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Sample records for regulatory cascade functions

  1. Multiple Linear Regression for Reconstruction of Gene Regulatory Networks in Solving Cascade Error Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Hani Mohamed Salleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory network (GRN reconstruction is the process of identifying regulatory gene interactions from experimental data through computational analysis. One of the main reasons for the reduced performance of previous GRN methods had been inaccurate prediction of cascade motifs. Cascade error is defined as the wrong prediction of cascade motifs, where an indirect interaction is misinterpreted as a direct interaction. Despite the active research on various GRN prediction methods, the discussion on specific methods to solve problems related to cascade errors is still lacking. In fact, the experiments conducted by the past studies were not specifically geared towards proving the ability of GRN prediction methods in avoiding the occurrences of cascade errors. Hence, this research aims to propose Multiple Linear Regression (MLR to infer GRN from gene expression data and to avoid wrongly inferring of an indirect interaction (A → B → C as a direct interaction (A → C. Since the number of observations of the real experiment datasets was far less than the number of predictors, some predictors were eliminated by extracting the random subnetworks from global interaction networks via an established extraction method. In addition, the experiment was extended to assess the effectiveness of MLR in dealing with cascade error by using a novel experimental procedure that had been proposed in this work. The experiment revealed that the number of cascade errors had been very minimal. Apart from that, the Belsley collinearity test proved that multicollinearity did affect the datasets used in this experiment greatly. All the tested subnetworks obtained satisfactory results, with AUROC values above 0.5.

  2. Multiple Linear Regression for Reconstruction of Gene Regulatory Networks in Solving Cascade Error Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Faridah Hani Mohamed; Zainudin, Suhaila; Arif, Shereena M

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory network (GRN) reconstruction is the process of identifying regulatory gene interactions from experimental data through computational analysis. One of the main reasons for the reduced performance of previous GRN methods had been inaccurate prediction of cascade motifs. Cascade error is defined as the wrong prediction of cascade motifs, where an indirect interaction is misinterpreted as a direct interaction. Despite the active research on various GRN prediction methods, the discussion on specific methods to solve problems related to cascade errors is still lacking. In fact, the experiments conducted by the past studies were not specifically geared towards proving the ability of GRN prediction methods in avoiding the occurrences of cascade errors. Hence, this research aims to propose Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) to infer GRN from gene expression data and to avoid wrongly inferring of an indirect interaction (A → B → C) as a direct interaction (A → C). Since the number of observations of the real experiment datasets was far less than the number of predictors, some predictors were eliminated by extracting the random subnetworks from global interaction networks via an established extraction method. In addition, the experiment was extended to assess the effectiveness of MLR in dealing with cascade error by using a novel experimental procedure that had been proposed in this work. The experiment revealed that the number of cascade errors had been very minimal. Apart from that, the Belsley collinearity test proved that multicollinearity did affect the datasets used in this experiment greatly. All the tested subnetworks obtained satisfactory results, with AUROC values above 0.5.

  3. Cascade probabilistic function and the Markov's processes. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the Chapter 1 the physical and mathematical descriptions of radiation processes are carried out. The relation of the cascade probabilistic functions (CPF) for electrons, protons, alpha-particles and ions with Markov's chain is shown. The algorithms for CPF calculation with accounting energy losses are given

  4. Mathematical simulation of cascade-probabilistic functions for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Smygaleva, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical expressions for cascade-probabilistic functions (CPF) for electrons, protons, α-particles and ions with taking into account energy losses are received. Mathematical analysis of these functions is carried out and main properties of function are determined. Algorithms of CPF are developed and their computer calculation were conducted. Regularities in behavior of function in dependence on initial particles energy, atomic number and registration depth are established. Book is intended to specialists on mathematical simulation of radiation defects, solid state physics, elementary particle physics and applied mathematics. There are 3 chapters in the book: 1. Cascade-probabilistic functions for electrons; 2. CPF for protons and α-particles; 3. CPF with taking unto account energy losses of ions. (author)

  5. The Regulatory Function of Eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ting; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-10-01

    Eosinophils are a minority circulating granulocyte classically viewed as being involved in host defense against parasites and promoting allergic reactions. However, a series of new regulatory functions for these cells have been identified in the past decade. During homeostasis, eosinophils develop in the bone marrow and migrate from the blood into target tissues following an eotaxin gradient, with interleukin-5 being a key cytokine for eosinophil proliferation, survival, and priming. In multiple target tissues, eosinophils actively regulate a variety of immune functions through their vast arsenal of granule products and cytokines, as well as direct cellular interaction with cells in proximity. The immunologic regulation of eosinophils extends from innate immunity to adaptive immunity and also involves non-immune cells. Herein, we summarize recent findings regarding novel roles of murine and human eosinophils, focusing on interactions with other hematopoietic cells. We also review new experimental tools available and remaining questions to uncover a greater understanding of this enigmatic cell.

  6. Establishment and evaluation of operation function model for cascade hydropower station

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-ming Ji; Ting Zhou; Hai-tao Huang

    2010-01-01

    Toward solving the actual operation problems of cascade hydropower stations under hydrologic uncertainty, this paper presents the process of extraction of statistical characteristics from long-term optimal cascade operation, and proposes a monthly operation function algorithm for the actual operation of cascade hydropower stations through the identification, processing, and screening of available information during long-term optimal operation. Applying the operation function to the cascade hy...

  7. The cascade probabilistic functions and the Markov's processes. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the Chapter 1 the physical and mathematical descriptions of radiation processes are carried out. The relation of the cascade probabilistic functions (CPF) with Markov's chain is shown. The CPF calculation for electrons with the energy losses taking into account are given. The calculation of the CPF on the computer was carried out. The estimation of energy losses contribution in the CPFs and radiation defects concentration are made. Besides calculation of the primarily knock-on atoms and radiation defects at electron irradiation with use of the CPF with taking into account energy losses are conducted

  8. Analysis of a Gene Regulatory Cascade Mediating Circadian Rhythm in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In the study of circadian rhythms, it has been a puzzle how a limited number of circadian clock genes can control diverse aspects of physiology. Here we investigate circadian gene expression genome-wide using larval zebrafish as a model system. We made use of a spatial gene expression atlas to investigate the expression of circadian genes in various tissues and cell types. Comparison of genome-wide circadian gene expression data between zebrafish and mouse revealed a nearly anti-phase relationship and allowed us to detect novel evolutionarily conserved circadian genes in vertebrates. We identified three groups of zebrafish genes with distinct responses to light entrainment: fast light-induced genes, slow light-induced genes, and dark-induced genes. Our computational analysis of the circadian gene regulatory network revealed several transcription factors (TFs) involved in diverse aspects of circadian physiology through transcriptional cascade. Of these, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor a (mitfa), a dark-induced TF, mediates a circadian rhythm of melanin synthesis, which may be involved in zebrafish's adaptation to daily light cycling. Our study describes a systematic method to discover previously unidentified TFs involved in circadian physiology in complex organisms. PMID:23468616

  9. Use of polarization measurements in evaluating cascade contributions to optical excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConkey, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent developments in theory and experimental measurements of rotational line polarization fractions of diatomic molecules following electron impact are used to show how in some instances cascade free optical excitation functions can be derived without additional measurements of the cascading contribution. The Lyman system of H 2 is presented as an example and some previously conflicting excitation cross-section measurements obtained by different techniques are reconciled

  10. Molecular evidence for increased regulatory conservation during metamorphosis, and against deleterious cascading effects of hybrid breakdown in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artieri Carlo G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Speculation regarding the importance of changes in gene regulation in determining major phylogenetic patterns continues to accrue, despite a lack of broad-scale comparative studies examining how patterns of gene expression vary during development. Comparative transcriptional profiling of adult interspecific hybrids and their parental species has uncovered widespread divergence of the mechanisms controlling gene regulation, revealing incompatibilities that are masked in comparisons between the pure species. However, this has prompted the suggestion that misexpression in adult hybrids results from the downstream cascading effects of a subset of genes improperly regulated in early development. Results We sought to determine how gene expression diverges over development, as well as test the cascade hypothesis, by profiling expression in males of Drosophila melanogaster, D. sechellia, and D. simulans, as well as the D. simulans (♀ × D. sechellia (♂ male F1 hybrids, at four different developmental time points (3rd instar larval, early pupal, late pupal, and newly-emerged adult. Contrary to the cascade model of misexpression, we find that there is considerable stage-specific autonomy of regulatory breakdown in hybrids, with the larval and adult stages showing significantly more hybrid misexpression as compared to the pupal stage. However, comparisons between pure species indicate that genes expressed during earlier stages of development tend to be more conserved in terms of their level of expression than those expressed during later stages, suggesting that while Von Baer's famous law applies at both the level of nucleotide sequence and expression, it may not apply necessarily to the underlying overall regulatory network, which appears to diverge over the course of ontogeny and which can only be ascertained by combining divergent genomes in species hybrids. Conclusion Our results suggest that complex integration of regulatory

  11. Regulatory cascade and biological activity of Beauveria bassiana oosporein that limits bacterial growth after host death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanhua; Liu, Xi; Keyhani, Nemat O; Tang, Guirong; Pei, Yan; Zhang, Wenwen; Tong, Sheng

    2017-02-28

    The regulatory network and biological functions of the fungal secondary metabolite oosporein have remained obscure. Beauveria bassiana has evolved the ability to parasitize insects and outcompete microbial challengers for assimilation of host nutrients. A novel zinc finger transcription factor, BbSmr1 ( B. bassiana secondary metabolite regulator 1), was identified in a screen for oosporein overproduction. Deletion of Bbsmr1 resulted in up-regulation of the oosporein biosynthetic gene cluster ( OpS genes) and constitutive oosporein production. Oosporein production was abolished in double mutants of Bbsmr1 and a second transcription factor, OpS3 , within the oosporein gene cluster ( ΔBbsmr1ΔOpS3 ), indicating that BbSmr1 acts as a negative regulator of OpS3 expression. Real-time quantitative PCR and a GFP promoter fusion construct of OpS1 , the oosporein polyketide synthase, indicated that OpS1 is expressed mainly in insect cadavers at 24-48 h after death. Bacterial colony analysis in B. bassiana -infected insect hosts revealed increasing counts until host death, with a dramatic decrease (∼90%) after death that correlated with oosporein production. In vitro studies verified the inhibitory activity of oosporein against bacteria derived from insect cadavers. These results suggest that oosporein acts as an antimicrobial compound to limit microbial competition on B. bassiana -killed hosts, allowing the fungus to maximally use host nutrients to grow and sporulate on infected cadavers.

  12. The regulatory function in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Allan Duncan, expert to NEA and former Chief Inspector for Pollution (United Kingdom), elaborated on the regulatory function in the domain of radioactive waste management. The preparation of a document and a brochure on the subject has been one of the main tasks of the Regulators' Forum since its creation in 2001. He stressed that management of NORM waste was generally subject to different standards than similar radioactive waste from a nuclear source, for no obvious reason than that of public perception. He also pointed out the large number of 'regulatory bodies' involved in the regulation of radioactive waste management facilities and particularly geological disposal facilities, and their links to the Government. He gave the example of the United Kingdom. He stressed the fact that, since there will not be continuous control, licensing of geological disposal is an act of trust in the regulatory system. A. Duncan gave the position of two Commissions in England on deep geological disposal. The UK Sustainable Development Commission says, 'it is impossible to guarantee safety over long-term disposal of (nuclear) waste' which implies that nuclear fission power should be shut down; CoRWM, the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management, recommends instead geological disposal for existing wastes as a broadly acceptable solution. As a concluding remark A. Duncan focused the attention on the general question of what current society needs to do in order to meet its obligations to future generations with respect to disposal of long-lived wastes. (authors)

  13. Protective Controller against Cascade Outages with Selective Harmonic Compensation Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovich, B. N.; Kuznetsov, P. A.; Sychev, Yu A.

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents data on the power quality and development of protective devices for the power networks with distributed generation (DG).The research has shown that power quality requirements for DG networks differ from conventional ones. That is why main tendencies, protective equipment and filters should be modified. There isa developed algorithm for detection and prevention of cascade outages that can lead to the blackoutin DG networks and there was a proposed structural scheme for a new active power filter for selective harmonics compensation. Analysis of these theories and equipment led to the development of protective device that could monitor power balance and cut off non-important consumers. The last part of the article describes a microcontroller prototype developed for connection to the existing power station control center.

  14. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  15. Pharmacodynamic/Pharmacogenomic Modeling of Insulin Resistance Genes in Rat Muscle After Methylprednisolone Treatment: Exploring Regulatory Signaling Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Yao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids (CS effects on insulin resistance related genes in rat skeletal muscle were studied. In our acute study, adrenalectomized (ADX rats were given single doses of 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL intravenously. In our chronic study, ADX rats were implanted with Alzet mini-pumps giving zero-order release rates of 0.3 mg/kg/h MPL and sacrificed at various times up to 7 days. Total RNA was extracted from gastrocnemius muscles and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChips. Data mining and literature searches identified 6 insulin resistance related genes which exhibited complex regulatory pathways. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4 (PDK4, fatty acid translocase (FAT and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT dynamic profiles were modeled with mutual effects by calculated nuclear drug-receptor complex (DR(N and transcription factors. The oscillatory feature of endothelin-1 (ET-1 expression was depicted by a negative feedback loop. These integrated models provide test- able quantitative hypotheses for these regulatory cascades.

  16. Cumulative Risk Disparities in Children's Neurocognitive Functioning: A Developmental Cascade Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mark; Browne, Dillon T.; Plamondon, Andre; Daniel, Ella; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the role of cumulative social risk on children's theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF) across early development. Further, we also tested a cascade model of development in which children's social cognition at 18 months was hypothesized to predict ToM and EF at age 4.5 through intermediary…

  17. Photon strength function in the Hf-181 nucleus by method of two-step cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong Khiem

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of sum-coincidence measurements of two-step cascade gamma ray spectra determining Photon Strength Function (PSF) of Hf-181 induced from Hf-180 (n,2γ) Hf-181 reaction is presented. Up to 80% intensity of the primary gamma ray transitions in a wide energy range have been deduced and compared to model calculation. (author)

  18. Regulatory cross-talks and cascades in rice hormone biosynthesis pathways contribute to stress signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Deb

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each other’s production directly. Thus multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones.

  19. Simulation on a computer the cascade probabilistic functions and theirs relation with Markov's processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Shmygaleva, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    Within framework of the cascade-probabilistic (CP) method the radiation and physical processes are studied, theirs relation with Markov's processes are found. The conclusion that CP-function for electrons, protons, alpha-particles and ions are describing by unhomogeneous Markov's chain is drawn. The algorithms are developed, the CP-functions calculations for charged particles, concentration of radiation defects in solids at ion irradiation are carried out as well. Tables for CPF different parameters and radiation defects concentration at charged particle interaction with solids are given. The book consists of the introduction and two chapters: (1) Cascade probabilistic function and the Markov's processes; (2) Radiation defects formation in solids as a part of the Markov's processes. The book is intended for specialists on the radiation defects mathematical stimulation, solid state physics, elementary particles physics and applied mathematics

  20. The transverse momentum dependence of quark fragmentation functions from cascade models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, E.H. de; Engels, J.

    1979-01-01

    A covariant generalization of the onedimensional cascade model for quark fragmentation functions is presented, so as to include the transverse momentum behaviour and the possibility to produce different particles at different vertices along the chain. In the scaling limit the exact solution is given, if the primordial function is of the type αZsup(α-1). T(pT). For the more general case of factorizing primordial functions an analytic expression for the seagull effect is derived, which turns out to be independent of the function T(pT). (orig.) [de

  1. Cascade-probabilistic function with taking unto account energy losses of ions. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical simulation of cascade-probabilistic functions (CPF) for ions with taking into account of energy losses is carried out. Recommendations for CPF calculation on computer are given. Influence of both the interaction number on CPF domain and the interaction depth on CPF domain are determined. Contribution of energy losses into simplest CPF is estimated. Algorithm of radiation defects concentration calculation under ion irradiation with taking into consideration energy losses is cited

  2. Carrier transport in THz quantum cascade lasers: Are Green's functions necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyas, A; Jirauschek, C; Kubis, T; Lugli, P

    2009-01-01

    We have applied two different simulation models for the stationary carrier transport and optical gain analysis in resonant phonon depopulation THz Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), based on the semiclassical ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) and fully quantum mechanical non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) method, respectively. We find in the incoherent regime near and above the threshold current a qualitative and quantitative agreement of both methods. Therefore, we show that THz-QCLs can be successfully optimized utilizing the numerically efficient EMC method.

  3. Review of NRC Regulatory processes and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has spent much time over many years observing and examining the NRC licensing process. The Committee is, consequently, in a position to comment on the situation, and it believes this review will be helpful to those examining the regulatory process by discussing how it works, where it is weak, and the opportunities for improvement. The Committee's review may also help put current proposals and discussions in perspective

  4. The cascade probabilistic functions with taking into account energy losses for ions. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the Chapter 3 the cascade probabilistic functions mathematical simulation with taking into account energy losses for ions are considered. The calculation of the CPF on the computer is carried out. The influence of both the interaction number and the penetration depth on the CPF determination field for ions are revealed. The estimation of energy losses contribution in the simplest CPF is made. Calculation algorithm for radiation defects concentration at ion irradiation with use of the CPF with taking into account of energy losses is given

  5. Carrier transport in THz quantum cascade lasers: Are Green's functions necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, A; Jirauschek, C [Emmy Noether Research Group ' Modeling of Quantum Cascade Devices' , TU Muenchen, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); Kubis, T [Walter Schottky Institute, TU Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lugli, P, E-mail: alparmat@mytum.d [Institute of Nanoelectronics, TU Muenchen, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    We have applied two different simulation models for the stationary carrier transport and optical gain analysis in resonant phonon depopulation THz Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), based on the semiclassical ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) and fully quantum mechanical non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) method, respectively. We find in the incoherent regime near and above the threshold current a qualitative and quantitative agreement of both methods. Therefore, we show that THz-QCLs can be successfully optimized utilizing the numerically efficient EMC method.

  6. General trend and local variations of neutron resonance cascade gamma-decay radiative strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Furman, W.I.; Khitrov, V.A.; Jovancevic, N.

    2012-01-01

    A new hypothesis on the dependence of the form of the radiative strength functions of electric and magnetic dipole gamma transitions in a heated nucleus on the excited level density was suggested and tested experimentally. For this purpose, the region of possible values of random values of the level density and radiative strength functions which precisely reproduced experimental intensity of two-step cascades for 41 nuclei from 40K to 200Hg was determined. It was obtained that the suggested hypothesis can provide the maximal increase of radiative strength functions values by order of magnitude in comparison with existing notations as a result of collective effects enhancement. This result points to the necessity to take into account this possibility in existing and future models of radiative strength functions

  7. ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 constitute a transcriptional regulatory cascade involved in salt or osmotic stress in Tamarix hispida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Dandan; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Yiming; Zhao, Huimin; Wang, Yucheng

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the upstream regulators of a gene is important to characterize the transcriptional pathway and the function of the gene. Previously, we found that a zinc finger protein (ThZFP1) is involved in abiotic stress tolerance of Tamarix hispida. In the present study, we further investigated the transcriptional pathway of ThZFP1. Dof motifs are abundant in the ThZFP1 promoter; therefore, we used them to screen for transcriptional regulators of ThZFP1. A Dof protein, ThDof1.4, binds to the Dof motif specifically, and was hypothesized as the upstream regulator of ThZFP1. Further study showed that overexpression of ThDof1.4 in T. hispida activated the expression of GUS controlled by the ThZFP1 promoter. In T. hispida, transient overexpression of ThDof1.4 increased the transcripts of ThZFP1; conversely, transient RNAi-silencing of ThDof1.4 reduced the expression of ThZFP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that ThDof1.4 binds to the ThZFP1 promoter. Additionally, ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 share similar expression patterns in response to salt or drought stress. Furthermore, like ThZFP1, ThDof1.4 could increase the proline level and enhance ROS scavenging capability to improve salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Together, these results suggested that ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 form a transcriptional regulatory cascade involved in abiotic stress resistance in T. hispida.

  8. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed

  9. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  10. Structural and regulatory functions of keratins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, Thomas M.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of epithelial functions is reflected by the expression of distinct keratin pairs that are responsible to protect epithelial cells against mechanical stress and to act as signaling platforms. The keratin cytoskeleton integrates these functions by forming a supracellular scaffold that connects at desmosomal cell-cell adhesions. Multiple human diseases and murine knockouts in which the integrity of this system is destroyed testify to its importance as a mechanical stabilizer in certain epithelia. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the precise mechanisms responsible for assembly and disease pathology. In addition to these structural aspects of keratin function, experimental evidence accumulating in recent years has led to a much more complex view of the keratin cytoskeleton. Distinct keratins emerge as highly dynamic scaffolds in different settings and contribute to cell size determination, translation control, proliferation, cell type-specific organelle transport, malignant transformation and various stress responses. All of these properties are controlled by highly complex patterns of phosphorylation and molecular associations

  11. Cascade-probabilistic functions for protons and α-particles. Chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Cascade-probabilistic function (CPF) for protons and α-particles with taking into account of energy losses is developed. CPF calculation on computer are given. Application package for CPF calculation and selection of theoretical curves are realized on BEhSM-6 and EhS-1045 on Fortran-Dubna and Fortran-4 languages. Calculations for protons and α-particles in Al, Si, Ti, Cu, Mo under E 0 =1-50 MeV are carried out. Calculation results for protons shows that CPF behavior is analogous to case with electrons. Some peculiarities of calculation of CPF are emphasized. Energy losses contribution into CPF and radiation defects concentration are estimated. Radiation defect generation under proton and α-irradiation with use CPF with taking into account energy losses is considered

  12. Modulation transfer function cascade model for a sampled IR imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, L; Cardone, G

    1991-05-01

    The performance of the infrared scanning radiometer (IRSR) is strongly stressed in convective heat transfer applications where high spatial frequencies in the signal that describes the thermal image are present. The need to characterize more deeply the system spatial resolution has led to the formulation of a cascade model for the evaluation of the actual modulation transfer function of a sampled IR imaging system. The model can yield both the aliasing band and the averaged modulation response for a general sampling subsystem. For a line scan imaging system, which is the case of a typical IRSR, a rule of thumb that states whether the combined sampling-imaging system is either imaging-dependent or sampling-dependent is proposed. The model is tested by comparing it with other noncascade models as well as by ad hoc measurements performed on a commercial digitized IRSR.

  13. Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Maturation of Serotonin Neuron Identity and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, William C; Deneris, Evan S

    2017-01-01

    The brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system has been extensively studied for its role in normal physiology and behavior, as well as, neuropsychiatric disorders. The broad influence of 5-HT on brain function, is in part due to the vast connectivity pattern of 5-HT-producing neurons throughout the CNS. 5-HT neurons are born and terminally specified midway through embryogenesis, then enter a protracted period of maturation, where they functionally integrate into CNS circuitry and then are maintained throughout life. The transcriptional regulatory networks controlling progenitor cell generation and terminal specification of 5-HT neurons are relatively well-understood, yet the factors controlling 5-HT neuron maturation are only recently coming to light. In this review, we first provide an update on the regulatory network controlling 5-HT neuron development, then delve deeper into the properties and regulatory strategies governing 5-HT neuron maturation. In particular, we discuss the role of the 5-HT neuron terminal selector transcription factor (TF) Pet-1 as a key regulator of 5-HT neuron maturation. Pet-1 was originally shown to positively regulate genes needed for 5-HT synthesis, reuptake and vesicular transport, hence 5-HT neuron-type transmitter identity. It has now been shown to regulate, both positively and negatively, many other categories of genes in 5-HT neurons including ion channels, GPCRs, transporters, neuropeptides, and other transcription factors. Its function as a terminal selector results in the maturation of 5-HT neuron excitability, firing characteristics, and synaptic modulation by several neurotransmitters. Furthermore, there is a temporal requirement for Pet-1 in the control of postmitotic gene expression trajectories thus indicating a direct role in 5-HT neuron maturation. Proper regulation of the maturation of cellular identity is critical for normal neuronal functioning and perturbations in the gene regulatory networks controlling

  14. Do stage-specific functional responses of consumers dampen the effects of subsidies on trophic cascades in streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takuya; Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    2014-07-01

    Resource subsidies often weaken trophic cascades in recipient communities via consumers' functional response to the subsidies. Consumer populations are commonly stage-structured and may respond to the subsidies differently among the stages yet less is known about how this might impact the subsidy effects on the strength of trophic cascades in recipient systems. We show here, using a large-scale field experiment, that the stage structure of a recipient consumer would dampen the effects of terrestrial invertebrate subsidies on the strength of trophic cascade in streams. When a high input rate of the terrestrial invertebrates was available, both large and small fish stages switched their diet to the terrestrial subsidy, which weakened the trophic cascade in streams. However, when the input rate of the terrestrial invertebrates was at a moderate level, the terrestrial subsidy did not weaken the trophic cascade. This discrepancy was likely due to small fish stages being competitively excluded from feeding on the subsidy by larger stages of fish and primarily foraging on benthic invertebrates under the moderate input level. Although previous studies using single fish stages have clearly demonstrated that the terrestrial invertebrate input equivalent to our moderate input rate weakened the trophic cascade in streams, this subsidy effect might be overestimated given small fish stage may not switch their diet to the subsidy under competition with large fish stage. Given the ubiquity of consumer stage structure and interaction among consumer stages, the effects we saw might be widespread in nature, requiring future studies that explicitly involve consumer's stage structure into community ecology. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  15. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The Role of Advisory Committees on Regulatory functions: Argentine Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, A. M.; Arias, C.; Kunst, J. J.; Perez, R. M.; Rudelli, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) has appointed a consultants body that advises its Board of Directors on aspects related to authorization's granting to individuals for the use of radioisotopes and ionizing radiation in medicine, research and industry. Such committee, whose existence goes back to the year 1958, is integrated by prominent professionals knowledgeable about ionizing radiation and radioisotopes applications in the medical, biomedical and industrial fields, representing important professional associations or institutions related to the practices in question. Originally, the committee was conceived as a consultation body to fulfil two important functions: To produce, in a regular way, authorized opinions at experts level to settle down questions relative to the regulation of practices, new at that time in the country, and To submit to a peer review applications for individual authorization for different uses of ionizing radiation previously it's granting by the Regulatory Authority. In this paper the role of the advisory council is analyzed from a historical perspective trying to emphasize an outstanding aspect not sufficiently analyzed linked to the capability that advisory bodies, with representative users' presence, can reach in the interpretation of regulatory standards based on a performance philosophy. Such approach outlines the permanent dilemma about the performance level of the licensee that should satisfy the Regulatory Authority. Once the broad objectives of radiation protection has been defined professional criteria is required for applying them to different practices. Balance between flexibility and avoidance of excessive uncertainty is desirable. In the authors' opinion the inclusion, inside the regulator's structure of consultants bodies giving direct participation to qualified stakeholders, far from harming the necessary independence that should characterize the regulator, on the contrary, allows to have an excellent social

  17. Memory functions reveal structural properties of gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Carrasco, Ruben

    2018-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) control cellular function and decision making during tissue development and homeostasis. Mathematical tools based on dynamical systems theory are often used to model these networks, but the size and complexity of these models mean that their behaviour is not always intuitive and the underlying mechanisms can be difficult to decipher. For this reason, methods that simplify and aid exploration of complex networks are necessary. To this end we develop a broadly applicable form of the Zwanzig-Mori projection. By first converting a thermodynamic state ensemble model of gene regulation into mass action reactions we derive a general method that produces a set of time evolution equations for a subset of components of a network. The influence of the rest of the network, the bulk, is captured by memory functions that describe how the subnetwork reacts to its own past state via components in the bulk. These memory functions provide probes of near-steady state dynamics, revealing information not easily accessible otherwise. We illustrate the method on a simple cross-repressive transcriptional motif to show that memory functions not only simplify the analysis of the subnetwork but also have a natural interpretation. We then apply the approach to a GRN from the vertebrate neural tube, a well characterised developmental transcriptional network composed of four interacting transcription factors. The memory functions reveal the function of specific links within the neural tube network and identify features of the regulatory structure that specifically increase the robustness of the network to initial conditions. Taken together, the study provides evidence that Zwanzig-Mori projections offer powerful and effective tools for simplifying and exploring the behaviour of GRNs. PMID:29470492

  18. Functional alignment of regulatory networks: a study of temperate phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Trusina

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the design and functionality of molecular networks is now a key issue in biology. Comparison of regulatory networks performing similar tasks can provide insights into how network architecture is constrained by the functions it directs. Here, we discuss methods of network comparison based on network architecture and signaling logic. Introducing local and global signaling scores for the difference between two networks, we quantify similarities between evolutionarily closely and distantly related bacteriophages. Despite the large evolutionary separation between phage lambda and 186, their networks are found to be similar when difference is measured in terms of global signaling. We finally discuss how network alignment can be used to pinpoint protein similarities viewed from the network perspective.

  19. Interleukin-2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 and its downstream target STAT5 have effects on many aspects of immune function. This has been perhaps best documented in regulatory T cells. In this review we summarize the initial findings supporting a role for IL2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and outline more recent studies describing how this critical signaling pathway entrains regulatory T cell differentiation and affects regulatory T cell function.

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Archaeal Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-associated Complex for Antiviral Defense (CASCADE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA....... The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5......a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2...

  1. A review of NRC regulatory processes and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    A reexamination by the ACRS of the Regulatory Process has been made. Objectives were to provide in a single source, ACRS' understanding of the Regulatory Process and to point out perceived weaknesses and to make appropriate recommendations for change

  2. Functional and topological characteristics of mammalian regulatory domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmons, Orsolya; Uslu, Veli Vural; Tsujimura, Taro; Ruf, Sandra; Nassari, Sonya; Schwarzer, Wibke; Ettwiller, Laurence; Spitz, François

    2014-01-01

    Long-range regulatory interactions play an important role in shaping gene-expression programs. However, the genomic features that organize these activities are still poorly characterized. We conducted a large operational analysis to chart the distribution of gene regulatory activities along the mouse genome, using hundreds of insertions of a regulatory sensor. We found that enhancers distribute their activities along broad regions and not in a gene-centric manner, defining large regulatory domains. Remarkably, these domains correlate strongly with the recently described TADs, which partition the genome into distinct self-interacting blocks. Different features, including specific repeats and CTCF-binding sites, correlate with the transition zones separating regulatory domains, and may help to further organize promiscuously distributed regulatory influences within large domains. These findings support a model of genomic organization where TADs confine regulatory activities to specific but large regulatory domains, contributing to the establishment of specific gene expression profiles. PMID:24398455

  3. The morphology of collision cascades as a function of recoil energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1989-09-01

    An analytical method based on defect densities has been devised to determine the threshold energies for subcascade formation in computer simulated collision cascades. Cascades generated with the binary collision code MARLOWE in Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Fe, Mo and W were analyzed to determine the threshold energy for subcascade formation, the number of subcascades per recoil per unit energy and the average spacing of subcascades. Compared on the basis of reduced damage energy, metals of the same crystal structure have subcascade thresholds at the same reduced energy. The number of subcascades per unit reduced damage energy is about the same for metals of the same crystal structure, and the average spacing of subcascades is about the same in units of lattice parameters. Comparisons between subcascade threshold energies and average recoil energies in fission and fusion neutron environments show the spectral sensitivity of the formation of subcascades

  4. Representation of radiative strength functions within a practical model of cascade gamma decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, D. C., E-mail: vuconghnue@gmail.com; Sukhovoj, A. M., E-mail: suchovoj@nf.jinr.ru; Mitsyna, L. V., E-mail: mitsyna@nf.jinr.ru; Zeinalov, Sh., E-mail: zeinal@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Jovancevic, N., E-mail: nikola.jovancevic@df.uns.ac.rs; Knezevic, D., E-mail: david.knezevic@df.uns.ac.rs; Krmar, M., E-mail: krmar@df.uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences (Serbia); Dragic, A., E-mail: dragic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-03-15

    A practical model developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna) in order to describe the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances makes it possible to determine simultaneously, from an approximation of the intensities of two-step cascades, parameters of nuclear level densities and partial widths with respect to the emission of nuclear-reaction products. The number of the phenomenological ideas used isminimized in themodel version considered in the present study. An analysis of new results confirms what was obtained earlier for the dependence of dynamics of the interaction of fermion and boson nuclear states on the nuclear shape. From the ratio of the level densities for excitations of the vibrational and quasiparticle types, it also follows that this interaction manifests itself in the region around the neutron binding energy and is probably different in nuclei that have different parities of nucleons.

  5. Representation of the radiative strength functions in the practical model of cascade gamma decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, D.C.; Sukhovoj, A.M.; Mitsyna, L.V.; Zeinalov, Sh.; Jovancevic, N.; Knezevic, D.; Krmar, M.; Dragic, A.

    2016-01-01

    The developed in Dubna practical model of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonance allows one, from the fitted intensities of the two-step cascades, to obtain parameters both of level density and of partial widths of emission of nuclear reaction products. In the presented variant of the model a part of phenomenological representations is minimized. Analysis of new results confirms the previous finding that dynamics of interaction between Fermi- and Bose-nuclear states depends on the form of the nucleus. It also follows from the ratios of densities of vibrational and quasi-particle levels that this interaction exists at least up to the binding neutron energy and probably differs for nuclei with varied parities of nucleons. [ru

  6. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  7. An iron/amine-catalyzed cascade process for the enantioselective functionalization of allylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Adrien; Constantieux, Thierry; Rodriguez, Jean

    2013-12-02

    Three is a lucky number: An enantioselective transformation of allylic alcohols into β-chiral saturated alcohols has been developed by combining two distinct metal- and organocatalyzed catalytic cycles. This waste-free triple cascade process merges an iron-catalyzed borrowing-hydrogen step with an aminocatalyzed nucleophilic addition reaction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D.; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H.; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain–containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  9. 1974 annual report to Congress. Part one: operating and developmental functions. Part two: regulatory functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This report is of a nontechnical nature, with numerous photographs. The first part contains chapters on the reorganization of the AEC to ERDA and NRC, the history of the AEC: 1946--1975, energy research and development, breeder reactors, public health and safety, fusion research, environmental research, biomedical research, physical research, nuclear materials, national security, and management of radioactive waste. The part on regulatory functions contains chapters on nuclear regulation in 1974, 1974 nuclear power licensing, fuels and materials licensing, nuclear materials and plant protection, regulatory operations, nuclear standards development, public participation in regulation, and state and international liaison. Appendixes give membership of various boards and committees, changes in rules and regulations, a list of AEC regulatory guides, and a table of nuclear electric generating units in operation, under construction, or planned. (U.S.)

  10. First results on photon strength functions of 78Se from the two-step γ Cascades measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Stanislav; Bečvář, František; Krtička, Milan; Tomandl, Ivo

    2017-09-01

    Two-step gamma cascades (TSCs) following the radiative capture of thermal neutrons in 77Se were measured at the research reactor at Řež near Prague. Results on photon strength functions (PSFs) of 78Se, obtained from comparison of experimental TSC spectra with outcomes of simulations under different assumptions about level density and PSFs using the DICEBOX algorithm, are presented. The main attention is paid to possible manifestation of the pygmy resonance observed recently in this nucleus in the nuclear resonance fluorescence measurement and low-energy PSF enhancement observed in Oslo-type experiments for all A ≲ 100 nuclei.

  11. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for GaN-based terahertz-quantum cascade laser structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, H.; Kubis, T.; Hosako, I.; Hirakawa, K.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigated GaN-based resonant phonon terahertz-quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures for possible high-temperature operation by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It was found that the GaN-based THz-QCL structures do not necessarily have a gain sufficient for lasing, even though the thermal backfilling and the thermally activated phonon scattering are effectively suppressed. The main reason for this is the broadening of the subband levels caused by a very strong interaction between electrons and longitudinal optical (LO) phonons in GaN.

  12. Comparative Evolution of Morphological Regulatory Functions in Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Erika; Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; Childers, Delma S.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological transitions play an important role in virulence and virulence-related processes in a wide variety of pathogenic fungi, including the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. While environmental signals, transcriptional regulators, and target genes associated with C. albicans morphogenesis are well-characterized, considerably little is known about morphological regulatory mechanisms and the extent to which they are evolutionarily conserved in less pathogenic and less filamentous non-albicans Candida species (NACS). We have identified specific optimal filament-inducing conditions for three NACS (C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii), which are very limited, suggesting that these species may be adapted for niche-specific filamentation in the host. Only a subset of evolutionarily conserved C. albicans filament-specific target genes were induced upon filamentation in C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii. One of the genes showing conserved expression was UME6, a key filament-specific regulator of C. albicans hyphal development. Constitutive high-level expression of UME6 was sufficient to drive increased filamentation as well as biofilm formation and partly restore conserved filament-specific gene expression in both C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis, suggesting that evolutionary differences in filamentation ability among pathogenic Candida species may be partially attributed to alterations in the expression level of a conserved filamentous growth machinery. In contrast to UME6, NRG1, an important repressor of C. albicans filamentation, showed only a partly conserved role in controlling NACS filamentation. Overall, our results suggest that C. albicans morphological regulatory functions are partially conserved in NACS and have evolved to respond to more specific sets of host environmental cues. PMID:23913541

  13. Pretransplantation recipient regulatory T cell suppressive function predicts delayed and slow graft function after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Tri J P; Fryml, Elise; Sahakian, Sossy K; Liu, Shuqing; Michel, Rene P; Lipman, Mark L; Mucsi, Istvan; Cantarovich, Marcelo; Tchervenkov, Jean I; Paraskevas, Steven

    2014-10-15

    Delayed graft function (DGF) and slow graft function (SGF) are a continuous spectrum of ischemia-reperfusion-related acute kidney injury (AKI) that increases the risk for acute rejection and graft loss after kidney transplantation. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical in transplant tolerance and attenuate murine AKI. In this prospective observational cohort study, we evaluated whether pretransplantation peripheral blood recipient Treg frequency and suppressive function are predictors of DGF and SGF after kidney transplantation. Deceased donor kidney transplant recipients (n=53) were divided into AKI (n=37; DGF, n=10; SGF, n=27) and immediate graft function (n=16) groups. Pretransplantation peripheral blood CD4CD25FoxP3 Treg frequency was quantified by flow cytometry. Regulatory T-cell suppressive function was measured by suppression of autologous effector T-cell proliferation by Treg in co-culture. Pretransplantation Treg suppressive function, but not frequency, was decreased in AKI recipients (Paccounting for the effects of cold ischemic time and donor age, Treg suppressive function discriminated DGF from immediate graft function recipients in multinomial logistic regression (odds ratio, 0.77; Pfunction is a potential independent pretransplantation predictor of DGF and SGF.

  14. Engineering Specificity and Function of Therapeutic Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L. McGovern

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with polyclonal regulatory T cells (Tregs has shown efficacy in suppressing detrimental immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity and transplantation. The lack of specificity is a potential limitation of Treg therapy, as studies in mice have demonstrated that specificity can enhance the therapeutic potency of Treg. We will discuss that vectors encoding T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors provide an efficient gene-transfer platform to reliably produce Tregs of defined antigen specificity, thus overcoming the considerable difficulties of isolating low-frequency, antigen-specific cells that may be present in the natural Treg repertoire. The recent observations that Tregs can polarize into distinct lineages similar to the Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets described for conventional T helper cells raise the possibility that Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-driven pathology may require matching Treg subsets for optimal therapeutic efficacy. In the future, genetic engineering may serve not only to enforce FoxP3 expression and a stable Treg phenotype but it may also enable the expression of particular transcription factors that drive differentiation into defined Treg subsets. Together, established and recently developed gene transfer and editing tools provide exciting opportunities to produce tailor-made antigen-specific Treg products with defined functional activities.

  15. The Diguanylate Cyclase HsbD Intersects with the HptB Regulatory Cascade to Control Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Valentini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of second messenger signaling relies on an array of proteins that synthesize, degrade or bind the molecule to produce coherent functional outputs. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP has emerged as a eubacterial nucleotide second messenger regulating a plethora of key behaviors, like the transition from planktonic cells to biofilm communities. The striking multiplicity of c-di-GMP control modules and regulated cellular functions raised the question of signaling specificity. Are c-di-GMP signaling routes exclusively dependent on a central hub or can they be locally administrated? In this study, we show an example of how c-di-GMP signaling gains output specificity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observed the occurrence in P. aeruginosa of a c-di-GMP synthase gene, hsbD, in the proximity of the hptB and flagellar genes cluster. We show that the HptB pathway controls biofilm formation and motility by involving both HsbD and the anti-anti-sigma factor HsbA. The rewiring of c-di-GMP signaling into the HptB cascade relies on the original interaction between HsbD and HsbA and on the control of HsbD dynamic localization at the cell poles.

  16. Cascaded nano-porous silicon for high sensitive biosensing and functional group distinguishing by Mid-IR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hang; Tsai, Hau-Jie; Wu, Jen-Kuei; Wu, Yi-Shiuan; Lee, Ming-Chang; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-09-15

    We present a chemical-biosensor in the Mid-IR range and based on cascaded porous silicon made on p- and n-type (100) silicon substrates of resistivities between 0.001Ωcm and 0.005Ωcm. The stacked porous layers of various porosities (20-80%) and thicknesses (5-9μm) are formed by successive electrochemical etchings with different current densities. Working with FTIR technique that possesses fast response, high sensitivity, and capability of detecting and identifying functional groups, the cascaded porous structures provided enhanced refractive index sensitivities and reduced detection limits in chemical and biodetection. The largest wavenumber shifts were 50cm(-1)/mM obtained for d-(+)-glucose and 96cm(-1)/μg/mL for Cy5-conjungated Rabbit Anti-Mouse IgG. The lowest detectable concentration of glucose was 80μM (1.4mg/mL) with PS porosity of 40% and thickness of about 9μm while it was 40ng/mL for Cy5-conjugated Rabbit Anti-Mouse IgG which is 2.5×10(5) folds better than those in literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Sequence and Structure Based Method to Predict Putative Substrates, Functions and Regulatory Networks of Endo Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Prasanna; Balakrishnan, Satish; Rao, Shashidhar; Hooda, Yogesh; Pol, Suyog

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteases play a central role in cellular homeostasis and are responsible for the spatio- temporal regulation of function. Many putative proteases have been recently identified through genomic approaches, leading to a surge in global profiling attempts to characterize their function. Through such efforts and others it has become evident that many proteases play non-traditional roles. Accordingly, the number and the variety of the substrate repertoire of proteases are expected to be much larger than previously assumed. In line with such global profiling attempts, we present here a method for the prediction of natural substrates of endo proteases (human proteases used as an example) by employing short peptide sequences as specificity determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings Our method incorporates specificity determinants unique to individual enzymes and physiologically relevant dual filters namely, solvent accessible surface area-a parameter dependent on protein three-dimensional structure and subcellular localization. By incorporating such hitherto unused principles in prediction methods, a novel ligand docking strategy to mimic substrate binding at the active site of the enzyme, and GO functions, we identify and perform subjective validation on putative substrates of matriptase and highlight new functions of the enzyme. Using relative solvent accessibility to rank order we show how new protease regulatory networks and enzyme cascades can be created. Conclusion We believe that our physiologically relevant computational approach would be a very useful complementary method in the current day attempts to profile proteases (endo proteases in particular) and their substrates. In addition, by using functional annotations, we have demonstrated how normal and unknown functions of a protease can be envisaged. We have developed a network which can be integrated to create a proteolytic world. This network can in turn be extended to integrate other regulatory

  18. Structural and functional characterization of an archaeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated complex for antiviral defense (CASCADE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K; Graham, Shirley; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H; Sdano, Matthew; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Copié, Valérie; Young, Mark J; White, Malcolm F; Lawrence, C Martin

    2011-06-17

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA. The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2-Cas5a complex is sufficient to bind crRNA and complementary ssDNA. The structure of Csa2 reveals a crescent-shaped structure unexpectedly composed of a modified RNA-recognition motif and two additional domains present as insertions in the RNA-recognition motif. Conserved residues indicate potential crRNA- and target DNA-binding sites, and the H160A variant shows significantly reduced affinity for crRNA. We propose a general subunit architecture for CASCADE in other bacteria and Archaea.

  19. Transcriptional regulatory programs underlying barley germination and regulatory functions of Gibberellin and abscisic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed germination is a complex multi-stage developmental process, and mainly accomplished through concerted activities of many gene products and biological pathways that are often subjected to strict developmental regulation. Gibberellins (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) are two key phytohormones regulating seed germination and seedling growth. However, transcriptional regulatory networks underlying seed germination and its associated biological pathways are largely unknown. Results The studies examined transcriptomes of barley representing six distinct and well characterized germination stages and revealed that the transcriptional regulatory program underlying barley germination was composed of early, late, and post-germination phases. Each phase was accompanied with transcriptional up-regulation of distinct biological pathways. Cell wall synthesis and regulatory components including transcription factors, signaling and post-translational modification components were specifically and transiently up-regulated in early germination phase while histone families and many metabolic pathways were up-regulated in late germination phase. Photosynthesis and seed reserve mobilization pathways were up-regulated in post-germination phase. However, stress related pathways and seed storage proteins were suppressed through the entire course of germination. A set of genes were transiently up-regulated within three hours of imbibition, and might play roles in initiating biological pathways involved in seed germination. However, highly abundant transcripts in dry barley and Arabidopsis seeds were significantly conserved. Comparison with transcriptomes of barley aleurone in response to GA and ABA identified three sets of germination responsive genes that were regulated coordinately by GA, antagonistically by ABA, and coordinately by GA but antagonistically by ABA. Major CHO metabolism, cell wall degradation and protein degradation pathways were up-regulated by both GA and seed

  20. Transcriptional regulatory programs underlying barley germination and regulatory functions of Gibberellin and abscisic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed germination is a complex multi-stage developmental process, and mainly accomplished through concerted activities of many gene products and biological pathways that are often subjected to strict developmental regulation. Gibberellins (GA and abscisic acid (ABA are two key phytohormones regulating seed germination and seedling growth. However, transcriptional regulatory networks underlying seed germination and its associated biological pathways are largely unknown. Results The studies examined transcriptomes of barley representing six distinct and well characterized germination stages and revealed that the transcriptional regulatory program underlying barley germination was composed of early, late, and post-germination phases. Each phase was accompanied with transcriptional up-regulation of distinct biological pathways. Cell wall synthesis and regulatory components including transcription factors, signaling and post-translational modification components were specifically and transiently up-regulated in early germination phase while histone families and many metabolic pathways were up-regulated in late germination phase. Photosynthesis and seed reserve mobilization pathways were up-regulated in post-germination phase. However, stress related pathways and seed storage proteins were suppressed through the entire course of germination. A set of genes were transiently up-regulated within three hours of imbibition, and might play roles in initiating biological pathways involved in seed germination. However, highly abundant transcripts in dry barley and Arabidopsis seeds were significantly conserved. Comparison with transcriptomes of barley aleurone in response to GA and ABA identified three sets of germination responsive genes that were regulated coordinately by GA, antagonistically by ABA, and coordinately by GA but antagonistically by ABA. Major CHO metabolism, cell wall degradation and protein degradation pathways were up

  1. Regulatory immune cells and functions in autoimmunity and transplantation immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gabor; Boros, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2017-05-01

    In physiological circumstances, various tolerogenic mechanisms support the protection of self-structures during immune responses. However, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in regulatory immune cells and mediators can evoke auto-reactive immune responses, and upon susceptible genetic background, along with the presence of other concomitant etiological factors, autoimmune disease may develop. In transplant immunology, tolerogenic mechanisms are also critical, since the balance between of alloantigen-reactive effector cells and the regulatory immune cells will ultimately determine whether a graft is accepted or rejected. Better understanding of the immunological tolerance and the potential modulations of immune regulatory processes are crucial for developing effective therapies in autoimmune diseases as well as in organ transplantation. In this review, we focus on the novel insights regarding the impaired immune regulation and other relevant factors contributing to the development of auto-reactive and graft-reactive immune responses in autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, respectively. We also address some promising approaches for modification of immune-regulatory processes and tolerogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity and solid organ transplantation, which may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Everyday risk taking as a function of regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamstra, Melvyn R. W.; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Veldstra, Janet L.

    Uncertainty is an inherent aspect of everyday life. However, faced with uncertainty, some individuals take risks more eagerly than others. Regulatory focus theory may explain such differences because risky behavior may arise naturally from the eagerness of promotion focused individuals, while safe

  3. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  4. Airway function, inflammation and regulatory T cell function in subjects in asthma remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Turcott, Hélène; Plante, Sophie; Chakir, Jamila

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with asthma remission need to be determined, particularly when remission occurs in adulthood. To evaluate airway responsiveness and inflammation in adult patients in asthma remission compared with adults with mild, persistent symptomatic asthma. Adenosine monophosphate and methacholine responsiveness were evaluated in 26 patients in complete remission of asthma, 16 patients in symptomatic remission of asthma, 29 mild asthmatic patients and 15 healthy controls. Blood sampling and induced sputum were also obtained to measure inflammatory parameters. Perception of breathlessness at 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s was similar among groups. In subjects with symptomatic remission of asthma, responsiveness to adenosine monophosphate and methacholine was intermediate between mild asthma and complete asthma remission, with the latter group similar to controls. Asthma remission was associated with a shorter duration of disease. Blood immunoglobulin E levels were significantly increased in the asthma group, and blood eosinophils were significantly elevated in the complete asthma remission, symptomatic remission and asthma groups compared with controls. The suppressive function of regulatory T cells was lower in asthma and remission groups compared with controls. A continuum of asthma remission was observed, with patients in complete asthma remission presenting features similar to controls, while patients in symptomatic asthma remission appeared to be in an intermediate state between complete asthma remission and symptomatic asthma. Remission was associated with a shorter disease duration. Despite remission of asthma, a decreased suppressor function of regulatory T cells was observed, which may predispose patients to future recurrence of the disease.

  5. Regulatory networks and connected components of the neutral space. A look at functional islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldhaus, G.; Klemm, K.

    2010-09-01

    The functioning of a living cell is largely determined by the structure of its regulatory network, comprising non-linear interactions between regulatory genes. An important factor for the stability and evolvability of such regulatory systems is neutrality - typically a large number of alternative network structures give rise to the necessary dynamics. Here we study the discretized regulatory dynamics of the yeast cell cycle [Li et al., PNAS, 2004] and the set of networks capable of reproducing it, which we call functional. Among these, the empirical yeast wildtype network is close to optimal with respect to sparse wiring. Under point mutations, which establish or delete single interactions, the neutral space of functional networks is fragmented into ≈ 4.7 × 108 components. One of the smaller ones contains the wildtype network. On average, functional networks reachable from the wildtype by mutations are sparser, have higher noise resilience and fewer fixed point attractors as compared with networks outside of this wildtype component.

  6. GenomeRunner web server: regulatory similarity and differences define the functional impact of SNP sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Cara, Lukas R; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D

    2016-08-01

    The growing amount of regulatory data from the ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics and other consortia provides a wealth of opportunities to investigate the functional impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Yet, given the large number of regulatory datasets, researchers are posed with a challenge of how to efficiently utilize them to interpret the functional impact of SNP sets. We developed the GenomeRunner web server to automate systematic statistical analysis of SNP sets within a regulatory context. Besides defining the functional impact of SNP sets, GenomeRunner implements novel regulatory similarity/differential analyses, and cell type-specific regulatory enrichment analysis. Validated against literature- and disease ontology-based approaches, analysis of 39 disease/trait-associated SNP sets demonstrated that the functional impact of SNP sets corresponds to known disease relationships. We identified a group of autoimmune diseases with SNPs distinctly enriched in the enhancers of T helper cell subpopulations, and demonstrated relevant cell type-specificity of the functional impact of other SNP sets. In summary, we show how systematic analysis of genomic data within a regulatory context can help interpreting the functional impact of SNP sets. GenomeRunner web server is freely available at http://www.integrativegenomics.org/ mikhail.dozmorov@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Rising tides, cumulative impacts and cascading changes to estuarine ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Theresa A; Hillman, Jenny R; Thrush, Simon F

    2017-08-31

    In coastal ecosystems, climate change affects multiple environmental factors, yet most predictive models are based on simple cause-and-effect relationships. Multiple stressor scenarios are difficult to predict because they can create a ripple effect through networked ecosystem functions. Estuarine ecosystem function relies on an interconnected network of physical and biological processes. Estuarine habitats play critical roles in service provision and represent global hotspots for organic matter processing, nutrient cycling and primary production. Within these systems, we predicted functional changes in the impacts of land-based stressors, mediated by changing light climate and sediment permeability. Our in-situ field experiment manipulated sea level, nutrient supply, and mud content. We used these stressors to determine how interacting environmental stressors influence ecosystem function and compared results with data collected along elevation gradients to substitute space for time. We show non-linear, multi-stressor effects deconstruct networks governing ecosystem function. Sea level rise altered nutrient processing and impacted broader estuarine services ameliorating nutrient and sediment pollution. Our experiment demonstrates how the relationships between nutrient processing and biological/physical controls degrade with environmental stress. Our results emphasise the importance of moving beyond simple physically-forced relationships to assess consequences of climate change in the context of ecosystem interactions and multiple stressors.

  8. Sustained attention in infancy as a longitudinal predictor of self-regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Maria; Marciszko, Carin; Gredebäck, Gustaf; Nyström, Pär; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2015-11-01

    Previous literature suggests that attention processes such as sustained attention would constitute a developmental foundation for the self-regulatory functions executive functioning and effortful control (e.g., Garon, Bryson, & Smith, 2008; Rothbart, Derryberry, & Posner, 1994). Our main aim was to test this hypothesis by studying whether sustained attention at age 1 year can predict individual differences in self-regulatory functions at age 2 years. Longitudinal data from 66 infants and their parents were included in the study. Sustained attention was assessed during free play at age 1 year; executive functioning, measured using an eye-tracking version of the A-not-B task, and effortful control, measured using parental ratings, were assessed at both age 1 and age 2 years. The results did support a longitudinal prediction of individual differences in 2-year-olds' self-regulatory functions as a function of sustained attention at age 1 year. We also found significant improvement in both executive functioning and effortful control over time, and the two self-regulatory constructs were related in toddlerhood but not in infancy. The study helps increase our understanding of the early development of self-regulatory functions necessary for identifying developmental risks and, in the future, for developing new interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical immunoassay for thyroxine detection using cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer and multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying, E-mail: yingzhuo@swu.edu.cn; Chai, Yaqin; Yu, Yanqing; Liao, Ni; Yuan, Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn

    2013-08-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A reusable electrochemical immunosensor is developed for thyroxine detection. •Cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer. •Multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag. •The novel strategy has the advantages of high sensitivity, good selectivity and reproducibility. -- Abstract: This paper constructed a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of thyroxine at an ultralow concentration using cascade catalysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and glucose oxidase (GOx) as signal amplified enhancer. It is worth pointing out that numerous Cyt c and GOx were firstly carried onto the double-stranded DNA polymers based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and then the amplified responses could be achieved by cascade catalysis of Cyt c and GOx recycling with the help of glucose. Moreover, multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere was synthesized and used as signal tag, which not only exhibited good mechanical properties, large surface area and an excellent electron transfer rate of graphene, but also possessed excellent redox activity and desirable magnetic property. With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the proposed cascade catalysis amplification strategy could greatly enhance the sensitivity for the detection of thyroxine. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear ranged from 0.05 pg mL{sup −1} to 5 ng mL{sup −1} and a low detection limit down to 15 fg mL{sup −1}. Importantly, the proposed method offers promise for reproducible and cost-effective analysis of biological samples.

  10. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  11. Fully Connected Cascade Artificial Neural Network Architecture for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Classification From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Wang, Peng; Rangaprakash, D; Wilamowski, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    Automated recognition and classification of brain diseases are of tremendous value to society. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a diverse spectrum disorder whose diagnosis is based on behavior and hence will benefit from classification utilizing objective neuroimaging measures. Toward this end, an international competition was conducted for classifying ADHD using functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from multiple sites worldwide. Here, we consider the data from this competition as an example to illustrate the utility of fully connected cascade (FCC) artificial neural network (ANN) architecture for performing classification. We employed various directional and nondirectional brain connectivity-based methods to extract discriminative features which gave better classification accuracy compared to raw data. Our accuracy for distinguishing ADHD from healthy subjects was close to 90% and between the ADHD subtypes was close to 95%. Further, we show that, if properly used, FCC ANN performs very well compared to other classifiers such as support vector machines in terms of accuracy, irrespective of the feature used. Finally, the most discriminative connectivity features provided insights about the pathophysiology of ADHD and showed reduced and altered connectivity involving the left orbitofrontal cortex and various cerebellar regions in ADHD.

  12. One-pot cascade michael.cyclization reactions of ο-hydroxycinnamaldehydes: Synthesis of functionalized 2,3-dihydrobenzofuranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwon, Sung Hyuk; Kim, Sunggon

    2012-01-01

    We described the cascade Michael.cyclization reaction of o-hydroxycinnamaldehydes with diethyl α-bromomalonate promoted by potassium carbonate. The reactions provided functionalized 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans in good yields for a variety of o-hydroxyaromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Current work focuses on expanding the scope of this reaction to other substrates such as sulfur yields, and on developing an efficient catalytic asymmetric variant. 2,3-Dihydrobenzofurans are found in numerous biologically active natural products and synthetic compounds. These are an attractive type of oxygenated compound because their basic core skeleton is present in neolignans, pterocarpans, and synthetic drugs used in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, and central nervous system trauma and ischemia. Owing to the importance of their structures, numerous synthetic methods for 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans have been developed, primarily: radical cyclizations, Lewis acid promoted reactions, anionic cyclizations, and transition-metal catalyzed processes. However, these methods cannot be generalized as much as is desirable, and they yielded poor chemo- and/or stereoselectivities. Hence, the development of an efficient enantioselective synthetic method for obtaining 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran scaffolds attracted our attention

  13. One-pot cascade michael.cyclization reactions of ο-hydroxycinnamaldehydes: Synthesis of functionalized 2,3-dihydrobenzofuranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwon, Sung Hyuk; Kim, Sunggon [Kyonggi Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    We described the cascade Michael.cyclization reaction of o-hydroxycinnamaldehydes with diethyl α-bromomalonate promoted by potassium carbonate. The reactions provided functionalized 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans in good yields for a variety of o-hydroxyaromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Current work focuses on expanding the scope of this reaction to other substrates such as sulfur yields, and on developing an efficient catalytic asymmetric variant. 2,3-Dihydrobenzofurans are found in numerous biologically active natural products and synthetic compounds. These are an attractive type of oxygenated compound because their basic core skeleton is present in neolignans, pterocarpans, and synthetic drugs used in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, and central nervous system trauma and ischemia. Owing to the importance of their structures, numerous synthetic methods for 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans have been developed, primarily: radical cyclizations, Lewis acid promoted reactions, anionic cyclizations, and transition-metal catalyzed processes. However, these methods cannot be generalized as much as is desirable, and they yielded poor chemo- and/or stereoselectivities. Hence, the development of an efficient enantioselective synthetic method for obtaining 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran scaffolds attracted our attention.

  14. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of acquired immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS which we call Adaptive Immune Response Simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system which responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner which is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate acquired immune system, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices. PMID:26391084

  15. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex 'information-processing cores' composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  16. The Unexplored Mechanisms and Regulatory Functions of Ribosomal Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Jose Luis

    In every cell, protein synthesis is carried out by the ribosome, a complex macromolecular RNA-protein assembly. Decades of structural and kinetic studies have increased our understanding of ribosome initiation, decoding, translocation and termination. Yet, the underlying mechanism of these fundamental processes has yet to be fully delineated. Hence, the molecular basis of regulation remains obscure. Here, single-molecule fluorescence methods are applied to decipher the mechanism and regulatory roles of the multi-step process of directional substrate translocation on the ribosome that accompanies every round of protein synthesis. In Chapter 1, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is introduced as a tool for studying bacterial ribosome translocation. Chapter 2 details the experimental methods. In Chapter 3, the elongation factor G(EF-G)-catalyzed movement of substrates through the ribosome is examined from several perspectives or signals reporting on various degrees of freedom of ribosome dynamics. Two ribosomal states interconvert in the presence of EF-G(GDP), displaying novel head domain motions, until relocking takes place. In Chapter 4, in order to test if the mentioned fluctuations leading to relocking are correlated to the engagement of the P-site by the peptidyl-tRNA, the translocation of miscoded tRNAs is studied. Severe defects in the relocking stages of translocation reveal the correlation between this new stage of translocation and P-site tRNA engagement.

  17. Using synthetic biology to distinguish and overcome regulatory and functional barriers related to nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex process requiring multiple genes working in concert. To date, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif gene cluster, divided into seven operons, is one of the most studied systems. Its nitrogen fixation capacity is subject to complex cascade regulation and physiological limitations. In this report, the entire K. pneumoniae nif gene cluster was reassembled as operon-based BioBrick parts in Escherichia coli. It provided ~100% activity of native K. pneumoniae system. Based on the expression levels of these BioBrick parts, a T7 RNA polymerase-LacI expression system was used to replace the σ(54-dependent promoters located upstream of nif operons. Expression patterns of nif operons were critical for the maximum activity of the recombinant system. By mimicking these expression levels with variable-strength T7-dependent promoters, ~42% of the nitrogenase activity of the σ(54-dependent nif system was achieved in E. coli. When the newly constructed T7-dependent nif system was challenged with different genetic and physiological conditions, it bypassed the original complex regulatory circuits, with minor physiological limitations. Therefore, we have successfully replaced the nif regulatory elements with a simple expression system that may provide the first step for further research of introducing nif genes into eukaryotic organelles, which has considerable potentials in agro-biotechnology.

  18. Identification and Functional Analysis of Gene Regulatory Sequences Interacting with Colorectal Tumor Suppressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Troelsen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Several tumor suppressors possess gene regulatory activity. Here, we describe how promoter and promoter/enhancer reporter assays can be used to characterize a colorectal tumor suppressor proteins’ gene regulatory activity of possible target genes. In the first part, a bioinformatic approach...... of the quick and efficient In-Fusion cloning method, and how to carry out transient transfections of Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the produced luciferase reporter plasmids using polyethyleneimine (PEI). A plan describing how to set up and carry out the luciferase expression assay is presented. The luciferase...... to identify relevant gene regulatory regions of potential target genes is presented. In the second part, it is demonstrated how to prepare and carry out the functional assay. We explain how to clone the bioinformatically identified gene regulatory regions into luciferase reporter plasmids by the use...

  19. Computer simulation of displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1983-06-01

    More than 500 displacement cascades in copper have been generated with the computer simulation code MARLOWE over an energy range pertinent to both fission and fusion neutron spectra. Three-dimensional graphical depictions of selected cascades, as well as quantitative analysis of cascade shapes and sizes and defect densities, illustrate cascade behavior as a function of energy. With increasing energy, the transition from production of single compact damage regions to widely spaced multiple damage regions is clearly demonstrated

  20. Testing for Cognitive Function in Animals in a Regulatory Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superior cognitive functions have allowed the human species to dominate a world of incredible biological diversity. Threats to these essential capacities cannot be ignored, and a strategy is needed to evaluate the hazard posed by exposure to chemical and other agents. Because peo...

  1. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices

  2. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-19

    This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices.

  3. Galectin-1 is required for the regulatory function of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabbab, R; Blair, P; Smyth, L A; Ratnasothy, K; Peng, Q; Moreau, A; Lechler, R; Elgueta, R; Lombardi, G

    2018-02-09

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) is required for the development of B cells in the bone marrow (BM), however very little is known about the contribution of Gal-1 to the development of B cell regulatory function. Here, we report an important role for Gal-1 in the induction of B cells regulatory function. Mice deficient of Gal-1 (Gal-1 -/- ) showed significant loss of Transitional-2 (T2) B cells, previously reported to include IL-10 + regulatory B cells. Gal-1 -/- B cells stimulated in vitro via CD40 molecules have impaired IL-10 and Tim-1 expression, the latter reported to be required for IL-10 production in regulatory B cells, and increased TNF-α expression compared to wild type (WT) B cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, T2 and T1 Gal-1 -/- B cells did not suppress TNF-α expression by CD4 + T cells activated in vitro with allogenic DCs (allo-DCs), nor were they suppressive in vivo, being unable to delay MHC-class I mismatched skin allograft rejection following adoptive transfer. Moreover, T cells stimulated with allo-DCs show an increase in their survival when co-cultured with Gal-1 -/- T2 and MZ B cells compared to WT T2 and MZ B cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Gal-1 contributes to the induction of B cells regulatory function.

  4. Pain acceptance, psychological functioning, and self-regulatory fatigue in temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Burris, Jessica L; Evans, Daniel R

    2013-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that chronic pain patients suffer from chronic self-regulatory fatigue: difficulty controlling thoughts, emotions, and behavior. Pain acceptance, which involves responding to pain and related experiences without attempts to control or avoid them (pain willingness), and pursuit of valued life activities regardless of pain (activity engagement) has been associated with various favorable outcomes in chronic pain patients, including better psychological functioning. The study presented here tested the hypotheses that pain acceptance is associated with less psychological distress, higher psychological well-being, and reduced self-regulatory fatigue in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients, particularly for those with longer pain duration. Cross-sectional data were provided by 135 TMD patients during an initial evaluation at a university-based tertiary orofacial pain clinic. Results of hierarchical linear regression models indicated that, controlling for pain severity, pain willingness is associated with less psychological distress and lower self-regulatory fatigue, and activity engagement is associated with greater psychological well-being. Furthermore, the effect of pain willingness on psychological distress was moderated by pain duration such that pain willingness was more strongly associated with less psychological distress in patients with longer pain duration; this moderating effect was fully mediated by self-regulatory fatigue. These findings suggest pain willingness may buffer against self-regulatory fatigue in those with longer pain duration, and such conservation of self-regulatory resources may protect against psychological symptoms.

  5. DMPD: The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17702640 The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function...in dendritic celldevelopment and function. PubmedID 17702640 Title The role of th...e interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. Authors Gabriele L, O

  6. MicroRNAs: Processing, Maturation, Target Recognition and Regulatory Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Girish C.; Singh, Jagjit; Barik, Sailen

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable discovery of small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) and their role in posttranscriptional gene regulation have revealed another fine-tuning step in the expression of genetic information. A large number of cellular pathways, which act in organismal development and are important in health and disease, appear to be modulated by miRNAs. At the molecular level, miRNAs restrain the production of proteins by affecting the stability of their target mRNA and/or by down-regulating their translation. This review attempts to offer a snapshot of aspects of miRNA coding, processing, target recognition and function in animals. Our goal here is to provide the readers with a thought-provoking and mechanistic introduction to the miRNA world rather than with a detailed encyclopedia. PMID:22468167

  7. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmeira, Carlos M.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-01-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  8. Formalism of continual integrals for cascade processes with particle fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedalin, Eh.V.

    1987-01-01

    Formalism of continuous integrals for description of cascade processes, in which besides cascade particle reproduction, their synthesis and coalescence take place, is used. Account of cascade particle coalescence leads to the fact that the development of some cascade branches cannot be independent and main equations of the cascade process become functional instead of integral. The method of continuous intagrals permits to construct in the closed form producing functionals for the cascade process and to obtain the rules of their calculation using diagrams. Analytical expressions in the form of continuous integrals for producing functionals describing cascade development are obtained

  9. Stability of cascade search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomenko, Tatiana N [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-22

    We find sufficient conditions on a searching multi-cascade for a modification of the set of limit points of the cascade that satisfy an assessing inequality for the distance from each of these points to the initial point to be small, provided that the modifications of the initial point and the initial set-valued functionals or maps used to construct the multi-cascade are small. Using this result, we prove the stability (in the above sense) of the cascade search for the set of common pre-images of a closed subspace under the action of n set-valued maps, n{>=}1 (in particular, for the set of common roots of these maps and for the set of their coincidences). For n=2 we obtain generalizations of some results of A. V. Arutyunov; the very statement of the problem comes from a recent paper of his devoted to the study of the stability of the subset of coincidences of a Lipschitz map and a covering map.

  10. Inferring network structure from cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonge, Sushrut; Vural, Dervis Can

    2017-07-01

    Many physical, biological, and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we offer three topological methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for several different cascade models.

  11. Functional analysis of a potential regulatory K+-binding site in the Na+, K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase functions by actively transporting 3 Na+ ions out of and 2 K+ ions into the cell, thereby creating ion gradients crucial for many physiological processes. Recently, a combined structural and functional study of the closely related Ca2+-ATPase indicated the presence...... of a regulatory K+-binding site in the P-domain of the enzyme, identifying E732 as being of particular importance (Sorensen, Clausen et al. 2004). In addition, P709 is thought to play a significant role in the structural organization of this site. Both E732 and P709 are highly conserved among P-type ATPases (E732...... is present as either glutamic acid or aspartic acid), which supports their importance and additionally raises the question whether this site may play a general role among P-type ATPases. In Na+, K+-ATPase, K+ functions directly as a substrate for membrane binding sites, however, an additional regulatory...

  12. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L; Landolin, Jane M; Bristow, Christopher A; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W; Brooks, Angela N; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A; Duff, Michael O; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K; Riddle, Nicole C; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E; Schwartz, Yuri B; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E; Brent, Michael R; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C R; Gingeras, Thomas R; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J; Celniker, Susan E; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H; Lai, Eric C; MacAlpine, David M; Stein, Lincoln D; White, Kevin P; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-24

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation.

  13. Training and the personnel accreditation of regulatory functions in the Argentine Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menossi, C.A.; Fraire, E.O.; Segado, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Teaching and the training are indispensable for the development of the human resources in all disciplines and occupations of the man in the world scale. About the applications of the radionuclides in the nuclear industry, in Argentina, during the last years, the efforts have been intensified. The necessity of improving the capacity of answer in radiation protection and nuclear safety demands an focus integrated in the teaching and the training. The radiological protection and the nuclear safety presents elements of the applied physics, the chemistry, the biology, the nuclear technology and other specialized subjects. However, in relation with the development of the human resources, specially those that belong to regulatory bodies and perform inspection functions, have important differences, necessities and specific problems. Some differences and problems emerge of the wide diversity and reach of the radiological and nuclear applications. Nowadays, in the world, the applications of the radiation and radioactive sources are being diversified in the medicine (diagnosis, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, the industry, the agricultures, and the investigation and teaching), that involve a permanent knowledge and actualization of the personnel of the regulatory bodies. For that exposed this work describe training program for the personnel with regulatory functions (inspectors) of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in the Argentine Republic. Also, this document includes the description of the basic formation and specialized in each case and it reach. (author)

  14. Plasticity of the cis-regulatory input function of a gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham E Mayo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription rate of a gene is often controlled by several regulators that bind specific sites in the gene's cis-regulatory region. The combined effect of these regulators is described by a cis-regulatory input function. What determines the form of an input function, and how variable is it with respect to mutations? To address this, we employ the well-characterized lac operon of Escherichia coli, which has an elaborate input function, intermediate between Boolean AND-gate and OR-gate logic. We mapped in detail the input function of 12 variants of the lac promoter, each with different point mutations in the regulator binding sites, by means of accurate expression measurements from living cells. We find that even a few mutations can significantly change the input function, resulting in functions that resemble Pure AND gates, OR gates, or single-input switches. Other types of gates were not found. The variant input functions can be described in a unified manner by a mathematical model. The model also lets us predict which functions cannot be reached by point mutations. The input function that we studied thus appears to be plastic, in the sense that many of the mutations do not ruin the regulation completely but rather result in new ways to integrate the inputs.

  15. Multi-catalysis cascade reactions based on the methoxycarbonylketene platform: diversity-oriented synthesis of functionalized non-symmetrical malonates for agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachary, Dhevalapally B; Venkaiah, Chintalapudi; Reddy, Y Vijayendar; Kishor, Mamillapalli

    2009-05-21

    In this paper we describe new multi-catalysis cascade (MCC) reactions for the one-pot synthesis of highly functionalized non-symmetrical malonates. These metal-free reactions are either five-step (olefination/hydrogenation/alkylation/ketenization/esterification) or six-step (olefination/hydrogenation/alkylation/ketenization/esterification/alkylation), and employ aldehydes/ketones, Meldrum's acid, 1,4-dihydropyridine/o-phenylenediamine, diazomethane, alcohols and active ethylene/acetylenes, and involve iminium-, self-, self-, self- and base-catalysis, respectively. Many of the products have direct application in agricultural and pharmaceutical chemistry.

  16. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yonglun; Blechingberg, Jenny; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders D; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-11-14

    FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins.

  17. REGULATORY POLICY AND OPTIMIZATION OF INVESTMENT RESOURCE ALLOCATION IN THE MODEL OF FUNCTIONING OF RECREATION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Shevchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is the rationale of the theoretical and methodical approach concerning the improvement of regulatory policy as well as the process of distribution of financial investments using the model of the functioning of a recreational sector of the national economy. The methodology of the study includes the use of optimal control theory for the model formation of the functioning of the recreational industry as well as determining the behaviour of regulatory authorities and capabilities to optimize the allocation of investment resources in the recreational sector of the national economy. Results. The issue of equilibration of regulatory policy in the recreational sector of the national economy is actualized, including the question of targeted distribution of state and external financial investments. Also, it is proved that regulatory policy should establish the frameworks that on the one hand, do not allow public authorities to exercise extra influence on the economy of recreation, on the other hand, to keep the behaviour of the recreational business entities within the limits of normal socio-economic activity – on the basis of analysis of the continuum “recreation – work” by means of modified Brennan-Buchanan model. It is revealed that even with the condition of the tax reduction, the situation when the population resting less and works more than in the background of a developed economy is observed. However, according to the optimistic forecast, eventually on condition when the economy is emerging from the shade, we will obtain an official mode of the work in which, while maintaining taxes on proposed more advantageous for the population level, ultimately the ratio leisure and work will be established which is corresponding to the principles of sustainable development. Practical value. On the basis of methodical principles of the theory of optimal control, the model of the functioning of the recreational industry under the

  18. E3Net: a system for exploring E3-mediated regulatory networks of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngwoong; Lee, Hodong; Park, Jong C; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) is a key enzyme targeting specific substrates in diverse cellular processes for ubiquitination and degradation. The existing findings of substrate specificity of E3 are, however, scattered over a number of resources, making it difficult to study them together with an integrative view. Here we present E3Net, a web-based system that provides a comprehensive collection of available E3-substrate specificities and a systematic framework for the analysis of E3-mediated regulatory networks of diverse cellular functions. Currently, E3Net contains 2201 E3s and 4896 substrates in 427 organisms and 1671 E3-substrate specific relations between 493 E3s and 1277 substrates in 42 organisms, extracted mainly from MEDLINE abstracts and UniProt comments with an automatic text mining method and additional manual inspection and partly from high throughput experiment data and public ubiquitination databases. The significant functions and pathways of the extracted E3-specific substrate groups were identified from a functional enrichment analysis with 12 functional category resources for molecular functions, protein families, protein complexes, pathways, cellular processes, cellular localization, and diseases. E3Net includes interactive analysis and navigation tools that make it possible to build an integrative view of E3-substrate networks and their correlated functions with graphical illustrations and summarized descriptions. As a result, E3Net provides a comprehensive resource of E3s, substrates, and their functional implications summarized from the regulatory network structures of E3-specific substrate groups and their correlated functions. This resource will facilitate further in-depth investigation of ubiquitination-dependent regulatory mechanisms. E3Net is freely available online at http://pnet.kaist.ac.kr/e3net.

  19. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Integration and Two-Dimensional Molecular Maps with Regulatory and Functional Linkages: Application to Cell Proliferation and Invasion Networks in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Jayaram, Savita; Reddy, Divijendra Natha; Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-12-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is characterized by high rates of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. New therapeutic strategies and targets are being continuously explored with the hope for better outcome. By overlaying transcriptomic and proteomic data from GBM clinical tissues, we identified 317 differentially expressed proteins to be concordant with the messenger RNAs (mRNAs). We used these entities to generate integrated regulatory information at the level of microRNAs (miRNAs) and their mRNA and protein targets using prediction programs or experimentally verified miRNA target mode in the miRWalk database. We observed 60% or even more of the miRNA-target pairs to be consistent with experimentally observed inverse expression of these molecules in GBM. The integrated view of these regulatory cascades in the contexts of cell proliferation and invasion networks revealed two-dimensional molecular interactions with regulatory and functional linkages (miRNAs and their mRNA-protein targets in one dimension; multiple miRNAs associated in a functional network in the second dimension). A total of 28 of the 35 differentially expressed concordant mRNA-protein entities represented in the proliferation network, and 51 of the 59 such entities represented in the invasion network, mapped to altered miRNAs from GBM and conformed to an inverse relationship in their expression. We believe the two-dimensional maps of gene expression changes enhance the strength of the discovery datasets derived from omics-based studies for their applications in GBM as well as tumors in general.

  20. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins.......Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...

  1. Progranulin facilitates conversion and function of regulatory T cells under inflammatory conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanhua Wei

    Full Text Available The progranulin (PGRN is known to protect regulatory T cells (Tregs from a negative regulation by TNF-α, and its levels are elevated in various kinds of autoimmune diseases. Whether PGRN directly regulates the conversion of CD4+CD25-T cells into Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (iTreg, and whether PGRN affects the immunosuppressive function of Tregs, however, remain unknown. In this study we provide evidences demonstrating that PGRN is able to stimulate the conversion of CD4+CD25-T cells into iTreg in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. In addition, PGRN showed synergistic effects with TGF-β1 on the induction of iTreg. PGRN was required for the immunosuppressive function of Tregs, since PGRN-deficient Tregs have a significant decreased ability to suppress the proliferation of effector T cells (Teff. In addition, PGRN deficiency caused a marked reduction in Tregs number in the course of inflammatory arthritis, although no significant difference was observed in the numbers of Tregs between wild type and PGRN deficient mice during development. Furthermore, PGRN deficiency led to significant upregulation of the Wnt receptor gene Fzd2. Collectively, this study reveals that PGRN directly regulates the numbers and function of Tregs under inflammatory conditions, and provides new insight into the immune regulatory mechanism of PGRN in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune-related diseases.

  2. Information processing in the transcriptional regulatory network of yeast: Functional robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehmer Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene networks are considered to represent various aspects of molecular biological systems meaningfully because they naturally provide a systems perspective of molecular interactions. In this respect, the functional understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network is considered as key to elucidate the functional organization of an organism. Results In this paper we study the functional robustness of the transcriptional regulatory network of S. cerevisiae. We model the information processing in the network as a first order Markov chain and study the influence of single gene perturbations on the global, asymptotic communication among genes. Modification in the communication is measured by an information theoretic measure allowing to predict genes that are 'fragile' with respect to single gene knockouts. Our results demonstrate that the predicted set of fragile genes contains a statistically significant enrichment of so called essential genes that are experimentally found to be necessary to ensure vital yeast. Further, a structural analysis of the transcriptional regulatory network reveals that there are significant differences between fragile genes, hub genes and genes with a high betweenness centrality value. Conclusion Our study does not only demonstrate that a combination of graph theoretical, information theoretical and statistical methods leads to meaningful biological results but also that such methods allow to study information processing in gene networks instead of just their structural properties.

  3. Infant Functional Regulatory Problems and Gender Moderate Bidirectional Effects Between Externalizing Behavior and Maternal Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Daniel Ewon; Sameroff, Arnold J.; McDonough, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study of 251 families examined bidirectional associations between maternal depressive symptoms and toddler behavioral problems. Functional regulatory problems in infancy and gender were examined as moderators. Mothers rated children’s regulatory problems of crying, feeding, and sleeping in infancy, toddler-age externalizing behavior, and their own depressive symptoms when children were ages 7, 15, and 33 months. Using a structural equation model we found that exposure to maternal depressive symptoms at 7 months predicted high levels of child externalizing behavior at 15 and 33 months. Gender moderated the effect, such that maternal depressive symptoms only predicted boys’ externalizing behavior at 33 months. Toddler-age externalizing behavior predicted high levels of maternal depressive symptoms at 33 months, only among those who had relatively few regulatory problems as infants. Infancy seems to be a period of heightened vulnerability to effects of maternal depression and boys are more likely than girls to develop resulting externalizing problems. Mothers of infants with few regulatory problems may develop worse depressive symptoms in response to their children’s preschool-age behavioral problems. PMID:23545078

  4. Exploring associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological functioning and driver behaviour after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Johansen, Hans J; Ulleberg, Pål; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this prospective one-year follow-up study was to explore the associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological tests as well as baseline and follow-up ratings of driver behaviour. The participants were a cohort of subjects with stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were found fit to drive after a multi-disciplinary driver assessment (baseline). Baseline measures included neuropsychological tests and ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms, i.e., executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version; BRIEF-A) and impulsive personality traits (UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale). The participants rated pre-injury driving behaviour on the Driver Behaviour Qestionnaire (DBQ) retrospectively at baseline and after one year of post-injury driving (follow-up). Better performance on neuropsychological tests was significantly associated with more post-injury DBQ Violations. The BRIEF-A main indexes were significantly associated with baseline and follow-up ratings of DBQ Mistakes and follow-up DBQ Inattention. UPPS (lack of) Perseverance was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inattention, whereas UPPS Urgency was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inexperience and post-injury DBQ Mistakes. There were no significant changes in DBQ ratings from baseline (pre-injury) to follow-up (post-injury). It was concluded that neuropsychological functioning and self-regulatory mechanisms are related to driver behaviour. Some aspects of driver behaviour do not necessarily change after brain injury, reflecting the influence of premorbid driving behaviour or impaired awareness of deficits on post-injury driving behaviour. Further evidence is required to predict the role of self-regulatory mechanisms on driver behaviour and crashes or near misses.

  5. Simultaneous genome-wide inference of physical, genetic, regulatory, and functional pathway components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Y Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular pathways are built from diverse types of pairwise interactions, ranging from physical protein-protein interactions and modifications to indirect regulatory relationships. One goal of systems biology is to bridge three aspects of this complexity: the growing body of high-throughput data assaying these interactions; the specific interactions in which individual genes participate; and the genome-wide patterns of interactions in a system of interest. Here, we describe methodology for simultaneously predicting specific types of biomolecular interactions using high-throughput genomic data. This results in a comprehensive compendium of whole-genome networks for yeast, derived from ∼3,500 experimental conditions and describing 30 interaction types, which range from general (e.g. physical or regulatory to specific (e.g. phosphorylation or transcriptional regulation. We used these networks to investigate molecular pathways in carbon metabolism and cellular transport, proposing a novel connection between glycogen breakdown and glucose utilization supported by recent publications. Additionally, 14 specific predicted interactions in DNA topological change and protein biosynthesis were experimentally validated. We analyzed the systems-level network features within all interactomes, verifying the presence of small-world properties and enrichment for recurring network motifs. This compendium of physical, synthetic, regulatory, and functional interaction networks has been made publicly available through an interactive web interface for investigators to utilize in future research at http://function.princeton.edu/bioweaver/.

  6. Functional evolution of cis-regulatory modules at a homeotic gene in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C W Ho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules.

  7. Regulatory function of a novel population of mouse autoantigen-specific Foxp3 regulatory T cells depends on IFN-gamma, NO, and contact with target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyndi Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both naturally arising Foxp3(+ and antigen-induced Foxp3(- regulatory T cells (Treg play a critical role in regulating immune responses, as well as in preventing autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. It is known that antigen-specific Treg are more potent than polyclonal Treg in suppressing pathogenic immune responses that cause autoimmunity and inflammation. However, difficulty in identifying and isolating a sufficient number of antigen-specific Treg has limited their use in research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their regulatory function and their potential role in therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel class II MHC tetramer, we have isolated a population of CD4(+ Foxp3(- T cells specific for the autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase p286-300 peptide (NR286 T cells from diabetes-resistant non-obese resistant (NOR mice. These Foxp3(- NR286 T cells functioned as Treg that were able to suppress target T cell proliferation in vitro and inhibit type 1 diabetes in animals. Unexpected results from mechanistic studies in vitro showed that their regulatory function was dependent on not only IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, but also on cell contact with target cells. In addition, separating NR286 Treg from target T cells in transwell assays abolished both production of NO and suppression of target T cells, regardless of whether IFN-gamma was produced in cell cultures. Therefore, production of NO, not IFN-gamma, was cell contact dependent, suggesting that NO may function downstream of IFN-gamma in mediating regulatory function of NR286 Treg. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies identified a unique population of autoantigen-specific Foxp3(- Treg that can exert their regulatory function dependent on not only IFN-gamma and NO but also cell contact with target cells.

  8. Glucose oxidase-initiated cascade catalysis for sensitive impedimetric aptasensor based on metal-organic frameworks functionalized with Pt nanoparticles and hemin/G-quadruplex as mimicking peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingxing; Guo, Shijing; Gao, Jiaxi; Zhao, Jianmin; Xue, Shuyan; Xu, Wenju

    2017-12-15

    Based on cascade catalysis amplification driven by glucose oxidase (GOx), a sensitive electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor for protein (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA as tested model) was proposed by using Cu-based metal-organic frameworks functionalized with Pt nanoparticles, aptamer, hemin and GOx (Pt@CuMOFs-hGq-GOx). CEA aptamer loaded onto Pt@CuMOFs was bound with hemin to form hemin@G-quadruplex (hGq) with mimicking peroxidase activity. Through sandwich-type reaction of target CEA and CEA aptamers (Apt1 and Apt2), the obtained Pt@CuMOFs-hGq-GOx as signal transduction probes (STPs) was captured to the modified electrode interface. When 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and glucose were introduced, the cascade reaction was initiated by GOx to catalyze the oxidation of glucose, in situ generating H 2 O 2 . Simultaneously, the decomposition of the generated H 2 O 2 was greatly promoted by Pt@CuMOFs and hGq as synergistic peroxide catalysts, accompanying with the significant oxidation process of DAB and the formation of nonconductive insoluble precipitates (IPs). As a result, the electron transfer in the resultant sensing interface was effectively hindered and the electrochemical impedimetric signal (EIS) was efficiently amplified. Thus, the high sensitivity of the proposed CEA aptasensor was successfully improved with 0.023pgmL -1 , which may be promising and potential in assaying certain clinical disease related to CEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Validation of Skeletal Muscle cis-Regulatory Module Predictions Reveals Nucleotide Composition Bias in Functional Enhancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Andrew T.; Chou, Alice Yi; Arenillas, David J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions. PMID:22144875

  10. Validation of skeletal muscle cis-regulatory module predictions reveals nucleotide composition bias in functional enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kwon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions.

  11. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-01-01

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25 - CD4 + effector (Teff) and CD25 + CD4 + regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4 + T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4 + T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the regulatory function mediated by the small regulatory psm-mec RNA of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Villaruz, Amer E; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Duong, Anthony C; Yeh, Anthony J; Nguyen, Thuan H; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Queck, S Y; Otto, M

    2014-07-01

    Several methicillin resistance (SCCmec) clusters characteristic of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains harbor the psm-mec locus. In addition to encoding the cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)-mec, this locus has been attributed gene regulatory functions. Here we employed genome-wide transcriptional profiling to define the regulatory function of the psm-mec locus. The immune evasion factor protein A emerged as the primary conserved and strongly regulated target of psm-mec, an effect we show is mediated by the psm-mec RNA. Furthermore, the psm-mec locus exerted regulatory effects that were more moderate in extent. For example, expression of PSM-mec limited expression of mecA, thereby decreasing methicillin resistance. Our study shows that the psm-mec locus has a rare dual regulatory RNA and encoded cytolysin function. Furthermore, our findings reveal a specific mechanism underscoring the recently emerging concept that S. aureus strains balance pronounced virulence and high expression of antibiotic resistance. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Technical and Scientific Support Organizations Providing Support to Regulatory Functions. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This publication introduces the general principles underlying the provision of technical and scientific support to a regulatory body and the characteristics of organizations providing such support. It describes the services provided to support regulatory functions as well as the associated activities and processes to maintain the needed level of expertise, state of the art tools and equipment. The publication is intended for use primarily by organizations that provide technical and scientific support in the field of nuclear and radiation safety. This also includes organizations that acquire such support, and regulatory bodies and governments, as they make decisions on the model of technical and scientific support to be developed at the national level, for example in the case of a country embarking on the development of a nuclear power programme. It is the first IAEA publication dedicated to the specific practices and challenges to be met by the technical and scientific support organizations. This CD-ROM includes the annexes to the printed publication of examples of TSOs and their interactions with key stakeholders.

  14. The regulatory function of self-esteem: testing the epistemic and acceptance signaling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Danu Anthony; Logel, Christine; Holmes, John G; Wood, Joanne V; Forest, Amanda L; Gaucher, Danielle; Fitzsimons, Grainné M; Kath, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    The authors draw on sociometer theory (e.g., Leary, 2004) and self-verification theory (e.g., Swann, 1997) to propose an expanded model of the regulatory function of self-esteem. The model suggests that people not only possess an acceptance signaling system that indicates whether relational value is high or low but also possess an epistemic signaling system that indicates whether social feedback is consistent or inconsistent with chronic perceived relational value (i.e., global self-esteem). One correlational study and 5 experiments, with diverse operationalizations of social feedback, demonstrated that the epistemic signaling system responds to self-esteem consistent or inconsistent relational-value feedback with increases or deceases in epistemic certainty. Moreover, Studies 3-6 demonstrated that the acceptance and epistemic signaling systems respond uniquely to social feedback. Finally, Studies 5 and 6 provide evidence that the epistemic signaling system is part of a broader self-regulatory system: Self-esteem inconsistent feedback caused cognitive efforts to decrease the discrepancy between self-views and feedback and caused depleted self-regulatory capacity on a subsequent self-control task. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. An enhanced computational platform for investigating the roles of regulatory RNA and for identifying functional RNA motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsi-Yuan; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Weng, Shun-Long; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional RNA molecules participate in numerous biological processes, ranging from gene regulation to protein synthesis. Analysis of functional RNA motifs and elements in RNA sequences can obtain useful information for deciphering RNA regulatory mechanisms. Our previous work, RegRNA, is widely used in the identification of regulatory motifs, and this work extends it by incorporating more comprehensive and updated data sources and analytical approaches into a new platform. Methods ...

  16. Quantitative and functional analysis of CD69+ T regulatory lymphocytes in patients with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitales-Noyola, Marlen; Martínez-Martínez, Rita; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P; Baranda, Lourdes; Niño-Moreno, Perla; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Periodontal disease is chronic inflammatory process that affects the attachment structures of the teeth and constitutes a significant cause of tooth loss in adults. Although different bacteria play an important role in the triggering of this condition, the progression and severity of the disease are strongly affected by the host immune response, which is under the control of different immune regulatory mechanisms, including T regulatory (Treg) cells. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and function of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in patients with chronic periodontal disease. Peripheral blood samples (n = 33) and gingival tissue (n = 9) were obtained from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Blood samples from 25 healthy individuals were also studied. Levels of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in peripheral blood and gingival tissue were determined by six-color multiparametric flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. The immune regulatory function of CD69 + Treg cells was tested by an in vitro assay of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Percentages of CD69 + Treg cells were significantly higher in the peripheral blood from patients with active periodontal disease compared to healthy controls, and these percentages inversely correlated with the periodontal attachment loss. Increased numbers of these Treg cells were detected in the gingival tissue from active PD patients compared to their peripheral blood. However, the suppressive function of CD69 + Treg cells was significantly diminished in patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that CD69 + Treg cells seem to be another important piece in the complex immunopathogenesis of periodontal disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Deng, Patricia; Jacobson, Dionna; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3'UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3'UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions.

  18. CRISPR-Cas9 epigenome editing enables high-throughput screening for functional regulatory elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Tyler S; Black, Joshua B; Chellappan, Malathi; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Hilton, Isaac B; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    Large genome-mapping consortia and thousands of genome-wide association studies have identified non-protein-coding elements in the genome as having a central role in various biological processes. However, decoding the functions of the millions of putative regulatory elements discovered in these studies remains challenging. CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenome editing technologies have enabled precise perturbation of the activity of specific regulatory elements. Here we describe CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenomic regulatory element screening (CERES) for improved high-throughput screening of regulatory element activity in the native genomic context. Using dCas9 KRAB repressor and dCas9 p300 activator constructs and lentiviral single guide RNA libraries to target DNase I hypersensitive sites surrounding a gene of interest, we carried out both loss- and gain-of-function screens to identify regulatory elements for the β-globin and HER2 loci in human cells. CERES readily identified known and previously unidentified regulatory elements, some of which were dependent on cell type or direction of perturbation. This technology allows the high-throughput functional annotation of putative regulatory elements in their native chromosomal context.

  19. Cascade annealing: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Schiffgens, J.O.

    1976-04-01

    Concepts and an overview of radiation displacement damage modeling and annealing kinetics are presented. Short-term annealing methodology is described and results of annealing simulations performed on damage cascades generated using the Marlowe and Cascade programs are included. Observations concerning the inconsistencies and inadequacies of current methods are presented along with simulation of high energy cascades and simulation of longer-term annealing

  20. Phylogenetic conservation of the regulatory and functional properties of the Vav oncoprotein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couceiro, Jose R.; Martin-Bermudo, Maria D.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2005-01-01

    Vav proteins are phosphorylation-dependent GDP/GTP exchange factors for Rho/Rac GTPases. Despite intense characterization of mammalian Vav proteins both biochemically and genetically, there is little information regarding the conservation of their biological properties in lower organisms. To approach this issue, we have performed a characterization of the regulatory, catalytic, and functional properties of the single Vav family member of Drosophila melanogaster. These analyses have shown that the intramolecular mechanisms controlling the enzyme activity of mammalian Vav proteins are already present in Drosophila, suggesting that such properties have been set up before the divergence between protostomes and deuterostomes during evolution. We also show that Drosophila and mammalian Vav proteins have similar catalytic specificities. As a consequence, Drosophila Vav can trigger oncogenic transformation, morphological change, and enhanced cell motility in mammalian cells. Gain-of-function studies using transgenic flies support the implication of this protein in cytoskeletal-dependent processes such as embryonic dorsal closure, myoblast fusion, tracheal development, and the migration/guidance of different cell types. These results highlight the important roles of Vav proteins in the signal transduction pathways regulating cytoskeletal dynamics. Moreover, they indicate that the foundations for the regulatory and enzymatic activities of this protein family have been set up very early during evolution

  1. PKC-theta in regulatory and effector T-cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran eBrezar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teff or regulatory (Tregs T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ to the immunological synapse is instrumental for the formation of signalling complexes, that ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the immunological synapse where its formation induces altered signalling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance.This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs.

  2. Effects of low dose radiation on regulatory function between lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hailin; Su Liaoyuan; Du Zeji; Zou Huawei; Wang Aiqing

    1997-01-01

    Four kinds of McAbs (anti CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 and CD 57 ) were used to separate CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 (B) and CD 57 (NK) lymphocyte subsets from human peripheral blood by 'Panning-direct' method. First the natural killing activity of each subsets and the regulatory functions between CD 57 and other subsets were studied. Then the effects of low dose radiation on the function of CD 57 cells and the regulatory functions between CD 57 and other subsets were studied. The results showed that the NK activity was found in all of the four subsets, with CD 57 cell having the strongest activity. When CD 4 and CD 57 cells were co-cultured, the total NK activity was higher than that of the sum of these two single subsets, i.e. there was synergistic effect between CD 4 and CD 57 cells. When CD 8 or CD 19 cells were co-cultured separately with CD 57 cells, no synergistic effect was found. Irradiation by gamma rays at doses of 50 cGy and 80 cGy was able to stimulate the function of CD 57 cells. After Cd 4 or CD 57 cells were irradiated, the total NK activity of their co-culture increased significantly. This phenomenon was not found in other subsets. This suggested that low dose radiation can enhance the synergistic action between CD 4 and CD 57 cells. So at least four subsets (CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 , CD 57 ) contribute to the total NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (15 refs., 4 tabs.)

  3. Moonlighting microtubule-associated proteins: regulatory functions by day and pathological functions at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, J; Tőkési, N; Lehotzky, A; Orosz, F; Ovádi, J

    2013-11-01

    The sensing, integrating, and coordinating features of the eukaryotic cells are achieved by the complex ultrastructural arrays and multifarious functions of the cytoskeletal network. Cytoskeleton comprises fibrous protein networks of microtubules, actin, and intermediate filaments. These filamentous polymer structures are highly dynamic and undergo constant and rapid reorganization during cellular processes. The microtubular system plays a crucial role in the brain, as it is involved in an enormous number of cellular events including cell differentiation and pathological inclusion formation. These multifarious functions of microtubules can be achieved by their decoration with proteins/enzymes that exert specific effects on the dynamics and organization of the cytoskeleton and mediate distinct functions due to their moonlighting features. This mini-review focuses on two aspects of the microtubule cytoskeleton. On the one hand, we describe the heteroassociation of tubulin/microtubules with metabolic enzymes, which in addition to their catalytic activities stabilize microtubule structures via their cross-linking functions. On the other hand, we focus on the recently identified moonlighting tubulin polymerization promoting protein, TPPP/p25. TPPP/p25 is a microtubule-associated protein and it displays distinct physiological or pathological (aberrant) functions; thus it is a prototype of Neomorphic Moonlighting Proteins. The expression of TPPP/p25 is finely controlled in the human brain; this protein is indispensable for the development of projections of oligodendrocytes that are responsible for the ensheathment of axons. The nonphysiological, higher or lower TPPP/p25 level leads to distinct CNS diseases. Mechanisms contributing to the control of microtubule stability and dynamics by metabolic enzymes and TPPP/p25 will be discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 77 FR 73651 - Cascade Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On October 23, 2012, Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, filed... Executive Officer, Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, 1210 W. Franklin Street, Ste. 2, Boise, Idaho 83702; phone... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14464-000] Cascade Energy...

  5. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [EA-11-013] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order Approving Direct Transfer of Licenses and Conforming Amendment I USEC... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead Cascade) and American Centrifuge Plant (ACP), respectively, which...

  6. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  7. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25hi T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell–cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24116901

  8. Do motifs reflect evolved function?--No convergent evolution of genetic regulatory network subgraph topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Johannes F; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Schilstra, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    Methods that analyse the topological structure of networks have recently become quite popular. Whether motifs (subgraph patterns that occur more often than in randomized networks) have specific functions as elementary computational circuits has been cause for debate. As the question is difficult to resolve with currently available biological data, we approach the issue using networks that abstractly model natural genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) which are evolved to show dynamical behaviors. Specifically one group of networks was evolved to be capable of exhibiting two different behaviors ("differentiation") in contrast to a group with a single target behavior. In both groups we find motif distribution differences within the groups to be larger than differences between them, indicating that evolutionary niches (target functions) do not necessarily mold network structure uniquely. These results show that variability operators can have a stronger influence on network topologies than selection pressures, especially when many topologies can create similar dynamics. Moreover, analysis of motif functional relevance by lesioning did not suggest that motifs were of greater importance to the functioning of the network than arbitrary subgraph patterns. Only when drastically restricting network size, so that one motif corresponds to a whole functionally evolved network, was preference for particular connection patterns found. This suggests that in non-restricted, bigger networks, entanglement with the rest of the network hinders topological subgraph analysis.

  9. Watt-Level Continuous-Wave Emission from a Bi-Functional Quantum Cascade Laser/Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    cally authorized by the U.S. Government may violate any copyrights that exist in this work. Watt-level continuous- wave emission from a bi- functional ... wave bi- functional devices, opens the perspective of on-chip dual comb spectroscopy. Also for discrete sens- ing setups, one can switch to lasers...seas.harvard.edu Abstract Bi- functional active regions, capable of light generation and detection at the same wavelength, allow a straightforward realization of

  10. SLAM-seq defines direct gene-regulatory functions of the BRD4-MYC axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhar, Matthias; Ebert, Anja; Neumann, Tobias; Umkehrer, Christian; Jude, Julian; Wieshofer, Corinna; Rescheneder, Philipp; Lipp, Jesse J; Herzog, Veronika A; Reichholf, Brian; Cisneros, David A; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schlapansky, Moritz F; Bhat, Pooja; von Haeseler, Arndt; Köcher, Thomas; Obenauf, Anna C; Popow, Johannes; Ameres, Stefan L; Zuber, Johannes

    2018-05-18

    Defining direct targets of transcription factors and regulatory pathways is key to understanding their roles in physiology and disease. We combined SLAM-seq [thiol(SH)-linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA], a method for direct quantification of newly synthesized messenger RNAs (mRNAs), with pharmacological and chemical-genetic perturbation in order to define regulatory functions of two transcriptional hubs in cancer, BRD4 and MYC, and to interrogate direct responses to BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETis). We found that BRD4 acts as general coactivator of RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, which is broadly repressed upon high-dose BETi treatment. At doses triggering selective effects in leukemia, BETis deregulate a small set of hypersensitive targets including MYC. In contrast to BRD4, MYC primarily acts as a selective transcriptional activator controlling metabolic processes such as ribosome biogenesis and de novo purine synthesis. Our study establishes a simple and scalable strategy to identify direct transcriptional targets of any gene or pathway. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  11. The importance of the practical training, the retraining and the accreditation of the personnel with regulatory functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menossi, Carlos A.

    2004-01-01

    Medicine, industry, hydrology, research, development and academic scenarios are, nowadays the focus for a wide application of radioisotope techniques of permanently increasing use. This situation should move the governments towards the improvement of their infrastructures and the updating of the nuclear regulatory authorities knowledge. The regulation and control of radioactive sources and its associated practices, to guarantee its safe use and minimize the derived risks from those practices, constitute the main tasks of nuclear regulatory institutions. On the other hand, it is known that personnel with regulatory functions has further interaction with people responsible of facilities and practices (users). In fact, most of these people only have contact with the regulatory authority through the inspector visits, the documents, notes or requirements received. For such a reason, nuclear regulatory authority management success or failure depends fundamentally on the successes or errors occurring in the course of these interactions. Due to it, it should be kept in mind that a successful management of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority implies: a) The users accomplish the effective standards and satisfy the authority requirements, and b) An attitude of respect is induced in the users by the appropriate regulatory function. That is to say because the 'inspectors' possess the necessary technical knowledge. In that sense, with the experience of many years, improvements have been introduced in the radiological protection Post Graduate Course program. This course sponsored by the IAEA has been given in Argentina for 24 years. Such improvements have been made to allow participants that will perform regulatory functions to have enough sessions of practical training, demonstrations, laboratory exercises, case studies and technical visits. This formation course will be supplemented by an accreditation and training on the job. The scope and dimension of the improvements are

  12. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gap Ryol Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing excessive immune responses. Treg cells induce tolerance against self- and foreign antigens, thus preventing autoimmunity, allergy, graft rejection, and fetus rejection during pregnancy. However, Treg cells also infiltrate into tumors and inhibit antitumor immune responses, thus inhibiting anticancer therapy. Depleting whole Treg cell populations in the body to enhance anticancer treatments will produce deleterious autoimmune diseases. Therefore, understanding the precise nature of tumor-infiltrating Treg cells is essential for effectively targeting Treg cells in tumors. This review summarizes recent results relating to Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment, with particular emphasis on their accumulation, phenotypic, and functional properties, and targeting to enhance the efficacy of anticancer treatment.

  13. The regulatory function of self-conscious emotion: insights from patients with orbitofrontal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Jennifer S; Heerey, Erin A; Keltner, Dacher; Scabini, Donatella; Knight, Robert T

    2003-10-01

    Although once considered disruptive, self-conscious emotions are now theorized to be fundamentally involved in the regulation of social behavior. The present study examined the social regulation function of self-conscious emotions by comparing healthy participants with a neuropsychological population--patients with orbitofrontal lesions--characterized by selective regulatory deficits. Orbitofrontal patients and healthy controls participated in a series of tasks designed to assess their social regulation and self-conscious emotions. Another task assessed the ability to infer others' emotional states, an appraisal process involved in self-conscious emotion. Consistent with the theory that self-conscious emotions are important for regulating social behavior, the findings show that deficient behavioral regulation is associated with inappropriate self-conscious emotions that reinforce maladaptive behavior. Additionally, deficient behavioral regulation is associated with impairments in interpreting the self-conscious emotions of others.

  14. Self-regulatory processes and exercise adherence in older adults: executive function and self-efficacy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Edward; Mullen, Sean P; Szabo, Amanda N; White, Siobhan M; Wójcicki, Thomas R; Mailey, Emily L; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; Voss, Michelle; Erickson, Kirk; Prakash, Ruchika; Kramer, Arthur F

    2011-09-01

    Self-efficacy and the use of self-regulatory strategies are consistently associated with physical activity behavior. Similarly, behavioral inhibition and cognitive resource allocation-indices of executive control function-have also been associated with this health behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between self-regulatory processes, such as executive function, and sustained exercise behavior. Older adults (N=177, mean age=66.44 years) completed measures of executive function, self-reported use of self-regulatory strategies, and self-efficacy prior to and during the first month of a 12-month exercise intervention. Percentage of exercise classes attended over the following 11 months was used to represent adherence. Data were collected from 2007 to 2010 and analyzed in 2010-2011. Structural equation models were tested examining the effect of executive function and strategy use on adherence via efficacy. As hypothesized, results showed significant direct effects of two elements of executive function and of strategy use on self-efficacy and of efficacy on adherence. In addition, there were significant indirect effects of strategy use and executive function on adherence via self-efficacy. Higher levels of executive function and use of self-regulatory strategies at the start of an exercise program enhance beliefs in exercise capabilities, which in turn leads to greater adherence. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  16. Loop 7 of E2 enzymes: an ancestral conserved functional motif involved in the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Papaleo

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin (Ub system controls almost every aspect of eukaryotic cell biology. Protein ubiquitination depends on the sequential action of three classes of enzymes (E1, E2 and E3. E2 Ub-conjugating enzymes have a central role in the ubiquitination pathway, interacting with both E1 and E3, and influencing the ultimate fate of the substrates. Several E2s are characterized by an extended acidic insertion in loop 7 (L7, which if mutated is known to impair the proper E2-related functions. In the present contribution, we show that acidic loop is a conserved ancestral motif in E2s, relying on the presence of alternate hydrophobic and acidic residues. Moreover, the dynamic properties of a subset of family 3 E2s, as well as their binary and ternary complexes with Ub and the cognate E3, have been investigated. Here we provide a model of L7 role in the different steps of the ubiquitination cascade of family 3 E2s. The L7 hydrophobic residues turned out to be the main determinant for the stabilization of the E2 inactive conformations by a tight network of interactions in the catalytic cleft. Moreover, phosphorylation is known from previous studies to promote E2 competent conformations for Ub charging, inducing electrostatic repulsion and acting on the L7 acidic residues. Here we show that these active conformations are stabilized by a network of hydrophobic interactions between L7 and L4, the latter being a conserved interface for E3-recruitment in several E2s. In the successive steps, L7 conserved acidic residues also provide an interaction interface for both Ub and the Rbx1 RING subdomain of the cognate E3. Our data therefore suggest a crucial role for L7 of family 3 E2s in all the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade. Its different functions are exploited thank to its conserved hydrophobic and acidic residues in a finely orchestrate mechanism.

  17. Dual functions of a small regulatory subunit in the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Phillips, Charles B; Ranaghan, Matthew; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Wu, Yujiao; Willliams, Carole; Miller, Christopher

    2016-04-21

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, a process crucial for bioenergetics and Ca(2+) signaling, is catalyzed by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. The uniporter is a multi-subunit Ca(2+)-activated Ca(2+) channel, with the Ca(2+) pore formed by the MCU protein and Ca(2+)-dependent activation mediated by MICU subunits. Recently, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein EMRE was identified as a uniporter subunit absolutely required for Ca(2+) permeation. However, the molecular mechanism and regulatory purpose of EMRE remain largely unexplored. Here, we determine the transmembrane orientation of EMRE, and show that its known MCU-activating function is mediated by the interaction of transmembrane helices from both proteins. We also reveal a second function of EMRE: to maintain tight MICU regulation of the MCU pore, a role that requires EMRE to bind MICU1 using its conserved C-terminal polyaspartate tail. This dual functionality of EMRE ensures that all transport-competent uniporters are tightly regulated, responding appropriately to a dynamic intracellular Ca(2+) landscape.

  18. The Alternative NF-κB Pathway in Regulatory T Cell Homeostasis and Suppressive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg-Bleyer, Yenkel; Caron, Rachel; Seeley, John J; De Silva, Nilushi S; Schindler, Christian W; Hayden, Matthew S; Klein, Ulf; Ghosh, Sankar

    2018-04-01

    CD4 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential regulators of immune responses. Perturbation of Treg homeostasis or function can lead to uncontrolled inflammation and autoimmunity. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in Treg biology remains an active area of investigation. It has been shown previously that the NF-κB family of transcription factors, in particular, the canonical pathway subunits, c-Rel and p65, are crucial for the development, maintenance, and function of Tregs. However, the role of the alternative NF-κB pathway components, p100 and RelB, in Treg biology remains unclear. In this article, we show that conditional deletion of the p100 gene, nfkb2 , in Tregs, resulted in massive inflammation because of impaired suppressive function of nfkb2 -deficient Tregs. Surprisingly, mice lacking RelB in Tregs did not exhibit the same phenotype. Instead, deletion of both relb and nfkb2 rescued the inflammatory phenotype, demonstrating an essential role for p100 as an inhibitor of RelB in Tregs. Our data therefore illustrate a new role for the alternative NF-κB signaling pathway in Tregs that has implications for the understanding of molecular pathways driving tolerance and immunity. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Trichostatin A Promotes the Generation and Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Doñas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells are a specific subset of lymphocytes that suppress immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. They can be generated in the thymus as well as in the periphery through differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. The forkhead box P3 transcription factor (Foxp3 is a crucial molecule regulating the generation and function of Tregs. Here we show that the foxp3 gene promoter becomes hyperacetylated in in vitro differentiated Tregs compared to naïve CD4+ T cells. We also show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA stimulated the in vitro differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into Tregs and that this induction was accompanied by a global increase in histone H3 acetylation. Importantly, we also demonstrated that Tregs generated in the presence of TSA have phenotypical and functional differences from the Tregs generated in the absence of TSA. Thus, TSA-generated Tregs showed increased suppressive activities, which could potentially be explained by a mechanism involving the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73. Our data show that TSA could potentially be used to enhance the differentiation and suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells.

  20. Catalytic Cascade Dehydration-Etherification of Fructose into 5-Ethoxymethylfurfural with SO3H-Functionalized Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of SO3H-functionalized polymers were prepared and employed as heterogeneous catalysts for one-pot transformation of fructose into 5-ethoxymethylfurfural (EMF that is considered to be one of potential liquid biofuels. A high EMF yield of 72.8% could be obtained at 110°C for 10 h, and the polymeric acid catalysts could be recycled for five times without significant loss of catalytic performance.

  1. Toward a functional definition of a "rare disease" for regulatory authorities and funding agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Joe T R; Coyle, Doug; Evans, Gerald; Martin, Janet; Winquist, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The designation of a disease as "rare" is associated with some substantial benefits for companies involved in new drug development, including expedited review by regulatory authorities and relaxed criteria for reimbursement. How "rare disease" is defined therefore has major financial implications, both for pharmaceutical companies and for insurers or public drug reimbursement programs. All existing definitions are based, somewhat arbitrarily, on disease incidence or prevalence. What is proposed here is a functional definition of rare based on an assessment of the feasibility of measuring the efficacy of a new treatment in conventional randomized controlled trials, to inform regulatory authorities and funding agencies charged with assessing new therapies being considered for public funding. It involves a five-step process, involving significant negotiations between patient advocacy groups, pharmaceutical companies, physicians, and public drug reimbursement programs, designed to establish the feasibility of carrying out a randomized controlled trial with sufficient statistical power to show a clinically significant treatment effect. The steps are as follows: 1) identification of a specific disease, including appropriate genetic definition; 2) identification of clinically relevant outcomes to evaluate efficacy; 3) establishment of the inherent variability of measurements of clinically relevant outcomes; 4) calculation of the sample size required to assess the efficacy of a new treatment with acceptable statistical power; and 5) estimation of the difficulty of recruiting an adequate sample size given the estimated prevalence or incidence of the disorder in the population and the inclusion criteria to be used. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T Young

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade's kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1 Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2 Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it

  3. Regio- and Stereoselective Cascades via Aldol Condensation and 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition for Construction of Functional Pyrrolizidine Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhuo-Ya; Liu, Yi-Wen; Han, Pan; Dong, Han-Qing; Si, Chang-Mei; Wei, Bang-Guo; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2018-02-16

    An efficient and step-economical approach to access functionalized pyrrolizidine derivatives by a one-pot tandem sequence, including an aldol condensation and subsequent 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition process, has been developed, starting from acetone, aldehyde, and proline. A number of substituted aromatic aldehydes were amenable to this transformation, and the desired products, racemic 7a-7w and chiral 9a-9m, were obtained with excellent regioselectivities and outstanding diastereoselectivities. Moreover, in situ NMR studies revealed MgSO 4 could effectively promote the aldol condensation pathway in this tandem process.

  4. Design of three-well indirect pumping terahertz quantum cascade lasers for high optical gain based on nonequilibrium Green's function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Kubis, Tillmann; Jie Wang, Qi; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    The nonequilibrium Green's function approach is applied to the design of three-well indirect pumping terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based on a resonant phonon depopulation scheme. The effects of the anticrossing of the injector states and the dipole matrix element of the laser levels on the optical gain of THz QCLs are studied. The results show that a design that results in a more pronounced anticrossing of the injector states will achieve a higher optical gain in the indirect pumping scheme compared to the traditional resonant-tunneling injection scheme. This offers in general a more efficient coherent resonant-tunneling transport of electrons in the indirect pumping scheme. It is also shown that, for operating temperatures below 200 K and low lasing frequencies, larger dipole matrix elements, i.e., vertical optical transitions, offer a higher optical gain. In contrast, in the case of high lasing frequencies, smaller dipole matrix elements, i.e., diagonal optical transitions are better for achieving a higher optical gain.

  5. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France); Tora, Laszlo, E-mail: laszlo@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France)

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  6. Regulatory functional territory of PLK-1 and their substrates beyond mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiv; Sharma, Garima; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Jaebong

    2017-06-06

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) is a well-known (Ser/Thr) mitotic protein kinase and is considered as a proto-oncogene. As hyper-activation of PLK-1 is broadly associated with poor prognosis and cancer progression, it is one of the most extensively studied mitotic kinases. During mitosis, PLK-1 regulates various cell cycle events, such as spindle pole maturation, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. However, studies have demonstrated that the role of PLK-1 is not only restricted to mitosis, but PLK-1 can also regulate other vital events beyond mitosis, including transcription, translation, ciliogenesis, checkpoint adaptation and recovery, apoptosis, chromosomes dynamics etc. Recent reviews have tried to define the regulatory role of PLK-1 during mitosis progression and tumorigenesis, but its' functional role beyond mitosis is still largely unexplored. PLK-1 can regulate the activity of many proteins that work outside of its conventional territory. The dysregulation of these proteins can cause diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, tumorigenesis etc. and may also lead to drug resistance. Thus, in this review, we discussed the versatile role of PLK-1 and tried to collect data to validate its' functional role in cell cycle regulation apart from mitosis.

  7. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela; Tora, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    TAF15 (formerly TAF II 68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  8. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  9. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  10. Environmentally friendly consumer choices: Cultural differences in the self-regulatory function of anticipated pride and guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onwezen, M.C.; Bartels, J.; Antonides, G.

    2014-01-01

    Anticipated self-conscious emotions, such as pride and guilt, help individuals to behave in line with their personal and social standards regarding the environment. We seek to explore whether ths self-regulatory role of anticipated pride and guilt functions similarly across individuals from

  11. Environmentally friendly consumer choices: Cultural differences in the self-regulatory function of anticipated pride and guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onwezen, M.C.; Bartels, J.; Antonides, G.

    2014-01-01

    Anticipated self-conscious emotions, such as pride and guilt, help individuals to behave in line with their personal and social standards regarding the environment. We seek to explore whether this self-regulatory role of anticipated pride and guilt functions similarly across individuals from

  12. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J. G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence Hai-Chun Jing1,2, Lisa Anderson3, Marcel J.G. Sturre1, Jacques Hille1 and Paul P. Dijkwel1,* 1Molecular Biology of Plants, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and

  13. A multifaceted imbalance of T cells with regulatory function characterizes type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Silvia; Longhi, Maria Serena; De Molo, Chiara; Lalanne, Claudine; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Hussain, Munther J; Ma, Yun; Lenzi, Marco; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Bianchi, Francesco B; Vergani, Diego; Muratori, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    Immunotolerance is maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs), including CD4(+)CD25(hi), CD8(+)CD28(-), gammadelta, and CD3(+)CD56(+) [natural killer T (NKT)] cells. CD4(+)CD25(hi) cells are impaired in children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Little is known about Tregs in adults with AIH. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and function of Treg subsets in adult patients with AIH during periods of active disease and remission. Forty-seven AIH patients (16 with active disease and 31 in remission) and 28 healthy controls were studied. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate surface markers and function-related intracellular molecules in gammadelta, CD8(+)CD28(-), NKT, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) cells. CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cell function was determined by the ability to suppress proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production by CD4(+)CD25(-) target cells. Liver forkhead box P3-positive (FOXP3(+)) cells were sought by immunohistochemistry. In AIH patients, particularly during active disease, CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells were fewer, expressed lower levels of FOXP3, and were less effective at inhibiting target cell proliferation versus healthy controls. Moreover, although the numbers of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells were similar in AIH patients and healthy controls, NKT cells were numerically reduced, especially during active disease, and produced lower quantities of the immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-4 versus controls. In contrast, gammadelta T cells in AIH patients were more numerous versus healthy controls and had an inverted Vdelta1/Vdelta2 ratio and higher IFN-gamma and granzyme B production; the latter was correlated to biochemical indices of liver damage. There were few FOXP3(+) cells within the portal tract inflammatory infiltrate. Our data show that the defect in immunoregulation in adult AIH is complex, and gammadelta T cells are likely to be effectors of liver damage.

  14. The physiological functions of iron regulatory proteins in iron homeostasis - an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Liang eZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs regulate the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron responsive elements (IREs in target mRNAs. IRP binding inhibits the translation of mRNAs that contain an IRE in the 5’untranslated region of the transcripts, and increases the stability of mRNAs that contain IREs in the 3'untranslated region of transcripts. By these mechanisms, IRPs increase cellular iron absorption and decrease storage and export of iron to maintain an optimal intracellular iron balance. There are two members of the mammalian IRP protein family, IRP1 and IRP2, and they have redundant functions as evidenced by the embryonic lethality of the mice that completely lack IRP expression (Irp1-/-/Irp2-/- mice, which contrasts with the fact that Irp1-/- and Irp2-/- mice are viable. In addition, Irp2-/- mice also display neurodegenerative symptoms and microcytic hypochromic anemia, suggesting that IRP2 function predominates in the nervous system and erythropoietic homeostasis. Though the physiological significance of IRP1 had been unclear since Irp1-/- animals were first assessed in the early 1990’s, recent studies indicate that IRP1 plays an essential function in orchestrating the balance between erythropoiesis and bodily iron homeostasis. Additionally, Irp1-/- mice develop pulmonary hypertension, and they experience sudden death when maintained on an iron-deficient diet, indicating that IRP1 has a critical role in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in understanding the physiological roles of IRP1 and IRP2, and further discusses the implications for clinical research on patients with idiopathic polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension and neurodegeneration.

  15. Mechanisms of cascade collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Smalinskas, K.; Averback, R.S.; Robertson, I.M.; Hseih, H.; Benedek, R.

    1988-12-01

    The spontaneous collapse of energetic displacement cascades in metals into vacancy dislocation loops has been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Simulations of 5 keV recoil events in Cu and Ni provide the following scenario of cascade collapse: atoms are ejected from the central region of the cascade by replacement collision sequences; the central region subsequently melts; vacancies are driven to the center of the cascade during resolidification where they may collapse into loops. Whether or not collapse occurs depends critically on the melting temperature of the metal and the energy density and total energy in the cascade. Results of TEM are presented in support of this mechanism. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Cascade detection for the extraction of localized sequence features; specificity results for HIV-1 protease and structure-function results for the Schellman loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Nicholas E

    2011-12-15

    The extraction of the set of features most relevant to function from classified biological sequence sets is still a challenging problem. A central issue is the determination of expected counts for higher order features so that artifact features may be screened. Cascade detection (CD), a new algorithm for the extraction of localized features from sequence sets, is introduced. CD is a natural extension of the proportional modeling techniques used in contingency table analysis into the domain of feature detection. The algorithm is successfully tested on synthetic data and then applied to feature detection problems from two different domains to demonstrate its broad utility. An analysis of HIV-1 protease specificity reveals patterns of strong first-order features that group hydrophobic residues by side chain geometry and exhibit substantial symmetry about the cleavage site. Higher order results suggest that favorable cooperativity is weak by comparison and broadly distributed, but indicate possible synergies between negative charge and hydrophobicity in the substrate. Structure-function results for the Schellman loop, a helix-capping motif in proteins, contain strong first-order features and also show statistically significant cooperativities that provide new insights into the design of the motif. These include a new 'hydrophobic staple' and multiple amphipathic and electrostatic pair features. CD should prove useful not only for sequence analysis, but also for the detection of multifactor synergies in cross-classified data from clinical studies or other sources. Windows XP/7 application and data files available at: https://sites.google.com/site/cascadedetect/home. nacnewell@comcast.net Supplementary information is available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Transcriptional Repressor HIC1 Contributes to Suppressive Function of Human Induced Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaid Ullah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical in regulating the immune response. In vitro induced Treg (iTreg cells have significant potential in clinical medicine. However, applying iTreg cells as therapeutics is complicated by the poor stability of human iTreg cells and their variable suppressive activity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of human iTreg cell specification. We identified hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1 as a transcription factor upregulated early during the differentiation of human iTreg cells. Although FOXP3 expression was unaffected, HIC1 deficiency led to a considerable loss of suppression by iTreg cells with a concomitant increase in the expression of effector T cell associated genes. SNPs linked to several immune-mediated disorders were enriched around HIC1 binding sites, and in vitro binding assays indicated that these SNPs may alter the binding of HIC1. Our results suggest that HIC1 is an important contributor to iTreg cell development and function.

  18. FARE-CAFE: a database of functional and regulatory elements of cancer-associated fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Praveen Kumar; Cheng, Jack; Huang, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation (CT) is of enormous clinical interest because this disorder is associated with various major solid tumors and leukemia. A tumor-specific fusion gene event may occur when a translocation joins two separate genes. Currently, various CT databases provide information about fusion genes and their genomic elements. However, no database of the roles of fusion genes, in terms of essential functional and regulatory elements in oncogenesis, is available. FARE-CAFE is a unique combination of CTs, fusion proteins, protein domains, domain-domain interactions, protein-protein interactions, transcription factors and microRNAs, with subsequent experimental information, which cannot be found in any other CT database. Genomic DNA information including, for example, manually collected exact locations of the first and second break points, sequences and karyotypes of fusion genes are included. FARE-CAFE will substantially facilitate the cancer biologist's mission of elucidating the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. This database will ultimately help to develop 'novel' therapeutic approaches. Database URL: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/FARE-CAFE. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  20. Functional Analysis of In-frame Indel ARID1A Mutations Reveals New Regulatory Mechanisms of Its Tumor Suppressor Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Guan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A has emerged as a new tumor suppressor in which frequent somatic mutations have been identified in several types of human cancers. Although most ARID1A somatic mutations are frame-shift or nonsense mutations that contribute to mRNA decay and loss of protein expression, 5% of ARID1A mutations are in-frame insertions or deletions (indels that involve only a small stretch of peptides. Naturally occurring in-frame indel mutations provide unique and useful models to explore the biology and regulatory role of ARID1A. In this study, we analyzed indel mutations identified in gynecological cancers to determine how these mutations affect the tumor suppressor function of ARID1A. Our results demonstrate that all in-frame mutants analyzed lost their ability to inhibit cellular proliferation or activate transcription of CDKN1A, which encodes p21, a downstream effector of ARID1A. We also showed that ARID1A is a nucleocytoplasmic protein whose stability depends on its subcellular localization. Nuclear ARID1A is less stable than cytoplasmic ARID1A because ARID1A is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nucleus. In-frame deletions affecting the consensus nuclear export signal reduce steady-state protein levels of ARID1A. This defect in nuclear exportation leads to nuclear retention and subsequent degradation. Our findings delineate a mechanism underlying the regulation of ARID1A subcellular distribution and protein stability and suggest that targeting the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system can increase the amount of the ARID1A protein in the nucleus and restore its tumor suppressor functions.

  1. Accumulation and suppressive function of regulatory T cells in malignant ascites: Reducing their suppressive function using arsenic trioxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zilong; Hu, Shidong; Wu, Youjun; Li, Songyan; He, Changzheng; Xing, Xiaowei; Wang, Yufeng; Du, Xiaohui

    2018-04-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has demonstrated effective and remarkable clinical responses in several studies, this approach does not lead to objective clinical responses in all cases. The function of ACT is often compromised by various tumor escape mechanisms, including the accumulation of immunoregulatory cells. As a result of peritoneal metastasis in the terminal stage, malignant ascites fluid lacks effectiveness and is a poor prognostic factor for gastric cancer. The present study assessed T-cell subsets in lymphocytes derived from malignant ascites, and investigated the effects of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) on regulatory T cells (Tregs) and ascites-derived tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in vitro . In this study, lymphocytes were separated from malignant ascites and T-cell subsets were detected via flow cytometry. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Abundant Tregs were observed in ascites lymphocytes, which and exhibited a significantly increased frequency compared with that in the peripheral blood of patients. Furthermore, As 2 O 3 treatment significantly reduced Treg numbers and Foxp3 mRNA levels in vitro (P<0.05). IFN-γ levels in the supernatant of ascites-derived TILs were increased by As 2 O 3 , whereas IL-10 and TGF-β levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05). As 2 O 3 may induce selective depletion and inhibit immunosuppressive function of Tregs, and may enhance the cytotoxic activity of ascites-derived TILs.

  2. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  3. Evaluation of potential regulatory function of breast cancer risk locus at 6q25.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaqiong; Ye, Chuanzhong; Guo, Xingyi; Wen, Wanqing; Long, Jirong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin

    2016-02-01

    In a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women, we identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210 at 6q25.1 for breast cancer risk. To explore a potential regulatory role for this risk locus, we measured expression levels of nine genes at the locus in breast cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue samples obtained from 67 patients recruited in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We found that rs2046210 had a statistically significant association with the expression levels of the AKAP12 and ESR1 genes in adjacent normal breast tissues. Women who carry the AA/AG risk genotypes had higher expressions of these two genes compared to those who carry G/G genotypes (P = 0.02 and 0.04 for the AKAP12 and ESR1, respectively). However, no significant differences of SNP rs2046210 with gene expression levels were found in tumor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, the AA/AG risk genotypes of SNP rs2046210 were associated with a significantly higher expression level of the AKAP12 gene and a lower level of the ESR1 gene in tumor tissue. Functional analysis using ENCODE data revealed that SNP rs7763637, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with SNP rs2046210, is likely a potential functional variant, regulating the AKAP12 gene. Taken together, these results from our study suggest that the association between the 6q25.1 locus and breast cancer risk may be mediated through SNPs that regulate expressions of the AKAP12 gene. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Identification of direct regulatory targets of the transcription factor Sox10 based on function and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sanghyuk

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox10, a member of the Sry-related HMG-Box gene family, is a critical transcription factor for several important cell lineages, most notably the neural crest stem cells and the derivative peripheral glial cells and melanocytes. Thus far, only a handful of direct target genes are known for this transcription factor limiting our understanding of the biological network it governs. Results We describe identification of multiple direct regulatory target genes of Sox10 through a procedure based on function and conservation. By combining RNA interference technique and DNA microarray technology, we have identified a set of genes that show significant down-regulation upon introduction of Sox10 specific siRNA into Schwannoma cells. Subsequent comparative genomics analyses led to potential binding sites for Sox10 protein conserved across several mammalian species within the genomic region proximal to these genes. Multiple sites belonging to 4 different genes (proteolipid protein, Sox10, extracellular superoxide dismutase, and pleiotrophin were shown to directly interact with Sox10 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We further confirmed the direct regulation through the identified cis-element for one of the genes, extracellular superoxide dismutase, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter assay. Conclusion In sum, the process of combining differential expression profiling and comparative genomics successfully led to further defining the role of Sox10, a critical transcription factor for the development of peripheral glia. Our strategy utilizing relatively accessible techniques and tools should be applicable to studying the function of other transcription factors.

  5. Pathogenic adaptation of intracellular bacteria by rewiring a cis-regulatory input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Suzanne E; Walthers, Don; Tomljenovic, Ana M; Mulder, David T; Silphaduang, Uma; Duong, Nancy; Lowden, Michael J; Wickham, Mark E; Waller, Ross F; Kenney, Linda J; Coombes, Brian K

    2009-03-10

    The acquisition of DNA by horizontal gene transfer enables bacteria to adapt to previously unexploited ecological niches. Although horizontal gene transfer and mutation of protein-coding sequences are well-recognized forms of pathogen evolution, the evolutionary significance of cis-regulatory mutations in creating phenotypic diversity through altered transcriptional outputs is not known. We show the significance of regulatory mutation for pathogen evolution by mapping and then rewiring a cis-regulatory module controlling a gene required for murine typhoid. Acquisition of a binding site for the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 regulator, SsrB, enabled the srfN gene, ancestral to the Salmonella genus, to play a role in pathoadaptation of S. typhimurium to a host animal. We identified the evolved cis-regulatory module and quantified the fitness gain that this regulatory output accrues for the bacterium using competitive infections of host animals. Our findings highlight a mechanism of pathogen evolution involving regulatory mutation that is selected because of the fitness advantage the new regulatory output provides the incipient clones.

  6. Regulatory effect of paraprobiotic Lactobacillus gasseri CP2305 on gut environment and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Sugawara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lactobacillus gasseri CP2305 (CP2305 is a strain of Lactobacillus isolated from a stool sample from a healthy adult that showed beneficial effects on health as a paraprobiotic. In a previous study, we demonstrated that CP2305-fermented heat-treated milk modified gut functions more than artificially acidified sour milk. Thus, the regulatory activity of the former beverage was attributed to the inactivated CP2305 cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to elucidate the contribution of non-viable paraprobiotic CP2305 cells to regulating human gut functions. We thus conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded parallel group trial. Design: The trial included 118 healthy participants with relatively low or high stool frequencies. The test beverage was prepared by adding 1×1010 washed, heat-treated, and dried CP2305 cells directly to the placebo beverage. The participants ingested a bottle of the assigned beverage daily for 3 weeks and answered daily questionnaires about defecation and quality of life. Fecal samples were collected and the fecal characteristics, microbial metabolite contents of the feces and composition of fecal microbiota were evaluated. Results: The number of evacuations and the scores for fecal odors were significantly improved in the group that consumed the CP2305-containing beverage compared with those of the group that consumed the placebo (p=0.035 and p=0.040, respectively. Regarding the fecal contents of microbial metabolites, the level of fecal p-cresol was significantly decreased in the CP2305 group relative to that of the placebo group (p=0.013. The Bifidobacterium content of the intestinal microbiota was significantly increased in the CP2305 group relative to that of the placebo group (p<0.008, whereas the content of Clostridium cluster IV was significantly decreased (p<0.003. The parasympathetic nerve activity of the autonomic nervous system became dominant and the total power of autonomic

  7. Levels and function of regulatory T cells in patients with polymorphic light eruption: relation to photohardening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweintzger, N; Gruber-Wackernagel, A; Reginato, E; Bambach, I; Quehenberger, F; Byrne, S N; Wolf, P

    2015-08-01

    We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the immunological abnormalities seen in patients with polymorphic light eruption (PLE). To investigate the number and suppressive function of peripheral Tregs in patients with PLE compared with healthy controls. Blood sampling was done in 30 patients with PLE [seeking or not seeking 311-nm ultraviolet (UV)B photohardening] as well as 19 healthy controls at two time points: TP1, March to June (before phototherapy); and TP2, May to August (after phototherapy). We compared the number of CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(-) FoxP3(+) Tregs by flow cytometry and their function by assessing FoxP3 mRNA levels and effector T cell/Treg suppression assays. Tregs isolated from healthy controls significantly suppressed the proliferation of effector T cells at TP1 by 68% (P = 0·0156). In contrast, Tregs from patients with PLE entirely lacked the capacity to suppress effector T-cell proliferation at that time point. The medical photohardening seen in 23 patients with PLE resulted in a significant increase in the median percentage of circulating Tregs [both as a proportion of all lymphocytes; 65 6% increase (P = 0·0049), and as a proportion of CD4(+) T cells; 32.5% increase (P = 0·0049)]. This was accompanied by an increase in the expression of FoxP3 mRNA (P = 0·0083) and relative immunosuppressive function of Tregs (P = 0·083) comparing the two time points in representative subsets of patients with healthy controls tested. Seven patients with PLE not receiving 311-nm UVB also exhibited an increase in the number of Tregs but this was not statistically significant. No significant differences in Treg numbers were observed in healthy subjects between the two time points. An impaired Treg function is likely to play a role in PLE pathogenesis. A UV-induced increase in the number of Tregs (either naturally or therapeutically) may be a compensatory mechanism by which the immune system counteracts the susceptibility to

  8. Functional organization of an Mbp enhancer exposes striking transcriptional regulatory diversity within myelinating glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionne, Nancy; Dib, Samar; Finsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    regulatory element combinations were found to drive expression in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells with a minimal 129 bp sequence conferring expression in oligodendrocytes throughout myelin elaboration, maintenance and repair. Unexpectedly, M3 derivatives conferred markedly different spatial and temporal...

  9. Cascade theory in isotopic separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    Three main areas are developed within the scope of this work: - the first one is devoted to fundamentals: separative power, value function, ideal cascade and square cascade. Applications to two main cases are carried out, namely: Study of binary isotopic mix, Study of processes with a small enrichment coefficient. - The second one is devoted to cascade coupling -high-flux coupling (more widely used and better known) as well as low-flux coupling are presented and compared to one another. - The third one is an outlook on problems linked to cascade transients. Those problem are somewhat intricate and their interest lies mainly into two areas: economics where the start-up time may have a large influence on the interests paid during the construction and start-up period, military productions where the start-up time has a direct bearing on the production schedule. (author). 50 figs. 3 annexes. 12 refs. 6 tabs

  10. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita Júnior, D.; Cruvinel, W.M.; Araujo, J.A.P.; Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G.; Andrade, L.E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25 +/high CD127 Ø/low FoxP3 + , and effector T cells were defined as CD25 + CD127 + FoxP3 Ø . The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4 + TREG and CD28 + TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L + TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR + , HLA-DR + , OX40 + , and CD45RO + cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L + cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L + TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease

  12. Conjugation of cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Martin, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Presented in this work are some results relative to sequences found in the logistic equation bifurcation diagram, which is the unimodal quadratic map prototype. All of the different saddle-node bifurcation cascades, associated with every last appearance p-periodic orbit (p=3,4,5,...), can also be generated from the very Feigenbaum cascade. In this way it is evidenced the relationship between both cascades. The orbits of every saddle-node bifurcation cascade, mentioned above, are located in different chaotic bands, and this determines a sequence of orbits converging to every band-merging Misiurewicz point. In turn, these accumulation points form a sequence whose accumulation point is the Myrberg-Feigenbaum point. It is also proven that the first appearance orbits in the n-chaotic band converge to the same point as the last appearance orbits of the (n + 1)-chaotic band. The symbolic sequences of band-merging Misiurewicz points are computed for any window.

  13. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  14. State of Charge Balancing Control of a Multi-Functional Battery Energy Storage System Based on a 11-Level Cascaded Multilevel PWM Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Songcen; Teodorescu, Remus; Máthé, Lászlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and SOC (State of Charge) balancing control of lithium-ion battery energy storage system based on cascaded multilevel converter for both grid integration and electric vehicle propulsion applications. The equivalent electrical circuit model of lithium-ion battery...

  15. Learning optimal embedded cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberian, Mohammad Javad; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2012-10-01

    The problem of automatic and optimal design of embedded object detector cascades is considered. Two main challenges are identified: optimization of the cascade configuration and optimization of individual cascade stages, so as to achieve the best tradeoff between classification accuracy and speed, under a detection rate constraint. Two novel boosting algorithms are proposed to address these problems. The first, RCBoost, formulates boosting as a constrained optimization problem which is solved with a barrier penalty method. The constraint is the target detection rate, which is met at all iterations of the boosting process. This enables the design of embedded cascades of known configuration without extensive cross validation or heuristics. The second, ECBoost, searches over cascade configurations to achieve the optimal tradeoff between classification risk and speed. The two algorithms are combined into an overall boosting procedure, RCECBoost, which optimizes both the cascade configuration and its stages under a detection rate constraint, in a fully automated manner. Extensive experiments in face, car, pedestrian, and panda detection show that the resulting detectors achieve an accuracy versus speed tradeoff superior to those of previous methods.

  16. Optimization of the cascade with gas centrifuges for uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, N.; Harada, I.

    1976-01-01

    Computer programs to optimize the step and tapered-step cascades with gas centrifuges are developed. The 'Complex Method', one of the direct search method, is employed to find the optimum of the nonlinear function of several variables within a constrained region. The separation characteristics of the optimized step and tapered-step cascades are discussed in comparison with that of the ideal cascade. The local optima of the cascade profile, the convergence of the object function, and the stopping criterion for the optimization trial are also discussed. (author)

  17. Hill functions for stochastic gene regulatory networks from master equations with split nodes and time-scale separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipan, Ovidiu; Ferwerda, Cameron

    2018-02-01

    The deterministic Hill function depends only on the average values of molecule numbers. To account for the fluctuations in the molecule numbers, the argument of the Hill function needs to contain the means, the standard deviations, and the correlations. Here we present a method that allows for stochastic Hill functions to be constructed from the dynamical evolution of stochastic biocircuits with specific topologies. These stochastic Hill functions are presented in a closed analytical form so that they can be easily incorporated in models for large genetic regulatory networks. Using a repressive biocircuit as an example, we show by Monte Carlo simulations that the traditional deterministic Hill function inaccurately predicts time of repression by an order of two magnitudes. However, the stochastic Hill function was able to capture the fluctuations and thus accurately predicted the time of repression.

  18. Modeling of cascade and sub-cascade formation at high pka energies in irradiated fusion structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.; Metelkin, E.V.; Semenov, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A new theoretical model is developed for the investigations of cascade and sub-cascade formation in fusion structural materials under fast neutron irradiation at high primary knock atom (PKA) energies. Under 14 MeV neutron irradiation especially of light fusion structural materials such as Be, C, SiC materials PKA will have the energies up to 1 MeV. At such high energies it is very difficult to use the Monte Carlo or molecular dynamic simulations. The developed model is based on the analytical consideration of elastic collisions between displaced moving atoms into atomic cascades produced by a PKAs with the some kinetic energy obtained from fast neutrons. The Tomas-Fermy interaction potential is used for the describing of elastic collisions between moving atoms. The suggested model takes into account also the electronic losses for moving atoms between elastic collisions. The self consistent criterion for sub-cascade formation is suggested here which is based on the comparison of mean distance between two consequent PKA collisions and size of sub-cascade produced by PKA. The analytical relations for the most important characteristics of cascades and sub-cascade are determined including the average number of sub-cascades per one PKA in the dependence on PKA energy, the distance between sub-cascades and the average cascade and sub-cascade sizes as a function of PKA energy. The developed model allows determining the total numbers, distribution functions of cascades and sub-cascades in dependence on their sizes and generation rate of cascades and sub-cascades for different fusion neutron energy spectra. Based on the developed model the numerical calculations for main characteristics of cascades and sub-cascades in different fusion structural materials are performed using the neutron flux and PKA energy spectra for fusion reactors: ITER and DEMO. The main characteristics for cascade and sub-cascade formation are calculated here for the

  19. Phenotypic and functional markers for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)-modified regulatory dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A W; Holmstrøm, K; Jensen, S S

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of dendritic cells (DCs) to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance has been hampered by the lack of a widely acknowledged method for generating human regulatory DCs but even more so by the non-existence of reliable markers. Thus, we set out to find reliable markers that can...... CD14 and reduced CD1a on the cell surface. These VD3-treated DCs exert a long-lasting inefficient T cell stimulation and induce T cell hyporesponsiveness with regulatory potential. Importantly, such VD3-treated DCs were readily distinguishable from untreated DCs by low levels of interleukin-23...

  20. Cascade of links in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yeqian; Sun, Bihui [Department of Management Science, School of Government, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Zeng, An, E-mail: anzeng@bnu.edu.cn [School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2017-01-30

    Cascading failure is an important process which has been widely used to model catastrophic events such as blackouts and financial crisis in real systems. However, so far most of the studies in the literature focus on the cascading process on nodes, leaving the possibility of link cascade overlooked. In many real cases, the catastrophic events are actually formed by the successive disappearance of links. Examples exist in the financial systems where the firms and banks (i.e. nodes) still exist but many financial trades (i.e. links) are gone during the crisis, and the air transportation systems where the airports (i.e. nodes) are still functional but many airlines (i.e. links) stop operating during bad weather. In this letter, we develop a link cascade model in complex networks. With this model, we find that both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. However, the link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes in the network which do not respond to any link reduction. Finally, a simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes, which significantly improves the robustness of the networks against the link cascade. - Highlights: • We propose a link cascade model in complex networks. • Both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. • The link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes. • A simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes.

  1. Cascade of links in complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yeqian; Sun, Bihui; Zeng, An

    2017-01-01

    Cascading failure is an important process which has been widely used to model catastrophic events such as blackouts and financial crisis in real systems. However, so far most of the studies in the literature focus on the cascading process on nodes, leaving the possibility of link cascade overlooked. In many real cases, the catastrophic events are actually formed by the successive disappearance of links. Examples exist in the financial systems where the firms and banks (i.e. nodes) still exist but many financial trades (i.e. links) are gone during the crisis, and the air transportation systems where the airports (i.e. nodes) are still functional but many airlines (i.e. links) stop operating during bad weather. In this letter, we develop a link cascade model in complex networks. With this model, we find that both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. However, the link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes in the network which do not respond to any link reduction. Finally, a simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes, which significantly improves the robustness of the networks against the link cascade. - Highlights: • We propose a link cascade model in complex networks. • Both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. • The link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes. • A simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes.

  2. The regulatory function of social referencing in preschoolers with Down syndrome or Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurman Angela John

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important developmental task is to learn to recognize another person as a source of information and to utilize this information as a method of learning about the surrounding world. This socially guided form of learning, referred to as social referencing, is critical for the development of children’s understanding of other people, themselves and their surrounding world. In the present project, the regulatory function of social referencing was examined in two genetic disorders that are characterized by differing patterns of socio-cognitive development: Down syndrome (DS and Williams syndrome (WS. Methods Participants were 20 children with DS and 20 children with WS aged 42 to 71 months, matched on chronological age and gender. Each child participated in four studies: one study in which we examined performance in a social referencing paradigm and three studies in which we considered performance on tasks designed to tap each of three component abilities (initiating eye contact, gaze following and emotional responsivity important for success in social referencing. Results The majority of children in both groups demonstrated positive behavioral responses regarding the stimulus in the Social Referencing task when the adult communicated a joyful message but did not regulate their own behavior in accordance with the adult’s expression of fear. Between-group differences were observed in both conditions, with most differences indicating more advanced socio-communicative competence for children with DS than for children with WS even though the overall intellectual abilities and receptive language abilities of the children with WS were significantly higher than were those of the children with DS. The results of follow-up studies indicated that children with DS were more likely to initiate eye contact (unsolicited and to follow another person’s gaze in triadic situations than were children with WS. Neither group regulated their

  3. Dietary isoflavones alter regulatory behaviors, metabolic hormones and neuroendocrine function in Long-Evans male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Lihong

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytoestrogens derived from soy foods (or isoflavones have received prevalent usage due to their 'health benefits' of decreasing: a age-related diseases, b hormone-dependent cancers and c postmenopausal symptoms. However, little is known about the influence of dietary phytoestrogens on regulatory behaviors, such as food and water intake, metabolic hormones and neuroendocrine parameters. This study examined important hormonal and metabolic health issues by testing the hypotheses that dietary soy-derived isoflavones influence: 1 body weight and adipose deposition, 2 food and water intake, 3 metabolic hormones (i.e., leptin, insulin, T3 and glucose levels, 4 brain neuropeptide Y (NPY levels, 5 heat production [in brown adipose tissue (BAT quantifying uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNA levels] and 6 core body temperature. Methods This was accomplished by conducting longitudinal studies where male Long-Evans rats were exposed (from conception to time of testing or tissue collection to a diet rich in isoflavones (at 600 micrograms/gram of diet or 600 ppm vs. a diet low in isoflavones (at approximately 10–15 micrograms/gram of diet or 10–15 ppm. Body, white adipose tissue and food intake were measured in grams and water intake in milliliters. The hormones (leptin, insulin, T3, glucose and NPY were quantified by radioimmunoassays (RIA. BAT UCP-1 mRNA levels were quantified by PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis while core body temperatures were recorded by radio telemetry. The data were tested by analysis of variance (ANOVA (or where appropriate by repeated measures. Results Body and adipose tissue weights were decreased in Phyto-600 vs. Phyto-free fed rats. Food and water intake was greater in Phyto-600 animals, that displayed higher hypothalamic (NPY concentrations, but lower plasma leptin and insulin levels, vs. Phyto-free fed males. Higher thyroid levels (and a tendency for higher glucose levels and increased uncoupling

  4. Elements in the transcriptional regulatory region flanking herpes simplex virus type 1 oriS stimulate origin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S W; Schaffer, P A

    1991-05-01

    Like other DNA-containing viruses, the three origins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA replication are flanked by sequences containing transcriptional regulatory elements. In a transient plasmid replication assay, deletion of sequences comprising the transcriptional regulatory elements of ICP4 and ICP22/47, which flank oriS, resulted in a greater than 80-fold decrease in origin function compared with a plasmid, pOS-822, which retains these sequences. In an effort to identify specific cis-acting elements responsible for this effect, we conducted systematic deletion analysis of the flanking region with plasmid pOS-822 and tested the resulting mutant plasmids for origin function. Stimulation by cis-acting elements was shown to be both distance and orientation dependent, as changes in either parameter resulted in a decrease in oriS function. Additional evidence for the stimulatory effect of flanking sequences on origin function was demonstrated by replacement of these sequences with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter, resulting in nearly wild-type levels of oriS function. In competition experiments, cotransfection of cells with the test plasmid, pOS-822, and increasing molar concentrations of a competitor plasmid which contained the ICP4 and ICP22/47 transcriptional regulatory regions but lacked core origin sequences resulted in a significant reduction in the replication efficiency of pOS-822, demonstrating that factors which bind specifically to the oriS-flanking sequences are likely involved as auxiliary proteins in oriS function. Together, these studies demonstrate that trans-acting factors and the sites to which they bind play a critical role in the efficiency of HSV-1 DNA replication from oriS in transient-replication assays.

  5. The functions and organization of the regulatory authority for nuclear energy in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, Nejat

    1979-01-01

    Following a description of the legislative and regulatory provisions governing nuclear activities in Turkey, this paper analyses the licensing system for nuclear installations. Special emphasis is placed on the problems of setting up a nuclear power plant project in a developing country and on the need for codes of practice on safe design and operation of such plants at the national level. (NEA) [fr

  6. Functional defect of circulating regulatory CD4+T cells in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis in remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel Habib; Stegeman, Coen; van der Geld, Y.M.; Doornbos-van der Meer, B.; Limburg, Piet; Kallenberg, Cees

    Objective. Accumulating data support the role of regulatory T cells, a subset of CD4+ T cells that expresses CD25(high) and the transcription factor fork-head box P3 (FoxP3), in controlling and preventing autoimmunity. In Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), an autoimmune vasculitis, up-regulation of CD25

  7. Cis-regulatory elements in the primate brain: from functional specialization to neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermunt, Marit W.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the noncoding part of the genome has been shown to harbour thousands of cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, that activate well-defined gene expression programs. Here, we charted active enhancers in a multiplicity of human brain regions to understand the role of

  8. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Energy cascades in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, A. C.; Brown, T. D.

    1979-03-15

    Combining energy uses in a cascade can result in significant overall reductions in fuel requirements. The simplest applications for a cascade are in the recovery of waste heat from existing processes using special boilers or turbines. Specific applications of more-complex energy cascades for Canada are discussed. A combined-cycle plant at a chemical refinery in Ontario is world leader in energy efficiency. Total-energy systems for commercial buildings, such as one installed in a school in Western Canada, offer attractive energy and operating cost benefits. A cogeneration plant proposed for the National Capital Region, generating electricity as well as steam for district heating, allows the use of a low-grade fossil fuel (coal), greatly improves energy-transformation efficiency, and also utilizes an effectively renewable resource (municipal garbage). Despite the widespread availability of equipment and technology of energy cascades, the sale of steam and electricity across plant boundaries presents a barrier. More widespread use of cascades will require increased cooperation among industry, electric utilities and the various levels of government if Canada is to realize the high levels of energy efficiency potential available.

  10. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.; Barlier, Vincent S.; Chin, Stephanie W.; Whited, Matthew T.; McAnally, R. Eric; Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Hadron cascades produced by electromagnetic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.; Ranft, J.

    1986-12-01

    A method for calculating high energy hadron cascades induced by multi-GeV electron and photon beams is described. Using the EGS4 computer program, high energy photons in the EM shower are allowed to interact hadronically according to the vector meson dominance (VMD) model, facilitated by a Monte Carlo version of the dual multistring fragmentation model which is used in the hadron cascade code FLUKA. The results of this calculation compare very favorably with experimental data on hadron production in photon-proton collisions and on the hadron production by electron beams on targets (i.e., yields in secondary particle beam lines). Electron beam induced hadron star density contours are also presented and are compared with those produced by proton beams. This FLUKA-EGS4 coupling technique could find use in the design of secondary beams, in the determination high energy hadron source terms for shielding purposes, and in the estimation of induced radioactivity in targets, collimators and beam dumps

  12. DNA-binding site of major regulatory protein alpha 4 specifically associated with promoter-regulatory domains of alpha genes of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Kristie, T M; Roizman, B

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 genes form at least five groups (alpha, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 1, and gamma 2) whose expression is coordinately regulated and sequentially ordered in a cascade fashion. Previous studies have shown that functional alpha 4 gene product is essential for the transition from alpha to beta protein synthesis and have suggested that alpha 4 gene expression is autoregulatory. We have previously reported that labeled DNA fragments containing promoter-regulatory domains of thr...

  13. The Contribution of Serine 194 Phosphorylation to Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Function

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Goro; Zubair, Mohamad; Ishii, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Toshikatsu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme catalyzes the initial step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. StAR was initially identified in adrenocortical cells as a phosphoprotein, the expression and phosphorylation of which were stimulated by corticotropin. A number of in vitro studies have implicated cAMP-dependent phosphorylation at serine 194 (S194, S195 in hum...

  14. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0355] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order EA-12- [[Page 9274

  15. Bringing a probiotic-containing functional food to the market: microbiological, product, regulatory and labeling issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M E; Huis in't Veld, J

    1999-01-01

    Properly formulated probiotic-containing foods offer consumers a low risk, low cost dietary component that has the potential to promote health in a variety of ways. Several such products are available commercially, although markets in Japan and Europe are more developed than in the USA. Once healthful attributes of a probiotic product have been identified, there remain microbiological, product, regulatory and labeling issues to be addressed prior to marketing. Microbiological and product issues include safety, effective scale-up for manufacturing, definition of probiotic activity, probiotic stability in the product over the course of product manufacture, shelf-life and consumption, definition of effective dose and target population(s), and development of quality assurance approaches. Examples of probiotic-containing foods are given. Regulatory and labeling issues are complicated because they differ for each country, but are likewise critical because they provide the means for communication of the product benefits to the consumer. The regulatory climate worldwide appears to be one of caution about overstating the benefits of such products but at the same time not preventing corporate commitment to marketing.

  16. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J P Smith

    Full Text Available Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α, rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006, and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS.

  17. CLIP-seq analysis of multi-mapped reads discovers novel functional RNA regulatory sites in the human transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijun; Xing, Yi

    2017-09-19

    Crosslinking or RNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (CLIP-seq or RIP-seq) allows transcriptome-wide discovery of RNA regulatory sites. As CLIP-seq/RIP-seq reads are short, existing computational tools focus on uniquely mapped reads, while reads mapped to multiple loci are discarded. We present CLAM (CLIP-seq Analysis of Multi-mapped reads). CLAM uses an expectation-maximization algorithm to assign multi-mapped reads and calls peaks combining uniquely and multi-mapped reads. To demonstrate the utility of CLAM, we applied it to a wide range of public CLIP-seq/RIP-seq datasets involving numerous splicing factors, microRNAs and m6A RNA methylation. CLAM recovered a large number of novel RNA regulatory sites inaccessible by uniquely mapped reads. The functional significance of these sites was demonstrated by consensus motif patterns and association with alternative splicing (splicing factors), transcript abundance (AGO2) and mRNA half-life (m6A). CLAM provides a useful tool to discover novel protein-RNA interactions and RNA modification sites from CLIP-seq and RIP-seq data, and reveals the significant contribution of repetitive elements to the RNA regulatory landscape of the human transcriptome. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Cascade reactor: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade is a concept for an ultrasafe, highly efficient, easily built reactor to convert inertial-confinement fusion energy into electrical power. The Cascade design includes a rotating double-cone-shaped chamber in which a moving, 1-m-thick ceramic granular blanket is held against the reactor wall by centrifugal action. The granular material absorbs energy from the fusion reactions. Accomplishments this year associated with Cascade included improvements to simplify chamber design and lower activation. The authors switched from a steel chamber wall to one made from silicon-carbide (SiC) panels held in compression by SiC-fiber/Al-composite tendons that gird the chamber both circumferentially and axially. The authors studies a number of heat-exchanger designs and selected a gravity-flow cascade design with a vacuum on the primary side. This design allows granules leaving the chamber to be transported to the heat exchangers using their own peripheral speed. The granules transfer their thermal energy and return to the chamber gravitationally: no vacuum locks or conveyors are needed

  19. Hadronic cascade processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Kripfganz, J.; Moehring, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical treatment of hadronic decay cascades within the framework of the statistical bootstrap model is demonstrated on the basis of a simple variant. Selected problems for a more comprehensive formulation of the model such as angular momentum conservation, quantum statistical effects, and the immediate applicability to particle production processes at high energies are discussed in detail

  20. Cascade theory in isotopic separation processes; Theorie des cascades en separation isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, J P

    1994-06-01

    Three main areas are developed within the scope of this work: - the first one is devoted to fundamentals: separative power, value function, ideal cascade and square cascade. Applications to two main cases are carried out, namely: Study of binary isotopic mix, Study of processes with a small enrichment coefficient. - The second one is devoted to cascade coupling -high-flux coupling (more widely used and better known) as well as low-flux coupling are presented and compared to one another. - The third one is an outlook on problems linked to cascade transients. Those problem are somewhat intricate and their interest lies mainly into two areas: economics where the start-up time may have a large influence on the interests paid during the construction and start-up period, military productions where the start-up time has a direct bearing on the production schedule. (author). 50 figs. 3 annexes. 12 refs. 6 tabs.

  1. Displacement cascades in diatomic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Coulter, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new function, the specified-projectile displacement function p/sub ijk/ (E), is introduced to describe displacement cascades in polyatomic materials. This function describes the specific collision events that produce displacements and hence adds new information not previously available. Calculations of p/sub ijk/ (E) for MgO, Al 2 O 3 and TaO are presented and discussed. Results show that the parameters that have the largest effect on displacement collision events are the PKA energy and the mass ratio of the atom types in the material. It is further shown that the microscopic nature of the displacement events changes over the entire recoil energy range relevant to fusion neutron spectra and that these changes are different in materials whose mass ratio is near one than in those where it is far from one

  2. Trophic cascades: linking ungulates to shrub-dependent birds and butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Teichman, Kristine; Nielsen, Scott E; Roland, Jens

    2013-11-01

    1. Studies demonstrating trophic cascades through the loss of top-down regulatory processes in productive and biologically diverse terrestrial ecosystems are limited. 2. Elk Island National Park, Alberta and surrounding protected areas have a wide range of ungulate density due to the functional loss of top predators, management for high ungulate numbers and variable hunting pressure. This provides an ideal setting for studying the effects of hyper-abundant ungulates on vegetation and shrub-dependent bird and butterfly species. 3. To examine the cascading effects of high ungulate density, we quantified vegetation characteristics and abundances of yellow warbler Dendroica petechia and Canadian tiger swallowtail Papilio canadensis under different ungulate density in and around Elk Island National Park. 4. Using Structural Equation Models we found that ungulate density was inversely related to shrub cover, whereas shrub cover was positively related to yellow warbler abundance. In addition, chokecherry Prunus virginiana abundance was inversely related to browse impact but positively related to P. canadensis abundance. 5. These results demonstrate a cascade resulting from hyper-abundant ungulates on yellow warblers and Canadian tiger swallowtails through reductions in shrub cover and larval host plant density. The combined effect of the functional loss of top predators and management strategies that maintain high ungulate numbers can decouple top-down regulation of productive temperate ecosystems. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  3. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated Broadband Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Kamjou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband, integrated quantum cascade laser is disclosed, comprising ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers formed by applying standard semiconductor process techniques to a monolithic structure of alternating layers of claddings and active region layers. The resulting ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers may be individually controlled by independent voltage potentials, resulting in control of the overall spectrum of the integrated quantum cascade laser source. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Frank Andrew; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory...... discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly...

  6. Transitional-2 B cells acquire regulatory function during tolerance induction and contribute to allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Aurélie; Blair, Paul A; Chai, Jian-Guo; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Alhabbab, Rowa; Rackham, Chloe L; Jones, Peter M; Smyth, Lesley; Elgueta, Raul; Howard, Jane K; Lechler, Robert I; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    In humans, tolerance to renal transplants has been associated with alterations in B-cell gene transcription and maintenance of the numbers of circulating transitional B cells. Here, we use a mouse model of transplantation tolerance to investigate the contribution of B cells to allograft survival. We demonstrate that transfer of B cells from mice rendered tolerant to MHC class I mismatched skin grafts can prolong graft survival in a dose-dependent and antigen-specific manner to a degree similar to that afforded by graft-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells. Tolerance in this model was associated with an increase in transitional-2 (T2) B cells. Only T2 B cells from tolerized mice, not naïve T2 nor alloantigen experienced T2, were capable of prolonging skin allograft survival, and suppressing T-cell activation. Tolerized T2 B cells expressed lower levels of CD86, increased TIM-1, and demonstrated a preferential survival in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate a synergistic effect between tolerized B cells and graft-specific Treg cells. IL-10 production by T2 B cells did not contribute to tolerance, as shown by transfer of B cells from IL-10(-/-) mice. These results suggest that T2 B cells in tolerant patients may include a population of regulatory B cells that directly inhibit graft rejection. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Integrated analysis of microRNA and gene expression profiles reveals a functional regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Wenshan; Yang, Aiting; Xu, Anjian; Wang, Huan; Cong, Min; Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; You, Hong

    2017-12-15

    Liver fibrosis, characterized with the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, represents the final common pathway of chronic liver inflammation. Ever-increasing evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) dysregulation has important implications in the different stages of liver fibrosis. However, our knowledge of miRNA-gene regulation details pertaining to such disease remains unclear. The publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets of patients suffered from cirrhosis were extracted for integrated analysis. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and genes (DEGs) were identified using GEO2R web tool. Putative target gene prediction of DEMs was carried out using the intersection of five major algorithms: DIANA-microT, TargetScan, miRanda, PICTAR5 and miRWalk. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory network (FMGRN) was constructed based on the computational target predictions at the sequence level and the inverse expression relationships between DEMs and DEGs. DAVID web server was selected to perform KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory module was generated based on the biological interpretation. Internal connections among genes in liver fibrosis-related module were determined using String database. MiRNA-gene regulatory modules related to liver fibrosis were experimentally verified in recombinant human TGFβ1 stimulated and specific miRNA inhibitor treated LX-2 cells. We totally identified 85 and 923 dysregulated miRNAs and genes in liver cirrhosis biopsy samples compared to their normal controls. All evident miRNA-gene pairs were identified and assembled into FMGRN which consisted of 990 regulations between 51 miRNAs and 275 genes, forming two big sub-networks that were defined as down-network and up-network, respectively. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that up-network was prominently involved in several KEGG pathways, in which "Focal adhesion", "PI3K-Akt signaling pathway" and "ECM

  8. Numerical routine for magnetic heat pump cascading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin; Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    Heat pumps use low-temperature heat absorbed from the energy source to create temperature gradient (TG) across the energy sink. Magnetic heat pumps (MHP) can perform this function through operating active magnetic regeneration (AMR) cycle. For building heating, TGs of up to a few K might...... and 3 K. Changing the number of MHPs, we optimized input parameters to achieve maximum heating powers. We have found that both maximum heating power and COP decrease together with number of heat pumps, but the TGs and the temperature span can be largely increased. References [1] M. Tahavori et al., “A...... be necessary, which is hardly achievable with a single MHP and such techniques as cascading are required. Series and parallel cascading increase the AMR span and heating power, respectively, but do not change TG. Therefore, the intermediate type of cascading was proposed with individual MHPs separately...

  9. Ion-irradiation studies of cascade damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.

    1982-03-01

    Ion-irradiation studies of the fundamental aspects of cascade damage in metals are reviewed. The emphasis of these studies has been the determination of the primary state of damage (i.e. the arrangement of atoms in the cascade region prior to thermal migration of defects). Progress has been made towards understanding the damage function (i.e. the number of Frenkel pairs produced as a function of primary recoil atom energy), the spatial configuration of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade and the cascade-induced mixing of atoms. It is concluded for these studies that the agitation of the lattice in the vicinity of energetic displacement cascades stimulates the defect motion and that such thermal spike motion induces recombination and clustering of Frenkel defects. 9 figures

  10. Human mesenchymal stromal cells enhance the immunomodulatory function of CD8+CD28− regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuli; Zheng, Haiqing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Peng, Yanwen; Huang, Weijun; Li, Xiaobo; Li, Gang; Xia, Wenjie; Sun, Qiquan; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2015-01-01

    One important aspect of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-mediated immunomodulation is the recruitment and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, we do not yet know whether MSCs have similar effects on the other subsets of Treg cells. Herein, we studied the effects of MSCs on CD8+CD28− Treg cells and found that the MSCs could not only increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells, but also enhance CD8+CD28−T cells' ability of hampering naive CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation, decreasing the production of IFN-γ by activated CD4+ T cells and inducing the apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells. Mechanistically, the MSCs affected the functions of the CD8+CD28− T cells partially through moderate upregulating the expression of IL-10 and FasL. The MSCs had no distinct effect on the shift from CD8+CD28+ T cells to CD8+CD28− T cells, but did increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells by reducing their rate of apoptosis. In summary, this study shows that MSCs can enhance the regulatory function of CD8+CD28− Treg cells, shedding new light on MSCs-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25482073

  11. Information cascade on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  12. Cascade ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Pitts, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO 2 . The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor

  13. Some characteristics of the development of high energy electromagnetic cascades in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, Z.; Tomaszewski, A.; Wrotniak, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of the calculations of some characteristics of electromagnetic cascades induced by cosmic radiation are showed. The cascade parameters are influenced by effect of threshold energy of gamma quanta registration in emulsion chambers. Ratio of integral gamma quanta energies in cascade to initial particle energy and mean energy weighted radius as a function of primary interaction hight, as well as total energy and number of gamma quanta in the cascade are calculated. (S.B.)

  14. Modeling of cascade and sub-cascade formation at high PKA energies in irradiated fusion structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Metelkin, E.V.; Semenov, E.V.

    2009-01-01

    A new theoretical model is developed for the investigations of cascade and sub-cascade formation in fusion structural materials under fast neutron irradiation at high primary knock-on atom energies. Light fusion structural materials: such as Be, C and SiC under 14 MeV neutron irradiation in fusion reactor will have the primary knock-on atoms with the energies up to 1 MeV. It is very difficult to use at such high energies the Monte-Carlo or molecular dynamic simulations [H.L. Heinisch, B.N. Singh, Philos. Mag. A67 (1993) 407; H.L. Heinisch, B.N. Singh, J. Nucl. Mater. 251 (1997) 77]. The developed model is based on the analytical consideration of elastic collisions between displaced moving atoms produced by primary knock-on atoms with some kinetic energies obtained from fast neutrons and crystal lattice atoms. The Thomas-Fermi interaction potential is used here for the description of these elastic atomic collisions. The suggested model takes into account also the electronic losses for moving atoms between elastic collisions. The self-consistent criterion for sub-cascade formation is suggested here which is based on the comparison of mean distance of primary knock-on atoms between consequent collisions of them with the target atoms and a size of sub-cascade produced by moving secondary knock-on atoms produced in such collisions. The analytical relations for the most important characteristics of cascades and sub-cascades are determined including the average number of sub-cascades per one primary knock-on atom in the dependence on its energy, the distance between sub-cascades and the average cascade and sub-cascade sizes. The developed model allows determining the total numbers, distribution functions of cascades and sub-cascades in dependence on their sizes and generation rate of cascades and sub-cascades for the different fusion neutron energy spectra. On the basis of this developed model the numerical calculations for main characteristics of cascades and sub-cascades

  15. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  16. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Matthew P; Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-11-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  17. Percentage and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Jun; Cao, Xue-Liang; Luan, Sha; Cui, Wan-Hui; Qiu, Si-Huang; Wang, Yi-Chao; Zhao, Chang-Jiu; Fu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    The current study observed the percentage of peripheral blood (PB) CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the influence of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells in patients with hyperthyroidism. Furthermore, preliminary discussions are presented on the action mechanism of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on hyperthyroidism attacks. The present study identified that compared with the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in healthy control subjects, no significant changes were observed in the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in patients with hyperthyroidism (P>0.05). For patients with hyperthyroidism, CD4+CD25+ Tregs exhibited significantly reduced inhibition of the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells and decreased secretion capacity on the cytokines of CD4 T cells, compared with those of healthy control subjects (Phyperthyroidism was significantly improved (Phyperthyroidism before treatment, no significant changes were observed in the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in hyperthyroidism patients following treatment (P>0.05). In the patients with hyperthyroidism, following treatment, CD4+CD25+ Tregs exhibited significantly increased inhibition of the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells and increased secretion capacity of CD4 T cell cytokines, compared with those of the patients with hyperthyroidism prior to treatment (Phyperthyroidism, and its non-proportional decrease may be closely associated with the occurrence and progression of hyperthyroidism. PMID:29207121

  18. Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+CD27-CD28- T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar-Salazar, Adriana; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Jesser, Renee; Weinberg, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27 - CD28 - T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - cells are regulatory T cells (T R ). CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4 + T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R expressed FoxP3, TGFβ, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFβ inhibition. The CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R . The CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

  19. Experience of regulatory body functioning in energy industry of Ukraine: Prospects for future development of state regulation of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oruskaya, M.

    2002-01-01

    Materials collected (presented) in the paper introduce to (familiarise) the audience with the main forms, methods and phases of the state regulation of energy industry in Ukraine in the period of transition to market economy. Special attention was paid to the following aspects: 1. Necessity and history of establishment of special regulatory body in Ukraine - The National Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC); 2. The main tasks and authorities of NERC according to the Ukraine Law on Energy Sector; 3. Regulation mechanisms of the main processes in the energy industry used by the Commission on the current level of energy sector development and economic results of its introduction; 4. Problems with functioning of the wholesale energy market specifically as the main component of the Ukraine energy industry and trends of future development (improvement of energy industry's financial situation, intensification of competition between energy producers and suppliers, improvement of tariff and investment policies, etc.); 5. Necessity and ways of future improvement of the standards and legal basis for regulation in Ukraine. (author)

  20. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  1. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  2. Spatial and functional restriction of regulatory molecules during mammalian myoblast fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlath, Grace K.

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is key for forming skeletal muscle during development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be understood about the molecular regulation of myoblast fusion. Some molecules that influence mammalian muscle fusion display specific cellular localization during myogenesis. Such molecules can be localized to the contact region between two fusing cells either in both cells or only in one of the cells. How distinct localization of molecules contributes to fusion is not clear. Further complexity exists as other molecules are functionally restricted to myoblasts at later stages of myogenesis to regulate their fusion with multinucleated myotubes. This review examines these three categories of molecules and discusses how spatial and functional restriction may contribute to the formation of a multinucleated cell. Understanding how and why molecules become restricted in location or function is likely to provide further insights into the mechanisms regulating mammalian muscle fusion.

  3. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs): Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Donald N.; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs). We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated. PMID:26878025

  4. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs: Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald N. Cook

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs. We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated.

  5. Downregulated regulatory T cell function is associated with increased peptic ulcer in Helicobacter pylori-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Elahi, Shokrollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Rashidii, Reza; Sarafnejad, Abdulfatah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Faridani, Rana; Tahmasbi, Kamran; Kheiri, Soleiman; Razavi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes gastric/duodenal mucosa and induces gastroduodenal disease such as gastritis and peptic ulcer and induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. The objective of this study was to determine the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer and determined the relationship between main virulence factor of H. pylori and Tregs. A total of 89 patients with gastritis, 63 patients with peptic ulcer and 40 healthy, H. pylori-negative subjects were enrolled in this study. Expression of CD4 and Foxp3 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, bacterial virulence factors and histopathological assessments. TGF-β1, IL-10 and FOXP3 expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The numbers of CD4 + and Foxp3 + T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3, INF-γ and IL-17A in infected patients were significantly higher than the ones in uninfected patients. Also, the number of CD4 + T cells was independent on the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA) and outer inflammatory protein A (oipA), but it was positively correlated with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). Instead, the number of Foxp3 + T cells was dependent on the vacA and oipA, but it was independent on cagA. The number of Foxp3 + T cells and the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1 and FOXP3 in infected patients with gastritis were significantly higher than the ones in infected patients with peptic ulcer. Moreover, the number of CD4 + T cells and the expression of IL-17A and INF-γ was the lowest in the gastritis patients, however, increased progressively in the peptic ulcer patients. Additionally, the numbers of CD4 + and Foxp3 + T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3 and INF-γ were positively

  6. Novel effector phenotype of Tim-3+ regulatory T cells leads to enhanced suppressive function in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuqing; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Shayan, Gulidanna; Li, Jing; Chen, Kevin; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Kane, Lawrence P; Lu, Binfeng; Ferris, Robert L

    2018-04-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important suppressive cells among tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Treg express the well-known immune checkpoint receptor PD-1, which is reported to mark "exhausted" Treg with lower suppressive function. T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim)-3, a negative regulator of Th1 immunity, is expressed by a sizeable fraction of TIL Tregs, but the functional status of Tim-3+ Tregs remains unclear. CD4+CTLA-4+CD25high Treg were sorted from freshly excised head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) TIL based on Tim-3 expression. Functional and phenotypic features of these Tim-3+ and Tim-3- TIL Tregs were tested by in vitro suppression assays and multi-color flow cytometry. Gene expression profiling and NanoString analysis of Tim-3+ TIL Treg were performed. A murine HNSCC tumor model was used to test the effect of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy on Tim-3+ Treg.  Results: Despite high PD-1 expression, Tim-3+ TIL Treg displayed a greater capacity to inhibit naïve T cell proliferation than Tim-3- Treg. Tim-3+ Treg from human HNSCC TIL also displayed an effector-like phenotype, with more robust expression of CTLA-4, PD-1, CD39 and IFN-γ receptor. Exogenous IFN-γ treatment could partially reverse the suppressive function of Tim-3+ TIL Treg. Anti-PD-1 immunotherapy downregulated Tim-3 expression on Tregs isolated from murine HNSCC tumors, and this treatment reversed the suppressive function of HNSCC TIL Tregs. Tim-3+ Treg are functionally and phenotypically distinct in HNSCC TIL, and are highly effective at inhibiting T cell proliferation despite high PD-1 expression.  IFN-γ induced by anti-PD-1 immunotherapy may be beneficial by reversing Tim-3+ Treg suppression. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position

  8. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-23

    This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position.

  9. The Conscience as a Regulatory Function: Empathy, Shame, Pride, Guilt, and Moral Orientation in Delinquent Adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, F.; Stams, G.J.; Stegge, H.; Dekker, J.; Peen, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines an emotion-based theory of the conscience, which provides forensic practitioners tools for assessing the state of the conscience. It is operationalized as an emotion-regulating function, making use of empathy, self-conscious emotions, such as shame, pride or guilt, and moral

  10. The conscience as a regulatory function: Empathy, shame, pride, guilt, and moral orientation in delinquent adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, F.; Stams, G.J.; Stegge, H.; Dekker, J.; Peen, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines an emotion-based theory of the conscience, which provides forensic practitioners tools for assessing the state of the conscience. It is operationalized as an emotion-regulating function, making use of empathy, self-conscious emotions, such as shame, pride or guilt, and moral

  11. The Conscience as a Regulatory Function: Empathy, Shame, Pride, Guilt, and Moral Orientation in Delinquent Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalkwijk, Frans; Stams, Geert Jan; Stegge, Hedy; Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap

    2016-05-01

    This study examines an emotion-based theory of the conscience, which provides forensic practitioners tools for assessing the state of the conscience. It is operationalized as an emotion-regulating function, making use of empathy, self-conscious emotions, such as shame, pride or guilt, and moral judgment. This was put to test in a questionnaire survey with 59 delinquent and 275 non-delinquent juveniles. As was hypothesized, the functioning of the conscience of these groups differed, with offenders having lower levels of some aspects of empathic capacity, being less prone to experiencing shame and guilt, being more prone to experiencing pride, and being more punishment oriented than victim oriented. The research confirmed that operationalization of the conscience in terms of empathy, self-conscious emotions, and moral orientation is feasible. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Multipronged regulatory functions of a novel endonuclease (TieA) from Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Devi, Savita; Ansari, Suhail A.; Tenguria, Shivendra; Kumar, Naveen; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori portrays a classical paradigm of persistent bacterial infections. A well balanced homeostasis of bacterial effector functions and host responses is purported to be the key in achieving long term colonization in specific hosts. H. pylori nucleases have been shown to assist in natural transformation, but their role in virulence and colonization remains elusive. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the involvement of these nucleases in the pathogenesis of H. pylori. Here...

  13. Cell model for the study of receptor and regulatory functions of human proHB-EGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Korotkevych

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing of new models and approaches, particularly with fluorescent techniques, for investigation of intracellular transport of proHB-EGF and its ligand-receptor complexes is strongly required. In order to create a model for studying proHB-EGF functions the genetic construction pEGFP-N1-proHB-EGF, encoding proHB-EGF-EGFP which is fluorescent-labeled form of proHB-EGF with enhanced green fluorescent protein EGFP in the cytoplasmic terminus of the molecule, was obtained. Eukaryotic cells expressing fusion protein proHB-EGF-EGFP on the cell surface were obtained by transfection with pEGFP-N1-proHB-EGF. Expressed in the Vero cells proHB-EGF-EGFP could bind fluorescent derivative of nontoxic receptor-binding subunit B of diphtheria toxin mCherry-SubB. After stimulation of transfected cells with TPA (12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, proHB-EGF-EGFP formed a fluorescentl-labeled C-terminal fragment of the molecule – CTF-EGFP. Thus, the obtained genetic construction pEGFP-N1-proHB-EGF could be helpful in visualization of molecules proHB-EGF and CTF in cells, may open new possibilities for the studying of their functions, such as receptor function of proHB-EGF for diphtheria toxin, intracellular translocation of CTF and provide possibilities for natural proHB-EGF ligands search.

  14. Regulatory mechanisms of RNA function: emerging roles of DNA repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Laure; Nilsen, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    The acquisition of an appropriate set of chemical modifications is required in order to establish correct structure of RNA molecules, and essential for their function. Modification of RNA bases affects RNA maturation, RNA processing, RNA quality control, and protein translation. Some RNA modifications are directly involved in the regulation of these processes. RNA epigenetics is emerging as a mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of RNA function. Other modifications may prevent or be a signal for degradation. All types of RNA species are subject to processing or degradation, and numerous cellular mechanisms are involved. Unexpectedly, several studies during the last decade have established a connection between DNA and RNA surveillance mechanisms in eukaryotes. Several proteins that respond to DNA damage, either to process or to signal the presence of damaged DNA, have been shown to participate in RNA quality control, turnover or processing. Some enzymes that repair DNA damage may also process modified RNA substrates. In this review, we give an overview of the DNA repair proteins that function in RNA metabolism. We also discuss the roles of two base excision repair enzymes, SMUG1 and APE1, in RNA quality control.

  15. Citrate, a Ubiquitous Key Metabolite with Regulatory Function in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Belhage, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Citrate is key constituent of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, serves as substrate for fatty acid and sterol biosynthesis, and functions as a key regulator of intermediary energy metabolism. Ursula Sonnewald had initiated studies using for the first time both proton- and 13C-NMR to investigate...... metabolic processes in cultured neurons and astrocytes resulting in the important observation that citrate was specifically synthesized in and released from astrocytes in large amounts which is in keeping with the high concentration found in the CSF. The aim of this review is to highlight the possible roles...

  16. Multipronged regulatory functions of a novel endonuclease (TieA) from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Savita; Ansari, Suhail A; Tenguria, Shivendra; Kumar, Naveen; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-11-02

    Helicobacter pylori portrays a classical paradigm of persistent bacterial infections. A well balanced homeostasis of bacterial effector functions and host responses is purported to be the key in achieving long term colonization in specific hosts. H. pylori nucleases have been shown to assist in natural transformation, but their role in virulence and colonization remains elusive. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the involvement of these nucleases in the pathogenesis of H. pylori Here, we report the multifaceted role of a TNFR-1 interacting endonuclease A (TieA) from H. pylori. tieA expression is differentially regulated in response to environmental stress and post adherence to gastric epithelial cells. Studies with isogenic knockouts of tieA revealed it to be a secretory protein which translocates into the host gastric epithelial cells independent of a type IV secretion system, gets phosphorylated by DNA-PK kinase and auto-phosphorylates as serine kinase. Furthermore, TieA binds to and cleaves DNA in a non-specific manner and promotes Fas mediated apoptosis in AGS cells. Additionally, TieA induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion via activation of transcription factor AP-1 and signaled through MAP kinase pathway. Collectively, TieA with its multipronged and moonlighting functions could facilitate H. pylori in maintaining a balance of bacterial adaptation, and elimination by the host responses. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Cascade Error Projection Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Stubberud, A. R.; Daud, T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed mathematical analysis is presented for a new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) and a general learning frame work. This frame work can be used to obtain the cascade correlation learning algorithm by choosing a particular set of parameters.

  18. Simulation of short-term annealing of displacement cascades in FCC metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Doran, D.G.; Schwartz, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Computer models have been developed for the simulation of high energy displacement cascades. The objective is the generation of defect production functions for use in correlation analysis of radiation effects in fusion reactor materials. In particular, the stochastic cascade annealing simulation code SCAS has been developed and used to model the short-term annealing behavior of simulated cascades in FCC metals. The code is fast enough to make annealing of high energy cascades practical. Sets of cascades from 5 keV to 100 keV in copper were generated by the binary collision code MARLOWE

  19. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 Inhibition Upregulates Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Frequency and Function during the Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxia Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis is related to imbalance of immune responses, and the equilibrium between inflammatory T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs plays an important role in the intestinal homeostasis. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of PRMTs affects colitis pathogenesis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease patients and further explored the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we found that protein arginine N-methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1 treatments increased Tregs frequency, function, and reduced colitis incidence. Adoptive transfer of AMI-1-treated Tregs could reduce the colitis incidence. Colitis was associated with increased local PRMT5 expression, which was inhibited by AMI-1 treatment. Additionally, PRMT5 knockdown T cells produced a better response to TGFβ and promoted Tregs differentiation through decreased DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 expression. PRMT5 also enhanced H3K27me3 and DNMT1 binding to Foxp3 promoter, which restricted Tregs differentiation. Furthermore, PRMT5 knockdown led to decreased Foxp3 promoter methylation during Tregs induction. PRMT5 expression had a negative relationship with Tregs in UC patients, knockdown of PRMT5 expression increased Tregs frequency and decreased TNFα, IL-6, and IL-13 levels. Our study outlines a novel regulation of PRMT5 on Tregs development and function. Strategies to decrease PRMT5 expression might have therapeutic potential to control UC.

  20. Functional identification and regulatory analysis of Δ6-fatty acid desaturase from the oleaginous fungus Mucor sp. EIM-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianzhang; Liu, Hongjiao; Niu, Yongchao; Qi, Feng; Zhang, Mingliang; Huang, Jianzhong

    2017-03-01

    To enlarge the diversity of the desaturases associated with PUFA biosynthesis and to better understand the transcriptional regulation of desaturases, a Δ 6 -desaturase gene (Md6) from Mucor sp. and its 5'-upstream sequence was functionally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of the Δ 6 -fatty acid desaturase (Md6) in S. cerevisiae showed that Md6 could convert linolenic acid to γ-linolenic acid. Computational analysis of the promoter of Md6 suggested it contains several eukaryotic fundamental transcription regulatory elements. In vivo functional analysis of the promoter showed the 5'-upstream sequence of Md6 could initiate expression of GFP and Md6 itself in S. cerevisiae. A series deletion analysis of the promoter suggested that sequence between -919 to -784 bp (relative to start site) named as eMd6 is the key factor for high activity of Δ 6 -desaturase. The activity of Δ 6 -desaturase was increased by 2.8-fold and 2.5-fold when the eMd6 sequence was placed upstream of -434 with forward or reverse orientations respectively. To our best knowledge, the native promoter of Md6 from Mucor is the strongest promoter for Δ 6 -desaturase reported so far and the sequence between -919 to -784 bp is an enhancer for Δ 6 -desaturase activity.

  1. [Advance in research on regulatory mechanism and functions of neutral sphingomyelinse 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Guo, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), which located mainly on the plasma membrane, hydrolyzes sphingomyelin into ceramide and plays an important role in the physiological and pathological regulation of cell apoptosis, cell growth arrest, and inflammation. nSMase2 is also involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease and the bone growth.Under neutral pH and the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(+), the activity of nSMase2 is induced by oxidative stress through phosphorylation. Furthermore, the induced interaction of anionic phospholipids and the signaling molecules like receptor for activated C-kinase 1/embryonic ectodermal development with nSMase2 are also crucial mechanisms of protein activation. In the review, recent research advances in the structure and function of nSMase2 and its underlying mechanisms are summarized.

  2. A functional imaging study of self-regulatory capacities in persons who stutter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    Full Text Available Developmental stuttering is a disorder of speech fluency with an unknown pathogenesis. The similarity of its phenotype and natural history with other childhood neuropsychiatric disorders of frontostriatal pathology suggests that stuttering may have a closely related pathogenesis. We investigated in this study the potential involvement of frontostriatal circuits in developmental stuttering. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 46 persons with stuttering and 52 fluent controls during performance of the Simon Spatial Incompatibility Task. We examined differences between the two groups of blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation associated with two neural processes, the resolution of cognitive conflict and the context-dependent adaptation to changes in conflict. Stuttering speakers and controls did not differ on behavioral performance on the task. In the presence of conflict-laden stimuli, however, stuttering speakers activated more strongly the cingulate cortex, left anterior prefrontal cortex, right medial frontal cortex, left supplementary motor area, right caudate nucleus, and left parietal cortex. The magnitude of activation in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated inversely in stuttering speakers with symptom severity. Stuttering speakers also showed blunted activation during context-dependent adaptation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain region that mediates cross-temporal contingencies. Frontostriatal hyper-responsivity to conflict resembles prior findings in other disorders of frontostriatal pathology, and therefore likely represents a general mechanism supporting functional compensation for an underlying inefficiency of neural processing in these circuits. The reduced activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex likely represents the inadequate readiness of stuttering speakers to execute a sequence of motor responses.

  3. How periodic are terahertz quantum cascade lasers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, T; Vogl, P

    2009-01-01

    We apply a novel non-equilibrium Green's function method for open quantum devices to analyze quantum cascade lasers. We find the carrier distribution in typical resonant phonon THz-QCLs to develop a periodicity that differs from the geometric periodicity of the QCL. We propose a design improvement that thermalizes electrons at threshold bias and thereby pins the electron density to the QCL periodicity.

  4. How periodic are terahertz quantum cascade lasers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, T; Vogl, P, E-mail: tillmann.kubis@wsi.tum.d [Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    We apply a novel non-equilibrium Green's function method for open quantum devices to analyze quantum cascade lasers. We find the carrier distribution in typical resonant phonon THz-QCLs to develop a periodicity that differs from the geometric periodicity of the QCL. We propose a design improvement that thermalizes electrons at threshold bias and thereby pins the electron density to the QCL periodicity.

  5. Interband cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurgaftman, I; Meyer, J R; Canedy, C L; Kim, C S; Bewley, W W; Merritt, C D; Abell, J; Weih, R; Kamp, M; Kim, M; Höfling, S

    2015-01-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron–hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3–6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm −2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT. (topical review)

  6. Immuno-regulatory function of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase through modulation of innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe-Sadat Poormasjedi-Meibod

    Full Text Available Successful long-term treatment of type-1 diabetes mainly relies on replacement of β-cells via islet transplantation. Donor shortage is one of the main obstacles preventing transplantation from becoming the treatment of choice. Although animal organs could be an alternative source for transplantation, common immunosuppressive treatments demonstrate low efficacy in preventing xenorejection. Immunoprotective effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO on T-cell mediated allorejection has been extensively studied. Our studies revealed that IDO expression by fibroblasts, induced apoptosis in T-cells while not affecting non-immune cell survival/function. Since macrophages play a pivotal role in xenograft rejection, herein we investigated the effect of IDO-induced tryptophan deficiency/kynurenine accumulation on macrophage function/survival. Moreover, we evaluated the local immunosuppressive effect of IDO on islet-xenograft protection. Our results indicated that IDO expression by bystander fibroblasts significantly reduced the viability of primary macrophages via apoptosis induction. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages by IDO-expressing fibroblast conditioned medium significantly reduced their proinflammatory activity through inhibition of iNOS expression. To determine whether IDO-induced tryptophan starvation or kynurenine accumulation is responsible for macrophage apoptosis and inhibition of their proinflammatory activity, Raw264.7 cell viability and proinflammatory responses were evaluated in tryptophan deficient medium or in the presence of kynurenine. Tryptophan deficiency, but not kynurenine accumulation, reduced Raw264.7 cell viability and suppressed their proinflammatory activity. Next a three-dimensional islet-xenograft was engineered by embedding rat islets within either control or IDO-expressing fibroblast-populated collagen matrix. Islets morphology and immune cell infiltration were then studied in the xenografts transplanted into the C57

  7. Product of the powers of generalized Nakagami-m variates and performance of cascaded fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Yilmaz, Ferkan; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2009-01-01

    -identically distributed GNM random variables, for the purpose of modeling the cascaded fading channels. In particular, using the Fox's H function, we derive the probability density function, the cumulative distribution function, the moment generating function

  8. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Draft Law on the creation, attribution, organization and functioning of a ''Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Safety'' (ARSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issoufou, Mahamadou

    2016-08-01

    This Draft Law deals with the establishment, responsibilities, organization and functioning of an Autority Control and Nuclear Safety. Through this law, the Regulatory and Nuclear Safety Autority is responsible for regulation of nuclear and radiological activities to ensure the safety, security and protection of persons and the environment against the effects of radiation throughout the national territory. [fr

  10. Multi Agent System Based Wide Area Protection against Cascading Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Leo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-agent system based wide area protection scheme is proposed in order to prevent long term voltage instability induced cascading events. The distributed relays and controllers work as a device agent which not only executes the normal function automatically but also can...... the effectiveness of proposed protection strategy. The simulation results indicate that the proposed multi agent control system can effectively coordinate the distributed relays and controllers to prevent the long term voltage instability induced cascading events....

  11. Function of RSKS-1-AAK-2-DAF-16 signaling cascade in enhancing toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be suppressed by mir-259 activation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziheng; Li, Min; Liu, Hui; Luo, Libo; Gu, Weidong; Wu, Qiuli; Wang, Dayong

    2016-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important non-mammalian alternative assay model for toxicological study. Previous study has indicated that exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dysregulated the transcriptional expression of mir-259. In this study, we examined the molecular basis for mir-259 in regulating MWCNTs toxicity in nematodes. Mutation of mir-259 induced a susceptible property to MWCNTs toxicity, and MWCNTs exposure induced a significant increase in mir-259::GFP in pharyngeal/intestinal valve and reproductive tract, implying that mir-259 might mediate a protection mechanisms for nematodes against MWCNTs toxicity. RSKS-1, a putative ribosomal protein S6 kinase, acted as the target for mir-259 in regulating MWCNTs toxicity, and mutation of rsks-1 suppressed the susceptible property of mir-259 mutant to MWCNTs toxicity. Moreover, mir-259 functioned in pharynx-intestinal valve and RSKS-1 functioned in pharynx to regulate MWCNTs toxicity. Furthermore, RSKS-1 regulated MWCNTs toxicity by suppressing the function of AAK-2-DAF-16 signaling cascade. Our results will strengthen our understanding the microRNAs mediated protection mechanisms for animals against the toxicity from certain nanomaterials.

  12. Aspects of the QCD cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Magnus.

    1993-02-01

    A model is proposed for the production of transverse jets from diffractively excited protons. We propose that transverse jets can be obtained from gluonic bremsstrahlung in a way similar to the emission in DIS. Qualitative agreement is obtained between the model and the uncorrected data published by the UA8 collaboration. Perturbative QCD in the MLLA approximation is applied to multiple jet production in e + e - -annihilation. We propose modified evolution equations for deriving the jet cross sections, defined in the 'k t ' or 'Durham' algorithm. The mean number of jets as a function of the jet resolution is studied, and analytical predictions are compared to the results of MC simulations. We also study a set of differential-difference equations for multiplicity distributions in e + e - -annihilations, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions. These equations take into account nonsingular terms in the GLAP splitting functions as well as kinematical constraints related to recoil effects. The presence of retarded terms imply that the cascade develops more slowly and reduces the fluctuations. The solutions agree well with MC simulations and experimental data. (authors)

  13. Virus-specific regulatory T cells ameliorate encephalitis by repressing effector T cell functions from priming to effector stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the presence of pathogen-specific Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg in infected animals, but little is known about where and how these cells affect the effector T cell responses and whether they are more suppressive than bulk Treg populations. We recently showed the presence of both epitope M133-specific Tregs (M133 Treg and conventional CD4 T cells (M133 Tconv in the brains of mice with coronavirus-induced encephalitis. Here, we provide new insights into the interactions between pathogenic Tconv and Tregs responding to the same epitope. M133 Tregs inhibited the proliferation but not initial activation of M133 Tconv in draining lymph nodes (DLN. Further, M133 Tregs inhibited migration of M133 Tconv from the DLN. In addition, M133 Tregs diminished microglia activation and decreased the number and function of Tconv in the infected brain. Thus, virus-specific Tregs inhibited pathogenic CD4 T cell responses during priming and effector stages, particularly those recognizing cognate antigen, and decreased mortality and morbidity without affecting virus clearance. These cells are more suppressive than bulk Tregs and provide a targeted approach to ameliorating immunopathological disease in infectious settings.

  14. Functional and genomic analyses of FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells as regulatory T (Treg)-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Hurt, Elaine M.; Chen, Xin; Howard, O.M. Zack; Farrar, William L.

    2007-01-01

    FOXP3, a forkhead transcription factor is essential for the development and function of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast to conversion of murine naive T cells to Tregs by transduction of Foxp3, it is controversial whether ectopic expression of FOXP3 in human CD4 + T cells is sufficient for acquisition of suppressive activity. Here, we show that retroviral transduction of FOXP3 induces a Treg phenotype in human leukemic CD4 + Jurkat-T cells, evidenced by increased expression of Treg-associated cell surface markers as well as inhibition of cytokine production. Furthermore, FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells suppress the proliferation of human CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Additionally, DNA microarray analysis identifies Treg-related genes regulated by FOXP3. Our study demonstrates that enforced expression of FOXP3 confers Treg-like properties on Jurkat-T cells, which can be a convenient and efficient Treg-like cell model for further study to identify Treg cell surface markers and target genes regulated by FOXP3

  15. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  16. Organophosphate-Induced Changes in the PKA Regulatory Function of Swiss Cheese/NTE Lead to Behavioral Deficits and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is a Wallerian-type axonopathy that occurs weeks after exposure to certain organophosphates (OPs). OPs have been shown to bind to Neuropathy Target Esterase (NTE), thereby inhibiting its enzymatic activity. However, only OPs that also induce the so-called aging reaction cause OPIDN. This reaction results in the release and possible transfer of a side group from the bound OP to NTE and it has been suggested that this induces an unknown toxic function of NTE. To further investigate the mechanisms of aging OPs, we used Drosophila, which expresses a functionally conserved orthologue of NTE named Swiss Cheese (SWS). Treating flies with the organophosporous compound tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) resulted in behavioral deficits and neurodegeneration two weeks after exposure, symptoms similar to the delayed effects observed in other models. In addition, we found that primary neurons showed signs of axonal degeneration within an hour after treatment. Surprisingly, increasing the levels of SWS, and thereby its enzymatic activity after exposure, did not ameliorate these phenotypes. In contrast, reducing SWS levels protected from TOCP-induced degeneration and behavioral deficits but did not affect the axonopathy observed in cell culture. Besides its enzymatic activity as a phospholipase, SWS also acts as regulatory PKA subunit, binding and inhibiting the C3 catalytic subunit. Measuring PKA activity in TOCP treated flies revealed a significant decrease that was also confirmed in treated rat hippocampal neurons. Flies expressing additional PKA-C3 were protected from the behavioral and degenerative phenotypes caused by TOCP exposure whereas primary neurons were not. In addition, knocking-down PKA-C3 caused similar behavioral and degenerative phenotypes as TOCP treatment. We therefore propose a model in which OP-modified SWS cannot release PKA-C3 and that the resulting loss of PKA-C3 activity plays a crucial role in developing

  17. Functional anatomy and ion regulatory mechanisms of the antennal gland in a semi-terrestrial crab, Ocypode stimpsoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyuan-Ru Tsai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brachyuran crabs from diverse habitats show great differences in their osmoregulatory processes, especially in terms of the structural and physiological characteristics of the osmoregulatory organs. In crustaceans, the antennal glands are known to be important in osmoregulation, and they play a functional role analogous to that of the vertebrate kidney. Nevertheless, the detailed structure and function of the antennal glands in different species have rarely been described. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the antennal gland in ion regulation by examining the ultrastructure of the cells and the distribution of the ion regulatory proteins in each cell type in the antennal gland of a semi-terrestrial crab. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase activity significantly increased in the antennal gland after a 4-day acclimation in dilute seawater and returned to its original (day 0 level after 7 days. Three major types of cells were identified in the antennal gland, including coelomic cells (COEs, labyrinthine cells (LBRs and end-labyrinthine cells (ELBRs. The proximal tubular region (PT and distal tubular region (DT of the antennal gland consist of LBRs and COEs, whereas the end tubular region (ET consists of all three types of cells, with fewer COEs and more ELBRs. We found a non-uniform distribution of NKA immunoreactivity, with increasing intensity from the proximal to the distal regions of the antennal gland. We summarise our study with a proposed model for the urine reprocessing pathway and the role of each cell type or segment of the antennal gland.

  18. Regulatory network analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies functional modules and hub genes involved in infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorebrahim, Mansour; Salarian, Ali; Najafi, Saeideh; Abazari, Mohammad Foad; Aleagha, Maryam Nouri; Dadras, Mohammad Nasr; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad; Ataei, Atousa; Poortahmasebi, Vahdat

    2017-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and establishes lifetime infection associated with a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to develop an integrative gene regulatory network (GRN) approach and overlying gene expression data to identify the representative subnetworks for IM and EBV latent infection (LI). After identifying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in both IM and LI gene expression profiles, functional annotations were applied using gene ontology (GO) and BiNGO tools, and construction of GRNs, topological analysis and identification of modules were carried out using several plugins of Cytoscape. In parallel, a human-EBV GRN was generated using the Hu-Vir database for further analyses. Our analysis revealed that the majority of DEGs in both IM and LI were involved in cell-cycle and DNA repair processes. However, these genes showed a significant negative correlation in the IM and LI states. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) - a hub gene with the highest centrality score - appeared to be the key player in cell cycle regulation in IM disease. The most significant functional modules in the IM and LI states were involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively. Human-EBV network analysis revealed several direct targets of EBV proteins during IM disease. Our study provides an important first report on the response to IM/LI EBV infection in humans. An important aspect of our data was the upregulation of genes associated with cell cycle progression and proliferation.

  19. New insights into the regulatory function of CYFIP1 in the context of WAVE- and FMRP-containing complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha Abekhoukh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein 1 (CYFIP1 is a candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID, autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. It is a member of a family of proteins that is highly conserved during evolution, sharing high homology with its Drosophila homolog, dCYFIP. CYFIP1 interacts with the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, encoded by the FMR1 gene, whose absence causes Fragile X syndrome, and with the translation initiation factor eIF4E. It is a member of the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC, thus representing a link between translational regulation and the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present data showing a correlation between mRNA levels of CYFIP1 and other members of the WRC. This suggests a tight regulation of the levels of the WRC members, not only by post-translational mechanisms, as previously hypothesized. Moreover, we studied the impact of loss of function of both CYFIP1 and FMRP on neuronal growth and differentiation in two animal models – fly and mouse. We show that these two proteins antagonize each other's function not only during neuromuscular junction growth in the fly but also during new neuronal differentiation in the olfactory bulb of adult mice. Mechanistically, FMRP and CYFIP1 modulate mTor signaling in an antagonistic manner, likely via independent pathways, supporting the results obtained in mouse as well as in fly at the morphological level. Collectively, our results illustrate a new model to explain the cellular roles of FMRP and CYFIP1 and the molecular significance of their interaction.

  20. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  1. Functional promoter upstream p53 regulatory sequence of IGFBP3 that is silenced by tumor specific methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafusa, Tadashi; Shinji, Toshiyuki; Shiraha, Hidenori; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Yumoto, Eichiro; Ono, Toshiro; Koide, Norio

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 functions as a carrier of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in circulation and a mediator of the growth suppression signal in cells. There are two reported p53 regulatory regions in the IGFBP3 gene; one upstream of the promoter and one intronic. We previously reported a hot spot of promoter hypermethylation of IGFBP-3 in human hepatocellular carcinomas and derivative cell lines. As the hot spot locates at the putative upstream p53 consensus sequences, these p53 consensus sequences are really functional is a question to be answered. In this study, we examined the p53 consensus sequences upstream of the IGFBP-3 promoter for the p53 induced expression of IGFBP-3. Deletion, mutagenesis, and methylation constructs of IGFBP-3 promoter were assessed in the human hepatoblastoma cell line HepG2 for promoter activity. Deletions and mutations of these sequences completely abolished the expression of IGFBP-3 in the presence of p53 overexpression. In vitro methylation of these p53 consensus sequences also suppressed IGFBP-3 expression. In contrast, the expression of IGFBP-3 was not affected in the absence of p53 overexpression. Further, we observed by electrophoresis mobility shift assay that p53 binding to the promoter region was diminished when methylated. From these observations, we conclude that four out of eleven p53 consensus sequences upstream of the IGFBP-3 promoter are essential for the p53 induced expression of IGFBP-3, and hypermethylation of these sequences selectively suppresses p53 induced IGFBP-3 expression in HepG2 cells

  2. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  3. Cascade energy amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilov, A.P.; Gulevich, A.V.; Kukharchuk, O.F.

    2000-01-01

    The technical problem of long-life fission product and minor actinide incineration and production of plutonium fuel in the prospective nuclear systems will arise at significant scales of nuclear power industry development. Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by extemal neutron sources (energy amplifiers) are considered as incinerators of toxicity of complete nuclear industry. In the frames of this concept, the subcritical reactor part consisting of two coupled blanket regions (inner fast neutron spectrum core and outer thermal core) driven by extemal neutron source is discussed. Two types of source are studied: spallation target and 14-MeV fusion bum of micropellets. Liquid metal Pb-Bi is considered as target material and coolant of inner fast core. Thermal core is a heavy-water subcritical reactor of the Candu-type. The fast core is protected from thermal neutrons influence with the boron shield. All reactor technologies used in this concept are tested during years of operation and commercially available. Thus, the cascade energy amplifiers have a set of advantages in comparison with traditional concepts: in energy production, in transmutation efficiency, and in economics. (authors)

  4. Cascade Structure of Digital Predistorter for Power Amplifier Linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Solovyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cascade structure of nonlinear digital predistorter (DPD synthesized by the direct learning adaptive algorithm is represented. DPD is used for linearization of power amplifier (PA characteristic, namely for compensation of PA nonlinear distortion. Blocks of the cascade DPD are described by different models: the functional link artificial neural network (FLANN, the polynomial perceptron network (PPN and the radially pruned Volterra model (RPVM. At synthesis of the cascade DPD there is possibility to overcome the ill conditionality problem due to reducing the dimension of DPD nonlinear operator approximation. Results of compensating nonlinear distortion in Wiener–Hammerstein model of PA at the GSM–signal with four carriers are shown. The highest accuracy of PA linearization is produced by the cascade DPD containing PPN and RPVM.

  5. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, D.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1998-08-24

    A two-phase cascade code, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy-ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies {radical}(s)=17-20. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy-ion experiments at the CERN SPS. (orig.) 26 refs.

  6. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    A two-phase cascade code, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy-ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies √(s)=17-20. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy-ion experiments at the CERN SPS. (orig.)

  7. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS

  8. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  9. Quantum Cascade Lasers Modulation and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhansky, Edward

    The mid-wave IR (MWIR) spectral band, extending from 3 to 5 microns, is considered to be a low loss atmospheric window. There are several spectral sub-bands with relatively low atmospheric attenuation in this region making it popular for various commercial and military applications. Relatively low thermal and solar background emissions, effective penetration through the natural and anthropogenic obscurants and eye safety add to the long list of advantages of MWIR wavelengths. Quantum Cascade Lasers are compact semiconductor devices capable of operating in MWIR spectrum. They are based on inter-subband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well (QW) hetero-structure, designed by means of band-structure engineering. The inter-subband nature of the optical transition has several key advantages. First, the emission wavelength is primarily a function of the QW thickness. This characteristic allows choosing well-understood and reliable semiconductors for the generation of light in a wavelength range of interest. Second, a cascade process in which tens of photons are generated per injected electron. This cascading process is behind the intrinsic high-power capabilities of QCLs. This dissertation is focused on modulation properties of Quantum Cascade Lasers. Both amplitude and phase/frequency modulations were studied including modulation bandwidth, modulation efficiency and chirp linearity. Research was consisted of the two major parts. In the first part we describe the theory of frequency modulation (FM) response of Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers (DFB QCL). It includes cascading effect on the QCL's maximum modulation frequency. The "gain levering" effect for the maximum FM response of the two section QCLs was studied as well. In the second part of research we concentrated on the Pulse Position Amplitude Modulation of a single section QCL. The low complexity, low size, weight and power Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red optical communications transceiver concept is

  10. Stochastic background of atmospheric cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Fluctuations in the atmospheric cascades developing during the propagation of very high energy cosmic rays through the atmosphere are investigated using stochastic branching model of pure birth process with immigration. In particular, we show that the multiplicity distributions of secondaries emerging from gamma families are much narrower than those resulting from hadronic families. We argue that the strong intermittent like behaviour found recently in atmospheric families results from the fluctuations in the cascades themselves and are insensitive to the details of elementary interactions

  11. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed

  12. Circulating gluten-specific FOXP3+CD39+ regulatory T cells have impaired suppressive function in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura; Munier, C Mee Ling; Seddiki, Nabila; van Bockel, David; Ontiveros, Noé; Hardy, Melinda Y; Gillies, Jana K; Levings, Megan K; Reid, Hugh H; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P; Zaunders, John J; Tye-Din, Jason A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-12-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by dietary gluten. Although the effector T-cell response in patients with celiac disease has been well characterized, the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the loss of tolerance to gluten remains poorly understood. We sought to define whether patients with celiac disease have a dysfunction or lack of gluten-specific forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) + Treg cells. Treated patients with celiac disease underwent oral wheat challenge to stimulate recirculation of gluten-specific T cells. Peripheral blood was collected before and after challenge. To comprehensively measure the gluten-specific CD4 + T-cell response, we paired traditional IFN-γ ELISpot with an assay to detect antigen-specific CD4 + T cells that does not rely on tetramers, antigen-stimulated cytokine production, or proliferation but rather on antigen-induced coexpression of CD25 and OX40 (CD134). Numbers of circulating gluten-specific Treg cells and effector T cells both increased significantly after oral wheat challenge, peaking at day 6. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 80% of the ex vivo circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells were FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells, which reside within the pool of memory CD4 + CD25 + CD127 low CD45RO + Treg cells. Although we observed normal suppressive function in peripheral polyclonal Treg cells from patients with celiac disease, after a short in vitro expansion, the gluten-specific FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells exhibited significantly reduced suppressive function compared with polyclonal Treg cells. This study provides the first estimation of FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cell frequency within circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells after oral gluten challenge of patients with celiac disease. FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells comprised a major proportion of all circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells but had impaired suppressive function, indicating that Treg cell dysfunction might be a key

  13. CCR6 is expressed on an IL-10-producing, autoreactive memory T cell population with context-dependent regulatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Gruarin, Paola; Häringer, Barbara; Steinfelder, Svenja; Lozza, Laura; Steckel, Bodo; Weick, Anja; Sugliano, Elisa; Jarrossay, David; Kühl, Anja A; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Abrignani, Sergio; Sallusto, Federica; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Geginat, Jens

    2010-03-15

    Interleukin (IL)-10 produced by regulatory T cell subsets is important for the prevention of autoimmunity and immunopathology, but little is known about the phenotype and function of IL-10-producing memory T cells. Human CD4(+)CCR6(+) memory T cells contained comparable numbers of IL-17- and IL-10-producing cells, and CCR6 was induced under both Th17-promoting conditions and upon tolerogenic T cell priming with transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In normal human spleens, the majority of CCR6(+) memory T cells were in the close vicinity of CCR6(+) myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), and strikingly, some of them were secreting IL-10 in situ. Furthermore, CCR6(+) memory T cells produced suppressive IL-10 but not IL-2 upon stimulation with autologous immature mDCs ex vivo, and secreted IL-10 efficiently in response to suboptimal T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation with anti-CD3 antibodies. However, optimal TCR stimulation of CCR6(+) T cells induced expression of IL-2, interferon-gamma, CCL20, and CD40L, and autoreactive CCR6(+) T cell lines responded to various recall antigens. Notably, we isolated autoreactive CCR6(+) T cell clones with context-dependent behavior that produced IL-10 with autologous mDCs alone, but that secreted IL-2 and proliferated upon stimulation with tetanus toxoid. We propose the novel concept that a population of memory T cells, which is fully equipped to participate in secondary immune responses upon recognition of a relevant recall antigen, contributes to the maintenance of tolerance under steady-state conditions.

  14. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  15. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirauschek, Christian [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität München, D-80333 Munich (Germany); Kubis, Tillmann [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue University, 207 S Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  16. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirauschek, Christian; Kubis, Tillmann

    2014-03-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  17. FeF(3) catalyzed cascade C-C and C-N bond formation: synthesis of differentially substituted triheterocyclic benzothiazole functionalities under solvent-free condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Amol B; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2014-05-01

    A series of diverse polyfunctionalized triheterocyclic benzothiazoles were easily prepared in excellent yields via the Biginelli reaction of 2-aminobenzothiazole with substituted benzaldehydes and α-methylene ketones using FeF(3) as an expeditious catalyst under solvent-free conditions. The protocol provides a practical and straightforward approach toward highly functionalized triheterocyclic benzothiazole derivatives in excellent yields. The reaction was conveniently promoted by FeF(3) and the catalyst could be recovered easily after the reaction and reused without any loss of its catalytic activity. The advantageous features of this methodology are high atom economy, operational simplicity, shorter reaction time, convergence, and facile automation.

  18. MicroRNA-triggered, cascaded and catalytic self-assembly of functional ``DNAzyme ferris wheel'' nanostructures for highly sensitive colorimetric detection of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbin; Li, Xin; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The construction of DNA nanostructures with various sizes and shapes has significantly advanced during the past three decades, yet the application of these DNA nanostructures for solving real problems is still in the early stage. On the basis of microRNA-triggered, catalytic self-assembly formation of the functional ``DNAzyme ferris wheel'' nanostructures, we show here a new signal amplification platform for highly sensitive, label-free and non-enzyme colorimetric detection of a small number of human prostate cancer cells. The microRNA (miR-141), which is catalytically recycled and reused, triggers isothermal self-assembly of a pre-designed, G-quadruplex sequence containing hairpin DNAs into ``DNAzyme ferris wheel''-like nanostructures (in association with hemin) with horseradish peroxidase mimicking activity. These DNAzyme nanostructures catalyze an intensified color transition of the probe solution for highly sensitive detection of miR-141 down to 0.5 pM with the naked eye, and the monitoring of as low as 283 human prostate cancer cells can also, theoretically, be achieved in a colorimetric approach. The work demonstrated here thus offers new opportunities for the construction of functional DNA nanostructures and for the application of these DNA nanostructures as an effective signal amplification means in the sensitive detection of nucleic acid biomarkers.

  19. Arterivirus replicase processing : regulatory cascade or Gordian knot?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, Arnoldus Theodorus van

    2008-01-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the prototypic virus of the family Arteriviridae. The EAV genome is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA molecule in which two open reading frames (ORFs) encode the large replicase polyproteins pp1a and pp1ab. Processing of pp1a and pp1ab is mediated by three viral

  20. Regulatory cascade of neuronal loss and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mubashir; Sehgal, Sheikh A; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, numerous lines of research including proteomics and molecular biology have highlighted multiple targets and signaling pathways involved in metabolic abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, correlation studies of individual neurodegenerative disorders (ND) including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in association with Diabetes type 2 Mellitus (D2M) are demanding tasks. Here, we report a comprehensive mechanistic overview of major contributors involved in process-based co-regulation of D2M and NDs. D2M is linked with Alzheimer's disease through deregulation of calcium ions thereby leading to metabolic fluctuations of glucose and insulin. Parkinson-associated proteins disturb insulin level through ATP-sensitive potassium ion channels and extracellular signal-regulated kinases to enhance glucose level. Similarly, proteins which perturb carbohydrate metabolism for disturbing glucose homeostasis link Huntington, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and D2M. Other misleading processes which interconnect D2M and NDs include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunctions and microRNAs (miRNA29a/b and miRNA-9). Overall, the collective listing of pathway-specific targets would help in establishing novel connections between NDs and D2M to explore better therapeutic interventions.

  1. Time structure of cascade showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Takao

    1984-01-01

    Interesting results have been reported on the time structure of the electromagnetic components of air showers which have been obtained by using recent fast electronic circuit technology. However, these analyses and explanations seem not very persuasive. One of the reasons is that there is not satisfactory theoretical calculation yet to explain the delay of electromagnetic components in cascade processes which are the object of direct observation. Therefore, Monte Carlo calculation was attempted for examining the relationship between the altitude at which high energy γ-ray is generated up in the air and the time structure of cascade showers at the level of observation. The investigation of a dominant factor over the delay of electromagnetic components indicated that the delay due to the multiple scattering of electrons was essential. The author used the analytical solution found by himself of C. N. Yang's equation for the study on the delay due to multiple scattering. The results were as follows: The average delay time and the spread of distribution of electromagnetic cascades were approximately in linear relationship with the mass of a material having passed in a thin uniform medium; the rise time of arrival time distribution for electromagnetic cascade showers was very steep under the condition that they were generated up in the air and observed on the ground; the subpeaks delayed by tens of ns in arrival time may sometimes appear due to the perturbation in electromagnetic cascade processes. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Distinctive functions of Syk N-terminal and C-terminal SH2 domains in the signaling cascade elicited by oxidative stress in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J; Takano, T; Hermann, P; Gao, S; Han, W; Noda, C; Yanagi, S; Yamamura, H

    2000-05-01

    Syk plays a crucial role in the transduction of oxidative stress signaling. In this paper, we investigated the roles of Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of Syk in oxidative stress signaling, using Syk-negative DT40 cells expressing the N- or C-terminal SH2 domain mutant [mSH2(N) or mSH2(C)] of Syk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk in cells expressing mSH2(N) Syk after H(2)O(2) treatment was higher than that in cells expressing wild-type Syk or mSH2(C) Syk. The tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Syk and mSH2(C) Syk, but not that of mSH2(N), was sensitive to PP2, a specific inhibitor of Src-family protein-tyrosine kinase. In oxidative stress, the C-terminal SH2 domain of Syk was demonstrated to be required for induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins, phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma2 phosphorylation, inositol 1,4, 5-triphosphate (IP(3)) generation, Ca(2)(+) release from intracellular stores, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. In contrast, in mSH2(N) Syk-expressing cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins including PLC-gamma2 was markedly induced in oxidative stress. The enhanced phosphorylation of mSH2(N) Syk and PLC-gamma2, however, did not link to Ca(2)(+) mobilization from intracellular pools and IP(3) generation. Thus, the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of Syk possess distinctive functions in oxidative stress signaling.

  3. Protein phosphatase 2ACα gene knock-out results in cortical atrophy through activating hippo cascade in neuronal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Sun, Li-Hua; Huang, Yan-Fei; Guo, Li-Jun; Luo, Li-Shu

    2018-02-01

    Protein phosphatase 2ACα (PP2ACα), a vital member of the protein phosphatase family, has been studied primarily as a regulator for the development, growth and protein synthesis of a lot of cell types. Dysfunction of PP2ACα protein results in neurodegenerative disease; however, this finding has not been directly confirmed in the mouse model with PP2ACα gene knock-out. Therefore, in this study presented here, we generated the PP2ACα gene knock-out mouse model by the Cre-loxP targeting gene system, with the purpose to directly observe the regulatory role of PP2ACα gene in the development of mouse's cerebral cortex. We observe that knocking-out PP2ACα gene in the central nervous system (CNS) results in cortical neuronal shrinkage, synaptic plasticity impairments, and learning/memory deficits. Further study reveals that PP2ACα gene knock-out initiates Hippo cascade in cortical neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs), which blocks YAP translocation into the nuclei of NPCs. Notably, p73, directly targeted by Hippo cascade, can bind to the promoter of glutaminase2 (GLS2) that plays a dominant role in the enzymatic regulation of glutamate/glutamine cycle. Finally, we find that PP2ACα gene knock-out inhibits the glutamine synthesis through up-regulating the activity of phosphorylated-p73 in cortical NPCs. Taken together, it concludes that PP2ACα critically supports cortical neuronal growth and cognitive function via regulating the signaling transduction of Hippo-p73 cascade. And PP2ACα indirectly modulates the glutamine synthesis of cortical NPCs through targeting p73 that plays a direct transcriptional regulatory role in the gene expression of GLS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quadrotor trajectory tracking using PID cascade control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idres, M.; Mustapha, O.; Okasha, M.

    2017-12-01

    Quadrotors have been applied to collect information for traffic, weather monitoring, surveillance and aerial photography. In order to accomplish their mission, quadrotors have to follow specific trajectories. This paper presents proportional-integral-derivative (PID) cascade control of a quadrotor for path tracking problem when velocity and acceleration are small. It is based on near hover controller for small attitude angles. The integral of time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) criterion is used to determine the PID gains as a function of quadrotor modeling parameters. The controller is evaluated in three-dimensional environment in Simulink. Overall, the tracking performance is found to be excellent for small velocity condition.

  5. Rescuing Ecosystems from Extinction Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Sagar; Motter, Adilson

    2010-03-01

    Food web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and natural disasters often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions. Using a predictive modeling framework, here we will present a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions. We will show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal of a second specific species, which is a counter-intuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not a priori evident from local predator-prey relationships. Strikingly, in numerous cases even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. Other nondestructive interventions based on partial removals and growth suppression and/or mortality increase are shown to sometimes prevent all secondary extinctions.

  6. IL-4 production by group 2 innate lymphoid cells promotes food allergy by blocking regulatory T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Oettgen, Hans C; Chatila, Talal

    2016-09-01

    Food allergy is a major health issue, but its pathogenesis remains obscure. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) promote allergic inflammation. However their role in food allergy is largely unknown. We sought to investigate the role of ILC2s in food allergy. Food allergy-prone mice with a gain-of-function mutation in the IL-4 receptor α chain (Il4raF709) were orally sensitized with food allergens, and the ILC2 compartment was analyzed. The requirement for ILC2s in food allergy was investigated by using Il4raF709, IL-33 receptor-deficient (Il1rl1(-/-)), IL-13-deficient (Il13(-/-)), and IL-4-deficient (Il4(-/-)) mice and by adoptive transfer of in vitro-expanded ILC2s. Direct effects of ILC2s on regulatory T (Treg) cells and mast cells were analyzed in coculture experiments. Treg cell control of ILC2s was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Il4raF709 mice with food allergy exhibit increased numbers of ILC2s. IL-4 secretion by ILC2s contributes to the allergic response by reducing allergen-specific Treg cell and activating mast cell counts. IL-33 receptor deficiency in Il4raF709 Il1rl1(-/-) mice protects against allergen sensitization and anaphylaxis while reducing ILC2 induction. Adoptive transfer of wild-type and Il13(-/-) but not Il4(-/-) ILC2s restored sensitization in Il4raF709 Il1rl1(-/-) mice. Treg cells suppress ILC2s in vitro and in vivo. IL-4 production by IL-33-stimulated ILC2s blocks the generation of allergen-specific Treg cells and favors food allergy. Strategies to block ILC2 activation or the IL-33/IL-33 receptor pathway can lead to innovative therapies in the treatment of food allergy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional architecture and global properties of the Corynebacterium glutamicum regulatory network: Novel insights from a dataset with a high genomic coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyre-González, Julio A; Tauch, Andreas

    2017-09-10

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped soil bacterium able to grow on a diversity of carbon sources like sugars and organic acids. It is a biotechnological relevant organism because of its highly efficient ability to biosynthesize amino acids, such as l-glutamic acid and l-lysine. Here, we reconstructed the most complete C. glutamicum regulatory network to date and comprehensively analyzed its global organizational properties, systems-level features and functional architecture. Our analyses show the tremendous power of Abasy Atlas to study the functional organization of regulatory networks. We created two models of the C. glutamicum regulatory network: all-evidences (containing both weak and strong supported interactions, genomic coverage=73%) and strongly-supported (only accounting for strongly supported evidences, genomic coverage=71%). Using state-of-the-art methodologies, we prove that power-law behaviors truly govern the connectivity and clustering coefficient distributions. We found a non-previously reported circuit motif that we named complex feed-forward motif. We highlighted the importance of feedback loops for the functional architecture, beyond whether they are statistically over-represented or not in the network. We show that the previously reported top-down approach is inadequate to infer the hierarchy governing a regulatory network because feedback bridges different hierarchical layers, and the top-down approach disregards the presence of intermodular genes shaping the integration layer. Our findings all together further support a diamond-shaped, three-layered hierarchy exhibiting some feedback between processing and coordination layers, which is shaped by four classes of systems-level elements: global regulators, locally autonomous modules, basal machinery and intermodular genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Infant Distress and Regulatory Behaviors Vary as a Function of Attachment Security Regardless of Emotion Context and Maternal Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerkes, Esther M.; Wong, Maria S.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in infant distress and regulatory behaviors based on the quality of attachment to mother, emotion context (frustration versus fear), and whether or not mothers were actively involved in the emotion-eliciting tasks were examined in a sample of ninety-eight 16-month-old infants and their mothers. Dyads participated in the Strange…

  9. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  10. Correlation Scales of the Turbulent Cascade at 1 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Coburn, Jesse T.; Forman, Miriam A.; Stawarz, Julia E.

    2018-05-01

    We examine correlation functions of the mixed, third-order expressions that, when ensemble-averaged, describe the cascade of energy in the inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Unlike the correlation function of primitive variables such as the magnetic field, solar wind velocity, temperature, and density, the third-order expressions decorrelate at a scale that is approximately 20% of the lag. This suggests the nonlinear dynamics decorrelate in less than one wavelength. Therefore, each scale can behave differently from one wavelength to the next. In the same manner, different scales within the inertial range can behave independently at any given time or location. With such a cascade that can be strongly patchy and highly variable, it is often possible to obtain negative cascade rates for short periods of time, as reported earlier for individual samples of data.

  11. Correction: β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryousuke; Nakada, Chika; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2017-01-18

    Correction for 'β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade' by Ryousuke Ito et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2017, 15, 177-188.

  12. The ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8(+) T cells and regulatory CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Teh, Hung-Sia

    2014-03-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor ThPOK plays a crucial role in CD4 T-cell development and CD4/CD8 lineage decision. In ThPOK-deficient mice, developing T cells expressing MHC class II-restricted T-cell receptors are redirected into the CD8 T-cell lineage. In this study, we investigated whether the ThPOK transgene affected the development and function of two additional types of T cells, namely self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Self-specific CD8 T cells are characterized by high expression of CD44, CD122, Ly6C, 1B11 and proliferation in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. The ThPOK transgene converted these self-specific CD8 T cells into CD4 T cells. The converted CD4(+) T cells are no longer self-reactive, lose the characteristics of self-specific CD8 T cells, acquire the properties of conventional CD4 T cells and survive poorly in peripheral lymphoid organs. By contrast, the ThPOK transgene promoted the development of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells resulting in an increased recovery of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells that expressed higher transforming growth factor-β-dependent suppressor activity. These studies indicate that the ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Displacement cascades and defect annealing in tungsten, Part II: Object kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of tungsten cascade aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar, E-mail: giridhar.nandipati@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Roche, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The results of object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations of the annealing of primary cascade damage in bulk tungsten using a comprehensive database of cascades obtained from molecular dynamics (Setyawan et al.) are described as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy at temperatures of 300, 1025 and 2050 K. An increase in SIA clustering coupled with a decrease in vacancy clustering with increasing temperature, in addition to the disparate mobilities of SIAs versus vacancies, causes an interesting effect of temperature on cascade annealing. The annealing efficiency (the ratio of the number of defects after and before annealing) exhibits an inverse U-shape curve as a function of temperature. The capabilities of the newly developed OKMC code KSOME (kinetic simulations of microstructure evolution) used to carry out these simulations are described.

  14. Displacement cascades and defect annealing in tungsten, Part II: Object kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Tungsten Cascade Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    The results of object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations of the annealing of primary cascade damage in bulk tungsten using a comprehensive database of cascades obtained from molecular dynamics (Setyawan et al.) are described as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy at temperatures of 300, 1025 and 2050 K. An increase in SIA clustering coupled with a decrease in vacancy clustering with increasing temperature, in addition to the disparate mobilities of SIAs versus vacancies, causes an interesting effect of temperature on cascade annealing. The annealing efficiency (the ratio of the number of defects after and before annealing) exhibits an inverse U-shape curve as a function of temperature. The capabilities of the newly developed OKMC code KSOME (kinetic simulations of microstructure evolution) used to carry out these simulations are described.

  15. Multiplicity distributions in QCD cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, G.

    1992-03-01

    Multiplicity distributions for hadrons and for jets are studied in QCD parton cascades. The colour dipole formalism is used and earlier results in the double log approximation are generalized to include terms which are suppressed by colour factors or factors of ln s. The result is a set of coupled differential equations, together with appropriate boundary conditions

  16. Cascaded FSO-VLC Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Akash

    2017-08-28

    The proposed cascaded free space optics (FSO)-visible light communication (VLC) system consists of multiple VLC access points which caters the end users connected via a decode and forward (DF) relay to the FSO backhaul link. The FSO link is assumed to be affected by path-loss, pointing error and atmospheric turbulence while the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of VLC downlinks are statistically characterized considering the randomness of users position. In this study, the novel closed form expressions of the statistics like probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the equivalent SNR are derived. Capitalizing on these, the closed form expressions for various performance metrics such as outage probability and error probability are provided. The simulation results are provided to verify the functional curves of mathematical analysis.

  17. ERK5 signaling gets XIAPed: a role for ubiquitin in the disassembly of a MAPK cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Aileen M; Cobb, Melanie H

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are tightly controlled through a series of well-characterized phospho-regulatory events. In this issue, Takeda et al (2014) identify the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, XIAP, as a key regulator of ERK5 activation via uncoupling of upstream kinase activity by non-degradative ubiquitination. PMID:25012518

  18. A2E Suppresses Regulatory Function of RPE Cells in Th1 Cell Differentiation Via Production of IL-1β and Inhibition of PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian; Wang, Qiu; Li, Jing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Fan, Huimin; Wang, Fenghua; Liu, Haiyun; Sun, Xiangjun; Sun, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory status of RPE cells induced by A2E is essential in the development of AMD. Recent research indicated T-cell immunity was involved in the pathological progression of AMD. This study was designed to investigate how A2E suppresses immunoregulatory function of RPE cells in T-cell immunity in vitro. Mouse RPE cells or human ARPE19 cells were stimulated with A2E, and co-cultured with naïve T cells under Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization conditions. The intracellular cytokines or transcript factors of the induced T-cells subset were detected with flow cytometer and qRT-PCR. The ROS levels were detected, and the factors and possible pathways involved in the A2E-laden RPE cells were analyzed through neutralization antibody of IL-1β and inhibitors of related pathways. The A2E reduced regulatory function of RPE cells in Treg differentiation. The A2E-laden RPE cells promoted polarization of Th1 cells in vitro, but not Th2 or Th17 differentiation. The A2E induced RPE cells to release inflammatory cytokines and ROS, but PGE2 production was inhibited. Through neutralization of IL-1β or inhibition of COX2-PGE2 pathways, A2E-laden RPE cells expressed reduced effect in inducing Th1 cells. The A2E inhibited regulatory function of RPE cells in suppressing Th1 cell immunity in vitro through production of IL-1β and inhibition of PGE2. Our data indicate that A2E could suppress immunoregulatory function of RPE cells and adaptive immunity might play a role in the immune pathogenesis of AMD.

  19. A comparison of methods for cascade prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ruocheng; Shakarian, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Information cascades exist in a wide variety of platforms on Internet. A very important real-world problem is to identify which information cascades can go viral. A system addressing this problem can be used in a variety of applications including public health, marketing and counter-terrorism. As a cascade can be considered as compound of the social network and the time series. However, in related literature where methods for solving the cascade prediction problem were proposed, the experimen...

  20. Node vulnerability of water distribution networks under cascading failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuang, Qing; Zhang, Mingyuan; Yuan, Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    Water distribution networks (WDNs) are important in modern lifeline system. Its stability and reliability are critical for guaranteeing high living quality and continuous operation of urban functions. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the nodal vulnerability of WDNs under cascading failures. Vulnerability is defined to analyze the effects of the consequent failures. A cascading failure is a step-by-step process which is quantitatively investigated by numerical simulation with intentional attack. Monitored pressures in different nodes and flows in different pipes have been used to estimate the network topological structure and the consequences of nodal failure. Based on the connectivity loss of topological structure, the nodal vulnerability has been evaluated. A load variation function is established to record the nodal failure reason and describe the relative differences between the load and the capacity. The proposed method is validated by an illustrative example. The results revealed that the network vulnerability should be evaluated with the consideration of hydraulic analysis and network topology. In the case study, 70.59% of the node failures trigger the cascading failures with different failure processes. It is shown that the cascading failures result in severe consequences in WDNs. - Highlights: • The aim of this paper is to evaluate the nodal vulnerability of water distribution networks under cascading failures. • Monitored pressures and flows have been used to estimate the network topological structure and the consequences of nodal failure. • Based on the connectivity loss of topological structure, the nodal vulnerability has been evaluated. • A load variation function is established to record the failure reason and describe the relative differences between load and capacity. • The results show that 70.59% of the node failures trigger the cascading failures with different failure processes

  1. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  2. A cis-regulatory sequence driving metabolic insecticide resistance in mosquitoes: functional characterisation and signatures of selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Craig S; Smith, Ian; Lynd, Amy; Yawson, Alexander Egyir; Weetman, David; Paine, Mark J I; Donnelly, Martin J

    2012-09-01

    Although cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes are frequently up-regulated in mosquitoes resistant to insecticides, no regulatory motifs driving these expression differences with relevance to wild populations have been identified. Transposable elements (TEs) are often enriched upstream of those CYP450s involved in insecticide resistance, leading to the assumption that they contribute regulatory motifs that directly underlie the resistance phenotype. A partial CuRE1 (Culex Repetitive Element 1) transposable element is found directly upstream of CYP9M10, a cytochrome P450 implicated previously in larval resistance to permethrin in the ISOP450 strain of Culex quinquefasciatus, but is absent from the equivalent genomic region of a susceptible strain. Via expression of CYP9M10 in Escherichia coli we have now demonstrated time- and NADPH-dependant permethrin metabolism, prerequisites for confirmation of a role in metabolic resistance, and through qPCR shown that CYP9M10 is >20-fold over-expressed in ISOP450 compared to a susceptible strain. In a fluorescent reporter assay the region upstream of CYP9M10 from ISOP450 drove 10× expression compared to the equivalent region (lacking CuRE1) from the susceptible strain. Close correspondence with the gene expression fold-change implicates the upstream region including CuRE1 as a cis-regulatory element involved in resistance. Only a single CuRE1 bearing allele, identical to the CuRE1 bearing allele in the resistant strain, is found throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, in contrast to the diversity encountered in non-CuRE1 alleles. This suggests a single origin and subsequent spread due to selective advantage. CuRE1 is detectable using a simple diagnostic. When applied to C. quinquefasciatus larvae from Ghana we have demonstrated a significant association with permethrin resistance in multiple field sites (mean Odds Ratio = 3.86) suggesting this marker has relevance to natural populations of vector mosquitoes. However, when CuRE1 was excised

  3. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Fasting and meal-stimulated residual beta cell function is positively associated with serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and negatively associated with anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh-Long; Kolb, H; Battelino, T

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes.......Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes....

  5. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or “coarse-grained” solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive “4/5th-law”-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the “Big Power Law in the Sky” observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  6. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L.; Drivas, Theodore D.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or "coarse-grained" solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy) by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive "4 /5 th-law"-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents) required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the "Big Power Law in the Sky" observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  7. Arsenic trioxide decreases the amount and inhibits the function of regulatory T cells, which may contribute to its efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Li, Xiaoxia; Quan, Lina; Yao, Jiying; Mu, Guannan; Guo, Jingjie; Wang, Yitong

    2018-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) exhibits substantial clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Here, we investigated whether ATO exerts its efficacy by affecting regulatory T (Treg) cells. We determined whether ATO treatment influenced the amount and function of purified Treg cells. We also examined the effect of ATO treatment on Treg cells from APL patients. ATO treatment induced apoptosis in purified Treg cells and dampened the inhibition of effector T (Teff) cells proliferation and the secretion of cytokine by Treg cells. Treg cell levels in the peripheral blood and serum IL-10 levels were dramatically decreased in APL patients after single ATO treatment. In summary, our results show that ATO decreases the amount and inhibits the function of Treg cells, thereby enhancing Teff cell function and overall anti-tumor immunity.

  8. Design of ideal cascades of gas centrifuges with variable separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of designing ideal cascades in which the separation factor varies with stage number is presented and applied to centrifuges as separating units. The centrifuge is characterized by a performance function, which gives the separative power, optimized with respect to all internal variables, as a function of cut and throughput. For centrifuges with certain types of performance functions, variable-α ideal cascades can provide a product at a lower cost than the conventional ideal cascade in which the separation factor is independent of stage number

  9. Space-time evolution of electron cascades in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaja, Beata; Szoeke, Abraham; Spoel, David van der; Hajdu, Janos

    2002-01-01

    The impact of a primary electron initiates a cascade of secondary electrons in solids, and these cascades play a significant role in the dynamics of ionization. Here we describe model calculations to follow the spatiotemporal evolution of secondary electron cascades in diamond. The band structure of the insulator has been explicitly incorporated into the calculations as it affects ionizations from the valence band. A Monte Carlo model was constructed to describe the path of electrons following the impact of a single electron of energy E∼250 eV. This energy is similar to the energy of an Auger electron from carbon. Two limiting cases were considered: the case in which electrons transmit energy to the lattice, and the case where no such energy transfer is permitted. The results show the evolution of the secondary electron cascades in terms of the number of electrons liberated, the spatial distribution of these electrons, and the energy distribution among the electrons as a function of time. The predicted ionization rates (∼5-13 electrons in 100 fs) lie within the limits given by experiments and phenomenological models. Calculation of the local electron density and the corresponding Debye length shows that the latter is systematically larger than the radius of the electron cloud, and it increases exponentially with the radial size of the cascade. This means that the long-range Coulomb field is not shielded within this cloud, and the electron gas generated does not represent a plasma in a single impact cascade triggered by an electron of E∼250 eV energy. This is important as it justifies the independent-electron approximation used in the model. At 1 fs, the (average) spatial distribution of secondary electrons is anisotropic with the electron cloud elongated in the direction of the primary impact. The maximal radius of the cascade is about 50 A at this time. At 10 fs the cascade has a maximal radius of ∼70 A, and is already dominated by low-energy electrons

  10. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  11. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  12. Cascade reactor: granule fabrication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandson, O.D.; Winkler, E.O.; Maya, I.; Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A key feature of Cascade is the granular blanket. Of the many blanket material options open to Cascade, fabrication of Li 2 O granules was felt to offer the greatest challenge. The authors explored available methods for initial Li 2 O granule fabrication. They identified three cost-effective processes for fabricating Li 2 O granules: the VSM drop-melt furnace process, which is based on melting and spheroidizing irregularly shaped Li 2 O feed granules; the LiOH process, which spheroidizes liquefied LiOH and uses GA Technologies' sphere-forming procedures; and the Li 2 CO 3 sol-gel process, used for making spherical fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Each process is described below

  13. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  14. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  15. Targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 costimulation differentially controls immune synapses and function of human regulatory and conventional T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahzli Dilek

    Full Text Available CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, the three identified ligands for CD80/86, are pivotal positive and negative costimulatory molecules that, among other functions, control T cell motility and formation of immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs. What remains incompletely understood is how CD28 leads to the activation of effector T cells (Teff but inhibition of suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs, while CTLA-4 and PD-L1 inhibit Teff function but are crucial for the suppressive function of Tregs. Using alloreactive human T cells and blocking antibodies, we show here by live cell dynamic microscopy that CD28, CTLA-4, and PD-L1 differentially control velocity, motility and immune synapse formation in activated Teff versus Tregs. Selectively antagonizing CD28 costimulation increased Treg dwell time with APCs and induced calcium mobilization which translated in increased Treg suppressive activity, in contrast with the dampening effect on Teff responses. The increase in Treg suppressive activity after CD28 blockade was also confirmed with polyclonal Tregs. Whereas CTLA-4 played a critical role in Teff by reversing TCR-induced STOP signals, it failed to affect motility in Tregs but was essential for formation of the Treg immune synapse. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for PD-L1-CD80 interactions in suppressing motility specifically in Tregs. Thus, our findings reveal that the three identified ligands of CD80/86, CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, differentially control immune synapse formation and function of the human Teff and Treg cells analyzed here. Individually targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 might therefore represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat immune disorders where effector and regulatory T cell functions need to be differentially targeted.

  16. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  17. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  18. Organization of cis-acting regulatory elements in osmotic- and cold-stress-responsive promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2005-02-01

    cis-Acting regulatory elements are important molecular switches involved in the transcriptional regulation of a dynamic network of gene activities controlling various biological processes, including abiotic stress responses, hormone responses and developmental processes. In particular, understanding regulatory gene networks in stress response cascades depends on successful functional analyses of cis-acting elements. The ever-improving accuracy of transcriptome expression profiling has led to the identification of various combinations of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of stress-inducible genes involved in stress and hormone responses. Here we discuss major cis-acting elements, such as the ABA-responsive element (ABRE) and the dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat (DRE/CRT), that are a vital part of ABA-dependent and ABA-independent gene expression in osmotic and cold stress responses.

  19. Abnormal cascading failure spreading on complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Sun, Enhui; Xu, Bo; Li, Peng; Ni, Chengzhang

    2016-01-01

    Applying the mechanism of the preferential selection of the flow destination, we develop a new method to quantify the initial load on an edge, of which the flow is transported along the path with the shortest edge weight between two nodes. Considering the node weight, we propose a cascading model on the edge and investigate cascading dynamics induced by the removal of the edge with the largest load. We perform simulated attacks on four types of constructed networks and two actual networks and observe an interesting and counterintuitive phenomenon of the cascading spreading, i.e., gradually improving the capacity of nodes does not lead to the monotonous increase in the robustness of these networks against cascading failures. The non monotonous behavior of cascading dynamics is well explained by the analysis on a simple graph. We additionally study the effect of the parameter of the node weight on cascading dynamics and evaluate the network robustness by a new metric.

  20. Disaster Mythology and Availability Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Grow Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sociological research conducted in the aftermath of natural disasters has uncovered a number of “disaster myths” – widely shared misconceptions about typical post-disaster human behavior. This paper discusses the possibility that perpetuation of disaster mythology reflects an “availability cascade,” defined in prior scholarship as a “self-reinforcing process of collective belief formation by which an expressed perception triggers a chain reaction that gives the perception increasing plausibility through its rising availability in public discourse.” (Kuran and Sunstein 1999. Framing the spread of disaster mythology as an availability cascade suggests that certain tools may be useful in halting the myths’ continued perpetuation. These tools include changing the legal and social incentives of so-called “availability entrepreneurs” – those principally responsible for beginning and perpetuating the cascade, as well as insulating decision-makers from political pressures generated by the availability cascade. This paper evaluates the potential effectiveness of these and other solutions for countering disaster mythology. Las investigaciones sociológicas realizadas tras los desastres naturales han hecho evidentes una serie de “mitos del desastre”, conceptos erróneos ampliamente compartidos sobre el comportamiento humano típico tras un desastre. Este artículo analiza la posibilidad de que la perpetuación de los mitos del desastre refleje una “cascada de disponibilidad”, definida en estudios anteriores como un “proceso de auto-refuerzo de la formación de una creencia colectiva, a través del que una percepción expresada produce una reacción en cadena que hace que la percepción sea cada vez más verosímil, a través de una mayor presencia en el discurso público” (Kuran y Sunstein 1999. Enmarcar la propagación de los mitos del desastre como una cascada de disponibilidad sugiere que ciertas herramientas pueden ser

  1. Ion-implantation dense cascade data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterbon, K.B.

    1983-04-01

    A tabulation is given of data useful in estimating various aspects of ion-implantation cascades in the nuclear stopping regime, particularly with respect to nonlinearity of the cascade at high energy densities. The tabulation is restricted to self-ion implantation. Besides power-cross-section cascade dimensions, various material properties are included. Scaling of derived quantities with input data is noted, so one is not limited to the values assumed by the author

  2. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, or interferon (IFN)-γ on either protein or mRNA levels. The anergic state of CD4+CD25+ T cells is not reversible by the addition of anti-CD28, anti–CTLA-4, anti–transforming growth factor β, or anti–IL-10 antibody. However, the refractory state of CD4+CD25+ T cells was partially reversible by the addition of IL-2 or IL-4. These data demonstrate that human blood contains a resident T cell population with potent regulatory properties. PMID:11390435

  3. Structural and functional analysis of mouse Msx1 gene promoter: sequence conservation with human MSX1 promoter points at potential regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, S M; Ferland, L H; Robert, B; Abdelhay, E

    1998-06-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are related to one of the most divergent homeobox genes of Drosophila, the muscle segment homeobox (msh) gene, and are expressed in a well-defined pattern at sites of tissue interactions. This pattern of expression is conserved in vertebrates as diverse as quail, zebrafish, and mouse in a range of sites including neural crest, appendages, and craniofacial structures. In the present work, we performed structural and functional analyses in order to identify potential cis-acting elements that may be regulating Msx1 gene expression. To this end, a 4.9-kb segment of the 5'-flanking region was sequenced and analyzed for transcription-factor binding sites. Four regions showing a high concentration of these sites were identified. Transfection assays with fragments of regulatory sequences driving the expression of the bacterial lacZ reporter gene showed that a region of 4 kb upstream of the transcription start site contains positive and negative elements responsible for controlling gene expression. Interestingly, a fragment of 130 bp seems to contain the minimal elements necessary for gene expression, as its removal completely abolishes gene expression in cultured cells. These results are reinforced by comparison of this region with the human Msx1 gene promoter, which shows extensive conservation, including many consensus binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role for them.

  4. Functional dissection of the promoter of the pollen-specific gene NTP303 reveals a novel pollen-specific, and conserved cis-regulatory element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, K; Schrauwen, J; Wullems, G; Twell, D

    1995-07-01

    Regulatory elements within the promoter of the pollen-specific NTP303 gene from tobacco were analysed by transient and stable expression analyses. Analysis of precisely targeted mutations showed that the NTP303 promoter is not regulated by any of the previously described pollen-specific cis-regulatory elements. However, two adjacent regions from -103 to -86 bp and from -86 to -59 bp were shown to contain sequences which positively regulated the NTP303 promoter. Both of these regions were capable of driving pollen-specific expression from a heterologous promoter, independent of orientation and in an additive manner. The boundaries of the minimal, functional NTP303 promoter were determined to lie within the region -86 to -51 bp. The sequence AAATGA localized from -94 to -89 bp was identified as a novel cis-acting element, of which the TGA triplet was shown to comprise an active part. This element was shown to be completely conserved in the similarly regulated promoter of the Bp 10 gene from Brassica napus encoding a homologue of the NTP303 gene.

  5. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade without any mixing: net cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shi; Jiang Dongjun; Ying Zhengen

    2012-01-01

    A component has different concentrations in the incoming flows at a confluent point in all existing isotope separations cascades for multi-component isotope separation and mixing is inevitable, which results in deterioration of separation performance of the separation cascade. However, realization of no-mixing at a confluent point is impossible with a conventional cascade. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade, net cascade, is found to be able to realize no mixings for all components at confluent points, and its concept is further developed here. No-mixing is fulfilled by requiring symmetrical separation of two specified key components at every stage, and the procedure of realizing no-mixing is presented in detail. Some properties of net cascade are investigated preliminarily, and the results demonstrated the no-mixing property is indeed realized. Net cascade is the only separation cascade that so far possesses the no-mixing property. (authors)

  6. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  7. Cascading failures in interdependent systems under a flow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingrui; Arenas, Alex; Yaǧan, Osman

    2018-02-01

    Robustness and cascading failures in interdependent systems has been an active research field in the past decade. However, most existing works use percolation-based models where only the largest component of each network remains functional throughout the cascade. Although suitable for communication networks, this assumption fails to capture the dependencies in systems carrying a flow (e.g., power systems, road transportation networks), where cascading failures are often triggered by redistribution of flows leading to overloading of lines. Here, we consider a model consisting of systems A and B with initial line loads and capacities given by {LA,i,CA ,i} i =1 n and {LB,i,CB ,i} i =1 n, respectively. When a line fails in system A , a fraction of its load is redistributed to alive lines in B , while remaining (1 -a ) fraction is redistributed equally among all functional lines in A ; a line failure in B is treated similarly with b giving the fraction to be redistributed to A . We give a thorough analysis of cascading failures of this model initiated by a random attack targeting p1 fraction of lines in A and p2 fraction in B . We show that (i) the model captures the real-world phenomenon of unexpected large scale cascades and exhibits interesting transition behavior: the final collapse is always first order, but it can be preceded by a sequence of first- and second-order transitions; (ii) network robustness tightly depends on the coupling coefficients a and b , and robustness is maximized at non-trivial a ,b values in general; (iii) unlike most existing models, interdependence has a multifaceted impact on system robustness in that interdependency can lead to an improved robustness for each individual network.

  8. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  9. A Semisupervised Cascade Classification Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatis Karlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification is one of the most important tasks of data mining techniques, which have been adopted by several modern applications. The shortage of enough labeled data in the majority of these applications has shifted the interest towards using semisupervised methods. Under such schemes, the use of collected unlabeled data combined with a clearly smaller set of labeled examples leads to similar or even better classification accuracy against supervised algorithms, which use labeled examples exclusively during the training phase. A novel approach for increasing semisupervised classification using Cascade Classifier technique is presented in this paper. The main characteristic of Cascade Classifier strategy is the use of a base classifier for increasing the feature space by adding either the predicted class or the probability class distribution of the initial data. The classifier of the second level is supplied with the new dataset and extracts the decision for each instance. In this work, a self-trained NB∇C4.5 classifier algorithm is presented, which combines the characteristics of Naive Bayes as a base classifier and the speed of C4.5 for final classification. We performed an in-depth comparison with other well-known semisupervised classification methods on standard benchmark datasets and we finally reached to the point that the presented technique has better accuracy in most cases.

  10. [Chaotic dynamic process of multiple organs dysfunction syndrome and the regulatory function of shenqin liquid on it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Xiong; Weng, Shu-He; Chen, Jing-He

    2008-07-01

    To explore the chaotic dynamic process of multiple organs dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and the regulatory effect of Shenqin Liquid (SQL), a Chinese herbal liquid preparation with the action of purging and qi-tonifying. Eighty SD rats were divided into 4 groups, and were given suspension of zymosan A and paraffine (1 mL/kg) by peritoneal injection except for those in the blank control group to set up the multiple organs dysfunction syndrome (MODS) model. Low and high doses SQL were administered twice at the doses of 30 and 60 g/kg of SQL respectively at an interval of 8 h per day before modeling. Serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) in MODS model animals were tested diachronically, eg. 12, 6 h before modeling, during modeling, 6 and 12 h after modeling, and then the mathematic models were built up with compartment analysis. Lyapunov exponents (LE) of the mathematic models were calculated to evaluate their chaotic characteristics of movement and the degree of chaos was ascertained with the correlation dimension (CD). The serum levels of TNF-alpha and NO were significantly higher than those in the bland control group at modeling, 6, and 12 h after modeling (P SQL were significantly lower than the model group (P SQL was significantly lower than that in the low dose group (P 0 respectively; in the low dose and high dose SQL treated groups, CD was 0.517 and 0.653 respectively and LE >0. CD of NO movement in the blank control group was 0.670 and with LE 0; in the low dose SQL group, 0.574 and in the high dose SQL group 0.850, and LE SQL can intervene the movement of TNF-alpha and NO, decrease the complexity of their chaotic movement, and make them return back to a stable state.

  11. Functional characterization of a three-component regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a form of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to control a wide range of physiological processes in a population density-dependent manner. Production of peptide antibiotics is one of the processes regulated by quorum sensing in several species of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. This bacterium and its peptide antibiotics are of interest due to their potential applications in food preservation. The molecular bases of the quorum sensing phenomenon controlling peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum remain poorly understood. The present study was aimed at gaining a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism involved in quorum sensing-mediated regulation of peptide antibiotic (bacteriocin production by C. maltaromaticum. We report the functional analyses of the CS (autoinducer-CbnK (histidine protein kinase-CbnR (response regulator three-component regulatory system and the three regulated promoters involved in peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum LV17B. Results CS-CbnK-CbnR system-dependent activation of carnobacterial promoters was demonstrated in both homologous and heterologous hosts using a two-plasmid system with a β-glucuronidase (GusA reporter read-out. The results of our analyses support a model in which the CbnK-CbnR two-component signal transduction system is necessary and sufficient to transduce the signal of the peptide autoinducer CS into the activation of the promoters that drive the expression of the genes required for production of the carnobacterial peptide antibiotics and the immunity proteins that protect the producer bacterium. Conclusions The CS-CbnK-CbnR triad forms a three-component regulatory system by which production of peptide antibiotics by C. maltaromaticum LV17B is controlled in a population density-dependent (or cell proximity-dependent manner. This regulatory mechanism would permit the bacterial

  12. Atomistic simulations of displacement cascades in Y2O3 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Manan; Chandra, Sharat; Valsakumar, M.C.; Mathi Jaya, S.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) The averaged distortion index and the Y–O bond length of the Y 2 O 3 octahedra as a function of the simulation time for 5 keV PKA. (b) Shows the nearest neighbourhood of one of the Y ions as a function of simulation time, showing the destruction and the recovery of the YO 6 octahedron during the cascade corresponding to 5 keV Y PKA. - Highlights: • Qualitative difference in displacement cascades exists for Y and O PKA. • Nearest neighbour correlation between Y and O ions exists even at cascade peak. • Cascade core in Y 2 O 3 does not undergo melting. • Topological connectivity of YO 6 polyhedra plays important role in stability of Y 2 O 3 . - Abstract: We study the characteristics of displacement cascades in single crystal Y 2 O 3 using classical molecular dynamics. There are two possible ways to generate the cascades in yttria, using either the Y or the O atoms as the primary knock-on (PKA) atom. It is shown that there is a qualitative difference in the characteristics of the cascades obtained in these two cases. Even though the crystal is seen to be in a highly disordered state in the cascade volume, as seen from the plots of radial distribution function, the correlation between the Y and O atoms is not completely lost. This facilitates a quick recovery of the system during the annealing phase. Topological connectivity of the YO 6 polyhedral units plays an important role in imparting stability to the Y 2 O 3 crystal. These characteristics of the cascades can help explain the stability of the yttria nanoparticles when they are dispersed in oxide dispersion strengthened steels

  13. Cascade DNA nanomachine and exponential amplification biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Xu, Huo; Li, Hongling; Jia, Lee

    2015-11-15

    DNA is a versatile scaffold for the assembly of multifunctional nanostructures, and potential applications of various DNA nanodevices have been recently demonstrated for disease diagnosis and treatment. In the current study, a powerful cascade DNA nanomachine was developed that can execute the exponential amplification of p53 tumor suppressor gene. During the operation of the newly-proposed DNA nanomachine, dual-cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (dual-CNDP) was ingeniously introduced, where the target trigger is repeatedly used as the fuel molecule and the nicked fragments are dramatically accumulated. Moreover, each displaced nicked fragment is able to activate the another type of cyclical strand-displacement amplification, increasing exponentially the value of fluorescence intensity. Essentially, one target binding event can induce considerable number of subsequent reactions, and the nanodevice was called cascade DNA nanomachine. It can implement several functions, including recognition element, signaling probe, polymerization primer and template. Using the developed autonomous operation of DNA nanomachine, the p53 gene can be quantified in the wide concentration range from 0.05 to 150 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM. If taking into account the final volume of mixture, the detection limit is calculated as lower as 6.2 pM, achieving an desirable assay ability. More strikingly, the mutant gene can be easily distinguished from the wild-type one. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein is expected to promote the development and application of DNA nanomachine, showing great potential value in basic biology and medical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DECREASING OF WATER TROPHY IN CASCADE SYSTEMS, ON EXAMPLE OF THE SOŁA RIVER DAM CASCADE (SOUTHERN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jachniak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis the subject of water self-purification in cascade systems of water reservoirs was engaged. The results of hydrobiological research of three dam reservoirs (Tresna, Porąbka and Czaniec, creating the Soła river dam cascade were presented. The trophic status of these reservoirs was defined on the grounds of the concentration of chlorophyll a, biomass of phytoplankton and occurrence of indicating species of planktonic algae. The results of research indicated on decreasing of water trophy in the layout from the highest into the lowest reservoir of the cascade. The average concentrations of chlorophyll a amounted appropriately 19,99 μg·dm-3, 8,74 μg·dm-3 and 4,29 μg·dm-3, instead the average biomass of phytoplankton amounted appropriately 4,1 mg·dm-3, 3,4 mg·dm-3 and 0,1 mg·dm-3. The observed species of algae confirmed occurrence of differences between reservoirs. In Tresna reservoir more species of phytoplankton indicating for eutrophy were thrived, instead in Porąbka and Czaniec reservoirs the species occurring in oligomesotrophic water thrived. Water self-purification in the Soła river dam cascade expressed decreasing of their fertility is important for water management of the region, because the Czaniec reservoir fulfill a function of water-supply reservoir.

  15. Cascades of pile-up and dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomme, S.

    2008-01-01

    Count loss through a cascade of pile-up and dead time is studied. Time interval density-distribution functions and throughput factors are presented for counters with a series arrangement of pile-up and extending or non-extending dead time. A counter is considered, where an artificial dead time is imposed on every counted event, in order to control the length and type of dead time. For such a system, it is relatively easy to determine an average count-loss correction factor via a live-time clock gated by the imposed dead-time signal ('live-time mode'), or otherwise to apply a correction factor based on the inversion of the throughput function ('real-time mode'). However, these techniques do not account for additional loss through pulse pile-up. In this work, counting errors associated with neglecting cascade effects are calculated for measurements in live-time and real-time mode

  16. Design concept of Hydro cascade control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fustik, Vangel; Kiteva, Nevenka

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a design concept of the comple hydro cascade scheme is presented with the design parameters of the main technical features. The cascade control system architecture is designed considering up-to-date communication and information technology. The control algorithm is based on Pond Level Control and Economic Load Allocation concepts.

  17. Centrifugal separator cascade connected in zigzag manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Nagakura, Masaaki.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To effectively accommodate centrifugal separators of the entire cascade within the available space in a plant by freely selecting perpendicular direction of connection of the centrifugal separator. Structure: Centrifugal separators are connected in zigzag fashion by using a single header for each stage so that in a rectangular shape the entire cascade is arranged. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Cascaded impedance networks for NPC inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2010-01-01

    they are subject to the renewable sources. To date, three distinct types of impedance networks can be summarized for implementing a hybrid source impedance network, which can in principle be combined and cascaded before connected to a NPC inverter by proposed two ways. The resulting cascaded impedance network NPC...

  19. Cascading costs: an economic nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moomaw, William R; Birch, Melissa B L

    2005-09-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrified to N(2). We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single ton of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade. Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a ton of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that ton would cascade. The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a ton of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  20. Ubiquitin-specific Protease-7 Inhibition Impairs Tip60-dependent Foxp3+ T-regulatory Cell Function and Promotes Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqing Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Foxp3+ T-regulatory (Treg cells are known to suppress protective host immune responses to a wide variety of solid tumors, but their therapeutic targeting is largely restricted to their transient depletion or “secondary” modulation, e.g. using anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody. Our ongoing studies of the post-translational modifications that regulate Foxp3 demonstrated that the histone/protein acetyltransferase, Tip60, plays a dominant role in promoting acetylation, dimerization and function in Treg cells. We now show that the ubiquitin-specific protease, Usp7, controls Treg function largely by stabilizing the expression and promoting the multimerization of Tip60 and Foxp3. Genetic or pharmacologic targeting of Usp7 impairs Foxp3+ Treg suppressive functions, while conventional T cell responses remain intact. As a result, pharmacologic inhibitors of Usp7 can limit tumor growth in immunocompetent mice, and promote the efficacy of antitumor vaccines and immune checkpoint therapy with anti-PD1 monoclonal antibody in murine models. Hence, pharmacologic therapy with Usp7 inhibitors may have an important role in future cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Runx1 and Runx3 are involved in the generation and function of highly suppressive IL-17-producing T regulatory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lequn Li

    Full Text Available CD4(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells (Tregs display phenotypic and functional plasticity that is regulated by cytokines and other immune cells. Previously, we determined that during co-culture with CD4(+CD25(- T cells and antigen presenting cells, Tregs produced IL-17. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of IL-17-producing Treg (Tr17 cells and their molecular and functional properties. We determined that during stimulation via TCR/CD3 and CD28, the combination of IL-1β and IL-2 was necessary and sufficient for the generation of Tr17 cells. Tr17 cells expressed Runx1 transcription factor, which was required for sustained expression of Foxp3 and RORγt and for production of IL-17. Surprisingly, Tr17 cells also expressed Runx3, which regulated transcription of perforin and granzyme B thereby mediating cytotoxic activity. Our studies indicate that Tr17 cells concomitantly express Foxp3, RORγt, Runx1 and Runx3 and are capable of producing IL-17 while mediating potent suppressive and cytotoxic function.

  2. Cascade Error Projection: An Efficient Hardware Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) is presented. CEP is an adaption of a constructive architecture from cascade correlation and the dynamical stepsize of A/D conversion from the cascade back propagation algorithm.

  3. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maczka Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green’s functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  4. The width of electron-photon cascades in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, H.R.; Crannell, C.J.; Hough, J.H.; Shutie, P.F.; Sun, M.P.

    1975-01-01

    A new Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-photon cascade development is shown to give results in agreement with a) the calculations of Nordheim et al, b) simulations using the Berger-Seltzer electron photon transport programme and c) experimental measurements in water. However, the lateral spread is much narrower than that given by the Nishimura-Kamata functions or the Messel-Crawford tabulations. (orig.) [de

  5. The Geant4 Bertini Cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.H.; Kelsey, M.H.

    2015-12-21

    One of the medium energy hadron–nucleus interaction models in the GEANT4 simulation toolkit is based partly on the Bertini intranuclear cascade model. Since its initial appearance in the toolkit, this model has been largely re-written in order to extend its physics capabilities and to reduce its memory footprint. Physics improvements include extensions in applicable energy range and incident particle types, and improved hadron–nucleon cross-sections and angular distributions. Interfaces have also been developed which allow the model to be coupled with other GEANT4 models at lower and higher energies. The inevitable speed reductions due to enhanced physics have been mitigated by memory and CPU efficiency improvements. Details of these improvements, along with selected comparisons of the model to data, are discussed.

  6. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption......In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  7. Prediction of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin

    2008-01-01

    Finding the regulatory mechanisms responsible for gene expression remains one of the most important challenges for biomedical research. A major focus in cellular biology is to find functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) responsible for the regulation of a downstream gene. As wet......-lab methods are time consuming and expensive, it is not realistic to identify TFBS for all uncharacterized genes in the genome by purely experimental means. Computational methods aimed at predicting potential regulatory regions can increase the efficiency of wet-lab experiments significantly. Here, methods...

  8. Neutron cross sections for defect production by high-energy displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Mann, F.M.

    1983-08-01

    Defect production cross sections for copper have been devised, based on computer simulations of displacement cascades. One thousand cascades ranging in energy from 200 eV to 200 keV were generated with the MARLOWE computer code. The cascades were subjected to a semi-empirical cascade quenching procedure and to short-term annealing with the ALSOME computer code. Functions were fitted to the numbers of defects produced as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) damage energy for the following defect types: 1) the total number of point defects after quenching and after short-term annealing, 2) the numbers of free interstitials and free vacancies after shortterm annealing, and 3) the numbers and sizes of vacancy and interstitial clusters after shortterm annealing. In addition, a function describing the number of distinct damage regions (lobes) per cascade was fitted to results of a graphical analysis of the cascade configurations. The defect production functions have been folded into PKA spectra using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system with ENDF/B-V nuclear data to yield neutron cross sections for defect production in copper. The free vacancy cross section displays much less variation with neutron energy than the cross sections for damage energy or total point defects

  9. Neutron cross sections for defect production by high energy displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Mann, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Defect production cross sections for copper have been devised, based on computer simulations of displacement cascades. One thousand cascades ranging in energy from 200 eV to 200 keV were generated with the MARLOWE computer code. The cascades were subjected to a semi-empirical cascade quenching procedure and to short-term annealing with the ALSOME computer code. Functions were fitted to the numbers of defects produced as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) damage energy for the following defect types: 1) the total number of point defects after quenching and after short-term annealing, 2) the numbers of free interstitials and free vacancies after short-term annealing, and 3) the numbers and sizes of vacancy and interstitial clusters after short-term annealing. In addition, a function describing the number of distinct damage regions (lobes) per cascade was fitted to results of a graphical analysis of the cascade configurations. The defect production functions have been folded into PKA spectra using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system with ENDF/B-V nuclear data to yield neutron cross sections for defect production in copper. The free vacancy cross section displays much less variation with neutron energy than the cross sections for damage energy or total point defects. (orig.)

  10. Experimental study of flow through compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Panchal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to study the behaviour of flow at the inlet, within the blade passage and at the exit of a compressor cascade. For this purpose, a cascade with six numbers of aerofoil blades was designed and constructed. The cascade was fitted on the cascade test tunnel. Out of six blades two were instrumented for measuring the pressure distribution on the pressure and suction surface. The blades had a parabolic camber line, with a maximum camber position at 40% of the chord from the leading edge of the blade. The profile of the blade was C4, height of the blade was 160 mm, chord length was 80 mm, camber angle was 45° and stagger angle was 30°. Similarly, the length of the cascade was 300 mm, span was 160 mm, pitch was 60 mm, the actual chord of the cascade was 80 mm, the axial chord of the cascade was 70 mm, the stagger angle of the cascade was 30° and the pitch-chord ratio was 0.75. The data was taken and analyzed at −500% of the axial chord before the cascade, −25% of the axial chord before the leading edge, 25%, 50%, 75% and 150% of the axial chord from the leading edge of the blade. The readings were taken from the cascade wall to the mid span position along the pitch wise direction. The angle of incidence was also changed during the experiment and varied from i=−50°, −30°, −10° to 5°.

  11. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  12. Regulatory Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.; Vetterlein, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory governance frameworks have become essential building blocks of world society. From supply chains to the regimes surrounding international organizations, extensive governance frameworks have emerged which structure and channel a variety of social exchanges, including economic, political...... by the International Transitional Administrations (ITAs) in Kosovo and Iraq as well as global supply chains and their impact on the garment industry in Bangladesh....

  13. Mouse transgenesis identifies conserved functional enhancers and cis-regulatory motif in the vertebrate LIM homeobox gene Lhx2 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison P Lee

    Full Text Available The vertebrate Lhx2 is a member of the LIM homeobox family of transcription factors. It is essential for the normal development of the forebrain, eye, olfactory system and liver as well for the differentiation of lymphoid cells. However, despite the highly restricted spatio-temporal expression pattern of Lhx2, nothing is known about its transcriptional regulation. In mammals and chicken, Crb2, Dennd1a and Lhx2 constitute a conserved linkage block, while the intervening Dennd1a is lost in the fugu Lhx2 locus. To identify functional enhancers of Lhx2, we predicted conserved noncoding elements (CNEs in the human, mouse and fugu Crb2-Lhx2 loci and assayed their function in transgenic mouse at E11.5. Four of the eight CNE constructs tested functioned as tissue-specific enhancers in specific regions of the central nervous system and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, recapitulating partial and overlapping expression patterns of Lhx2 and Crb2 genes. There was considerable overlap in the expression domains of the CNEs, which suggests that the CNEs are either redundant enhancers or regulating different genes in the locus. Using a large set of CNEs (810 CNEs associated with transcription factor-encoding genes that express predominantly in the central nervous system, we predicted four over-represented 8-mer motifs that are likely to be associated with expression in the central nervous system. Mutation of one of them in a CNE that drove reporter expression in the neural tube and DRG abolished expression in both domains indicating that this motif is essential for expression in these domains. The failure of the four functional enhancers to recapitulate the complete expression pattern of Lhx2 at E11.5 indicates that there must be other Lhx2 enhancers that are either located outside the region investigated or divergent in mammals and fishes. Other approaches such as sequence comparison between multiple mammals are required to identify and characterize such enhancers.

  14. Differentially expressed plasma microRNAs and the potential regulatory function of Let-7b in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Guo

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1 thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2 Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3 ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs. These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of

  15. Differentially Expressed Plasma MicroRNAs and the Potential Regulatory Function of Let-7b in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  16. Regulatory Mechanisms of a Highly Pectinolytic Mutant of Penicillium occitanis and Functional Analysis of a Candidate Gene in the Plant Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bravo-Ruiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium occitanis is a model system for enzymatic regulation. A mutant strain exhibiting constitutive overproduction of different pectinolytic enzymes both under inducing (pectin or repressing conditions (glucose was previously isolated after chemical mutagenesis. In order to identify the molecular basis of this regulatory mechanism, the genomes of the wild type and the derived mutant strain were sequenced and compared, providing the first reference genome for this species. We used a phylogenomic approach to compare P. occitanis with other pectinolytic fungi and to trace expansions of gene families involved in carbohydrate degradation. Genome comparison between wild type and mutant identified seven mutations associated with predicted proteins. The most likely candidate was a mutation in a highly conserved serine residue of a conserved fungal protein containing a GAL4-like Zn2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain and a fungus-specific transcription factor regulatory middle homology region. To functionally characterize the role of this candidate gene, the mutation was recapitulated in the predicted orthologue Fusarium oxysporum, a vascular wilt pathogen which secretes a wide array of plant cell wall degrading enzymes, including polygalacturonases, pectate lyases, xylanases and proteases, all of which contribute to infection. However, neither the null mutant nor a mutant carrying the analogous point mutation exhibited a deregulation of pectinolytic enzymes. The availability, annotation and phylogenomic analysis of the P. occitanis genome sequence represents an important resource for understanding the evolution and biology of this species, and sets the basis for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest for the degradation of complex polysaccharides.

  17. Tol2 transposon-mediated transgenesis in the Midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellus) - towards understanding gene function and regulatory evolution in an ecological model system for rapid phenotypic diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Claudius F; Sefton, Maggie M; Liang, Yipeng; Meyer, Axel

    2017-11-23

    The Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) is widely known among evolutionary biologists as a model system for sympatric speciation and adaptive phenotypic divergence within extremely short periods of time (a few hundred generations). The repeated parallel evolution of adaptive phenotypes in this radiation, combined with their near genetic identity, makes them an excellent model for studying phenotypic diversification. While many ecological and evolutionary studies have been performed on Midas cichlids, the molecular basis of specific phenotypes, particularly adaptations, and their underlying coding and cis-regulatory changes have not yet been studied thoroughly. For the first time in any New World cichlid, we use Tol2 transposon-mediated transgenesis in the Midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellus). By adapting existing microinjection protocols, we established an effective protocol for transgenesis in Midas cichlids. Embryos were injected with a Tol2 plasmid construct that drives enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression under the control of the ubiquitin promoter. The transgene was successfully integrated into the germline, driving strong ubiquitous expression of eGFP in the first transgenic Midas cichlid line. Additionally, we show transient expression of two further transgenic constructs, ubiquitin::tdTomato and mitfa::eGFP. Transgenesis in Midas cichlids will facilitate further investigation of the genetic basis of species-specific traits, many of which are adaptations. Transgenesis is a versatile tool not only for studying regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers, but also for testing gene function through overexpression of allelic gene variants. As such, it is an important first step in establishing the Midas cichlid as a powerful model for studying adaptive coding and non-coding changes in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  18. Regulatory functions and pathological relevance of the MECP2 3′UTR in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather McGowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2, encoded by the gene MECP2, is a transcriptional regulator and chromatin-remodeling protein, which is ubiquitously expressed and plays an essential role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS. Highly enriched in post-migratory neurons, MeCP2 is needed for neuronal maturation, including dendritic arborization and the development of synapses. Loss-of-function mutations in MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a phase of normal development, followed by the progressive loss of milestones and cognitive disability. While a great deal has been discovered about the structure, function, and regulation of MeCP2 in the time since its discovery as the genetic cause of RTT, including its involvement in a number of RTT-related syndromes that have come to be known as MeCP2-spectrum disorders, much about this multifunctional protein remains enigmatic. One unequivocal fact that has become apparent is the importance of maintaining MeCP2 protein levels within a narrow range, the limits of which may depend upon the cell type and developmental time point. As such, MeCP2 is amenable to complex, multifactorial regulation. Here, we summarize the role of the MECP2 3' untranslated region (UTR in the regulation of MeCP2 protein levels and how mutations in this region contribute to autism and other non-RTT neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. A Discrete Dynamical System Approach to Pathway Activation Profiles of Signaling Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catozzi, S; Sepulchre, J-A

    2017-08-01

    In living organisms, cascades of covalent modification cycles are one of the major intracellular signaling mechanisms, allowing to transduce physical or chemical stimuli of the external world into variations of activated biochemical species within the cell. In this paper, we develop a novel method to study the stimulus-response of signaling cascades and overall the concept of pathway activation profile which is, for a given stimulus, the sequence of activated proteins at each tier of the cascade. Our approach is based on a correspondence that we establish between the stationary states of a cascade and pieces of orbits of a 2D discrete dynamical system. The study of its possible phase portraits in function of the biochemical parameters, and in particular of the contraction/expansion properties around the fixed points of this discrete map, as well as their bifurcations, yields a classification of the cascade tiers into three main types, whose biological impact within a signaling network is examined. In particular, our approach enables to discuss quantitatively the notion of cascade amplification/attenuation from this new perspective. The method allows also to study the interplay between forward and "retroactive" signaling, i.e., the upstream influence of an inhibiting drug bound to the last tier of the cascade.

  20. A new cascade NN based method to short-term load forecast in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouhi, Sajjad; Keynia, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We are proposed a new hybrid cascaded NN based method and WT to short-term load forecast in deregulated electricity market. • An efficient preprocessor consist of normalization and shuffling of signals is presented. • In order to select the best inputs, a two-stage feature selection is presented. • A new cascaded structure consist of three cascaded NNs is used as forecaster. - Abstract: Short-term load forecasting (STLF) is a major discussion in efficient operation of power systems. The electricity load is a nonlinear signal with time dependent behavior. The area of electricity load forecasting has still essential need for more accurate and stable load forecast algorithm. To improve the accuracy of prediction, a new hybrid forecast strategy based on cascaded neural network is proposed for STLF. This method is consists of wavelet transform, an intelligent two-stage feature selection, and cascaded neural network. The feature selection is used to remove the irrelevant and redundant inputs. The forecast engine is composed of three cascaded neural network (CNN) structure. This cascaded structure can be efficiently extract input/output mapping function of the nonlinear electricity load data. Adjustable parameters of the intelligent feature selection and CNN is fine-tuned by a kind of cross-validation technique. The proposed STLF is tested on PJM and New York electricity markets. It is concluded from the result, the proposed algorithm is a robust forecast method

  1. An algebraic approach to signaling cascades with N layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Knudsen, Michael; Andersen, Lars Nørvang

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins is key in transmission of signals in cells. Many signaling pathways contain several layers of modification cycles that mediate and change the signal through the pathway. Here, we study a simple signaling cascade consisting of n layers of modification cyc...... state for any given total amounts of substrates and enzymes.We demonstrate that many steady-state concentrations are related through rational functions that can be found recursively. For example, stimulus-response curves arise as inverse functions to explicit rational functions. We show...

  2. Program death-1 signaling and regulatory T cells collaborate to resist the function of adoptively transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes in advanced acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J; Riddle, Megan; Sharpe, Arlene H; Vallera, Daniel A; Azuma, Miyuki; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Murphy, William J; Munn, David H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2010-10-07

    Tumor-induced immune defects can weaken host immune response and permit tumor cell growth. In a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML), tumor progression resulted in increased regulatory T cells (Treg) and elevation of program death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) at the tumor site. PD-1 knockout mice were more resistant to AML despite the presence of similar percentage of Tregs compared with wild type. In vitro, intact Treg suppression of CD8(+) T-cell responses was dependent on PD-1 expression by T cells and Tregs and PD-L1 expression by antigen-presenting cells. In vivo, the function of adoptively transferred AML-reactive CTLs was reduced by AML-associated Tregs. Anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment increased the proliferation and function of CTLs at tumor sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors. Treg depletion followed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade showed superior efficacy for eradication of established AML. These data demonstrated that interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can facilitate Treg-induced suppression of T-effector cells and dampen the antitumor immune response. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade coupled with Treg depletion represents an important new approach that can be readily translated into the clinic to improve the therapeutic efficacy of adoptive AML-reactive CTLs in advanced AML disease.

  3. Ancient duplications and functional divergence in the interferon regulatory factors of vertebrates provide insights into the evolution of vertebrate immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kang; Zhong, Zaixuan; Fang, Chengchi; Dai, Wei; Shen, Yanjun; Gan, Xiaoni; He, Shunping

    2018-04-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) were first discovered as transcription factors that regulate the transcription of human interferon (IFN)-β. Increasing evidence shows that they might be important players involved in Adaptive immune system (AIS) evolution. Although numbers of IRFs have been identified in chordates, the evolutionary history and functional diversity of this gene family during the early evolution of vertebrates have remained obscure. Using IRF HMM profile and HMMER searches, we identified 148 IRFs in 11 vertebrates and 4 protochordates. For them, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships, determined the synteny conservation, investigated the profile of natural selection, and analyzed the expression patterns in four "living fossil" vertebrates: lamprey, elephant shark, coelacanth and bichir. The results from phylogeny and synteny analysis imply that vertebrate IRFs evolved from three predecessors, instead of four as suggested in a previous study, as results from an ancient duplication followed by special expansions and lost during the vertebrate evolution. The profile of natural selection and expression reveals functional dynamics during the process. Together, they suggest that the 2nd whole-genome duplication (2WGD) provided raw materials for innovation in the IRF family, and that the birth of type-I IFN might be an important factor inducing the establishment of IRF-mediated immune networks. As a member involved in the AIS evolution, IRF provide insights into the process and mechanism involved in the complexity and novelties of vertebrate immune systems. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Freeze-thaw lysates of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells induce differentiation of functionally competent regulatory T cells from memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Olivia C; Lawrence, Emma; Gray, Alice P; Njie, Madi; Riley, Eleanor M; Walther, Michael

    2012-07-01

    In addition to naturally occurring regulatory T (nTreg) cells derived from the thymus, functionally competent Treg cells can be induced in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes in response to TCR stimulation with cytokine costimulation. Using these artificial stimulation conditions, both naïve as well as memory CD4(+) T cells can be converted into induced Treg (iTreg) cells, but the cellular origin of such iTreg cells in vivo or in response to more physiologic stimulation with pathogen-derived antigens is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that a freeze/thaw lysate of Plasmodium falciparum schizont extract (PfSE) can induce functionally competent Treg cells from peripheral lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner without the addition of exogenous costimulatory factors. The PfSE-mediated induction of Treg cells required the presence of nTreg cells in the starting culture. Further experiments mixing either memory or naïve T cells with antigen presenting cells and CFSE-labeled Treg cells identified CD4(+) CD45RO(+) CD25(-) memory T cells rather than Treg cells as the primary source of PfSE-induced Treg cells. Taken together, these data suggest that in the presence of nTreg cells, PfSE induces memory T cells to convert into iTreg cells that subsequently expand alongside PfSE-induced effector T cells. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Functional diversification of grapevine MYB5a and MYB5b in the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in a petunia anthocyanin regulatory mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Erika; Zenoni, Sara; Finezzo, Laura; Guzzo, Flavia; Zamboni, Anita; Avesani, Linda; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-03-01

    Flavonoids play a key role in grapevine physiology and also contribute substantially to the quality of berries and wines. VvMYB5a and VvMYB5b are R2R3-MYB transcription factors previously proposed to control the spatiotemporal expression of flavonoid structural genes during berry development. We investigated the functions of these two proteins in detail by heterologous expression in a petunia an2 mutant, which has negligible anthocyanin levels in the petals because it lacks the MYB protein PhAN2. We also expressed VvMYBA1, the grapevine ortholog of petunia PhAN2, in the same genetic background. The anthocyanin profiles induced by expressing these transgenes in the petals revealed that VvMYBA1 is the functional ortholog of PhAN2 and that, unlike VvMYB5a, VvMYB5b can partially complement the an2 mutation. Transcriptomic analysis of petals by microarray hybridization and quantitative PCR confirmed that VvMYB5b up-regulates a subset of anthocyanin structural genes, whereas VvMYB5a has a more limited impact on the expression of genes related to anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, we identified additional specific and common targets of these two regulators, related to vacuolar acidification and membrane remodeling. Taken together, these data provide insight into the role of VvMYB5a and VvMYB5b in flavonoid biosynthesis and provide evidence for additional regulatory roles in distinct pathways.

  6. Active site-targeted covalent irreversible inhibitors of USP7 impair the functions of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells by promoting ubiquitination of Tip60.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Foxp3+ T-regulatory (Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment is associated with tumor immune evasion and poor patient outcome in the case of many solid tumors. Current therapeutic strategies for blocking Treg functions are not Treg-specific, and display only modest and transient efficacy. Recent studies revealed that ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7 is essential for Treg functions by stabilizing expression of Tip60 and Foxp3, which together are central to the development and maintenance of the Treg cell lineage. Pharmacological inhibition of USP7 is therefore a promising strategy for suppressing Treg functions and promoting anti-tumor immunity. Previously, we reported the P5091 series of small molecule USP7 inhibitors and demonstrated their direct anti-tumor activity in vivo using xenograft models. However, the precise mechanism of action of these compounds was not well defined. In this study, we report the development and characterization of P217564, a second-generation USP7 inhibitor with improved potency and selectivity. P217564 selectively targets the catalytic cleft of USP7 and modifies its active site cysteine (C223 by forming a covalent adduct. Irreversible inhibition of USP7 results in durable downstream biological responses in cells, including down-regulation of Tip60 and consequent impairment of Treg suppressive function. In addition, we demonstrate that both USP7 and various USP7 substrates are subjected to Lys48-mediated ubiquitin modification, consistent with increased proteasomal degradation of these proteins because of USP7 inhibition.

  7. Prokaryotic regulatory systems biology: Common principles governing the functional architectures of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli unveiled by the natural decomposition approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyre-González, Julio A; Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis G; Valtierra-Gutiérrez, Ilse A; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa María; Alonso-Pavón, José A

    2012-10-31

    Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are two of the best-studied prokaryotic model organisms. Previous analyses of their transcriptional regulatory networks have shown that they exhibit high plasticity during evolution and suggested that both converge to scale-free-like structures. Nevertheless, beyond this suggestion, no analyses have been carried out to identify the common systems-level components and principles governing these organisms. Here we show that these two phylogenetically distant organisms follow a set of common novel biologically consistent systems principles revealed by the mathematically and biologically founded natural decomposition approach. The discovered common functional architecture is a diamond-shaped, matryoshka-like, three-layer (coordination, processing, and integration) hierarchy exhibiting feedback, which is shaped by four systems-level components: global transcription factors (global TFs), locally autonomous modules, basal machinery and intermodular genes. The first mathematical criterion to identify global TFs, the κ-value, was reassessed on B. subtilis and confirmed its high predictive power by identifying all the previously reported, plus three potential, master regulators and eight sigma factors. The functionally conserved cores of modules, basal cell machinery, and a set of non-orthologous common physiological global responses were identified via both orthologous genes and non-orthologous conserved functions. This study reveals novel common systems principles maintained between two phylogenetically distant organisms and provides a comparison of their lifestyle adaptations. Our results shed new light on the systems-level principles and the fundamental functions required by bacteria to sustain life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Altered Gene-Regulatory Function of KDM5C by a Novel Mutation Associated With Autism and Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, Christina N; Farrehi, Clara; Friez, Michael J; Burmeister, Margit; Keegan, Catherine E; Iwase, Shigeki

    2018-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) affects up to 2% of the population world-wide and often coincides with other neurological conditions such as autism spectrum disorders. Mutations in KDM5C cause Mental Retardation, X-linked, Syndromic, Claes-Jensen type (MRXSCJ, OMIM #300534) and are one of the most common causes of X-linked ID. KDM5C encodes a histone demethylase for di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3), which are enriched in transcriptionally engaged promoter regions. KDM5C regulates gene transcription; however, it remains unknown whether removal of H3K4me is fully responsible for KDM5C-mediated gene regulation. Most mutations functionally tested to date result in reduced enzymatic activity of KDM5C, indicating loss of demethylase function as the primary mechanism underlying MRXSCJ. Here, we report a novel KDM5C mutation, R1115H, identified in an individual displaying MRXSCJ-like symptoms. The carrier mother's cells exhibited a highly skewed X-inactivation pattern. The KDM5C-R1115H substitution does not have an impact on enzymatic activity nor protein stability. However, when overexpressed in post-mitotic neurons, KDM5C-R1115H failed to fully suppress expression of target genes, while the mutant also affected expression of a distinct set of genes compared to KDM5C-wildtype. These results suggest that KDM5C may have non-enzymatic roles in gene regulation, and alteration of these roles contributes to MRXSCJ in this patient.

  9. Identification, characterization and functional analysis of regulatory region of nanos gene from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinqiang; Li, Yongjuan; Shao, Changwei; Wang, Na; Chen, Songlin

    2017-06-20

    The nanos gene encodes an RNA-binding zinc finger protein, which is required in the development and maintenance of germ cells. However, there is very limited information about nanos in flatfish, which impedes its application in fish breeding. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, characterization and functional analysis of the 3'-untranslated region of the nanos gene (Csnanos) from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), which is an economically important flatfish in China. The 1233-bp cDNA sequence, 1709-bp genomic sequence and flanking sequences (2.8-kb 5'- and 1.6-kb 3'-flanking regions) of Csnanos were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis revealed that CsNanos shares low homology with Nanos in other species, but the zinc finger domain of CsNanos is highly similar. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsNanos belongs to the Nanos2 subfamily. Csnanos expression was widely detected in various tissues, but the expression level was higher in testis and ovary. During early development and sex differentiation, Csnanos expression exhibited a clear sexually dimorphic pattern, suggesting its different roles in the migration and differentiation of primordial germ cells (PGCs). Higher expression levels of Csnanos mRNA in normal females and males than in neomales indicated that the nanos gene may play key roles in maintaining the differentiation of gonad. Moreover, medaka PGCs were successfully labeled by the microinjection of synthesized mRNA consisting of green fluorescence protein and the 3'-untranslated region of Csnanos. These findings provide new insights into nanos gene expression and function, and lay the foundation for further study of PGC development and applications in tongue sole breeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic algorithm based separation cascade optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendra, A.K.; Sanyal, A.; Gouthaman, G.; Bera, T.K.

    2008-01-01

    The conventional separation cascade design procedure does not give an optimum design because of squaring-off, variation of flow rates and separation factor of the element with respect to stage location. Multi-component isotope separation further complicates the design procedure. Cascade design can be stated as a constrained multi-objective optimization. Cascade's expectation from the separating element is multi-objective i.e. overall separation factor, cut, optimum feed and separative power. Decision maker may aspire for more comprehensive multi-objective goals where optimization of cascade is coupled with the exploration of separating element optimization vector space. In real life there are many issues which make it important to understand the decision maker's perception of cost-quality-speed trade-off and consistency of preferences. Genetic algorithm (GA) is one such evolutionary technique that can be used for cascade design optimization. This paper addresses various issues involved in the GA based multi-objective optimization of the separation cascade. Reference point based optimization methodology with GA based Pareto optimality concept for separation cascade was found pragmatic and promising. This method should be explored, tested, examined and further developed for binary as well as multi-component separations. (author)

  11. A novel regulatory function of sweet taste-sensing receptor in adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Masubuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed not only in taste buds but also in nongustatory organs such as enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic beta-cells, and may play more extensive physiological roles in energy metabolism. Here we examined the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in 3T3-L1 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In undifferentiated preadipocytes, both T1R2 and T1R3 were expressed very weakly, whereas the expression of T1R3 but not T1R2 was markedly up-regulated upon induction of differentiation (by 83.0 and 3.8-fold, respectively at Day 6. The α subunits of Gs (Gαs and G14 (Gα14 but not gustducin were expressed throughout the differentiation process. The addition of sucralose or saccharin during the first 48 hours of differentiation considerably reduced the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα at Day 2, the expression of aP2 at Day 4 and triglyceride accumulation at Day 6. These anti-adipogenic effects were attenuated by short hairpin RNA-mediated gene-silencing of T1R3. In addition, overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of Gαs but not YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gα14, impeded the effects of sweeteners, suggesting a possible coupling of Gs with the putative sweet taste-sensing receptor. In agreement, sucralose and saccharin increased the cyclic AMP concentration in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and also in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing T1R3. Furthermore, the anti-adipogenic effects of sweeteners were mimicked by Gs activation with cholera toxin but not by adenylate cyclase activation with forskolin, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Gαs had the opposite effects. CONCLUSIONS: 3T3-L1 cells express a functional sweet taste-sensing receptor presumably as a T1R3 homomer, which mediates the anti-adipogenic signal by a Gs-dependent but cAMP-independent mechanism.

  12. Beyond KNO multiplicative cascades and novel multiplicity scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, S

    1999-01-01

    The collapse of multiplicity distributions P/sub n/ onto a universal scaling curve arises when P/sub n/ is expressed as a function of the standardized multiplicity (n-c)/ lambda with c and lambda being location and scale parameters governed by leading particle effects and the growth of average multiplicity. It is demonstrated that self- similar multiplicative cascade processes such as QCD parton branching naturally lead to a novel type of scaling behavior of P/sub n/ which manifests itself in Mellin space through a location change controlled by the degree of multifractality and a scale change governed by the depth of the cascade. Applying the new scaling rule it is shown how to restore data collapsing behavior of P/sub n/ measured in hh collisions at ISR and SPS energies. (21 refs).

  13. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  14. Effects of ivermectin application on the diversity and function of dung and soil fauna: Regulatory and scientific background information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Nicole; Bachmann, Jean; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Floate, Kevin D; Jensen, John; Römbke, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The application of veterinary medical products to livestock can impact soil organisms in manure-amended fields or adversely affect organisms that colonize dung pats of treated animals and potentially retard the degradation of dung on pastures. For this reason, the authorization process for veterinary medicinal products in the European Union includes a requirement for higher-tier tests when adverse effects on dung organisms are observed in single-species toxicity tests. However, no guidance documents for the performance of higher-tier tests are available. Hence, an international research project was undertaken to develop and validate a proposed test method under varying field conditions of climate, soil, and endemic coprophilous fauna at Lethbridge (Canada), Montpellier (France), Zurich (Switzerland), and Wageningen (The Netherlands). The specific objectives were to determine if fecal residues of an anthelmintic with known insecticidal activity (ivermectin) showed similar effects across sites on 1) insects breeding in dung of treated animals, 2) coprophilous organisms in the soil beneath the dung, and 3) rates of dung degradation. By evaluating the effects of parasiticides on communities of dung-breeding insects and soil fauna under field conditions, the test method meets the requirements of a higher-tier test as mandated by the European Union. The present study provides contextual information on authorization requirements for veterinary medicinal products and on the structure and function of dung and soil organism communities. It also provides a summary of the main findings. Subsequent studies on this issue provide detailed information on different aspects of this overall project. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1914-1923. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Emotion regulatory function of parent attention to child pain and associated implications for parental pain control behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Sütterlin, Stefan; Caes, Line; Moors, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the function of parental attention to child pain in regulating parental distress and pain control behaviour when observing their child performing a painful (cold pressor) task (CPT); we also studied the moderating role of parental state anxiety. Participants were 62 schoolchildren and one of their parents. Parental attention towards or away from child pain (ie, attend to pain vs avoid pain) was experimentally manipulated during a viewing task pairing unfamiliar children's neutral and pain faces. Before and after the viewing task, parental distress regulation was assessed by heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). In a subsequent phase, parents observed their own child perform a CPT task, allowing assessment of parental pain control behaviour (indexed by latency to stop their child's CPT performance) and parental distress, which was assessed via self-report before and after observation of child CPT performance. Eye tracking during the viewing task and self-reported attention to own child's pain confirmed successful attention manipulation. Further, findings indicated that the effect of attentional strategy on parental emotion regulation (indexed by HR, self-report) and pain control behaviour depended on parents' state anxiety. Specifically, whereas low anxious parents reported more distress and demonstrated more pain control behaviour in the Attend to Pain condition, high anxious parents reported more distress and showed more pain control behaviour in the Avoid Pain condition. This inverse pattern was likewise apparent in physiological distress indices (HR) in response to the initial viewing task. Theoretical/clinical implications and further research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bright luminescence of Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutants reveals a connection between citrate and the Gac/Csr regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Whistler, Cheryl; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    The Gac/Csr regulatory system is conserved throughout the γ-proteobacteria and controls key pathways in central carbon metabolism, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence in important plant and animal pathogens. Here we show that elevated intracellular citrate levels in a Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutant correlate with activation of the Gac/Csr cascade and induction of bright luminescence. Spontaneous or directed mutations in the gene that encodes citrate synthase reversed the bright luminescence of aconitase mutants, eliminated their citrate accumulation and reversed their elevated expression of CsrB. Our data elucidate a correlative link between central metabolic and regulatory pathways, and they suggest that the Gac system senses a blockage at the aconitase step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either through elevated citrate levels or a secondary metabolic effect of citrate accumulation, and responds by modulating carbon flow and various functions associated with host colonization, including bioluminescence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ex-Th17 (Nonclassical Th1) Cells Are Functionally Distinct from Classical Th1 and Th17 Cells and Are Not Constrained by Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basdeo, Sharee A; Cluxton, Deborah; Sulaimani, Jamal; Moran, Barry; Canavan, Mary; Orr, Carl; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula; Fletcher, Jean M

    2017-03-15

    Th17 cells are an important therapeutic target in autoimmunity. However, it is known that Th17 cells exhibit considerable plasticity, particularly at sites of autoimmune inflammation. Th17 cells can switch to become ex-Th17 cells that no longer produce IL-17 but produce IFN-γ. These ex-Th17 cells are also called nonclassical Th1 cells because of their ability to produce IFN-γ, similar to Th1 cells; however, it is unclear whether they resemble Th1 or Th17 cells in terms of their function and regulation, and whether they have a pathogenic role in autoimmunity. We compared the phenotypic and functional features of human Th17, Th1, and ex-Th17 cell populations. Our data showed that despite their loss of IL-17 expression, ex-Th17 cells were more polyfunctional in terms of cytokine production than either Th1 or bona fide Th17 cells, and produced increased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. The proliferative brake on Th17 cells appeared to be lifted because ex-Th17 cells proliferated more than Th17 cells after stimulation. In contrast with Th1 and Th17 cells, ex-Th17 cells were highly resistant to suppression of proliferation and cytokines by regulatory T cells. Finally, we showed that ex-Th17 cells accumulated in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these data indicate that human ex-Th17 cells are functionally distinct from Th1 and Th17 cells, and suggest that they may play a pathogenic role at sites of autoimmunity, such as the rheumatoid arthritis joint where they accumulate. These findings have implications for therapeutic strategies that target IL-17, because these may not inhibit pathogenic ex-Th17 cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. An investigation of collision propagation in energetic ion initiated cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarov, I.R.; Webb, R.P.; Smith, R.; Beardmore, K.

    1995-01-01

    Using simple Binary Collision simulations of energetic ion initiated collision cascades, particles are considered to undergo a series of binary collisions with their surroundings. In Molecular Dynamics simulation it is difficult to even define what is meant by a collision as the interaction potentials are infinite in nature and consequently all particles are considered to interact with all other particles. By making a suitable definition of a collision for Molecular Dynamics we are able to compare the temporal behaviour of the number of collisions occurring during the propagation of a collision cascade between the two different calculation schemes. An investigation is made of the number of collisions as a function of time occurring in collision cascades. We compare these results to the time ordered version of MARLOWE. By making further definitions about what makes a many body collision, we further investigate the numbers of many body collisions occurring during a number of collision cascades. (orig.)

  19. Study on computer-aided simulation procedure for multicomponent separating cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro

    1982-11-01

    The present report reviews the author's study on the computer-aided simulation procedure for a multicomponent separating cascade. As a conclusion, two very powerful simulation procedures have been developed for cascades composed of separating elements whose separation factors are very large. They are applicable in cases where interstage flow rates are input variables for the calculation and stage separation factors are given either as constants or as functions of compositions of the up and down streams. As an application of the new procedure, a computer-aided simulation study has been performed for hydrogen isotope separating cascades by porous membrane method. A cascade system configuration is developed and pertinent design specifications are determined in an example case of the feed conditions and separation requirements. (author)

  20. Regulatory and licensee surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the workshop two CSNI/WGHOF surveys were distributed. One survey was directed at regulatory bodies and the other was directed at plant licensees. The surveys were: 1 - Regulatory Expectations of Licensees' Arrangements to Ensure Suitable Organisational Structure, Resources and Competencies to Manage Safety (sent to WGHOF regulatory members). The survey requested that the respondents provide a brief overview of the situation related to plant organisations in their country, their regulatory expectations and their formal requirements. The survey addressed three subjects: the demonstration and documentation of organisational structures, resources and competencies, organisational changes, issues for improvement (for both current and new plants). Responses were received from eleven regulatory bodies. 2 - Approaches to Justify Organisational Suitability (sent to selected licensees). The purpose of the survey to was to gain an understanding of how licensees ensure organisational suitability, resources and competencies. This information was used to assist in the development of the issues and subjects that were addressed at the group discussion sessions. Responses were received from over fifteen licensees from nine countries. The survey requested that the licensees provide information on how they ensure effective organisational structures at their plants. The survey grouped the questions into the following four categories: organisational safety functions, resource and competence, decision-making and communication, good examples and improvement needs. The findings from these surveys were used in conjunction with other factors to identify the key issues for the workshop discussion sessions. The responses from these two surveys are discussed briefly in Sections 4 and 5 of this report. More extensive reviews of the regulatory and licensee responses are provided in Appendix 1

  1. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov—Maxwell system. A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma. It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light, as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction. The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period. The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade, which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures. For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation, higher-harmonic generation and wave—wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter. In addition, stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  2. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, B.N.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    in terms of this reaction kinetics taking into account cluster production, dissociation, migration and annihilation at extended sinks. Microstructural features which are characteristic of cascade damage and cannot be explained in terms of the conventional single defect reaction kinetics are emphasized......There is now ample evidence from both experimental and computer simulation studies that in displacement cascades not only intense recombination takes place but also efficient clustering of both self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies. The size distributions of the two types of defects produced...... reactions kinetics associated with the specific features of cascade damage is described, with emphasis on asymmetries between SIA and vacancy type defects concerning their production, stability, mobility and interactions with other defects. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions is discussed...

  3. τ polarization in SUSY cascade decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Hagiwara, K.; Kim, Y.G.

    2006-12-01

    τ leptons emitted in cascade decays of supersymmetric particles are polarized. The polarization may be exploited to determine spin and mixing properties of the neutralinos and stau particles involved. (orig.)

  4. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors which trigger MAPK-dependent innate ...

  5. Cascade processes in kaonic and muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M.P.; Men'shikov, L.I.

    2003-01-01

    Cascade processes in exotic (kaonic and muonic) hydrogen/deuterium have been studied with the quantum-classical Monte Carlo code (QCMC) developed for 'ab initio' - calculations. It has been shown that the majority of kaonic hydrogen atoms during cascade are accelerated to high energies E ∼ 100 eV, which leads to a much lower value for the calculated yields Y of x-rays than predicted by the 'standard cascade model'. The modified QCMC scheme has been applied to the study of the cascade in μp and μd muonic atoms. A comparison of the calculated yields for K-series x-rays with experimental data directly indicates that the molecular structure of the hydrogen target and new types of non-radiative transitions are essential for the light muonic atoms, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic) atoms. These processes have been considered and estimates of their probabilities are presented. (author)

  6. Cascade Error Projection: A New Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Stubberud, A. R.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    A new neural network architecture and a hardware implementable learning algorithm is proposed. The algorithm, called cascade error projection (CEP), handles lack of precision and circuit noise better than existing algorithms.

  7. Assessment of regulatory effectiveness. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This report arises from the seventh series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Assessment of Regulatory Effectiveness'. The term 'regulatory effectiveness' covers the quality of the work and level of performance of a regulatory body. In this sense, regulatory effectiveness applies to regulatory body activities aimed at preventing safety degradation and ensuring that an acceptable level of safety is being maintained by the regulated operating organizations. In addition, regulatory effectiveness encompasses the promotion of safety improvements, the timely and cost effective performance of regulatory functions in a manner which ensures the confidence of the operating organizations, the general public and the government, and striving for continuous improvements to performance. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in two peer group discussions during March and May 1999. The discussions were focused on the elements of an effective regulatory body, possible indicators of regulatory effectiveness and its assessment. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations they belong to, or the International Atomic Energy Agency. In order to protect people and the environment from hazards associated with nuclear facilities, the main objective of a nuclear regulatory body is to ensure that a high level of safety in the nuclear activities under its jurisdiction is achieved, maintained and within the control of operating organizations. Even if it is possible to directly judge objective safety levels at nuclear facilities, such safety levels would not provide an exclusive indicator of regulatory effectiveness. The way the regulatory body ensures the safety of workers and the public and the way it discharges its responsibilities also determine its effectiveness. Hence the

  8. Simulation of concentration spikes in cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    Research has been conducted to investigate the maximum possible enrichment that might be temporarily achieved in a facility that is producing enriched uranium for fuel for nuclear power reactors. The purpose is to provide information to evaluate if uranium enrichment facilities are producing 235 U enriched within declared limits appropriate for power reactors or if the facilities are actually producing more highly enriched uranium. The correlation between feed rate and separation factor in a gas centrifuge cascade shows that as flow decreases, the separation factor increases, thereby, creating small amounts of higher enriched uranium than would be found under optimum design operating conditions. The research uses a number of cascade enrichment programs to model the phenomenon and determine the maximum enrichment possible during the time transient of a gas centrifuge cascade. During cascade start-up, the flow through the centrifuges begins at lower than centrifuge design stage flow rates. Steady-state cascade models have been used to study the maximum 235 U concentrations that would be predicted in the cascade. These calculations should produce an upper bound of product concentrations expected during the transient phase of start-up. Due to the fact that there are different ways in which to start a cascade, several methods are used to determine the maximum enrichment during the time transient. Model cascades were created for gas centrifuges with several product to .feed assay separation factors. With this information, the models were defined and the equilibrium programs were used to determine the maximum enrichment level during the time transient. The calculations predict in a cascade with separation factor 1.254 designed to produce enriched uranium for the purpose of supplying reactor fuel, it would not be unreasonable to see some 235 U in the range of 12-15%. Higher assays produced during the start-up period might lead inspectors to believe the cascade is being

  9. Immunoregulatory changes induced by total lymphoid irradiation. II. Development of thymus-leukemia antigen-positive and -negative suppressor T cells that differ in their regulatory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.P.; Strober, S.

    1981-01-01

    BALB/c mice treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) develop non-antigen-specific suppressor cells of the adoptive secondary antibody response and of the mixed leukocyte reaction. Suppressors of the adoptive anti-DNP response were eliminated by incubation of spleen cells with anti-Thy-1.2 or anti-thymus-leukemia (TL) antiserum and complement before cell transfer. Thymectomy before TLI prevented the appearance of the latter suppressor cells. On the other hand, suppressors of the MLR were eliminated by incubation of spleen cells with anti-Thy-1.2 but not anti-TL antiserum and complement. Thymectomy before TLI did not prevent their subsequent development. Thus, two subpopulations of suppressor T cells that differ in the expression of the TL surface antigen, dependence on the presence of the thymus, and in regulatory functions develop after TLI. The TL+, thymus-dependent cell suppresses the adoptive antibody response, and the TL-, thymus-independent cell suppresses the MLR

  10. Lower omental t-regulatory cell count is associated with higher fasting glucose and lower β-cell function in adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Lam, Jonathan; Alderete, Tanya L; Allayee, Hooman; Akbari, Omid; Katkhouda, Namir; Goran, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    T-lymphocytes are potential initiators and regulators of adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, but there is limited human data on omental AT. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T cells, particularly Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, in human subcutaneous (subQ) and omental AT and type 2 diabetes risk. SubQ and deep subQ (DsubQ) abdominal and omental AT biopsies were collected from 44 patients (body mass index, BMI ≥25) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Flow cytometry was used to quantify CD4+ T cell (T effector and Treg) and macrophages (M1 and M2), and systemic inflammation was measured in fasting blood. Tregs were significantly lower in omental versus subQ and DsubQ AT, and M1 cell counts were significantly higher in the omental and DsubQ depot relative to the subQ. Only omental AT Tregs were negatively associated with fasting glucose and MCP-1 and positively associated with homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β. M1 and M2 cell counts across multiple depots had significant relationships with HOMA-insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor-α, insulin, and HOMA-β. All relationships were consistent across ethnicities. Tregs were significantly lower in omental versus both subQ adipose depots. Fewer omental Tregs may have metabolic implications based on depot-specific relationships with higher fasting glucose and lower β-cell function. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  11. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  12. High energy evolution of soft gluon cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvaev, A.; Wallon, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we derive an evolution equation for the gluon density in soft gluon cascades emitted from any colored source, in the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. We show that this equation has the same form as the BFKL equation in the forward case. An explicit expression for the total cascade wavefunction involving an arbitrary number of soft gluons is obtained. Renormalization of the colored source wavefunction turns out to be responsible for the reggeization of the source. (orig.)

  13. High energy evolution of soft gluon cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvaev, A. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg district (Russian Federation); Wallon, S. [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we derive an evolution equation for the gluon density in soft gluon cascades emitted from any colored source, in the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. We show that this equation has the same form as the BFKL equation in the forward case. An explicit expression for the total cascade wavefunction involving an arbitrary number of soft gluons is obtained. Renormalization of the colored source wavefunction turns out to be responsible for the reggeization of the source. (orig.)

  14. Defect production in simulated cascades: Cascade quenching and short-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    Defect production in displacement cascades in copper has been modeled using the MARLOWE code to generate cascades and the stochastic annealing code ALSOME to simulate cascade quenching and short-term annealing of isolated cascades. Quenching is accomplished by using exaggerated values for defect mobilities and for critical reaction distances in ALSOME for a very short time. The quenched cascades are then short-term annealed with normal parameter values. The quenching parameter values were empirically determined by comparison with results of resistivity measurements. Throughout the collisional, quenching and short-term annealing phases of cascade development, the high energy cascades continue to behave as a collection of independent lower energy lobes. For recoils above about 30 keV the total number of defects and the numbers of free defects scale with the damage energy. As the energy decreases from 30 keV, defect production varies with the changing nature of the cascade configuration, resulting in more defects per unit damage energy. The simulated annealing of a low fluence of interacting cascades revealed an interstitial shielding effect on depleted zones during Stage I recovery. (orig.)

  15. MCDF calculations of Auger cascade processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerwerth, Randolf; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    We model the multiple ionization of near-neutral core-excited atoms where a cascade of Auger processes leads to the emission of several electrons. We utilize the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method to generate approximate wave functions for all fine-structure levels and to account for all decays between them. This approach allows to compute electron spectra, the population of final-states and ion yields, that are accessible in many experiments. Furthermore, our approach is based on the configuration interaction method. A careful treatment of correlation between electronic configurations enables one to model three-electron processes such as an Auger decay that is accompanied by an additional shake-up transition. Here, this model is applied to the triple ionization of atomic cadmium, where we show that the decay of inner-shell 4p holes to triply-charged final states is purely due to the shake-up transition of valence 5s electrons. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  16. Depression: An Immuno-Inflammatory Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder also known as clinical depression, unipolar depression or depression is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, high suicidal tendencies and deaths. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that psychiatric illnesses like MDD, are associated with inflammatory processes. While it is unlikely that major depressive disorder is a primary and lsquo;inflammatory' disorder, there is now evidence to suggest that inflammation play a subtle role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. The inflammation in depression cascade pin points to the origin from immune hyperactivity and thus a new theory that explains role of immune system mediated inflammation has been accepted and researched upon. widely. This theory states that depression is accompanied by altered immune function and activation of the inflammatory response system. This theory is strengthened form the fact that the current therapeutic options which mainly target neurotransmitters, are not effective in many patients and these patients has been found to be associated with elevated levels of inflammatory mediators specifically cytokines. It is reported more recently that other risk factors for depression, including psychosocial stress, psychological trauma, sleep disturbance and pain, also increases inflammatory processes. Thus the intervention in the immune system originated from inflammatory cytokines seems a therapeutically viable option in the field of depression research. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 223-240

  17. The effects of HIV-1 regulatory TAT protein expression on brain reward function, response to psychostimulants and delay-dependent memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    Depression and psychostimulant abuse are common comorbidities among humans with immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The HIV regulatory protein TAT is one of multiple HIV-related proteins associated with HIV-induced neurotoxicity. TAT-induced dysfunction of dopamine and serotonin systems in corticolimbic brain areas may result in impaired reward function, thus, contributing to depressive symptoms and psychostimulant abuse. Transgenic mice with doxycycline-induced TAT protein expression in the brain (TAT+, TAT- control) show neuropathology resembling brain abnormalities in HIV+ humans. We evaluated brain reward function in response to TAT expression, nicotine and methamphetamine administration in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure. We evaluated the brain dopamine and serotonin systems with high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of TAT expression on delay-dependent working memory in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the operant delayed nonmatch-to-position task were also assessed. During doxycycline administration, reward thresholds were elevated by 20% in TAT+ mice compared with TAT- mice. After the termination of doxycycline treatment, thresholds of TAT+ mice remained significantly higher than those of TAT- mice and this was associated with changes in mesolimbic serotonin and dopamine levels. TAT+ mice showed a greater methamphetamine-induced threshold lowering compared with TAT- mice. TAT expression did not alter delay-dependent working memory. These results indicate that TAT expression in mice leads to reward deficits, a core symptom of depression, and a greater sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced reward enhancement. Our findings suggest that the TAT protein may contribute to increased depressive-like symptoms and continued methamphetamine use in HIV-positive individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear Envelope Phosphatase 1-Regulatory Subunit 1 (Formerly TMEM188) Is the Metazoan Spo7p Ortholog and Functions in the Lipin Activation Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sungwon; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Zhang, Peixiang; Grishin, Nick; Oegema, Karen; Crooke, Roseann; Graham, Mark; Reue, Karen; Dixon, Jack E.; Goodman, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipin-1 catalyzes the formation of diacylglycerol from phosphatidic acid. Lipin-1 mutations cause lipodystrophy in mice and acute myopathy in humans. It is heavily phosphorylated, and the yeast ortholog Pah1p becomes membrane-associated and active upon dephosphorylation by the Nem1p-Spo7p membrane complex. A mammalian ortholog of Nem1p is the C-terminal domain nuclear envelope phosphatase 1 (CTDNEP1, formerly “dullard”), but its Spo7p-like partner is unknown, and the need for its existence is debated. Here, we identify the metazoan ortholog of Spo7p, TMEM188, renamed nuclear envelope phosphatase 1-regulatory subunit 1 (NEP1-R1). CTDNEP1 and NEP1-R1 together complement a nem1Δspo7Δ strain to block endoplasmic reticulum proliferation and restore triacylglycerol levels and lipid droplet number. The two human orthologs are in a complex in cells, and the amount of CTDNEP1 is increased in the presence of NEP1-R1. In the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo, expression of nematode CTDNEP1 and NEP1-R1, as well as lipin-1, is required for normal nuclear membrane breakdown after zygote formation. The expression pattern of NEP1-R1 and CTDNEP1 in human and mouse tissues closely mirrors that of lipin-1. CTDNEP1 can dephosphorylate lipins-1a, -1b, and -2 in human cells only in the presence of NEP1-R1. The nuclear fraction of lipin-1b is increased when CTDNEP1 and NEP1-R1 are co-expressed. Therefore, NEP1-R1 is functionally conserved from yeast to humans and functions in the lipin activation pathway. PMID:22134922

  19. INFLUENCE OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE ON REGULATORY AND ADAPTIVE STATUS OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE FUNCTIONAL CLASS I. RESULTS OF NOT COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Tregubov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate metoprolol succinate effect on regulatory and adaptive status (RAS of patients with сhronic heart failure (CHF functional class (FC I and arterial hypertension (HT I-II stages. Material and methods. 51 patients with CHF FC I and HT I-II stage, (30 men and 21 women aged 52.6±1.4 yeas. Cardio-respiratory synchronism (CRS test, 6-minute walking test, tread-mill burden test with registration of maximal oxygen consumption, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography and determination of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP blood level were performed initially and after 6 months of therapy with metoprolol succinate (dose 78.1±5.7 mg/day in sustained-release presentation. Results. Metoprolol succinate therapy had no significant effect on RAS (there was no unidirectional dynamics of the basic CRS test parameters: a range of synchronization decreased significantly from 8.8±0.4 to 7.2±0.6 сardio-respiratory cycles per minute (in 18%; р<0.05, and duration of CRS development on the minimal boundary from 18.8±2.2 to 14.3±1.2 сardiocycles (in 24%; р<0,05; RAS index considerably did not change, myocardium structure, exercise tolerance and neuro-humoral activity. Metoprolol therapy only moderately improved left ventricle diastolic function. Conclusion. Metoprolol succinate therapy has no significant effect on RAS of patients with CHF FC I and HT I-II stages.

  20. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Schneider Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1. The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  1. Boolean Models of Biological Processes Explain Cascade-Like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Guanyu; Simha, Rahul; Du, Chenghang; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-29

    Biological networks play a key role in determining biological function and therefore, an understanding of their structure and dynamics is of central interest in systems biology. In Boolean models of such networks, the status of each molecule is either "on" or "off" and along with the molecules interact with each other, their individual status changes from "on" to "off" or vice-versa and the system of molecules in the network collectively go through a sequence of changes in state. This sequence of changes is termed a biological process. In this paper, we examine the common perception that events in biomolecular networks occur sequentially, in a cascade-like manner, and ask whether this is likely to be an inherent property. In further investigations of the budding and fission yeast cell-cycle, we identify two generic dynamical rules. A Boolean system that complies with these rules will automatically have a certain robustness. By considering the biological requirements in robustness and designability, we show that those Boolean dynamical systems, compared to an arbitrary dynamical system, statistically present the characteristics of cascadeness and sequentiality, as observed in the budding and fission yeast cell- cycle. These results suggest that cascade-like behavior might be an intrinsic property of biological processes.

  2. Diode pumped cascade Er:Y2O3 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanamyan, T

    2015-01-01

    A cascade, diode-pumped, continuous wave (CW), dual-wavelength operation in a 0.5% Er 3+ :Y 2 O 3 cryogenic ceramic laser is demonstrated for the first time. The laser operates on cascaded Er ( 4 I 11/2   →   4 I 13/2   →   4 I 15/2 ) transitions and can deliver 24 and 13 W at 1.6 and 2.7 μm, respectively. The overall efficiency with respect to the absorbed ∼980 nm power was 62%. This is, to our best knowledge, the first demonstration of an efficient, high power, cascade, erbium laser achieved in bulk solid-state lasers. The analysis of the output power, the laser’s wavelengths and slope efficiency for each individual laser transition are presented for pure CW operation mode. Also presented are the temporal behaviors of each laser line as a function of pump pulse duration in the quasi-CW regime. (letter)

  3. Cascading Events, Technology and the Floods Directive: future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pescaroli Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascading events can be referred to multidimensional disasters, where a primary trigger generates a nonlinear series of secondary emergencies that escalate in time, becoming eventually the priority to tackle. In this process, critical infrastructure can be handled as roots of vulnerabilities, because they accumulate both physical attributes and functional nodes. When compromised, they produce widespread breakdowns of society, but also orient emergency responses and long-term recovery. Although floods have been widely associated to the failure of vulnerable equipments or to the disruption of strategic sectors such as energy, communication and transportation, their integration with the emerging concept of cascading has been limited. This open topic presents many challenges for scholars, researchers and practitioners, in particular when the implementation of the EU Floods Directive is considered. The paper presents an overview of the Floods Directive and its relation with the cascading events, using case studies and examples from the existing literature to point out missing links and gaps in the legislation. Conclusions argue that the Directive considers only local geographical scales and limited temporal horizons, which can be result inadequate to limit the escalation of events.

  4. Modulation of phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T regulatory lymphocytes mediated by cAMP elevating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Riccomi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that Cholera Toxin (CT and other cyclic AMP (cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 in human resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, which following the treatment acquired suppressive functions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of cAMP elevating agents on human CD4+CD25+ T cells, which include the T regulatory (Treg cells that play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. We found that cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of CTLA-4 in CD4+CD25- and further enhance its expression in CD4+CD25+ T cells. We observed an increase of two isoforms of mRNA coding for the membrane and the soluble CTLA-4 molecules, suggesting that the regulation of CTLA-4 expression by cAMP is at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25+ T cells converts the CD4+CD25+Foxp3- T cells in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, whereas the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25- T cells did not up-regulate Foxp3 in the absence of activation stimuli. To investigate the function of these cells, we performed an in vitro suppression assay by culturing CD4+CD25+ T cells untreated or pre-treated with CT with anti-CD3 mAbs-stimulated autologous PBMC. We found that CT enhances the inhibitory function of CD4+CD25+ T cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production are strongly inhibited by CD4+CD25+ T cells pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents. Furthermore, we found that CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents induce the up-regulation of CD80 and CD86 co-stimulatory molecules on immature dendritic cells (DCs in the absence of antigenic stimulation, however without leading to full DC maturation. These data show that the increase of intracellular cAMP modulates the phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T cells.

  5. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    KAUST Repository

    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Prince, S

    2009-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular

  6. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in a Changing Nuclear Regulatory Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illizastigui, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    The paper addresses the approach followed by the Cuban National Center for Nuclear Safety for the management of current and new competences of its regulatory staff with the aim of allowing those staff to effectively fulfill their core regulatory functions. The approach is realized through an Integrated System for Competence Building, which is based on the IAEA recommendations, shown to be effective in ensuring the necessary competence in the relevant areas. In the author’s opinion, competence of the regulatory staff in the area of human and organizational factors is of paramount importance and needs to be further strengthened in order to be able to assess safety performance at the facilities and detect early signs of deteriorating safety performance. The former is defined by the author as the core regulatory function “Analysis” which covers the entire spectrum of assessment tasks carried out by the regulatory staff to: a) detect declining safety performance, b) diagnose latent weaknesses (root causes) and c) make effective safety culture interventions. The author suggests that competence associated with the fulfillment of the analysis function is distinctly identified and dealt with separately in the current system of managing regulatory competence. (author)

  7. Defect production in simulated cascades: cascade quenching and short-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Defect production in high energy displacement cascades has been modeled using the computer code MARLOWE to generate the cascades and the stochastic computer code ALSOME to simulate the cascade quenching and short-term annealing of isolated cascades. The quenching is accomplished by using ALSOME with exaggerated values for defect mobilities and critical reaction distanes for recombination and clustering, which are in effect until the number of defect pairs is equal to the value determined from resistivity experiments at 4K. Then normal mobilities and reaction distances are used during short-term annealing to a point representative of Stage III recovery. Effects of cascade interactions at low fluences are also being investigated. The quenching parameter values were empirically determined for 30 keV cascades. The results agree well with experimental information throughout the range from 1 keV to 100 keV. Even after quenching and short-term annealing the high energy cascades behave as a collection of lower energy subcascades and lobes. Cascades generated in a crystal having thermal displacements were found to be in better agreement with experiments after quenching and annealing than those generated in a non-thermal crystal

  8. Efficient network reconstruction from dynamical cascades identifies small-world topology of neuronal avalanches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinisa Pajevic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascading activity is commonly found in complex systems with directed interactions such as metabolic networks, neuronal networks, or disease spreading in social networks. Substantial insight into a system's organization can be obtained by reconstructing the underlying functional network architecture from the observed activity cascades. Here we focus on Bayesian approaches and reduce their computational demands by introducing the Iterative Bayesian (IB and Posterior Weighted Averaging (PWA methods. We introduce a special case of PWA, cast in nonparametric form, which we call the normalized count (NC algorithm. NC efficiently reconstructs random and small-world functional network topologies and architectures from subcritical, critical, and supercritical cascading dynamics and yields significant improvements over commonly used correlation methods. With experimental data, NC identified a functional and structural small-world topology and its corresponding traffic in cortical networks with neuronal avalanche dynamics.

  9. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  10. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  11. A BMP-mediated transcriptional cascade involving Cash1 and Tlx-3 specifies first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbruch, Amata; Ma, Grace; Ballermann, Mark A; Tumova, Katerina; Liu, Dan; Cairine Logan, C

    2005-07-01

    The divergent homeobox-containing transcription factor, Tlx-3 (also known as Hox11L2/Rnx), is required for proper formation of first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing vertebrate brainstem. To date, however, the inductive signals and transcriptional regulatory cascade underlying their development are poorly understood. We previously isolated the chick Tlx-3 homologue and showed it is expressed early (i.e. beginning at HH15) in distinct subcomponents of both the trigeminal/solitary and vestibular nuclei. Here we show via in vivo rhombomere inversions that expression of Tlx-3 is under control of local environmental signals. Our RNA in situ analysis shows expression of the BMP-specific receptor, Bmpr-1b, correlates well with Tlx-3. Furthermore, manipulation of the BMP signaling pathway in vivo via electroporation of expression vectors encoding either BMP or NOGGIN coupled with MASH1 gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that a BMP-mediated transcriptional cascade involving Cash1 and Tlx-3 specifies first-order relay sensory neurons in the developing brainstem. Notably, high-level Noggin misexpression results in an increase in newly differentiated Tlx-3+ neurons that correlates with a corresponding increase in the number of Calretinin+ neurons in vestibular nuclei at later developmental stages strongly suggesting that Tlx-3, in addition to being required for proper formation of somatic as well as visceral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and solitary nuclei, respectively, is sufficient for proper formation of special somatic sensory neurons in vestibular nuclei.

  12. Novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells by coupling allergoids to nonoxidized mannan enhance allergen uptake and induce functional regulatory T cells through programmed death ligand 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Sofía; Soria, Irene; Cirauqui, Cristina; Cases, Bárbara; Manzano, Ana I; Diez-Rivero, Carmen M; Reche, Pedro A; López-Relaño, Juan; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Subiza, Javier; Casanovas, Miguel; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Subiza, José Luis; Palomares, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative treatment for allergy. AIT faces pitfalls related to efficacy, security, duration, and patient compliance. Novel vaccines overcoming such inconveniences are in demand. We sought to study the immunologic mechanisms of action for novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells (DCs) generated by coupling glutaraldehyde-polymerized grass pollen allergoids to nonoxidized mannan (PM) compared with glutaraldehyde-polymerized allergoids (P) or native grass pollen extracts (N). Skin prick tests and basophil activation tests with N, P, or PM were performed in patients with grass pollen allergy. IgE-blocking experiments, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, cocultures, suppression assays, real-time quantitative PCR, ELISAs, and ELISpot assays were performed to assess allergen capture by human DCs and T-cell responses. BALB/c mice were immunized with PM, N, or P. Antibody levels, cytokine production by splenocytes, and splenic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells were quantified. Experiments with oxidized PM were also performed. PM displays in vivo hypoallergenicity, induces potent blocking antibodies, and is captured by human DCs much more efficiently than N or P by mechanisms depending on mannose receptor- and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin-mediated internalization. PM endorses human DCs to generate functional FOXP3(+) Treg cells through programmed death ligand 1. Immunization of mice with PM induces a shift to nonallergic responses and increases the frequency of splenic FOXP3(+) Treg cells. Mild oxidation impairs these effects in human subjects and mice, demonstrating the essential role of preserving the carbohydrate structure of mannan. Allergoids conjugated to nonoxidized mannan represent suitable vaccines for AIT. Our findings might also be of the utmost relevance to development of therapeutic interventions in other immune tolerance-related diseases. Copyright

  13. Optimization of codon composition and regulatory elements for expression of human insulin like growth factor-1 in transgenic chloroplasts and evaluation of structural identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, Henry; Ruiz, Gricel; Denes, Bela; Sandberg, Laurence; Langridge, William

    2009-04-03

    Transgenic chloroplasts are potential bioreactors for recombinant protein production, especially for achievement of high levels of protein expression and proper folding. Production of therapeutic proteins in leaves provides transgene containment by elimination of reproductive structures. Therefore, in this study, human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 is expressed in transgenic chloroplasts for evaluation of structural identity and function. Expression of the synthetic Insulin like Growth Factor 1 gene (IGF-1s, 60% AT) was observed in transformed E. coli. However, no native IGF-1 gene (IGF-1n, 41% AT) product was detected in the western blots in E. coli. Site-specific integration of the transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome was confirmed after transformation using PCR. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the transgenic lines were homoplasmic. The transgenic plant lines had IGF-1s expression levels of 11.3% of total soluble protein (TSP). The IGF-1n plants contained 9.5% TSP as IGF-1n, suggesting that the chloroplast translation machinery is more flexible than E. coli in codon preference and usage. The expression of IGF-1 was increased up to 32% TSP under continuous illumination by the chloroplast light regulatory elements. IgG-Sepharose affinity column chromatographic separation of Z domain containing chloroplast derived IGF-1 protein, single and two dimensional electrophoresis methods and mass spectrometer analysis confirmed the identity of human IGF-1 in transgenic chloroplasts. Two spots analyzed from 2-D focusing/phoresis acrylamide gel showed the correct amino acid sequence of human IGF-1 and the S. aureus Z-tag. Cell proliferation assays in human HU-3 cells demonstrated the biological activity of chloroplast derived IGF-1 even in the presence of the S. aureus Z tag. This study demonstrates that the human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 expressed in transgenic chloroplasts is identical to the native protein and is fully functional. The ability to use plant

  14. Optimization of codon composition and regulatory elements for expression of human insulin like growth factor-1 in transgenic chloroplasts and evaluation of structural identity and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandberg Laurence

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic chloroplasts are potential bioreactors for recombinant protein production, especially for achievement of high levels of protein expression and proper folding. Production of therapeutic proteins in leaves provides transgene containment by elimination of reproductive structures. Therefore, in this study, human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 is expressed in transgenic chloroplasts for evaluation of structural identity and function. Results Expression of the synthetic Insulin like Growth Factor 1 gene (IGF-1s, 60% AT was observed in transformed E. coli. However, no native IGF-1 gene (IGF-1n, 41% AT product was detected in the western blots in E. coli. Site-specific integration of the transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome was confirmed after transformation using PCR. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the transgenic lines were homoplasmic. The transgenic plant lines had IGF-1s expression levels of 11.3% of total soluble protein (TSP. The IGF-1n plants contained 9.5% TSP as IGF-1n, suggesting that the chloroplast translation machinery is more flexible than E. coli in codon preference and usage. The expression of IGF-1 was increased up to 32% TSP under continuous illumination by the chloroplast light regulatory elements. IgG-Sepharose affinity column chromatographic separation of Z domain containing chloroplast derived IGF-1 protein, single and two dimensional electrophoresis methods and mass spectrometer analysis confirmed the identity of human IGF-1 in transgenic chloroplasts. Two spots analyzed from 2-D focusing/phoresis acrylamide gel showed the correct amino acid sequence of human IGF-1 and the S. aureus Z-tag. Cell proliferation assays in human HU-3 cells demonstrated the biological activity of chloroplast derived IGF-1 even in the presence of the S. aureus Z tag. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 expressed in transgenic chloroplasts is identical to the native

  15. Influence of interface roughness in quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivas, K. A.; Winge, D. O.; Franckié, M.; Wacker, A.

    2015-01-01

    We use a numerical model based on non-equilibrium Green's functions to investigate the influence of interface roughness (IFR) scattering in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. We confirm that IFR is an important phenomenon that affects both current and gain. The simulations indicate that IFR causes a leakage current that transfers electrons from the upper to the lower laser state. In certain cases, this current can greatly reduce gain. In addition, individual interfaces and their impact on the renormalized single particle energies are studied and shown to give both blue- and red-shifts of the gain spectrum

  16. Joint state and parameter estimation for a class of cascade systems: Application to a hemodynamic model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we address a special case of state and parameter estimation, where the system can be put on a cascade form allowing to estimate the state components and the set of unknown parameters separately. Inspired by the nonlinear Balloon hemodynamic model for functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging problem, we propose a hierarchical approach. The system is divided into two subsystems in cascade. The state and input are first estimated from a noisy measured signal using an adaptive observer. The obtained input is then used to estimate the parameters of a linear system using the modulating functions method. Some numerical results are presented to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Non-spill control squared cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Suemori, Nobuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To reduce a mixed loss thus enhancing separating efficiency by the provision of a simple arrangement wherein a reflux portion in a conventional spill control squared cascade is replaced by a special stage including centrifugal separators. Structure: Steps in the form of a square cascade, in which a plurality of centrifugal separators are connected by pipe lines, are accumulated in multistage fashion to form a squared cascade. Between the adjoining steps is disposed a special stage including a centrifugal separator which receives both lean flow from the upper step and rich flow from the lower step. The centrifugal separator in the special stage has its rich side connected to the upper step and its lean side connected to the lower step. Special stages are each disposed at the upper side of the uppermost step and at the lower side of the lowermost step. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Sample Selection for Training Cascade Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vállez, Noelia; Deniz, Oscar; Bueno, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Automatic detection systems usually require large and representative training datasets in order to obtain good detection and false positive rates. Training datasets are such that the positive set has few samples and/or the negative set should represent anything except the object of interest. In this respect, the negative set typically contains orders of magnitude more images than the positive set. However, imbalanced training databases lead to biased classifiers. In this paper, we focus our attention on a negative sample selection method to properly balance the training data for cascade detectors. The method is based on the selection of the most informative false positive samples generated in one stage to feed the next stage. The results show that the proposed cascade detector with sample selection obtains on average better partial AUC and smaller standard deviation than the other compared cascade detectors.

  19. Sample Selection for Training Cascade Detectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Vállez

    Full Text Available Automatic detection systems usually require large and representative training datasets in order to obtain good detection and false positive rates. Training datasets are such that the positive set has few samples and/or the negative set should represent anything except the object of interest. In this respect, the negative set typically contains orders of magnitude more images than the positive set. However, imbalanced training databases lead to biased classifiers. In this paper, we focus our attention on a negative sample selection method to properly balance the training data for cascade detectors. The method is based on the selection of the most informative false positive samples generated in one stage to feed the next stage. The results show that the proposed cascade detector with sample selection obtains on average better partial AUC and smaller standard deviation than the other compared cascade detectors.

  20. Multilevel Inverter by Cascading Industrial VSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the modularity concept applied to medium-voltage adjustable speed drives is addressed. First, the single-phase cascaded voltage-source inverter that uses series connection of IGBT H-bridge modules with isolated dc-buses is presented. Next, a novel three-phase cascaded voltage......-source inverter that uses three IGBT triphase inverter modules along with an output transformer to obtain a 3 p.u. multilevel output voltage is introduced. The system yields in high-quality multistep voltage with up to 4 levels and low dv/dt, balanced operation of the inverter modules, each supplying a third...... of the motor rated kVA. The concept of using cascaded inverters is further extended to a new modular motor-modular inverter system where the motor winding connections are reconnected into several three-phase groups, either six-lead or 12-lead connection according to the voltage level, each powered...

  1. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trophic redundancy reduces vulnerability to extinction cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Dirk; Thébault, Elisa; Kehoe, Rachel; Frank van Veen, F J

    2018-03-06

    Current species extinction rates are at unprecedentedly high levels. While human activities can be the direct cause of some extinctions, it is becoming increasingly clear that species extinctions themselves can be the cause of further extinctions, since species affect each other through the network of ecological interactions among them. There is concern that the simplification of ecosystems, due to the loss of species and ecological interactions, increases their vulnerability to such secondary extinctions. It is predicted that more complex food webs will be less vulnerable to secondary extinctions due to greater trophic redundancy that can buffer against the effects of species loss. Here, we demonstrate in a field experiment with replicated plant-insect communities, that the probability of secondary extinctions is indeed smaller in food webs that include trophic redundancy. Harvesting one species of parasitoid wasp led to secondary extinctions of other, indirectly linked, species at the same trophic level. This effect was markedly stronger in simple communities than for the same species within a more complex food web. We show that this is due to functional redundancy in the more complex food webs and confirm this mechanism with a food web simulation model by highlighting the importance of the presence and strength of trophic links providing redundancy to those links that were lost. Our results demonstrate that biodiversity loss, leading to a reduction in redundant interactions, can increase the vulnerability of ecosystems to secondary extinctions, which, when they occur, can then lead to further simplification and run-away extinction cascades. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Cascade of negative muons in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylas, V.R.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the evolution of a negative muon captured in an atom and the formalism of energy loss associated with the muonic atom. The principal goals are to calculate reliability the muon x-ray intensities, given the initial population of the muonic orbits, to invert the problem and deduce the initial distribution from the x-ray intensities, to provide a reasonably simple and convenient tool to correlate observations, and finally, to systematize some questions of theoretical interest. The early part of the history of the muon in matter, including the atomic capture and classical phase of the atomic cascade are reviewed. In the quantal treatment of the transition rates, both radiative and electron Auger transitions are considered. In general, multipolarities up to E3 and K, L, and M electronic shells are fully investigated. Multipole radiation is treated in the conventinal way and pesents no special problems. Magnetic type transitions between states with different principal quantum numbers are shown to be small. Auger electron ejection rates are more complicated and several approximations have been adopted. The basic results have been computed in terms of elemetary functions. In the Auger transitions we have shown that magnetic multipoles can be safety neglected. The relative sizes of the rates corresponding to different multipoles are systematically studied. A comparison of results is made with atomic photoelectric effect data and with the nuclear internal conversion coefficients. A general agreement is found, except around shell thresholds. The existing data of muonic x-ray intensities in iron and thallium are analyzed in a systematic way. It is found that for Fe the initial l-distribution is almost flat, whereas that for T1 is weighted towards the high l values, sharper than statistical. As a result of the investigations and in order to make our findings usable, a computer program has been developed. 36 references

  4. Regulatory pathways for vaccines for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstien, Julie; Belgharbi, Lahouari

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines that are designed for use only in developing countries face regulatory hurdles that may restrict their use. There are two primary reasons for this: most regulatory authorities are set up to address regulation of products for use only within their jurisdictions and regulatory authorities in developing countries traditionally have been considered weak. Some options for regulatory pathways for such products have been identified: licensing in the country of manufacture, file review by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency on behalf of WHO, export to a country with a competent national regulatory authority (NRA) that could handle all regulatory functions for the developing country market, shared manufacturing and licensing in a developing country with competent manufacturing and regulatory capacity, and use of a contracted independent entity for global regulatory approval. These options have been evaluated on the basis of five criteria: assurance of all regulatory functions for the life of the product, appropriateness of epidemiological assessment, applicability to products no longer used in the domestic market of the manufacturing country, reduction of regulatory risk for the manufacturer, and existing rules and regulations for implementation. No one option satisfies all criteria. For all options, national infrastructures (including the underlying regulatory legislative framework, particularly to formulate and implement local evidence-based vaccine policy) must be developed. WHO has led work to develop this capacity with some success. The paper outlines additional areas of action required by the international community to assure development and use of vaccines needed for the developing world. PMID:15042235

  5. Cascade Processes in Muonic Hydrogen Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M. P.; Men'Shikov, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    The QCMC scheme created earlier for cascade calculations in heavy hadronic atoms of hydrogen isotopes has been modified and applied to the study of cascade processes in the μp muonic hydrogen atoms. The distribution of μp atoms over kinetic energies has been obtained and the yields of K-series X-rays per one stopped muon have been calculated.Comparison with experimental data indicated directly that for muonic and pionic atoms new types of non-radiative transitions are essential, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic, antiprotonic, etc.) atoms. These processes have been considered and their probabilities have been estimated.

  6. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  7. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Ben

    2017-08-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  8. Interferometric modulation of quantum cascade interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Stefano; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2018-05-01

    We consider many-body quantum systems dissipatively coupled by a cascade network, i.e., a setup in which interactions are mediated by unidirectional environmental modes propagating through a linear optical interferometer. In particular we are interested in the possibility of inducing different effective interactions by properly engineering an external dissipative network of beam splitters and phase shifters. In this work we first derive the general structure of the master equation for a symmetric class of translation-invariant cascade networks. Then we show how, by tuning the parameters of the interferometer, one can exploit interference effects to tailor a large variety of many-body interactions.

  9. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Zbijewski, W; Gang, G; Stayman, J W; Taguchi, K; Lundqvist, M; Fredenberg, E; Carrino, J A; Siewerdsen, J H

    2014-10-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1-7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at which the MTF falls to a value of

  10. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f 50 (spatial-frequency at

  11. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E. [Philips Healthcare, Solna 171 41 (Sweden); Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  12. Quality assurance within regulatory bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The IAEA directed extensive efforts during the years 1991 to 1995 to the integral revision of all NUSS quality assurance publications, which were approved and issued as Safety Series No.50-C/SG-Q, Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and other Nuclear Installations (1996). When these quality assurance publications were developed, their prime focus was on requirements against which work performed by the licensees could be measured and assessed by the regulatory bodies. In this way, they only helped to facilitate the functions of regulators. No requirements or recommendations were provided on how the regulators should ensure the effective implementation of their own activities. The present publication is a first attempt to collect, integrate and offer available experience to directly support performance of regulatory activities. It presents a comprehensive compilation on the application of quality assurance principles and methods by regulatory bodies to their activities. The aim is consistent good performance of regulatory activities through a systematic approach

  13. Improvement of livestock breeding strategies using physiologic and functional genomic information of the muscle regulatory factors gene family for skeletal muscle development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Soumillon, A.

    2001-01-01

    A defined number of skeletal muscle fibers are formed in two separate waves during prenatal development, while postnatal growth is restricted to hypertrophic muscle fiber growth. The genes of the MRF (muscle regulatory factors) gene family, consisting of 4 structurally related transcription factors

  14. IL-15 Renders Conventional Lymphocytes Resistant to Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells through Activation of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Melika Ben; Hmida, Nadia Belhadj; Moes, Nicolette; Buyse, Sophie; Abdeladhim, Maha; Louzir, Hechmi; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    IL-15 drives chronic inflammation in several human diseases. We have recently shown that IL-15 inhibits the immunosuppressive effects of TGF-beta through blockage of the Smad3-signaling pathway. Data pointing to reciprocal interactions between TGF-beta and CD4(+) regulatory T cells led us to

  15. A flexible regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, T.

    2000-01-01

    Regulatory reform of the Finnish electricity market meant opening up potentially competitive parts of the electricity sector to competition and eliminating all unnecessary forms of regulation covering generation, wholesale supply, retail supply, and foreign trade in electricity. New types of control and regulatory mechanisms and institutions were set up for those parts of the electricity industry that were excluded from competition, such as network operations. Network activities now have to be licensed, whereas no licence is needed for generation or supply. A new sector-specific regulatory authority was established in 1995 to coincide with the implementation of the Electricity Market Act, known as the Electricity Market Authority. This is responsible for regulating network activities and retail supply to captive customers. The core function of the authority, which employs some 14 people, is to promote the smooth operation of the Finnish electricity market and to oversee the implementation of the Electricity Market Act and its provisions. Its most important duties are linked to overseeing the process by which network companies price their electricity. As price regulation no longer exists, all the companies in the electricity sector set their tariffs independently, even network companies. The job of controlling the pricing of network services is handed by the Electricity Market Authority, following the principles of competition control. Pricing control takes place ex post - after a pricing system has been adopted by a company and concentrates on individual cases and companies. There is no ex ante system of setting or approving prices and tariffs by the regulator. The tariffs and pricing of network services can be evaluated, however, by both the Electricity Market Authority and the Finnish Competition Authority, which have overlapping powers as regards the pricing of network activities. The Finnish regulatory framework can be described as a system of light

  16. Cascading effects of overfishing marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Carpenter, S.; Young, de B.

    2005-01-01

    Profound indirect ecosystem effects of overfishing have been shown for coastal systems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A new study from the ecosystem off the Canadian east coast now reveals that the elimination of large predatory fish can also cause marked cascading effects on the pelagic food

  17. Plant MAPK cascades: Just rapid signaling modules?

    KAUST Repository

    Boudsocq, Marie; Danquah, Agyemang; Zé licourt, Axel de; Hirt, Heribert; Colcombet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    rapid MAPK activation, we showed that the activation of the new MAPK module is delayed and relies on the MAP3K protein synthesis. In this addendum, we discuss the role of this original and unexpected activation mechanism of MAPK cascades which suggests

  18. Computer simulation of high energy displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology developed for modeling many aspects of high energy displacement cascades with molecular level computer simulations is reviewed. The initial damage state is modeled in the binary collision approximation (using the MARLOWE computer code), and the subsequent disposition of the defects within a cascade is modeled with a Monte Carlo annealing simulation (the ALSOME code). There are few adjustable parameters, and none are set to physically unreasonable values. The basic configurations of the simulated high energy cascades in copper, i.e., the number, size and shape of damage regions, compare well with observations, as do the measured numbers of residual defects and the fractions of freely migrating defects. The success of these simulations is somewhat remarkable, given the relatively simple models of defects and their interactions that are employed. The reason for this success is that the behavior of the defects is very strongly influenced by their initial spatial distributions, which the binary collision approximation adequately models. The MARLOWE/ALSOME system, with input from molecular dynamics and experiments, provides a framework for investigating the influence of high energy cascades on microstructure evolution. (author)

  19. Energy Cascade in Fermi-Pasta Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponno, A.; Bambusi, D.

    We show that, for long-wavelength initial conditions, the FPU dynamics is described, up to a certain time, by two KdV-like equations, which represent the resonant Hamiltonian normal form of the system. The energy cascade taking place in the system is then quantitatively characterized by arguments of dimensional analysis based on such equations.

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1990-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of cascades in Cu and Ni with primary-knock-on energies up to 5 keV and lattice temperatures in the range 0 K--700 K are described. Interatomic forces were represented by either the Gibson II (Cu) or Johnson-Erginsoy (Ni) potentials in most of this work, although some simulations using ''Embedded Atom Method'' potentials, e.g., for threshold events in Ni 3 Al, are also presented. The results indicate that the primary state of damage produced by displacement cascades is controlled by two phenomena, replacement collision sequences during the collisional phase of the cascade and local melting during the thermal spike. As expected, the collisional phase is rather similar in Cu and Ni, however, the thermal spike is of longer duration and has a more pronounced influence in Cu than Ni. When the ambient temperature of the lattice is increased, the melt zones are observed to both increase in size and cool more slowly. This has the effect of reducing defect production and enhancing atomic mixing and disordering. The implications of these results for defect production, cascade collapse, atomic disordering will be discussed. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Impedance interactions in bidirectional cascaded converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Yanjun; Loh, Poh Chiang; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    A cascaded converter is built by connecting one elementary converter to another. Output impedance of one converter will therefore interact with input impedance of the other converter. This interaction will change when power flow reverses. To compare this difference, an investigation is performed...

  2. Forecasting Social Unrest Using Activity Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Jose; Korkmaz, Gizem; Kuhlman, Chris J; Marathe, Achla; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Vullikanti, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Social unrest is endemic in many societies, and recent news has drawn attention to happenings in Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Civilian populations mobilize, sometimes spontaneously and sometimes in an organized manner, to raise awareness of key issues or to demand changes in governing or other organizational structures. It is of key interest to social scientists and policy makers to forecast civil unrest using indicators observed on media such as Twitter, news, and blogs. We present an event forecasting model using a notion of activity cascades in Twitter (proposed by Gonzalez-Bailon et al., 2011) to predict the occurrence of protests in three countries of Latin America: Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The basic assumption is that the emergence of a suitably detected activity cascade is a precursor or a surrogate to a real protest event that will happen "on the ground." Our model supports the theoretical characterization of large cascades using spectral properties and uses properties of detected cascades to forecast events. Experimental results on many datasets, including the recent June 2013 protests in Brazil, demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  3. Forecasting Social Unrest Using Activity Cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Cadena

    Full Text Available Social unrest is endemic in many societies, and recent news has drawn attention to happenings in Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Civilian populations mobilize, sometimes spontaneously and sometimes in an organized manner, to raise awareness of key issues or to demand changes in governing or other organizational structures. It is of key interest to social scientists and policy makers to forecast civil unrest using indicators observed on media such as Twitter, news, and blogs. We present an event forecasting model using a notion of activity cascades in Twitter (proposed by Gonzalez-Bailon et al., 2011 to predict the occurrence of protests in three countries of Latin America: Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The basic assumption is that the emergence of a suitably detected activity cascade is a precursor or a surrogate to a real protest event that will happen "on the ground." Our model supports the theoretical characterization of large cascades using spectral properties and uses properties of detected cascades to forecast events. Experimental results on many datasets, including the recent June 2013 protests in Brazil, demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  4. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  5. The Attention Cascade Model and Attentional Blink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shui-I

    2008-01-01

    An attention cascade model is proposed to account for attentional blinks in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli. Data were collected using single characters in a single RSVP stream at 10 Hz [Shih, S., & Reeves, A. (2007). "Attentional capture in rapid serial visual presentation." "Spatial Vision", 20(4), 301-315], and single words,…

  6. Cascaded FSO-VLC Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Akash; Sharma, Nikhil; Garg, Parul; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    The proposed cascaded free space optics (FSO)-visible light communication (VLC) system consists of multiple VLC access points which caters the end users connected via a decode and forward (DF) relay to the FSO backhaul link. The FSO link is assumed

  7. A simple method for potential flow simulation of cascades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vortex panel method to simulate potential flow in cascades is presented. The cascade ... The fluid loading on the blades, such as the normal force and pitching moment, may ... of such discrete infinite array singularities along the blade surface.

  8. [The Influence of the Functional State of Brain Regulatory Structures on the Programming, Selective Regulation and Control of Cognitive Activity in Children. Report I: Neuropsychological and EEG Analysis of Age-Related Changes in Brain Regulatory Functions in Children Aged 9-12 Years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, A; Machinskaya, R I; Lomakin, D I

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes in brain regulatory functions in children aged from 9 to 12 years with typical development were studied by means of neuropsychological and EEG analysis. The participants of the study were 107 children without learning difficulties and behavior deviations; they were devided into three groups (9-10, 10-11 and 11-12 years). The neuropsychological tests revealed nonlinear age-related changes in different executive brain functions. The group of 10-11-year-old children showed better results in programming, in- hibition of impulsive reactions and in the perception of socially relevant information than the group of 9-10- year-old children. At the same time, these children had more difficulties with selective activity regulation as compared with the younger group. The difficulties were mainly caused by switching from one element of the program to another and by retention of learned sequence of actions. These children also showed a lower level of motivation for task performance. The children aged 11-12 years had less difficulties with selective activity regulation; however, impulsive behavior was more frequent; these children also had a higher level of task performance motivation than in children aged 10-11 years. The analysis of resting state EEG revealed age-related differences in deviated EEG patterns associated with non-optimal functioning of fronto-thalamic system and hypothalamic structures. The incidence of these two types of EEG patterns was significantly higher in children aged 10-11 years as compared with children aged 9-10 years. The EEG of the groups of 10-11 and 11-12-years-old children did not show any significant differences.

  9. Aspects of microstructure evolution under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Trinkaus, H.; Barashev, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    The conventional theoretical models describing the damage accumulation, particularly void swelling, under cascade damage conditions do not include treatments of important features such as intracascade clustering of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and one-dimensional glide of SIA clusters produced in the cascades. Recently, it has been suggested that the problem can be treated in terms of 'production bias' and one-dimensional glide of small SIA clusters. In the earlier treatments a 'mean size approximation' was used for the defect clusters and cavities evolving during irradiation. In the present work, we use the 'size distribution function' to determine the dose dependence of sink strengths, vacancy supersaturation and void swelling as a function of dislocation density and grain size within the framework of production bias model and glide of small SIA clusters. In this work, the role of the sessile-glissile loop transformation (due to vacancy supersaturation) on the damage accumulation behaviour is included. The calculated results on void swelling are compared with the experimental results as well as the results of the earlier calculations using the 'mean size approximation'. The calculated results agree very well with the experimental results. (orig.)

  10. Particle fluxes in atomic collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sckerl, B.W.; Sigmund, P.; Vicanek, M.

    1996-01-01

    The flux of recoil atoms in atomic collision cascades induced by an ion beam or another source of energetic particles in a material is known to approach isotropy at kinetic energies far below the beam energy. A variety of irradiation effects can be explained satisfactorily on the basis of an isotropic particle flux, but significant deviations from this simple behavior are known to exist. While numerous examples have been studied by numerical simulation of cascade processes, the systematics is, by and large, unknown. The present study aims at general scaling properties and estimates of the magnitude of moderate deviations from isotropy and their spatial dependence for a wide range of beam and material parameters. Anisotropies introduced by crystal structure are ignored. Although it is well established that cascade anisotropy is related to the momentum of beam particles, previous attempts to quantify this relation have failed. We have found that there are two leading correction terms to the isotropic particle flux, a well-known term centered around the beam direction as a symmetry axis and a new term proportional to the gradient of the deposited-energy density. As a general rule the two contributions are either both significant or both negligible. Specific situations in which the gradient term dominates are, however, of considerable interest in applications. The parameters which characterize the anisotropy of collision cascades also determine the deposition of momentum, but the connection is less straightforward than asserted hitherto. General principles are first illustrated on the specific case of elastic-collision cascades under self-bombardment which contains the essentials. Thereafter several generalizations are made, including atomic binding forces and inelasticity as well as allowance for multicomponent materials. Application areas in mixing and sputtering are outlined. (au) 58 refs

  11. Cascading Generative Adversarial Networks for Targeted

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdi, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Abundance of labelled data played a crucial role in the recent developments in computer vision, but that faces problems like scalability and transferability to the wild. One alternative approach is to utilize the data without labels, i.e. unsupervised learning, in learning valuable information and put it in use to tackle vision problems. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have gained momentum for their ability to model image distributions in unsupervised manner. They learn to emulate the training set and that enables sampling from that domain and using the knowledge learned for useful applications. Several methods proposed enhancing GANs, including regularizing the loss with some feature matching. We seek to push GANs beyond the data in the training and try to explore unseen territory in the image manifold. We first propose a new regularizer for GAN based on K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) selective feature matching to a target set Y in high-level feature space, during the adversarial training of GAN on the base set X, and we call this novel model K-GAN. We show that minimizing the added term follows from cross-entropy minimization between the distributions of GAN and set Y. Then, we introduce a cascaded framework for GANs that try to address the task of imagining a new distribution that combines the base set X and target set Y by cascading sampling GANs with translation GANs, and we dub the cascade of such GANs as the Imaginative Adversarial Network (IAN). Several cascades are trained on a collected dataset Zoo-Faces and generated innovative samples are shown, including from K-GAN cascade. We conduct an objective and subjective evaluation for different IAN setups in the addressed task of generating innovative samples and we show the effect of regularizing GAN on different scores. We conclude with some useful applications for these IANs, like multi-domain manifold traversing.

  12. Cascading Generative Adversarial Networks for Targeted

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdi, Abdullah

    2018-04-09

    Abundance of labelled data played a crucial role in the recent developments in computer vision, but that faces problems like scalability and transferability to the wild. One alternative approach is to utilize the data without labels, i.e. unsupervised learning, in learning valuable information and put it in use to tackle vision problems. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have gained momentum for their ability to model image distributions in unsupervised manner. They learn to emulate the training set and that enables sampling from that domain and using the knowledge learned for useful applications. Several methods proposed enhancing GANs, including regularizing the loss with some feature matching. We seek to push GANs beyond the data in the training and try to explore unseen territory in the image manifold. We first propose a new regularizer for GAN based on K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) selective feature matching to a target set Y in high-level feature space, during the adversarial training of GAN on the base set X, and we call this novel model K-GAN. We show that minimizing the added term follows from cross-entropy minimization between the distributions of GAN and set Y. Then, we introduce a cascaded framework for GANs that try to address the task of imagining a new distribution that combines the base set X and target set Y by cascading sampling GANs with translation GANs, and we dub the cascade of such GANs as the Imaginative Adversarial Network (IAN). Several cascades are trained on a collected dataset Zoo-Faces and generated innovative samples are shown, including from K-GAN cascade. We conduct an objective and subjective evaluation for different IAN setups in the addressed task of generating innovative samples and we show the effect of regularizing GAN on different scores. We conclude with some useful applications for these IANs, like multi-domain manifold traversing.

  13. [Dynamic hierarchy of regulatory peptides. Structure of the induction relations of regulators as the target for therapeutic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, S V; Miasoedov, N F

    2012-01-01

    Based on the database information (literature period 1970-2010 gg.) on the effects of regulatory peptides (RP) and non-peptide neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, norepi-nephrine, acetylcholine) it was analyzed of possible cascade processes of endogenous regulators. It was found that the entire continuum of RP and mediators is a chaotic soup of the ordered three-level compartments. Such a dynamic functional hierarchy of endogenous regulators allows to create start-up and corrective tasks for a variety of physiological functions. Some examples of static and dynamic patterns of induction processes of RP and mediators (that regulate the states of anxiety, depression, learning and memory, feeding behavior, reproductive processes, etc.) are considered.

  14. Cascade Analysis of a Floating Wind Turbine Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliassen, Lene; Jakobsen, Jasna B; Knauer, Andreas; Nielsen, Finn Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Mounting a wind turbine on a floating foundation introduces more complexity to the aerodynamic loading. The floater motion contains a wide range of frequencies. To study some of the basic dynamic load effect on the blades due to these motions, a two-dimensional cascade approach, combined with a potential vortex method, is used. This is an alternative method to study the aeroelastic behavior of wind turbines that is different from the traditional blade element momentum method. The analysis tool demands little computational power relative to a full three dimensional vortex method, and can handle unsteady flows. When using the cascade plane, a ''cut'' is made at a section of the wind turbine blade. The flow is viewed parallel to the blade axis at this cut. The cascade model is commonly used for analysis of turbo machineries. Due to the simplicity of the code it requires little computational resources, however it has limitations in its validity. It can only handle two-dimensional potential flow, i.e. including neither three-dimensional effects, such as the tip loss effect, nor boundary layers and stall effects are modeled. The computational tool can however be valuable in the overall analysis of floating wind turbines, and evaluation of the rotor control system. A check of the validity of the vortex panel code using an airfoil profile is performed, comparing the variation of the lift force, to the theoretically derived Wagner function. To analyse the floating wind turbine, a floating structure with hub height 90 m is chosen. An axial motion of the rotor is considered

  15. Translating Volcano Hazards Research in the Cascades Into Community Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, J. W.; Driedger, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Research by the science community into volcanic histories and physical processes at Cascade volcanoes in the states of Washington, Oregon, and California has been ongoing for over a century. Eruptions in the 20th century at Lassen Peak and Mount St. Helen demonstrated the active nature of Cascade volcanoes; the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was a defining moment in modern volcanology. The first modern volcano hazards assessments were produced by the USGS for some Cascade volcanoes in the 1960s. A rich scientific literature exists, much of which addresses hazards at these active volcanoes. That said community awareness, planning, and preparation for eruptions generally do not occur as a result of a hazard analyses published in scientific papers, but by direct communication with scientists. Relative to other natural hazards, volcanic eruptions (or large earthquakes, or tsunami) are outside common experience, and the public and many public officials are often surprised to learn of the impacts volcanic eruptions could have on their communities. In the 1980s, the USGS recognized that effective hazard communication and preparedness is a multi-faceted, long-term undertaking and began working with federal, state, and local stakeholders to build awareness and foster community action about volcano hazards. Activities included forming volcano-specific workgroups to develop coordination plans for volcano emergencies; a concerted public outreach campaign; curriculum development and teacher training; technical training for emergency managers and first responders; and development of hazard information that is accessible to non-specialists. Outcomes include broader ownership of volcano hazards as evidenced by bi-national exchanges of emergency managers, community planners, and first responders; development by stakeholders of websites focused on volcano hazards mitigation; and execution of table-top and functional exercises, including evacuation drills by local communities.

  16. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  17. Effects of temperature in binary-collision simulations of high-energy displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1981-10-01

    Several hundred cascades ranging from 1 to 500 keV were generated using the binary collision code MARLOWE for primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with randomly chosen directions in both a non-thermal copper lattice and one having atomic displacements representative of room temperature. To simulate the recombination occurring during localized quenching of the highly excited cascade region, an effective spontaneous recombination radius was applied to reduce the number of defect pairs to be consistent with values extracted from resistivity measurements at 4 0 K. At room temperature fewer widely separated pairs are produced, thus the recombination radius is smaller, however, the recombination radii were found to be independent of energy over the entire energy range investigated for both the cold and room temperature cases. The sizes and other features of the point defect distributions were determined as a function of energy. Differences between cold and room temperature cascade dimensions are small. The room temperature cascades tend to have a greater number of distinct damage regions per cascade, with about the same frequency of widely separated subcascades

  18. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades in Fe-10 at.%Cr binary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.; Svetukhin, V.; Kadochkin, A.; Gaganidze, E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of atomic displacement cascades up to 20 keV has been performed in Fe-10 at.%Cr binary alloy at a temperature of 600 K. The N-body interatomic potentials of Finnis-Sinclair type were used. According to the obtained results the dependence of 'surviving' defects amount is well approximated by power function that coincides with other researchers' results. Obtained cascade efficiency for damage energy in the range from 10 to 20 keV is ∼0.2 NRT that is slightly higher than for pure α-Fe. In post-cascade area Cr fraction in interstitials is in range 2-5% that is essentially lower than Cr content in the base alloy. The results on size and amount of vacancy and interstitial clusters generated in displacement cascades are obtained. For energies of 2 keV and higher the defect cluster average size increases and it is well approximated by a linear dependence on cascade energy both for interstitials and vacancies.

  19. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades in Fe-10 at.%Cr binary alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonchev, M., E-mail: tikhonchev@sv.ulsu.r [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str., 42, Ulyanovsk 432970 (Russian Federation); Joint Stock Company, ' State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors' , 433510 Dimitrovgrad-10 (Russian Federation); Svetukhin, V.; Kadochkin, A. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str., 42, Ulyanovsk 432970 (Russian Federation); Gaganidze, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IMF II, 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation of atomic displacement cascades up to 20 keV has been performed in Fe-10 at.%Cr binary alloy at a temperature of 600 K. The N-body interatomic potentials of Finnis-Sinclair type were used. According to the obtained results the dependence of 'surviving' defects amount is well approximated by power function that coincides with other researchers' results. Obtained cascade efficiency for damage energy in the range from 10 to 20 keV is approx0.2 NRT that is slightly higher than for pure alpha-Fe. In post-cascade area Cr fraction in interstitials is in range 2-5% that is essentially lower than Cr content in the base alloy. The results on size and amount of vacancy and interstitial clusters generated in displacement cascades are obtained. For energies of 2 keV and higher the defect cluster average size increases and it is well approximated by a linear dependence on cascade energy both for interstitials and vacancies.

  20. Distribution of hadron intranuclear cascade for large distance from a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibin, V.L.; Kazarnovskij, M.V.; Serezhnikov, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical solution of the problem of three-component hadron cascade development for large distances from a source is obtained in the framework of a series of simplifying assumptions. It makes possible to understand physical mechanisms of the process studied and to obtain approximate asymptotic expressions for hadron distribution functions

  1. Landscape evaluation of female black bear habitat effectiveness and capability in the North Cascades, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Gaines; Andrea L. Lyons; John F. Lehmkuhl; Kenneth J. Raedeke

    2005-01-01

    We used logistic regression to derive scaled resource selection functions (RSFs) for female black bears at two study areas in the North Cascades Mountains. We tested the hypothesis that the influence of roads would result in potential habitat effectiveness (RSFs without the influence of roads) being greater than realized habitat effectiveness (RSFs with roads). Roads...

  2. An efficient synthesis of isocoumarins via a CuI catalyzed cascade reaction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    3-Alkyl isocoumarins are provided by CuI/amino acid-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction of o-bromo benzoic acids and terminal alkynes and the subsequent additive cyclization. This cascade process allows synthesis of diverse isocoumarins by varying both coupling partners bearing a wide range of functional groups.

  3. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yanjun; Li, Chunquan; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Chunlong; Su, Fei; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it i...

  4. Production bias: A proposed modification of the driving force for void swelling under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.; Garner, F.A.

    1991-11-01

    A new concept of point-defect production as the main driving force for void swelling under cascade damage conditions is proposed. This concept takes into account the recombination and formation of immobile clusters and loops of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade region. The life times of the clusters and loops due to desolution are strong functions of the temperature, as well as their vacancy and interstitial nature. The resulting biased production of free point defects from the internal sources is shown to be a strong driving force for void swelling. The characteristics of void swelling due to production bias are described and compared with experimental results. We conclude that the production bias concept provides a good description of void swelling under cascade damage conditions

  5. Production bias: A proposed modification of the driving force for void swelling under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept of point defect production as the main driving force for void swelling under cascade damage conditions is proposed. This concept takes into account the recombination and formation of immobile clusters and loops of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade region. The lifetimes of the clusters and loops due to desolution are strong functions of the temperature, as well as their vacancy and interstitial nature. The resulting biased production of free point defects from the internal sources is shown to be a strong driving force for void swelling. The characteristics of void swelling due to production bias are described and compared with experimental results. We conclude that the production bias concept provides a good description of void swelling under cascade damage conditions. (orig.)

  6. Social relevance: toward understanding the impact of the individual in an information cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert T.; White, Joshua S.; Fields, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Information Cascades (IC) through a social network occur due to the decision of users to disseminate content. We define this decision process as User Diffusion (UD). IC models typically describe an information cascade by treating a user as a node within a social graph, where a node's reception of an idea is represented by some activation state. The probability of activation then becomes a function of a node's connectedness to other activated nodes as well as, potentially, the history of activation attempts. We enrich this Coarse-Grained User Diffusion (CGUD) model by applying actor type logics to the nodes of the graph. The resulting Fine-Grained User Diffusion (FGUD) model utilizes prior research in actor typing to generate a predictive model regarding the future influence a user will have on an Information Cascade. Furthermore, we introduce a measure of Information Resonance that is used to aid in predictions regarding user behavior.

  7. Pair Cascades and Deathlines in Magnetic Fields with Offset Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of electron-positron pair cascade simulations in a dipole magnetic field whose polar cap is offset from the dipole axis. In such a field geometry, the polar cap is displaced a small fraction of the neutron star radius from the star symmetry axis and the field line radius of curvature is modified. Using the modified parallel electric field near the offset polar cap, we simulate pair cascades to determine the pair deathlines and pair multiplicities as a function of the offset. We find that the pair multiplicity can change dr;unatically with a modest offset, with a significant increase on one side of the polar cap. Lower pair deathlines allow a larger fraction of the pulsar population, that include old and millisecond pulsars, to produce cascades with high multiplicity. The results have some important implications for pulsar particle production, high-energy emission and cosmic-ray contribution.

  8. Cascading second-order nonlinear processes in a lithium niobate-on-insulator microdisk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie; Zheng, Yuanlin; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-09-15

    Whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities are very important in both fundamental science and practical applications, among which on-chip second-order nonlinear microresonators play an important role in integrated photonic functionalities. Here we demonstrate resonant second-harmonic generation (SHG) and cascaded third-harmonic generation (THG) in a lithium niobate-on-insulator (LNOI) microdisk resonator. Efficient SHG in the visible range was obtained with only several mW input powers at telecom wavelengths. THG was also observed through a cascading process, which reveals simultaneous phase matching and strong mode coupling in the resonator. Cascading of second-order nonlinear processes gives rise to an effectively large third-order nonlinearity, which makes on-chip second-order nonlinear microresonators a promising frequency converter for integrated nonlinear photonics.

  9. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    KAUST Repository

    Heckmann, J M

    2009-08-13

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198CG SNP (odds ratio8.6; P0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5?-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198CG SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. As to achieve regulatory action, regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, R.; Encinas, D.

    2014-01-01

    The achievement of the effectiveness in the performance of a nuclear regulatory body has been a permanent challenge in the recent history of nuclear regulation. In the post-Fukushima era this challenge is even more important. This article addresses the subject from two complementary points of view: the characteristics of an effective regulatory body and the regulatory approaches. This work is based on the most recent studies carried out by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, CNRA (OECD/NEA), as well as on the experience of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, CSN, the Spanish regulatory body. Rafael Cid is the representative of CSN in these project: Diego Encinas has participated in the study on regulatory approaches. (Author)

  11. Cascading failure in the wireless sensor scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Ran; Dong, Ming-Ru; Yin, Rong-Rong; Han, Li

    2015-05-01

    In the practical wireless sensor networks (WSNs), the cascading failure caused by a failure node has serious impact on the network performance. In this paper, we deeply research the cascading failure of scale-free topology in WSNs. Firstly, a cascading failure model for scale-free topology in WSNs is studied. Through analyzing the influence of the node load on cascading failure, the critical load triggering large-scale cascading failure is obtained. Then based on the critical load, a control method for cascading failure is presented. In addition, the simulation experiments are performed to validate the effectiveness of the control method. The results show that the control method can effectively prevent cascading failure. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. F2014203239), the Autonomous Research Fund of Young Teacher in Yanshan University (Grant No. 14LGB017) and Yanshan University Doctoral Foundation, China (Grant No. B867).

  12. Invariant mass distributions in cascade decays

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, D J; Raklev, A R

    2006-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the shape of the invariant mass distributions of massless Standard Model endproducts in cascade decays involving massive New Physics (NP) particles, D -> Cc -> Bbc -> Aabc, where the final NP particle A in the cascade is unobserved and where two of the particles a, b, c may be indistinguishable. Knowledge of these expressions can improve the determination of NP parameters at the LHC. The shape formulas are composite, but contain nothing more complicated than logarithms of simple expressions. We study the effects of cuts, final state radiation and detector effects on the distributions through Monte Carlo simulations, using a supersymmetric model as an example. We also consider how one can deal with the width of NP particles and with combinatorics from the misidentification of final state particles. The possible mismeasurements of NP masses through `feet' in the distributions are discussed. Finally, we demonstrate how the effects of different spin configurations can be inclu...

  13. Invariant mass distributions in cascade decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David J.; Osland, Per; Raklev, Are R.

    2006-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the shape of the invariant mass distributions of massless Standard Model endproducts in cascade decays involving massive New Physics (NP) particles, D→Cc→Bbc→Aabc, where the final NP particle A in the cascade is unobserved and where two of the particles a, b, c may be indistinguishable. Knowledge of these expressions can improve the determination of NP parameters at the LHC. The shape formulas are composite, but contain nothing more complicated than logarithms of simple expressions. We study the effects of cuts, final state radiation and detector effects on the distributions through Monte Carlo simulations, using a supersymmetric model as an example. We also consider how one can deal with the width of NP particles and with combinatorics from the misidentification of final state particles. The possible mismeasurements of NP masses through 'feet' in the distributions are discussed. Finally, we demonstrate how the effects of different spin configurations can be included in the distributions

  14. Cascade-based attacks on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2002-12-01

    We live in a modern world supported by large, complex networks. Examples range from financial markets to communication and transportation systems. In many realistic situations the flow of physical quantities in the network, as characterized by the loads on nodes, is important. We show that for such networks where loads can redistribute among the nodes, intentional attacks can lead to a cascade of overload failures, which can in turn cause the entire or a substantial part of the network to collapse. This is relevant for real-world networks that possess a highly heterogeneous distribution of loads, such as the Internet and power grids. We demonstrate that the heterogeneity of these networks makes them particularly vulnerable to attacks in that a large-scale cascade may be triggered by disabling a single key node. This brings obvious concerns on the security of such systems.

  15. Cascade Apartments: Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mattheis, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kunkle, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Howard, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lubliner, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions : 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  16. What happens at the end of the QCD cascades?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1999-01-01

    This is a progress report on recent work done in Lund to describe the final steps in the QCD coherent bremsstrahlung cascades, with particular emphasis on the occurrence of a size parameter c=11/6 in phase space. Two gluons, being interacting vector particles, remain due to helicity conservation effectively apart a distance c, counted in generalised rapidity (a notion which I define in the text but essentially corresponds to rapidity measured along the color flux lines of the field between the gluons). The same size c also occurs in the β-function as a measure of the region, inside which a virtual gluon splitting via reabsorption in the next step of perturbation theory corresponds to a ''loss-term'' in the Callan-Symanzik equations. Our conclusion is that at the end of the cascades when the dipole masses (M d ) are such that log (M d 2 /Λ 2 )∼nc with n a few units, then an ordered field of a helix character emerges, i.e. a set of final ''screwy gluons'' are emitted in an ordered way in rapidity and azimuthal angle around the dipole axes so that the color lines are turning around. (orig.)

  17. Minimizing variability of cascade impaction measurements in inhalers and nebulizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonam, Matthew; Christopher, David; Cipolla, David; Donovan, Brent; Goodwin, David; Holmes, Susan; Lyapustina, Svetlana; Mitchell, Jolyon; Nichols, Steve; Pettersson, Gunilla; Quale, Chris; Rao, Nagaraja; Singh, Dilraj; Tougas, Terrence; Van Oort, Mike; Walther, Bernd; Wyka, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to catalogue in a systematic way the available information about factors that may influence the outcome and variability of cascade impactor (CI) measurements of pharmaceutical aerosols for inhalation, such as those obtained from metered dose inhalers (MDIs), dry powder inhalers (DPIs) or products for nebulization; and to suggest ways to minimize the influence of such factors. To accomplish this task, the authors constructed a cause-and-effect Ishikawa diagram for a CI measurement and considered the influence of each root cause based on industry experience and thorough literature review. The results illustrate the intricate network of underlying causes of CI variability, with the potential for several multi-way statistical interactions. It was also found that significantly more quantitative information exists about impactor-related causes than about operator-derived influences, the contribution of drug assay methodology and product-related causes, suggesting a need for further research in those areas. The understanding and awareness of all these factors should aid in the development of optimized CI methods and appropriate quality control measures for aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of pharmaceutical aerosols, in line with the current regulatory initiatives involving quality-by-design (QbD).

  18. Output Control Using Feedforward And Cascade Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1990-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of open-loop control elements in single-input, single-output linear system. Focus on output-control (servomechanism) problem, in which objective is to find control scheme that causes output to track certain command inputs and to reject certain disturbance inputs in steady state. Report closes with brief discussion of characteristics and relative merits of feedforward, cascade, and feedback controllers and combinations thereof.

  19. [Development of boomerang-type intramolecular cascade reactions and application to natural product synthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, K

    2001-12-01

    Intramolecular cascade reaction has received much attention as a powerful methodology to construct a polycyclic framework in organic synthesis. We have been developing "boomerang-type cascade reaction" to construct a variety of polycyclic skeletons efficiently. In the above reactions, a nucleophilic function of substrates changes the character into an electrophile after the initial reaction, and the electrophilic group acts as a nucleophile in the second reaction. That is, the reaction center stepwise moves from one functional group back to the same one via other functional groups. The stream of the electron concerning the cascade reaction is like a locus of boomerang. We show here three different boomerang-type reactions via ionic species or free radicals. 1) Diastereoselective Michael-aldol reaction based on the chiral auxiliary method and enantioselective Michael-aldol reaction by the use of external chiral sources. 2) Short and efficient total syntheses of longifolane sesquiterpenes utilizing intramolecular double Michael addition as a key step. 3) Development of boomerang-type radical cascade reaction of halopolyenes to construct terpenoid skeletons and its regioselectivity.

  20. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  1. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  2. Global transcriptional regulatory network for Escherichia coli robustly connects gene expression to transcription factor activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Sastry, Anand; Mih, Nathan; Kim, Donghyuk; Tan, Justin; Lloyd, Colton J.; Gao, Ye; Yang, Laurence; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) have been studied intensely for >25 y. Yet, even for the Escherichia coli TRN—probably the best characterized TRN—several questions remain. Here, we address three questions: (i) How complete is our knowledge of the E. coli TRN; (ii) how well can we predict gene expression using this TRN; and (iii) how robust is our understanding of the TRN? First, we reconstructed a high-confidence TRN (hiTRN) consisting of 147 transcription factors (TFs) regulating 1,538 transcription units (TUs) encoding 1,764 genes. The 3,797 high-confidence regulatory interactions were collected from published, validated chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and RegulonDB. For 21 different TF knockouts, up to 63% of the differentially expressed genes in the hiTRN were traced to the knocked-out TF through regulatory cascades. Second, we trained supervised machine learning algorithms to predict the expression of 1,364 TUs given TF activities using 441 samples. The algorithms accurately predicted condition-specific expression for 86% (1,174 of 1,364) of the TUs, while 193 TUs (14%) were predicted better than random TRNs. Third, we identified 10 regulatory modules whose definitions were robust against changes to the TRN or expression compendium. Using surrogate variable analysis, we also identified three unmodeled factors that systematically influenced gene expression. Our computational workflow comprehensively characterizes the predictive capabilities and systems-level functions of an organism’s TRN from disparate data types. PMID:28874552

  3. Small RNA target genes and regulatory connections in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Brian K; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2011-01-01

    of extracellular autoinducers triggers a signaling cascade resulting in the transcription of four small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs). Our results support the model that the QS sRNAs bind to the 5' untranslated region of multiple mRNAs and alter the fate of one in a positive manner and several others in a negative...

  4. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG overlapping regulatory region reveals LD structure and functional variants in association with leprosy in unrelated indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Rupali; Ali, Shafat; Srivastava, Amit K; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Jena, Mamta; Garg, Vijay K; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations.

  5. DNA methylation affects the lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers - Evidence for a regulatory module that involves vitellogenin expression but is independent of juvenile hormone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos A M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina R; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The canonic regulatory module for lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers involves a mutual repressor relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and vitellogenin (Vg). Compared to vertebrates, however, little is known about a possible role of epigenetic factors. The full genomic repertoire of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) makes the honey bee an attractive emergent model for studying the role of epigenetics in the aging process of invertebrates, and especially so in social insects. We first quantified the transcript levels of the four DNMTs encoding genes in the head thorax and abdomens of workers of different age, showing that dnmt1a and dnmt3 expression is up-regulated in abdomens of old workers, whereas dnmt1b and dnmt2 are down-regulated in heads of old workers. Pharmacological genome demethylation by RG108 treatment caused an increase in worker lifespan. Next, we showed that the genomic DNA methylation status indirectly affects vitellogenin gene expression both in vitro and in vivo in young workers, and that this occurs independent of caloric restriction or JH levels, suggesting that a non-canonical circuitry may be acting in parallel with the JH/Vg module to regulate the adult life cycle of honey bee workers. Our data provide evidence that epigenetic factors play a role in regulatory networks associated with complex life history traits of a social insect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. NLP model based thermoeconomic optimization of vapor compression–absorption cascaded refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Sachdeva, Gulshan; Kachhwaha, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • It addresses the size and cost estimation of cascaded refrigeration system. • Cascaded system is a promising decarburizing and energy efficient technology. • Second law analysis is carried out with modified Gouy-Stodola equation. • The total annual cost of plant operation is optimized in present work. - Abstract: This paper addresses the size and cost estimation of vapor compression–absorption cascaded refrigeration system (VCACRS) for water chilling application taking R410a and water–LiBr as refrigerants in compression and absorption section respectively which can help the design engineers in manufacturing and experimenting on such kind of systems. The main limitation in the practical implementation of VCACRS is its size and cost which are optimized in the present work by implementing Direct Search Method in non-linear programming (NLP) mathematical model of VCACRS. The main objective of optimization is to minimize the total annual cost of system which comprises of costs of exergy input and capital costs in monetary units. The appropriate set of decision variables (temperature of evaporator, condenser, generator, absorber, cascade condenser, degree of overlap and effectiveness of solution heat exchanger) minimizes the total annual cost of VCACRS by 11.9% with 22.4% reduction in investment cost at the base case whereas the same is reduced by 7.5% with 11.7% reduction in investment cost with reduced rate of interest and increased life span and period of operation. Optimization results show that the more investment cost in later case is well compensated through the performance and operational cost of the system. In the present analysis, optimum cascade condensing temperature is a strong function of period of operation and capital recovery factor. The cascading of compression and absorption systems becomes attractive for lower rate of interest and increase life span and operational period

  7. Species coexistence and the superior ability of an invasive species to exploit a facilitation cascade habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Altieri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation cascades generated by co-occurring foundation species can enhance the abundance and diversity of associated organisms. However, it remains poorly understood how differences among native and invasive species in their ability to exploit these positive interactions contribute to emergent patterns of community structure and biotic acceptance. On intertidal shorelines in New England, we examined the patterns of coexistence between the native mud crabs and the invasive Asian shore crab in and out of a facilitation cascade habitat generated by mid intertidal cordgrass and ribbed mussels. These crab species co-occurred in low intertidal cobbles adjacent to the cordgrass–mussel beds, despite experimental findings that the dominant mud crabs can kill and displace Asian shore crabs and thereby limit their successful recruitment to their shared habitat. A difference between the native and invasive species in their utilization of the facilitation cascade likely contributes to this pattern. Only the Asian shore crabs inhabit the cordgrass–mussel beds, despite experimental evidence that both species can similarly benefit from stress amelioration in the beds. Moreover, only Asian shore crabs settle in the beds, which function as a nursery habitat free of lethal mud crabs, and where their recruitment rates are particularly high (nearly an order of magnitude higher than outside beds. Persistence of invasive adult Asian shore crabs among the dominant native mud crabs in the low cobble zone is likely enhanced by a spillover effect of the facilitation cascade in which recruitment-limited Asian shore crabs settle in the mid intertidal cordgrass–mussel beds and subsidize their vulnerable populations in the adjacent low cobble zone. This would explain why the abundances of Asian shore crabs in cobbles are doubled when adjacent to facilitation cascade habitats. The propensity for this exotic species to utilize habitats created by facilitation cascades

  8. Professional and Regulatory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professional and Regulatory search are designed for people who use EPA web resources to do their job. You will be searching collections where information that is not relevant to Environmental and Regulatory professionals.

  9. Team structure and regulatory focus: the impact of regulatory fit on team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Davison, Robert B; Hollenbeck, John R

    2012-03-01

    We report a within-teams experiment testing the effects of fit between team structure and regulatory task demands on task performance and satisfaction through average team member positive affect and helping behaviors. We used a completely crossed repeated-observations design in which 21 teams enacted 2 tasks with different regulatory focus characteristics (prevention and promotion) in 2 organizational structures (functional and divisional), resulting in 84 observations. Results suggested that salient regulatory demands inherent in the task interacted with structure to determine objective and subjective team-level outcomes, such that functional structures were best suited to (i.e., had best fit with) tasks with a prevention regulatory focus and divisional structures were best suited to tasks with a promotion regulatory focus. This contingency finding integrates regulatory focus and structural contingency theories, and extends them to the team level with implications for models of performance, satisfaction, and team dynamics.

  10. TAM receptor tyrosine kinase function and the immunopathology of liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S K; Wilhelm, A; Antoniades, C G

    2016-06-01

    Tyro3, Axl, MERTK (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinases are implicated in the regulation of the innate immune response through clearance of apoptotic cellular debris and control of cytokine signaling cascades. As a result they are pivotal in regulating the inflammatory response to tissue injury. Within the liver, immune regulatory signaling is employed to prevent the overactivation of innate immunity in response to continual antigenic challenge from the gastrointestinal tract. In this review we appraise current understanding of the role of TAM receptor function in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, with a focus on its impact upon hepatic inflammatory pathology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Future nuclear regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In December 1996, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities concluded that changes resulting from economic deregulation and other recent developments affecting nuclear power programmes have consequences both for licensees and regulatory authorities. A number of potential problems and issues which will present a challenge to nuclear regulatory bodies over the next ten years have been identified in a report just released. (author)

  12. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings: Cascading configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. Jayachander; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been used in diverse label-free spectroscopy and imaging applications of live cells, biological tissues, and functional materials. Recently, we developed a theoretical framework for the three-beam double SRS processes that involve pump, Stokes, and depletion beams, where the pump-Stokes and pump-depletion SRS processes compete with each other. It was shown that the net Stokes gain signal can be suppressed by increasing the depletion beam intensity. The theoretical prediction has been experimentally confirmed recently. In the previous scheme for a selective suppression of one SRS by making it compete with another SRS, the two SRS processes occur in a parallel manner. However, there is another possibility of three-beam double SRS scheme that can be of use to suppress either Raman gain of the Stokes beam or Raman loss of the pump beam by depleting the Stokes photons with yet another SRS process induced by the pair of Stokes and another (second) Stokes beam. This three-beam double SRS process resembles a cascading energy transfer process from the pump beam to the first Stokes beam (SRS-1) and subsequently from the first Stokes beam to the second Stokes beam (SRS-2). Here, the two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are associated with two different Raman-active vibrational modes of solute molecule. In the present theory, both the radiation and the molecules are treated quantum mechanically. We then show that the cascading-type three-beam double SRS can be described by coupled differential equations for the photon numbers of the pump and Stokes beams. From the approximate solutions as well as exact numerical calculation results for the coupled differential equations, a possibility of efficiently suppressing the stimulated Raman loss of the pump beam by increasing the second Stokes beam intensity is shown and discussed. To further prove a potential use of this scheme for developing a super-resolution SRS microscopy, we

  13. Spectral behavior of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, J M; Montoya, Juan; Allen, M G; Xu, J; Mahler, L; Tredicucci, A; Beere, H E; Ritchie, D A

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, the spectral behavior of two terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operating both pulsed and cw is characterized using a heterodyne technique. Both lasers emitting around 2.5 THz are combined onto a whisker contact Schottky diode mixer mounted in a corner cube reflector. The resulting difference frequency beatnote is recorded in both the time and frequency domain. From the frequency domain data, we measure the effective laser linewidth and the tuning rates as a function of both temperature and injection current and show that the current tuning behavior cannot be explained by temperature tuning mechanisms alone. From the time domain data, we characterize the intrapulse frequency tuning behavior, which limits the effective linewidth to approximately 5 MHz.

  14. Typing pictures: Linguistic processing cascades into finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaltritti, Michele; Arfé, Barbara; Torrance, Mark; Peressotti, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of psycholinguistic variables on measures of response latency and mean interkeystroke interval in a typewritten picture naming task, with the aim to outline the functional organization of the stages of cognitive processing and response execution associated with typewritten word production. Onset latencies were modulated by lexical and semantic variables traditionally linked to lexical retrieval, such as word frequency, age of acquisition, and naming agreement. Orthographic variables, both at the lexical and sublexical level, appear to influence just within-word interkeystroke intervals, suggesting that orthographic information may play a relevant role in controlling actual response execution. Lexical-semantic variables also influenced speed of execution. This points towards cascaded flow of activation between stages of lexical access and response execution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amyloid cascade hypothesis: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Various therapeutic approaches are being used to improve the cholinergic neurotransmission, but their role in AD pathogenesis is still unknown. Although, an increase in tau protein concentration in CSF has been described in AD, but several issues remains unclear. Extensive and accurate analysis of CSF could be helpful to define presence of tau proteins in physiological conditions, or released during the progression of neurodegenerative disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that the neurodegeneration in AD caused by abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques in various areas of the brain. The amyloid hypothesis has continued to gain support over the last two decades, particularly from genetic studies. Therefore, current research progress in several areas of therapies shall provide an effective treatment to cure this devastating disease. This review critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of Aβ directed therapeutics and their relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of Cascadable DDCC-Based Universal Filter Using NAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu-Duy Tran

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel systematic approach for synthesizing DDCC-based voltage-mode biquadratic universal filters is proposed. The DDCCs are described by infinity-variables’ models of nullor-mirror elements which can be used in the nodal admittance matrix expansion process. Applying the proposed method, the obtained 12 equivalent filters offer the following features: multi-input and two outputs, realization of all five standard filter functions, namely lowpass, bandpass, highpass, notch and allpass, high-input impedance, employing only grounded capacitors and resistors, orthogonal controllability between pole frequency and quality factor, and cascadable, low active and passive sensitivities. The workability of some synthesized filters is verified by HSPICE simulations to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  17. Cascade Distillation System Design for Safety and Mission Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Okon, Shira

    2015-01-01

    Per the NASA Human Health, Life Support and Habitation System Technology Area 06 report "crewed missions venturing beyond Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) will require technologies with improved reliability, reduced mass, self-sufficiency, and minimal logistical needs as an emergency or quick-return option will not be feasible".1 To meet this need, the development team of the second generation Cascade Distillation System (CDS 2.0) chose a development approach that explicitly incorporate consideration of safety, mission assurance, and autonomy. The CDS 2.0 preliminary design focused on establishing a functional baseline that meets the CDS core capabilities and performance. The critical design phase is now focused on incorporating features through a deliberative process of establishing the systems failure modes and effects, identifying mitigation strategies, and evaluating the merit of the proposed actions through analysis and test. This paper details results of this effort on the CDS 2.0 design.

  18. Distinct gene regulatory programs define the inhibitory effects of liver X receptors and PPARG on cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Ramaker, Ryne C; Roberts, Brian S; Dean, Emma C; Burwell, Todd C; Meadows, Sarah K; Cooper, Sara J; Garabedian, Michael J; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M

    2016-07-11

    The liver X receptors (LXRs, NR1H2 and NR1H3) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG, NR1C3) nuclear receptor transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of energy homeostasis. Intriguingly, recent studies suggest that these metabolic regulators also impact tumor cell proliferation. However, a comprehensive temporal molecular characterization of the LXR and PPARG gene regulatory responses in tumor cells is still lacking. To better define the underlying molecular processes governing the genetic control of cellular growth in response to extracellular metabolic signals, we performed a comprehensive, genome-wide characterization of the temporal regulatory cascades mediated by LXR and PPARG signaling in HT29 colorectal cancer cells. For this analysis, we applied a multi-tiered approach that incorporated cellular phenotypic assays, gene expression profiles, chromatin state dynamics, and nuclear receptor binding patterns. Our results illustrate that the activation of both nuclear receptors inhibited cell proliferation and further decreased glutathione levels, consistent with increased cellular oxidative stress. Despite a common metabolic reprogramming, the gene regulatory network programs initiated by these nuclear receptors were widely distinct. PPARG generated a rapid and short-term response while maintaining a gene activator role. By contrast, LXR signaling was prolonged, with initial, predominantly activating functions that transitioned to repressive gene regulatory activities at late time points. Through the use of a multi-tiered strategy that integrated various genomic datasets, our data illustrate that distinct gene regulatory programs elicit common phenotypic effects, highlighting the complexity of the genome. These results further provide a detailed molecular map of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells through LXR and PPARG activation. As ligand-inducible TFs, these nuclear receptors can potentially serve as attractive therapeutic

  19. International regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    Concerning International regulatory activities, we find for the european atomic energy community an entry into force of the lisbon treaty (2009), it amends the treaty on European union and replaces the treaty establishing the European Community by the new treaty on the functioning of the European Union; more, an amendment to council regulation on the conditions governing imports of agricultural products originating in third countries following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station (2009). About International atomic energy agency is reported an open-ended meeting of technical and legal experts for sharing of information on states implementation of the code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources and its supplementary guidance on the import and export of radioactive sources (2010). (N.C.)

  20. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.