim of evaluating how the different strategies can improve S....... METHODS AND DISCUSSION: The Workshop was divided into two sessions. The first was dedicated to lectures focused on different aspects of S. In the second session participants discussed key issues with the aim of exploring the actions needed to improve international S. systems....

  3. Proceedings of the international workshop on conduct of inspections and inspector qualification and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, B.K.

    1993-02-01

    In the Fall of 1991, the OECD Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) approved the proposal of the Working Group (WGIP) on Inspection Practices to hold a workshop on the conduct of inspections, inspector qualification and training, and shutdown inspections at the Technical Training Center of the USNRC in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The workshop was held from August 29 to September 4, 1992. The workshop was preceded by an orientation briefing for facilitators and a get-acquainted reception for participants. The workshop began with a plenary introductory session and ended with a plenary conclusion and evaluation session. Individual discussion sessions have been cataloged separately

  4. NASA/FAA helicopter simulator workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, William E. (Editor); Randle, Robert J., Jr. (Editor); Bray, Richard S. (Editor); Zuk, John (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A workshop was convened by the FAA and NASA for the purpose of providing a forum at which leading designers, manufacturers, and users of helicopter simulators could initiate and participate in a development process that would facilitate the formulation of qualification standards by the regulatory agency. Formal papers were presented, special topics were discussed in breakout sessions, and a draft FAA advisory circular defining specifications for helicopter simulators was presented and discussed. A working group of volunteers was formed to work with the National Simulator Program Office to develop a final version of the circular. The workshop attracted 90 individuals from a constituency of simulator manufacturers, training organizations, the military, civil regulators, research scientists, and five foreign countries.

  5. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  6. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  7. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991.

  8. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strålberg, Elisabeth; Klemola, Seppo; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical...

  9. YEREVAN: Acceleration workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Sponsored by the Yerevan Physics Institute in Armenia, a Workshop on New Methods of Charged Particle Acceleration in October near the Nor Amberd Cosmic Ray Station attracted participants from most major accelerator centres in the USSR and further afield

  10. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  11. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification

  12. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  13. Second ICFA workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the topics discussed at the second ICFA Workshop on 'Possibilities and Limitations of Accelerators and Detectors'. High energy accelerators are discussed, particularly electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders. (W.D.L.).

  14. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, M.

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements

  15. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  16. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  17. TPC workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept is now nearly ten years old and, as is evident in this workshop, is still evolving in many directions. From the liquid xenon TPC for double beta decay studies to the impressively large second generation TPC for the LEP experiment ALEPH, the surprising diversity of current applications is apparent. This workshop, the first to concentrate solely on the TPC has provided a most congenial and rewarding occasion for all TPC enthusiasts to share experience, results, and ideas

  18. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  19. 76 FR 10810 - Public Workshop to Discuss Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Radioactive Waste Management AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Public Workshop and Request for... regulatory framework for the management of commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The purpose of this...-level radioactive wastes that did not exist at the time part 61 was promulgated. The developments...

  20. Highlights and Comments from a Regulator's Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2002-01-01

    Mikael Jensen (SSI, Sweden) presented the feedback of the regulatory workshop that took place in Sweden in September 2001, titled 'The Role of Future Society and Biosphere in Demonstrating Compliance with High-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Standards and Regulations'. The theme included questions such as how to meet regulatory compliance with an evolving biosphere and how will regulators judge compliance? During the Workshop, presentations were made from international regulatory aspects such as IAEA or ICRP. There were also very interesting country-by-country presentation such as the Finnish presentation by STUK which specifies limits on radionuclide releases from a repository after a thousand years or so. There appears to be a consensus on the relevance developing initiatives on the sustainable development, the protection of the environment and addressing long time scales. One technical aspects, the geosphere/biosphere interface, was viewed as a key issue for future study and analysis

  1. Industry role stressed at backfit workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach to backfitting nuclear power plants in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) rules could lower costs and make backfitting procedures less unpredictable. The NRC described the approach in a series of regional workshops with utilities. The author explains how and when a backfit analysis is to be made, how priorities are set, exceptions, and the role assigned to the industry and the NRC. Disagreement between NRC and utilities over backfitting will not lead to retribution against the utility. Instead, the objective is to bring industry more into a partnership role. 2 tables

  2. WPDD workshop on: 'safe, efficient, and cost-effective decommissioning'. Workshop Conclusions/Final Stocktaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    On September 6-10, 2004 a workshop on 'Safe, Efficient, and Cost-Effective Decommissioning' was held in Rome (Italy) to enable international experts on decommissioning to compare and evaluate respective approaches and experiences in decommissioning nuclear power and fuel cycle facilities and to formulate proposals for future international cooperation in the decommissioning arena. The main messages emerging from the workshop are: - Decommissioning is a mature industrial process and many projects have been safely completed with support of local communities. Technical and scientific issues are well-understood and practical experience and associated lessons are being documented to guide future activities. Emphasis is being placed on effective planning with active programmes of community involvement. - Individual countries need to further develop integrated decommissioning and waste management strategies to ensure that long-term solutions will be available for all wastes generated from decommissioning. National systems are evolving to meet national needs, against a framework provided by the international organisations, and these seem increasingly to favour early dismantling regardless of the availability of waste disposal routes. - Realistic and streamlined regulatory programmes are being developed with feed back from industry experience and are placing more responsibility and accountability on licensees. - Accurate decommissioning waste cost calculation methods is needed. Waste volumes may vary from project to project even for similar installations. There though appears to be a strong case for accumulating data and benchmarking costs for similar plants and processes. Further work and experience exchange on cost comparisons between different strategies (for example clearance and recycling/reuse of materials versus direct surface disposal) would be valuable. - International clearance criteria have been established, with individual countries free to adopt them

  3. Proceedings of the Digital Systems Reliability and Nuclear Safety Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, D. R.; Cuthill, B. B.; Ippolito, L. M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Beltracchi, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States) ed.

    1994-03-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), in cooperation with the National Institute of Standards and Technology conducted the.Digital Systems Reliability and Nuclear Safety Workshop on September 13--14, 1993, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop provided a forum for the exchange of information among experts within the nuclear industry, experts from other industries, regulators and academia. The information presented at this workshop provided in-depth exposure of the NRC staff and the nuclear industry to digital systems design safety issues and also provided feedback to the NRC from outside experts regarding identified safety issues, proposed regulatory positions, and intended research associated with the use of digital systems in nuclear power plants. Technical presentations provided insights on areas where current software engineering practices may be inadequate for safety-critical systems, on potential solutions for development issues, and on methods for reducing risk in safety-critical systems. This report contains an analysis of results of the workshop, the papers presented panel presentations, and summaries of, discussions at this workshop. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  4. Regulatory aspects of management of change - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear licensees are increasingly required to adapt to a more challenging commercial environment as moves to de-regulate electricity markets gather pace. One of the costs that is often perceived as being amenable to control is staffing, and hence there is significant exploration of new strategies for managing staffing levels. This report presents the outputs from a Workshop convened by the Special Experts' Group in Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and organised by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). The purpose of the workshop was to facilitate the exchange of views on, and approaches towards, the regulation of organisational change. The major risks associated with organisational change were discussed, and a range of regulatory challenges was identified for detailed discussion. There was agreement that the licensee must retain the responsibility to manage its own business but that organisational issues should be subject to regulatory scrutiny if they have the potential to impact on safety. The regulator should be able to demonstrate an approach to oversight of organisational change which is valid, transparent and consistent, and should inform the licensee of its expectations in terms of information supplied, communication and timing. The workshop confirmed that there is significant agreement between regulators concerning the need for licensees to put in place arrangements to manage organisational change. There was also broad consensus on what should constitute the elements of a licensee's management of change process. Differing views were evident about the balance between regulatory scrutiny of the process, as opposed to the outcomes of change, which largely represents differing regulatory regimes and philosophies. However, it was acknowledged that the regulator must be capable of taking an early view of the adequacy of proposed changes, rather than monitoring outcomes alone

  5. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management 'sharing practices and experiences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management was to share practices and experiences in approaches to severe accident management. The workshop: provided an international forum for information and experience exchange amongst nuclear electricity utilities and national regulatory authorities on approaches to, and issues in severe accident management, including national and international implications. Focus was placed on sharing practices and experiences in many countries on approaches to severe accident management; identified best occupational radiation protection approaches in strategies, practices, as well as limitations for developing effective management. This included experiences in various countries; identified national experiences to be incorporated into the final version of ISOE EG-SAM report. The workshop included a series of plenary presentations that provided participants with an overview of practices and experiences in severe accident management from various countries. Furthermore, by taking into account the structure of the interim report, common themes and issues were discussed in follow-up breakout sessions. Sessions included invited speakers, moderated by designated experts, allowing participants to discuss their national experiences and possible inputs into the report. The outcomes of the breakout sessions were presented in plenary by the respective moderators followed by an open discussion, with a view towards elaborating ways forward to achieve more effective severe accident management. This document brings together the abstracts and the slides of the available presentations

  6. Final Report National Laboratory Professional Development Workshop for Underrepresented Participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Valerie [Texas Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The 2013 CMD-IT National Laboratories Professional Development Workshop for Underrepresented Participants (CMD-IT NLPDev 2013) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus in Oak Ridge, TN. from June 13 - 14, 2013. Sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research Program, the primary goal of these workshops is to provide information about career opportunities in computational science at the various national laboratories and to mentor the underrepresented participants through community building and expert presentations focused on career success. This second annual workshop offered sessions to facilitate career advancement and, in particular, the strategies and resources needed to be successful at the national laboratories.

  7. Improvement of livestock breeding strategies using physiologic and functional genomic information of the muscle regulatory factors gene family for skeletal muscle development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Soumillon, A.

    2001-01-01

    A defined number of skeletal muscle fibers are formed in two separate waves during prenatal development, while postnatal growth is restricted to hypertrophic muscle fiber growth. The genes of the MRF (muscle regulatory factors) gene family, consisting of 4 structurally related transcription factors

  8. EML indoor radon workshop, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Lowder, W.; Fisenne, I.; Knutson, E.O.; Hinchliffe, L.

    1983-07-01

    A workshop on indoor radon, held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) on November 30 and December 1, 1982, covered recent developments in radon daughter research and development. Thirty papers were presented dealing with standardization and quality assurance measurement methods, surveys, measurements strategy, physical mechanisms of radon and radon daughter transport and development of guidance standards for indoor exposures. The workshop concluded with a planning session that identified the following needs: (1) national and international intercomparisons of techniques for measuring radon and radon daughter concentrations, working level and radon exhalation flux density; (2) development and refinement of practical measurement techniques for thoron and its daughter products; (3) quantitative definition of the sources of indoor radon and the mechanisms of transport into structures; (4) better knowledge of the physical properties of radon daughters; (5) more complete and accurate data on the population exposure to radon, which can only be met by broadly based surveys; and (6) more international cooperation and information exchange among countries with major research programs

  9. The QED Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  10. t4 Workshop Report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  11. Proceedings of Pulsed Magnet Design and Measurement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaftan, T.; Heese, R.; Ozaki,S.

    2010-01-19

    The goals of the Workshop are to assess the design of pulsed system at the NSLS-II and establish mitigation strategies for critical issues during development. The focus of the Workshop is on resolving questions related to the set-up of the pulsed magnet laboratory, on measuring the pulsed magnet's current waveforms and fields, and on achieving tight tolerances on the magnet's alignment and field quality.

  12. The Impact of Self-Regulatory Strategies on the Essay Writing of EFL Students with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Najafi Marboyeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of self-regulatory strategies has been challenging to educational researchers who seek to find proper interventions that benefit students and teachers. This study has employed the Self-Regulatory Strategy Development (SRSD model of instruction to help students monitor, evaluate and revise their writing. SRSD would be beneficial for adult students with learning disabilities in the procedure of essay writing. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD as a cognitive-behavioral dysregulation is a consequence of deficits in self-regulatory process. Many students with learning disorders such as ADHD have trouble in the mechanics and process of writing. The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of SRSD on the essay writing of EFL undergraduate students. This study tried to evaluate the effects of SRSD intervention on the essay writing of ADHD and NON-ADHD students. To fulfill the mentioned objectives, 126 EFL undergraduate students who enrolled in essay writing course at Tehran Azad University participated in this study. The results indicated that SRSD instruction had a significant effect on the essay writing of the EFL undergraduate students. Likewise, ADHD students could achieve a significant improvement after receiving SRSD intervention. چکیده: پیچیدگی روش های خود تنظیمی برای محققین حوزه آموزش معمولا چالش برانگیز بوده است و آنها همیشه سعی در یافتن روش مناسبی برای دانشجویان و اساتید در این زمینه داشته اند. این تحقیق از روش "استراتژی های ایجاد خود تنظیمی" برای کمک به دانشجویان در زمینه های مشاهده، ارزیابی و تجدیدنظر بهره برده است. "استراتژی های ایجاد خود تنظیمی" برای دانشجویانی که در زمینه نگارش مشکل دارند مفید خواهد

  13. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  14. WALLTURB International Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This book brings together selected contributions from the WALLTURB workshop on ”Understanding and modelling of wall turbulence” held in Lille, France, on April 21st to 23rd 2009. This workshop was organized by the WALLTURB consortium, in order to present to the relevant scientific community the main results of the project and to stimulate scientific discussions around the subject of wall turbulence. The workshop reviewed the recent progress in theoretical, experimental and numerical approaches to wall turbulence. The problems of zero pressure gradient, adverse pressure gradient and separating turbulent boundary layers were addressed in detail with the three approaches, using the most advanced tools. This book is a milestone in the research field, thanks to the high level of the invited speakers and the involvement of the contributors and a testimony of the achievement of the WALLTURB project.

  15. Vulcano Workshop 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Mannocchi, G.; Morselli, A.; Trinchero, G.

    2016-01-01

    We announce the XVI Vulcano Workshop, which will be held from May 22nd to May 28th, 2016 in the Vulcano Island (Sicily, Italy). As in the past editions, the workshop will aim to gather people from High Energy Astrophysics and Particle Physics to discuss the most recent highlights in these fields. The workshop will cover the following topics: Astrophysics/Cosmology, Astrophysics/Gravity, Dark Matter, Particle Physics, Cosmic Rays, Gamma/Neutrino Astronomy, Neutrinos and Future Prospects. The scientific program will include several 30-minute review talks, to introduce the current problems, and 20-minute talks, giving new experimental and theoretical results. The participation is by invitation and limited to 80 people.

  16. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  17. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-01-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  18. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Diagnostic Imaging Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Fisica Medica

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) and the Argentina Society of Medical Physics (SAFIM) was organized the Diagnostic Imaging Workshop 2012, in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This workshop was an oriented training and scientific exchange between professionals and technicians who work in medical physics, especially in the areas of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, with special emphasis on the use of multimodal imaging for radiation treatment, planning as well of quality assurance associates.

  20. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keckler, C.R.; Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report

  1. DESY: QCD workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, Gunnar

    1994-01-01

    The traditional annual DESY Theory Workshop highlights a topical theory sector. The most recent was under the motto 'Quantum Chromo-Dynamics' - QCD, the field theory of quarks and gluons. The organizers had arranged a programme covering most aspects of current QCD research. This time the workshop was followed by a topical meeting on 'QCD at HERA' to look at the electron-proton scattering experiments now in operation at DESY's new HERA collider

  2. IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose of providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The IOGCC and DOE staff worked with key state and industry representatives to develop a list of appropriate regulatory and industry representatives to be invited to participate. These same industry and regulatory representatives also provided a prioritized list of topics to be discussed at this workshop. After the topic leader set out the issue, views of those present were solicited. In almost every case, both the industry representatives and the regulatory personnel spoke with candor in discussing the problems. Common points of discussion for each topic were: (1) conflicting state and federal regulations; (2) conflicting regulations or permit requirements established by different state agencies; (3) increasing compliance costs; and (4) regulatory constraints that will result in ''no net growth'' in California oil and gas production and more likely a net decrease. This report contains a copy of the written presentation for each topic as well as a summary of the participants discussion

  3. Transactions of the criticality alarm systems workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The first Criticality Alarm workshop was held by the US Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office in 1985. This second workshop is the first held on an international level. There were 98 persons in attendance. They represented the Department of Energy (DOE) field offices, DOE contractors, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC licensees, and agencies in the United Kingdom, France, West Germany, and Japan. Topics were on practices experience, and development. A key value of the workshop was the sharing of critical alarm system experiences, problems, and advances in the state of the art. In addition, several Criticality Alarm Systems (CAS) equipment systems were exhibited. Papers were presented on: nature of criticality accidents; lessons learned from past accidents; application of ANS 8.3 standard; gamma and neutron detection systems; research and development in progress; testing at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos; methods used to place detectors; centralized readout feature; false alarms; trip-point settings; and testing and maintenance. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  4. Bioprocessing automation in cell therapy manufacturing: Outcomes of special interest group automation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Oliver; Robinson, Sarah; Bure, Kim; Brindley, David A; Mccall, David

    2018-04-01

    Phacilitate held a Special Interest Group workshop event in Edinburgh, UK, in May 2017. The event brought together leading stakeholders in the cell therapy bioprocessing field to identify present and future challenges and propose potential solutions to automation in cell therapy bioprocessing. Here, we review and summarize discussions from the event. Deep biological understanding of a product, its mechanism of action and indication pathogenesis underpin many factors relating to bioprocessing and automation. To fully exploit the opportunities of bioprocess automation, therapeutics developers must closely consider whether an automation strategy is applicable, how to design an 'automatable' bioprocess and how to implement process modifications with minimal disruption. Major decisions around bioprocess automation strategy should involve all relevant stakeholders; communication between technical and business strategy decision-makers is of particular importance. Developers should leverage automation to implement in-process testing, in turn applicable to process optimization, quality assurance (QA)/ quality control (QC), batch failure control, adaptive manufacturing and regulatory demands, but a lack of precedent and technical opportunities can complicate such efforts. Sparse standardization across product characterization, hardware components and software platforms is perceived to complicate efforts to implement automation. The use of advanced algorithmic approaches such as machine learning may have application to bioprocess and supply chain optimization. Automation can substantially de-risk the wider supply chain, including tracking and traceability, cryopreservation and thawing and logistics. The regulatory implications of automation are currently unclear because few hardware options exist and novel solutions require case-by-case validation, but automation can present attractive regulatory incentives. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy

  5. Scenario Development Workshop Synopsis. Integration Group for the Safety Case - June 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Paul; Voinis, Sylvie; Griffault, Lise; De Meredieu, Jean; Kwong, Gloria; ); Van Luik, Abraham; Bailey, Lucy; Capouet, Manuel; Depaus, Christophe; Makino, Hitoshi; Leigh, Christi; Kirkes, Ross; Leino, Jaakko; Niemeyer, Matthias; Wolf, Jens; Watson, Sarah; Franke, Bettina; Ilett, Doug; Pastina, Barbara; Weetjens, Eef

    2016-03-01

    Scenario development and selection describes the collection and organisation of the scientific and technical information relevant to the potential paths of evolution of a radioactive waste disposal facility (repository) that is necessary to assess its long-term performance and safety. In 1999, the NEA held its first workshop on scenario development in Madrid, Spain, with the objective to review the methods for developing scenarios in safety assessments and their application. Since then, the process of scenario development and analysis for the disposal of radioactive waste has changed and, in 2015, the NEA Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) held a second workshop on this topic at its offices in Paris to further evaluate the experience acquired in developing scenarios since 1999. To prepare for this workshop, the IGSC also launched a survey in 2014 to gather the latest scenario development and uncertainty management strategies used in IGSC member countries. The purposes of the workshop were to (i) provide a forum to review and discuss methods for scenario development and their contribution to the development of recent safety cases (since the 1999 workshop); (ii) examine the latest methods and compare their scope, consistency and function within the overall safety assessment process, based on practical experience of applications; and (iii) provide a basis for producing the present report summarising the current status of scenario methodologies, identifying where sufficient methods exist and any outstanding problem areas. This report provides an overview of the state of the art in scenario development related to the long-term safety of geological repositories for radioactive waste. In particular, it discusses how potential scenarios are developed in safety assessments of radioactive waste that contains long-lived radionuclides. Safety assessment is the process of quantitatively and qualitatively evaluating the safety of a repository, often in support of a

  6. Recent advances in the dissection of drought-stress regulatory networks and strategies for development of drought-tolerant transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaka, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Advances have been made in the development of drought-tolerant transgenic plants, including cereals. Rice, one of the most important cereals, is considered to be a critical target for improving drought tolerance, as present-day rice cultivation requires large quantities of water and as drought-tolerant rice plants should be able to grow in small amounts of water. Numerous transgenic rice plants showing enhanced drought tolerance have been developed to date. Such genetically engineered plants have generally been developed using genes encoding proteins that control drought regulatory networks. These proteins include transcription factors, protein kinases, receptor-like kinases, enzymes related to osmoprotectant or plant hormone synthesis, and other regulatory or functional proteins. Of the drought-tolerant transgenic rice plants described in this review, approximately one-third show decreased plant height under non-stressed conditions or in response to abscisic acid treatment. In cereal crops, plant height is a very important agronomic trait directly affecting yield, although the improvement of lodging resistance should also be taken into consideration. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of plant growth reduction under drought stress conditions holds promise for developing transgenic plants that produce high yields under drought stress conditions. Plant growth rates are reduced more rapidly than photosynthetic activity under drought conditions, implying that plants actively reduce growth in response to drought stress. In this review, we summarize studies on molecular regulatory networks involved in response to drought stress. In a separate section, we highlight progress in the development of transgenic drought-tolerant rice plants, with special attention paid to field trial investigations.

  7. Executive summary. Summary of the workshop sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The workshop played a great role in sharing the current state-of-the art on the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) of new and advanced reactors, and points of interest among member countries. The major concern expressed by the participants included passive safety system reliability, digital system reliability, new and advanced reactors-specific risk assessment methodology and relevant computational tool, and safety-security interface, etc). Main findings obtained from the workshop are as follows. For new reactors, the role of PSA is more important and more formalized comparing with exiting reactors. The PSAs are being used in the design of new reactors for purposes such as balance between accident prevention and mitigation features of the design, demonstration of safety, identification of design vulnerabilities and improvements, and comparison with the risk of existing plants, etc. For advanced reactors, the role of PSA is also being regarded as an essential tool for safety improvement and comparison of reactor designs at the conceptual or preliminary stages, but their practical use is at the early stage to gain the insights of risk into these reactors. This is due to the fact that the use of PSA for advanced reactors is mainly focused on identifying the PSA issues for designer and regulatory bodies, and developing the relevant methodologies and tools. Better guidance and peer review process on the PSA of new and advanced reactors was identified by both industry and regulatory as an important aspect

  8. Background to the workshop: purpose and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    In its report on future regulatory challenges, CNRA identified the human element as one of the most critical aspects of maintaining regulatory effectiveness, efficiency and quality of work. There is a need to preserve among the staff a collective knowledge in all relevant technical disciplines with sufficient depth to permit adequate independent assessment of safety issues. Quality organisations require well educated well trained and well motivated staff. In some countries national R and D programmes are being replaced to such a point that forming an independent regulatory position might be in jeopardy. If a significant problem occurred over the next ten years there might not be sufficient knowledge and capability to deal with it in a timely manner if the current trend continues. It is against this background that CNRA recommended this workshop should be organised to consider these human issues in relation to maintaining corporate knowledge, both within the industry and regulatory bodies. This is a complex issue as there are different circumstances in each country arising from the status of the industry and its economic and political interactions. A simple model for considering these interactions is set out in Figure 1. (author)

  9. Regulatory aspects of mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.R.; Orlando, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed waste is waste that satisfies the definition of low-level radioactive waste in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) and contains hazardous waste that is either: (1) listed as a hazardous waste in 40 CFR 261, Subpart D; or (2) causes the waste to exhibit any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR 261, Subpart C. Low-level radioactive waste is defined in the LLRWPAA as radioactive material that is not high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or byproduct material, as defined in Section 11e(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and is classified as low-level waste by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses dual regulatory (NRC and Environmental Protection Agency) responsibility, overview of joint NRC/EPA guidance, workshops, national mixed waste survey, and principal mixed waste uncertainties

  10. Summary of cosmology workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in quality, quantity, and the scope of cosmological observations. While the ob- ... In this article, I summarize both the oral and poster presentations made at the workshop. ... the angular spectrum of CMB anisotropy with recent measurements of the power spectrum of ..... A thermodynamical treatment within the framework of.

  11. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  12. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  13. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  14. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  15. WORKSHOP: Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheepard, Jim; Van Dyck, Olin

    1985-06-15

    A workshop 'Dirac Approaches t o Nuclear Physics' was held at Los Alamos from 31 January to 2 February, the first meeting ever on relativistic models of nuclear phenomena. The objective was to cover historical background as well as the most recent developments in the field, and communication between theorists and experimentalists was given a high priority.

  16. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  17. General conclusions on workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustand, H.

    2006-01-01

    The author proposes a general conclusion on the second workshop on the indemnification of damage in the event of a nuclear accident, organized in Bratislava, the 18-20 May 2005. He pointed out the most important discussions and the results revealed during these two days. (A.L.B.)

  18. WORKSHOP: Scintillating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-12-15

    Scintillating crystals are one of the big spinoff success stories of particle physics, and from 22-26 September an international workshop in Chamonix in the French Alps looked at the increasing role of these materials in pure and applied science and in industry.

  19. ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Capeans, M.

    Starting on 17th May, the ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop was organised by Ken MacFarlane and his team at Hampton University, Virginia, USA. During a welcome break in the very dense workshop programme, the group enjoyed a half-day long boat trip along the waterways, offering a first-hand look at the history and heritage of this part of America. The attendance during the six-day workshop was about 50 people representing most of the collaborating institutes, although many Russian colleagues had stayed in their institutes to pursue the start-up of end-cap wheel production at PNPI and DUBNA. The meeting clearly showed that, during the year 2002, the TRT community is focusing on final design issues and module/wheel construction, while moving at the same time towards acceptance testing and integration, including the front-end electronics. The two main topics treated at the workshop were the preparation for beginning full production of the FE electronics, and the wire-joint problem that the US barrel colleagues have been fa...

  20. WORKSHOP: Scintillating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillating crystals are one of the big spinoff success stories of particle physics, and from 22-26 September an international workshop in Chamonix in the French Alps looked at the increasing role of these materials in pure and applied science and in industry

  1. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  2. Conferences, workshops, trainings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goals Recycling Green Purchasing Pollution Prevention Reusing Water Resources Environmental Management . Mar 1 Wed 8:00 AM Cosmic Rays, Pulsar Nebulae and Dark Matter La Fonda Hotel, Santa Fe, NM The purpose Quantum Matter La Fonda Hotel - 100 East San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, NM The purpose of this workshop

  3. YOUR house - workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Exhibition shows the result of a three-week workshop for 3.year students from the Architecture school in which I wanted to test the idea that good architecture is a balanced work between the non-reflective life experience of space and materiality (all the things you know and feel subconsciously a...

  4. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  5. DNA Microarray Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauro, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    .... Funding for the workshop was provided by the US Department of Defense (USAMRAA). The aim of the meeting was to discuss how to best use the data derived from the Malaria Genome Sequencing Project for the functional analysis of the genome...

  6. FINPIE/97. Workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This publication contains the proceedings of 1997 Finnish Workshop on Power and Industrial Electronics, held in Espoo, Finland, on 26 August, 1997. The programme consisted of technical sessions on Advanced AC Motor Control, Electric Machines and Drives, Advanced Control and Measurement, Power Electronics Systems, Modelling and Simulation, and Power Converters

  7. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  8. 8. stellarator workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The technical reports in this collection of papers were presented at the 8th International Workshop on Stellarators, and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting. They include presentations on transport, magnetic configurations, fluctuations, equilibrium, stability, edge plasma and wall aspects, heating, diagnostics, new concepts and reactor studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. "I Should Remember I Don't Want to become Fat": Adolescents' Views on Self-Regulatory Strategies for Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stok, F. Marijn; de Vet, Emely; de Ridder, Denise T. D.; de Wit, John B. F.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the strategies adolescents identify to self-regulate eating behavior. Aiming to address this gap in the literature, the current article describes a bottom-up investigation of strategies adolescents identify for the successful self-regulation of eating behavior. Sixty-two adolescents generated statements about…

  10. Workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses organized and hosted a workshop on ''Rock Mechanics Issues in Repository Design and Performance Assessment'' on behalf its sponsor the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop was held on September 19- 20, 1994 at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, Rockville, Maryland. The objectives of the workshop were to stimulate exchange of technical information among parties actively investigating rock mechanics issues relevant to the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain and identify/confirm rock mechanics issues important to repository design and performance assessment The workshop contained three technical sessions and two panel discussions. The participants included technical and research staffs representing the NRC and the Department of Energy and their contractors, as well as researchers from the academic, commercial, and international technical communities. These proceedings include most of the technical papers presented in the technical sessions and the transcripts for the two panel discussions

  11. Proceedings of the advisory committee on reactor safeguards workshop on future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    This report contains the information presented at the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Workshop on Future Reactors held at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, on June 4-5, 2001. Included are the subject matter summaries, followed by the presentation material and selected participants discussions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to identify the regulatory challenges associated with future reactor designs. A list of such challenges was developed from the workshop notes, the various presentations, the panel discussions and the question and answer sessions. This list is included in the Introduction section of this document. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final workshop agenda

  12. Proceedings of the advisory committee on reactor safeguards workshop on future reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    This report contains the information presented at the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Workshop on Future Reactors held at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, on June 4-5, 2001. Included are the subject matter summaries, followed by the presentation material and selected participants discussions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to identify the regulatory challenges associated with future reactor designs. A list of such challenges was developed from the workshop notes, the various presentations, the panel discussions and the question and answer sessions. This list is included in the Introduction section of this document. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final workshop agenda.

  13. Minutes of the workshop on off-site release criteria for contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.N.

    1989-11-01

    A one and one-half-day workshop was held May 2-3, 1989, at the Pollard Auditorium in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with the objective of formulating a strategy for developing reasonable and uniform criteria for releasing radioactively contaminated materials from the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This report contains the minutes of the workshop. At the conclusion of the workshop, a plan was formulated to facilitate the development of the above-mentioned off-site release criteria

  14. Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on information management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, K.A.

    1992-03-01

    As a practical result of this workshop it is expected that the possibilities for the acquisition of information become more transparent. From the point of view of the authorities this would be of special interest in the field of safety evaluations, on the regulatory level, and for the work of the press and public relations. The wish has been fulfilled to invite to this workshop the information experts competent in the specialist area. This means that at the end of this workshop a qualified survey over existing information sources will be available. All this is of vital importance for effective information management of the topic areas of nuclear safety, radiation protection and environmental protection. (orig./DG)

  15. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    , and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learning through video conferencing. Through analysis and discussion of these studies’ findings, we argue......This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice...... that workshops provide a platform that can aid researchers in identifying and exploring relevant factors in a given domain by providing means for understanding complex work and knowledge processes that are supported by technology (for example, e-learning). The approach supports identifying factors...

  16. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuykendall, Tommie G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allsop, Jacob Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boumedine, Marc [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carter, Cedric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galvin, Seanmichael Yurko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Oscar [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Wellington K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Han Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, Tyler Jake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nauer, Kevin S.; Potts, Beth A.; Ta, Kim Thanh; Trasti, Jennifer; White, David R.

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses are designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.

  17. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  18. Regulatory Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.; Vetterlein, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory governance frameworks have become essential building blocks of world society. From supply chains to the regimes surrounding international organizations, extensive governance frameworks have emerged which structure and channel a variety of social exchanges, including economic, political...... by the International Transitional Administrations (ITAs) in Kosovo and Iraq as well as global supply chains and their impact on the garment industry in Bangladesh....

  19. Third EC/ISOE workshop on occupational exposure management at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, Mike; Morris, Simon

    2002-01-01

    The third workshop was jointly sponsored by the IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. It was organised by the European Commission Directorate-General for the Environment, Nuclear Safety and Civil Protection and the ISOE European Regional Technical Centre. The workshop provided a forum for Health Physics practitioners and operators to exchange information and experience on occupational exposure issues at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). There were approximately 130 participants of whom 63% were from utilities, 11% from contractors and 26% from regulatory bodies

  20. Proceedings: 20th Steam Generator NDE Workshop: Orlando, Florida, July 9-11, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 2001 workshop took place in Orlando, Florida, from July 9 to 11, 2001. It covered one full day and two half-days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, NSSS vendors, NDE service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE issues and means for their resolution

  1. First Canadian workshop on engineering structural integrity : CWESI. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The First Canadian Workshop on Engineering Structural Integrity (CWESI) was held on October 16 and 17, 2002, in Toronto, Canada. The purpose of the Workshop was to review strategies for ESI in a number of key industries, and to attempt to plot a course for co-operation in ESI activities and implementation of ESI initiatives in Canadian industry, together with support for appropriate educational, research and development activities. The Workshop consisted of presentations by speakers from a number of industries. Presentations focused on in-service experience under service conditions related to the Canadian environment. This Workshop was attended by practising structural integrity engineers, managers with the responsibility for delivery of safe and reliable operation, and researchers in the structural integrity area

  2. FORATOM - IAEA Workshop, Mamaia 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Nicolai

    2006-01-01

    The FORATOM Workshop was organized on May 16-19, 2006 by IAEA and FORATOM in the frame of common actions of experience exchange planned to take place every 18 months. At the same time at Mamaia, Romania, a meeting of the Business Excellence FORATOM group took place in which the Romanian organization ROMATOM is represented by the author of the paper from behalf of the Quality Management Group. Romanian Atomic Forum, ROMATOM as a member of European Atomic Forum, FORATOM, plays an active role in nuclear field in Romania. The Business Excellence Working Group, as the most active group in FORATOM, has the following objectives: - to promote and support the safe and effective performance of nuclear facilities to encourage the common of high level business standards; - to support FORATOM to enable decision makers and the public at large to get informed; - to facilities the exchange of best practices for management systems in order to raise the level of awareness and understanding so that members can better support the improvement within the member organizations, the other nuclear facilities in the BEx -WG member countries, the regular organization in the member countries, and international organizations active in the same fields of interest; - to provide a focus for influencing the development and harmonization of nuclear industry standards and practices to achieve improved business effectiveness and quality and safety management of nuclear facilities; - to advise FORATOM on management system issues. The FORATOM Workshop organized at Mamaia was held under the topics 'Successful Management of Organizational Change'. Three key issues for debate were established as follows: - key issue 1, effective handling of organizational change: drivers for change; managing change: the IAEA perspective; managing change within a utility; managing outsourcing; - key issue 2, organizational culture and safety culture: management systems and safety culture; proactive management; developing

  3. Proceedings of the CNRA/CSNI workshop on steam generator tube integrity in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the workshop was to provide a working forum for the exchange of information by contributing experts on current issues related to PWR steam generator tube integrity. One hundred persons from 15 countries attended the workshop, including 36 from regulatory and nuclear policy agencies, 28 from research and development laboratories, 18 from nuclear vendors and consulting firms, and 18 from electrical utilities. The workshop opened with a plenary session; the first part of the session covered international steam generator regulatory practices and issues, featuring speakers from regulatory bodies in Belgium, France, Japan, Spain, and the US. In Part 2 of the plenary session, comprehensive technical overviews on steam generator tubing degradation, inspection, and integrity were presented by authorities in these fields from the US, France, and Belgium. Parallel working sessions on the second and third days of the workshop then developed findings and recommendations in the areas of (1) tubing degradation, (2) tubing inspection, (3) tubing integrity, (4) preventative and corrective measures, and (5) operational aspects and risk analysis. On the final day of the workshop, the working-session facilitators presented summaries of their sessions to the workshop attendees. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Proceedings of the CNRA/CSNI workshop on steam generator tube integrity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the workshop was to provide a working forum for the exchange of information by contributing experts on current issues related to PWR steam generator tube integrity. One hundred persons from 15 countries attended the workshop, including 36 from regulatory and nuclear policy agencies, 28 from research and development laboratories, 18 from nuclear vendors and consulting firms, and 18 from electrical utilities. The workshop opened with a plenary session; the first part of the session covered international steam generator regulatory practices and issues, featuring speakers from regulatory bodies in Belgium, France, Japan, Spain, and the US. In Part 2 of the plenary session, comprehensive technical overviews on steam generator tubing degradation, inspection, and integrity were presented by authorities in these fields from the US, France, and Belgium. Parallel working sessions on the second and third days of the workshop then developed findings and recommendations in the areas of (1) tubing degradation, (2) tubing inspection, (3) tubing integrity, (4) preventative and corrective measures, and (5) operational aspects and risk analysis. On the final day of the workshop, the working-session facilitators presented summaries of their sessions to the workshop attendees. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  5. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Straelberg, E.; Klemola, S.; Nielsen, Sven P.; Palsson, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  6. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  7. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  8. Accelerator reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, L; Duru, Ph; Koch, J M; Revol, J L; Van Vaerenbergh, P; Volpe, A M; Clugnet, K; Dely, A; Goodhew, D

    2002-07-01

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop.

  9. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  10. Accelerator reliability workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.; Duru, Ph.; Koch, J.M.; Revol, J.L.; Van Vaerenbergh, P.; Volpe, A.M.; Clugnet, K.; Dely, A.; Goodhew, D.

    2002-01-01

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop

  11. Spiral 2 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop

  12. ARCSACC '99: Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahir, M.; Biggar, K.

    1999-01-01

    The assessment and remediation of contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments is an area of increasing concern, primarily because of the unique problems associated with northern regions. Not only the obvious effects of the cold temperatures on the operation of many systems, but also remedial effectiveness of measures under extreme cold conditions are of interest. Accordingly, this workshop was organized to provide a means of exchange of information among people responsible for cleaning-up contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments, researchers, and providers of remediation services with experience in dealing with such conditions. Speakers at the workshop addressed problems concerning risk assessment and site characterization, contaminant migration in permafrost, contamination caused by mining and associated clean-up problems, assessed bioremediation as a means of contaminant control, reviewed various remediation technologies and techniques, and presented a number of bioremediation case studies. refs., tabs., figs

  13. MATHEON Workshop 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Calderbank, Robert; Kutyniok, Gitta; Vybíral, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Since publication of the initial papers in 2006, compressed sensing has captured the imagination of the international signal processing community, and the mathematical foundations are nowadays quite well understood. Parallel to the progress in mathematics, the potential applications of compressed sensing have been explored by many international groups of, in particular, engineers and applied mathematicians, achieving very promising advances in various areas such as communication theory, imaging sciences, optics, radar technology, sensor networks, or tomography. Since many applications have reached a mature state, the research center MATHEON in Berlin focusing on "Mathematics for Key Technologies", invited leading researchers on applications of compressed sensing from mathematics, computer science, and engineering to the "MATHEON Workshop 2013: Compressed Sensing and its Applications” in December 2013. It was the first workshop specifically focusing on the applications of compressed sensing. This book featur...

  14. Workshop on decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.

    2005-12-01

    A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

  15. Solar workshops financial incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Ten one-day workshops were held across the United States. Information in this workbook is compiled in conjunction with those workshops. The following discussions are included: solar as a fuel (history); why alternative fuels are being sought today; the need for conservation; advantages of solar energy; the potential of solar energy; why solar energy is not more widely used; a definition of solar; how solar can help meet energy demands; Federal policies and programs; what solar technologies exist today that can be effectively utilized (thermal applications, fuels from biomass, solar electric). Additional information is presented in three attachments: Energy-Conserving Methods; Domestic Policy Review of Solar Energy; and DOE Secretary's Annual Report to Congress-Solar Section. (MCW)

  16. Synopsis of an oil spill modeling workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnigan, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The performance quality of various PC-based numerical spill models available on the market, were evaluated in a special spill modeling workshop. The models examined included OSSM/ADIOS, WOSM, OILMAP, SPILLSIM, and COZOIL. It was found that most oil spill trajectory models are based on the same basic trajectory and fates algorithms, but often provide different results. This anomaly was attributed to variations in how the algorithms are programmed and implemented. The lack of uniformity of predictions has contributed to a lack of faith in model results by local authorities, spill response operators and logistics groups. Some of the criticism levelled against the merits of the different spill models was considered unjustified by workshop participants. A list of 'best practices' for modeling/response strategies was compiled, and steps to be taken to minimize the variations in spill trajectory and weathering forecasts that would likely improve the usefulness of the models were identified. 15 refs., 4 figs

  17. RADIOFREQUENCY SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency is already playing an important role in the beam acceleration system for the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and new such systems are being prepared for other major machines. Thus the fourth Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity, organized by KEK under the chairmanship of local specialist Yuzo Kojima and held just before the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators, had much progress to review and even more to look forward to

  18. Workshop UNK-600 (proceedings)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, A.M.; Bitykov, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    Proceedings are presented of the workshop devoted to the accelerating storage complex of IHEP (UNK-600). In the first section is given the information on the present status of the UNK-600 and particle channels design and on the adopted experiment NEPTUN-A. In the papers of the second section are discussed hadron physics investigations at 600 GeV. Experiments in the neutrino and muon beams are analyzed. A possible program of studying the charged kaon rare decays is described

  19. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    At the experimental halls workshop, discussions were held on: (1) open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) the needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) the hall for the lepton detector; and (4) the hall for the hadron spectrometer. The value of different possibilities for the future experimental program was explored. A number of suggestions emerged which will be used as the design of the experimental halls progresses

  20. WORKSHOP: Let's twist again..

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobos Baillie, Orlando

    1988-12-15

    In the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) candidate theory of interquark forces, calculations involve summing the effects from many different possible quark/gluon interactions. In addition to the 'leading term' frequently used as the basis for QCD calculations, additional contributions — so-called 'higher twists' — are modulated by powers of kinematical factors. An illuminating international workshop to discuss higher twist QCD was held at the College de France, Paris, from 21-23 September.

  1. DESY Theory Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Held during the 'Festwoche' which marked the 25th anniversary of the German DESY Laboratory last year, the traditional DESY Theory Workshop concentrated on weak interactions of heavy quarks and on non-standard models for weak interactions, together with a progress report on lattice gauge theories with fermions. The organizing committee had invited eleven lecturers to present experiments and theoretical ideas in these fields. Also many short communications contributed interesting material

  2. Imaging sciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. International Social Pharmacy Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Cordina, Maria; Journal of the Malta College of Pharmacy Practice Editorial Board

    2003-01-01

    The Malta College of Pharmacy Practice, will be hosting the 13th International Social Pharmacy Workshop next summer. The concept of social pharmacy is very clearly explained in the article by Professor Ellen West Sørensen and colleagues, who are considered to be pioneers in this field. Malta has successfully hosted a number of pharmacy conferences, however this one is somewhat different and rather special.

  4. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators.

  5. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators

  6. Regulatory control of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to support IAEA training courses and workshops in the field of regulatory control of nuclear power plants as well as to support the regulatory bodies of Member States in their own training activities. The target group is the professional staff members of nuclear safety regulatory bodies supervising nuclear power plants and having duties and responsibilities in the following regulatory fields: regulatory framework; regulatory organization; regulatory guidance; licensing and licensing documents; assessment of safety; and regulatory inspection and enforcement. Important topics such as regulatory competence and quality of regulatory work as well as emergency preparedness and public communication are also covered. The book also presents the key issues of nuclear safety such as 'defence-in-depth' and safety culture and explains how these should be taken into account in regulatory work, e.g. during safety assessment and regulatory inspection. The book also reflects how nuclear safety has been developed during the years on the basis of operating experience feedback and results of safety research by giving topical examples. The examples cover development of operating procedures and accident management to cope with complicated incidents and severe accidents to stress the importance of regulatory role in nuclear safety research. The main target group is new staff members of regulatory bodies, but the book also offers good examples for more experienced inspectors to be used as comparison and discussion basis in internal workshops organized by the regulatory bodies for refreshing and continuing training. The book was originally compiled on the basis of presentations provided during the two regulatory control training courses in 1997 and 1998. The textbook was reviewed at the beginning of the years 2000 and 2002 by IAEA staff members and consistency with the latest revisions of safety standards have been ensured. The textbook was completed in the

  7. Auroral Tomography Workshop, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, Aa.

    1993-08-01

    In ionospheric and atmospheric physics the importance of multi-station imaging has grown as a consequence of the availability of scientific grade CCD cameras with digital output and affordable massive computing power. Tomographic inversion techniques are used in many different areas, e.g. medicine, plasma research and space physics. The tomography workshop was announced to gather a limited group of people interested in auroral tomography or tomographic inversion methods in general. ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System) is a multi-station ground-based system developed primarily for three-dimensional auroral imaging, however other non-auroral objects can be studied with ALIS, e.g. stratospheric clouds. Several of the contributions in the workshop dealt with problems related to geometries similar to the ALIS-configuration. The Proceedings contain written contributions received either in abstract form or as full papers. The Proceedings also contain contributions intended for the Workshop but not presented due to the absence of the speaker. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 of the 17 papers

  8. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2005-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses, classes for undergraduate majors, and High Schools. Here we briefly describe a few of the more popular tools. The Life of the Sun (New!): The history of the Sun is animated as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve in time. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbital motions of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country of impact (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by a NASA EPO grant.

  9. Grid and Entrepreneurship Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN openlab is organising a special workshop about Grid opportunities for entrepreneurship. This one-day event will provide an overview of what is involved in spin-off technology, with a special reference to the context of computing and data Grids. Lectures by experienced entrepreneurs will introduce the key concepts of entrepreneurship and review, in particular, the industrial potential of EGEE (the EU co-funded Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project, led by CERN). Case studies will be given by CEOs of European start-ups already active in the Grid and computing cluster area, and regional experts will provide an overview of efforts in several European regions to stimulate entrepreneurship. This workshop is designed to encourage students and researchers involved or interested in Grid technology to consider the entrepreneurial opportunities that this technology may create in the coming years. This workshop is organized as part of the CERN openlab student programme, which is co-sponsored by CERN, HP, ...

  10. The ROS Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Francis, D.

    The first week of February saw the taking place of the ReadOut Subsystem (ROS) workshop. The ROS is the subsystem of the Trigger, DAQ & DCS project which receives and buffers data from the detector ReadOut Drivers (RODs). On request it then provides a subset of this buffered data, the so-called Regions of Interest (RoI), to the Level 2 trigger. Using the subsequent Level 2 trigger decision, the ROS either removes the buffered event data from its buffers or sends the full event data to the Event Filter for further processing. The workshop took place over a four-day period at a location in the Jura. The average daily attendance was twenty people, which mainly represented the five main ATLAS institutes currently engaged in this Trigger, DAQ & DCS activity. The aim of the workshop was to bring to an end the current prototyping activities in this area and launch the next, final, phase of prototyping. This new phase of prototyping will build on the successful activities of the previous phase and will focus...

  11. Bridging content and EFL: a one-day ESP workshop for flight instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This workshop allows an ESP provider with limited specialized knowledge in the field of aviation to train English-speaking flight instructors in basic EFL communication strategies. While the present workshop is based on a Canadian model of flight instruction, it can be easily adapted to other jurisdictions

  12. Planetarium Educator's Workshop Guide. International Planetarium Society Special Report No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alan; And Others

    Presented is a workshop guide for planetarium educators. Seven modules and four appendices focus on organizational patterns, learning theories, questioning strategies, activities for the planetarium, and incorporating all of the above into teaching. The four appendices include a list of the 1978 workshop participants, an annotated bibliography for…

  13. Outcomes assessment of dental hygiene clinical teaching workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Juanita S; Infante, Taline D

    2008-10-01

    Faculty development courses related to acquiring clinical teaching skills in the health professions are limited. Consequently, the Department of Dental Hygiene at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio conducted a series of clinical teaching workshops to address clinical teaching methodology. The goal of these workshops was to promote a problem-solving learning atmosphere for dental hygiene faculty to acquire and share sound clinical teaching strategies. To determine the value of the annual workshops on clinical teaching and evaluation, a web-based qualitative program assessment was developed using software by Survey Tracker. Four open-ended questions were designed to elicit perceptions regarding what significant changes in teaching strategies were achieved, what barriers or challenges were encountered in making these changes, and what strategies were used to overcome the barriers. The assessment was sent to dental hygiene educators representing thirty-eight dental hygiene programs who had participated in two or more of these workshops. Twenty-eight programs provided collective responses to the questions, and the narrative data were analyzed, using a qualitative methodology. Responses revealed that programs had made productive changes to their clinical education curricula and the information gained from the workshops had a positive effect on clinical teaching.

  14. Proceedings of the Radon national action plan workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, Pierre-Franck; Godet, Jean-Luc; Tirmarche, Margot; Strand, Per; Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Dysvik, Solveig; Skjold, Anne Marit; Vallet, Benoit; Van Deventer, Emilie; Colgan, Tony; ); Mundigl, Stefan; ); Magnusson, S.; Long, Bill; McBurney, Ruth; Thompson, P.A; Pollard, David; Fenton, David; Long, Stephanie; Dehandschutter, Boris; Murith, Christophe; Skeppstroem, Kirlna; Petrova, Karla; Davidkova, Jana; Pravdova, Eva; Kiselev, Sergey; Mc Coll, Neil; Vallet, Jeremie; Rannou, Alain; Kurttio, Paivi; Martinsen, Finn; Roulet, Claude-Alain; Goyette, Joelle; Frutos, Borja; Olaya, Manuel; Linares Alemparte, Pilar; Marinko, Janez; Garcia-Talavera, Marta; Pedrazzi, Lisa; Mc Laughlin, James; Gutierrez-Villanueva, Jose-Luis; Janssens, Augustin

    2015-01-01

    Following the publication of the new European Basic Safety Standards Directive (the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM ), published in January 2014, Member States of the European Union have 4 years to incorporate it and to prepare or update their strategy for reducing radon concentration and the associated national radon action plan. Under a joint initiative from ASN and NRPA, 20 European countries, represented by authorities in charge of Radiation Protection, Health, Labour and Housing and Landscaping were brought together during a workshop on national radon action plans. The objective of the workshop, held in ASN's premises, was to share the views and experiences concerning national strategies for reducing radon exposure of the population and associated lung cancer risk. The radon workshop was supported by the World Health Organisation (WHO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Heads of European Radiation protection Control Authorities (HERCA) and the European Commission (EC). Authorities from USA (EPA, CRCPD), Canada (CNSC) and Russia (FMBA) and the European Radon Association (ERA) also participated in the workshop. This radon workshop has offered the opportunity to compare the actions in place or in preparation in different countries aiming at reducing radon exposure in home and dwellings, in buildings with public access (i.e. schools) and in workplaces. Preventive and corrective solutions, associated with incentives and communication to increase the public awareness, as well as education and training actions for different actors concerned, have been presented and discussed. The question about the relative place of regulation in the national strategy has been considered as an important key point. This document brings together the presentations (slides) given at the workshop. The main conclusions of the workshop are presented at the end of the document

  15. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  16. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  17. Canadian Site Visit and Workshop - Summary and International Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The third workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) for three days in Ottawa, following a one-day visit of the Port Hope area which included meetings with community representatives and project managers and a tour of low-level waste management facilities. The Ottawa workshop examined social concerns regarding radioactive waste management: what the concerns are, how they are identified, and how they can be addressed. Sixty-nine people attended the workshop from fourteen countries and forty-five organizations. They ranged from representatives of municipal governments, non-governmental organizations and private citizens to government policy makers, regulators, implementers, consultants and university, social and media researchers. The participants included stakeholders in large-scale industrial projects (both nuclear and nonnuclear) and stakeholders directly affected by nuclear projects. About one half came from FSC member organisations; the remainders were Canadian stakeholders. The workshop was structured with five half-day sessions. The opening half-day described Canadian policy and the regulatory environment for radioactive waste management and the two central case studies for the workshop: the Port Hope Area Initiative and the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act. Three sessions addressed the topics 'What are the social concerns?', 'How to address social concerns?' and 'Development opportunities for communities'. Each of the sessions began with plenary presentations by five stakeholders. These 'stakeholder voices' were followed by roundtable discussions. The participants were divided into eight tables, each including a mix of Canadian and other attendees. Each table discussed a set of pre-defined questions under the direction of a facilitator/Rapporteur. The discussions from each round table were reported in a follow-up plenary. The final half-day of the workshop was

  18. Report of the Orientation Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunez, Heilyn Camacho; Buus, Lillian; Ogange, Betty

    2014-01-01

    This Orientation Workshops is part of MAAGART project. The workshop is divided in three parts: 1) pre-Orientation Workshop stage, 2) Face-to-Face stage and 3) post-Orientation stage. Pre and post stages will be developed online. All the activities will take place in a virtual learning environment...... created for this purpose. Participants will receive all the information about how to access the virtual learning environment (Moodle) prior to the pre-orientation workshop. In this report we cover only the two first stages. Jørgen Bang, as a part of the Community of Practice activity, will be facilitating...

  19. An AHP-based evaluation method for teacher training workshop on information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rochelle Irene; Promentilla, Michael Angelo; Ubando, Aristotle; Tan, Raymond Girard; Aviso, Kathleen; Yu, Krista Danielle

    2017-08-01

    The emergence of information and communication technology (ICT) has created opportunities for enhancing the learning process at different educational levels. However, its potential benefits can only be fully realized if teachers are properly trained to utilize such tools. The rapid evolution of ICT also necessitates rigorous assessment of training programs by participants. Thus, this study proposes an evaluation framework based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to systematically evaluate such workshops designed for teachers. The evaluation model is decomposed hierarchically into four main criteria namely: (1) workshop design, (2) quality of content of the workshop, (3) quality of delivery of the content of the workshop, and the (4) relevance of the workshop. These criteria are further disaggregated into 24 sub-indicators to measure the effectiveness of the workshop as perceived by the participants based on their own expectations. This framework is applied to a case study of ICT workshops done in the Philippines. In this case, relevance of the workshop is found to be the most important main criterion identified by the participants, particularly on the new ICT knowledge that promotes teachers' professional growth and development. The workshop evaluation index (WEI) is also proposed as a metric to support decision-making by providing a mechanism for benchmarking performance, tracking improvement over time, and developing strategies for the design and improvement of training programs or workshops on ICT for teachers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. North Region ROW tool implementation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    Welcome to the North Region ROW Tool Workshop. This workshop is funded under an implementation project sponsored by TxDOTs Research & Technology Implementation Office (RTI). This is the second of four regional workshops being planned for this summ...

  1. Varenna workshop report. Operational earthquake forecasting and decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Marzocchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A workshop on Operational earthquake forecasting and decision making was convened in Varenna, Italy, on June 8-11, 2014, under the sponsorship of the EU FP 7 REAKT (Strategies and tools for Real-time EArthquake risK reducTion project, the Seismic Hazard Center at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. The main goal was to survey the interdisciplinary issues of operational earthquake forecasting (OEF, including the problems that OEF raises for decision making and risk communication. The workshop was attended by 64 researchers from universities, research centers, and governmental institutions in 11 countries. Participants and the workshop agenda are listed in the appendix.The workshop comprised six topical sessions structured around three main themes: the science of operational earthquake forecasting, decision making in a low-probability environment, and communicating hazard and risk. Each topic was introduced by a moderator and surveyed by a few invited speakers, who were then empaneled for an open discussion. The presentations were followed by poster sessions. During a wrap-up session on the last day, the reporters for each topical session summarized the main points that they had gleaned from the talks and open discussions. This report attempts to distill this workshop record into a brief overview of the workshop themes and to describe the range of opinions expressed during the discussions.

  2. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... District Office (DALDO), in collaboration with Oklahoma State University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food...

  3. 75 FR 29775 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...: Institute of Food Science & Engineering, University of Arkansas, 2650 North Young Ave., Fayetteville, AR...

  4. 78 FR 56719 - Challenging Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ...] Challenging Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of Metabolic Diseases... announcing a public workshop entitled ``Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices... registration information on the AGA Web site. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please...

  5. 78 FR 69694 - Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of Obesity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...] Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of Obesity and... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms... information on the AGA Web site. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please contact...

  6. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  7. Magnet failure workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marston, P G [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (U.S.A.); Desportes, H [C.E.N.-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morpurgo, M [C.E.R.N., Geneva (Switzerland); Komarek, P [Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany, FR); Van Hulst, K [University of Nijmegen (The Netherlands); Hackley, D [General Dynamics Convair, San Diego, CA (U.S.A.); Young, J L [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, PE (U.S.A.); Kibbe, K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (U.S.A.)

    1984-01-01

    The dictionary defines failure as nonperformance or an unacceptable want of success. (The definition implies that the results should have been avoided). In an emerging technology such as ours, the boundaries of expectations and ''unacceptable success'' are often ill defined. Failures are often touted as hugh successes (occasionally rightfully so) and exceptional technological achievement can become dismal failure (if expectations are too high). We all, however, have experienced problems of one sort or another and the basic purpose of the workshop was simply to communicate these so that new or future workers don't make the same mistakes.

  8. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  9. WORKSHOP: Thermal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-04-15

    The early history of the Universe is a crucial testing ground for theories of elementary particles. Speculative ideas about the constituents of matter and their interactions are reinforced if they are consistent with what we suppose happened near the beginning of time and discarded if they are not. The cosmological consequences of these theories are usually deduced using a general statistical approach called thermal field theory. Thus, 75 physicists from thirteen countries met in Cleveland, Ohio, last October for the first 'Workshop on Thermal Field Theories and their Applications'.

  10. High Field Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    A Workshop was held in Frascati at the end of September under the title 'Generation of High Fields for Particle Acceleration to Very High Energies'. It was organized by the CERN Accelerator School, the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) and the Italian INFN and was a further stage in the exploratory moves towards new techniques of acceleration. Such techniques might become necessary to respond to the needs of high energy physics some decades from now when the application of conventional techniques will probably have reached their limits.

  11. Magnet failure workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, P.G.; Desportes, H.; Morpurgo, M.; Komarek, P.; Van Hulst, K.; Hackley, D.; Young, J.L.; Kibbe, K.

    1984-01-01

    The dictionary defines failure as nonperformance or an unacceptable want of success. (The definition implies that the results should have been avoided). In an emerging technology such as ours, the boundaries of expectations and ''unacceptable success'' are often ill defined. Failures are often touted as hugh successes (occasionally rightfully so) and exceptional technological achievement can become dismal failure (if expectations are too high). We all, however, have experienced problems of one sort or another and the basic purpose of the workshop was simply to communicate these so that new or future workers don't make the same mistakes

  12. SIMS applications workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The first ANSTO/AINSE SIMS Workshop drew together a mixture of Surface Analysis experts and Surface Analysis users with the concept that SIMS analysis has to be enfolded within the spectrum of surface analysis techniques and that the user should select the technique most applicable to the problem. With this concept in mind the program was structured as sessions on SIMS Facilities; Applications to Mineral Surfaces; Applications to Biological Systems, Applications to Surfaces as Semi- conductors, Catalysts and Surface Coatings; and Applications to Ceramics

  13. Workshop on Cancer Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermorken, A.; Durieux, L.

    1991-01-01

    On April, 22-24 April 1991, the Hungarian National Institute of Oncology and the Commission of the European Communities have organized a workshop on Cancer Research. The aim of the meeting was to provide the participants information on the ongoing research in Hungary and in Member States. The topic is of importance for Hungary and it was also considered that the meeting could contribute to identify subjects of possible collaboration between Hungarian and Member State laboratories in the case financial support would become available. Three papers about new therapies under development were presented proton therapy and Boron neutron capture therapy

  14. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich

  15. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-06-15

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich.

  16. WORKSHOPS: Hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    'Hadron facilities' – high intensity (typically a hundred microamps), medium energy (30-60 GeV) machines producing intense secondary beams of pions, kaons, etc., are being widely touted as a profitable research avenue to supplement what is learned through the thrust for higher and higher energies. This interest was reflected at an International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As well as invited talks describing the various projects being pushed in the US, Europe and Japan, the meeting included working groups covering linacs, beam dynamics, hardware, radiofrequency, polarized beams and experimental facilities

  17. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    On May 26 and 27, 1976, approximately 50 people met for an informal workshop on plans for experimental halls for ISABELLE. Plans as they exist in the May 1976 version of the ISABELLE proposal were presented. Discussions were held on the following four general topics by separate working groups: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer. The planning for experimental halls at PEP, the hall for the lepton detector, the hadron spectrometer, and open areas are discussed

  18. Workshop ''Radiooncology and law''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sack, H.; Deutsch, E.; Sauerwein, W.

    1998-01-01

    From 25 to 27 Sept 1997, a workshop was organized at the Essen Medical School (Universitaetsklinikum Essen), at which radiooncologists and jurists from universities and courts as well as lawyers contributed their views on mutual problems. The following topics were discussed by papers and in round table meetings: 'Requirements on the patient's information', 'definition of therapeutic guidelines - limits of clinical research and standard treatments', 'treatment documentation', 'liability of the physician for treatment faults' and 'technical standard and preserve of quality'. The consensual guidelines to the topics 'patient's information', 'therapeutic guidelines' and 'liability' are presented here. (orig.) [de

  19. Purpose of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the Workshop is to share the experience on emergency data management and to review various conceptual, technical, organisational and operational aspects and problems. The problems posed by hardware and software, the interplay of software developers and users/operators and the positive and negative experiences both from development and operation of data management systems are discussed. Emergency data management systems and their demonstrations are divided into four classes of possible applications: video games, training and simulation systems, 'history writing' = post-event analysis and documentation systems, real-time operational systems. (author)

  20. FASTBUS software workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    FASTBUS is a standard for modular high-speed data acquisition, data-processing and control, development for use in high-energy physics experiments incorporating different types of computers and microprocessors. This Workshop brought together users from different laboratories for a review of current software activities, using the standard both in experiments and for test equipment. There are also papers on interfacing and the present state of systems being developed for use in future LEP experiments. Also included is a discussion on the proposed revision of FASTBUS Standard Routines. (orig.)

  1. International regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Different international regulatory activities are presented: recommendation on the protection of the public against exposure to radon in drinking water supplies, amendment to the legislation implementing the regulation on imports of agricultural products originating in third countries following the Chernobyl accident, resolution on the commission green paper towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply, declaration of mandatory nature of the international code for the safe carriage of packaged irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive wastes on board ships, adoption of action plan against nuclear terrorism. (N.C.)

  2. Alpha-contaminated waste management workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    These proceedings are published to provide a record of the oral presentations made at the DOE Alpha-Contaminated Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland, on August 10-13, 1982. The papers are transcriptions of these oral presentations and, as such, do not contain as significant detail as will be found in the reviewed papers to be published in the periodical Nuclear and Chemical Waste Management in the first issue for 1983. These transcriptions have been reviewed by the speakers and some illustrations have been provided, but these contain only the preliminary information that will be provided in the technical papers to be published in the periodical. These papers have been grouped under the following headings: source terms; disposal technology and practices for alpha-contaminated waste; risk analyses and safety assessments. These papers in addition to those dealing with legislative and regulatory aspects have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  3. Exploring Programmatic Interoperability: Army Future Force Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith , II., James D; Meyers, B. C

    2005-01-01

    .... It describes the background and motivation for the workshop, provides a brief overview of the workshop activities, and highlights the key observations and conclusions obtained through the course...

  4. Nutrient Status Assessment in Individuals and Populations for Healthy Aging-Statement from an Expert Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, Szabolcs; Saris, Wim H. M.; Mathers, John C.; Feskens, Edith; Schols, Annemie; Navis, Gerjan; Kuipers, Folkert; Weber, Peter; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    A workshop organized by the University Medical Center Groningen addressed various current issues regarding nutrient status of individuals and populations, tools and strategies for its assessment, and opportunities to intervene. The importance of nutrient deficiencies and information on nutrient

  5. Letter Report for the Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop (August 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  6. A Marketing Perspective on Educational Games, Simulations and Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    Examines the literature on marketing and uses the four elements of product, price, place, and promotion to elicit guidance for those who wish to market educational games, simulations, and workshops. Devising a marketing strategy centered on the customer is discussed, and the distinction between goods and services is described. (11 references)…

  7. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. A Portable Computer Security Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Paul J.; Phillips, Andrew T.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a computer security workshop designed to instruct post-secondary instructors who want to start a course or laboratory exercise sequence in computer security. This workshop has also been used to provide computer security education to IT professionals and students. It is effective in communicating basic computer security principles…

  9. IFPA meeting 2008 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast...

  10. IFPA meeting 2009 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the annual meeting of the International Federation of Placenta Associations (IFPA). At IFPA Meeting 2009 diverse topics were discussed in twelve themed workshops. Topics covered included: immune response to pregnancy; signaling between fetus and placenta...

  11. Workshop Polli Talu Loomingulises Keskuses

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    MAP Intermedia Performance Collaboration'i (USA) workshop. Brendan McCall (liikumine), N. B. Aldrich (heli) ja Zach Poff (video) workshop tutvustab kolme kunstniku koostööd. Näidatakse ka multimeedia etendust, mis on külaliskunstnikel valminud Polli talus

  12. A Workshop in Transcultural Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Thomas B.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experimental, week-long interdisciplinary (i.e., nursing and anthropology) workshop on the relationship between health and culture conducted by Ohio University, Zanesville, in conjunction with the University of Toronto. Discusses program formulation, objectives, results, and suggestions for future workshops. (LAL)

  13. Special workshop on lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    A Special Workshop on Lung Dosimetry was convened in Salt Lake City, Utah, on April 21-22, 1982, to stimulate the use of improved radiation dosimetry and to formulate a stronger basis for dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides. The two-day workshop was held in conjunction with the 30th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society. Publication is planned

  14. Secondary School Design: Workshop Crafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Design features are described for school shop facilities. Some general requirements common to most workshops are discussed; and specific design information is provided for general woodwork, general metalwork, and combined wood and metalwork facilities. The grouping of the workshop crafts and their relation to other parts of the school are also…

  15. AAAI Workshop on Nonmonotonic Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Etherington, David

    1985-01-01

    On October 17-19 1984 a workshop on non-monotonic reasoning was held at Mohonk Mountain House, outside New Paltz, New York. The workshop was organized by Raymond Reiter and Bonnie Webber, and was sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

  16. Presentation Skills Workshops for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, S.; Kenyon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Workshops were held to prepare nurses (n=87) to present results of professional activities. One year after the course, 20 had made oral and 30 written presentations. The workshops increased their confidence and were considered practical, informal, and nonthreatening. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  17. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  18. Summary of experimental insertions workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandweiss, J.; Month, M.

    1976-01-01

    An ISABELLE workshop of the summer 1976 series, which was held at Brookhaven August 16--20, focused on the design and utilization of the experimental insertions. The goals of the workshop are outlined, and a few general remarks about the results are presented

  19. The changing regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, G.

    1999-01-01

    The role and value of regulation in the energy sector was discussed, demonstrating how, despite common perception, regulation is an essential part of Canada's strategy to find and develop new opportunities. The future vision of regulation for industry participants was presented with particular focus on issues related to streamlining the regulatory process. As far as pipelines are concerned, regulatory actions are necessary to facilitate capacity increases and to ensure the line's integrity, safety and environmental record. Furthermore, regulation provides economic solutions where market forces cannot provide them, as for example where business has elements of monopoly. It arbitrates interests of landowners, business, consumers, and environmental groups. It looks for ways to ensure conditions under which competition can flourish. It acts as the guardian of citizens' rights in a democratic society by providing citizens with an opportunity to be heard on the building or expansion of pipelines and associated facilities. As citizens become more and more concerned about their property and the land that surrounds them, citizen involvement in decision making about how industry activity affects their quality of life will become correspondingly more important. Regulatory agencies are committed to facilitate this engagement by flexible hearing procedures and by making use of evolving communication and information technology

  20. The math excellence workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasser, Susan J.S.; Snelsire, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the first two years of the Clemson University College of Engineering's Math Excellence Workshop, a program administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Savannah River Site, and funded by the Department of Energy. The objective of the program is to prepare minority students for technical/scientific study, with the goal of increasing minority retention in the College of Engineering, Twenty-three African American students, all of whom had been accepted into the College of Engineering Fall 1990 freshman class, took part in the first year of the program. The contract paid for room, board, tuition, fees, books, and supplies for the students to live on campus and take a precalculus math course. In addition, the students attended a special honors workshop designed to prepare them to study technical material effectively. Twenty of the 23 students earned As or Bs in the precalculus class. All participants indicated that they felt confident of their ability to succeed academically at Clemson. At the end of the session, twenty of the students were still planning to major in engineering. The program was repeated the following summer with 24 students from the 1991 freshman class. Twelve of the students earned A's or B's in the precalculus class. (author)

  1. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    {\\bf The Astronomy Workshop} (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe a few of the available tools. {\\bf Solar Systems Visualizer}: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. {\\bf Solar System Calculators}: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed. {\\bf Stellar Evolution}: The "Life of the Sun" tool animates the history of the Sun as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve over billions of years. In "Star Race," the user selects two stars of different masses and watches their evolution in a split-screeen format that emphasizes the great differences in stellar lifetimes and fates.

  2. Highlights of the Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1997-01-01

    Economic stresses are forcing many industries to reduce cost and time-to-market, and to insert emerging technologies into their products. Engineers are asked to design faster, ever more complex systems. Hence, there is a need for novel design paradigms and effective design tools to reduce the design and development times. Several computational tools and facilities have been developed to support the design process. Some of these are described in subsequent presentations. The focus of the workshop is on the computational tools and facilities which have high potential for use in future design environment for aerospace systems. The outline for the introductory remarks is given. First, the characteristics and design drivers for future aerospace systems are outlined; second, simulation-based design environment, and some of its key modules are described; third, the vision for the next-generation design environment being planned by NASA, the UVA ACT Center and JPL is presented. The anticipated major benefits of the planned environment are listed; fourth, some of the government-supported programs related to simulation-based design are listed; and fifth, the objectives and format of the workshop are presented.

  3. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramebaeck, H. (ed.) (Swedish Defence Research Agency (Sweden)); Straalberg, E. (Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway)); Klemola, S. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Nielsen, Sven P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland))

    2012-01-15

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  4. The math excellence workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasser, Susan J.S.; Snelsire, Robert W [College of Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the first two years of the Clemson University College of Engineering's Math Excellence Workshop, a program administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Savannah River Site, and funded by the Department of Energy. The objective of the program is to prepare minority students for technical/scientific study, with the goal of increasing minority retention in the College of Engineering, Twenty-three African American students, all of whom had been accepted into the College of Engineering Fall 1990 freshman class, took part in the first year of the program. The contract paid for room, board, tuition, fees, books, and supplies for the students to live on campus and take a precalculus math course. In addition, the students attended a special honors workshop designed to prepare them to study technical material effectively. Twenty of the 23 students earned As or Bs in the precalculus class. All participants indicated that they felt confident of their ability to succeed academically at Clemson. At the end of the session, twenty of the students were still planning to major in engineering. The program was repeated the following summer with 24 students from the 1991 freshman class. Twelve of the students earned A's or B's in the precalculus class. (author)

  5. Cell banking for regulatory T cell-based therapy: strategies to overcome the impact of cryopreservation on the Treg viability and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołąb, Karolina; Grose, Randall; Placencia, Veronica; Wickrema, Amittha; Solomina, Julia; Tibudan, Martin; Konsur, Evelyn; Ciepły, Kamil; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Millis, J Michael; Fung, John; Witkowski, Piotr

    2018-02-09

    The first clinical trials with adoptive Treg therapy have shown safety and potential efficacy. Feasibility of such therapy could be improved if cells are cryopreserved and stored until optimal timing for infusion. Herein, we report the evaluation of two cell-banking strategies for Treg therapy: 1) cryopreservation of CD4 + cells for subsequent Treg isolation/expansion and 2) cryopreservation of ex-vivo expanded Tregs (CD4 + CD25 hi CD127 lo/- cells). First, we checked how cryopreservation affects cell viability and Treg markers expression. Then, we performed Treg isolation/expansion with the final products release testing. We observed substantial decrease in cell number recovery after thawing and overnight culture. This observation might be explained by the high percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells found just after thawing. Furthermore, we noticed fluctuations in percentage of CD4 + CD25 hi CD127 - and CD4 + FoxP3 + cells obtained from cryopreserved CD4 + as well as Treg cells. However, after re-stimulation Tregs expanded well, presented a stable phenotype and fulfilled the release criteria at the end of expansions. Cryopreservation of CD4 + cells for subsequent Treg isolation/expansion and cryopreservation of expanded Tregs with re-stimulation and expansion after thawing, are promising solutions to overcome detrimental effects of cryopreservation. Both of these cell-banking strategies for Treg therapy can be applied when designing new clinical trials.

  6. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Capacity building of Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority is considered an essential element in pursuit of its vision to become a world class regulatory body. Since its inception in 2001, PNRA has continuously endeavoured to invest in its people, develop training infrastructure and impart sound knowledge and professional skills with the aim to improve its regulatory effectiveness. The use of nuclear and radioactive material in Pakistan has increased manifold in recent years, thus induction of more manpower was needed for regulatory oversight. PNRA adopted two pronged approach for meeting the manpower demand (a) employment of university graduates through fast track recruitment drive and (b) induction of graduates by offering fellowships for Master degree programs. Although, the newly employed staff was selected on the basis of their excellent academic qualifications in basic and applied sciences, but they required rigorous knowledge and skills in regulatory perspectives. In order to implement a structured training program, PNRA conducted Training Needs Assessment (TNA) and identified competency gaps of the regulatory staff in legal, technical, regulatory practice and behavioural domains. PNRA took several initiatives for capacity building which included establishment of a training centre for sustainability of trainings, initiation of a fellowship scheme for Master program, attachment of staff at local institutes for on-the-job training and placement at foreign regulatory bodies and organizations for technical development with the assistance of IAEA. The above strategies have been very beneficial in competence building of the PNRA staff to perform all regulatory activities indigenously for nuclear power plants, research reactors and radiation facilities. Provision of vibrant technical support to IAEA and Member States in various programs by PNRA is a landmark of these competence development efforts. This paper summarizes PNRA initiatives and the International Atomic

  7. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  8. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  9. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  10. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2017-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA) and propionic acid (PA), with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  11. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveg Yadav

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP, with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA and propionic acid (PA, with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  12. Workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter Sadowski; Roald Sagdeev

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary of the Workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production A workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production was sponsored by the East-West Center of the University of Maryland on October 11-13, 2004. The subject of the workshop was the application of subcritical neutrons to transmutation of actinides. The workshop was attended by members of the fission, accelerator and fusion communities. Papers on the state of development of neutron production by accelerators, fusion devices, and fission reactors were presented. Discussions were held on the potential of these technologies to solve the problems of spent nuclear waste storage and nuclear non-proliferation presented by current and future nuclear power reactors. A list of participants including their affiliation and their E-Mail addresses is attached. The workshop concluded that the technologies, presently available or under development, hold out the exciting possibility of improving the environmental quality and long term energy resources of nuclear power while strengthening proliferation resistance. The workshop participants agreed on the following statements. The workshop considered a number of technologies to deal with spent nuclear fuels and current actinide inventories. The conclusion was reached that substantial increase in nuclear power production will require that the issue of spent nuclear fuel be resolved. The Workshop concluded that 14 MeV fusion neutrons can be used to destroy nuclear reactor by-products, some of which would otherwise have to be stored for geologic periods of time. The production of 14 MeV neutrons is based on existing fusion technologies at different research institutions in several countries around the world. At the present time this technology is used to produce 14 MeV neutrons in JET. More development work will be required, however, to bring fusion technology to the level where it can be used for actinide burning on an industrial scale. The workshop concluded that the potential

  13. DESY: Theory Workshop 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    For 1994, the traditional annual DESY Theory Workshop was devoted to supersymmetry. This is a novel symmetry relating bosons (normally force-carrying particles) and fermions (which normally feel the forces). In supersymmetry, bosons could have fermion counterparts, and vice versa. Although this subject is still largely a theorist's playground, many of the particles and phenomena predicted by models of low energy supersymmetry now seem within reach of present and planned future accelerator experiments, and this was one of the main reasons for choosing a more speculative theme after more phenomenological orientations in recent DESY Theory Workshops. After the welcome by DESY Director General Bjorn Wiik, attention was immediately focused on experimental aspects. P. Steffen (DESY) presented the latest results from HERA. In the following talks, K. Honscheid (Ohio), S. Lammel (Fermilab) and S. Komamiya (CERN and Tokyo) reviewed the experimental situation at electron-proton, hadron and electron-positron colliders, respectively. They discussed the most recent limits for supersymmetric particles (still none in sight!), as well as precision experiments where deviations from the standard model might show up. The workshop was treated to a first rate introduction to the MSSM (''minimal supersymmetric standard model'') by F. Zwirner (CERN), who clearly explained the motivation for going supersymmetric and reviewed the basic structure of the MSSM, its particle content and couplings, as well as the soft breaking terms necessary to avoid immediate conflict with experiment. This was followed by a systematic discussion of the Higgs sector by H. Haber (Santa Cruz), where the first hints of new physics could appear. However, he also made clear that it may not be easy to distinguish standard and non-standard Higgs bosons. Symmetries beyond the standard model, and in particular supersymmetric grand unification were treated in detail by G. Ross (Oxford) and S

  14. CTBTO international cooperation workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Cooperation Workshop took place in Vienna, Austria, on 16 and 17 November 1998, with the participation of 104 policy/decision makers, Research and Development managers and diplomatic representatives from 58 States Signatories to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Workshop attempted to develop Treaty stipulations to: promote cooperation to facilitate and participate in the fullest possible exchange relating to technologies used in the verification of the Treaty; enable member states to strengthen national implementation of verification measures, and to benefit from the application of such technologies for peaceful purposes. The potential benefits arising from the CTBT monitoring, analysis and data communication systems are multifaceted, and as yet unknown. This Workshop provided the opportunity to examine some of these possibilities. An overview of the CTBT verification regime on the general aspects of the four monitoring technologies (seismic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound and radionuclides), including some of the elements that are the subject of international cooperation, were presented and discussed. Questions were raised on the potential benefits that can be derived by participating in the CTBT regime and broad-based discussions took place. Several concrete proposals on ways and means to facilitate and promote cooperation among States Signatories were suggested. The main points discussed by the participants can be summarized as follows: the purpose of the CTBT Organization is to assist member states to monitor Treaty compliance; the CTBT can be a highly effective technological tool which can generate wide-ranging data, which can be used for peaceful purposes; there are differences in the levels of technology development in the member states that is why peaceful applications should be supported by the Prep Com for the benefit of all member states, whether developed or developing, training being a key element to optimize the CTBT

  15. 5th Evian Workshop on LHC beam operation

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Dubourg, S; Evian 2014

    2014-01-01

    The principal aims of the workshop are to: • Suggest operational parameter ranges for re-commissioning and operation in 2015; • Establish re-commissioning requirements for beam based LHC systems; • Establish planning for re-commissioning 2015; • Revisit overall strategy for 2015 (bunch spacing, scrubbing, special runs, MD etc.); • Provide input to Chamonix 2014. Chair: Mike LAMONT Deputy Chairs: Malika MEDDAHI, Brennan GODDARD Editors of the Proceedings: Brennan GODDARD, Sylvia DUBOURG Informatics & infrastructure support: Pierre CHARRUE Workshop Secretary: Sylvia DUBOURG

  16. Conference Report: Readings of Qualitative Research – Methods Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Pfahl

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available At the workshop, the relationship of poststructuralist and postmodernist social theory to the theoretical and methodological positions of interpretive sociology were discussed. A number of presentations contributed methodological reflections from biographical research and (Foucauldian discourse analysis; others discussed results of the application of discourse analysis and deconstruction in empirical research. All in all, it seems that (German biographical researchers have partly recognized and incorporated deconstructionist critique into their enquiries. The workshop has shown there is still a need for reflection on how poststructuralist strategies can inform empirical projects on a practical level. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402158

  17. Safety of Long-term Interim Storage Facilities - Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this workshop was to discuss and review current national activities, plans and regulatory approaches for the safety of long term interim storage facilities dedicated to spent nuclear fuel (SF), high level waste (HLW) and other radioactive materials with prolonged storage regimes. It was also intended to discuss results of experiments and to identify necessary R and D to confirm safety of fuel and cask during the long-term storage. Safety authorities and their Technical Support Organisation (TSO), Fuel Cycle Facilities (FCF) operating organisations and international organisations were invited to share information on their approaches, practices and current developments. The workshop was organised in an opening session, three technical sessions, and a conclusion session. The technical sessions were focused on: - National approaches for long term interim storage facilities; - Safety requirements, regulatory framework and implementation issues; - Technical issues and operational experience, needs for R and D. Each session consisted of a number of presentations followed by a panel discussion moderated by the session Chairs. A summary of each session and subsequent discussion that ensued are provided as well as a summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  18. The Third ATLAS ROD Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Poggioli, L.

    A new-style Workshop After two successful ATLAS ROD Workshops dedicated to the ROD hardware and held at the Geneva University in 1998 and in 2000, a new style Workshop took place at LAPP in Annecy on November 14-15, 2002. This time the Workshop was fully dedicated to the ROD-TDAQ integration and software in view of the near future integration activities of the final RODs for the detector assembly and commissioning. More precisely, the aim of this workshop was to get from the sub-detectors the parameters needed for T-DAQ, as well as status and plans from ROD builders. On the other hand, what was decided and assumed had to be stated (like EB decisions and URDs), and also support plans. The Workshop gathered about 70 participants from all ATLAS sub-detectors and the T-DAQ community. The quite dense agenda allowed nevertheless for many lively discussions, and for a dinner in the old town of Annecy. The Sessions The Workshop was organized in five main sessions: Assumptions and recommendations Sub-de...

  19. 78 FR 75562 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice of Staff Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ..., DC 20426. The workshop will be led by Commission staff, with presentations from panelists. The... Generator Interconnection Agreement and Article 1.8 of the pro forma Small Generator Interconnection... Affairs, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426, (202) 502-8368...

  20. Waste Management in Universities and Colleges. Workshop Proceedings (Madison, Wisconsin, July 9-11, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    In response to a request from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Region V of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a workshop on waste management in universities and colleges. It consisted of four sessions: (1) managing general university waste and regulatory concerns; (2) chemical waste management; (3)…

  1. 76 FR 81929 - South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Workshop for Santee Cooper Hydroelectric Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 199-205] South Carolina Public Service Authority; Notice of Workshop for Santee Cooper Hydroelectric Project On May 26 and...) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority (SCPSA), licensee for the Santee-Cooper Hydroelectric...

  2. 76 FR 72203 - Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Reliability Workshop Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD12-5-000] Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Reliability Workshop Agenda As announced in the Notice of Staff..., from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to explore the interaction between voltage control, reliability, and economic...

  3. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    1993-01-01

    Full text: With superconducting radiofrequency playing a major role in the push for new machines to break fresh physics frontiers, it has become a tradition for experts and newcomers in this field from all over the world to meet every second year to hear progress reports from laboratories and to discuss common problems and possible solutions. The sixth such workshop was held from 4-8 October under the chairmanship of Ron Sundelin at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) under construction in Newport News, Virginia. With 170 participants from 14 countries including Eastern Europe and China, it reflected the growing interest in the field - looking back to 1984, when CERN was the host laboratory, the second workshop had less than 100 participants. The CEBAF meeting began with laboratory status reports, covering both high beam energy ('high beta') applications with 'spherical' cavities (as with CERN's LEP200), all using niobium as superconductor and working between 352 MHz and 3 GHz, and lower energy (low beta') applications with geometrically more complicated shapes such as quarter or half wave, split ring or spoke resonators, some using electrodeposited lead as superconductor and working around 100 MHz. During these talks it became clear that more and more laboratories have focused on routine problems, such as reliable series production and testing, running cavities with ancillaries in the machines, or building complete prototypes for projects to be approved by critical funding authorities. This contrasts with the heady days just a few years ago when - at least in the high beta community - the main objective was to explore new ideas. State-of-the-art summaries showed how at 1.3 and 3 GHz 25-30 MV/m have been reached by several laboratories using different preparation methods. Newer developments for common problems included r.f. windows, couplers, controls, and especially field emission, public enemy number one for

  4. NOMA 2013 International Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Fournier-Prunaret, Danièle; Nishio, Yoshifumi; Grácio, Clara

    2015-01-01

    In the field of Dynamical Systems, nonlinear iterative processes play an important role. Nonlinear mappings can be found as immediate models for many systems from different scientific areas, such as engineering, economics, biology, or can also be obtained via numerical methods permitting to solve non-linear differential equations. In both cases, the understanding of specific dynamical behaviors and phenomena is of the greatest interest for scientists. This volume contains papers that were presented at the International Workshop on Nonlinear Maps and their Applications (NOMA 2013) held in Zaragoza, Spain, on September 3-4, 2013. This kind of collaborative effort is of paramount importance in promoting communication among the various groups that work in dynamical systems and networks in their research theoretical studies as well as for applications. This volume is suitable for graduate students as well as researchers in the field.

  5. Workshop on Computational Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a comprehensive collection of extended contributions from the Workshop on Computational Optimization 2014, held at Warsaw, Poland, September 7-10, 2014. The book presents recent advances in computational optimization. The volume includes important real problems like parameter settings for controlling processes in bioreactor and other processes, resource constrained project scheduling, infection distribution, molecule distance geometry, quantum computing, real-time management and optimal control, bin packing, medical image processing, localization the abrupt atmospheric contamination source and so on. It shows how to develop algorithms for them based on new metaheuristic methods like evolutionary computation, ant colony optimization, constrain programming and others. This research demonstrates how some real-world problems arising in engineering, economics, medicine and other domains can be formulated as optimization tasks.

  6. Workshop on Computational Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Our everyday life is unthinkable without optimization. We try to minimize our effort and to maximize the achieved profit. Many real world and industrial problems arising in engineering, economics, medicine and other domains can be formulated as optimization tasks. This volume is a comprehensive collection of extended contributions from the Workshop on Computational Optimization 2013. It presents recent advances in computational optimization. The volume includes important real life problems like parameter settings for controlling processes in bioreactor, resource constrained project scheduling, problems arising in transport services, error correcting codes, optimal system performance and energy consumption and so on. It shows how to develop algorithms for them based on new metaheuristic methods like evolutionary computation, ant colony optimization, constrain programming and others.

  7. Recombinational repair: workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1983-01-01

    Recombinational repair may or may not be synonymous with postreplication repair. Considerable progress has been made in the study of the relevant enzymes, particularly those from bacteria. In this workshop we focus on the recombination enzyme RecA protein. What structural changes take place in the protein and in DNA during repair. How does homologous pairing take place. How is ATP hydrolysis coupled to the stand exchange reaction and the formation of heteroduplx DNA. Turning to another enzyme needed for certain kinds of bacterial recombination, we will ask whether the purified recB protein and recC protein complement each other and are sufficient for exonuclease V activity. In higher cells, we would like to know whether sister exchanges, which occur in bacteria after uv irradiation, are also seen in animal cells

  8. Student interaction in workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evers, Winie

    2014-01-01

    A kind of teaching for active learning has been experimented with at SDU Sønderborg as part of the course Supply Chain Dynamics. In this course the students learn about complex systems, system dynamics as well as supply chain instability and oscillation, the course lecturer invited the author...... to experiment with novel workshop methods and techniques, where objects are used to illustrate and model business issues (Heinemann et al, 2011, Buur et al, 2013). The idea was to see how students could be engaged in a different and more interactive way to learn about these topics, by assigning the students...... teaching should reflect this diversity by embracing and experimenting with multiple forms, including activation of students by students’ interaction and manipulation with objects....

  9. 2016 MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Kaden, Enrico; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational diffusion MRI and mathematical methods for brain connectivity, while also sharing new perspectives and insights on the latest research challenges for those currently working in the field. Over the last decade, interest in diffusion MRI has virtually exploded. The technique provides unique insights into the microstructure of living tissue and enables in-vivo connectivity mapping of the brain. Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into the clinic, while new processing methods are essential to addressing issues at each stage of the diffusion MRI pipeline: acquisition, reconstruction, modeling and model fitting, image processing, fiber tracking, connectivity mapping, visualization, group studies and inference. These papers from the 2016 MICCAI Workshop “Computational Diffusion MRI” – which was intended to provide a snapshot of the la...

  10. Workshop on Teaching Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    It seemed appropriate to arrange a meeting of teachers of thermodynamics in the United Kingdom, a meeting held in the pleasant surroundings of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in Sept~mber, 1984. This volume records the ideas put forward by authors, the discussion generated and an account of the action that discussion has initiated. Emphasis was placed on the Teaching of Thermodynamics to degree-level students in their first and second years. The meeting, a workshop for practitioners in which all were expected to take part, was remarkably well supported. This was notable in the representation of essentially every UK university and polytechnic engaged in teaching engineering thermodynamics and has led to a stimulating spread of ideas. By intention, the emphasis for attendance was put on teachers of engineering concerned with thermodynamics, both mechanical and chemical engineering disciplines. Attendance from others was encouraged but limited as follows: non-engineering acad­ emics, 10%, industrialists, 10%. The ...

  11. Workshop Econophys-2015

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyama, Hideaki; Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Deo, Nivedita; Raina, Dhruv; Vodenska, Irena

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings from ECONOPHYS-2015, an international workshop held in New Delhi, India, on the interrelated fields of “econophysics” and “sociophysics”, which have emerged from the application of statistical physics to economics and sociology. Leading researchers from varied communities, including economists, sociologists, financial analysts, mathematicians, physicists, statisticians, and others, report on their recent work, discuss topical issues, and review the relevant contemporary literature. A society can be described as a group of people who inhabit the same geographical or social territory and are mutually involved through their shared participation in different aspects of life. It is possible to observe and characterize average behaviors of members of a society, an example being voting behavior. Moreover, the dynamic nature of interaction within any economic sector comprising numerous cooperatively interacting agents has many features in common with the interacting systems ...

  12. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  13. Signal sciences workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing

  14. 2014 MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco; Schneider, Torben

    2014-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the 2014 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, CDMRI’14. Detailing new computational methods applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data, it offers readers a snapshot of the current state of the art and covers a wide range of topics from fundamental theoretical work on mathematical modeling to the development and evaluation of robust algorithms and applications in neuroscientific studies and clinical practice.   Inside, readers will find information on brain network analysis, mathematical modeling for clinical applications, tissue microstructure imaging, super-resolution methods, signal reconstruction, visualization, and more. Contributions include both careful mathematical derivations and a large number of rich full-color visualizations.   Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into the clinic. This volume will offer a valuable starting point for anyone interested i...

  15. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  16. Nuclear physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Workshop in Nuclear Physics related to the TANDAR, took place in Buenos Aires in April from 23 to 26, 1987, with attendance of foreign scientists. There were presented four seminars and a lot of studies which deal with the following fields: Nuclear Physics at medium energies, Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Reactions, Nuclear Matter, Instrumentation and Methodology for Nuclear Spectroscopy, Classical Physics, Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory. It must be emphasized that the Electrostatic Accelerator TANDAR allows to work with heavy ions of high energy, that opens a new field of work in PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission). This powerful analytic technique makes it possiblethe analysis of nearly all the elements of the periodic table with the same accuracy. (M.E.L.) [es

  17. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  18. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. [comps.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  19. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. (comps.)

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  20. ICES WKMAL Report 2010 - Report of the Joint MEDPOL/Black Sea/JRC/ICES Workshop on Marine Litter (WKMAL)

    OpenAIRE

    GALGANI Francois; PIHA HENNA EMILIA

    2010-01-01

    The Joint MEDPOL/Blacksea/JRC/ICES Workshop on Marine Litter (WKMAL) was established as a follow-up to previous activities on marine litter in relation to the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, where Marine Litter is one of the descriptors. The workshop was chaired by Francois Galgani (France) and supported by Henna Piha (JRC). The workshop considered the following points: ¿ Monitoring and experimental results ¿ The status of marine litter ¿ Identification of existing data on ma...

  1. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; McCord, Raymond [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Sisterson, Doug [Argonne National Laboratory; Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-11-08

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  2. 2015 Inverter Workshop | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverter Workshop 2015 Inverter Workshop Wednesday, February 25, 2015 Chair: Jack Flicker In about inverters. This workshop represented a follow-on to the inverter workshops that Sandia National conversations between module and inverter experts. Agenda For a detailed schedule of the day's events, access

  3. Summary of the PSI workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The PSI workshop had been held at JAERI-Naka, from March 15th to 16th, 2002. This workshop is held twice a year as the skull practice session to report the recent progress on the plasma - surface interactions of the experimental reactors such as ITER, JT-60, LHD, etc. and the development of the plasma facing components. There were 34 participants from the university and 18 participants from JAERI and 26 papers were presented. This booklet was published for the purpose of saving a record of this workshop performed in oral lecture form. (author)

  4. Consultation and concurrence: workshop proceedings, September 23-26, 1979, the Orcas meeting, Eastsound, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the workshop was to probe the concepts of consultation and concurrence and to address issues in establishing and maintaining an effective state-federal process in nuclear waste management. The workshop was a gathering of some 50 people from industry, the environmental movement, local government, executive and legislative branches of state government, US Congressional staffs, the US Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ONWI, university social science departments, and other research institutions. The workshop consisted of general sessions at which ten papers covering various aspects of consultation and concurrence were presented and of working groups which further explored issues raised by the papers. This report presents a general summary of discussions, the text of a background paper prepared for the workshop, the presented papers, and individual comments by several participants

  5. [How to design workshops to promote health in community groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Josefina; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; Marín Torrens, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    One of the strategies of health promotion is to develop life skills people considering themselves as the main health resource. A workshop has to get its participants become «asset» to make decisions and create health, focusing on the development and acquisition of skills in a motivating group and in order to achieve health objectives. The concepts behind the design of a workshop are: participatory planning, training, meaningful learning, group learning and participatory techniques. The steps to follow to design a workshop and facilitate their application are: Stage 0, founding; initial stage, host and initial evaluation; central or construction stage based learning in the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes and skills, and final stage or evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Double-shell target fabrication workshop-2016 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. Morris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oertel, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrell, Michael [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baumann, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huang, Haibo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, Abbas [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-10

    On June 30, 2016, over 40 representatives from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), General Atomics (GA), Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Schafer Corporation, and NNSA headquarter attended a double-shell (DS) target fabrication workshop at Livermore, California. Pushered-single-shell (PSS) and DS metalgas platforms potentially have a large impact on programmatic applications. The goal of this focused workshop is to bring together target fabrication scientists, physicists, and designers to brainstorm future PSS and DS target fabrication needs and strategies. This one-day workshop intends to give an overall view of historical information, recent approaches, and future research activities at each participating organization. Five topical areas have been discussed that are vital to the success of future DS target fabrications, including inner metal shells, foam spheres, outer ablators, fill tube assembly, and metrology.

  7. Aerial Observation Needs Workshop, May 13-14, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasiri, Shaima [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Serbin, Shawn [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lesmes, David [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Petty, Rick [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schmid, Beat [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vogelmann, Andrew [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); de Boer, Gijs [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dafflon, Baptiste [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Guenther, Alex [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Moore, David [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The mission of the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science is "to advance a robust, predictive understanding of Earth's climate and environmental systems and to inform the development of sustainable solutions to the nation's energy and environmental challenges." Accomplishing this mission requires aerial observations of the atmospheric and terrestrial components of the climate system. CESD is assessing its current and future aerial observation needs to develop a strategy and roadmap of capability requirements for the next decade. To facilitate this process, a workshop was convened that consisted of invited experts in the atmospheric and terrestrial sciences, airborne observations, and modeling. This workshop report summarizes the community input prior to and during the workshop on research challenges and opportunities, as well as specific science questions and observational needs that require aerial observations to address.

  8. Proceedings of the 10th Korea-Japan joint workshop on PSA. For Asian PSA network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon-Eon; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2009-12-01

    The tenth Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) was held in the Jeju island of Korea, on May 18-20, 2009 organized by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for presentation and discussions on experiences and technical achievements related to PSA, risk-informed and performance-based approach, and other relevant issues in both countries. Since the first Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on PSA started in 1992, the workshops have provided an important and timely opportunity for exchange and discussion of the relevant information to all PSA practitioners and users of risk information in the industry, research, academia and regulatory arena. This was the tenth anniversary of the Joint Workshop with the main theme of 'For Asian PSA Network' and participants included those from China, Taiwan and the United States of America besides Korea and Japan. Two keynote speeches were presented by the former chairmen of this workshop, Prof. Chang-Sun Kang of Seoul National University and Prof. emeritus Shunsuke Kondo of Tokyo University. We had two special lectures, 70 papers presented by experts at 10 technical sessions related PSA, the special session on the status of PSA in Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan and panel discussion on their cooperation in PSA. This report provides the summary of each session, and all the presentation materials presented in the 10th Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on PSA. (author)

  9. A global regulatory science agenda for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmgren, Lindsay; Li, Xuguang; Wilson, Carolyn; Ball, Robert; Wang, Junzhi; Cichutek, Klaus; Pfleiderer, Michael; Kato, Atsushi; Cavaleri, Marco; Southern, James; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Minor, Philip; Griffiths, Elwyn; Sohn, Yeowon; Wood, David

    2013-04-18

    The Decade of Vaccines Collaboration and development of the Global Vaccine Action Plan provides a catalyst and unique opportunity for regulators worldwide to develop and propose a global regulatory science agenda for vaccines. Regulatory oversight is critical to allow access to vaccines that are safe, effective, and of assured quality. Methods used by regulators need to constantly evolve so that scientific and technological advances are applied to address challenges such as new products and technologies, and also to provide an increased understanding of benefits and risks of existing products. Regulatory science builds on high-quality basic research, and encompasses at least two broad categories. First, there is laboratory-based regulatory science. Illustrative examples include development of correlates of immunity; or correlates of safety; or of improved product characterization and potency assays. Included in such science would be tools to standardize assays used for regulatory purposes. Second, there is science to develop regulatory processes. Illustrative examples include adaptive clinical trial designs; or tools to analyze the benefit-risk decision-making process of regulators; or novel pharmacovigilance methodologies. Included in such science would be initiatives to standardize regulatory processes (e.g., definitions of terms for adverse events [AEs] following immunization). The aim of a global regulatory science agenda is to transform current national efforts, mainly by well-resourced regulatory agencies, into a coordinated action plan to support global immunization goals. This article provides examples of how regulatory science has, in the past, contributed to improved access to vaccines, and identifies gaps that could be addressed through a global regulatory science agenda. The article also identifies challenges to implementing a regulatory science agenda and proposes strategies and actions to fill these gaps. A global regulatory science agenda will enable

  10. Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Program

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Stefano V.; Beck, J. Christopher; Buckeridge, David L.; Botea, Adi; Caragea, Cornelia; Chi, Chi-hung; Damoulas, Theodoros; Dilkina, Bistra; Eaton, Eric; Fazli, Pooyan; Ganzfried, Sam; Giles, C. Lee; Guillet, Sébastian; Holte, Robert; Hutter, Frank

    2015-01-01

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25–26, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austion, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included AI and Ethics, AI for Cities, AI for Transportation: Advice, Interactivity and Actor Modeling, Algorithm Configuration, Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technol...

  11. Reports on the AAAI 1999 Workshop Program

    OpenAIRE

    Drabble, Brian; Chaudron, Laurent; Tessier, Catherine; Abu-Hakima, Sue; Willmott, Steven; Austin, Jim; Faltings, Boi; Freuder, Eugene C.; Friedrich, Gerhard; Freitas, Alex A.; Cortes, U.; Sanchez-Marre, M.; Aha, David W.; Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Munoz-Avila, Hector

    2000-01-01

    The AAAI-99 Workshop Program (a part of the sixteenth national conference on artificial intelligence) was held in Orlando, Florida. The program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in AI. Each workshop was limited to approximately 25 to 50 participants. Participation was by invitation from the workshop organizers. The workshops were Agent-Based Systems in the Business Context, Agents' Conflicts, Artificial Intelligence for Distributed Information Networking, Artificial Intell...

  12. Proceedings of the AECB sponsored workshop on control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The workshop was held in Mississauga, Ontario, on February 4, 1997 for the purpose of bringing together radiation safety professionals to exchange information and propose options for action for the improved control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive materials. The focus was on unsealed radioisotopes and Type 'A' shipments. The workshop participants represented five major processors or distributors and five users who manage large radiation safety programs. These participants were invited because of their knowledge, experience and proximity. Workshop objectives were developed from a review of AECB files, from an AECB report which analysed, in a systematic manner, controls on the ordering and receiving of radioactive material, and from the participants' responses to a pre-workshop request for additional information. The objectives were to propose options for action: to prevent unauthorized persons from placing an order with a supplier; to prevent unauthorized persons from receiving radioactive material by establishing tighter control on the transfer of radioactive material and improving the control of radioactive material during and after delivery. This report provides a record of the presentations and discussions as well as the options for action developed during the workshop. The proposed options for action suggest additional regulatory requirements and guidance documents. Also identified was a need for better assessment, stricter enforcement and future discussions. Included in this report are new licence conditions which were developed as a result of this workshop, several 'parking lot' issues which were raised but considered outside the scope of the discussion and a list of participants. This workshop met the needs and expectation of the Materials Regulation Division (MRD) staff and addressed the needs of the participants. It also provided an opportunity to share information and ideas. It is MRDs intention to keep this collaborative workshop approach for

  13. Systematic Review Workshop (August 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal for this workshop is to receive scientific input regarding approaches for different steps within a systematic review, such as evaluating individual studies, synthesizing evidence within a particular discipline, etc.

  14. Stanford Workshop on Surgical Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salisbury, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    .... The goal of this workshop was to bring together researchers and developers from around the world who focus on modeling and simulation of deformable materials for applications requiring real-time interaction...

  15. Workshop on Language Student Attrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whelan, Bree

    2001-01-01

    Seventy individuals from Government agencies (military and civilian), academia, and contractor organizations attended all or parts of a Workshop on student Attrition held at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC...

  16. Baltic Nuclear workshop. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlberg, L.G.

    2001-05-01

    Proceedings of the NKS/BOK-1.6 workshop on crisis communication 'Baltic Nuclear', held in Stockholm March 19 -20, 2001, with participants from the nuclear power plants and nuclear authorities in the Baltic Sea region. The main content of the workshop was founded on the principle of 'learning by doing'. The participants were therefore practically trained in how to handle a crisis from an information and communication point of view. Added to that there were three different lectures. (au)

  17. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  18. Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2002-12-05

    OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

  19. Cyber Mutual Assistance Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Threat Intelligence 19 2.13 Industry Forums and Groups 20 2.14 Cybersecurity Vendors 20 3 Conclusions and Recommendations 22 Appendix A List of...establishing reliable situational awareness from an OT per- spective, from manual change analysis to machine learning or artificial intelligence . From a...dark web, or following cybersecurity -related news. Workshop members identified other threat intelligence collection sources during the workshop, which

  20. The AAAI-13 Conference Workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Vikas; Archibald, Christopher; Bhatt, Mehul; Bui, Hung; Cook, Diane J.; Cortés, Juan; Geib, Christopher; Gogate, Vibhav; Guesgen, Hans W.; Jannach, Dietmar; Johanson, Michael; Kersting, Kristian; Konidaris, George; Kotthoff, Lars; Michalowski, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The AAAI-13 Workshop Program, a part of the 27th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, was held Sunday and Monday, July 14–15, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel in Bellevue, Washington, USA. The program included 12 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence, including Activity Context-Aware System Architectures (WS-13-05); Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Methods in Computational Biology (WS-13-06); Combining Constraint Solving with Mining and Lear...