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Sample records for regulations applicable doe

  1. NRC regulation of DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.; Edgar, G.; Silverman, D.; Murley, T.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are in for major changes if the DOE follows through on its intentions announced December 20, 1996. The DOE is seeking legislation to establish the NRC as the regulatory agency with jurisdiction over nuclear health, safety, and security at a wide range of DOE facilities. At this stage, it appears that as many as 200 (though not all) DOE facilities would be affected. On March 28, 1997, the NRC officially endorsed taking over the responsibility for regulatory oversight of DOE nuclear facilities as the DOE had proposed, contingent upon adequate funding, staffing resources, and a clear delineation of NRC authority. This article first contrasts the ways in which the NRC and the DOE carry out their basic regulatory functions. Next, it describes the NRC's current authority over DOE facilities and the status of the DOE's initiative to expand that authority. Then, it discusses the basic changes and impacts that can be expected in the regulation of DOE facilities. The article next describes key lessons learned from the recent transition of the GDPs from DOE oversight to NRC regulation and the major regulatory issues that arose in that transition. Finally, some general strategies are suggested for resolving issues likely to arise as the NRC assumes regulatory authority over DOE facilities

  2. 10 CFR 603.125 - Applicability of other parts of the DOE Assistance Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations. 603.125 Section 603.125 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY...: (1) 10 CFR part 601—lobbying restrictions apply by law (31 U.S.C. 1352) to a TIA that is a... nonprocurement instruments in general; and (3) 10 CFR part 607—drug-free work-place (financial assistance...

  3. Food Applications and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate; Omar, Nabil Ben; Lucas, Rosario

    This chapter deals with food applications of bacteriocins. Regulatory issues on the different possibilities for incorporating bacteriocins as bioprotectants are discussed. Specific applications of bacteriocins or bacteriocin-producing strains are described for main food categories, including milk and dairy products, raw meats, ready-to-eat meat and poultry products, fermented meats, fish and fish products or fermented fish. The last section of the chapter deals with applications in foods and beverages derived from plant materials, such as raw vegetable foods, fruits and fruit juices, cooked food products, fermented vegetable foods and ­fermented beverages. Results obtained for application of bacteriocins in combination with other hurdles are also discussed for each specific case, with a special emphasis on novel food packaging and food-processing technologies, such as irradiation, pulsed electric field treatments or high hydrostatic pressure treatment.

  4. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards

  5. Choosing to regulate: does choice enhance craving regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasser, Arian; Zeithamova, Dagmar; Pfeifer, Jennifer H

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Goal-directed behavior and lifelong well-being often depend on the ability to control appetitive motivations, such as cravings. Cognitive reappraisal is an effective way to modulate emotional states, including cravings, but is often studied under explicit instruction to regulate. Despite the strong prediction from Self-Determination Theory that choice should enhance task engagement and regulation success, little is known empirically about whether and how regulation is different when participants choose (vs are told) to exert control. To investigate how choice affects neural activity and regulation success, participants reappraised their responses to images of personally-craved foods while undergoing functional neuroimaging. Participants were either instructed to view or reappraise (‘no-choice’) or chose freely to view or reappraise (‘yes-choice’). Choice increased activity in the frontoparietal control network. We expected this activity would be associated with increased task engagement, resulting in better regulation success. However, contrary to this prediction, choice slightly reduced regulation success. Follow-up multivariate functional neuroimaging analyses indicated that choice likely disrupted allocation of limited cognitive resources during reappraisal. While unexpected, these results highlight the importance of studying upstream processes such as regulation choice, as they may affect the ability to regulate cravings and other emotional states. PMID:29462475

  6. 49 CFR 40.1 - Who does this regulation cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who does this regulation cover? 40.1 Section 40.1 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL... is intended to supersede or conflict with the implementation of the Federal Railroad Administration's...

  7. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  8. 34 CFR 660.30 - How does the Secretary evaluate an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary evaluate an application? 660.30 Section 660.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the...

  9. 34 CFR 656.20 - How does the Secretary evaluate an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STUDIES OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 656.20 How... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary evaluate an application? 656.20 Section 656.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF...

  10. Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE's experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions

  11. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE`s nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation.

  12. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by DOE itself. The three major recommendations are: under any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  13. The regulation of mobile health applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Amy J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In July 2011, the United States Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidance concerning the regulation of mobile medical applications (applications on a wireless device that are used as accessories to medical devices or to convert a mobile platform to a medical device. While the suggestion of regulation is rooted in patient safety, concerns about limits on innovation and discovery as well as the evolving nature of both mobile health and current healthcare delivery have emerged. This article discusses the prevalence of mobile health, the context of regulation concerning mobile medical applications, and implications for the future.

  14. 34 CFR 303.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this part; (2) Special education, related services, free appropriate public education, free public... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 303.5 Section 303.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  15. The regulation of mobile health applications

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Amy J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In July 2011, the United States Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidance concerning the regulation of mobile medical applications (applications on a wireless device that are used as accessories to medical devices or to convert a mobile platform to a medical device). While the suggestion of regulation is rooted in patient safety, concerns about limits on innovation and discovery as well as the evolving nature of both mobile health and current healthcare delivery have emerged...

  16. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  17. 300 Area TEDF DOE order compliance applicability assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eacker, J.A.

    1994-11-08

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to determine applicability of Department of Energy Orders at the Hanford 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This assessment placed each of the reviewed orders into one of three compliance categories: (A) order applicable at a facility specific level (20 identified); (B) order applicable at a policy level (11 identified); or (C) order not applicable (21 identified). The scope of the assessment from the DOE Order standpoint was the 52 Level 1 Orders of interest to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB). Although the TEDF is a non-nuclear facility, this order basis was chosen as a Best Management Practice to be consistent with ongoing efforts across the Hanford Site. Three tables in the report summarize the DOE order applicability by the compliance categories, with a table for Level A, Level B, and Level C applicability. The attachment to the report documents the compliance applicability assessment for each individual DOE Order.

  18. 300 Area TEDF DOE order compliance applicability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eacker, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to determine applicability of Department of Energy Orders at the Hanford 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This assessment placed each of the reviewed orders into one of three compliance categories: (A) order applicable at a facility specific level (20 identified); (B) order applicable at a policy level (11 identified); or (C) order not applicable (21 identified). The scope of the assessment from the DOE Order standpoint was the 52 Level 1 Orders of interest to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB). Although the TEDF is a non-nuclear facility, this order basis was chosen as a Best Management Practice to be consistent with ongoing efforts across the Hanford Site. Three tables in the report summarize the DOE order applicability by the compliance categories, with a table for Level A, Level B, and Level C applicability. The attachment to the report documents the compliance applicability assessment for each individual DOE Order

  19. 34 CFR 658.30 - How does the Secretary evaluate an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary evaluate an application? 658.30 Section 658.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE...

  20. 30 CFR 285.1000 - What activities does this subpart regulate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities does this subpart regulate? 285.1000 Section 285.1000 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Activities § 285.1000 What activities does this subpart regulate? (a) This subpart provides the general...

  1. Learning curve tool applications in DOE materials management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will examine the application of learning curve theory, an economic theory that quantifies cost savings over time in a labor intensive process. Learning curve theory has been traditionally applied to a production process. This paper examines the application of learning curve theory in cost estimating of waste characterization in storage at a DOE facility

  2. U.S. DOE Southeast Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarella, Isaac [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mago, Pedro [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Kalland, Stephen [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Between 2010 and 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Southeast Clean Energy Application Center (SE-CEAC), co-located at the North Carolina Solar Center at NC State University (NCSU) and at Mississippi State University. The SE-CEAC was one of eight regional CEACs established to promote and assist in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), district energy (DE) and waste heat to power (WHP) throughout the U.S. CHP locates power generation at the point of demand and makes productive use of the residual thermal energy for process and space heating in factories and businesses, thus lowering the cost of meeting electricity and heat requirements and increasing energy efficiency. The overall goal of the SE-CEAC was to support end-user implementation and overall market transformation for CHP and related clean energy technologies. Five objectives were targeted to achieve the goal: 1. Market Analysis and Information Dissemination 2. Outreach and Education for Potential CHP End-users 3. Policy Support for State and Regional Stakeholders 4. Technical Assistance to Support CHP Deployment 5. Collaboration with DOE and other CEACs Throughout the project, the CEACs provided key services of education and outreach, technical assistance and market analysis in support of project objectives. These services were very effective at achieving key objectives of assisting prospective CHP end-users and informing policy makers, utilities and others about the benefits of CHP. There is a marked increase in the awareness of CHP technologies and applications as an energy resource among end-users, policymakers, utility regulators, electric utilities and natural gas utilities in the Southeast region as a result. At the end of 2013, a number of best-practice policies for CHP were applied or under consideration in various Southeast states. The SE-CEAC met its targets for providing technical assistance with over 50 analyses delivered for 412 MW of potential end

  3. Does self-regulation of advertisement length improve consumer welfare?

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubae, Taisuke; Matsushima, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, TV platforms regulate themselves as to the length of the advertisements they air. Using modified Hotelling models, we investigate whether such self-regulation improves consumer and social welfare or not. When all consumers choose a single TV program (the utility functions of consumers satisfy the standard 'full-coverage' condition), self-regulation always reduces consumer welfare. It improves social welfare only if the advertisement revenue of each platform is not small and the cost...

  4. Does drug price-regulation affect healthcare expenditures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Aharon, Omer; Shavit, Oren; Magnezi, Racheli

    2017-09-01

    Increasing health costs in developed countries are a major concern for decision makers. A variety of cost containment tools are used to control this trend, including maximum price regulation and reimbursement methods for health technologies. Information regarding expenditure-related outcomes of these tools is not available. To evaluate the association between different cost-regulating mechanisms and national health expenditures in selected countries. Price-regulating and reimbursement mechanisms for prescription drugs among OECD countries were reviewed. National health expenditure indices for 2008-2012 were extracted from OECD statistical sources. Possible associations between characteristics of different systems for regulation of drug prices and reimbursement and health expenditures were examined. In most countries, reimbursement mechanisms are part of publicly financed plans. Maximum price regulation is composed of reference-pricing, either of the same drug in other countries, or of therapeutic alternatives within the country, as well as value-based pricing (VBP). No association was found between price regulation or reimbursement mechanisms and healthcare costs. However, VBP may present a more effective mechanism, leading to reduced costs in the long term. Maximum price and reimbursement mechanism regulations were not found to be associated with cost containment of national health expenditures. VBP may have the potential to do so over the long term.

  5. Does business regulation matter for banks in the European Union?

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyvas, Nikolaos Antonios; Mamatzakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the impact of business and financial specific regulations on banks in the EU-27 over the 2004–2010 period. We employ a dataset of a wide range of business regulation indices from the “Doing Business” project of the World Bank. Results for the credit regulation indices show that the strength of creditor rights is negatively related to bank performance as measured by cost efficiency, although this effect subdues during the recent crisis period (20...

  6. Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program

  7. Environmental regulation and MNEs location : does CSR matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Dam, L.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether firms with relatively low environmental standards are more often located in countries that are poor, corrupt or have weak environmental regulations. We find new empirical evidence in favor of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis, which states that MNEs are transferring their dirty

  8. Radioactive waste disposal: Regulations and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The regulation of radioactive discharges, i.e. solid radioactive waste resulting from operation of nuclear installations and liquid and gazeous effluents released by them may be dealt with from two angles: the receiving environment and the polluting agent. French law covers both. Law on atmospheric pollution is based mainly on the Act of 2 August 1961 while the Act of 16 December 1964 governs water pollution. Both Acts have been the subject of a great number of implementing decrees, certain of which contain standards specific to radioactive pollution. Regulations on the polluting agent, namely its activity, comply with the generally established distinction between large nuclear installations and others. There again, there are many applicable texts, in particular, the Act of 19 July 1976 for classified installations, and the Decree of 11 December 1963, supplemented by the Decrees of 6 November 1974 and 31 December 1974 for large nuclear installations. This detailed analysis of national regulations is followed by a presentation of the applicable provisions in the Communities law and in international public law. (N.E.A.) [fr

  9. The regulation of mobile medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetisen, Ali Kemal; Martinez-Hurtado, J L; da Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando; Simsekler, M C Emre; Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-03-07

    The rapidly expanding number of mobile medical applications have the potential to transform the patient-healthcare provider relationship by improving the turnaround time and reducing costs. In September 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance to regulate these applications and protect consumers by minimising the risks associated with their unintended use. This guidance distinguishes between the subset of mobile medical apps which may be subject to regulation and those that are not. The marketing claims of the application determine the intent. Areas of concern include compliance with regular updates of the operating systems and of the mobile medical apps themselves. In this article, we explain the essence of this FDA guidance by providing examples and evaluating the impact on academia, industry and other key stakeholders, such as patients and clinicians. Our assessment indicates that awareness and incorporation of the guidelines into product development can hasten the commercialisation and market entry process. Furthermore, potential obstacles have been discussed and directions for future development suggested.

  10. Insulin regulates brain function, but how does it get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah M; Meijer, Rick I; Barrett, Eugene J

    2014-12-01

    We have learned over the last several decades that the brain is an important target for insulin action. Insulin in the central nervous system (CNS) affects feeding behavior and body energy stores, the metabolism of glucose and fats in the liver and adipose, and various aspects of memory and cognition. Insulin may even influence the development or progression of Alzheimer disease. Yet, a number of seemingly simple questions (e.g., What is the pathway for delivery of insulin to the brain? Is insulin's delivery to the brain mediated by the insulin receptor and is it a regulated process? Is brain insulin delivery affected by insulin resistance?) are unanswered. Here we briefly review accumulated findings affirming the importance of insulin as a CNS regulatory peptide, examine the current understanding of how peripheral insulin is delivered to the brain, and identify key gaps in the current understanding of this process. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Does Erythropoietin Regulate TRPC Channels in Red Blood Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Danielczok

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cation channels play an essential role in red blood cells (RBCs ion homeostasis. One set of ion channels are the transient receptor potential channels of canonical type (TRPC channels. The abundance of these channels in primary erythroblasts, erythroid cell lines and RBCs was associated with an increase in intracellular Ca2+ upon stimulation with Erythropoietin (Epo. In contrast two independent studies on Epo-treated patients revealed diminished basal Ca2+ concentration or reduced phosphatidylserine exposure to the outer membrane leaflet. Methods: To resolve the seemingly conflicting reports we challenged mature human and mouse RBCs of several genotypes with Epo and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and recorded the intracellular Ca2+ content. Next Generation Sequencing was utilised to approach a molecular analysis of reticulocytes. Results/Conclusions: Our results allow concluding that Epo and PGE2 regulation of the Ca2+ homeostasis is distinctly different between murine and human RBCs and that changes in intracellular Ca2+ upon Epo treatment is a primary rather than a compensatory effect. In human RBCs, Epo itself has no effect on Ca2+ fluxes but inhibits the PGE2-induced Ca2+ entry. In murine mature RBCs functional evidence indicates TRPC4/C5 mediated Ca2+ entry activated by Epo whereas PGE2 leads to a TRPC independent Ca2+ entry.

  12. Conventional sunscreen application does not lead to sufficient body coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Z; Schornstein, T; Sutor, A; Neufang, G; Hagens, R

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to assess sunscreen application habits and relative body coverage after single whole body application. Fifty-two healthy volunteers were asked to use the test product once, following their usual sunscreen application routine. Standardized UV photographs, which were evaluated by Image Analysis, were conducted before and immediately after product application to evaluate relative body coverage. In addition to these procedures, the volunteers completed an online self-assessment questionnaire to assess sunscreen usage habits. After product application, the front side showed significantly less non-covered skin (4.35%) than the backside (17.27%) (P = 0.0000). Females showed overall significantly less non-covered skin (8.98%) than males (13.16%) (P = 0.0381). On the backside, females showed significantly less non-covered skin (13.57%) (P = 0.0045) than males (21.94%), while on the front side, this difference between females (4.14%) and males (4.53%) was not significant. In most cases, the usual sunscreen application routine does not provide complete body coverage even though an extra light sunscreen with good absorption properties was used. On average, 11% of the body surface was not covered by sunscreen at all. Therefore, appropriate consumer education is required to improve sunscreen application and to warrant effective sun protection. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  13. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue does not regulate iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that has an absolute requirement for iron which it transports from the host as heme and/or Fe2+. Iron transport must be regulated to prevent toxic effects from excess metal in the cell. P. gingivalis has one ferric uptake regulator (Fur orthologue encoded in its genome called Har, which would be expected to regulate the transport and usage of iron within this bacterium. As a gene regulator, inactivation of Har should result in changes in gene expression of several genes compared to the wild-type. This dataset (GEO accession number GSE37099 provides information on expression levels of genes in P. gingivalis in the absence of Har. Surprisingly, these genes do not relate to iron homeostasis.

  14. Does electricity (and heat) network regulation have anything to learn from fixed line telecoms regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollitt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the lessons from the recent history of telecoms deregulation for electricity (and by implication heat) network regulation. We do this in the context of Ofgem's RPI-X rate at 20 review of energy regulation in the UK, which considers whether RPI-X-based price regulation is fit for purpose after over 20 years of operation in energy networks. We examine the deregulation of fixed line telecoms in the UK and the lessons which it seems to suggest. We then apply the lessons to electricity networks in the context of a possible increase in distributed generation directly connected to local distribution networks. We conclude that there is the possibility of more parallels over time and suggest several implications of this for the regulation of electricity and heat networks. (author)

  15. Deriving a site characterization program from applicable regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voegele, M.D.; Younker, J.L.; Alexander, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The process of deriving a site characterization program from the applicable regulations was approached by the DOE through the use of two basic organizing principles. One organizing principle is a hierarchical structure of questions about regulatory criteria related to the acquisition of site data. This set of questions is called an issues hierarchy, and it provides a topical organizing framework for developing a site characterization program. The second basic organizing principle used by the DOE and its contractors to develop a site characterization program is called performance allocation. For each issue in the issues hierarchy, a resolution strategy is developed. These strategies involve the identification of elements of the disposal system that are relevant to isolation and containment of waste or to radiological safety. It is then possible to identify performance measures and information needed from the site characterization program. This information, coupled with information about confidence in existing data and the confidence required in the data to be obtained, allows the development of testing strategies for field programs

  16. Does regulating others' feelings influence people's own affective well-being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Karen; Totterdell, Peter; Holman, David; Headley, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Individuals in a variety of social contexts try to regulate other people's feelings, but how does this process affect the regulators themselves? This research aimed to establish a relationship between people's use of interpersonal affect regulation and their own affective well-being. In a field study, self- and other-reported data were collected from prisoners and staff members in a therapeutic prison using two surveys separated in time. In a laboratory study, a student sample reported their affect before and after attempting to influence the feelings of talent show contestants in a role-play task. The results of both studies indicated congruent associations between the use of affect-improving and affect-worsening interpersonal affect regulation and strategy agents' affective well-being. Our findings highlight that, when performing interpersonal affect regulation, people may not be immune from the effects of their own actions.

  17. Does Who I Am or How I Regulate Matter? Consequences of Manipulation of Emotion Regulation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sideeka; Alea, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    This study experimentally examined the affective and social consequences of emotion regulation in men and women from young adulthood to old age. Participants were instructed to reappraise, suppress, or given no instructions while recalling a negative memory about their romantic relationship. Participants were 191 adults in a Trinidadian lifespan sample. Engaging in suppression resulted in higher relationship satisfaction, particularly for women, whereas engaging in reappraisal reduced negative affect for middle-aged versus younger adults. Reappraisal was, however, particularly consequential for young women who experienced higher levels of negative affect compared with men of the same age and older aged women. Regardless of instructions, older adults experienced higher relationship satisfaction, higher positive and lower negative affect than younger aged adults. Results are discussed considering the positivity effect for older adults, and how the current and historical climate of Trinidad influences the way women regulate their emotions.

  18. Berkeley Lab Pilot on External Regulation of DOE National Laboratories by the U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Gary H.

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission entered into an agreement in November 1997 to pursue external regulation of radiation safety at DOE national laboratories through a Pilot Program of simulated regulation at 6-10 sites over a 2 year period. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the oldest of the DOE national laboratories, volunteered and was selected as the first Pilot site. Based on the similarities and linkages between Berkeley Lab and nearby university research laboratories, Berkeley Lab seemed a good candidate for external regulation and a good first step in familiarizing NRC with the technical and institutional issues involved in regulating laboratories in the DOE complex. NRC and DOE team members visited Berkeley Lab on four occasions between October 1997 and January 1998 to carry out the Pilot. The first step was to develop a detailed Work Plan, then to carry out both a technical review of the radiation safety program and an examination of policy and regulatory issues. The Pilot included a public meeting held in Oakland, CA in December 1997. The Pilot concluded with NRC's assessment that Berkeley Lab has a radiation protection program adequate to protect workers, the public and the environment, and that it is ready to be licensed by the NRC with minor programmatic exceptions. A draft final report of the Pilot was prepared and circulated for comment as a NUREG document (dated May 7, 1998). The report's recommendations include extending NRC regulatory authority to cover all ionizing radiation sources (including accelerators, x-ray units, NARM) at Berkeley Lab. Questions remaining to be resolved include: who should be the licensee (DOE, the Lab, or both)?; dealing with legacy issues and NRC D and D requirements; minimizing dual oversight; quantifying value added in terms of cost savings, enhanced safety, and improved public perception; extrapolating results to other national laboratories; and

  19. Synthesis and application of labelled growth regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyutte, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    For the investigation of the metabolism both of phytoeffectors like herbicides and plant growth regulators such compounds are needed in radioactive labelled form. The synthesis of radioactive labelled fluorodifen, nitrofen, ethephon, diphenylic acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, abscisic acid, hydroxybenzoic acids and different conjugates are described. Some examples of these compounds metabolism in plants are discussed [ru

  20. Exogenous application of plant growth regulators increased the total ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... the exogenous application of flavonoids reports plant growth regulation ... method used for extraction and quantification of endogenous gibberellins was ... 365 nm) while separation was done on a C18 reverse-phase HPLC.

  1. German rules and regulations eith special reference to application documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraut, A.

    1979-01-01

    Regulations and standards play an essential role in achieving a safe and economic technology and in making the licensing procedure systematic, effective and clear. German rules and regulations applicable to the nuclear field are presented in this paper together with references to the rulemaking organizations. Detailed information is given on those rules and regulations, which prescribe the requirements concerning necessary documents for the nuclear licensing procedure. (author)

  2. 7 CFR 3430.900 - Applicability of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability of regulations. 3430.900 Section 3430.900 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  3. Application of the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Hey, B.E.; Leach, D.S.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued their Nuclear Safety Policy for implementation on September 9, 1991. The statement noted that it was the DOE's policy that the general public should be protected such that no individual would bear significant additional risk to health and safety from operation of their nuclear facilities above the risks to which members of the general population were normally exposed. The intent is that from the nuclear safety policy will follow specific safety rules, orders, standards and other requirements. The DOE Nuclear Safety Policy provides general statements in the areas of management involvement and accountability, providing technically competent personnel, oversight and self-assessment, promoting a safety culture, and quantitative safety goals as aiming points for performance. In general, most DOE Management and Operating Contractors should have programs in place which address the general statements noted above. Thus, compliance with the general statements of the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy should present no significant difficulty. Consequently, the focus of this paper will be the two quantitative safety goals reproduced below from the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy. ''The risk to an average individual in the vicinity of a DOE facility for prompt fatalities that might result from accidents should not exceed one tenth of one percent (0.1 %) of the sum of prompt fatalities resulting from other accidents to which members of the population are generally exposed. For evaluation purposes, individuals are assumed to be located within one mile of the site boundary.'' ''The risk to the population in the area of a DOE nuclear facility for cancer fatalities that might result from operations should not exceed one tenth of one percent (0.1 %) of the sum of all cancer fatality risks resulting from all other causes. For evaluation purposes, individuals are assumed to be located within 10 miles of the site boundary.''

  4. R ampersand D activities at DOE applicable to mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, M.D.; Devgun, J.S.; Brown, J.J.; Beskid, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Within the new organization, the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is responsible for research, development, demonstration, testing and evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) activities aimed at meeting DOE cleanup goals, while minimizing cost and risk. Because of US governmental activities dating back to the Manhattan project, mixed radioactive and hazardous waste is an area of particular concern to DOE. The OTD is responsible for a number of R ampersand D activities aimed at improving capabilities to characterize, control, and properly dispose of mixed waste. These activities and their progress to date will be reviewed. In addition, needs for additional R ampersand D on managing mixed waste will be presented. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Progress in DOE high temperature superconductivity electric power applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, J.G.; Sheahn, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) leads national R and D effort to develop US industry's capability to produce a wide range of advanced energy-efficient electric power products. The immediate need is to make high temperature superconductivity (HTS) wire. Wire developers at the DOE National laboratories are working wit industrial partners toward this objective. In this paper, the authors describe the progress to date, citing both the difficulties associated with making wire from these ceramic materials, and achievements at several organizations. Results for progress over the next five years are stated

  6. How does the tobacco industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Savell

    Full Text Available The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control makes a number of recommendations aimed at restricting the marketing of tobacco products. Tobacco industry political activity has been identified as an obstacle to Parties' development and implementation of these provisions. This study systematically reviews the existing literature on tobacco industry efforts to influence marketing regulations and develops taxonomies of 1 industry strategies and tactics and 2 industry frames and arguments.Searches were conducted between April-July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Articles were included if they made reference to tobacco industry efforts to influence marketing regulations; supported claims with verifiable evidence; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990-2013. 48 articles met the review criteria. Narrative synthesis was used to combine the evidence.56% of articles focused on activity in North America, Europe or Australasia, the rest focusing on Asia (17%, South America, Africa or transnational activity. Six main political strategies and four main frames were identified. The tobacco industry frequently claims that the proposed policy will have negative unintended consequences, that there are legal barriers to regulation, and that the regulation is unnecessary because, for example, industry does not market to youth or adheres to a voluntary code. The industry primarily conveys these arguments through direct and indirect lobbying, the promotion of voluntary codes and alternative policies, and the formation of alliances with other industrial sectors. The majority of tactics and arguments were used in multiple jurisdictions.Tobacco industry political activity is far more diverse than suggested by existing taxonomies of corporate political activity. Tactics and arguments are repeated across jurisdictions, suggesting that the taxonomies of industry tactics and arguments developed in this paper are generalisable to multiple jurisdictions and can

  7. 45 CFR 61.2 - Applicability of these regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability of these regulations. 61.2 Section 61.2 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND...

  8. 45 CFR 60.2 - Applicability of these regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability of these regulations. 60.2 Section 60.2 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK FOR ADVERSE INFORMATION ON PHYSICIANS AND OTHER HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS General...

  9. 26 CFR 302.1-2 - Application of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION TAXES UNDER THE INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS SETTLEMENT ACT, AS AMENDED AUGUST 9, 1955 § 302.1-2... (40 Stat. 411). (b) Taxes covered. The regulations in this part are applicable to any internal revenue tax with respect to (1) property vested in the Attorney General or any action or transaction...

  10. 25 CFR 273.53 - Applicable procurement regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable procurement regulations. 273.53 Section 273.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT General Contract Requirements § 273.53...

  11. 10 CFR 727.4 - Is there any expectation of privacy applicable to a DOE computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... computer? 727.4 Section 727.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.4 Is there any expectation of privacy applicable to a DOE computer... Communications Privacy Act of 1986), no user of a DOE computer shall have any expectation of privacy in the use...

  12. Engineering simulator applications to emergency preparedness at DOE reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since 1984 the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has conducted twenty-seven comprehensive emergency preparedness exercises at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Headquarters Operations Center and Regional Incident Response Centers using the NRC's Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), developed at the INEL, as an engineering simulator. The objective of these exercises has been to assist the NRC in upgrading its preparedness to provide technical support backup and oversight to U.S. commercial nuclear plant licensees during emergencies. With the current focus on Department of Energy (DOE) reactor operational safety and emergency preparedness, this capability is envisioned as a means of upgrading emergency preparedness at DOE production and test reactor sites such as the K-Reactor at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL

  13. Drak2 Does Not Regulate TGF-β Signaling in T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarsha L Harris

    Full Text Available Drak2 is a serine/threonine kinase expressed highest in T cells and B cells. Drak2-/- mice are resistant to autoimmunity in mouse models of type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Resistance to these diseases occurs, in part, because Drak2 is required for the survival of autoreactive T cells that induce disease. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Drak2 affects T cell survival and autoimmunity are not known. A recent report demonstrated that Drak2 negatively regulated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling in tumor cell lines. Thus, increased TGF-β signaling in the absence of Drak2 may contribute to the resistance to autoimmunity in Drak2-/- mice. Therefore, we examined if Drak2 functioned as a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling in T cells, and whether the enhanced susceptibility to death of Drak2-/- T cells was due to augmented TGF-β signaling. Using several in vitro assays to test TGF-β signaling and T cell function, we found that activation of Smad2 and Smad3, which are downstream of the TGF-β receptor, was similar between wildtype and Drak2-/- T cells. Furthermore, TGF-β-mediated effects on naïve T cell proliferation, activated CD8+ T cell survival, and regulatory T cell induction was similar between wildtype and Drak2-/- T cells. Finally, the increased susceptibility to death in the absence of Drak2 was not due to enhanced TGF-β signaling. Together, these data suggest that Drak2 does not function as a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling in primary T cells stimulated in vitro. It is important to investigate and discern potential molecular mechanisms by which Drak2 functions in order to better understand the etiology of autoimmune diseases, as well as to validate the use of Drak2 as a target for therapeutic treatment of these diseases.

  14. DOE seeks applicants to develop next-generation nuclear detectors. (Sensors)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "DOE's Division of High Energy Physics seeks grant applications for development of advanced detectors in the areas of high energy physics experiments, which includes accelerator-based and non-accelerator based experiments" (1/2 page).

  15. 25 CFR 518.8 - Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation have a continuing duty to advise the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation... NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS SELF REGULATION OF CLASS II GAMING § 518.8 Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation have a continuing duty to...

  16. PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Thoman, D.C.; Lowrie, J.; Keller, A.

    2008-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases

  17. Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Disposal regulations and techniques applicable to devices using ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    L'office de Protection contre les rayonnement ionisants, being a government body under the supervision of Ministry of Health and Labour, among other different missions controls the compliance of radiation protection laws with the aim to guarantee the safe operation of equipment using ionising radiation sources. These regulations concerning competence of personnel, especially in the field of medicine or application of ionising radiation on humans, are restricted only to medical doctors (or dentists in their domain) by technical constraints dealing with design of equipment and its exploitation. At the same time regulations define conditions of permanent control in order to verify compliance of radiation protection laws

  19. Enhanced current and voltage regulators for stand-alone applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federico, de Bosio; Pastorelli, Michele; Antonio DeSouza Ribeiro, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    State feedback decoupling permits to achieve a better dynamic response for Voltage Source in stand-alone applications. The design of current and voltage regulators is performed in the discrete-time domain since it provides better accuracy and allows direct pole placement. As the attainable...... bandwidth of the current loop is mainly limited by computational and PWM delays, a lead compensator structure is proposed to overcome this limitation. The design of the voltage regulator is based on the Nyquist criterion, verifying to guarantee a high sensitivity peak. Discrete-time domain implementation...

  20. Does Training in How to Regulate One's Learning Affect How Students Report Self-Regulated Learning in Diary Tasks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Ferreira, P.; Veiga Simão, A. M.; Lopes da Silva, A.

    2015-01-01

    The processes and perceptions of students' self-regulated learning are not easily measured. Thus, research has presented and suggested numerous ways in which these processes and perceptions of self-regulated learning can be investigated and assessed. Accordingly, this study aims to assess whether training in how to regulate one's learning is…

  1. Does gender impact upon application rejection rate among Canadian radiology residency applicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerlocher, Mark O; Walker, Michelle

    2005-10-01

    To determine if and how gender ratios have changed within Canadian radiology, and to determine if gender discrimination occurs at the level of the radiology resident selection committee. The Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Association of Radiologists, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and Canadian Residency Matching Service provided gender-specific data. We compared the proportion of female applicants who ranked a radiology program as their top choice and were rejected from any radiology program with the corresponding proportion for male applicants. The numbers of women and men being awarded an MD from a Canadian university equalized nearly a decade ago. Women continue to be numerically underrepresented among practicing radiologists; however, the proportion of women continues to increase so that there is 1 female radiologist in practice to every 3 male radiologists in practice in 2005. More male medical students ranked a radiology residency training program as their top choice in the residency match; however, of those who did, they were as likely as women to be rejected from a radiology residency training program. Grouping all female and male graduating medical students participating in the residency match and ranking a radiology residency as their top choice between 1993 and 2004, the odds of men being rejected were 1.4 times (95% CI 0.99-1.9, p = 0.07) greater than for women. There continues to be more men than women radiologists in practice; however, the female-to-male ratio continues to increase. Our data suggest that discrimination against female applicants at the level of radiology residency selection does not occur.

  2. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Electromechanical properties of superconductors for DOE fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.; Bray, S.L.; Lutgen, C.L.; Bahn, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    The electrical performance of many superconducting materials is strongly dependent on mechanical load. This report presents electromechanical data on a broad range of high-magnetic-field superconductors. The conductors that were studied fall into three general categories: Candidate conductors, experimental conductors, and reference conductors. Research on candidate conductors for fusion applications provides screening data for superconductor selection as well as engineering data for magnet design and performance analysis. The effect of axial tensile strain on critical-current density was measured for several Nb 3 Sn candidate conductors including the US-DPC (United States Demonstration Poloidal Coil) cable strand and an ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) candidate conductor. Also, data are presented on promising experimental superconductors that have strong potential for fusion applications. Axial strain measurements were made on a V 3 Ga tape conductor that has good performance at magnetic fields up to 20 T. Axial strain data are also presented for three experimental Nb 3 Sn conductors that contain dispersion hardened copper reinforcement for increased tensile strength. Finally, electromechanical characteristics were measured for three different Nb 3 Sn reference conductors from the first and second VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) international Nb 3 Sn critical-current round robins. Published papers containing key results, including the first measurement of the transverse stress effect in Nb 3 Sn, the effect of stress concentration at cable-strand crossovers, and electromechanical characteristics of Nb 3 Al, are included throughout the report

  4. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Exercise training during normobaric hypoxic confinement does not alter hormonal appetite regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Debevec

    Full Text Available Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health.Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼ 4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139 ± 0.003% either combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (Exercise group; N = 8, Age = 25.8 ± 2.4 yrs, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.2 kg · m(-2 or without any exercise (Sedentary group; N = 6 Age = 24.8 ± 3.1 yrs, BMI = 22.3 ± 2.5 kg · m(-2. A meal tolerance test was performed before (Pre and after the confinement (Post to quantify fasting and postp randial concentrations of selected appetite-related hormones and metabolic risk markers. 13C-Glucose was dissolved in the test meal and 13CO2 determined in breath samples. Perceived appetite ratings were obtained throughout the meal tolerance tests.While body mass decreased in both groups (-1.4 kg; p = 0.01 following the confinement, whole body fat mass was only reduced in the Exercise group (-1.5 kg; p = 0.01. At Post, postprandial serum insulin was reduced in the Sedentary group (-49%; p = 0.01 and postprandial plasma glucose in the Exercise group (-19%; p = 0.03. Fasting serum total cholesterol levels were reduced (-12%; p = 0.01 at Post in the Exercise group only, secondary to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction (-16%; p = 0.01. No differences between groups or testing periods were noted in fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of total ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, adiponectin, expired 13CO2 as well as perceived appetite ratings (p>0.05.These findings suggest that performing daily moderate intensity exercise training during continuous hypoxic exposure does not alter hormonal appetite regulation but

  6. Exercise training during normobaric hypoxic confinement does not alter hormonal appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Tadej; Simpson, Elizabeth J; Macdonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health. Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼ 4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139 ± 0.003%) either combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (Exercise group; N = 8, Age = 25.8 ± 2.4 yrs, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.2 kg · m(-2)) or without any exercise (Sedentary group; N = 6 Age = 24.8 ± 3.1 yrs, BMI = 22.3 ± 2.5 kg · m(-2)). A meal tolerance test was performed before (Pre) and after the confinement (Post) to quantify fasting and postp randial concentrations of selected appetite-related hormones and metabolic risk markers. 13C-Glucose was dissolved in the test meal and 13CO2 determined in breath samples. Perceived appetite ratings were obtained throughout the meal tolerance tests. While body mass decreased in both groups (-1.4 kg; p = 0.01) following the confinement, whole body fat mass was only reduced in the Exercise group (-1.5 kg; p = 0.01). At Post, postprandial serum insulin was reduced in the Sedentary group (-49%; p = 0.01) and postprandial plasma glucose in the Exercise group (-19%; p = 0.03). Fasting serum total cholesterol levels were reduced (-12%; p = 0.01) at Post in the Exercise group only, secondary to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction (-16%; p = 0.01). No differences between groups or testing periods were noted in fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of total ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, adiponectin, expired 13CO2 as well as perceived appetite ratings (p>0.05). These findings suggest that performing daily moderate intensity exercise training during continuous hypoxic exposure does not alter hormonal appetite regulation but can

  7. U.S. DOE Intermountain Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, Patti [Etc Group, LLC, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Intermountain Clean Energy Application Center helped promote, assist, and transform the market for combined heat and power (CHP), including waste heat to power and district energy with CHP, in the intermountain states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. We accomplished these objectives through a combination of the following methods, which proved in concert to be a technically and economically effective strategy: o Identifying and facilitating high-impact CHP projects o Helping industrial, commercial, institutional, federal, and other large energy users in evaluating the economic and technical viability of potential CHP systems o Disseminating essential information about CHP including benefits, technologies, applications, project development, project financing, electric and gas utility incentives, and state policies o Coordinating and collaborating on CHP advancement with regional stakeholders including electric utilities, gas utilities, state energy offices, municipal development and planning personnel, trade associations, industry groups, non-profits, energy users, and others Outcomes of the project included increased understanding of and deployment of efficient and well-designed CHP systems in the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. Increased CHP deployment helps the United States to enhance energy efficiency, strengthen the competitiveness of American industries, promote economic growth, foster a robust and resilient energy infrastructure, reduce emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases, and increase the use of market-ready advanced technologies. Specific outcomes included direct assistance to energy-intensive industrial facilities and other businesses, workshops and CHP tours, communication materials, and state policy education, all contributing to implementation of CHP systems in the intermountain region.

  8. Applicability of gassy mine regulations: Engineering study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This study reviewed three bodies of current Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) gassy mine regulations, to address whether the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 30, Part 57 Safety and Health Standards - Metal and Nonmetal Underground Mines, Section 21-Gassy Mines, or Parts 75 Mandatory Safety Standards - Underground Coal Mines, and Part 77 Mandatory Safety Standards - Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines, are more applicable to a subsurface repository design. Part 57.21 is determined to be most applicable. There are, however, three sections in Parts 75 and 77 which address certain applicable items in greater detail and, therefore, will provide a more conservative design approach in these areas than Part 57.21, and should be incorporated into the basis for design. Study work also revealed that proposed CFR Title 30, Part 58 Mine Safety and Health - Metal and Nonmetal Standards, will have to be considered during design work if and when these have been promulgated. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Application of EPA regulations to low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowerman, B.S.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    The survey reported here was conducted with the intent of identifying categories of low-level radioactive wastes which would be classified under EPA regulations 40 CFR Part 261 as hazardous due to the chemical properties of the waste. Three waste types are identified under these criteria as potential radioactive mixed wastes: wastes containing organic liquids; wastes containing lead metal; and wastes containing chromium. The survey also indicated that certain wastes, specific to particular generators, may also be radioactive mixed wastes. Ultimately, the responsibility for determining whether a facility's wastes are mixed wastes rest with the generator. However, the uncertainties as to which regulations are applicable, and the fact that no legal definition of mixed wastes exists, make such a determination difficult. In addition to identifying mixed wastes, appropriate methods for the management of mixed wastes must be defined. In an ongoing study, BNL is evaluating options for the management of mixed wastes. These options will include segregation, substitution, and treatments to reduce or eliminate chemical hazards associated with the wastes listed above. The impacts of the EPA regulations governing hazardous wastes on radioactive mixed waste cannot be assessed in detail until the applicability of these regulations is agreed upon. This issue is still being discussed by EPA and NRC and should be resolved in the near future. Areas of waste management which may affect generators of mixed wastes include: monitoring/tracking of wastes before shipment; chemical testing of wastes; permits for treatment of storage of wastes; and additional packaging requirements. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. How Does Environmental Regulation Affect Industrial Transformation? A Study Based on the Methodology of Policy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference of factor input structure determines different response to environmental regulation. This paper constructs a theoretical model including environmental regulation, factor input structure, and industrial transformation and conducts a policy simulation based on the difference of influencing mechanism of environmental regulation considering industrial heterogeneity. The findings show that the impact of environmental regulation on industrial transformation presents comparison of distortion effect of resource allocation and technology effect. Environmental regulation will promote industrial transformation when technology effect of environmental regulation is stronger than distortion effect of resource allocation. Particularly, command-control environmental regulation has a significant incentive effect and spillover effect of technological innovation on cleaning industries, but these effects do not exist in pollution-intensive industries. Command-control environmental regulation promotes industrial transformation. The result of simulation showed that environmental regulation of market incentives is similar to that of command-control.

  11. How Does Self-Regulation Affect Computer-Programming Achievement in a Blended Context?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigdem, Harun

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on learners' self-regulation which is one of the essential skills for student achievement in blended courses. Research on learners' self-regulation skills in blended learning environments has gained popularity in recent years however only a few studies investigating the correlation between self-regulation skills and student…

  12. DOE's Institute for Advanced Architecture and Algorithms: An application-driven approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an application driven methodology for understanding the impact of future architecture decisions on the end of the MPP era. Fundamental transistor device limitations combined with application performance characteristics have created the switch to multicore/multithreaded architectures. Designing large-scale supercomputers to match application demands is particularly challenging since performance characteristics are highly counter-intuitive. In fact, data movement more than FLOPS dominates. This work discusses some basic performance analysis for a set of DOE applications, the limits of CMOS technology, and the impact of both on future architectures.

  13. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard

    2011-06-01

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  14. The Legal Structure of Commercial Banks and Financial Regulation : does organizational form matter for the design of bank regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.L.E. Cedeno-Brea (Enmanuel)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractDo the different ways that commercial banks are legally organized matter for the design of financial regulation? It is often assumed that most commercial banks are setup as investor owned business corporations. However, this is not always the case In many jurisdictions, banks are

  15. The applicability of DOE solar cell and array technology to space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Berman, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the main terrestrial photovoltaic development projects was performed. Technologies that may have applicability to space power are identified. Where appropriate, recommendations are made for programs to capitalize on developed technology. It is concluded that while the funding expended by DOE is considerably greater than the space (NASA and DOD) budget for photovoltaics, the terrestrial goals and the means for satisfying them are sufficiently different from space needs that little direct benefit currently exists for space applications.

  16. Compilation of nuclear safety criteria potential application to DOE nonreactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This bibliographic document compiles nuclear safety criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for a nonreactor nuclear facility (NNF). The criteria listed are derived from federal regulations, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guides and publications, DOE and DOE contractor publications, and industry codes and standards. The titles of the chapters and sections of Regulatory Guide 3.26, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Fuel Reprocessing Plants'' were used to format the chapters and sections of this compilation. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups, namely: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) USNRC Regulatory Guides, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplementary Information

  17. The Legal Structure of Commercial Banks and Financial Regulation : does organizational form matter for the design of bank regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Cedeno-Brea, Enmanuel

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractDo the different ways that commercial banks are legally organized matter for the design of financial regulation? It is often assumed that most commercial banks are setup as investor owned business corporations. However, this is not always the case In many jurisdictions, banks are legally organized using a plethora of organizational forms, which include: co-operatives, mutual associations and even nonprofit entities. Thus, some of the distinctive legal attributes and features o...

  18. The Fat-Dachsous signaling pathway regulates growth of horns in Trypoxylus dichotomus, but does not affect horn allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hust, James; Lavine, Mark D; Worthington, Amy M; Zinna, Robert; Gotoh, Hiroki; Niimi, T; Lavine, Laura

    Males of the Asian rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus, possess exaggerated head and thoracic horns that scale dramatically out of proportion to body size. While studies of insulin signaling suggest that this pathway regulates nutrition-dependent growth including exaggerated horns, what regulates disproportionate growth has yet to be identified. The Fat signaling pathway is a potential candidate for regulating disproportionate growth of sexually-selected traits, a hypothesis we advanced in a previous paper (Gotoh et al., 2015). To investigate the role of Fat signaling in the growth and scaling of the sexually dimorphic, condition-dependent traits of the in the Asian rhinoceros beetle T. dichotomus, we used RNA interference to knock down expression of fat and its co-receptor dachsous. Knockdown of fat, and to a lesser degree dachsous, caused shortening and widening of appendages, including the head and thoracic horns. However, scaling of horns to body size was not affected. Our results show that Fat signaling regulates horn growth in T. dichotomus as it does in appendage growth in other insects. However, we provide evidence that Fat signaling does not mediate the disproportionate, positive allometric growth of horns in T. dichotomus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 63355 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... (Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary Lodging and VHA Fisher House Application... information technology. Title: Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary Lodging and VHA Fisher House Application, VA Forms 10-0408 and 10-0408a. OMB Control Number: 2900-0630. Type of Review...

  20. Does Emotion Regulation Change in Treatment? An Investigation of cognitive-oriented therapies.

    OpenAIRE

    Finsrud, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently, there has been increased interest in the study of emotion regulation difficulties in psychopathology. Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, and growing research suggests that emotion regulation difficulties function as a maintaining factor in these disorders. A common characteristic of the various types of anxiety disorders is the use of inhibited emotion regulation strategies such as worry, suppression, and avoidance. Hence, our understanding of t...

  1. Supporting the self-regulatory resource: does conscious self-regulation incidentally prime nonconscious support processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, Derek C

    2009-11-01

    Ego-depletion (depletion of self-regulatory strength) can impair conscious efforts at self-regulation. Research into nonconscious self-regulation has demonstrated that preconscious automaticity and implementation intentions can automatically carry out regulatory tasks during times of ego-depletion. However, preconscious automaticity can only emerge during well-practiced tasks while implementation intentions can only support tasks that have been explicitly planned. Thus, when it comes to supporting the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour during times of ego-depletion these processes should be ineffective. However, it is argued here that because the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour can incidentally prime the underlying mental representations those primed representations can be postconsciously re-activated to support that behaviour during times of ego-depletion. Postconscious self-regulation might, therefore, support a type of self-regulatory behaviour that has, thus far, not been associated with any form of support.

  2. Does Preschool Self-Regulation Predict Later Behavior Problems in General or Specific Problem Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, Christopher J; Spiegel, Jamie A; Goodrich, J Marc; Morris, Brittany M; Osborne, Colleen M; Lerner, Matthew D; Phillips, Beth M

    2017-11-01

    Findings from prior research have consistently indicated significant associations between self-regulation and externalizing behaviors. Significant associations have also been reported between children's language skills and both externalizing behaviors and self-regulation. Few studies to date, however, have examined these relations longitudinally, simultaneously, or with respect to unique clusters of externalizing problems. The current study examined the influence of preschool self-regulation on general and specific externalizing behavior problems in early elementary school and whether these relations were independent of associations between language, self-regulation, and externalizing behaviors in a sample of 815 children (44% female). Additionally, given a general pattern of sex differences in the presentations of externalizing behavior problems, self-regulation, and language skills, sex differences for these associations were examined. Results indicated unique relations of preschool self-regulation and language with both general externalizing behavior problems and specific problems of inattention. In general, self-regulation was a stronger longitudinal correlate of externalizing behavior for boys than it was for girls, and language was a stronger longitudinal predictor of hyperactive/impulsive behavior for girls than it was for boys.

  3. 16 CFR 304.4 - Application of other law or regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of other law or regulation. 304.4 Section 304.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE HOBBY PROTECTION ACT § 304.4 Application of other law or...

  4. Bank regulation and financial fragility in developing countries: Does bank structure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Klomp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data for 1238 banks located in 94 developing and emerging countries, we explore whether the impact of bank regulation and supervision on banking risk (measured by the banks’ Z-scores depends on bank structure. Our findings suggest that stricter regulation and supervision increases the banks’ Z-scores. Notably capital requirements and supervisory control diminish banking risk. However, the effectiveness of other dimensions of regulation and supervision depends on the organizational structure of banks. Notably activity restrictions reduce risk of large and foreign owned banks, while liquidity restrictions have most effect on the Z-scores of unlisted and commercial banks.

  5. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  6. Small Area Estimate Maps: Does the FDA Regulate Tobacco? - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This metric is defined as a person 18 years of age or older who must have reported that he/she believes that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates tobacco products in the U.S.

  7. Emotion regulation as the foundation of political attitudes: does reappraisal decrease support for conservative policies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooa Julia Lee

    Full Text Available Cognitive scientists, behavior geneticists, and political scientists have identified several ways in which emotions influence political attitudes, and psychologists have shown that emotion regulation can have an important causal effect on physiology, cognition, and subjective experience. However, no work to date explores the possibility that emotion regulation may shape political ideology and attitudes toward policies. Here, we conduct four studies that investigate the role of a particular emotion regulation strategy--reappraisal in particular. Two observational studies show that individual differences in emotion regulation styles predict variation in political orientations and support for conservative policies. In the third study, we experimentally induce disgust as the target emotion to be regulated and show that use of reappraisal reduces the experience of disgust, thereby decreasing moral concerns associated with conservatism. In the final experimental study, we show that use of reappraisal successfully attenuates the relationship between trait-level disgust sensitivity and support for conservative policies. Our findings provide the first evidence of a critical link between emotion regulation and political attitudes.

  8. Emotion Regulation as the Foundation of Political Attitudes: Does Reappraisal Decrease Support for Conservative Policies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooa Julia; Sohn, Yunkyu; Fowler, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive scientists, behavior geneticists, and political scientists have identified several ways in which emotions influence political attitudes, and psychologists have shown that emotion regulation can have an important causal effect on physiology, cognition, and subjective experience. However, no work to date explores the possibility that emotion regulation may shape political ideology and attitudes toward policies. Here, we conduct four studies that investigate the role of a particular emotion regulation strategy – reappraisal in particular. Two observational studies show that individual differences in emotion regulation styles predict variation in political orientations and support for conservative policies. In the third study, we experimentally induce disgust as the target emotion to be regulated and show that use of reappraisal reduces the experience of disgust, thereby decreasing moral concerns associated with conservatism. In the final experimental study, we show that use of reappraisal successfully attenuates the relationship between trait-level disgust sensitivity and support for conservative policies. Our findings provide the first evidence of a critical link between emotion regulation and political attitudes. PMID:24367583

  9. How does the alcohol industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim To systematically review, using a qualitative, narrative synthesis approach, papers examining alcohol industry efforts to influence alcohol marketing policy, and compare with those used by the tobacco industry. Methods Literature searches were conducted between April and July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Papers were included if they: made reference to alcohol industry efforts to influence (a) policy debates concerning marketing regulations, (b) new specific marketing policies or (c) broad alcohol policy which included marketing regulations; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990–2013. Alcohol industry political activity was categorized into strategies/tactics and frames/arguments. Data extraction was undertaken by the lead author and 100% of the papers were fully second‐reviewed. Seventeen papers met the review criteria. Results Five main political strategies and five main frames were identified. The alcohol industry argues against marketing regulation by emphasizing industry responsibility and the effectiveness of self‐regulation, questioning the effectiveness of statutory regulation and by focusing on individual responsibility. Arguments relating to industry responsibility are often reinforced through corporate social responsibility activities. The industry primarily conveys its arguments through manipulating the evidence base and by promoting ineffective voluntary codes and non‐regulatory initiatives. Conclusions The alcohol industry's political activity is more varied than existing models of corporate political activity suggest. The industry's opposition to marketing regulation centres on claims that the industry is responsible and that self regulation is effective. There are considerable commonalities between tobacco and alcohol industry political activity, with differences due potentially to differences in policy contexts and perceived industry legitimacy. PMID:26173765

  10. How does the alcohol industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savell, Emily; Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review, using a qualitative, narrative synthesis approach, papers examining alcohol industry efforts to influence alcohol marketing policy, and compare with those used by the tobacco industry. Literature searches were conducted between April and July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Papers were included if they: made reference to alcohol industry efforts to influence (a) policy debates concerning marketing regulations, (b) new specific marketing policies or (c) broad alcohol policy which included marketing regulations; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990-2013. Alcohol industry political activity was categorized into strategies/tactics and frames/arguments. Data extraction was undertaken by the lead author and 100% of the papers were fully second-reviewed. Seventeen papers met the review criteria. Five main political strategies and five main frames were identified. The alcohol industry argues against marketing regulation by emphasizing industry responsibility and the effectiveness of self-regulation, questioning the effectiveness of statutory regulation and by focusing on individual responsibility. Arguments relating to industry responsibility are often reinforced through corporate social responsibility activities. The industry primarily conveys its arguments through manipulating the evidence base and by promoting ineffective voluntary codes and non-regulatory initiatives. The alcohol industry's political activity is more varied than existing models of corporate political activity suggest. The industry's opposition to marketing regulation centres on claims that the industry is responsible and that self regulation is effective. There are considerable commonalities between tobacco and alcohol industry political activity, with differences due potentially to differences in policy contexts and perceived industry legitimacy. © 2015 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of

  11. 76 FR 78739 - Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0630] Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary Lodging and VHA Fisher House Application... INFORMATION: Title: Regulation on Application for Fisher Houses and Other Temporary Lodging and VHA Fisher...

  12. Does rumination mediate the relationship between emotion regulation ability and posttraumatic stress disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ehring

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Trauma-related rumination has been suggested to be involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This view has empirically been supported by extensive evidence using cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental designs. However, it is unclear why trauma survivors engage in rumination despite its negative consequences. The current study aimed to explore the hypothesis that low emotion regulation ability underlies trauma-related rumination. Methods: Emotion regulation ability and trauma-related rumination were assessed in 93 road traffic accident survivors 2 weeks post-trauma. In addition, symptom levels of PTSD were assessed at 2 weeks as well as 1, 3, and 6 months follow-up. Results: Emotion regulation ability was significantly related to trauma-related rumination as well as levels of PTSD symptoms. In addition, the association between low emotion regulation ability and PTSD was mediated by rumination. Conclusions: The findings support the view that rumination is used as a dysfunctional emotion regulation strategy by trauma survivors.

  13. Does self-regulation capacity predict psychological well-being in physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christopher R; Durand-Bush, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing research on physician well-being, factors appearing to account for individual variation in levels of optimal functioning are largely unclear. One such factor could be self-regulation, which reflects how individuals effectively manage their thoughts, emotions and behaviours, and cope with adversity in their environment. The purpose of this study was to determine if self-regulation capacity could significantly predict psychological well-being in a sample of Canadian physicians. A total of 132 physicians completed the Scales of Psychological Well-Being and the short form of the Self-Regulation Questionnaire. Regression analyses confirmed the hypothesis that a significant amount of variance in levels of psychological well-being would be explained by self-regulation capacity. There was a particularly strong relationship between self-regulation capacity and the dimensions of purpose in life and environmental mastery, which suggests that physicians who effectively self-manage may be better able to preserve a sense of purpose and an adequate work-life balance in their daily life. Physicians today face consistently growing demands stemming from increasingly challenging work environments. Results of this study mark an important step in increasing our understanding of a potentially valuable skill that may help physicians to achieve well-being.

  14. Does enhanced regulation improve EIA report quality? Lessons from South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandham, L.A., E-mail: luke.sandham@nwu.ac.za [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Heerden, A.J. van [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Jones, C.E. [School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Retief, F.P.; Morrison-Saunders, A.N. [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-01-15

    Recently, various EIA systems have been subjected to system review processes with a view to improve performance. Many of these reviews resulted in some form of legislative reform. The South African Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) regulations were modified in 2006 with the express intent to improve EIA effectiveness. In order to evaluate to what extent the desired outcome was achieved, the quality of EIA reports produced under the 2006 regulations was investigated for comparative analysis with the preceding regime. A sample of EIA reports from the two legislative regimes was reviewed using an adapted version of a well established method known colloquially as the 'Lee and Colley' review package. Despite some improvements in certain aspects, overall report quality has decreased slightly from the 1997 EIA regime. It therefore appears that the modifications to the regulations, often heralded as the solution to improvements in performance have not resulted in improved quality of EIA reports. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EIA regulations in South Africa were revised and became more comprehensive in 2006. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The report quality of a sample of EIAs was reviewed using the Lee and Colley review package. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Report quality showed a slight decline from the previous regulatory regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EIA good practice needs flexibility rather than over-detailed regulation.

  15. Does enhanced regulation improve EIA report quality? Lessons from South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandham, L.A.; Heerden, A.J. van; Jones, C.E.; Retief, F.P.; Morrison-Saunders, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, various EIA systems have been subjected to system review processes with a view to improve performance. Many of these reviews resulted in some form of legislative reform. The South African Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) regulations were modified in 2006 with the express intent to improve EIA effectiveness. In order to evaluate to what extent the desired outcome was achieved, the quality of EIA reports produced under the 2006 regulations was investigated for comparative analysis with the preceding regime. A sample of EIA reports from the two legislative regimes was reviewed using an adapted version of a well established method known colloquially as the “Lee and Colley” review package. Despite some improvements in certain aspects, overall report quality has decreased slightly from the 1997 EIA regime. It therefore appears that the modifications to the regulations, often heralded as the solution to improvements in performance have not resulted in improved quality of EIA reports. - Highlights: ► EIA regulations in South Africa were revised and became more comprehensive in 2006. ► The report quality of a sample of EIAs was reviewed using the Lee and Colley review package. ► Report quality showed a slight decline from the previous regulatory regime. ► EIA good practice needs flexibility rather than over-detailed regulation.

  16. Electromechanical properties of superconductors for DOE/OFE applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.; Bray, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    In many superconductor applications, especially large magnets, the superconductor is required to perform while under the influence of strong mechanical forces. These forces are commonly due to residual fabrication stress, differential thermal contraction of dissimilar materials, and electromagnetic forces generated within an energized magnet coil. Thorough knowledge of a superconductor's electrical performance under the influence of these forces (electromechanical properties) is required for successful magnet engineering. This report presents results of research conducted during the period from august 1993 through March 1997 on the electromechanical properties of superconductors for DOE/OFE fusion applications

  17. Bank Risk-Taking Abroad : Does Home-Country Regulation and Supervision Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, S.; Popov, A.; Udell, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first empirical evidence on how home-country regulation and supervision affects bank risk-tailing in host-country markets. We analyze lending by 136 banks to 8,253 firms in 1,513 different localities across 13 countries. We find strong evidence that laxer regulatory

  18. Bank Risk-Taking Abroad : Does Home-Country Regulation and Supervision Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, S.; Popov, A.; Udell, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first empirical evidence on how home-country regulation and supervision affects bank risk-tailing in hostr-country markets. We analyze lending by 136 banks to 8,253 firms in 1,513 different localities across 13 countries. We find strong evidence that laxer regulatory

  19. How Does Self-Regulated Learning Relate to Active Procrastination and Other Learning Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masanori; Goda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeshi; Saito, Yutaka; Kato, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between self-regulated learning awareness, procrastination, and learning behaviors in a blended learning environment. Participants included 179 first-grade university students attending a blended learning-style class that used a learning management system. Data were collected using questionnaires on…

  20. Does Using E-Portfolios for Reflective Writing Enhance High School Students' Self-Regulated Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Shu, Kuen-Ming; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to examine whether reflective writing using e-portfolios enhances high school students' self-regulated learning. Participants included two classes of eighth-graders majoring in Information Processing and taking a course called "Website Design" at a vocational high school in Taiwan. There were 41 students, with 18 males and…

  1. Does Education Empower Women? The Regulated Empowerment of "Parhi Likhi" Women in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Ayesha

    2017-01-01

    Through employing ethnographic data collected with female teachers from rural and low-income communities in Pakistan, this paper examines how parhi likhi (educated) women's access to valuable opportunities in public domains is contingent upon them becoming subject to new regulations, especially regarding their sexuality. This gendered process of…

  2. Neonatal immune challenge does not affect body weight regulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sarah J; Mouihate, Abdeslam; Galic, Michael A; Ellis, Shaun L; Pittman, Quentin J

    2007-08-01

    The perinatal environment plays a crucial role in programming many aspects of adult physiology. Myriad stressors during pregnancy, from maternal immune challenge to nutritional deficiency, can alter long-term body weight set points of the offspring. In light of the increasing concern over body weight issues, such as obesity and anorexia, in modern societies and accumulating evidence that developmental stressors have long-lasting effects on other aspects of physiology (e.g., fever, pain), we explored the role of immune system activation during neonatal development and its impact on body weight regulation in adulthood. Here we present a thorough evaluation of the effects of immune system activation (LPS, 100 microg/kg ip) at postnatal days 3, 7, or 14 on long-term body weight, adiposity, and body weight regulation after a further LPS injection (50 microg/kg ip) or fasting and basal and LPS-induced circulating levels of the appetite-regulating proinflammatory cytokine leptin. We show that neonatal exposure to LPS at various times during the neonatal period has no long-term effects on growth, body weight, or adiposity. We also observed no effects on body weight regulation in response to a short fasting period or a further exposure to LPS. Despite reductions in circulating leptin levels in response to LPS during the neonatal period, no long-term effects on leptin were seen. These results convincingly demonstrate that adult body weight and weight regulation are, unlike many other aspects of adult physiology, resistant to programming by a febrile-dose neonatal immune challenge.

  3. Feasibility study--computerized application of the hazardous material regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Green, V.M.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-09-01

    The feasibility of developing a full expert system for transportation and packaging of hazardous and radioactive materials was initiated within the framework of three subtasks: (1) analysis of commercial packages related to regulation scanning, (2) analysis of computer languages to develop the expert system, and (3) development of expert system prototypes. The strategy to develop the latter subtask was to first,develop modules to capture the knowledge of different areas of transportation and packaging and second, to analyze the feasibility of appending these different modules in one final full package. The individual modules development contemplated one prototype for transporting and packaging of radioactive material and another for transporting hazardous chemical materials. In the event that it is not feasible to link these two packages, the modules can always be used as stand-alone tools, or linked as a single package with some restrictions in their applicability. The work done during this fiscal year has focused on developing a prototype for transporting radioactive materials

  4. Striking a balance: does nitrate uptake and metabolism regulate both NO generation and scavenging?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Gupta, Kapuganti J

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) influences many aspects of plant development and responses to stress.The concentration of NO can play an important role in influencing its action (for example, in stomatal regulation; Wilson et al., 2009) so that the mechanisms through which NO content is modulated must...... be an important facet of NO research. Whilst NO generation mechanisms are clearly important, NO removal is of equal relevance, especially as plants will be continually exposed to NOx (NO + NO2) gases derived from soil microbial activity (Mur et al., 2013). Establishing and regulating a poise between NO generation......, NO fumigation from external sources and NO scavenging, which also needs to be flexible enough to change in response to a variety of physiological cues, is an under-considered aspect of plant NO biology...

  5. Water Services in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area: How Does State Regulation Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Verónica Rocca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the State regulation of drinking water and sanitation services in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires. Its main objective is to identify the continuities and ruptures in State regulation during the transition from private management (1993-2006 to renationalisation and State management (2006 onwards. The concept of “State capacities” (both administrative and relational is used to assess regulatory performance. For the administrative capacities, the correspondence between the design and resources of the agencies, as well as the differences between their formal functions and actual practices, is examined. For the relational capacities, the policies of the National Government and its interaction with both the water and sanitation companies and the regulatory and control agencies are considered. The analysis is based on official documents, legislation and statistics, company balance sheets and reports, newspaper articles and semi-structured interviews.

  6. Does the intensity of prudential regulation affect banks? Evidence from the 2007-2009 crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Argimon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to gather empirical evidence on the effects of more or less stringency and more or less risk sensitivity in regulatory capital requirements on the observed behaviour of European banks during the initial years of the financial crisis. To do so, we use the indices built in Argimón and Ruiz (2010, which capture such characteristics of capital regulation. We test their incidence using changes in yearly data for individual banks for 25 countries of the European Union covering the period 2007-2009. Our results show that more stringency and risk sensitivity in capital regulation resulted in higher capital increases, with limited effect on risk taking. However, for well capitalized banks, higher risk sensitivity resulted in higher capital and higher risk, thus requiring striking the right balance, so as to lead to increased stability.

  7. Does a short self-compassion intervention for students increase healthy self-regulation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dundas, Ingrid; Binder, Per Einar; Hansen, Tia G.B.

    2017-01-01

    negative self-directed thinking; as well as for self-compassion, anxiety and depression. Concluding, a short self-compassion course seems an effective method of increasing self-compassion and perceived control over one's life for university students, as well as increasing mental health.......The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of a two-week self-compassion course on healthy self-regulation (personal growth self-efficacy and healthy impulse control) and unhealthy self-regulation (self-judgment and habitual negative self-directed thinking) in university students. We...... also examined the effects on self-compassion, anxiety and depression. Students (N = 158, 85% women, mean age = 25 years) were randomized to an intervention group and a waiting-list control group in a multi-baseline randomized control trial. Healthy self-control was measured by the Personal Growth...

  8. The Case of Dr. Oz: Ethics, Evidence, and Does Professional Self-Regulation Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburt, Jon C; Allyse, Megan; Hafferty, Frederic W

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Mehmet Oz is widely known not just as a successful media personality donning the title "America's Doctor ® ," but, we suggest, also as a physician visibly out of step with his profession. A recent, unsuccessful attempt to censure Dr. Oz raises the issue of whether the medical profession can effectively self-regulate at all. It also raises concern that the medical profession's self-regulation might be selectively activated, perhaps only when the subject of professional censure has achieved a level of public visibility. We argue here that the medical profession must look at itself with a healthy dose of self-doubt about whether it has sufficient knowledge of or handle on the less visible Dr. "Ozes" quietly operating under the profession's presumptive endorsement. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Does interoceptive awareness affect the ability to regulate unfair treatment by others?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascha eVan 't Wout

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we aimed to investigate how awareness of bodily responses, referred to as interoceptive awareness, influences decision-making in a social interactive context. Interoceptive awareness is thought to be crucial for adequate regulation of one’s emotions. However, there is a dearth of studies that examine the association between interoceptive awareness and the ability to regulate emotions during interpersonal decision-making. Here, we quantified interoceptive awareness with a heartbeat detection task in which we measured the difference between subjective self-reports and an objective psychophysiological measurement of participant heart rates. Social decision-making was quantified using a two-round Ultimatum Game. Participants were asked to first reject or accept an unfair division of money proposed by a partner. In turn, participants could then make an offer on how to divide an amount of money with the same partner. Participants performed 20 rounds of the two-round Ultimatum Game twice, once during baseline condition and once while asked to reappraise emotional reactions when confronted with unfair offers from partners. Results showed that after reappraisal participants 1 accepted more unfair offers and 2 offered higher return divisions, as compared to baseline. With respect to interoceptive awareness, participants with better heartbeat detection scores tended to report less emotional involvement when they applied reappraisal while playing the Ultimatum Game. However, there was no reliably significant relationship between heartbeat detection and the acceptance of unfair offers. Similarly, heartbeat detection accuracy was not related to return offers made in the second round of the Ultimatum Game or the habitual use of emotion regulation. These preliminary findings suggest that the relationship between interoceptive awareness and behavioral changes due to emotion regulation in a social decision-making context appears to be complex.

  10. Does body mass play a role in the regulation of food intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R; Stubbs, R James; Mercer, Julian G

    2002-11-01

    It is widely believed that body fatness (and hence total body mass) is regulated by a lipostatic feedback system. This system is suggested to involve at least one peripheral signalling compound, which signals to the brain the current size of body fat stores. In the brain the level of the signal is compared with a desirable target level, and food intake and energy expenditure are then regulated to effect changes in the size of body fat stores. There is considerable support for this theory at several different levels of investigation. Patterns of body-mass change in subjects forced into energy imbalance seem to demonstrate homeostasis, and long-term changes in body mass are minor compared with the potential changes that might result from energy imbalance. Molecular studies of signalling compounds have suggested a putative lipostatic signal (leptin) and a complex network of downstream processing events in the brain, polymorphisms of which lead to disruption of body-mass regulation. This network of neuropeptides provides a rich seam of potential pharmaceutical targets for the control of obesity. Despite this consistent explanation for the observed phenomena at several different levels of enquiry, there are alternative explanations. In the present paper we explore the possibility that the existence of lipostatic regulation of body fatness is an illusion generated by the links between body mass and energy expenditure and responses to energy imbalance that are independent of body mass. Using computer-based models of temporal patterns in energy balance we show that common patterns of change in body mass following perturbation can be adequately explained by this 'non-lipostatic' model. This model has some important implications for the interpretations that we place on the molecular events in the brain, and ultimately in the search for pharmaceutical agents for alleviation of obesity.

  11. Does rumination mediate the relationship between emotion regulation ability and posttraumatic stress disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Trauma-related rumination has been suggested to be involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This view has empirically been supported by extensive evidence using cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental designs. However, it is unclear why trauma survivors engage in rumination despite its negative consequences. The current study aimed to explore the hypothesis that low emotion regulation ability underlies trauma-related rumination.Met...

  12. The Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations: The Rome I Regulation in Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    De Miguel Asensio, Pedro Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations: The Rome I Regulation in Comparative Perspective I. Introduction II. Party Autonomy III. Applicable Law in the Absence of Choice IV. Protection of Weaker Parties V. Overriding Mandatory Rules and Public Policy

  13. Personal and situational predictors of everyday snacking: An application of temporal self-regulation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliston, Katherine G; Ferguson, Stuart G; Schüz, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    , specifically from discretionary food choices (snacking). Temporal self-regulation theory (Hall & Fong, ) takes into account both deliberate and momentary influences on health behaviour, which is especially relevant to exploring the drivers of snacking. What does this study add? Offers new insight into the application of TST in explaining momentary eating behaviours. Snacking initiation is guided by momentary cues, not person-level factors. Dietary interventions should acknowledge the momentary cues that are associated with snacking. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Does DNA methylation regulate metamorphosis? The case of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo-Soto, Lara; Saura, María; Morán, Paloma

    2015-07-01

    Lampreys represent one of the most ancient vertebrate lineages enclosing a special interest for genetic and epigenetic studies. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is an anadromous species that experiences metamorphosis all the way up to the adult stage. Although representing a gradual process, metamorphosis in this species involves dramatic conversions with regard to physiological together with structural body changes preparing individuals for a marine and parasitic life; in consequence, multiple gene expression modifications are expected. The implications of thyroid hormones and HOX gene expression changes have previously been reported in this species and also in other vertebrate species. Nonetheless, information lacks on how these genes are regulated in lampreys. We here report about the existence of methylation pattern differences between the adult and the larvae sea lamprey life cycle stages making use of the Methylation-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) technique. Differentially methylated fragment sequencing allowed to establish homologous identities with HOX genes involved in morphogenesis, along with genes related to the water balance and to the osmotic homoeostasis, all associated to a marine environment adaptation. These results provide evidences revealing that DNA methylation plays a role in the epigenetic regulation of the P. marinus post-natal development representing a starting point for future studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which detects DNA methylation changes associated with metamorphosis in lampreys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does energy-price regulation benefit China's economy and environment? Evidence from energy-price distortions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Keyi; Su, Bin; Zhou, Dequn; Wu, Junmin

    2017-01-01

    China's energy prices have long been regulated due to the critical role energy plays in economic growth and social development, which leads to energy-price distortion to some extent. To figure out whether energy-price regulations will benefit China's economy (measured by GDP growth) and environment (measured by carbon emissions), we conducted an in-depth simulation using path analysis, where five energy products (natural gas, gasoline, fuel oil, steam coal, and coking coal) are selected and three measurements (absolute, relative, and moving) of energy-price distortions are calculated. The results indicate that, with a series of energy pricing policies, the price distortion for a single type of energy has gradually transformed, while the energy pricing system in China is not fully market-oriented yet. Furthermore, China's economy benefits from relative and moving distortions, while the absolute distortions of energy prices have negative impacts on economic growth. Finally, with regard to the environment, carbon emissions call for fewer distortions. - Highlights: • Price distortion for a single type of energy has gradually transformed. • Energy pricing system in China is not yet fully market-oriented. • China's economy benefits from relative and moving distortions. • Absolute distortions of energy prices have negative effects on economic growth. • Carbon emissions call for less pricing distortions.

  16. How much does a regulator have to communicate, how and when?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyers, J.E.; Boyle, M.L.; Gwozdecky, M.

    2006-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations of this session can be summarized this way. - Challenges in communications can be directly due to the structure and politics of government at different levels.- A basic tenet is that journalists are different from the regulator and the industry, they may have a basic suspicion of technology and those who use it. - Two golden rules when communicating with the media: Always give them too much information and never miss a deadline. - Be true to the three basics of communication: Message - what you say. Myself - how you say it. Media - who you are talking to. Also, repetition can be an effective tool to stress the message that you are trying to convey.- Unfortunately, times change, the limits of full disclosure of information to the general public can be adversely affected by the actions of a few. Currently, the challenge in communications is the delivering the message of adequate level of safety and security without being able to discuss in detail why. - On emerging issues like risk of aircraft strikes after 9/11. Through a timely analysis and release of information, it makes easier to satisfy the needs of the public as evidenced by the short time span that this issue appeared in the media. - Implementation of a commitments document (with the help of consultant analyses, adoption of the European Foundation for Quality Management and its own soon to be effective FOI regulation and others) with those that it serve, is a challenging and effective way for improvement. (author)

  17. How does the regulator effectively involve the public in its activities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Degueldre, D.

    2006-01-01

    As a variety of viewpoints and subjects were given in the different representations. The following is a summary: - Regulator commitments regarding public participation and experience gained in terms of effectiveness, visibility and credibility. The way the public hearings/meetings are organised and how they are used in the regulatory process. - How public participation is expected to be in the frame of the new proposed site selection procedure for radioactive waste disposal facility. This new process expects stakeholder involvement from the very beginning, even during the development of the site selection procedure itself, consisting of steps very precisely structured. - Regulator experience on responding to sensitive or 'high emotional' situations reminding the three main key-principles: (1) preparation to have an opportunity to have success; (2) always being honest, even during an 'emergency'; (3) start by understanding correctly the issue. - On how to speak about radioactivity to school children in the frame of an issue of a specific newspaper dedicated for children (8-12 years). Additional local actions in schools were also mentioned. (author)

  18. Overview of the applications of cement-based immobilization technologies developed at US DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25-mm-(1-in.-) diam pellets in a glove box to producing 240-m-(800-ft-) diam grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of immobilization materials. The US DOE sites and their programs are: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Hydrofracture Grout; (2) Hanford, Transportable Grout Facility (TGF); (3) Savannah River Plant (SRP), Nitrate Saltcrete; (4) EG and G Idaho, Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP); (5) Mound Laboratory (ML), Waste Pelletization Process; (6) ORNL, FUETAP Concretes, and (7) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Inert Carrier Concrete Process (ICCP). The major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems are also presented. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is included along with a discussion of future trends in cement-based waste form developments and applications. 35 refs., 12 figs

  19. Lessons learned from application of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities - The regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efraimsson, Henrik; Amft, Martin; Leisvik, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It describes some of the experiences that the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority has gained from the application of these regulations. The focus of the present paper lies on administrative aspects of the care and maintenance operation and on the safety related documentation that has to be prepared before dismantling commences. Lessons learned during recent years will be considered when revising the regulations for decommissioning. Also these lessons learned will help to streamline the administration of the large NPP decommissioning projects that are anticipated to commence in Sweden in the near future. (authors)

  20. 42 CFR 423.2063 - Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings..., ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2063 Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS... on ALJs and the MAC. (b) CMS Rulings are published under the authority of the CMS Administrator...

  1. 42 CFR 405.1063 - Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings... Medicare Coverage Policies § 405.1063 Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings. (a) All laws and... the MAC. (b) CMS Rulings are published under the authority of the Administrator, CMS. Consistent with...

  2. Applicability of International and DOE Target Values to ALD Destructive Measurement Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    International Target values and target value applicability are a function of the nuclear material processing campaign or application for which the accountability measurement method is being applied. Safeguarding significant quantities of nuclear-grade materials requires that accountability measurements be as accurate, precise, and representative as practically possible. In general, the ITV provides a benchmark for determining generic acceptability of the performance of the various accountability measurement methods, since it represents a performance level that is accepted as highly reliable. There are cases where it is acceptable to select alternative accountability methods not specifically referenced by the ITV, or to use the recognized measurement method, even though the uncertainties are greater than the target values

  3. Eye Absence Does Not Regulate Planarian Stem Cells during Eye Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoCascio, Samuel A; Lapan, Sylvain W; Reddien, Peter W

    2017-02-27

    Dividing cells called neoblasts contain pluripotent stem cells and drive planarian flatworm regeneration from diverse injuries. A long-standing question is whether neoblasts directly sense and respond to the identity of missing tissues during regeneration. We used the eye to investigate this question. Surprisingly, eye removal was neither sufficient nor necessary for neoblasts to increase eye progenitor production. Neoblasts normally increase eye progenitor production following decapitation, facilitating regeneration. Eye removal alone, however, did not induce this response. Eye regeneration following eye-specific resection resulted from homeostatic rates of eye progenitor production and less cell death in the regenerating eye. Conversely, large head injuries that left eyes intact increased eye progenitor production. Large injuries also non-specifically increased progenitor production for multiple uninjured tissues. We propose a model for eye regeneration in which eye tissue production by planarian stem cells is not directly regulated by the absence of the eye itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TREE CANOPY PRUNING DOES NOT REGULATE BIENNIAL BEARING IN ”ELSTAR” APPLE (Malus domestica Borkh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Pavičić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Four alternative pruning strategies (A– 25 generative buds, B– 50 generative buds, C– 75 generative buds and D–100 generative buds per tree for Elstar apple cultivar and their possible impact on improvement in productivity were examined in 1999 and 2000. Year was significant factor for all traits, except yield. The pruning strategy is significant for number of fruits per flower cluster and fruit mass. Interaction year and pruning strategy is significant only for number of fruits per flower cluster. Fruit mass was larger for pruning strategy A compared to the pruning strategies C and D. Yield efficiency and biennial bearing index were not affected by pruning strategies. The biennial bearing index variance was the lowest for the pruning strategy B. Trunk cross sectional area (TCSA had negative impact on fruit mass in pruning strategy C. Correlation between the flower and crop density was positive in pruning strategy A. Flower density was in positive correlation with yield in pruning strategy C. The research shows that tree pruning alone will not result in adequate yield regulation in ‘Elstar’ apple.

  5. Why does it matter how we regulate the use of human body parts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Imogen

    2014-01-01

    Human tissue and body parts have been used in one way or another for millennia. They have been preserved and displayed, both in museums and public shows. Real human hair is used for wigs, while some artists even use human tissue in their works. Blood, bone marrow, whole organs and a host of other structures and human substances are all transplanted into living persons to treat illness. New life can be created from gametes through in vitro fertilisation (IVF), while the creation of cell lines keeps tissue alive indefinitely. These uses create significant challenges for the legal system in the UK. The major challenge for the law is to balance the competing demands of those groups who have vested interests in human tissue-researchers, medical practitioners, patients, families, the community and the police, among many others. It must provide sufficient control to users of tissue, but also take account of the fact that our bodies hold psychological importance for us while we live and, after we die, for those we leave behind. To some degree the law has been successful, but we still lack a comprehensive, coherent approach to the regulation of human tissue. Partially as a reaction to this lack of a comprehensive approach, some commentators have turned to applying the concept of property to human tissue means to achieve regulatory outcomes they support.

  6. Does dietary iodine regulate oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-02-10

    Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk.

  7. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Does Not Regulate Alloimmunization to Transfused Red Blood Cells in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Gibb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC transfusions are essential for patients with hematological disorders and bone marrow failure syndromes. Despite ABO matching, RBC transfusions can lead to production of alloantibodies against “minor” blood group antigens. Non-ABO alloimmunization is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality in the U.S. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the immunological factors that promote alloimmunization. Prior studies indicate that inflammatory conditions place patients at higher risk for alloimmunization. Additionally, co-exposure to pro-inflammatory pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs promotes alloimmunization in animal models, suggesting that RBC alloimmunization depends on innate immune cell activation. However, the specific innate immune stimuli and sensors that induce a T cell-dependent alloantibody response to transfused RBCs have not been identified. The NLRP3 inflammasome senses chemically diverse PAMPs and damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, including extracellular ATP and iron-containing heme. We hypothesized that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by endogenous DAMPs from RBCs promotes the alloimmune response to a sterile RBC transfusion. Using genetically modified mice lacking either NLRP3 or multiple downstream inflammasome response elements, we ruled out a role for the NLRP3 inflammasome or any Caspase-1 or -11 dependent inflammasome in regulating RBC alloantibody production to a model antigen.

  8. A Mobile Application for User Regulated Self-Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarinis, Fotis; Verykios, Vassilios S.; Panagiotakopoulos, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a mobile application for self-assessment. The work describes the main features of the application and focuses on its acceptance by students and the increase on their learning, through its usage in real testing settings. The application supports the retrieval of questions based on a number of criteria and it was evaluated…

  9. 7 CFR 3411.1 - Applicability of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... teams whose research has the eventual goal of technology transfer and education capacity through the... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... improve research capabilities in the agricultural, food, and environmental sciences in the following...

  10. Carbachol does not down-regulate substance P receptors in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, R J; Vinayek, R; Jensen, R T; Gardner, J D

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that first incubating guinea pig pancreatic acini with carbachol caused desensitization of the enzyme secretory response to cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8), bombesin, and carbachol but not that to substance P. This carbachol-induced desensitization could be accounted for by carbachol-induced down-regulation of receptors for CCK-8, bombesin, and carbachol. Although carbachol did not desensitize the enzyme secretory response to substance P, an effect of carbachol on substance P receptors was not examined. In the present study, in dispersed acini from guinea pig pancreas, substance P caused a twofold increase in amylase secretion. Stimulation was half-maximal at 0.7 nM and was maximal at 10 nM. Analysis of the ability of substance P to inhibit binding of 125I-substance P to substance P receptors indicated that acini possess a single class of receptors for substance P (Kd = 0.8 +/- 0.1 nM; Bmax = 1,037 +/- 145 fmol/mg of DNA). There was a close correlation between the relative potency with which substance P stimulated amylase secretion (0.7 nM) and the potency for inhibiting binding of 125I-substance P (Kd = 0.8 nM). First incubating pancreatic acini with carbachol did not alter either substance P-stimulated enzyme secretion or binding of 125I-substance P to substance P receptors, whereas in the same experiments, carbachol reduced binding of 125I-CCK-8 to cholecystokinin receptors by 50% and decreased in CCK-8-stimulated enzyme secretion by 50%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Application of Wireless Sensor Networks for Indoor Temperature Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojkoska, Biljana Risteska; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Chatzimisios, Periklis

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks take a major part in our everyday lives by enhancing systems for home automation, healthcare, temperature control, energy consumption monitoring, and so forth. In this paper we focus on a system used for temperature regulation for residential, educational, industrial...... energy savings by reducing the amount of data transmissions through the network. Furthermore, the framework explores techniques for localization, such that the location of the nodes can be used by algorithms that regulate temperature settings......., and commercial premises, and so forth. We propose a framework for indoor temperature regulation and optimization using wireless sensor networks based on ZigBee platform. This paper considers architectural design of the system, as well as implementation guidelines. The proposed system favors methods that provide...

  12. EVALUATION OF STATE-OF-THE-ART MANIPULATORS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACK, DEREK; GRUPINSKI, STEPHEN

    1998-10-08

    This report provides an overview of applications within the DOE complex which could benefit from the use of modular robotics technology during remediation operations. Each application area contains one or more specific tasks which are presently conducted by humans under hazardous conditions or which are deemed highly impractical, or are altogether impossible without automation. Five major areas were investigated for specific needs with respect to automation. Information was collected on Mixed Waste Operations, Contaminant Automated Analysis, Tanks, Decontamination and Dismantlement and Automated Plutonium Processing. During this investigation, information was gathered from available literature, telephone interviews with informed personnel and on-site visits. This data serves to provide design requirements and guidelines for the design of a family of modular actuators, which will be used to construct manipulators suited to each task. In addition, a survey of existing modular manipulator designs is presented. This survey addresses modular manipulators developed inside government labs and in universities for such applications as space exploration or controls research. It also addresses efforts at commercially viable industrial manipulators which have been built. This survey of robotic systems provides the reader with a glimpse into what technology currently exists in the way of modular manipulator automation and, to a degree, where this technology may be applicable or, more often, where these systems are unsuited to EM applications. From the information gathered during this study, it is possible to sufficiently define the requirements of one manipulator system which can be used to conduct automated transfer operations within Plutonium gloveboxes. This manipulator will be constructed from ARM Automation actuator modules and will provide this application with a viable option for automation within these gloveboxes. The design issues surrounding this manipulator and its

  13. Effects of some growth regulating applications on leaf yield, raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of repetitive applications of herbagreen (HG), humic acid (HA), combined foliar fertilizer (CFF) and HG+CFF performed in the Müsküle grape variety grafted on 5 BB rootstock on fresh or pickled leaf size and leaf raw cellulose content. HA application increased leaf area and leaf water ...

  14. 7 CFR 550.9 - Other applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY FOR NON-ASSISTANCE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General § 550....S.C. 205a et seq. “The Metric Conversion Act, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness...

  15. 7 CFR 3406.1 - Applicability of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... provisions of section 1417(b)(4) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of... Extension Service (CSREES), to make competitive grants to land-grant colleges and universities, to colleges... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION...

  16. Agriculture Teacher Awareness and Application of Self-Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendree, R. Bud; Washurn, Shannon G.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated four rural Kansas high school agriculture teachers' comprehension and implementation of self-regulation strategies in their own professional growth and in their instructional practice. The participants included two males and two females, each one having between five and 20 years of teaching experience.…

  17. Report of the DOE panel on low activation materials for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    In February, 1982, the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, through its Division of Development and Technology, established a Panel to examine materials with attractive radioactivation characteristics for applications in fusion power reactors. Since February, the Panel has met together and in subgroups numerous times. Input from knowledgeable people was elicited via a two day workshop held at UCLA in April, 1982. The agenda, titles of talks, and speakers are given in Appendix II. We present here a synopsis of the Panel's findings based upon both external information provided to us and upon the work and deliberations of the Panel itself. Conclusions and recommendations follow. Background technical information brought together by the Panel is relegated to Appendices III and IV

  18. Antioxidant response elements: Discovery, classes, regulation and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhwar Raghunath

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to antioxidants and xenobiotics triggers the expression of a myriad of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, detoxifying enzymes, and xenobiotic transporters to offer protection against oxidative stress. This articulated universal mechanism is regulated through the cis-acting elements in an array of Nrf2 target genes called antioxidant response elements (AREs, which play a critical role in redox homeostasis. Though the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE system involves many players, AREs hold the key in transcriptional regulation of cytoprotective genes. ARE-mediated reporter constructs have been widely used, including xenobiotics profiling and Nrf2 activator screening. The complexity of AREs is brought by the presence of other regulatory elements within the AREs. The diversity in the ARE sequences not only bring regulatory selectivity of diverse transcription factors, but also confer functional complexity in the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. The different transcription factors either homodimerize or heterodimerize to bind the AREs. Depending on the nature of partners, they may activate or suppress the transcription. Attention is required for deeper mechanistic understanding of ARE-mediated gene regulation. The computational methods of identification and analysis of AREs are still in their infancy. Investigations are required to know whether epigenetics mechanism plays a role in the regulation of genes mediated through AREs. The polymorphisms in the AREs leading to oxidative stress related diseases are warranted. A thorough understanding of AREs will pave the way for the development of therapeutic agents against cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, metabolic and other diseases with oxidative stress. Keywords: Antioxidant response elements, Antioxidant genes, ARE-reporter constructs, ARE SNPs, Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway, Oxidative stress

  19. Antioxidant response elements: Discovery, classes, regulation and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Azhwar; Sundarraj, Kiruthika; Nagarajan, Raju; Arfuso, Frank; Bian, Jinsong; Kumar, Alan P; Sethi, Gautam; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2018-07-01

    Exposure to antioxidants and xenobiotics triggers the expression of a myriad of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, detoxifying enzymes, and xenobiotic transporters to offer protection against oxidative stress. This articulated universal mechanism is regulated through the cis-acting elements in an array of Nrf2 target genes called antioxidant response elements (AREs), which play a critical role in redox homeostasis. Though the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE system involves many players, AREs hold the key in transcriptional regulation of cytoprotective genes. ARE-mediated reporter constructs have been widely used, including xenobiotics profiling and Nrf2 activator screening. The complexity of AREs is brought by the presence of other regulatory elements within the AREs. The diversity in the ARE sequences not only bring regulatory selectivity of diverse transcription factors, but also confer functional complexity in the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. The different transcription factors either homodimerize or heterodimerize to bind the AREs. Depending on the nature of partners, they may activate or suppress the transcription. Attention is required for deeper mechanistic understanding of ARE-mediated gene regulation. The computational methods of identification and analysis of AREs are still in their infancy. Investigations are required to know whether epigenetics mechanism plays a role in the regulation of genes mediated through AREs. The polymorphisms in the AREs leading to oxidative stress related diseases are warranted. A thorough understanding of AREs will pave the way for the development of therapeutic agents against cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, metabolic and other diseases with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CONSIDERATIONS APPLICABLE INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS OF WAGES AND RELATED RIGHTS

    OpenAIRE

    NASTASIE MIHAELA – ANDREEA; AVRAM MARIOARA

    2014-01-01

    General research area of this article is the issue of employee benefits nationwide and can be placed in the sphere of accounting research at the intersection of the finance research and field research on human resource management. The current conditions of global economic crisis, rewarding staff works on two levels, influencing both the behavior of employees and the efficiency of the economic entity. Wages and related rights are regulated under International Accounting Sta...

  1. Summary of regulation applicable to the gamma-graphy activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    The regulations relative to the gamma radiography activities concerns in one hand the radioactive sources, and on the other hand the radiation protection of the workers. The necessity of having a person competent in radiation protection and the tasks he or she has to do are described. The training of operators, the medical surveillance, the dosimetry are such obligations. The maintenance of equipment is an other obligation. The last point concerns the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  2. Application of the regulations on pressurized components or light water reactor primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, F.; Menjon, G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and the provisions of the Order of 26 February 1974 concerning application of the regulations on pressurized components for light water reactor steam supply systems. The aim is to show how these regulations which differ from other regulations on pressurized components and is more detailed on many points, is applied in practice in France in the various stages of the design, construction and operation of PWRs. (NEA) [fr

  3. 24 CFR 1000.1 - What is the applicability and scope of these regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the applicability and scope of these regulations? 1000.1 Section 1000.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.1 What is the...

  4. 18 CFR 1300.101 - Cross references to employee ethical conduct standards and other applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employee ethical conduct standards and other applicable regulations. 1300.101 Section 1300.101 Conservation... TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.101 Cross references to employee ethical conduct standards and other...-wide standards of ethical conduct at 5 CFR part 2635 and to the TVA regulations at 5 CFR part 7901...

  5. 26 CFR 1.854-1 - Limitations applicable to dividends received from regulated investment company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations applicable to dividends received from regulated investment company. 1.854-1 Section 1.854-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Regulated Investment Companies and...

  6. 7 CFR 54.1027 - Application of other regulations to appeal service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT..., Processing, and Packaging of Livestock and Poultry Products § 54.1027 Application of other regulations to...

  7. 15 CFR 700.92 - Applicability of this regulation and official actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability of this regulation and official actions. 700.92 Section 700.92 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY...

  8. 38 CFR 3.270 - Applicability of various dependency, income and estate regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dependency, income and estate regulations. 3.270 Section 3.270 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Dependency, Income and Estate § 3.270 Applicability of various dependency, income and estate regulations. (a...

  9. 20 CFR 626.3 - Purpose, scope, and applicability of the Job Training Partnership Act regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INTRODUCTION TO THE REGULATIONS UNDER THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT § 626.3 Purpose, scope, and applicability of the Job Training Partnership Act regulations. (a) Parts 626..., part C of the Job Training Partnership Act) establish the Federal programmatic and administrative...

  10. 43 CFR 4.1 - Scope of authority; applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Secretary, matters within the jurisdiction of the Department involving hearings, and appeals and other... administrative jurisdiction and special procedural rules as indicated. General rules applicable to all types of... (iii) the conduct of surface coal mining under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977...

  11. Does penile tourniquet application alter bacterial adhesion to rat urethral cells: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boybeyi-Turer, Ozlem; Kacmaz, Birgul; Arat, Esra; Atasoy, Pınar; Kisa, Ucler; Gunal, Yasemin Dere; Aslan, Mustafa Kemal; Soyer, Tutku

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effects of penile tourniquet (PT) application on bacterial adhesion to urothelium. Fifty-six rats were allocated into control group (CG), sham group (SG), PT group (PTG). No intervention was applied in CG. A 5mm-length urethral repair was performed in SG and PTG. In PTG, a 10-min duration of PT was applied during the procedure and the tissue oxygenation monitor was used to adjust the same degree of ischemia in all subjects. Samples were examined for wound healing parameters and tissue levels of inflammatory markers, eNOS, e-selectin, and ICAM-1antibodies. The adhesion of Escherichia coli to urothelium was investigated with in vitro adhesion assay. Inflammation was higher and wound healing was worse in SG than CG and in PTG in comparison to CG and SG (pcaused endothelial corruption and prevented cell proliferation in cell culture. The PT application does not improve wound healing and increases bacterial adhesion molecules in penile tissue. The in vitro assays showed that PT causes severe endothelial damage and inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation on applicability of the rules, regulations, and industrial codes and standards for SMART development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Suhn; Lee, C C.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, K.K.; Kim, J.P.; Kim, J.H.; Cho, B.H.; Kang, D J.; Bae, G.H.; Chung, M.; Chang, M.H.

    1999-03-01

    In this report, evaluation on applicability of the rules, regulations, and industrial codes and standards for SMART has been made. As the first step, past-to-present status of licensing structures were reviewed. Then, the rules, regulations, and standards applied to YGN 3-6 were listed and reviewed. Finally, evaluation on applicability of such rules and standards for SMART are made in each design fields. During this step technical evaluations on each items of rules, regulations and standards are made and the possible remedies or comments are suggested. The results are summarized in a tabular form and enclosed as Appendix. (Author). 8 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  13. 47 CFR 73.6026 - Broadcast regulations applicable to Class A television stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... television stations. 73.6026 Section 73.6026 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6026 Broadcast regulations applicable to Class A television stations. The following rules are applicable to Class A...

  14. 75 FR 35019 - Hampshire Paper Company; Notice Rejecting Application, Waiving Regulations, and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Paper Company; Notice Rejecting Application, Waiving Regulations, and Soliciting Applications June 15, 2010. On June 2, 2010, Hampshire Paper Company (Hampshire Paper), licensee for the Emeryville....\\1\\ \\1\\ Hampshire Paper was issued a major license for the project on June 17, 1982, for a term of 30...

  15. One year's experience by COGEMA logistics of application of the new modal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, P.

    2002-01-01

    International transport of radioactive materials is regulated by international and regional modal regulations that apply to all dangerous goods. The requirements for radioactive materials in the modal regulations are based on those of the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' set forth by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The last edition of the IAEA regulations was published in 1996 (TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised)), then incorporated in the modal regulations, and finally implemented, with various transitional periods throughout 2001. As a final result, since 1 January 2002 it has been mandatory, for all modes, to perform transports in accordance with the 1996 edition of the IAEA transport regulations. In the mean time, all the international and regional regulations have also been reformatted, and each of them has now adopted the unified format of the United Nations 'Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Model Regulations', often referred to as the Orange Book. This paper presents the experience of COGEMA Logistics with the application of this new set of regulations to design of packages, transport operations, and administrative matters. Both the advantages provided by these new regulations and the difficulties which were (and are still being) met are presented. (author)

  16. Great Big Hairy Bees! Regulating the European Bumblebee, Bombus Terrestris L. What does it say about the Precautionary Principle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Alastair Moore

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The previous Commonwealth Minister for the Environment, Mr Garrett, recently rejected a request to allow the importation of live bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L. to mainland Australia. New South Wales and Victoria had already listed the introduction of bumblebees as, respectively, a key threatening process and a potentially threatening process. The Commonwealth, however, had previously declined an application to list the introduction of bumblebees as a key threatening process, although its Threatened Species Scientific Committee urged ‘that extreme caution be shown in considering any proposal to introduce this species to the mainland.’ The potential threat from bumblebees would appear to beg the questions posed by the precautionary principle. Would the presence of bumblebees to mainland Australia pose a threat of serious or irreversible environmental damage? Should a lack of full scientific certainty be used as a reason for postponing measures to prevent environmental degradation? This paper considers the role of the precautionary principle in regulatory approaches to the bumblebee. It seeks to establish the application of the precautionary principle to this particular potential environmental threat, including its relationship to the principle of conservation of biological diversity. It concludes that, despite widespread adoption of the precautionary principle in policy, legislation and case law in Australia, its impact on regulating bumblebees has not been consistent.

  17. Recommended safety, reliability, quality assurance and management aerospace techniques with possible application by the DOE to the high-level radioactive waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, W.M. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Aerospace SRQA and management techniques, principally those developed and used by the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on the manned space flight programs, have been assessed for possible application by the DOE and the DOE-contractors to the high level radioactive waste repository program that results from the implementation of the NWPA of 1982. Those techniques believed to have the greatest potential for usefulness to the DOE and the DOE-contractors have been discussed in detail and are recommended to the DOE for adoption; discussion is provided for the manner in which this transfer of technology can be implemented. Six SRQA techniques and two management techniques are recommended for adoption by the DOE; included with the management techniques is a recommendation for the DOE to include a licensing interface with the NRC in the application of the milestone reviews technique. Three other techniques are recommended for study by the DOE for possible adaptation to the DOE program

  18. CONSIDERATIONS APPLICABLE INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS OF WAGES AND RELATED RIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NĂSTASIE MIHAELA – ANDREEA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available General research area of this article is the issue of employee benefits nationwide and can be placed in the sphere of accounting research at the intersection of the finance research and field research on human resource management. The current conditions of global economic crisis, rewarding staff works on two levels, influencing both the behavior of employees and the efficiency of the economic entity. Wages and related rights are regulated under International Accounting Standards and International Financial Reporting Standards by IAS 19 "Employee Benefits" and IFRS 2 "Share-based Payment". Concerns over the years, on remuneration, was the International Accounting Standards Board, as in 1998 was developed International Accounting Standard 19 "Employee Benefits" and in 2004 was drafted to International Financial Reporting Standard 2 "Share-based Payment". This article is part of a broader research and through it we tried to address a topical issue that employee benefits and consequences of the degree of economic and financial development of economic entities and living standards of the population.

  19. Problems and solutions in application of IEEE standards at Savannah River Site, Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.S.; Bowers, T.L.; Chopra, B.J.; Thompson, T.T.; Zimmerman, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Material Production Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were designed, constructed, and placed into operation in the early 1950's, based on existing industry codes/standards, design criteria, analytical procedures. Since that time, DOE has developed Orders and Polices for the planning, design and construction of DOE Nuclear Reactor Facilities which invoke or reference commercial nuclear reactor codes and standards. The application of IEEE reactor design requirements such as Equipment Qualification, Seismic Qualification, Single Failure Criteria, and Separation Requirement, to non-reactor facilities has been a problem since the IEEE reactor criteria do not directly confirm to the needs of non-reactor facilities. SRS Systems Engineering is developing a methodology for the application of IEEE Standards to non-reactor facilities at SRS

  20. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  1. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  2. A better regulation is required in viral hepatitis smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª R. Cantudo-Cuenca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe the characteristics and content of the available viral hepatitis mobile applications, as well as assess the level of participation of medical professionals in their development. Methods. A descriptive observational study was carried out in September 2013. We searched smartphone apps specifically relating to the viral hepatitis for using a keyword search with the following terms; «hepatitis», «hepatology», «hbv» and «hcv» in the Google Play Store (Android and the Apple App Store (iOS. Data recorded included: name, platform, category, cost, user star rating, number of downloads, date the app was updated by the developer and target audience. We analysed the content of the applications, and these were then categorised based on the viral hepatitis type into three groups. We conducted an analysis in which we specifically examined the authorship in order to assess the prevalence of health professional participation in their development. Results. A total of 33 apps were included (from 232 that were identified, among which there were 10 duplicates. Most of these apps were uploaded under the medical category. Three had ratings less than 3.9 stars (out of 5. Only 6 apps had exceeded 1000 downloads. A total of 12 apps were aimed at health professionals, while 4 focused on patients (7 for both of them. The participation of health professionals in the development of apps was 56.6%. Conclusions. Viral hepatitis apps are available for both professionals and patients; however, much of the information contained within them is often not validated. They should be certificated.

  3. A better regulation is required in viral hepatitis smartphone applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma R; Robustillo-Cortés, Ma A; Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma D; Morillo-Verdugo, R

    2014-04-01

    To describe the characteristics and content of the available viral hepatitis mobile applications, as well as assess the level of participation of medical professionals in their development. A descriptive observational study was carried out in September 2013. We searched smartphone apps specifically relating to the viral hepatitis for using a keyword search with the following terms; «hepatitis», «hepatology», «hbv» and «hcv» in the Google Play Store (Android) and the Apple App Store (iOS). Data recorded included: name, platform, category, cost, user star rating, number of downloads, date the app was updated by the developer and target audience. We analysed the content of the applications, and these were then categorised based on the viral hepatitis type into three groups. We conducted an analysis in which we specifically examined the authorship in order to assess the prevalence of health professional participation in their development. A total of 33 apps were included (from 232 that were identified), among which there were 10 duplicates. Most of these apps were uploaded under the medical category. Three had ratings less than 3.9 stars (out of 5). Only 6 apps had exceeded 1000 downloads. A total of 12 apps were aimed at health professionals, while 4 focused on patients (7 for both of them). The participation of health professionals in the development of apps was 56.6%. Viral hepatitis apps are available for both professionals and patients; however, much of the information contained within them is often not validated. They should be certificated. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education... purposes of the International Education Program authorized by part A of title VI of the HEA. (d...

  5. [Theory analysis and clinical application of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Tang, Lewei; Du, Huaibin; Zheng, Hui; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical foundation and scientific connotation of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method as well as its clinical application for pain are discussed. During spirit regulation, attention should be paid on regulating heart and brain, while acupoints should be selected mainly from the Heart Meridian, Pericardium Meridian and Governor Vessel. It has significant efficacy for refractory pain in clinical treatment. Spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method is development of acupuncture treating spirit, and it is an important method for pain in clinic. Improvement on sensitization of pain center and brain function is considered as one of the mechanisms in spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method.

  6. Analysis of concept and application or Risk-Informed Performed-Based Regulation (RI-PBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. S.; Sung, K. Y.; Lee, C. J.; Kim, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    For improving regulation of nuclear power plants, the USNRC is adopting the Risk-Informed Performance-Based Regulation (RI-PBR) as an alternative, in parallel with implementing current deterministic regulation. This paper introduces a research plan for 'Institutionalization of RI-PBR' that is being conducted by KINS as a national project for evaluating feasibility for application of the alternative to Korean regulation system. Analysis of regulation characteristics, case study and experience on RI-PBR were presented as interim research results. In addition, the future plan of development of RI-PBR concept as understandable to the public and evaluation of level of techniques needed for implementation of RI-PBR was introduced

  7. Does Self-Regulated Learning-Skills Training Improve High-School Students' Self-Regulation, Math Achievement, and Motivation While Using an Intelligent Tutor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrus, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study empirically evaluated the effectiveness of the instructional design, learning tools, and role of the teacher in three versions of a semester-long, high-school remedial Algebra I course to determine what impact self-regulated learning skills and learning pattern training have on students' self-regulation, math achievement, and…

  8. How it can assist in compliance with the DOE`S new 10 CFR 835 and the NRC`S 10 CFR 20 regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.H. [NFS Radiation Protection Systems, Inc., Erwin, TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    With new government regulations on the horizon, advanced technology will become a necessity for the accurate assessment of air sampling data and maintaining internal dose ALARA. Bar coding is one advanced technology which has provided significant improvements in radiological air sampling. When combined with specific hardware and software, bar code technology can be used to automate procedures and enhance the data accuracy associated with air sampling in the workplace. This paper discusses some of the regulatory issues regarding radiological air sampling and describes how improved bar coded accountability techniques can assist in regulatory compliance.

  9. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogwell, Thomas W. [Fogwell Consulting, P.O. Box 20221, Piedmont, CA 94620 (United States); Santina, Pete [SMI-PS, Inc., 2073 Prado Vista, Lincoln, CA 95648 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in

  10. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... the use of materials containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed... human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a...

  11. APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPLICATIONS OF A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Leona H. Clark1, Paul M. Schlosser2, and James F. Selgrade3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2CIIT, Research Triangle Park, NC; 3North Carolina State Un...

  12. Classification of Hydrogels Based on Their Source: A Review and Application in Stem Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Maziyar M.; Sorokina, Lioudmila V.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Mukhtar, Farrukh; Shirdar, Mostafa Rezazadeh; Shahidi, Mahnaz; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2017-08-01

    Stem cells are recognized by their self-renewal ability and can give rise to specialized progeny. Hydrogels are an established class of biomaterials with the ability to control stem cell fate via mechanotransduction. They can mimic various physiological conditions to influence the fate of stem cells and are an ideal platform to support stem cell regulation. This review article provides a summary of recent advances in the application of different classes of hydrogels based on their source (e.g., natural, synthetic, or hybrid). This classification is important because the chemistry of substrate affects stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Natural and synthetic hydrogels have been widely used in stem cell regulation. Nevertheless, they have limitations that necessitate a new class of material. Hybrid hydrogels obtained by manipulation of the natural and synthetic ones can potentially overcome these limitations and shape the future of research in application of hydrogels in stem cell regulation.

  13. Distributed Cooperative Regulation for Multiagent Systems and Its Applications to Power Systems: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Yong, Taiyou; Yu, Jie; Mao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative regulation of multiagent systems has become an active research area in the past decade. This paper reviews some recent progress in distributed coordination control for leader-following multiagent systems and its applications in power system and mainly focuses on the cooperative tracking control in terms of consensus tracking control and containment tracking control. Next, methods on how to rank the network nodes are summarized for undirected/directed network, based on which one can determine which follower should be connected to leaders such that partial followers can perceive leaders' information. Furthermore, we present a survey of the most relevant scientific studies investigating the regulation and optimization problems in power systems based on distributed strategies. Finally, some potential applications in the frequency tracking regulation of smart grids are discussed at the end of the paper. PMID:25243199

  14. Distributed cooperative regulation for multiagent systems and its applications to power systems: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Li, Yaping; Yong, Taiyou; Cao, Jinde; Yu, Jie; Mao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative regulation of multiagent systems has become an active research area in the past decade. This paper reviews some recent progress in distributed coordination control for leader-following multiagent systems and its applications in power system and mainly focuses on the cooperative tracking control in terms of consensus tracking control and containment tracking control. Next, methods on how to rank the network nodes are summarized for undirected/directed network, based on which one can determine which follower should be connected to leaders such that partial followers can perceive leaders' information. Furthermore, we present a survey of the most relevant scientific studies investigating the regulation and optimization problems in power systems based on distributed strategies. Finally, some potential applications in the frequency tracking regulation of smart grids are discussed at the end of the paper.

  15. FDA Regulation of Clinical Applications of CRISPR-CAS Gene-Editing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evita V

    Scientists have repurposed an adaptive immune system of single cell organisms to create a new type of gene-editing tool: CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas technology. Scientists in China have reported its use in the genome modification of non-viable human embryos. This has ignited a spirited debate about the moral, ethical, scientific, and social implications of human germline genome engineering. There have also been calls for regulations; however, FDA has yet to formally announce its oversight of clinical applications of CRISPR-Cas systems. This paper reviews FDA regulation of previously controversial biotechnology breakthroughs, recombinant DNA and human cloning. It then shows that FDA is well positioned to regulate CRISPR-Cas clinical applications, due to its legislative mandates, its existing regulatory frameworks for gene therapies and assisted reproductive technologies, and other considerations.

  16. Designing behavioral self-regulation application for preventive personal mental healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hirano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy targeted restoration and few have targeted primary prevention. The purpose of this study is to obtain the knowledge for further development on preventive mental healthcare application. We developed a personal mental healthcare application which aimed to give users the chance to manage their mental health by self-monitoring and regulating their behavior. Through the 30-day field trial, the results showed improvement of mood score through conducting of suggested action, and the depressive mood of the participants was significantly decreased after the trial. The possibility of application and further problem was confirmed.

  17. Influence of safety vlave pressure on gelled electrolyte valve-regulated lead/acid batteries under deep cycling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Hyub; Kim, Myung Soo; Lee, Jin Bok; Lee, Heung Lark

    2002-01-01

    Cycle life tests have been carried out to evaluate the influence of safety valve pressure on vlave regulated lead/acid batteries under deep cycling applications. Batteries were cycled at 5 hour rates at 100 % DOD, and safety valve pressure was set to 1.08 and 2.00 bar, respectively. The batteries lost 248.3 g of water for each case after about 1,200 cycles, but the cyclic performances of the batteries were comparable. Most of the gas of the battery during discharging was hydrogen, and the oxygen concentration increased to 18 % after 3 hours of charging. The micro structure of the positive active materials was completely changed and the corrosion layer of the positive grid was less than 50 μm, regardless of the pressure of the safety valve after cycle life tests. The cause of discharge capacity decrease was found to water loss and the shedding of the positive active materials. The pressure of safety valve does not give little effect to the cyclic performance and the failure modes of the gelled electrolyte valve-regulated lead acid batteries

  18. Application of United States Department of Transportation regulations to hazardous material and waste shipments on the Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnside, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    All hazardous material and waste transported over roadways open to the public must be in compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. The DOT states that the hazardous material regulations (HMR) also apply to government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) transportation operations over any U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site roadway where the public has free and unrestricted access. Hazardous material and waste in packages that do not meet DOT regulations must be transported on DOE site roadways in a manner that excludes the public and nonessential workers. At the DOE Richland Field Office (the Hanford Site), hazardous material and waste movements that do not meet DOT requirements are transported over public access roadways during off-peak hours with the roadways barricaded. These movements are accomplished using a transportation plan that involves the DOE, DOE contractors, and private utilities who operate on or near the Hanford Site. This method, which is used at the Hanford Site to comply with DOT regulations onsite, can be communicated to other DOE sites to provide a basis for achieving consistency in similar transportation operations. (author)

  19. Self-regulation and the problem of human autonomy: does psychology need choice, self-determination, and will?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Richard M; Deci, Edward L

    2006-12-01

    The term autonomy literally refers to regulation by the self. Its opposite, heteronomy, refers to controlled regulation, or regulation that occurs without self-endorsement. At a time when philosophers and economists are increasingly detailing the nature of autonomy and recognizing its social and practical significance, many psychologists are questioning the reality and import of autonomy and closely related phenomena such as will, choice, and freedom. Using the framework of self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000), we review research concerning the benefits of autonomous versus controlled regulation for goal performance, persistence, affective experience, quality of relationships, and well-being across domains and cultures. We also address some of the controversies and terminological issues surrounding the construct of autonomy, including critiques of autonomy by biological reductionists, cultural relativists, and behaviorists. We conclude that there is a universal and cross-developmental value to autonomous regulation when the construct is understood in an exacting way.

  20. Social Regulation of Learning During Collaborative Inquiry Learning in Science: How does it emerge and what are its functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucan, Serkan; Webb, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Students' ability to regulate their learning is considered important for the quality of collaborative inquiry learning. However, there is still limited understanding about how students engage in social forms of regulation processes and what roles these regulatory processes may play during collaborative learning. The purpose of this study was to identify when and how co- and shared regulation of metacognitive, emotional and motivational processes emerge and function during collaborative inquiry learning in science. Two groups of three students (aged 12) from a private primary school in Turkey were videotaped during collaborative inquiry activities in a naturalistic classroom setting over a seven-week period, and the transcripts were analysed in order to identify their use of regulation processes. Moreover, this was combined with the analysis of stimulated-recall interviews with the student groups. Results indicated that co- and shared regulation processes were often initiated by particular events and played a crucial role in the success of students' collaborative inquiry learning. Co-regulation of metacognitive processes had the function of stimulating students to reflect upon and clarify their thinking, as well as facilitating the construction of new scientific understanding. Shared regulation of metacognitive processes helped students to build a shared understanding of the task, clarify and justify their shared perspective, and sustain the ongoing knowledge co-construction. Moreover, the use of shared emotional and motivational regulation was identified as important for sustaining reciprocal interactions and creating a positive socio-emotional atmosphere within the groups. In addition, the findings revealed links between the positive quality of group interactions and the emergence of co- and shared regulation of metacognitive processes. This study highlights the importance of fostering students' acquisition and use of regulation processes during collaborative

  1. Space Shuttle 750 psi Helium Regulator Application on Mars Science Laboratory Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Yankura, George; Rust, Thomas; Anderson, John R.; Dien, Anthony; Garda, Hoshang; Bezer, Mary Ann; Johnson, David; Arndt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is NASA's next major mission to Mars, to be launched in September 2009. It is a nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. The descent and landing uses a unique 'skycrane' concept, where a rocket-powered descent stage decelerates the vehicle, hovers over the ground, lowers the rover to the ground on a bridle, then flies a safe distance away for disposal. This descent stage uses a regulated hydrazine propulsion system. Performance requirements for the pressure regulator were very demanding, with a wide range of flow rates and tight regulated pressure band. These indicated that a piloted regulator would be needed, which are notoriously complex, and time available for development was short. Coincidentally, it was found that the helium regulator used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter main propulsion system came very close to meeting MSL requirements. However, the type was out of production, and fabricating new units would incur long lead times and technical risk. Therefore, the Space Shuttle program graciously furnished three units for use by MSL. Minor modifications were made, and the units were carefully tuned to MSL requirements. Some of the personnel involved had built and tested the original shuttle units. Delta qualification for MSL application was successfully conducted on one of the units. A pyrovalve slam start and shock test was conducted. Dynamic performance analyses for the new application were conducted, using sophisticated tools developed for Shuttle. Because the MSL regulator is a refurbished Shuttle flight regulator, it will be the only part of MSL which has physically already been in space.

  2. Application of the EC eco-audit regulation in the energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    1994-01-01

    The eco-audit regulation isolates the precision of goals to improve operational environmental protection for observation, particularly with a view to the industrial energy economy. It is not wise without an investigation into the possible repercussions with other EU and national regulatory laws. Keywords here are: design of a heat application regulation according to the BImSchG, discussion over the introduction of an EC CO 2 Energy tax as well as the EC guidelines on reducing CO 2 emissions (SAVE). (orig./HP) [de

  3. Application of non-linear discretetime feedback regulators with assignable closed-loop dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljević Stevan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the application of a new approach is demonstrated to a discrete-time state feedback regulator synthesis with feedback linearization and pole-placement for non-linear discrete-time systems. Under the simultaneous implementation of a non-linear coordinate transformation and a non-linear state feedback law computed through the solution of a system of non-linear functional equations, both the feedback linearization and pole-placement design objectives were accomplished. The non-linear state feedback regulator synthesis method was applied to a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR under non-isothermal operating conditions that exhibits steady-state multiplicity. The control objective was to regulate the reactor at the middle unstable steady state by manipulating the rate of input heat in the reactor. Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed non-linear state feedback regulator, as it was shown a non-linear state feedback regulator clearly outperformed a standard linear one, especially in the presence of adverse disturbance under which linear regulation at the unstable steady state was not feasible.

  4. 14 CFR 1207.101 - Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure, and other applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure, and other applicable regulations. 1207.101 Section 1207.101 Aeronautics and Space...-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure, and other applicable regulations. Employees of the...

  5. 20 CFR 726.103 - Application for authority to self-insure; effect of regulations contained in this part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 726.103 Application for authority to self-insure; effect of regulations contained in this part. As... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for authority to self-insure; effect of regulations contained in this part. 726.103 Section 726.103 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT...

  6. 36 CFR 261.73 - Regulations applicable to Region 3, Southwestern Region, as defined in § 200.2. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations applicable to Region 3, Southwestern Region, as defined in § 200.2. [Reserved] 261.73 Section 261.73 Parks, Forests... § 261.73 Regulations applicable to Region 3, Southwestern Region, as defined in § 200.2. [Reserved] ...

  7. Does the regulation of the insurance industry have a pernicious effect on innovation by the sector in South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Zingwevu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Financial regulation could be a double edged sword in that despite its major thrust being that to secure the financial sector and bring about financial stability; it might have the unintended consequence of stifling innovation by the sector. We investigate the nexus between financial regulation and innovation by specifically focusing on the insurance industry in South Africa. We demonstrate that there are plethora pieces of legislation that govern the insurance industry in South Africa. As such this has driven the cost of compliance to unsustainable levels thereby curtailing the spending by companies on innovation. We thus would like to caution the policy makers’ that this “heavy-touch” regulatory mode is having a pernicious effect on research and development by the insurance sector. As such we encourage them to embrace the “light-touch” regulatory mode whereby self-regulation and moral suasion are other avenues to be considered.

  8. Does regulation stimulate productivity? The effect of air quality policies on the efficiency of US power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, Rachel; Alexander, Rob; Bretschneider, Stuart; Popp, David

    2009-01-01

    This research examines the effect of air quality regulations on the productivity of US power plants based on both economic and environmental outputs. Using data envelopment analysis (DEA) to estimate an efficiency measure incorporating both economic and environmental outcomes, we look at changes in efficiency in US power plants over an eleven-year time period (1994-2004) during which several different regulations were implemented for the control of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ). The paper then models how estimated efficiency behaves over time as a function of regulatory changes. Findings suggest mixed effects of regulations on power plant efficiency when pollution abatement and electricity generation are both included as outputs.

  9. 25 CFR 1000.27 - How does the Director select which Tribes in the applicant pool become self-governance Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... applicant pool become self-governance Tribes? 1000.27 Section 1000.27 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.27 How does the Director select which Tribes in the applicant pool become self-governance Tribes? The Director selects up...

  10. When the cat’s away the mice will play" : Does regulation at home affect bank risk-taking abroad?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, S.; Popov, A.; Udell, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first empirical evidence that bank regulation is associated with cross-border spillover effects through the lending activities of large multinational banks. We analyze business lending by 155 banks to 9,613 firms in 1,976 different localities across 16 countries. We find that

  11. Self-Regulation and Metacognition in Young Children: Does It Matter if Adults Are Present or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings together two areas of considerable interest to researchers, practitioners and policy makers: young children's developing self-regulation and metacognition, and the impact of adult (practitioner) presence or absence on their behaviour and learning. One hundred and twenty-eight observations of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a…

  12. Does Self-Licensing Benefit Self- Regulation Over Time? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study of Food Temptations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369408217; Evers, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/280594232; Wijngaards, Leoniek; van Vliet, Renee; de Ridder, D.T.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070706174

    2018-01-01

    Self-licensing, employing reasons to justify indulgence, may help resolve the conflict between immediate temptations and long-term goals in favor of the former. It was hypothesized that this conflict-resolving potential of self-licensing may benefit self-regulation over time. With a momentary

  13. Gene Regulation, Modulation, and Their Applications in Gene Expression Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Common microarray and next-generation sequencing data analysis concentrate on tumor subtype classification, marker detection, and transcriptional regulation discovery during biological processes by exploring the correlated gene expression patterns and their shared functions. Genetic regulatory network (GRN based approaches have been employed in many large studies in order to scrutinize for dysregulation and potential treatment controls. In addition to gene regulation and network construction, the concept of the network modulator that has significant systemic impact has been proposed, and detection algorithms have been developed in past years. Here we provide a unified mathematic description of these methods, followed with a brief survey of these modulator identification algorithms. As an early attempt to extend the concept to new RNA regulation mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA, into a modulator framework, we provide two applications to illustrate the network construction, modulation effect, and the preliminary finding from these networks. Those methods we surveyed and developed are used to dissect the regulated network under different modulators. Not limit to these, the concept of “modulation” can adapt to various biological mechanisms to discover the novel gene regulation mechanisms.

  14. 30 CFR 203.63 - Does my application have to include all leases in the field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The Regional Director maintains a Field Names Master List with updates of all leases in each... application for all leases that are part of the designated field on the date of application, except as... eventually become part of the authorized field. Therefore, if you have any other leases that you believe may...

  15. Effect of growth regulators application on the quality maintenance of 'Brookfield' apples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe main goal of the present study was to elucidate the effect of growth regulators at harvest and postharvest quality of 'Brookfield' apples stored under controlled atmosphere through a multivariate approach. Thus, an experiment with two steps (field and storage was carried out. The treatments in field were applied with an output of 1,000 L ha–1 of water. The following treatments were tested: Control: only water application; AVG (aminoethoxyvinylglycine: 0.83 kg ha–1 of Retain® applied 30 days before harvest (BH; NAA (naphthalene acetic acid: 40g ha–1of naphthalene acetic acid applied 7 days BH; Ethephon: 2.0 L ha–1 of Ethrel® applied 10 days BH; 1-MCP: 0.625µL L–1 of 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene: applied during postharvest (storage; LE (low ethylene: with the allocation of potassium permanganate sachets during postharvest. Fruits treated with AVG in the field showed an opposite response to the fruits with NAA. AVG application followed by another growth regulator (AVG + Ethephon and AVG + NAA showed an advance in maturation, nearing these fruits to the control treatment, this effect is likely related to the higher ethylene production by these fruits compared to fruits with AVG alone. AVG, 1-MCP and LE kept a similar response on quality maintenance. Ethephon application prevented the negative effect of NAA at harvest, but after storage, the combined NAA + ethephon application increased the physiological disorders, reducing internal quality.

  16. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  17. Regulating manure application discharges from concentrated animal feeding operations in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centner, Terence J.; Feitshans, Theodore A.

    2006-01-01

    In the United States, reducing pollution from agriculture has received attention due to data suggesting that this is the leading source of impairment of many waterbodies. The federal government revised its regulations governing concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) to enhance governmental oversight over sources of pollution. For the application of manure resulting in pollutant discharges, CAFOs need to implement nutrient management plans. A federal court affirmed the ability of the US federal government to oversee the application of manure from CAFOs that have discharges. Simultaneously, owners and operators of CAFOs who have implemented an appropriate nutrient management plan may forgo securing a permit if their discharges qualify under the agricultural stormwater discharge exemption. - New rules applying to the application of manure by large concentrated animal feeding operations should reduce water contamination

  18. U.S. DOE Progress Towards Developing Low-Cost, High Performance, Durable Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchins, Cassidy; Kleen, Greg J; Spendelow, Jacob S; Kopasz, John; Peterson, David; Garland, Nancy L; Ho, Donna Lee; Marcinkoski, Jason; Martin, Kathi Epping; Tyler, Reginald; Papageorgopoulos, Dimitrios C

    2012-12-18

    Low cost, durable, and selective membranes with high ionic conductivity are a priority need for wide-spread adoption of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Electrolyte membranes are a major cost component of PEMFC stacks at low production volumes. PEMFC membranes also impose limitations on fuel cell system operating conditions that add system complexity and cost. Reactant gas and fuel permeation through the membrane leads to decreased fuel cell performance, loss of efficiency, and reduced durability in both PEMFCs and DMFCs. To address these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program, in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, supports research and development aimed at improving ion exchange membranes for fuel cells. For PEMFCs, efforts are primarily focused on developing materials for higher temperature operation (up to 120 °C) in automotive applications. For DMFCs, efforts are focused on developing membranes with reduced methanol permeability. In this paper, the recently revised DOE membrane targets, strategies, and highlights of DOE-funded projects to develop new, inexpensive membranes that have good performance in hot and dry conditions (PEMFC) and that reduce methanol crossover (DMFC) will be discussed.

  19. U.S. DOE Progress Towards Developing Low-Cost, High Performance, Durable Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios C. Papageorgopoulos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low cost, durable, and selective membranes with high ionic conductivity are a priority need for wide-spread adoption of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. Electrolyte membranes are a major cost component of PEMFC stacks at low production volumes. PEMFC membranes also impose limitations on fuel cell system operating conditions that add system complexity and cost. Reactant gas and fuel permeation through the membrane leads to decreased fuel cell performance, loss of efficiency, and reduced durability in both PEMFCs and DMFCs. To address these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program, in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, supports research and development aimed at improving ion exchange membranes for fuel cells. For PEMFCs, efforts are primarily focused on developing materials for higher temperature operation (up to 120 °C in automotive applications. For DMFCs, efforts are focused on developing membranes with reduced methanol permeability. In this paper, the recently revised DOE membrane targets, strategies, and highlights of DOE-funded projects to develop new, inexpensive membranes that have good performance in hot and dry conditions (PEMFC and that reduce methanol crossover (DMFC will be discussed.

  20. Application of the LR-56 at DOE Facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C.

    1998-05-01

    The ability to ship Type B liquid packages will be necessary for the nuclear industry to meet the energy production requirements of the next century. There are no packages licensed in the United States for transportation of large quantities of such liquids at present. Packages designed for transporting liquids must address technical challenges and incorporate features which are not common to packages designed for solid contents. These issues and the methods of addressing them are illustrated by the safety analysis performed for utilization of the LR-56 Liquid Package at US DOE facilities

  1. Does the United States Naval Academy Admissions Board Evaluate an Applicant's Moral Values? If So, How?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clemans, Craig C

    2005-01-01

    .... This study explored that assumption. Through the literature review, this study examined the Admission Board's charter, each step of the admissions process and the practice used for evaluating an applicant's moral values...

  2. Maryland air toxics regulation applicable to a natural gas compressor station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidemann, H.A.; Hoffman, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation submitted an air permit application to the Maryland Department of the Environment to construct a natural gas compressor station near Rutledge, Maryland. The station consists of three natural gas-fueled internal combustion reciprocating engines, each rated at 3200 horsepower. Maximum potential pollutant emissions associated with the station operation did not trigger Prevention of Significant Deterioration review or nonattainment area New Source review. However, a minor source air permit cannot be issued without addressing Maryland's toxic air regulations. Columbia initiated a detailed investigation of toxic air pollutants, including a stack test of an identical engine. Based on this information, the proposed station was subject to the toxic air regulation for acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, crotonaldehyde, and formaldehyde. Compliance with the toxic air regulation for crotonaldehyde was demonstrated by having an emission rate less than the threshold emission rate, specified in the regulation. The ambient air quality impact of the other four pollutants was determined using the Industrial Source Complex dispersion model and resulted in predicted concentrations below the pollutant-specific acceptable ambient level. A carcinogenic impact analysis was performed for acetaldehyde, benzene, and formaldehyde to demonstrate compliance with the accepted risk of one in one hundred thousand

  3. Does industry self-regulation protect young people from exposure to alcohol marketing? A review of compliance and complaint studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jonathan K; Babor, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol marketing is considered to be potentially harmful to adolescents. In addition to statutory regulation, industry self-regulation is a common way to protect adolescents from alcohol marketing exposures. This paper critically reviews research designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the alcohol industry's compliance procedures to manage complaints when alcohol marketing is considered to have violated a self-regulatory code. Peer-reviewed papers were identified through four literature search engines: PubMed, SCOPUS, PsychINFO and CINAHL. Non-peer-reviewed reports produced by public health agencies, alcohol research centers, non-governmental organizations, government research centers and national industry advertising associations were also included. The search process yielded three peer-reviewed papers, seven non-peer reviewed reports published by academic institutes and non-profit organizations and 20 industry reports. The evidence indicates that the complaint process lacks standardization across countries, industry adjudicators may be trained inadequately or biased and few complaints are upheld against advertisements pre-determined to contain violations of a self-regulatory code. The current alcohol industry marketing complaint process used in a wide variety of countries may be ineffective at removing potentially harmful content from the market-place. The process of determining the validity of complaints employed by most industry groups appears to suffer from serious conflict of interest and procedural weaknesses that could compromise objective adjudication of even well-documented complaints. In our opinion the current system of self-regulation needs major modifications if it is to serve public health objectives, and more systematic evaluations of the complaint process are needed. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Does more government deficit raise the interest rate? Application of extended loanable funds model to Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hsing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Extending the open-economy loanable funds model, this paper finds that more government deficit as a percentage of GDP does not lead to a higher government bond yield. In addition, a higher real Treasury bill rate, a higher expected inflation rate, a higher EU government bond yield, or an expected depreciation of the euro against the U.S. dollar would increase Slovenia’s long-term interest rate. The negative coefficient of the percentage change in real GDP is insignificant at the10% level. Applying the standard closed-economy or open-economy loanable funds model without including the world interest rate and the expected exchange rate, we find similar conclusions except that the positive coefficient of the ratio of the net capital inflow to GDP has a wrong sign and is insignificant at the 10% level.

  5. Does active application of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode improve their performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of adhesion strategy on the enamel microshear bond strengths (μSBS), etching pattern, and in situ degree of conversion (DC) of seven universal adhesives. 84 extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, proximal) and divided into 21 groups, according to the combination of the main factors adhesive (AdheSE Universal [ADU], All-Bond Universal [ABU], Clearfil Universal [CFU], Futurabond U [FBU], G-Bond Plus [GBP], Prime&Bond Elect (PBE), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU]), and adhesion strategy (etch-and-rinse, active self-etch, and passive self-etch). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h) and tested at 1.0mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin interfaces were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a field-emission scanning electron microscope (direct and replica techniques). Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Active self-etch application increased μSBS and DC for five out of the seven universal adhesives when compared to passive application (padhesives in the etch-and-rinse strategy. A slight improvement in etching ability was observed in active self-etch application compared to that of passive self-etch application. Replicas of GBP and PBE applied in active self-etch mode displayed morphological features compatible with water droplets. The DC of GBP and PBE were not affected by the application/strategy mode. In light of the improved performance of universal adhesives when applied actively in SE mode, selective enamel etching with phosphoric acid may not be crucial for their adhesion to enamel. The active application of universal adhesives in self-etch mode may be a practical alternative to enamel etching in specific clinical situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does nitrogen fertilizer application rate to corn affect nitrous oxide emissions from the rotated soybean crop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javed; Mitchell, David C; Barker, Daniel W; Miguez, Fernando; Sawyer, John E; Pantoja, Jose; Castellano, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Little information exists on the potential for N fertilizer application to corn ( L.) to affect NO emissions during subsequent unfertilized crops in a rotation. To determine if N fertilizer application to corn affects NO emissions during subsequent crops in rotation, we measured NO emissions for 3 yr (2011-2013) in an Iowa, corn-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] rotation with three N fertilizer rates applied to corn (0 kg N ha, the recommended rate of 135 kg N ha, and a high rate of 225 kg N ha); soybean received no N fertilizer. We further investigated the potential for a winter cereal rye ( L.) cover crop to interact with N fertilizer rate to affect NO emissions from both crops. The cover crop did not consistently affect NO emissions. Across all years and irrespective of cover crop, N fertilizer application above the recommended rate resulted in a 16% increase in mean NO flux rate during the corn phase of the rotation. In 2 of the 3 yr, N fertilizer application to corn (0-225 kg N ha) did not affect mean NO flux rates from the subsequent unfertilized soybean crop. However, in 1 yr after a drought, mean NO flux rates from the soybean crops that received 135 and 225 kg N ha N application in the corn year were 35 and 70% higher than those from the soybean crop that received no N application in the corn year. Our results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that cover crop effects on NO emissions are not easily generalizable. When N fertilizer affects NO emissions during a subsequent unfertilized crop, it will be important to determine if total fertilizer-induced NO emissions are altered or only spread across a greater period of time. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard [Boston U.; Christ, Norman [Columbia U.; DeTar, Carleton [Utah U.; Edwards, Robert [Jefferson Lab; Mackenzie, Paul [Fermilab

    2017-10-30

    In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020's. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  8. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Richard; Christ, Norman; DeTar, Carleton; Edwards, Robert; Mackenzie, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020's. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  9. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brower Richard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020’s. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  10. Status of DOE defense waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, K.G.; Scott, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper very briefly traces the statutory basis for DOE management of atomic energy defense activity wastes, touches on the authority of the Federal agencies involved in the regulation of defense nuclear waste management, and addresses the applicable regulations and their status. This background sets the stage for a fairly detailed discussion of management and disposal strategies of the Defense Waste and Byproducts Management Program

  11. An application of nonlinear programming to the design of regulators of a linear-quadratic formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P.

    1983-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a nonlinear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer. One concerns helicopter longitudinal dynamics and the other the flight dynamics of an aerodynamically unstable aircraft.

  12. Does Shortened Application Time Affect Long-Term Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives to Dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikaew, P; Matsumoto, M; Chowdhury, Afma; Carvalho, R M; Sano, H

    2018-04-09

    This study evaluated the effect of shortened application time on long-term bond strength with universal adhesives. Three universal adhesives were used: Clearfil Universal Bond (CU, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, Tokyo, Japan), Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SB, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) or G-Premio Bond (GP, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan). Sixty molars were cut to expose midcoronal dentin and prepared with a regular diamond bur. Each adhesive was applied either according to the manufacturer's instruction or with shortened time. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and then cut into resin-dentin sticks. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was tested after either 24 hours or 1 year of water storage. Data were analyzed by the three-way ANOVA and Duncan tests ( α=0.05). Fracture modes were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). One dentin stick per group was selected after fracture mode analysis and further observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Six additional dentin discs were prepared and conditioned with each adhesive under the different application time to observe the adhesive-smear layer interaction by SEM. Shortened application time affected the μTBS ( puniversal adhesives to bur-cut dentin. The performance of universal adhesives can be compromised when applied using a shortened application time.

  13. 34 CFR 350.54 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use in evaluating an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; and (F) The proposed development efforts include adequate quality controls and, as appropriate... qualified researchers. (x) The extent to which the type, extent, and quality of the proposed clinical and... laboratories, if appropriate. (ii) The quality of an applicant's past performance in carrying out a grant. (iii...

  14. Does activity fulfil aspiration? a contextual comparison of smart city applications in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wijs, Lisanne; Witte, Patrick; de Klerk, Daniel; Geertman, Stan

    2017-01-01

    Research on smart city projects and applications has been increasing in recent years (Meijer and Bolivar 2015). The smart city concept is mostly considered from a technology-oriented perspective that stresses the use of data technologies, big data and ICT to ‘smarten up’ cities. In contrast,

  15. Biochar application does not improve the soil hydrological function of a sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, S.; Meinders, M.B.C.; Stoof, C.R.; Bezemer, T.M.; Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Mommer, Liesje; Van Groenigen, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to soil is currently being widely posited as a means to improve soil quality and thereby increase crop yield. Next to beneficial effects on soil nutrient availability and retention, biochar is assumed to improve soil water retention. However, evidence for such an effect in the

  16. 34 CFR 636.21 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assess the effectiveness of the procedures used by the applicant in determining need for the project...) Agencies of local government. (ii) Public and private elementary and secondary schools. (iii) Business... rationale; and (iii) Is a cost-effective approach for accomplishing project goals and objectives; and (2...

  17. Wood ash application increases pH but does not harm the soil mesofauna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Jiayi; Hovmand, M.; Ekelund, Flemming; Rønn, Regin; Christensen, S.; Groot, de G.A.; Mortensen, L.H.; Skov, Simon; Henning Krogh, P.

    2017-01-01

    Application of bioash from biofuel combustion to soil supports nutrient recycling, but may have unwanted and detrimental ecotoxicological side-effects, as the ash is a complex mixture of compounds that could affect soil invertebrates directly or through changes in their food or habitat conditions.

  18. Does the application site of spinal manipulative therapy alter spinal tissues loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Nougarou, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2018-01-31

    Previous studies found that the intervertebral disc (IVD) experiences the greatest loads during spinal manipulation therapy (SMT). Based on that, this study aimed to determine if loads experienced by spinal tissues are significantly altered when the application site of SMT is changed. A biomechanical robotic serial dissection study. Thirteen porcine cadaveric motion segments. Forces experienced by lumbar spinal tissues. A servo-controlled linear actuator provided standardized 300 N SMT simulations to six different cutaneous locations of the porcine lumbar spine: L2-L3 and L3-L4 facet joints (FJ), L3 and L4 transverse processes (TVP), and the space between the FJs and the TVPs (BTW). Vertebral kinematics were tracked optically using indwelling bone pins; the motion segment was removed and mounted in a parallel robot equipped with a six-axis load cell. Movements of each SMT application at each site were replayed by the robot with the intact specimen and following the sequential removal of spinal ligaments, FJs and IVD. Forces induced by SMT were recorded, and specific axes were analyzed using linear mixed models. Analyses yielded a significant difference (p<.05) in spinal structures loads as a function of the application site. Spinal manipulative therapy application at the L3 vertebra caused vertebral movements and forces between L3 and L4 spinal segment in the opposite direction to when SMT was applied at L4 vertebra. Additionally, SMT applications over the soft tissue between adjacent vertebrae significantly decreased spinal structure loads. Applying SMT with a constant force at different spinal levels creates different relative kinetics of the spinal segments and load spinal tissues in significantly different magnitudes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Study of the Application Rate of Effective Learning Technologies in Self-Regulation of KFU and VIIU Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuziakhmetov, Anvar N.; Amin, Azimi Sayed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is the study of the application rate of learning technologies in KFU and VIIU electronic courses to improve students' self-regulation. For this aim, this research was based on Kitsantas research, the rate of the use of effective learning technologies in students' self-regulation in electronic courses in these two…

  20. Relative risk analysis in regulating the use of radiation-emitting medical devices. A preliminary application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Altenbach, T.J.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary application of an analysis approach for assessing relative risks in the use of radiation- emitting medical devices. Results are presented on human-initiated actions and failure modes that are most likely to occur in the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma irradiation therapy device. This effort represents an initial step in a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plan to evaluate the potential role of risk analysis in regulating the use of nuclear medical devices. For this preliminary application of risk assessment, the focus was to develop a basic process using existing techniques for identifying the most likely risk contributors and their relative importance. The approach taken developed relative risk rankings and profiles that incorporated the type and quality of data available and could present results in an easily understood form. This work was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the NRC.

  1. Relative risk analysis in regulating the use of radiation-emitting medical devices. A preliminary application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Altenbach, T.J.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary application of an analysis approach for assessing relative risks in the use of radiation- emitting medical devices. Results are presented on human-initiated actions and failure modes that are most likely to occur in the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma irradiation therapy device. This effort represents an initial step in a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plan to evaluate the potential role of risk analysis in regulating the use of nuclear medical devices. For this preliminary application of risk assessment, the focus was to develop a basic process using existing techniques for identifying the most likely risk contributors and their relative importance. The approach taken developed relative risk rankings and profiles that incorporated the type and quality of data available and could present results in an easily understood form. This work was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the NRC

  2. Wood ash application increases pH but does not harm the soil mesofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Jiayi; Hovmand, Mads Frederik; Ekelund, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Application of bioash from biofuel combustion to soil supports nutrient recycling, but may have unwanted and detrimental ecotoxicological side-effects, as the ash is a complex mixture of compounds that could affect soil invertebrates directly or through changes in their food or habitat conditions...... is the likely cause of effects while high pH and heavy metals is of minor importance.......Application of bioash from biofuel combustion to soil supports nutrient recycling, but may have unwanted and detrimental ecotoxicological side-effects, as the ash is a complex mixture of compounds that could affect soil invertebrates directly or through changes in their food or habitat conditions....... To examine this, we performed laboratory toxicity studies of the effects of wood-ash added to an agricultural soil and the organic horizon of a coniferous plantation soil with the detrivore soil collembolans Folsomia candida and Onychiurus yodai, the gamasid predaceous mite Hypoaspis aculeifer...

  3. The new Portuguese law on surrogacy - The story of how a promising law does not really regulate surrogacy arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2017-09-01

    Since 2006, surrogacy arrangements have been expressly forbidden within the Portuguese legal order, in any one of its forms, and in some situations, it has even been criminalised. However, since August 2016, surrogacy has been allowed under certain restrictive scenarios, providing it follows several prerequisites. In spite of this progress, the 2016 amendment to the law has not been immune to criticism. One of its most debatable aspects is the lack of the surrogate's right to regret, although it is doubtful that surrogacy contracts will be enforced against a surrogate's wishes. But the weakest point of the new law is its failure to address some of the nuclear issues of surrogacy contracts, leaving solutions either to general contract law or to the clauses stipulated by the parties. Furthermore, it is unclear which clauses are allowed and which are forbidden under the law. This study describes the content of the new Portuguese surrogacy law, exposes its main fragilities and suggests solutions for matters not covered by the law. The conclusion is that a law full of promise fails regarding the issues it is supposed to regulate.

  4. Workshop on environmental assessment. [Regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, E.C. (comp.)

    1982-07-01

    Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs.

  5. How a regulator is preparing for reviewing a license application file: The case of ASN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, Loic

    2014-01-01

    The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) is an independent administrative authority. It prepares regulation pertaining to the management of radioactive waste, monitors the control of safety of basic nuclear installations that produce or treat waste or are involved in their disposal and performs inspections of waste producers (EDF, AREVA, CEA, hospitals, research centres, etc.) and Andra, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency. It regulates the overall system set up by Andra for accepting waste from producers and assesses waste management policy and the practices of radioactive waste producers. It reviews license applications and authorises commissioning of nuclear installations. In order to review technical documents, ASN benefits from the expertise of technical support organisations. The French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) is the main such organisation. ASN has been making efforts to diversify its experts for several years. In preparing its decisions, ASN also calls on the opinions and recommendations of seven Advisory Committees of Experts (GPE), with expert knowledge in the areas of waste, nuclear pressure equipment, medical exposure, non-medical radiation protection, reactors, transport, and laboratories and nuclear plants. ASN consults the GPEs in preparing its main decisions. In particular, they review the preliminary, provisional and final safety analysis reports for each nuclear installation. They can also be consulted about changes in regulations or doctrine. (authors)

  6. APPLICATION OF THE LASAGNA(trademark) SOIL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY AT THE DOE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Barry D.; Tarantino, Joseph J. P. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), has been enriching uranium since the early 1950s. The enrichment process involves electrical and mechanical components that require periodic cleaning. The primary cleaning agent was trichloroethene (TCE) until the late 1980s. Historical documentation indicates that a mixture of TCE and dry ice were used at PGDP for testing the integrity of steel cylinders, which stored depleted uranium. TCE and dry ice were contained in a below-ground pit and used during the integrity testing. TCE seeped from the pit and contaminated the surrounding soil. The Lasagna(trademark) technology was identified in the Record of Decision (ROD) as the selected alternative for remediation of the cylinder testing site. A public-private consortium formed in 1992 (including DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, Monsanto, DuPont, and General Electric) developed the Lasagna(trademark) technology. This innovative technology employs electrokinetics to remediate soil contaminated with organics and is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils. This technology uses direct current to move water through the soil faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods. Electrokinetics moves contaminants in soil pore water through treatment zones comprised of iron filings, where the contaminants are decomposed to basic chemical compounds such as ethane. After three years of development in the laboratory, the consortium field tested the Lasagna(trademark) process in several phases. CDM installed and operated Phase I, the trial installation and field test of a 150-square-foot area selected for a 120-day run in 1995. Approximately 98 percent of the TCE was removed. CDM then installed and operated the next phase (IIa), a year-long test on a 600-square-foot site. Completed in July 1997, this test removed 75 percent of the total volume of TCE down to a

  7. Cold-water acclimation does not modify whole-body fluid regulation during subsequent cold-water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, J M; Patterson, M J; Hyde, D E; Jenkins, A B; Mittleman, K D; Taylor, N A S

    2004-06-01

    We investigated the impact of cold-water acclimation on whole-body fluid regulation using tracer-dilution methods to differentiate between the intracellular and extracellular fluid compartments. Seven euhydrated males [age 24.7 (8.7) years, mass 74.4 (6.4) kg, height 176.8 (7.8) cm, sum of eight skinfolds 107.4 (20.4) mm; mean (SD)] participated in a 14-day cold-water acclimation protocol, with 60-min resting cold-water stress tests [CWST; 18.1 (0.1) degrees C] on days 1, 8 and 15, and 90-min resting cold-water immersions [18.4 (0.4) degrees C] on intervening days. Subjects were immersed to the 4th intercostal space. Intracellular and extracellular fluid compartments, and plasma protein, electrolyte and hormone concentrations were investigated. During the first CWST, the intracellular fluid (5.5%) and plasma volumes were reduced (6.1%), while the interstitial fluid volume was simultaneously expanded (5.4%). This pattern was replicated on days 8 and 15, but did not differ significantly among test days. Acclimation did not produce significant changes in the pre-immersion distribution of total body water, or changes in plasma osmolality, total protein, electrolyte, atrial natriuretic peptide or aldosterone concentrations. Furthermore, a 14-day cold-water acclimation regimen did not elicit significant changes in body-fluid distribution, urine production, or the concentrations of plasma protein, electrolytes or the fluid-regulatory hormones. While acclimation trends were not evident, we have confirmed that fluid from extravascular cells is displaced into the interstitium during acute cold-water immersion, both before and after cold acclimation.

  8. Application of DOE prescribed guides to the evaluation of Hanford's Mixed Low Level Solid Waste Treatment Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.F.; Nash, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    A recent Westinghouse Hanford Company report (WHC-SD-W100-ES-008, February, 1994), compared a Vitrification process to the WRAP-2A Grout/PE process for the treatment of Mixed Low Level Waste (MLLW). This comparison applied a limited scope numerical evaluation to compare technology complexity of the two processes, but focused primarily on capital and operating costs. The work reported here is supplementary to WHC-SD-Wl00-ES-008. It provides a record of the application of the more formal DOE-prescribed criteria (Treatment Selection Guides for Federal Facility Compliance Act Draft Site Treatment Plans) to the Vitrification and Grout/PE processes previously evaluated. Results of the evaluation favored the Grout/PE process by a weighted score of 83 to 78 over the Plasma arc vitrification process

  9. Evaluation of lead/carbon devices for utility applications : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walmet, Paula S. (MeadWestvaco Corporation,North Charleston, SC)

    2009-06-01

    This report describes the results of a three-phase project that evaluated lead-based energy storage technologies for utility-scale applications and developed carbon materials to improve the performance of lead-based energy storage technologies. In Phase I, lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were compared to other technologies that used the same or similar materials. At the end of Phase I (in 2005) it was found that lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were not yet fully developed and optimized (cost/performance) to be a viable option for utility-scale applications. It was, however, determined that adding carbon to the negative electrode of a standard lead-acid battery showed promise for performance improvements that could be beneficial for use in utility-scale applications. In Phase II various carbon types were developed and evaluated in lead-acid batteries. Overall it was found that mesoporous activated carbon at low loadings and graphite at high loadings gave the best cycle performance in shallow PSoC cycling. Phase III studied cost/performance benefits for a specific utility application (frequency regulation) and the full details of this analysis are included as an appendix to this report.

  10. The PorX response regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY two-component system does not directly regulate the Type IX secretion genes but binds the PorL subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxence S Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Type IX secretion system (T9SS is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion of surface attachment of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of the porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we showed that PorX does not bind and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS.

  11. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  12. Advanced valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for hybrid vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, M. L.; Trinidad, F.; Lacadena, J. M.; Sánchez, A.; Valenciano, J.

    Future vehicle applications require the development of reliable and long life batteries operating under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) working conditions. Work presented in this paper deals with the study of different design parameters, manufacturing process and charging conditions of spiral wound valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, in order to improve their reliability and cycle life for hybrid vehicle applications. Test results show that both electrolyte saturation and charge conditions have a strong effect on cycle life at HRPSoC performance, presumably because water loss finally accelerates battery failure, which is linked to irreversible sulphation in the upper part of the negative electrodes. By adding expanded graphite to the negative active mass formulation, increasing the electrolyte saturation degree (>95%) and controlling overcharge during regenerative braking periods (voltage limitation and occasional boosting) it is possible to achieve up to 220,000 cycles at 2.5% DOD, equivalent to 5500 capacity throughput. These results could make lead acid batteries a strong competitor for HEV applications versus other advanced systems such as Ni-MH or Li-ion batteries.

  13. Does the conductivity of interconnect coatings matter for solid oxide fuel cell applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Claudia; Fefekos, Alexander G.; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2018-04-01

    The present work aims to quantify the influence of typical interconnect coatings used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) on area specific resistance (ASR). To quantify the effect of the coating, the dependency of coating thickness on the ASR is examined on Crofer 22 APU at 600 °C. Three different Co coating thicknesses are investigated, 600 nm, 1500 nm, and 3000 nm. Except for the reference samples, the material is pre-oxidized prior to coating to mitigate the outward diffusion of iron and consequent formation of poorly conducting (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel. Exposures are carried out at 600 °C in stagnant laboratory air for 500 h and subsequent ASR measurements are performed. Additionally the microstructure is investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On all pre-oxidized samples, a homogenous dense Co3O4 top layer is observed beneath which a thin layer of Cr2O3 is present. As the ASR values range between 7 and 12 mΩcm2 for all pre-oxidized samples, even though different Co3O4 thicknesses are observed, the results strongly suggest that for most applicable cases the impact of the coating on ASR is negligible and the main contributor is Cr2O3.

  14. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  15. Does the application of kinesiotape change scapular kinematics in healthy female handball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herzeele, M; van Cingel, R; Maenhout, A; De Mey, K; Cools, A

    2013-11-01

    Elastic taping is widely used in sports medicine for correcting functional alignment and muscle recruitment. However, evidence regarding its influence on scapular dynamic positioning is scarce. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a specific kinesiotaping method on scapular kinematics in female elite handball players without shoulder complaints. 25 athletes (18.0±1.5 years) active in the highest national division were recruited. All subjects received an elastic adhesive tape (K-active tape©) with the purpose to correct scapular position. 3-dimensional scapular motion measurements were performed (Fastrak®) during humeral elevation in the sagittal, frontal and scapular plane. The results showed that taping has a moderate to large effect (Cohen's d>0.7) towards scapular posterior tilting, in all 3 planes of humeral movement and for all angles of elevation (mean posteriorizing effect of 4.23 °, 3.23 ° and 4.33 ° respectively for elevation in the sagittal, frontal and scapular plane, p0.7). Together these results suggest that kinesiotape application causes positive changes in scapular motion. This could support its use in sports medicine for preventing shoulder problems in overhead athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Radiation protection: Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium. 8. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, G.; Czarwinski, R.; Martini, E.; Ruehle, H.; Wust, P.

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, radiation effects and radiation risks were again a central issue, with new biokinetic and dosimetric models. Preliminary experience with new legal regulations on radiation protection was a central issue. Dosimetry and radiation protection metrology were gone into, as was radiation exposure in medicine, engineering, and the environment. New diagnostic methods in medicine were presented, and radiation exposures resulting from some of these techniques were analyzed. Industrial applications of ionising radiation and technical radiography were presented. Nuclear engineering was covered as well, e.g. how to maintain the current know-how after the agreed nuclear phase-out, the transport of spent fuel elements, and the safety of nuclear power stations in eastern Europe. As in the years before, detection limits in radiation measurement, calculations of radiation exposure, incidents in nuclear facilities, and radiation exposure assessment after safety-relevant incidents were among the issues discussed. (orig.)

  17. Coordination of Croatian National Legislative with EU Commission Regulation on the Application of Euratom Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilijas, B.; Medakovic, S.

    2012-01-01

    Having regard to the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) in the view of increasing quantities of nuclear materials produced, used, carried and recycled in the Community, and also development of trade in these materials, especially in the scope of the successive enlargements of the EU, it is essential to ensure effectiveness of safeguards. Commission Regulation on the application of Euratom safeguards of 8 February 2005 is a comprehensive regulation dealing with basic technical characteristics and particular safeguard provisions of installations for the production, separation, reprocessing, storage or other use of source material or special fissile material, as well as nuclear material accountancy, transfer between states and some specific provisions. Croatia signed the 'Agreement Between the Republic of Croatia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)' and a few years later 'Protocol Additional' to this Agreement that stipulates strict obligations of the Republic of Croatia under Safeguards in connection with NPT. Also, in Croatia is on power 'Act on Radiological and Nuclear Safety' which, beside others, establishes measures for ensuring the safe performance of practices involving ionising radiation sources, nuclear activities, radioactive waste disposal and the physical protection of ionising radiation sources and nuclear facilities. But on power is also 'Ordinance on control of the nuclear materials and special equipment' which refers to an old 'Act on nuclear safety', and also takes into account provisions of the NPT and 'Protocol Additional' regarding safeguards. A new ordinance should be promulgated in accordance with new act. As a new act also should be corrected before Croatia joins EU, an extensive job must be done in adjusting Croatian national legislative to Euratom safeguards.(author).

  18. Self-regulated learning as a framework for the educational application of virtual communities and personal learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 187 1033 USAL 8 2 1218 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} “Virtual Communities” (VC and “Personal learning Environments” (PLE, as products of the Web 2.0, of the cloud computing and of the “social media”, are impacting the field of education and are carrying the students to perform a more active role in the process of learning, and to integrate in their training not only the formal contexts, but also the informal and non-formal. However, we must be aware that the students control over the technology does not imply, necessarily, their control over their processes of teaching-learning and over the experience of learning. And for such control, self-regulation of learning by the student in CV and PLE can serve them to pass of their perception of technologies as technological tools to their perception of them as pedagogical tools, and to its use in the learning process in a planned and organized action, and directed toward specific goals. In order to do it, self-regulated learning, ie the application of learning strategies, their self-assessment, and the use of corrective actions in CV and in PLE, will led the student to take a more active, participatory and critical position in them, which will result in the creation of meaning mediated learning environments.

  19. Regulating the electrical behaviors of 2D inorganic nanomaterials for energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Wu, Junchi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-02-11

    Recent years have witnessed great developments in inorganic 2D nanomaterials for their unique dimensional confinement and diverse electronic energy bands. Precisely regulating their intrinsic electrical behaviors would bring superior electrical conductivity, rendering 2D nanomaterials ideal candidates for active materials in electrochemical applications when combined with the excellent reaction activity from the inorganic lattice. This Concept focuses on highly conducting inorganic 2D nanomaterials, including intrinsic metallic 2D nanomaterials and artificial highly conductive 2D nanomaterials. The intrinsic metallicity of 2D nanomaterials is derived from their closely packed atomic structures that ensure maximum overlapping of electron orbitals, while artificial highly conductive 2D nanomaterials could be achieved by designed methodologies of surface modification, intralayer ion doping, and lattice strain, in which atomic-scale structural modulation plays a vital role in realizing conducting behaviors. Benefiting from fast electron transfer, high reaction activity, as well as large surface areas arising from the 2D inorganic lattice, highly conducting 2D nanomaterials open up prospects for enhancing performance in electrochemical catalysis and electrochemical capacitors. Conductive 2D inorganic nanomaterials promise higher efficiency for electrochemical applications of energy conversion and storage. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Minocycline down-regulates topical mucosal inflammation during the application of microbicide candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangzhu Li

    Full Text Available An effective anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 microbicide should exert its action in the absence of causing aberrant activation of topical immunity that will increase the risk of HIV acquisition. In the present study, we demonstrated that the vaginal application of cellulose sulfate (CS gel induced topical mucosal inflammatory responses; the addition of minocycline to CS gel could significantly attenuate the inflammation in a mice model. The combined gel of CS plus minocycline not only reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines in cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs, also down-regulated the activation of CD4+ T cells and the recruitment of other immune cells including HIV target cells into vaginal tissues. Furthermore, an In vitro HIV-1 pseudovirus infection inhibition assay showed that the combined gel decreased the infection efficacy of different subtypes of HIV-1 pseudoviruses compared with that of CS gel alone. These results implicate that minocycline could be integrated into microbicide formulation to suppress the aberrant activation of topical mucosal immunity and enhance the safety profile during the application of microbicides.

  1. Model review and evaluation for application in DOE safety basis documentation of chemical accidents - modeling guidance for atmospheric dispersion and consequence assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Woodarad, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanna, S. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hesse, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huang, J. -C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lewis, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mazzola, C. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Defense Programs (DP), Office of Engineering and Operations Suppon, established the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (AP AC) Methodology Evaluation Program to identify and evaluate methodologies and computer codes to support accident phenomenological and consequence calculations for both radiological and nonradiological materials at DOE facilities and to identify development needs. The program is also intended to define and recommend "best or good engineering/safety analysis practices" to be followed in preparing ''design or beyond design basis" assessments to be included in DOE nuclear and nonnuclear facility safety documents. The AP AC effort is intended to provide scientifically sound and more consistent analytical approaches, by identifying model selection procedures and application methodologies, in order to enhance safety analysis activities throughout the DOE complex.

  2. "Does anger regulation mediate the discrimination-mental health link among Mexican-origin adolescents? A longitudinal mediation analysis using multilevel modeling": Correction to Park et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Reports an error in "Does Anger Regulation Mediate the Discrimination-Mental Health Link Among Mexican-Origin Adolescents? A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis Using Multilevel Modeling" by Irene J. K. Park, Lijuan Wang, David R. Williams and Margarita Alegría ( Developmental Psychology , Advanced Online Publication, Nov 28, 2016, np). In the article, there were several typographical errors in the Recruitment and Procedures section. The percentage of mothers who responded to survey items should have been 99.3%. Additionally, the youths surveyed at T2 and T3 should have been n=246 . Accordingly, the percentage of youths surveyed in T2 and T3 should have been 91.4% and the percentage of mothers surveyed at T2 and T3 should have been 90.7%. Finally, the youths missing at T2 should have been n= 23, and therefore the attrition rate for youth participants should have been 8.6. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-57671-001.) Although prior research has consistently documented the association between racial/ethnic discrimination and poor mental health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie this link are still unclear. The present 3-wave longitudinal study tested the mediating role of anger regulation in the discrimination-mental health link among 269 Mexican-origin adolescents ( M age = 14.1 years, SD = 1.6; 57% girls), 12 to 17 years old. Three competing anger regulation variables were tested as potential mediators: outward anger expression, anger suppression, and anger control. Longitudinal mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel modeling that disaggregated within-person effects from between-person effects. Results indicated that outward anger expression was a significant mediator; anger suppression and anger control were not significant mediators. Within a given individual, greater racial/ethnic discrimination was associated with more frequent outward anger expression. In turn

  3. Applicability of federal and state environmental requirements to selected DOE field installations and recommendations for development of generic compliance guidance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This final report identifies and describes federal and state environmental requirements applicable to selected Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear field installations, establishes priorities for the requirements, determines the need for development of additional compliance guidance, and recommends development of compliance guidance for specific priority requirements. Compliance guidance developed as part of the study is summarized. The applicability of environmental requirements to 12 DOE field installations was reviewed. Five installations were examined under Task 4. They are: Nevada Test Site; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Seven other installations were reviewed under Task 2 and included: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Hanford; Savannah River Plant; Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Pantex Plant; Rocky Flats Plant; and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This report combines results of the two tasks. The objective of the study was to identify the set of environmental requirements which are applicable to DOE field installations, track changes in the requirements, and prepare compliance guidance for important requirements and important regulatory developments as necessary. A cumulative calendar update for July 1982 represents the current status of applicable requirements. Environmental profiles of each facility, along with ambient monitoring results, are presented. Applicable federal requirements are identified. The specific applicability of federal and state requirements is detailed for each installation. Compliance guidance available from various agencies is described. Each requirement described is ranked by priority, and recommendations are made for development of additional guidance

  4. Application of the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC Fire PRA Methodology to a DOE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elicson, Tom; Harwood, Bentley; Yorg, Richard; Lucek, Heather; Bouchard, Jim; Jukkola, Ray; Phan, Duan

    2011-01-01

    The application NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology to DOE facility presented several challenges. This paper documents the process and discusses several insights gained during development of the fire PRA. A brief review of the tasks performed is provided with particular focus on the following: Tasks 5 and 14: Fire-induced risk model and fire risk quantification. A key lesson learned was to begin model development and quantification as early as possible in the project using screening values and simplified modeling if necessary. Tasks 3 and 9: Fire PRA cable selection and detailed circuit failure analysis. In retrospect, it would have been beneficial to perform the model development and quantification in 2 phases with detailed circuit analysis applied during phase 2. This would have allowed for development of a robust model and quantification earlier in the project and would have provided insights into where to focus the detailed circuit analysis efforts. Tasks 8 and 11: Scoping fire modeling and detailed fire modeling. More focus should be placed on detailed fire modeling and less focus on scoping fire modeling. This was the approach taken for the fire PRA. Task 14: Fire risk quantification. Typically, multiple safe shutdown (SSD) components fail during a given fire scenario. Therefore dependent failure analysis is critical to obtaining a meaningful fire risk quantification. Dependent failure analysis for the fire PRA presented several challenges which will be discussed in the full paper.

  5. Comparing welfare effects of different regulation schemes: An application to the electricity distribution industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsakangas-Savolainen, Maria; Svento, Rauli

    2010-01-01

    We compare the welfare effects of different regulation schemes of electricity distribution utilities. The compared regulation schemes are Fixed Price regulation, Cost of Service regulation, Menu of Cost-Contingent Contracts and Simple Menu of Contracts. In our calculations we utilize the information of a firm's potential to improve cost efficiency. The firm-specific cost information of Finnish electricity distribution utilities is obtained by using various Stochastic Frontier models. Our basic result is that welfare can be improved by changing the Cost of Service regulation scheme to the Menu of Contracts regulation. Welfare also increases in the case of Fixed Price regulation and Simple Menu of Contract regulation. There is however, a significant difference among regulation regimes on how this improved welfare is distributed to consumers and producers.

  6. Regulation on Deforestation and an example of its application in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Uroš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author sheds light on Regulation on Deforestation, introduced in Serbia in 1839 and an example of its application in practice - trials for deforestation before the Court of Kragujevac District in 1844, the year before the Regulation was amended. A number of elements of those trials were analyzed, among which how many perpetrators were trialed, in what manner offenses were executed, what evidence the Court used in order to acquire complete knowledge on cases and what punishments were inflicted. The number of offenders was much larger in comparison with years that preceded 1844. The perpetrators never appeared as individuals; deforestation was regularly carried out by several persons at the same time. Regarding evidence, the Court leaned on confessions, statements of witnesses and documentary evidence. Interestingly, none of perpetrators denied they committed the very act of offense. Whilst some of them gave full confessions, other attempted to either find grounds which would present their act as unpunishable, or base their defense on certain mitigating circumstances. Many of perpetrators considered the fact to have cut woods on their own land as the key factor excluding punishability of their acts. Similarly, some of them hoped to soften the Court stating that they cut woods because of utterly difficult financial situation. The testimonies of witnesses in one case served to corroborate charges against defendants, as in other situations they testified on behalf of alleged offenders. Documentary evidence were, as well as testimonies of witnesses, presented only in situations when the defendants would not confess to an offence, and they appear in the form of reports sent by District Police, tasked with investigation. The Court always administered two punishments. Besides fines, appearing in all trials, it cumulatively inflicted corporal punishment, prison or deprivation of titles. Corporal punishment is meted out in convincing majority of cases.

  7. Regulation of Spatiotemporal Patterns by Biological Variability: General Principles and Applications to Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Grace

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal patterns often emerge from local interactions in a self-organizing fashion. In biology, the resulting patterns are also subject to the influence of the systematic differences between the system's constituents (biological variability. This regulation of spatiotemporal patterns by biological variability is the topic of our review. We discuss several examples of correlations between cell properties and the self-organized spatiotemporal patterns, together with their relevance for biology. Our guiding, illustrative example will be spiral waves of cAMP in a colony of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analogous processes take place in diverse situations (such as cardiac tissue, where spiral waves occur in potentially fatal ventricular fibrillation so a deeper understanding of this additional layer of self-organized pattern formation would be beneficial to a wide range of applications. One of the most striking differences between pattern-forming systems in physics or chemistry and those in biology is the potential importance of variability. In the former, system components are essentially identical with random fluctuations determining the details of the self-organization process and the resulting patterns. In biology, due to variability, the properties of potentially very few cells can have a driving influence on the resulting asymptotic collective state of the colony. Variability is one means of implementing a few-element control on the collective mode. Regulatory architectures, parameters of signaling cascades, and properties of structure formation processes can be "reverse-engineered" from observed spatiotemporal patterns, as different types of regulation and forms of interactions between the constituents can lead to markedly different correlations. The power of this biology-inspired view of pattern formation lies in building a bridge between two scales: the patterns as a collective state of a very large number of cells on the one hand

  8. Application of the ELOHA framework to regulated rivers in the upper Tennessee River Basin: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan A. McManamay; Donald J. Orth; Charles A. Dolloff; David C. Mathews

    2013-01-01

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 603 - Applicable Federal Statutes, Executive Orders, and Government-wide Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pt. 603, App. A Appendix A to Part 603—Applicable Federal.... Prohibitions on discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin in Title VI of the Civil Rights... origin. 2. If the RD&D involves human subjects or animals, it is subject to the requirements codified by...

  10. 75 FR 181 - Application for Conversion From: (a) OTS-Regulated, State-Chartered Savings Association to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Application for Conversion From: (a) OTS-Regulated, State- Chartered Savings Association to Federal Savings Association; (b) National Bank, Commercial Bank, State Savings Bank, or Credit Union to Federal Savings Association; (c) State Mutual Holding...

  11. 75 FR 10560 - Application for Conversion From: (a) OTS-Regulated, State-Chartered Savings Association to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Application for Conversion From: (a) OTS-Regulated, State- Chartered Savings Association to Federal Savings Association; (b) National Bank, Commercial Bank, State Savings Bank, or Credit Union to Federal Savings Association; (c) State Mutual Holding...

  12. 15 CFR 0.735-2 - Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure, and other applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cross-references to ethical conduct... Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure, and other applicable regulations. Employees of the Department of Commerce should refer to the executive branch-wide Standards of Ethical Conduct...

  13. 43 CFR 20.101 - Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure and other applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cross-references to ethical conduct... Cross-references to ethical conduct, financial disclosure and other applicable regulations. In addition... Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, at 5 CFR part 2635; the Department's...

  14. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... power television and television translator stations. 74.789 Section 74.789 Telecommunication FEDERAL... AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator...

  15. 40 CFR 1051.1 - Does this part apply for my vehicles or engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Overview and Applicability § 1051.1 Does this part apply for my vehicles or engines? (a) The regulations in this part 1051... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this part apply for my vehicles...

  16. Regulating the surface of nanoceria and its applications in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Zhang, Sai; Tian, Zhimin; Liu, Yuxuan; Ho, Johnny C.; Qu, Yongquan

    2018-03-01

    Ceria (CeO2) as a support, additive, and active component for heterogeneous catalysis has been demonstrated to have great catalytic performance, which includes excellent thermal structural stability, catalytic efficiency, and chemoselectivity. Understanding the surface properties of CeO2 and the chemical reactions occurred on the corresponding interfaces is of great importance in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts for various reactions. In general, the reversible Ce3+/Ce4+ redox pair and the surface acid-base properties contribute to the superior intrinsic catalytic capability of CeO2, and hence yield enhanced catalytic phenomenon in many reactions. Particularly, nanostructured CeO2 is characterized by a large number of surface-bound defects, which are primarily oxygen vacancies, as the surface active catalytic sites. Many efforts have therefore been made to control the surface defects and properties of CeO2 by various synthetic strategies and post-treatments. The present review provides a comprehensive overview of recent progress in regulating the surface structure and composition of CeO2 and its applications in catalysis.

  17. UNLICENSED RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION: A REVIEW OF REGULATION AND APPLICATIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa GOZEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has stipulated that renewable energy sources (RES will have at least 30% share in electricity generation by 2023. To reach this target, a renewable energy promotion law (Law No. 5346 was enacted in 2005 and later amended in 2011. Through Law No. 5346, Turkey has launched a feed-in tariff (FIT for RES-based electricity with additional premium for the use of local equipment. The FIT is guaranteed for 10 years from the date of operation and valid only for RES power plants commissioned between the 18th May, 2005 and the 31th of December 2020. In addition, RES power plants with a capacity of up to 1 MW are exempted from licensing and establishing legal entities. There is an increasing demand to install unlicensed RES generators, mostly solar power plants, all over the country. At least one consumption unit must be associated with an unlicensed power plant. Excess generation from unlicensed RES power plants is automatically priced at the FIT for 10 years. Except for the FIT mechanism, unlicensed generators have no options to sell unconsumed electricity in the electricity market. The main difficulties lie in limited connection possibilities, the selection of plant locations, and coordination among relevant authorities. Moreover, an awareness campaign would help people to better understand the related regulation and applications.

  18. 34 CFR 225.11 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use in evaluating an application for a Credit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CREDIT ENHANCEMENT FOR CHARTER SCHOOL FACILITIES PROGRAM How Does the... school facilities programs, their performance in implementing these grants. (d) Quality of project... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What selection criteria does the Secretary use in...

  19. 34 CFR 226.12 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use in evaluating an application for a State Charter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE CHARTER SCHOOL FACILITIES INCENTIVE PROGRAM How Does the... facilities on a per-pupil basis. (b) Quality of plan. (1) The likelihood that the proposed grant project will... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What selection criteria does the Secretary use in...

  20. 48 CFR 22.1101 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability. 22.1101 Section 22.1101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC... their blue-collar service workers and some white-collar service workers fairly, but it does not cover...

  1. Chemical regulators of plant hormones and their applications in basic research and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Asami, Tadao

    2018-04-20

    Plant hormones are small molecules that play versatile roles in regulating plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Classic methodologies, including genetics, analytic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology, have contributed to the progress in plant hormone studies. In addition, chemical regulators of plant hormone functions have been important in such studies. Today, synthetic chemicals, including plant growth regulators, are used to study and manipulate biological systems, collectively referred to as chemical biology. Here, we summarize the available chemical regulators and their contributions to plant hormone studies. We also pose questions that remain to be addressed in plant hormone studies and that might be solved with the help of chemical regulators.

  2. DOE Patents Available for Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuber, C.

    1981-01-01

    DOE Patents Available for Licensing (DOE PAL) provides abstracting and indexing coverage of the DOE patent literature, including patent applications, that concerns any apsect of energy production, conservation, and utilization. The citations are arranged by subject category. DOE is prepared to grant exclusive or nonexclusive, revocable licenses under DOE-owned US patents and patent applications in accordance with the provisions of 10CFR781

  3. A program optimization system for the cleanup of DOE hazardous waste sites an application to FY 1990 funding decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkhofer, M.W.; Jenni, K.E.; Cotton, T.A.; Lehr, J.C.; Longo, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a formal system used by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an aid for allocating funds for cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The system, called the Program Optimization System (POS), is based on multiattribute utility analysis and was developed for DOE's Hazardous Waste and Remedial Actions Division (HWRAD). HWRAD has responsibility for recommending environmental restoration (ER) activities to the Assistant Secretary of Energy. Recently, the POS was used to analyze and recommend funding levels for FY 1990 cleanup activities at DOE defense program facilities

  4. Application of U.S. export controls to DOE technical exchanges: New guidelines on export control and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisann, E.G.; Hollander, Z.; Rudolph, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    As the Department of Energy's nuclear weapon's complex shrinks, concern regarding the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology through the release of export-controlled equipment, materials and information has come to the fore. In November, 1994 Under Secretary Charles Curtis issued new guidelines on export control and nonproliferation. The new policies and procedures are designed to help Department of Energy Headquarters Offices, Operations Offices, Area Offices, laboratories and contractors implement a consistent and technologically sound policy regarding DOE transfers of unclassified equipment, materials and information that could adversely affect US nuclear nonproliferation objectives or national security. The DOE Export Control Division has developed a multi-faceted program of guidelines and training materials to sensitize DOE and DOE-contractors to their responsibilities and to teach them how to evaluate the proliferation risks of their activities

  5. Exogenous short-term silicon application regulates macro-nutrients, endogenous phytohormones, and protein expression in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Soo-Won; Kim, Yoonha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Na, Chae-In; Lee, In-Jung

    2018-01-04

    Silicon (Si) has been known to regulate plant growth; however, the underlying mechanisms of short-term exogenous Si application on the regulation of calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N), endogenous phytohormones, and expression of essential proteins have been little understood. Exogenous Si application significantly increased Si content as compared to the control. Among Si treatments, 1.0 mM Si application showed increased phosphorus content as compared to other Si treatments (0.5, 2.0, and 4.0 mM). However, Ca accumulation was significantly reduced (1.8- to 2.0-fold) at the third-leaf stage in the control, whereas all Si treatments exhibited a dose-dependent increase in Ca as determined by radioisotope 45 Ca analysis. Similarly, the radioisotope 15 N for nitrogen localization and uptake showed a varying but reduced response (ranging from 1.03-10.8%) to different Si concentrations as compared to 15 N application alone. Physiologically active endogenous gibberellin (GA 1 ) was also significantly higher with exogenous Si (1.0 mM) as compared to GA 20 and the control plants. A similar response was noted for endogenous jasmonic and salicylic acid synthesis in rice plants with Si application. Proteomic analysis revealed the activation of several essential proteins, such as Fe-S precursor protein, putative thioredoxin, Ser/Thr phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6P), and importin alpha-1b (Imp3), with Si application. Among the most-expressed proteins, confirmatory gene expression analysis for G6P and Imp3 showed a similar response to those of the Si treatments. In conclusion, the current results suggest that short-term exogenous Si can significantly regulate rice plant physiology by influencing Ca, N, endogenous phytohormones, and proteins, and that 1.0 mM Si application is more beneficial to plants than higher concentrations.

  6. 47 CFR 74.780 - Broadcast regulations applicable to translators, low power, and booster stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assignments. Section 73.3561—Staff consideration of applications requiring Commission action. Section 73.3562... 73.3540—Application for voluntary assignment of transfer of control. Section 73.3541—Application for involuntary assignment or transfer of control. Section 73.3542—Application for emergency authorization...

  7. 77 FR 2679 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Order of Application for Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... following methods: [cir] Regulations.gov : http://www.regulations.gov . Submit comments via the Federal e... contract. In order to determine the sequence of modifications to a contract or order, a method for... the numeric order of the modifications to a contract is not the order in which the changes to the...

  8. The application of dangerous goods regulations to the transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkin, J.J.; Darby, W.P.; Heywood, J.D.; Wikinson, H.L.; Carrington, C.K.; Murray, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Some radioactive materials to be transported, including certain radioactive wastes, contain materials that qualify as dangerous goods as defined by the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (United Nations 1997). The regulations governing the transport of radioactive and dangerous goods in the UK are largely based on the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (IAEA 1990) and the UN Recommendations (United Nations 1993). Additional legislation will also apply including the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (Driver Training) Regulations 1996 (UK 1996). The IAEA Transport Regulations are clear that where radioactive materials have other dangerous properties the requirements of other relevant transport regulations for dangerous goods must also be met. They require that consignments are appropriately segregated from other dangerous goods, in accordance with relevant legislation, and that dangerous properties such as explosiveness, flammability etc. are taken into account in packing, labelling, marking, placarding, storage and transport. In practice, however, it requires a clear understanding of the relationship between the IAEA Transport Regulations and other dangerous goods legislation in order to avoid a number of problems in the approval of package design. This paper discusses the regulations applying to the transport of dangerous goods and explores practical problems associated with implementing them. It highlights a number of opportunities for developing the regulations, to make them easier to apply to radioactive materials that also have other potentially dangerous properties. (authors)

  9. Self-regulation theory: applications to medical education: AMEE Guide No. 58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John; Cleary, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation theory, as applied to medical education, describes the cyclical control of academic and clinical performance through several key processes that include goal-directed behaviour, use of specific strategies to attain goals, and the adaptation and modification to behaviours or strategies to optimise learning and performance. Extensive research across a variety of non-medical disciplines has highlighted differences in key self-regulation processes between high- and low-achieving learners and performers. Structured identification of key self-regulation processes can be used to develop specific remediation approaches that can improve performance in academic and complex psycho-motor skills. General teaching approaches that are guided by a self-regulation perspective can also enhance academic performance. Self-regulation theory offers an exciting potential for improving academic and clinical performance in medical education.

  10. Current products and future plan of regulatory technology R and D for risk-informed regulation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. Y.; Lee, C. J.; Kim, W. S.; Jeong, D. W.; Kim, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    The first phase of a R and D project for risk-informed regulation (RIR) and applications (RIA) has been finished. Various results which would be useful for preparing domestic RIR system were accomplished, in areas of safety goals and general principles of RIR, which provide fundamental bases for establishment of RIR system as well as regulatory review guides, which ensure the quality for PSA. RIA guidelines for ISI, IST, MOV, Tech.-Sepc. also have been developed, implementing some pilot plant applications. As essential documents for actual RIR inspection, risk-informed inspection guides and implementation guide for maintenance effectiveness were prepared. In the second phase of R and D, two projects on RIR area will be performed. One is to study on institutionalization of RIR and performance-based regulation, another is to develop a PSA model for regulatory audit as well as regulatory technology for risk monitoring

  11. DOE Fire Protection Handbook, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is delineated in a number of source documents including; the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), DOE Policy Statements and Orders, DOE and national consensus standards (such as those promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association), and supplementary guidance, This Handbook is intended to bring together in one location as much of this material as possible to facilitate understanding and ease of use. The applicability of any of these directives to individual Maintenance and Operating Contractors or to given facilities and operations is governed by existing contracts. Questions regarding applicability should be directed to the DOE Authority Having Jurisdiction for fire safety. The information provided within includes copies of those DOE directives that are directly applicable to the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program. They are delineated in the Table of Contents. The items marked with an asterisk (*) are included on the disks in WordPerfect 5.1 format, with the filename noted below. The items marked with double asterisks are provided as hard copies as well as on the disk. For those using MAC disks, the files are in Wordperfect 2.1 for MAC.

  12. Fuzzy Controller for a Voltage-Regulated Solar-Powered MPPT System for Hybrid Power System Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaw-Kuen Shiau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a fuzzy-logic-based voltage-regulated solar power maximum power point tracking (MPPT system for applications involving hybrid power systems. The system contains a solar power system and battery as the primary and secondary power sources, respectively. The solar system alone supplies power to the electric motor and maintains the output voltage at a predetermined level when it has sufficient power. When the solar power is insufficient, the solar system is operated at its maximum power point (MPP and the battery is engaged to compensate for the insufficiency. First, a variant of the incremental conductance MPP condition was established. Under the MPP condition, the voltage-regulated MPPT system was formulated as a feedback control system, where the MPP condition and voltage regulation requirements were used as the system inputs. Next, a fuzzy controller was developed to perform the voltage-regulated MPPT function for the hybrid power system. A simulation model based on Matrix laboratory (MATLAB/SIMULINK (a block diagram environment for multi-domain simulation and model-based design and a piecewise linear electric circuit simulation (PLECS tool for controlling the dc motor velocity was developed to verify the voltage-regulated solar power MPPT system.

  13. The thorium alloys in aeronautics: from material analysis to regulation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, P.; Cazoulat, A.; Gerasimo, P.

    1999-01-01

    The thorium handled in aeronautics is a mixing in variable proportion of different thorium isotopes and its daughter products, but the regulation considers only two alpha emitters (Th-232 and Th-228): the thorium being considered as a natural radioactive substance, the legislation and the activities authorised are less restrictive than for artificial elements, it is a paradoxical situation because the thorium has the annual limit of intake the lowest of the regulation. (N.C.)

  14. Assessment of the application of the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The IAEA, working with the individual Member States, undertook to examine the manner in which domestic, import, export and through-country shipments of radioactive materials are controlled and regulated worldwide. The information to be examined was collected by a questionnaire, which was sent to Member States in July 1984. Copies of the letter and the questionnaire are in Appendix I of this document. The follow-up letters, repeating the request to provide the IAEA with data and asking authorization to publish the data obtained through the questionnaire, were sent in February 1985 (Appendix II and III). By the end of June 1986 completed questionnaires had been received from 53 Member States. These Member States are listed in Appendix IV. The results of the examination are summarized in this report. The results indicate the important role the international organizations play in the transport of radioactive material. All the Member States involved in this examination regulate the transport of radioactive material within their country on the basis of international agreements, regulations and recommendations. The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6, is the ultimately controlling document since it serves as the basis for the radioactive material portions of other international transport documents (Appendix V) and since it is made directly binding in the regulations of many countries. In addition to the questions concerning the adoption of the regulations, some questions on the implementation of the transport regulations, e.g. on competent authorities and other regulatory bodies as well as quality assurance, were presented in the questionnaire. This report concerns only the adoption of the regulations

  15. 34 CFR 658.33 - What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.33... potential impact of the proposed project in improving international studies and the study of modern foreign... international studies or modern foreign languages at the undergraduate level; and (iv) The adequacy of the...

  16. 25 CFR 103.16 - How does BIA approve or reject a loan guaranty or insurance application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or if necessary, from liquidating loan collateral. Lenders are expected to obtain a first lien security interest in enough collateral to reasonably secure repayment of each loan guaranteed or insured... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does BIA approve or reject a loan guaranty or...

  17. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  18. Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-01

    This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

  19. Cross-Regulation Assessment of DIDO Buck-Boost Converter for Renewable Energy Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Elamalayil Soman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When medium- or high-voltage power conversion is preferred for renewable energy sources, multilevel power converters have received much of the interest in this area as methods for enhancing the conversion efficiency and cost effectiveness. In such cases, multilevel, multi-input multi-output (MIMO configurations of DC-DC converters come to the scenario for integrating several sources together, especially considering the stringent regulatory needs and the requirement of multistage power conversion systems. Considering the above facts, a three-level dual input dual output (DIDO buck-boost converter, as the simplest form of MIMO converter, is proposed in this paper for DC-link voltage regulation. The capability of this converter for cross regulating the DC-link voltage is analyzed in detail to support a three-level neutral point clamped inverter-based grid connection in the future. The cross-regulation capability is examined under a new type of pulse delay control (PDC strategy and later compared with a three-level boost converter (TLBC. Compared to conventional boost converters, the high-voltage three-level buck boost converter (TLBBC with PDC exhibits a wide controllability range and cross regulation capability. These enhanced features are extremely important for better regulating variable output renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, wave, marine current, etc. The simulation and experimental results are provided to validate the claim.

  20. The evolution of the structure and application of U.S. NRC regulations and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.; Rosztoczy, Z.R.; McPherson, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    NRC regulations and standards and their implementation have evolved from early adaptations of conventional engineering practices to a mature, cohesive set of regulations that govern NRC regulation of nuclear power plant safety in the United States. From a simple set of rules and design criteria and from the standards of the professional engineering societies, a hierarchy of practices, standards, guides, rules and goals has developed. Resting on a foundation of industrial practices, this hierarchy rises through levels of national standards, regulatory guides and standard review plans, policy statements and NRC regulations. The licensing process is evolving today toward one that permits both site approval and standard design certification before the plant is constructed. At the present time, NRC is reviewing five standard designs for certification for a period of 15 years. NRC focuses its regulation of operating nuclear plants on inspections conducted from five regional offices. Resident inspectors, specialist inspectors, and multi-disciplinary inspection teams examine specific plant situations. The results of all these inspections are used to develop a complete understanding of a plant's physical condition, its operation, maintenance and management. To improve safe operation of nuclear plants in the U.S., a most important program, the Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance, measures operational performance, using a broad spectrum of functional areas. (orig.)

  1. APPLICABILITY OF CONSOLIDATED TECHNIQUES IN THE VIEW OF ROMANIAN ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The accounting regulations are more and more interested in groups of companies. In some cases, these regulations require for preparing the consolidated financial statements. This is the task of the parent company who keeps the consolidated accounts. To accomplish its goals, the consolidated accounting uses a couple of, so-called, consolidation techniques. These are applied in the case of groups of companies with a complex structure. Their goal is to elaborate the consolidated financial statements using a set of methods and empirical skills. In this article we synthetize and apply the consolidation techniques in the view of Romanian accounting regulations. The Romanian practice has revealed, especially, two techniques: one based on direct consolidation and another one based on multiple levels (phased consolidation. Therefore, this work regards only the technical side of consolidated accounting, accounting records being evaded. Furthermore, we focus only on the preparation of the consolidated balance sheet in the case of some hypothetical groups of companies.

  2. Quality management system in radiotherapy in the light of regulations applicable in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The need to establish conditions for safe irradiation was noted in Poland back in 1986 in the Atomic Law, but for over 16 years no regulations regarding this aspect were passed. The radiological incident in Bialystok (Poland) in 2001 undeniably accelerated the implementation of new legal regulations. Nevertheless, in the absence of national guidelines until 2002, most health care institutions resorted to the quality management system (QMS) model proposed by the ISO norm 9001:2000. Eventually, practice proved the theory and the aforementioned model was also implemented into Polish acts of law defining basic requirements for QMS in radiotherapy. The aim of this work is to review current national regulations regarding QMS in radiotherapy, in particular those referring to standard procedures, the establishment of a commission for procedures and performance of external and internal clinical audits in oncological radiotherapy, as well as to present the process of their implementation into the practice of health care institutions. PMID:23788867

  3. Current control loop design and analysis based on resonant regulators for microgrid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federico, de Bosio; Pastorelli, Michelle; de Sousa Ribeiro, Luiz Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Voltage and current control loops play an important role in the performance of microgrids employing power electronics voltage source inverters. Correct design of feedback loops is essential for the proper operation of these systems. This paper analyzes the influence of state feedback cross......-coupling in the design of resonant regulators for inner current loops in power converters operating in standalone microgrids. It is also demonstrated that the effect of state feedback cross-coupling degrades the performance of the control loops by increasing the steady-state error. Different resonant regulators...

  4. To the problem of regulating of software applicability for the analysis of domestic reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, V.V.; Skalozubov, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    Based on consideration and generalization of results of verification/validation researches the necessity of development of an objective evaluation criterions of software applicability (calculated codes) for separate types of domestic reactor accidents is justified. These criterions should be used in a normative position of certification or the application order of calculated codes for the analysis of reactor safety

  5. Scientific foundation of regulating ionizing radiation: application of metrics for evaluation of regulatory science information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghissi, A Alan; Gerraa, Vikrham Kumar; McBride, Dennis K; Swetnam, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper starts by describing the historical evolution of assessment of biologic effects of ionizing radiation leading to the linear non-threshold (LNT) system currently used to regulate exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper describes briefly the concept of Best Available Science (BAS) and Metrics for Evaluation of Scientific Claims (MESC) derived for BAS. It identifies three phases of regulatory science consisting of the initial phase, when the regulators had to develop regulations without having the needed scientific information; the exploratory phase, when relevant tools were developed; and the standard operating phase, when the tools were applied to regulations. Subsequently, an attempt is made to apply the BAS/MESC system to various stages of LNT. This paper then compares the exposure limits imposed by regulatory agencies and also compares them with naturally occurring radiation at several cities. Controversies about LNT are addressed, including judgments of the U.S. National Academies and their French counterpart. The paper concludes that, based on the BAS/MESC system, there is no disagreement between the two academies on the scientific foundation of LNT; instead, the disagreement is based on their judgment or speculation.

  6. 75 FR 4305 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning the Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... review of, or preparation and transmission of, typed messages via wireless phones. Because of the safety... Secretary broad power in carrying out motor carrier safety statutes and regulations to ``prescribe.... Handheld or other wireless electronic devices that are brought into a CMV are considered ``additional...

  7. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... $250 for each violation, except the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death... and functions. Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) directs the... regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the...

  8. Major and trace elements regulation in natural granitic waters: Application to deep radioactive waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michard, G.; Negrel, G.; Toulhoat, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Ouzounian, G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to forecast the evolution of deep groundwaters in the environment of a radioactive waste disposal, one must be able to understand the behaviour of major and trace elements in natural systems. From granitic geothermal and groundwater systems the authors establish that major elements are controlled by mineral precipitation. Regulation levels depend both on equilibration temperature and mobile anion concentration (mainly C1). From empirical laws, the regulation levels with temperature of some trace elements (alkaline and most divalent) elements can be estimated, although a precise explanation for the regulation mechanism is not yet available. They demonstrate that some transition metals are controlled by sulphide precipitation; that uranium is controlled by uraninite solubility; that trivalent and tetravalent metals are present in association with colloidal particles. Maximum regulation levels can be estimated. Such studies can also be useful to forecast the concentration levels of many elements related to nuclear wastes, mainly fission products, uranium, thorium and by analogy artificial actinide elements, as the behaviour of corresponding natural elements can be evaluated

  9. 15 CFR 990.24 - Compliance with other applicable laws and regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Authorities § 990.24 Compliance with other... Endangered Species Act of 1973, 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.; the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, 16 U.S.C...

  10. Does the committee peer review select the best applicants for funding? An investigation of the selection process for two European molecular biology organization programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    Full Text Available Does peer review fulfill its declared objective of identifying the best science and the best scientists? In order to answer this question we analyzed the Long-Term Fellowship and the Young Investigator programmes of the European Molecular Biology Organization. Both programmes aim to identify and support the best post doctoral fellows and young group leaders in the life sciences. We checked the association between the selection decisions and the scientific performance of the applicants. Our study involved publication and citation data for 668 applicants to the Long-Term Fellowship programme from the year 1998 (130 approved, 538 rejected and 297 applicants to the Young Investigator programme (39 approved and 258 rejected applicants from the years 2001 and 2002. If quantity and impact of research publications are used as a criterion for scientific achievement, the results of (zero-truncated negative binomial models show that the peer review process indeed selects scientists who perform on a higher level than the rejected ones subsequent to application. We determined the extent of errors due to over-estimation (type I errors and under-estimation (type 2 errors of future scientific performance. Our statistical analyses point out that between 26% and 48% of the decisions made to award or reject an application show one of both error types. Even though for a part of the applicants, the selection committee did not correctly estimate the applicant's future performance, the results show a statistically significant association between selection decisions and the applicants' scientific achievements, if quantity and impact of research publications are used as a criterion for scientific achievement.

  11. 34 CFR 607.24 - How does the Secretary use an applicant's performance under a previous development grant when...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... objectives, the Secretary may— (1) Decide not to fund the applicant; or (2) Fund the applicant but impose... progress toward fulfilling, the goals and objectives of the previous grant, including, but not limited to... the goals and objectives of a previous grant or is not making substantial progress towards fulfilling...

  12. Synthesis Of 2- (1- Naphthyl) Ethanoic Acid ( Plant Growth Regulator ) From Coal Tar And Its Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin Mooh Theint; Tin Myint Htwe

    2011-12-01

    Plant growth regulators, which are commonly called as plant hormones, naturally produced non-nutrient chemical compounds involved in growth and development. Among the various kinds of plant growth regulators, 2- (1- Naphthyl ) ethanoic acid especially encourages the root development of the plant. In this work, NAA was successfuly synthesized from naphthalene which was extracted from coal tar. The purity of naphthalene, -Chloromethyl naphthalene, -Naphthyl acetonitrile, - Naphthyl acetic acid or 2 - ( 1-Naphthyl ) ethanoic acid were also confirmed by Thin Layer Chromatography, and by spectroscopy methods. The yield percent of NAA based on naphthalene was found to be 2.1%. The yield percent of naphthaleneFrom coal tar is found to be 4.09%. The effect of NAA on root development was also studied in different concentrations of soy bean (Glycine max)and cow pea (Vigna catjang walp).

  13. Applicable regulations and development of surveillance experiments of criticality approach in the TRIGA III Mark reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Aguilar H, F.; Rivero G, T.; Sainz M, E.

    2000-01-01

    In the procedure elaborated to repair the vessel of TRIGA III Mark reactor is required to move toward two tanks of temporal storage the fuel elements which are in operation and the spent fuel elements which are in decay inside the reactor pool. The National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS) has requested as protection measure that it is carried out a surveillance of the criticality approach of the temporal storages. This work determines the main regulation aspects that entails an experiment of criticality approach, moreover, informing about the results obtained in the developing of this experiments. The regulation aspects are not exclusives for this work in the TRIGA Mark III reactor but they also apply toward any assembling of fissile material. (Author)

  14. Benchmarking and incentive regulation of quality of service: an application to the UK electricity distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannakis, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago (United States); Jamasb, Tooraj [Department of Applied Economics, University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, Austin Robinson Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: tooraj.jamasb@econ.cam.ac.uk; Pollitt, Michael [Judge Institute of Management, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    Quality of service has emerged as an important issue in post-reform regulation of electricity distribution networks. Regulators have employed partial incentive schemes to promote cost saving, investment efficiency, and service quality. This paper presents a quality-incorporated benchmarking study of the electricity distribution utilities in the UK between 1991/92 and 1998/99. We calculate technical efficiency of the utilities using Data Envelopment Analysis technique and productivity change over time using quality-incorporated Malmquist indices. We find that cost-efficient firms do not necessarily exhibit high service quality and that efficiency scores of cost-only models do not show high correlation with those of quality-based models. The results also show that improvements in service quality have made a significant contribution to the sector's total productivity change. In addition, we show that integrating quality of service in regulatory benchmarking is preferable to cost-only approaches.

  15. Benchmarking and incentive regulation of quality of service: an application to the UK electricity distribution networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannakis, Dimitrios; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Quality of service has emerged as an important issue in post-reform regulation of electricity distribution networks. Regulators have employed partial incentive schemes to promote cost saving, investment efficiency, and service quality. This paper presents a quality-incorporated benchmarking study of the electricity distribution utilities in the UK between 1991/92 and 1998/99. We calculate technical efficiency of the utilities using Data Envelopment Analysis technique and productivity change over time using quality-incorporated Malmquist indices. We find that cost-efficient firms do not necessarily exhibit high service quality and that efficiency scores of cost-only models do not show high correlation with those of quality-based models. The results also show that improvements in service quality have made a significant contribution to the sector's total productivity change. In addition, we show that integrating quality of service in regulatory benchmarking is preferable to cost-only approaches

  16. MODEL REGULATION FOR DATA PRIVACY IN THE APPLICATION OF BIOMETRIC SMART CARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinta Dewi

    2017-03-01

    This article will explore data privacy model regulation which is intended to regulate and protect  data privacy. This  regulatory model  combining several approaches in managing data privacy, especially in using biometric smardcard. Firstly, through laws that enforces the principles and international standards. Secondly, through the market approach (market-based solution which is derived through industry associations to help protect consumer data privacy by applying privacy policy in the form of a statement that the industry will protect consumers' privacy by implementing fair information principles. Third, through technological approach such as PET's (privacy enchasing technology,  i.e the techniques for anonymous and pseudo-anonymous payment, communication, and web access. Fourthly, through corporate privacy rules.

  17. The Application and Regulation of Non-Medical radioactive Substances in Taiwan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chihchien; Chou, Keiden; Wang, Songfeng

    1998-01-01

    Based on the Atomic Energy Law of Taiwan and regulations regarding radiation protection, an operating system has been established for the approval and regulation of import (production), installation, licensing, safety inspection, record keeping, storage, transfer, transportation and abandonment of nonmedical radioactive materials and equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation. In order to ensure that all equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation can meet the respective standard of radiation protection in accordance with the ALARA principle, nonmedical equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation is divided into six categories depending on its inherent shielding ability, operation limit, characteristics of the radiation and the required degree of surveillance for achieving the purpose of radiation protection. The six categories are: 1. Protective equipment, 2. Immobile closed equipment, 3. Automatic operating equipment, 4. Mobile equipment, 5. Unsealed radioactive substances, 6. Consumer products and other radioactive sources with different properties. Each category has its specific requirements in radiation protection. (author)

  18. Application of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985 to a research establishment in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, I.; Walker, J.M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three important reasons for the UK Health and Safety Executive to embark on the preparation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations were: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 revised the basic recommendations for radiation protection on which national provisions are based; As members of the European Commission the UK is bound by the Euratom Directives to align its national legislation with other member states. The Directives lay down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation; The UK Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 allows outdated legislation to be progressively replaced by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare in the workplace

  19. Regulations applicable to plant food supplements and related products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silano, Vittorio; Coppens, Patrick; Larrañaga-Guetaria, Ainhoa; Minghetti, Paola; Roth-Ehrang, René

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with the current regulatory and legal settings of traditional plant food supplements and herbal medicinal products in the European Union (EU). Marketing of botanicals in foods and food supplements in the EU is subject to several provisions of food law, which cover aspects of safety, production, labelling and product composition, including the use of additives and maximum levels of contaminants and residues. However, due to limited harmonization at the EU level, specific national regulations adopted at a Member State level also apply and mutual recognition is the mechanism through which such products can be marketed in EU countries other than those of origin. Unlike food supplements, marketing of traditional herbal medicinal products is regulated by an ad hoc Directive (i.e. Directive 2004/24/EC) covering in detail all the relevant aspects of these products, including a facilitated registration procedure at national level. However, by distinguishing traditional herbal medicinal products from plant food supplements and establishing selective marketing modalities for these two product categories, the EU has been confronted with implementation difficulties for traditional herbal medicinal products and a lack of homogeneity in the regulatory approaches adopted in different EU Member States. In fact, currently the nature of the commercial botanical products made available to consumers as traditional medicinal products or food supplements, depends largely on the EU Member State under consideration as a consequence of how competent National Authorities and manufacturing companies interpret and apply current regulations rather than on the intrinsic properties of the botanical products and their constituents. When the EU approach is compared with approaches adopted in some non-European countries to regulate these product categories, major differences become evident.

  20. Numerical method for the solution of the regulator equation with application to nonlinear tracking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rehák, Branislav; Čelikovský, Sergej

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 5 (2008), s. 1358-1365 ISSN 0005-1098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/07/P413; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : nonlinear output regulation * finite-element method * optimization Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 3.178, year: 2008

  1. Ashes in concrete related applications. Regulations, best practice and experiences; Energiaskor i betongrelaterade tillaempningar. Normer, praxis och erfarenheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstroem, Erik; Thorsell, Per-Erik

    2003-10-01

    A compilation of regulations and best practice from different techniques to utilize ashes in concrete related applications is presented in this report. The term 'concrete related' applications also include geotechnical applications where cement is used as a binder. It can be seen that fully developed regulations is only available for concrete used as a structural building material. In other applications the formulations give an opportunity to use alternative materials as long as similar properties are achieved. In some applications not even this type of regulations are available but the alternatives are judged from case to case. The purpose with this work was to high-light acceptable variations for the parameters where limitations on constituent materials are formulated. During the work it has become clear that the task is not possible to solve since this kind of values seldom are available. A discussion about the economical potential for different applications is presented in the end of the report. In summary, the concrete applications do not allow the major part of the ashes to be utilized and the demands on the ashes are high. But it can also be stated that the high costs for cement give a big incitement for change of binder in concrete to e.g. flyash. In the geotechnical applications there is also a big potential both regarding technical and economical aspects, but the possible effects on soil and ground water will give rise to more rigorous considerations by the environmental authorities. Finally, the mining applications can give a large amount of ashes to be utilized in a limited region, and the transport cost can be problematic for the ash producers. The conclusions from the present work are that there exist several possible concrete applications also for other ashes than pure coal ashes. Type of ash, available amounts, storage facilities, local market, stability in fuel-mix, personal interests are important parameters influencing the possibilities

  2. Applicability of ASME sections III and VIII and of B31.1 and B31.3 to DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antaki, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    DOE order 6430.1A Section 1300-3.2 requires that open-quotes....safety class items shall be designed to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Section III) or to other comparable safety-related codes and standards...close quotes. This requirement raises a host of technical and practical questions which, to the author's knowledge, have not been fully addressed in the past. This paper attempts to cover the following essential points, in order: Evolution of industry reference codes, Code scope, Safety margins, Logistical considerations, Costs, Backfit considerations. These points are covered in the context of a reference safety class piping and vessel system at a DOE facility which processes radioactive fluids, and which this paper calls the open-quotes reference DOE nuclear facilityclose quotes. In the conclusion, the author proposes three alternatives for code applicability which are ranked technically as open-quotes goodclose quotes, open-quotes closer to 6430.1Aclose quotes and open-quotes closest to 6430.1Aclose quotes. It is however questionable whether the alternatives which are labeled open-quotes closerclose quotes and open-quotes closestclose quotes are practically viable, as will be discussed

  3. Development of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for Western Melton Valley: Application of P-FEM on a DOE waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, O.R.; Toran, L.E.

    1994-04-01

    Modeling the movement of hazardous waste in groundwater was identified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as one of the grand challenges in scientific computation. In recognition of this need, DOE has provided support for a group of scientists from several national laboratories and universities to conduct research and development in groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling. This group is part of a larger consortium of researchers, collectively referred to as the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS), that has been charged with the task of applying high-performance computational tools and techniques to grand challenge areas identified by DOE. One of the goals of the PICS Groundwater Group is to develop a new three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport code that is optimized for massively parallel computers. An existing groundwater flow code, 3DFEMWATER, was parallelized in order to serve as a benchmark for these new models. The application of P-FEM, the parallelized version of 3DFEMWATER, to a real field site is the subject of this report

  4. Development of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for Western Melton Valley: Application of P-FEM on a DOE waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, O.R.; Toran, L.E.

    1994-04-01

    Modeling the movement of hazardous waste in groundwater was identified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as one of the grand challenges in scientific computation. In recognition of this need, DOE has provided support for a group of scientists from several national laboratories and universities to conduct research and development in groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling. This group is part of a larger consortium of researchers, collectively referred to as the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS), that has been charged with the task of applying high-performance computational tools and techniques to grand challenge areas identified by DOE. One of the goals of the PICS Groundwater Group is to develop a new three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport code that is optimized for massively parallel computers. An existing groundwater flow code, 3DFEMWATER, was parallelized in order to serve as a benchmark for these new models. The application of P-FEM, the parallelized version of 3DFEMWATER, to a real field site is the subject of this report.

  5. The Rome II Regulation on the Law Applicable to Non-Contractual Obligations: The European Private International Law Tradition Continued. : Introductory Observations, Scope, System, and General Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.E. Kramer (Xandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe establishment of Regulation No 864/2007 on the Law Applicable to Non-Contractual Obligations (Rome II) is a landmark for European Private International Law. The regulation of torts in the European Union has a history of forty years, starting with the preparation of the Rome

  6. How does Germany's green energy policy affect electricity market volatility? An application of conditional autoregressive range models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Benjamin R.

    2016-01-01

    Based on a dynamic model for the high/low range of electricity prices, this article analyses the effects of Germany's green energy policy on the volatility of the electricity market. Using European Energy Exchange data from 2000 to 2015, we find rather high volatility in the years 2000–2009 but also that the weekly price range has significantly declined in the period following the year 2009. This period is characterised by active regulation under the Energy Industry Law (EnWG), the EU Emissions Trading Directive (ETD) and the Renewable Energy Law (EEG). In contrast to the preceding period, price jumps are smaller and less frequent (especially for day-time hours), implying that current policy measures are effective in promoting renewable energies while simultaneously upholding electricity market stability. This is because the regulations strive towards a more and more flexible and market-oriented structure which allows better integration of renewable energies and supports an efficient alignment of renewable electricity supply with demand. - Highlights: • We estimate a CARR model for German electricity price data. • We augment the model by dummies capturing important regulations. • We find a significant decline in the price range after the year 2009. • This implies effective price stabilisation by German energy policy.

  7. Application of the ALARA process in the regulation of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    In this report the historical and conceptual basis of the ALARA process has been reviewed. The application solely of a prescriptive approach, particularly a rigorous quantitative approach to the decision-making process, has been questioned. While the Committees recognize the value of quantitative techniques they strongly emphasize that application of the ALARA concept is a much broader process for the determination of acceptable levels of protection. An ALARA process should take into account social and economic factors that are not quantifiable and involve representation of all those having a legitimate interest in the results of the process

  8. Using Movement to Regulate Emotion: Neurophysiological Findings and Their Application in Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Shafir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation is a person’s active attempt to manage their emotional state by enhancing or decreasing specific feelings. Peripheral theories of emotion argue that the origins of emotions stem from bodily responses. This notion has been reformulated in neurophysiological terms by Damasio, who claimed that emotions are generated by conveying the current state of the body to the brain through interoceptive and proprioceptive afferent input. The resulting brain activation patterns represent unconscious emotions and correlate with conscious feelings. This proposition implies that through deliberate control of motor behavior and its consequent proprioception and interoception, one could regulate his emotions and affect his feelings. This concept is used in dance/movement (psychotherapy where, by guiding to move in a certain way, the therapist helps the client to evoke, process, and regulate specific emotions. Exploration and practice of new and unfamiliar motor patterns can help the client to experience new unaccustomed feelings. The idea that certain motor qualities enhance specific emotions is utilized by the therapist also when she mirrors the client’s movements or motor qualities in order to feel what the client feels, and empathize with them. Because of the mirror neurons, feeling what the client feels is enabled also through observation and imagination of their movements and posture. This principle can be used by verbal therapists as well, who should be aware of its bi-directionality: clients seeing the therapist’s motor behavior are unconsciously affected by the therapist’s bodily expressions. Additional implications for psychotherapy, of findings regarding mirror neurons activation, are discussed.

  9. The integrate model of emotion, thinking and self regulation: an application to the "paradox of aging".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leanne M; Gatt, Justine M; Hatch, Ainslie; Palmer, Donna M; Nagy, Marie; Rennie, Christopher; Cooper, Nicholas J; Morris, Charlotte; Grieve, Stuart; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Schofield, Peter; Clark, C Richard; Gordon, Evian; Arns, Martijn; Paul, Robert H

    2008-09-01

    This study was undertaken using the INTEGRATE Model of brain organization, which is based on a temporal continuum of emotion, thinking and self regulation. In this model, the key organizing principle of self adaption is the motivation to minimize danger and maximize reward. This principle drives brain organization across a temporal continuum spanning milliseconds to seconds, minutes and hours. The INTEGRATE Model comprises three distinct processes across this continuum. Emotion is defined by automatic action tendencies triggered by signals that are significant due to their relevance to minimizing danger-maximizing reward (such as abrupt, high contrast stimuli). Thinking represents cognitive functions and feelings that rely on brain and body feedback emerging from around 200 ms post-stimulus onwards. Self regulation is the modulation of emotion, thinking and feeling over time, according to more abstract adaptions to minimize danger-maximize reward. Here, we examined the impact of dispositional factors, age and genetic variation, on this temporal continuum. Brain Resource methodology provided a standardized platform for acquiring genetic, brain and behavioral data in the same 1000 healthy subjects. Results showed a "paradox" of declining function in the "thinking" time scale over the lifespan (6 to 80+ years), but a corresponding preservation or even increase in automatic functions of "emotion" and "self regulation". This paradox was paralleled by a greater loss of grey matter in cortical association areas (assessed using MRI) over age, but a relative preservation of subcortical grey matter. Genetic polymorphisms associated with both healthy function and susceptibility to disorder (including the BDNFVal(66)Met, COMTVal(158/108)Met, MAOA and DRD4 tandem repeat and 5HTT-LPR polymorphisms) made specific contributions to emotion, thinking and self regulatory functions, which also varied according to age.

  10. A bargaining model of regulated markets' integration with an application to electricity supply market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jingyuan; Smeers, Y.; Canon, E.

    1995-01-01

    An integrated market organized by regulated electric utilities is modelled. It is assumed that, given a price vector for the exchange of electricity between each pair of neighboring utilities, utilities independently maximize their own domestic social welfare subject to the zero profit constraint. An equilibrium price vector for exchanges among utilities is defined as the one which clears the exchanges for all pair of business partners. A single piecewise linear model is formulated for computing market equilibria. The model is used to simulate the electricity supply market organized by 11 western European countries

  11. Applicability of the PSD Regulations to Certain Modifications Made by Cooper Tire and Rubber Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium; Strahlenschutz. Wissenschaftliche Grundlagen, Rechtliche Regelungen, Praktische Anwendungen. Kompendium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard (eds.)

    2011-06-15

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  13. 77 FR 39141 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... final rule was published, DoD became aware of a drafting oversight and the need to correct the text of... Act, 5 U.S.C. 601, et seq., because this rule is just correcting a drafting oversight in rule 2009..., Technical Data--Commercial Items (DEC 2011), if applicable (see 227.7102-4(a)), if flow down is required in...

  14. 7 CFR 4290.1940 - Integration of this part with other regulations applicable to USDA's programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 4290.1940 Integration of this... extent applicable to this part, the Secretary will comply with subpart D of 7 CFR part 1900 and RD...

  15. 47 CFR 73.801 - Broadcast regulations applicable to LPFM stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....333Engineering charts. Section 73.503Licensing requirements and service. Section 73.508Standards of good... of taped, filmed, or recorded material. Section 73.1210TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto....3568Dismissal of applications. Section 73.3584Procedure for filing petitions to deny. Section 73.3587Procedure...

  16. 21 CFR 20.100 - Applicability; cross-reference to other regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Labeling for and lists of approved new drug applications, in § 314.430 of this chapter. (16) Master file... of this part and the limitations on exemptions established in subpart E of this part shall be... record that is ordinarily available for public disclosure in accordance with this part or under other...

  17. Does Anger Regulation Mediate the Discrimination-Mental Health Link among Mexican-Origin Adolescents? A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis Using Multilevel Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Irene J. K.; Wang, Lijuan; Williams, David R.; Alegría, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Although prior research has consistently documented the association between racial/ethnic discrimination and poor mental health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie this link are still unclear. The present 3-wave longitudinal study tested the mediating role of anger regulation in the discrimination-mental health link among 269 Mexican-origin…

  18. Neuro Emotional Literacy Program: Does Teaching the Function of Affect and Affect Regulation Strategies Improve Affect Management and Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Kathryn E.; Campbell, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Although research on Emotion Regulation (ER) is developing at a rapid rate, much of it lacks a clear theoretical framework and most focuses on a narrow set of ER strategies. This work presents the details of a pilot project, the Neuro Emotional Literacy Program (NELP), designed for parents and based on the Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect (SAMA).…

  19. [Regulation on EGFR function via its interacting proteins and its potential application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun-Fang; Chen, Hui-Min; He, Jun-Qi

    2013-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is imptortant for cell activities, oncogenesis and cell migration, and EGFR inhibitor can treat cancer efficiently, but its side effects, for example, in skin, limited its usage. On the other hand, EGFR interacting proteins may also lead to oncogenesis and its interacting protein as drug targets can avoid cutaneous side effect, which implies possibly a better outcome and life quality of cancer patients. For the multiple EGFR interaction proteins, B1R enhances Erk/MAPK signaling, while PTPN12, Kek1, CEACAM1 and NHERF repress Erk/MAPK signaling. CaM may alter charge of EGFR juxamembrane domain and regulate activation of PI3K/Akt and PLC-gamma/PKC. STAT1, STAT5b are widely thought to be activated by EGFR, while there is unexpectedly inhibiting sequence within EGFR to repress the activity of STATs. LRIG1 and ACK1 enhance the internalization and degration of EGFR, while NHERF and HIP1 repress it. In this article, proteins interacting with EGFR, their interacting sites and their regulation on EGFR signal transduction will be reviewed.

  20. Nuclear safety philosophy and its general application to fuel management and handling - a regulator's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, I.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) informs the UK Nuclear Industry of the principles that it applies in assessing whether licensees have demonstrated that their nuclear plants are as safe as is reasonably practicable. The paper commences with a discussion of the non-prescriptive approach to health and safety regulation which is the basis of the regulatory activities of NSD's operating arm -the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). It then describes in broad terms the overall approach used by NII for analysing the safety of nuclear plant, including fuel, which will cover both deterministic and probabilistic methodologies. The paper then introduces the sections of the Safety Assessment Principles which apply to nuclear fuel safety (both fuel handling and management). Most of these principles are of a general nature and do not just apply to fuel. The paper explains how safety cases might relate to the SAPs and offers some views on how a licensee might interpret them in developing his safety case. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of submitting a high quality safety case and the type of information that should be in it. The advantages of the approach proposed, to the licensee as well as to the regulator, are identified. (author)

  1. Impact of occupational issues on DOE's environmental restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.; Lesperance, A.M.; Smith, D.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a 30-yr, multi-billion-dollar environmental restoration program for most of the facilities included in its nuclear weapons complex. Long-term planning efforts are under way to identify strategies and approaches for carrying out this extraordinarily complicated task. The DOE has already entered into interagency agreements with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and states for many of its environmental restoration sites. These agreements set legally enforceable deadlines for cleanup activities at these sites. In addition, DOE has made other commitments to Congress and the public regarding its environmental restoration schedule. Thousands of workers will be directly involved in environmental restoration activities at DOE sites. Cleanup activity will be carried out in environments involving potential exposure to highly toxic chemical substances and radionuclides. It is inevitable that occupational safety and health (OSH) issues will become both critical and highly visible to DOE. The OSH issues associated with cleanup activities will likely attract the attention of workers, unions, the media, regulators, and the public. This paper reviews three case studies describing OSH activities in DOE's environmental restoration program. These case studies will help alert DOE officials to ways that various OSH issues should be considered when planning environmental restoration activities. This activity is being coordinated with other DOE work to identify occupational requirements that are applicable to DOE cleanup work

  2. Innovative remote monitoring of plant health for environmental applications: A joint effort between EPCOT{reg_sign} and the DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robitaille, H. [Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, FL (United States); Capelle, G.; Di Benedetto, J. [Special Technologies Lab., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    In September of 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology for (OST) and Epcot{reg_sign} in the WALT DISNEY WORLD{reg_sign} Resort (Epcot) signed an agreement to cooperate on the research, development, and public communication and display of environmental technologies. Although Epcot and OST have distinctive missions, certain areas of their respective research and development efforts are common, including the integration of remote sensors with robotics platforms, airborne surveys for environmental characterization and monitoring, and ground based measurements of vegetation stress. The first area of cooperative R&D pursued under the agreement is the evaluation of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI), a technology developed by OST and proven effective for uranium detection. This paper describes the efforts being conducted under the Epcot-OST agreement and presents initial results. An appendix describing LIFI technology is also included.

  3. Soft Regulators, though judges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geest, G.G.A.; Dari Mattiacci, G.

    Judges have a tendency to be more demanding than regulators. In the United States, a majority of the courts has adopted the rule that the unexcused violation of a statutory standard is negligence per se. However, the converse does not hold: compliance with regulation does not relieve the injurer of

  4. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P 0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3±1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0±3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA

  5. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heverhagen, J.T. E-mail: heverhag@post.med.uni-marburg.de; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J

    2002-10-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P<0.01; maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.6{+-}0.5 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 81.7{+-}0.6 cm/s). Following Gd-DTPA administration no significant (P>0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3{+-}1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0{+-}3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA.

  6. 34 CFR 663.21 - What criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... research methods to be used; (2) The relationship of the research to the literature on the topic and to... Secretary considers— (1) The overall strength of applicant's academic record (teaching, research... political science; (iii) A language, such as Hausa or Telegu; or (iv) A topic, such as religious...

  7. Does the Longer Application of Anodal-Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Increase Corticomotor Excitability Further? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Jaberzadeh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS of the primary motor cortex (M1 has been shown to be effective in increasing corticomotor excitability.  Methods: We investigated whether longer applications of a-tDCS coincide with greater increases in corticomotor excitability compared to shorter application of a-tDCS. Ten right-handed healthy participants received one session of a-tDCS (1mA current with shorter (10 min and longer (10+10 min stimulation durations applied to the left M1 of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR. Corticomotor excitability following application of a-tDCS was assessed at rest with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS elicited motor evoked potentials (MEP and compared with baseline data for each participant.  Results: MEP amplitudes were increased following 10 min of a-tDCS by 67% (p = 0.001 with a further increase (32% after the second 10 min of a-tDCS (p = 0.005. MEP amplitudes remained elevated at 15 min post stimulation compared to baseline values by 65% (p = 0.02.  Discussion: The results demonstrate that longer application of a-tDCS within the recommended safety limits, increases corticomotor excitability with after effects of up to 15 minutes post stimulation.

  8. Does the Longer Application of Anodal-Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Increase Corticomotor Excitability Further? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Jaberzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS of the primary motor cortex (M1 has been shown to be effective in increasing corticomotor excitability.Methods: We investigated whether longer applications of a-tDCS coincide with greater increases in corticomotor excitability compared to shorter application of a-tDCS. Ten right-handed healthy participants received one session of a-tDCS(1mA current with shorter (10 min and longer (10+10 min stimulation durationsapplied to the left M1 of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR. Corticomotorexcitability following application of a-tDCS was assessed at rest with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS elicited motor evoked otentials (MEP and compared with baseline data for each participant.Results: MEP amplitudes were increased following 10 min of a-tDCS by 67%(p = 0.001 with a further increase (32% after the second 10 min of a-tDCS (p = 0.005. MEP amplitudes remained elevated at 15 min post stimulation compared to baseline values by 65% (p = 0.02.Discussion: The results demonstrate that longer application of a-tDCS within the recommended safety limits, increases corticomotor excitability with after effects of up to 15 minutes post stimulation.

  9. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    , following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. METHODS: In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface...

  10. 34 CFR 606.24 - How does the Secretary use an applicant's performance under a previous development grant when...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... those goals and objectives, the Secretary may— (1) Decide not to fund the applicant; or (2) Fund the..., or is making substantial progress toward fulfilling, the goals and objectives of the previous grant... did not fulfill the goals and objectives of a previous grant or is not making substantial progress...

  11. Application of probabilistic safety goals to regulation of nuclear power plants in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzentkowski, G.; Akl, Y.; Yalaoui, S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    In the Canadian nuclear regulatory framework, Safety Goals are formulated in addition to the deterministic design requirements and the dose acceptance criteria so that risk to the public that originates from accidents outside the design basis is considered. In principle, application of the Safety Goals ensures that the likelihood of accidents with serious radiological consequences is extremely low, and the potential radiological consequences from severe accidents are limited as far as practicable. Effectively, the Safety Goals extend the plant design envelope to include not only the capabilities of the plant to successfully cope with various plant states, but also practical measures to halt the progression of severe accidents. This paper describes the general approach to the development of the Safety Goals and their application to the existing nuclear power plants in Canada. This general approach is consistent with the currently accepted international practice and Canadian regulatory experience. The results of probabilistic safety assessments indicate that the Safety Goals meet or exceed international safety objectives due to effective implementation of the defence-in-depth principle in the reactor design and plant operation. At the same time, the application of the Safety Goals reveal that practicable measures exist to further enhance the overall level of reactor safety by focusing on severe accident prevention and mitigation. These measures are being currently implemented through refurbishment projects and feedback on operating experience. (author)

  12. Seismic micro-zoning in the alpine valleys and local application in urban planning regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Cartier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Confrontées au risque sismique, les vallées sédimentaires alpines testent différentes solutions politiques pour transcrire en règles d’urbanisme les connaissances apportées par les micro-zonages. France, Italie, Slovénie et Suisse composent avec leur tradition politique et l’adoption de codes européens pour améliorer la sécurité selon la vulnérabilité et la géologie locales.Management of earthquake risks in the sedimentary valleys of the Alps depends on the ability to transcribe scientific knowledge obtained from micro-zoning into urban planning regulations. France, Italy, Slovenia and Switzerland are working with new European codes, and within their respective political contexts, to improve earthquake safety on the basis of enhanced input on local geological conditions and vulnerability levels.

  13. Operation set for 2018 as regulator considers olkiluoto-3 licence application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Finland has announced progress with its delayed nuclear project and has confirmed it will not be affected by anomalies discovered in some components manufactured for EPRs in France. The Olkiluoto-3 European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) nuclear plant under construction in Finland is on schedule to begin commercial operation in 2018 with the country's regulator preparing a safety assessment that will pave the way for fuel loading. Jouni Silvennoinen, senior vice-president for Olkiluoto-3 at Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), told NucNet that fuel loading at the EPR plant, which is nine years behind schedule, is expected in the spring of 2018. He said construction and licensing of the plant are progressing.

  14. New Trend in Crop Production – Application of Plant Natural Multicomponent Growth Regulators with Bioprotective Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Ponomarenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the help of the Dot-blot hybridization the difference in steps of homology between mRNA of control plants and small regulatory si/mi RNA isolated from second-generation plantlets of wheat, corn, soybeans, sugar beets, chickpea, etc. cultivated from the seeds of plants infected and processed by new polycomponent plant growth regulators Regoplant® and Stimpo® in the first generation was found. It is proved that this difference is related to a partial reprogramming of the cell genome under the influence of biostimulators on growing plants with infected backgrounds that turns out in induction of low-molecular si/miRNA with antipathogenic and antiparasitic properties, which are the components of the immune system of a living organism.

  15. Traditional and incentive regulation - applications to natural gas pipelines in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansell, R.L.; Church, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A study was conducted to examine alternative regimes for the regulation of major natural gas pipelines in Canada, with the specific objective of clarifying and analyzing key issues relating to these regulatory alternatives. An overview of the development and structure of the gas pipeline industry and a discussion of the main changes in the market and regulatory environment was included. The appropriateness of greater tolling flexibility and the role that competition plays in optimizing the use of existing pipelines was also discussed. Some of the incentive alternatives included price caps, automatic rate adjustment mechanisms, yardstick competition, profit sharing, benchmarking, capital cost incentives, and franchising. An evaluation of each alternative was provided. Examination of the various alternatives led to the conclusion that none of the new-style incentive regimes represent a panacea, nor is any of them uniformly better in terms of the key evaluation criteria than the traditional cost of service (COS) approach, especially that which incorporates streamlining. 163 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Impact of the Application of Exemption Regulation to the Non-nuclear Industry in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eri-Hiswara

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN) as a nuclear regulatory authority in Indonesia has published the exemption regulation that establishes the value of activity, activity concentration, and dose rate for practices that their operations do not require a licence. From an assessment it was found that the value of activity concentration and dose rate have been exceeded by technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) present in the raw material and product/waste of some mining and mineral industries known so far as non-nuclear industry. The result has the impact that those industries should be categorized as nuclear industry, with the implication that they need to have licence from regulatory authority, and their activities need to be inspected regularly from the radiation safety point of view by the authority. (author)

  17. The application of LQR synthesis techniques to the turboshaft engine control problem. [Linear Quadratic Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, W. H.; De Los Reyes, G.; Bobula, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    A power turbine governor was designed for a recent-technology turboshaft engine coupled to a modern, articulated rotor system using Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and Kalman Filter (KF) techniques. A linear, state-space model of the engine and rotor system was derived for six engine power settings from flight idle to maximum continuous. An integrator was appended to the fuel flow input to reduce the steady-state governor error to zero. Feedback gains were calculated for the system states at each power setting using the LQR technique. The main rotor tip speed state is not measurable, so a Kalman Filter of the rotor was used to estimate this state. The crossover of the system was increased to 10 rad/s compared to 2 rad/sec for a current governor. Initial computer simulations with a nonlinear engine model indicate a significant decrease in power turbine speed variation with the LQR governor compared to a conventional governor.

  18. Plain packaging and indirect expropriation of trademark rights under BITs: does FCTC help to establish a right to regulate tobacco products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chang-Fa

    2012-12-01

    Recently the giant tobacco company Philip Morris served its notice to launch an investor-to-state dispute settlement proceeding against the Australian Government for its introduction of plain packaging requirements on tobacco products. It is an important event in the field of intellectual property, investment and international health law. The fundamental questions involved are whether the restriction of trademark rights as a result of the plain packaging requirement is a compensable indirect expropriation under BITs or whether it falls within the scope of government's right to regulate and thus become not compensable. This paper is of the view that the requirement of plain packaging will deprive the essential value or core function of trademark rights and thus constitutes an indirect expropriation under BITs. However, such indirect expropriation meets the public interest requirement and the necessity requirement. The paper further argues that sovereign States have an inherent right to regulate domestic economic activities. Since the pain packaging requirements provided in the FCTC Guidelines are expected to protect the value of human lives and health, the protected values clearly outweigh the affected commercial interests of tobacco companies. Also the justification for host States to adopt a plain packaging policy is strong. Thus, the interpreters of BITs need to pay higher respect to the host State's sovereign power concerning its right to regulate tobacco products for a legitimate purpose. The conclusion of the paper is that the host States should enjoy a defense of the right to regulate to refuse compensation. The author believes that this is the only reasonable conclusion to avoid possible conflicts between different treaty systems (BITs and the FCTC) and between different legal systems and fields (trademark law, investment law and international health law).

  19. DOE Hazardous Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.; Craig, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the DOE Hazardous Waste Program is to support the implementation and improvement of hazardous-chemical and mixed-radioactive-waste management such that public health, safety, and the environment are protected and DOE missions are effectively accomplished. The strategy for accomplishing this goal is to define the character and magnitude of hazardous wastes emanating from DOE facilities, determine what DOE resources are available to address these problems, define the regulatory and operational constraints, and develop programs and plans to resolve hazardous waste issues. Over the longer term the program will support the adaptation and application of technologies to meet hazardous waste management needs and to implement an integrated, DOE-wide hazardous waste management strategy. 1 reference, 1 figure

  20. Presentation note of the order project related to the general technical regulation applicable to INBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the scope of the order project which defines the main requirements applicable to INBs (base nuclear installations) in terms of protection of people and of the environment in front of risks of accident, of pollutions and other nuisances. More precisely, the document explains the scope of the several specific aspects addressed by this order: safety policy and management, accident risk management, management of nuisance and of the installation impact on population and on the environment, management and elimination of wastes and fuels spent by a base nuclear installation, management of emergency situations, population information, authorization request procedures, and other provisions

  1. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Lucas, G.E.

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material ''tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed

  2. Application of game theory in decision making strategy: Does gas fuel industry need to kill oil based fuel industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Abdul Luky Shofi'ul; Prabandari, Dyah Lusiana; Hakim, Muhammad Lintang Islami

    2017-03-01

    Even though conversion of oil based fuel (Bahan Bakar Minyak) into gas fuel (Bahan Bakar Gas) for transportation (both land and sea) is one of the priority programs of the government of Indonesia, rules that have been established merely basic rules of gas fuel usage license for transportation, without discussing position of gas fuel related to oil based fuel in detail. This paper focus on possible strategic behavior of the key players in the oil-gas fuel conversion game, who will be impacted by the position of gas fuel as complement or substitution of oil based fuel. These players include industry of oil based fuel, industry of gas fuel, and the government. Modeling is made based on two different conditions: government plays a passive role and government plays an active role in legislating additional rules that may benefit industry of gas fuel. Results obtained under a passive government is that industry of oil based fuel need to accommodate the presence of industry of gas fuel, and industry of gas fuel does not kill/ eliminate the oil based fuel, or gas fuel serves as a complement. While in an active government, the industry of oil based fuel need to increase its negotiation spending in the first phase so that the additional rule that benefitting industry of gas fuel would not be legislated, while industry of gas fuel chooses to indifferent; however, in the last stage, gas fuel turned to be competitive or choose its role to be substitution.

  3. Response of morphological and physiological growth attributes to foliar application of plant growth regulators in gladiolus 'white prosperity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, Y.; Jaskani, M. J.; Qasim, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gladiolus is very popular among ornamental bulbous plants mainly used as cut flower and greatly demanded in the world floral market. Production of inferior quality spikes is one of the major hurdles for their export. The research was conducted under Faisalabad conditions to evaluate the use of plant growth regulators in order to improve the vegetative, floral and physiological attributes. Gladiolus plants were sprayed thrice with different concentrations (0.1, 0.4, 0.7 and 1mM) of gibberellic acid, benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid at three leaf stage, five leaf stage and slipping stage. Foliar application of 1mM gibberellic acid increased the plant height (122.14cm), spike length (58.41cm), florets spike-1 (13.49), corm diameter (4.43cm), corm weight (25.34g) and total cormel weight (20.45g) compared to benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid. Gibberellic acid at 1mM concentration also increased the total chlorophyll content to 7.72mg/g, total carotenoids (1.61mg/g), total soluble sugars (3.68mg/g) followed by application of benzylaminopurine. Salicylic acid application at 1mM concentration decreased the number of days to flower (64.93) compared to 76.12 days in non treated plants. (author)

  4. Design and Application of Drought Indexes in Highly Regulated Mediterranean Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletti, A.; Zaniolo, M.; Giuliani, M.

    2017-12-01

    Costs of drought are progressively increasing due to the undergoing alteration of hydro-meteorological regimes induced by climate change. Although drought management is largely studied in the literature, most of the traditional drought indexes fail in detecting critical events in highly regulated systems, which generally rely on ad-hoc formulations and cannot be generalized to different context. In this study, we contribute a novel framework for the design of a basin-customized drought index. This index represents a surrogate of the state of the basin and is computed by combining the available information about the water available in the system to reproduce a representative target variable for the drought condition of the basin (e.g., water deficit). To select the relevant variables and combinatione thereof, we use an advanced feature extraction algorithm called Wrapper for Quasi Equally Informative Subset Selection (W-QEISS). W-QEISS relies on a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to find Pareto-efficient subsets of variables by maximizing the wrapper accuracy, minimizing the number of selected variables, and optimizing relevance and redundancy of the subset. The accuracy objective is evaluated trough the calibration of an extreme learning machine of the water deficit for each candidate subset of variables, with the index selected from the resulting solutions identifying a suitable compromise between accuracy, cardinality, relevance, and redundancy. The approach is tested on Lake Como, Italy, a regulated lake mainly operated for irrigation supply. In the absence of an institutional drought monitoring system, we constructed the combined index using all the hydrological variables from the existing monitoring system as well as common drought indicators at multiple time aggregations. The soil moisture deficit in the root zone computed by a distributed-parameter water balance model of the agricultural districts is used as target variable. Numerical results show that

  5. Engineering Pseudomonas for phenazine biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnological applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Guo, Shuqi; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-10-03

    Pseudomonas strains are increasingly attracting considerable attention as a valuable bacterial host both for basic and applied research. It has been considered as a promising candidate to produce a variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, particularly phenazines. Apart from the biotechnological perspective, these aromatic compounds have the notable potential to inhibit plant-pathogenic fungi and thus are useful in controlling plant diseases. Nevertheless, phenazines production is quite low by the wild-type strains that necessitated its yield improvement for large-scale agricultural applications. Metabolic engineering approaches with the advent of plentiful information provided by systems-level genomic and transcriptomic analyses enabled the development of new biological agents functioning as potential cell factories for producing the desired level of value-added bioproducts. This study presents an up-to-date overview of recombinant Pseudomonas strains as the preferred choice of host organisms for the biosynthesis of natural phenazines. The biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism involved in the phenazine biosynthesis are comprehensively discussed. Finally, a summary of biological functionalities and biotechnological applications of the phenazines is also provided.

  6. The application of optimization of protection to regulation and operational practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilari, O.

    1989-01-01

    Optimization of protection and the problems of its practical application have been of concern for several years to the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health. The present paper summarizes the principal conclusions of a meeting on this topic organized by the NEA in March 1988, with the participation of radiation protection, nuclear safety and radioactive waste management experts. From the results of the meeting it appears that there is now as increasingly solid background of knowledge and common understanding of the conceptual aspects of optimization of protection. However, its degree of implementation in the regulatory and operational practices is very uneven. The areas of plant design and operation appear the most promising in terms of examples of concrete application, whilst severe reservations exist in the nuclear safety community on the possibility of applying this approach to the prevention of nuclear accidents. There is also consensus on the fact that optimization of protection can only play a partial and minor role in decisions concerning the choice of radioactive waste disposal options

  7. Application of plant growth regulators mitigates chlorotic foliar injury by the black pecan aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Ted E; Wood, Bruce W; Ni, Xinzhi

    2010-11-01

    Black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae (Davis) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), feeding elicits localized chlorotic injury to pecan foliage [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K Koch] and apparent acceleration of leaf senescence and defoliation. The ability of certain plant growth regulators (PGRs) (forchlorfenuron, gibberellic acid and aviglycine) to prevent M. caryaefoliae from triggering pecan leaf chlorosis and senescence-like processes was evaluated on two dates in both 2006 and 2007. Treatments were applied to orchard foliage and used in laboratory leaf-disc bioassays to assess possible reduction in aphid-elicited chlorosis and concomitant effects on aphid mortality and development. Foliage pretreated with forchlorfenuron + gibberellic acid prior to being challenged with aphids resulted in significantly less aphid-elicited chlorosis than did control or aviglycine-treated leaf discs. No PGR affected aphid mortality; however, development time was increased by forchlorfenuron + gibberellic acid in 2006 and by aviglycine + gibberellic acid on one date in 2007. Certain PGRs possess the potential for usage on pecan to protect foliar canopies from M. caryaefoliae via changes in the susceptibility of the host leaf to senescence-like factors being introduced by feeding aphids. This protective effect on host foliage and the associated suppressive effect on development of feeding aphids might also be relevant to pest management programs on other aphid-crop systems in which aphid-elicited chlorosis and senescence-like processes can limit profitability. Published 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Policy and technical matters for the application of ICRP 1977 recommendations to Japanese radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsuji

    1987-01-01

    Tens years has passed since 1977 when the ICRP recommendations were made, and the work of revising the Japanese radiation regulations in response to the recommendations is almost completed. The work has been conducted mainly by an elemental group established under the Radiation Council. The elemental group submitted the first interim report to the Council in 1980, which presented recommendations on the objectives of radiation protection, dose equivalent limits for the general public, facilities inspection and products testing, medical surveillance, etc. After making deliberations in response to studies by the ICRP working group, the elemental group compiled the second interim report in July 1981. Further studies were conducted and the final report was submitted to the Council in March 1983. The final report covered the definitions of such terms as 'dose equivalent', dose equivalent limit for workers, exposure dose in the event of emergency, dose equivalent limit for the general public, various standards for protection, classification of workers by working conditions, classification of work sites monitoring of exposure dose, and implementation of medical surveillance. After making deliberations, the Council submitted a report in 1986 to government agencies concerned, whose contents are almost the same as those of the above final report except for some amendments. (Nogami, K.)

  9. The potential application of a transcriptionally regulated oncolytic herpes simplex virus for human cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, L; Fraefel, C; Sia, K C; Newman, J P; Mohamed-Bashir, S A; Ng, W H; Lam, P Y P

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emerging studies have shown the potential benefit of arming oncolytic viruses with therapeutic genes. However, most of these therapeutic genes are placed under the regulation of ubiquitous viral promoters. Our goal is to generate a safer yet potent oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) for cancer therapy. Methods: Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) recombineering, a cell cycle-regulatable luciferase transgene cassette was replaced with the infected cell protein 6 (ICP6) coding region (encoded for UL39 or large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase) of the HSV-1 genome. These recombinant viruses, YE-PC8, were further tested for its proliferation-dependent luciferase gene expression. Results: The ability of YE-PC8 to confer proliferation-dependent transgene expression was demonstrated by injecting similar amount of viruses into the tumour-bearing region of the brain and the contralateral normal brain parenchyma of the same mouse. The results showed enhanced levels of luciferase activities in the tumour region but not in the normal brain parenchyma. Similar findings were observed in YE-PC8-infected short-term human brain patient-derived glioma cells compared with normal human astrocytes. intratumoural injection of YE-PC8 viruses resulted in 77% and 80% of tumour regression in human glioma and human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts, respectively. Conclusion: YE-PC8 viruses confer tumour selectivity in proliferating cells and may be developed further as a feasible approach to treat human cancers. PMID:24196790

  10. Gibberellin Application at Pre-Bloom in Grapevines Down-Regulates the Expressions of VvIAA9 and VvARF7, Negative Regulators of Fruit Set Initiation, during Parthenocarpic Fruit Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan Jin; Hur, Youn Young; Yu, Hee-Ju; Noh, Jung-Ho; Park, Kyo-Sun; Lee, Hee Jae

    2014-01-01

    Fruit set is initiated only after fertilization and is tightly regulated primarily by gibberellins (GAs) and auxins. The application of either of these hormones induces parthenocarpy, fruit set without fertilization, but the molecular mechanism underlying this induction is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that the parthenocarpic fruits induced by GA application at pre-bloom result from the interaction of GA with auxin signaling. The transcriptional levels of the putative negative regulators of fruit set initiation, including Vitis auxin/indole-3-acetic acid transcription factor 9 (VvIAA9), Vitis auxin response factor 7 (VvARF7), and VvARF8 were monitored during inflorescence development in seeded diploid ‘Tamnara’ grapevines with or without GA application. Without GA application, VvIAA9, VvARF7, and VvARF8 were expressed at a relatively high level before full bloom, but decreased thereafter following pollination. After GA application at 14 days before full bloom (DBF); however, the expression levels of VvIAA9 and VvARF7 declined at 5 DBF prior to pollination. The effects of GA application on auxin levels or auxin signaling were also analyzed by monitoring the expression patterns of auxin biosynthesis genes and auxin-responsive genes with or without GA application. Transcription levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes Vitis anthranilate synthase β subunit (VvASB1-like), Vitis YUCCA2 (VvYUC2), and VvYUC6 were not significantly changed by GA application. However, the expressions of Vitis Gretchen Hagen3.2 (VvGH3.2) and VvGH3.3, auxin-responsive genes, were up-regulated from 2 DBF to full bloom with GA application. Furthermore, the Vitis GA signaling gene, VvDELLA was up-regulated by GA application during 12 DBF to 7 DBF, prior to down-regulation of VvIAA9 and VvARF7. These results suggest that VvIAA9 and VvARF7 are negative regulators of fruit set initiation in grapevines, and GA signaling is integrated with auxin signaling via VvDELLA during

  11. Arteriolar hyalinosis does not interfere with the local veno-arteriolar reflex regulation of subcutaneous blood flow in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Nørgaard, T; Parving, H H

    1987-01-01

    The function of the local nervous veno-arteriolar reflex regulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg was studied in diabetic patients. The material comprised 11 long-term insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients with retinopathy and nephropathy and eight short-term IDDM...... patients without retinopathy or nephropathy and 11 non-diabetic subjects. The diabetic patients had no or a slight to moderate degree of peripheral autonomic and sensoric neuropathy. Blood flow was measured by the local 133Xe wash-out technique. Blood flow was determined before, during and after...

  12. Applicability of a field-portable toxic heavy metal detector, using a radioisotope-tagged metalloprotein, to DOE environmental remediation and waste minimization initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randles, K.E.; Bragg, D.J.; Bodette, D.E.; Lipinski, R.J.; Luera, T.F.

    1998-08-01

    A system based on the metal-binding kidney protein, metallothionein, bound with a trace quantity of radioactive metal, has been shown to be capable of detecting parts-per-million (ppm) to parts-per-billion (ppb) concentrations of some heavy metals in liquid solution. The main objective of this study was to determine if this type of system has adequate sensitivity and selectivity for application in detecting a number of metallic species of concern to DOE, such as mercury, lead, and chromium. An affinity-displacement study is reported here using the heavy metal radiotracers 65 Zn and 109 Cd bound to metallothionein immobilized on an Affi-Gel 10 filter support. When a heavy metal solution with a greater affinity than the tracer for the protein is poured through the filter the radiotracer is displaced by a mechanism similar to ion exchange. The main objective of this study was to verify previous internal experimental parameters and results, and to determine the specific affinities of metallothionein for the metallic species of most concern to DOE

  13. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of 18F-FDG-PET make sense?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, S.; Krolak, C.; Kessler, S.; Tiling, R.

    2006-01-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  14. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET make sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoepfner, S. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Standort Giessen (Germany); Krolak, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kessler, S. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Tiling, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  15. Model-Based Analysis for Qualitative Data: An Application in Drosophila Germline Stem Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pargett, Michael; Rundell, Ann E.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Umulis, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery in developmental biology is often driven by intuition that relies on the integration of multiple types of data such as fluorescent images, phenotypes, and the outcomes of biochemical assays. Mathematical modeling helps elucidate the biological mechanisms at play as the networks become increasingly large and complex. However, the available data is frequently under-utilized due to incompatibility with quantitative model tuning techniques. This is the case for stem cell regulation mechanisms explored in the Drosophila germarium through fluorescent immunohistochemistry. To enable better integration of biological data with modeling in this and similar situations, we have developed a general parameter estimation process to quantitatively optimize models with qualitative data. The process employs a modified version of the Optimal Scaling method from social and behavioral sciences, and multi-objective optimization to evaluate the trade-off between fitting different datasets (e.g. wild type vs. mutant). Using only published imaging data in the germarium, we first evaluated support for a published intracellular regulatory network by considering alternative connections of the same regulatory players. Simply screening networks against wild type data identified hundreds of feasible alternatives. Of these, five parsimonious variants were found and compared by multi-objective analysis including mutant data and dynamic constraints. With these data, the current model is supported over the alternatives, but support for a biochemically observed feedback element is weak (i.e. these data do not measure the feedback effect well). When also comparing new hypothetical models, the available data do not discriminate. To begin addressing the limitations in data, we performed a model-based experiment design and provide recommendations for experiments to refine model parameters and discriminate increasingly complex hypotheses. PMID:24626201

  16. The synthesis and application involving regulation of the insoluble drug release from mesoporous silica nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Changshan; Gao, Yikun; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mesoporous silica nanotubes (SNT) were synthesized by using CNT as hard template, and the formation of the SNT shows that CTAB played a significant effect on the coating process. • The tube mesoporous silica materials which were seldom reported were applied in the drug delivery system to improve the loading amount and the drug dissolution. • The release rate could be controlled by the gelatin layer on the silica surface and the mechanism was illustrated. - Abstract: Mesoporous silica nanotubes (SNT) were synthesized using hard template carbon nanotubes (CNT) with the aid of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) in a method, which was simple and inexpensive. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and specific surface area analysis were employed to characterize the morphology and structure of SNT, and the formation mechanism of SNT was also examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. There are few published reports of the mesoporous SNT with large specific surface area applied in the drug delivery systems to improve the amount of drug loading. In addition, the structure of SNT allows investigators to control the drug particle size in the pore channels and significantly increase the drug dissolution rate. The insoluble drug, cilostazol, was chosen as a model drug to be loaded into SNT and we developed a simple and efficient method for regulating the drug release by using a gelatin coating with different thicknesses around the SNT. The release rate was adjusted by the amount of gelatin surrounding the SNT, with an increased barrier leading to a reduction in the release rate. A model developed on the basis of the Weibull modulus was established to fit the release results

  17. Yes-associated protein and WW-containing transcription regulator 1 regulate the expression of sex-determining genes in Sertoli cells, but their inactivation does not cause sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Adrien; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek; Boyer, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) and WW-containing transcription regulator 1 (WWTR1) are two functionally redundant transcriptional regulators that are downstream effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, and that act as major regulators of cell growth and differentiation. To elucidate their role in Sertoli cells, primary Sertoli cell culture from Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox animals were infected with a Cre recombinase-expressing adenovirus. Concomitant inactivation of Yap and Wwtr1 resulted in a decrease in the mRNA levels of the male sex differentiation genes Dhh, Dmrt1, Sox9, and Wt1, whereas those of genes involved in female differentiation (Wnt4, Rspo1, and Foxl2) were induced. SOX9, FOXL2, and WNT4 proteins were regulated in the same manner as their mRNAs in response to loss of YAP and WWTR1. To further characterize the role of YAP and WWTR1 in Sertoli cells, we generated a mouse model (Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox; Amhcre/+) in which Yap and Wwtr1 were conditionally deleted in Sertoli cells. An increase in the number of apoptotic cells was observed in the seminiferous tubules of 4 dpp mutant mice, leading to a reduction in testis weights and a decrease in the number of Sertoli cells in adult animals. Gene expression analyses of testes from 4 dpp Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox; Amhcre/+ mice showed that Sertoli cell differentiation is initially altered, as Dhh, Dmrt1, and Sox9 mRNA levels were downregulated, whereas Wnt4 mRNA levels were increased. However, expression of these genes was not changed in older animals. Together, these results suggest a novel role of the Hippo signaling pathway in the mechanisms of sex differentiation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Does environmental regulation affect energy efficiency in China's thermal power generation? Empirical evidence from a slacks-based DEA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Gong-Bing; Song, Wen; Zhou, P.; Liang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA) has gained much popularity in performance measurement of power industry. This paper presents a slack-based measure approach to investigating the relationship between fossil fuel consumption and the environmental regulation of China's thermal power generation. We first calculate the total-factor energy efficiency without considering environmental constraints. An environmental performance indicator is proposed through decomposing the total-factor energy efficiency. The proposed approach is then employed to examine whether environmental regulation affects the energy efficiency of China's thermal power generation. We find that the environmental efficiency plays a significant role in affecting energy performance of China's thermal generation sector. Decreasing the discharge of major pollutants can improve both energy performance and environmental efficiency. Besides, we also have three main findings: (1) The energy efficiency and environmental efficiency were relatively low. (2) The energy and environmental efficiency scores show great variations among provinces. (3) Both energy efficiency and environmental efficiency are of obvious geographical characteristics. According to our findings, we suggest some policy implications. - Highlights: • We assess the energy efficiency and the environmental efficiency of China's thermal power generation simultaneously. • The energy efficiency and the environmental efficiency were relatively low during 2007–2009. • The energy efficiency and environmental efficiency show obvious geographic characters. • The environmental performance of a DMU plays a decisive role in the energy performance

  19. VHL genetic alteration in CCRCC does not determine de-regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyhan, Michelle J

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-alpha (HIF-alpha), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2\\/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. METHODS: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL\\'s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. RESULTS: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10\\/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15\\/17), 100% (17\\/17) and 88.2% (15\\/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2\\/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. CONCLUSION: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis.

  20. The down-regulation of the mitogenic fibrinogen receptor (MFR) in serum-containing medium does not occur in defined medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J P; Hatzfeld, A; Domart, I; Hatzfeld, J

    1990-02-01

    Normal human hemopoietic cells such as early bone marrow progenitors, or lymphoma-derived cell lines such as Raji or JM cells, possess a low-affinity receptor specific for fibrinogen. This receptor triggers a mitogenic effect. It differs from the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa which is involved in fibrinogen-induced platelet aggregation. We demonstrate here that this mitogenic fibrinogen receptor (MFR) can be internalized or reexpressed, depending on culture conditions. Internalization was temperature-dependent. At 37 degrees C in the presence of cycloheximide or actinomycin D, the half-life of cell surface MFRs was 2 h, independent of receptor occupancy. Binding of fibrinogen to the MFR resulted in a down-regulation which was fibrinogen dose-dependent. This occurred in serum-supplemented medium but not in defined medium supplemented with fatty acids. Reexpression of MFRs could be induced in 28 to 42 h by serum removal. The down-regulation of mitogenic receptors in plasma or serum could explain why normal cells do not proliferate in the peripheral blood.

  1. Exogenous applications of plant growth regulators influence the reproductive growth of citrus sinensis osbeck cv. blood red

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.S.; Malik, A.U.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, I.

    2014-01-01

    To study the influence of exogenous applications of plant growth regulators on the reproductive behaviour of low bearing sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) trees, three separate experiments were conducted on twelve years old 'Blood Red' Sweet orange trees budded on Rough Lemon (Citrus jambheri L.) root stock. In the first experiment, trees were sprayed with 20 mg L-1 2, 4-D and GA3 alone or in combination at mid bloom (MB) stage, whilst in the second and third experiments 20 mg L-1 2, 4-D and GA3 alone or in combination were sprayed at MB + 6 weeks after MB, and at MB + 22 and 28 weeks after MB stages, respectively. A single tree was selected as an experimental unit and each treatment was replicated four times. Data regarding the flowering intensity, flower drop, fruit set, fruit drop and fruit harvest percentages (%) were collected and analyzed statistically. In all experiments exogenous application of 20 mg L-1 2, 4-D and GA3 alone or in combination to Blood Red sweet orange trees reduced the flower drop % and increased the fruit set % as compared to untreated trees. Application 2, 4-D and GA3 alone or in combination at MB did not affect the fruit drop % and fruit harvest % in contrast to untreated trees. The trees sprayed with 20 mg L-1 GA3 alone or in combination with 2, 4-D at MB + 22 and 28 weeks after MB exhibited highest reduction in the fruit drop % compared to control trees. In conclusions application GA3 (20 mg L-1) alone or in combination of 2, 4-D (20 mg L-1) at MB + 22 and 28 weeks after MB can be used effectively to increase the fruit set and reduce the fruit drop in Blood Red sweet oranges. (author)

  2. EFFICIENCY OF COMBINED APPLICATION OF GROWTH REGULATORS «OBEREG» AND «ZAVYAZY» FOR WHITE HEAD CABBAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Alekseeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis of different ways of application of the growth regulators “Obereg” and “Zavyazy” for white head cabbage has been conducted. The most effective was the double spraying by the mixed growth regulators at the stage of 6-8 leaves and the stage of the beginning of the forming of head of cabbage (400 g/ha and 60 ml/ha. The time step between the treatments is 30 days. The treatments have speeded up the stage of the industrial ripeness on 5-6 days as compared to control and have increased yield of cabbage. The increasing of the content of dry  atter up to 1%, sugars up to 0.5%,  nd vitamin C up to 1.9% mg% was recorded. The nitrate content in all variants was in range of the maximum permissible concentration.

  3. Exogenous Melatonin Application Delays Senescence of Kiwifruit Leaves by Regulating the Antioxidant Capacity and Biosynthesis of Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a multiple signal molecule, plays important roles in delaying senescence during the development of plants. Because few species have been studied for the effect of exogenous melatonin on anti-aging, the plausible mechanism of melatonin of anti-aging effects on other plant species has remained largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of exogenous melatonin on leaf senescence in kiwifruit were examined during natural aging after melatonin (200 μM or water (Control pretreatment. The decreased membrane damage and lower hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 content due to the enhanced scavenging activity of antioxidant enzymes peroxidase (POD, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT demonstrated that melatonin effectively delayed the aging of kiwifruit leaves. Likewise, owing to up-regulated expression of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (CAB gene in the sampled leaves pretreated with melatonin, chlorophyll degradation decreased. Therefore, osmoregulatory substances in sampled leaves accumulated (e.g., soluble sugar and soluble protein and seedling cell environment stability was maintained. Simultaneously, melatonin decreased H2O2 concentration owing to increased glutathione (GSH and ascorbate (AsA content, and the expression levels of glutathione reductase (GR, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR were up-regulated by melatonin application, indicating that the increase of GSH and AsA was attributed to the expression of these genes. In addition, a large amount of flavonoids accumulated in seedlings pretreated with melatonin, and transcript levels of eight genes involved in flavonoid synthesis, including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, cinnamate-4-hydroxymate (C4H, chalcone synthase (CHS, flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H, flavonol synthase (FNS, leucoanthocyanin reductase (LAR, anthocyanin reductase (ANR, flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT were enhanced in response to melatonin

  4. Waste-clearance strategy for DOE waste processed at commercial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Pfingston, M.; LePoire, D.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1991, a moratorium was issued on shipping potentially mixed waste from DOE facilities nationwide to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. A potential waste-clearance strategy was developed to address the DOE mixed-waste moratorium issues, which had resulted from a lack of exisitng volume contamination regulations. This strategy also has important potential applications for establishing site clearance limits that ensure worker and public risks remain well below regulatory limits

  5. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment

  6. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment

  7. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment

  8. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive transformers; and electrical test components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment

  9. Cofactor engineering to regulate NAD+/NADH ratio with its application to phytosterols biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liqiu; Shen, Yanbing; Zhang, Wenkai; Gao, Tian; Shang, Zhihua; Wang, Min

    2017-10-30

    Cofactor engineering is involved in the modification of enzymes related to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NADH and NAD + ) metabolism, which results in a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products. Cofactor engineering plays an important role in metabolic engineering but is rarely reported in the sterols biotransformation process owing to its use of multi-catabolic enzymes, which promote multiple consecutive reactions. Androst-4-ene-3, 17-dione (AD) and androst-1, 4-diene-3, 17-dione (ADD) are important steroid medicine intermediates that are obtained via the nucleus oxidation and the side chain degradation of phytosterols by Mycobacterium. Given that the biotransformation from phytosterols to AD (D) is supposed to be a NAD + -dependent process, this work utilized cofactor engineering in Mycobacterium neoaurum and investigated the effect on cofactor and phytosterols metabolism. Through the addition of the coenzyme precursor of nicotinic acid in the phytosterols fermentation system, the intracellular NAD + /NADH ratio and the AD (D) production of M. neoaurum TCCC 11978 (MNR M3) were higher than in the control. Moreover, the NADH: flavin oxidoreductase was identified and was supposed to exert a positive effect on cofactor regulation and phytosterols metabolism pathways via comparative proteomic profiling of MNR cultured with and without phytosterols. In addition, the NADH: flavin oxidoreductase and a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus brevis, were successfully overexpressed and heterologously expressed in MNR M3 to improve the intracellular ratio of NAD + /NADH. After 96 h of cultivation, the expression of these two enzymes in MNR M3 resulted in the decrease in intracellular NADH level (by 51 and 67%, respectively) and the increase in NAD + /NADH ratio (by 113 and 192%, respectively). Phytosterols bioconversion revealed that the conversion ratio of engineered stains was ultimately improved by 58 and 147%, respectively. The highest AD (D

  10. Plant Pathology and Information Technology: Opportunity for Management of Disease Outbreak and Applications in Regulation Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luvisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In many European rural areas, agriculture is not only an economic activity, but it is strictly linked to environmental and social characteristics of the area. Thus, sometimes, a pathogen can become a social threat, as in the case of Xylella fastidiosa and olive trees (Olea europaea L. in Salento. Fast and systemic response to threats represents the key to success in stopping pest invasions, and proves a great help in managing lots of data in a short time or coordinating large-scale monitoring coming from applying Information Technology tools. Regarding the field of applications, the advantages provided by new technologies are countless. However, is it the same in agriculture? Electronic identification tools can be applied for plant health management and certification. Treatments, agrochemical management or impact assessment may also be supported by dematerialization of data. Information Technology solution for urban forestry management or traceability of commodities belonging to “Food from Somewhere” regimes were analyzed and compared to protection from pests of a unique tree heritage such as olive trees in Salento.

  11. BROCCOLI Spears Yield Affected By GAMMA Rays Irradiated Seeds And Foliar Application Of Some Growth Regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABDALLAH, A.A.; ABO EL-KHEIR, O.H.

    2010-01-01

    Two field experiments were carried out during 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 winter growing seasons at the experimental farm of Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Egypt.The experiments were conducted to study the effect of pre-sowing broccoli seeds (cv. F1 175) irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (2, 3 and 4 Gy). The plants were sprayed with GA3 at rate of 50 ml/liter/fed and 20 ml/liter/fed for NAA. Main spear fresh and dry weight per plant, total spears fresh and dry weight per plant, total spears yield, ascorbic acid, TSS, carbohydrates, total chlorophyll, NPK and total protein content of spears were evaluated. The results showed that broccoli seeds irradiated with gamma rays up to 4 Gy pre-sowing increased the abovementioned parameters with different magnitudes comparing with the non-irradiated control plants except spears N, P and protein contents showed decrease in their values comparing with un-treated plants.It could be concluded that the foliar application of GA3 and NAA on broccoli spears increased all the abovementioned parameters, except spears N, P and protein contents showed decrease in their values.

  12. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal, disabling primary headache that affects 16 % of the adult population. In spite of decades of intense research, the origin and the pathophysiology mechanisms involved are still not fully known. Although triptans and gepants provide effective relief from acute migraine for many patients, their site of action remains unidentified. It has been suggested that during migraine attacks the leakiness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered, increasing the passage of anti-migraine drugs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimental inflammation, following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface. Following 2, 24 or 48 h of inflammation we calculated permeability-surface area product (PS) for [(51)Cr]-EDTA in the trigeminal ganglion (TG), spinal trigeminal nucleus, cortex, periaqueductal grey and cerebellum. We observed that [(51)Cr]-EDTA did not pass into the central nervous system (CNS) in a major way. However, [(51)Cr]-EDTA readily passed the TG by >30 times compared to the CNS. Application of CFA or IS did not show altered transfer constants. With these experiments we show that dural IS/CFA triggered TG inflammation, did not increase the BBB passage, and that the TG is readily exposed to circulating molecules. The TG could provide a site of anti-migraine drug interaction with effect on the trigeminal system.

  13. Considering an Affect Regulation Framework for Examining the Association Between Body Dissatisfaction and Positive Body Image in Black Older Adolescent Females: Does Body Mass Index Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Ajibade, Phoebe; Robinson, Seronda A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provided an initial evaluation of an affect regulation model describing the association between body dissatisfaction and two contemporary measures of positive body image among 247 Black college-bound older adolescent females. We further tested whether possessing a higher body mass index (BMI) would strengthen these associations. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Respondents also completed a culturally-sensitive figure rating scale along with assessments of body appreciation and body image flexibility. Results indicated a robust positive association between the two measures of positive body image; BMI was the strongest predictor of both body appreciation and body image flexibility with body size discrepancy (current minus ideal) contributing incremental variance to both models tested. Implications for improving our understanding of the association between positive and negative body image and bolstering positive body image to promote health-protective behaviors among Black young women at this developmental juncture are discussed. PMID:25079011

  14. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  15. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  16. 34 CFR 646.10 - How many applications for a Student Support Services award may an eligible applicant submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many applications for a Student Support Services award may an eligible applicant submit? 646.10 Section 646.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of... STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM How Does One Apply for an Award? § 646.10 How many applications for a...

  17. 34 CFR 645.20 - How many applications for an Upward Bound award may an eligible applicant submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many applications for an Upward Bound award may an eligible applicant submit? 645.20 Section 645.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Does One Apply for An Award? § 645.20 How many applications for an Upward Bound award may an eligible...

  18. Culture and emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Brett Q; Mauss, Iris B

    2015-06-01

    While anthropological research has long emphasized cultural differences in whether emotions are viewed as beneficial versus harmful, psychological science has only recently begun to systematically examine those differences and their implications for emotion regulation and well-being. Underscoring the pervasive role of culture in people's emotions, we summarize research that has examined links between culture, emotion regulation, and well-being. Specifically, we focus on two questions. First, how does culture lead individuals to regulate their emotions? And second, how does culture modulate the link between emotion regulation and well-being? We finish by suggesting directions for future research to advance the study of culture and emotion regulation.

  19. Fisheries regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Frost, Hans Staby; Abildtrup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Economists normally claim that a stock externality arises within fisheries because each individual fisherman does not take the effect on stock size into account when making harvest decisions. Due to the stock externality, it is commonly argued that fisheries regulation is necessary, but regulatory...... decisions are complicated by a tremendous amount of uncertainty and asymmetric information. This paper provides an overview of selected parts of the literature on the regulation of fisheries under uncertainty and asymmetric information, and possible areas for future research are identified. Specifically...

  20. Closeout technical report for DOE award number DE-FG02-97ER62332 [Nitrogen budget under elevated CO{sub 2} levels: regulation by absorption and assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BassiriRad, Hormoz; Gutschick, Vincent

    2001-10-01

    This entire project was conducted between 1995 and 1999, during which two postdocs and numerous undergraduate students received training in research. Furthermore, the funds from this grant contributed either totally or partially to the publication of 14 refereed journal articles. The focus of this research was to investigate plant nitrogen budget under elevated CO{sub 2} concentration. Of particular interest were the following: (1) Does elevated CO{sub 2} increase root carbohydrate availability? (2) Does such an enhancement increase kinetics of root nitrogen acquisition? (3) Does the effect on kinetics differ between NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -}? (4) If there are interspecific differences in (1)-(3), could those variations lead to changes in community composition? This report shows that, although root carbohydrate availability often increases in response to elevated CO{sub 2}, such an increase is neither necessary nor directly related to changes in root N uptake kinetics . The data also show that, depending on species, the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on root nitrogen uptake kinetics ranges from down regulation to no changes to up regulation. Furthermore, the effects on NH{sub 4}{sup +} are not always similar to the effects on NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Perhaps the most critical finding is the fact that in many instances a change in root N uptake kinetics alone does not provide a reliable prediction of plant N acquisition in response to elevated CO{sub 2}. It is shown that a better examination of whether plant N uptake responds to CO{sub 2} level and whether such a response can be scaled up to community level processes would require integration of knowledge of other root system characteristics. For example, it is well established that mycorrhizal fungi are important regulators of plant N uptake. The data suggest that, while elevated CO{sub 2} affects root N uptake capacity, this effect is highly dependent on the type and level of the mycorrhizal infection. Another

  1. Insights into the Regulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities by Application of Bio-organic Fertilizer in Pseudostellaria heterophylla Monoculture Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkun Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass and quality of Pseudostellariae heterophylla suffers a significant decline under monoculture. Since rhizosphere microbiome plays crucial roles in soil health, deep pyrosequencing combined with qPCR was applied to characterize the composition and structure of soil bacterial community under monoculture and different amendments. The results showed compared with the first-year planted (FP, second-year monoculture of P. heterophylla (SP led to a significant decline in yield and resulted in a significant increase in Fusarium oxysporum but a decline in Burkholderia spp. Bio-organic fertilizer (MT formulated by combining antagonistic bacteria with organic matter could significantly promote the yield by regulating rhizosphere bacterial community. However, organic fertilizer (MO without antagonistic bacteria could not suppress Fusarium wilt. Multivariate statistics analysis showed a distinct separation between the healthy samples (FP and MT and the unhealthy samples (SP and MO, suggesting a strong relationship between soil microbial community and plant performance. Furthermore, we found the application of bio-organic fertilizer MT could significantly increase the bacterial community diversity and restructure microbial community with relatively fewer pathogenic F. oxysporum and more beneficial Burkholderia spp. In conclusion, the application of novel bio-organic fertilizer could effectively suppress Fusarium wilt by enriching the antagonistic bacteria and enhancing the bacterial diversity.

  2. Digital Convergence and Content Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Starks

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Broadcasting, Press and Internet journalism systems of distribution are converging: the same infrastructure can deliver all three historically separate services. Reception devices mirror this: the Connected TV, the tablet and the smart phone overlap in their functionality. Service overlaps are evident too, with broadcasters providing online and on-demand services and newspapers developing electronic versions. Does this mean that media regulation policies must converge too?My argument is that they should, though only where historically different communications are now fulfilling a similar function, e.g. broadcaster online services and electronic versions of newspapers. Convergence requires a degree of harmonisation and, to this end, I advocate a review of UK broadcasting's 'due impartiality' requirement and of the UK's application of the public service concept. I also argue for independent self-regulation (rather than state-based regulation of non-public-service broadcasting journalism.

  3. Title: Potassium application regulates nitrogen metabolism and osmotic adjustment in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) functional leaf under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Rizwan; Zhao, Wenqing; Abid, Muhammad; Dong, Haoran; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of potassium (K) in maintaining nitrogen metabolism and osmotic adjustment development of cotton functional leaves to sustain growth under soil drought and rewatering conditions, the plants of two cotton cultivars Siza 3 (low-K sensitive) and Simian 3 (low-K tolerant), were grown under three different K rates (K0, K1, and K2; 0, 150, and 300kgK 2 Oha -1 , respectively) and exposed to drought stress with 40±5% soil relative water content (SRWC). The drought stress was applied at flowering stage by withholding water for eight days followed by rewatering to a well-watered level (75±5% SRWC). The results showed that drought-stressed plants of both cultivars showed a decrease in leaf relative water content (RWC) and osmotic potential in the functional leaves and developed osmotic adjustment with an increase in the contents of free amino acids, soluble sugars, inorganic K, and nitrate as compared to well-watered plants. In drought-stressed plants, nitrogen-metabolizing enzyme activities of nitrogen reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) were diminished significantly (P≤0.05) along with decreased chlorophyll content and soluble proteins. However, drought-stressed plants under K application not only exhibited higher osmotic adjustment with greater accumulation of osmolytes but also regulated nitrogen metabolism by maintaining higher enzyme activities, soluble proteins, and chlorophyll content in functional leaves as compared to the plants without K application. Siza 3 showed better stability in enzyme activities and resulted in 89% higher seed cotton yield under K2 as compared to K0 in drought-stressed plants, whereas this increase was 53% in the case of Simian 3. The results of the study suggested that K application enhances cotton plants' potential for sustaining high nitrogen-metabolizing enzyme activities and related components to supplement osmotic adjustment under soil drought conditions. Copyright © 2017

  4. Does anger regulation mediate the discrimination-mental health link among Mexican-origin adolescents? A longitudinal mediation analysis using multilevel modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Irene J K; Wang, Lijuan; Williams, David R; Alegría, Margarita

    2017-02-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 53(2) of Developmental Psychology (see record 2017-04475-001). In the article, there were several typographical errors in the Recruitment and Procedures section. The percentage of mothers who responded to survey items should have been 99.3%. Additionally, the youths surveyed at T2 and T3 should have been n 246. Accordingly, the percentage of youths surveyed in T2 and T3 should have been 91.4% and the percentage of mothers surveyed at T2 and T3 should have been 90.7%. Finally, the youths missing at T2 should have been n 23, and therefore the attrition rate for youth participants should have been 8.6. All versions of this article have been corrected.] Although prior research has consistently documented the association between racial/ethnic discrimination and poor mental health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie this link are still unclear. The present 3-wave longitudinal study tested the mediating role of anger regulation in the discrimination-mental health link among 269 Mexican-origin adolescents ( M age = 14.1 years, SD = 1.6; 57% girls), 12 to 17 years old. Three competing anger regulation variables were tested as potential mediators: outward anger expression, anger suppression, and anger control. Longitudinal mediation analyses were conducted using multilevel modeling that disaggregated within-person effects from between-person effects. Results indicated that outward anger expression was a significant mediator; anger suppression and anger control were not significant mediators. Within a given individual, greater racial/ethnic discrimination was associated with more frequent outward anger expression. In turn, more frequent outward anger expression was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depression at a given time point. Gender, age, and nativity status were not significant moderators of the hypothesized mediation models. By identifying outward anger expression as an explanatory

  5. First Application of Robot Teaching in an Existing Industry 4.0 Environment: Does It Really Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Weiss

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports three case studies on the usability and acceptance of an industrial robotic prototype in the context of human-robot cooperation. The three case studies were conducted in the framework of a two-year project named AssistMe, which aims at developing different means of interaction for programming and using collaborative robots in a user-centered manner. Together with two industrial partners and a technological partner, two different application scenarios were implemented and studied with an off-the-shelf robotic system. The operators worked with the robotic prototype in laboratory conditions (two days, in a factory context (one day and in an automotive assembly line (three weeks. In the article, the project and procedures are described in detail, including the quantitative and qualitative methodology. Our results show that close human-robot cooperation in the industrial context needs adaptive pacing mechanisms in order to avoid a change of working routines for the operators and that an off-the-shelf robotic system is still limited in terms of usability and acceptance. The touch panel, which is needed for controlling the robot, had a negative impact on the overall user experience. It creates a further intermediate layer between the user, the robot and the work piece and potentially leads to a decrease in productivity. Finally, the fear of the worker of being replaced by an improved robotic system was regularly expressed and adds an additional anthropocentric dimension to the discussion of human-robot cooperation, smart factories and the upcoming Industry 4.0.

  6. DOE groundwater protection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, S.

    1988-01-01

    EH is developing a DOE-wide Groundwater Quality Protection Strategy to express DOE's commitment to the protection of groundwater quality at or near its facilities. This strategy responds to a September 1986 recommendation of the General Accounting Office. It builds on EPA's August 1984 Ground-Water Protection Strategy, which establishes a classification system designed to protect groundwater according to its value and vulnerability. The purposes of DOE's strategy are to highlight groundwater protection as part of current DOE programs and future Departmental planning, to guide DOE managers in developing site-specific groundwater protection practices where DOE has discretion, and to guide DOE's approach to negotiations with EPA/states where regulatory processes apply to groundwater protection at Departmental facilities. The strategy calls for the prevention of groundwater contamination and the cleanup of groundwater commensurate with its usefulness. It would require long-term groundwater protection with reliance on physical rather than institutional control methods. The strategy provides guidance on providing long-term protection of groundwater resources; standards for new remedial actions;guidance on establishing points of compliance; requirements for establishing classification review area; and general guidance on obtaining variances, where applicable, from regulatory requirements. It also outlines management tools to implement this strategy

  7. Does the conceptus of the viviparous lizard Barisia imbricata imbricata participates in the regulation of progesterone production and the control of luteolysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Martín; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Carmen; Cárdenas-León, Mario; Luis, Juana; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2014-08-01

    It is generally accepted that progesterone is necessary to maintain gestation; however, the mechanisms that control the production of this steroid remain unknown. The corpus luteum has been assigned a central role in the maintenance of gestation based on its capacity to produce progesterone. A pseudopregnancy model was performed in a viviparous lizard, Barisia imbricata imbricata, to determine whether the absence of embryos would affect the pattern of progesterone production or the corpus luteum histology. Blood samples were obtained prior to ovulation and at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after ovulation (pseudopregnant and pregnant lizards), as well as one day after parturition (pregnant lizards) or 32 weeks after ovulation (pseudopregnant lizards). The corpus luteum was surgically removed one day after blood samples were obtained. Blood aliquots from nongravid females were obtained at similar timepoints. We found a significant reduction in plasma progesterone concentrations at 24 and 32 weeks post-ovulation in pseudopregnant lizards compared with those observed at similar times in intact pregnant lizards, whereas the progesterone levels in non-gestant lizards remained significantly lower than in either pseudopregnant or pregnant lizards. Moreover, we observed that the histological appearance of the corpus luteum from pseudogestational females (obtained 24 and 32 weeks post-ovulation) differed from the corpora lutea from lizards in late gestation and intact parturient lizards. These observations suggest that the conceptus participates in the regulation of progesterone production in late gestation and also in luteolysis control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Considering an affect regulation framework for examining the association between body dissatisfaction and positive body image in Black older adolescent females: does body mass index matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Butler-Ajibade, Phoebe; Robinson, Seronda A

    2014-09-01

    The present study provided an initial evaluation of an affect regulation model describing the association between body dissatisfaction and two contemporary measures of positive body image among 247 Black college-bound older adolescent females. We further tested whether possessing a higher body mass index (BMI) would strengthen these associations. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Respondents also completed a culturally-sensitive figure rating scale along with assessments of body appreciation and body image flexibility. Results indicated a robust positive association between the two measures of positive body image; BMI was the strongest predictor of both body appreciation and body image flexibility with body size discrepancy (current minus ideal) contributing incremental variance to both models tested. Implications for improving our understanding of the association between positive and negative body image and bolstering positive body image to promote health-protective behaviors among Black young women at this developmental juncture are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulated underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ''roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation

  10. DOE management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezendes, V.S.

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that GAO, as well as the Department of Energy's Inspector General, have pointed out the need for major improvement in the University of California's management of the three DOE laboratories-Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Berkeley- and DOE oversight of that management effort. GAO found problems with University of California controls over laboratory operations, such as managing property, protecting classified documents, and ensuring that subcontractors are not subject to foreign influence, which might lead to transfers of nuclear technology to foreign influence, which might lead to transfers of nuclear technology or materials to foreign countries. In addition, clauses in the University of California contracts hamper DOE's ability to effectively manage the laboratories. DOE has addressed many of the specific problems that GAO identified and has tried to improve overall contract management. Negotiations with the University of California to extend the laboratory contracts will present another opportunity for DOE to take a firm stance on the need for management improvements. Having appropriate procedures and resources in place would also help DOE carry out its administration of contracts

  11. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A regulates sporulation, but does not contribute to toxin production, by direct high-affinity binding to target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E Rosenbusch

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI, for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely.

  12. Lack of conventional oxygen-linked proton and anion binding sites does not impair allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in dwarf caiman hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other vertebrate hemoglobins (Hbs) whose high intrinsic O2 affinities are reduced by red cell allosteric effectors (mainly protons, CO2, organic phosphates, and chloride ions), crocodilian Hbs exhibit low sensitivity to organic phosphates and high sensitivity to bicarbonate (HCO3−), which is believed to augment Hb-O2 unloading during diving and postprandial alkaline tides when blood HCO3− levels and metabolic rates increase. Examination of α- and β-globin amino acid sequences of dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus) revealed a unique combination of substitutions at key effector binding sites compared with other vertebrate and crocodilian Hbs: β82Lys→Gln, β143His→Val, and β146His→Tyr. These substitutions delete positive charges and, along with other distinctive changes in residue charge and polarity, may be expected to disrupt allosteric regulation of Hb-O2 affinity. Strikingly, however, P. palpebrosus Hb shows a strong Bohr effect, and marked deoxygenation-linked binding of organic phosphates (ATP and DPG) and CO2 as carbamate (contrasting with HCO3− binding in other crocodilians). Unlike other Hbs, it polymerizes to large complexes in the oxygenated state. The highly unusual properties of P. palpebrosus Hb align with a high content of His residues (potential sites for oxygenation-linked proton binding) and distinctive surface Cys residues that may form intermolecular disulfide bridges upon polymerization. On the basis of its singular properties, P. palpebrosus Hb provides a unique opportunity for studies on structure-function coupling and the evolution of compensatory mechanisms for maintaining tissue O2 delivery in Hbs that lack conventional effector-binding residues. PMID:23720132

  13. A survey of ecological risk assessment at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Bascietto, J.; Joseph, T.; Bilyard, G.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Risk-Based Standards Working Group is studying standard-setting and remedial action based on realistic estimates of human health and ecological risks. Federal and state regulations require DOE to assess ecological risks due to present and past operation of DOE facilities and ecological damage caused by remedial actions. Unfortunately, little technical guidance has been provided by regulatory agencies about how these assessments should be performed or what constitutes an adequate assessment. Active ecological research, environmental characterization, and ecological risk assessment programs are already underway at many locations. Some of these programs were established more than 30 years ago. Because of the strength of its existing programs and the depth of expertise available within the DOE complex, the agency is in a position to lead in developing ecological risk assessment procedures that are fully consistent with the general principles defined by EPA and that will ensure environmentally sound and cost-effective restoration of its sites. As a prelude to guidance development, the working group conducted a survey of ecological risk assessment activities at a subset of major DOE facilities. The survey was intended to (1) identify approaches now being used in ecological risk assessments performed by DOE staff and contractors at each site, (2) record successes and failures of these approaches, (3) identify new technical developments with potential for general application to many DOE facilities, and (4) identify major data needs, data resources, and methodological deficiencies

  14. Improvement of Self-regulated Learning in Mathematics through a Hypermedia Application: Differences based on Academic Performance and Previous Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueli, Marisol; Rodríguez, Celestino; Areces, Débora; García, Trinidad; González-Castro, Paloma

    2017-12-04

    Self-regulation on behalf of the student is crucial in learning Mathematics through hypermedia applications and is an even greater challenge in these IT environments. Two aims are formulated. First, to analyze the effectiveness of a hypermedia tool in improving perceived knowledge of self-regulatory strategies and the perceived usage of the planning, executing and assessment strategy on behalf of students with low, medium and high levels of academic performance. Second, to analyze the effectiveness of the hypermedia tool in improving perceived usage of the strategy for planning, monitoring and evaluating on behalf of students with a perceived knowledge (low, medium and high). Participants were 624 students (aged 10-13), classified into a treatment group (TG; 391) and a comparative group (CG; 233). They completed a questionnaire on perceived knowledge (Perceived Knowledge of Self-Regulatory Strategies) and another one on perceived usage of the strategy for planning, performing and evaluating (Inventory of Self-regulatory Learning Processes). Univariate covariance analyses (ANCOVAs) and Student-t tests were used. ANCOVA results were not statistically significant. However, the linear contrast indicated a significant improvement in perceived knowledge of strategies among the TG with low, medium and high academic performance (p ≤ .001). Results are discussed in the light of past and future research.

  15. Modification and evaluation of thermal properties of melamine-formaldehyde/n-eicosane microcapsules for thermo-regulation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohaddes, F.; Islam, S.; Shanks, R.; Fergusson, M.; Wang, L.; Padhye, R.

    2014-01-01

    A modified process to enhance the latent heat of fusion of n-eicosane microcapsules in melamine-formaldehyde shells is suggested for application in textiles. Deviations in melt enthalpy and phase change temperatures were determined for produced microcapsules by differential scanning calorimetry. Thermo-regulation efficiency of eicosane-microcapsule-treated fabrics was evaluated via fitting the Newton cooling law to the experimental data, and a new constant, α, was defined as the thermal delay factor. Scanning electron microscopy images and particle size distribution analysis were consistent and the particle size was found to be between 0.5 and 2.7 μm. Melamine-formaldehyde/n-eicosane microcapsule composition was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry. The microcapsules developed showed excellent heat storage capacities, over 162.4 J/g, over melting and crystallisation ranges compared with previous studies undertaken in this field. - Highlights: • Modified eicosane microcapsules with the highest phase change enthalpies were made. • Newton cooling law was fitted to determine thermal delay in PCM-substrates. • Fine microcapsule units with diameters less than 0.5 μm were prepared. • All pliable PCM-substrates can be thermally assessed using thermal logging method

  16. Is there health inequity in Europe today? The ‘strange case’ of the application of an European regulation to cartilage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Beretta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An important regulation, issued by the European Community in 2008, regulates the authorisation and supervision of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP and subsequent follow up in Europe. This law contains a Hospital Exemption clause, under which some hospitals in some countries can be exempted from the regulations governing ATMPs. The application of this regulation in Europe has resulted in differences in the costs of cell therapy for cartilage injuries in Germany compared with the costs in other European countries and in the U.S. The present paper argues on the real impact of political decisions on the health of citizens, on economy of healthcare systems, and highlights a possible case of inequality among European citizens with respect to cartilage repair procedures.

  17. Regulating N application for rice yield and sustainable eco-agro development in the upper reaches of Yellow River basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiping; Liu, Ruliang; Gao, Ji; Yang, Shiqi; Chen, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    High N fertilizer and flooding irrigation applied to rice on anthropogenic-alluvial soil often result in N leaching and low recovery of applied fertilizer N from the rice fields in Ningxia irrigation region in the upper reaches of the Yellow River, which threatens ecological environment, food security, and sustainable agricultural development. This paper reported the regulating N application for rice yield and sustainable Eco-Agro development in the upper reaches of Yellow River basin. The results showed that reducing and postponing N application could maintain crop yields while substantially reducing N leaching losses to the environment and improving the nitrogen use efficiency. Considering the high food production, the minimum environmental threat, and the low labor input, we suggested that regulating N application is an important measure to help sustainable agricultural development in this region.

  18. Guidance on the preparation and presentation of an application for authorisation of a novel food in the context of Regulation (EU) 2015/2283

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    . This guidance presents a common format for the organisation of the information to be presented in order to assist the applicant in preparing a well-structured application to demonstrate the safety of the novel food. The application should be comprehensive and complete. This guidance outlined the data needed......Following the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2015/2283 of the European Parliament and of the Council on novel foods, the European Commission requested EFSA to update and develop scientific and technical guidance for the preparation and presentation of applications for authorisation of novel foods...... for the safety assessments of novel foods. Requirements which should be covered in all applications relate to the description of the novel food, production process, compositional data, specification, proposed uses and use levels, and anticipated intake of the novel food. Further sections on the history of use...

  19. Avoiding dual regulation of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahakis, J.G.; Palabrica, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) has successfully negotiated the issuance of a Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Order that provides for exemption of RW from certain DOE directives. This exemption assures precedence of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in radiation protection, nuclear safety (including quality assurance), and safeguards and security of nuclear materials. This Order is necessary to avoid the unwarranted cost and potential confusion resulting from dual regulation of RW facilities and activities by DOE and NRC. Development of this Order involved a systematic review of applicable DOE directives and NRC requirements to identify potential overlaps and duplication when applied to the RW program. Following this review and extensive negotiations with appropriate DOE organizations responsible for directives development, this Order was issued as HQ 1321.1 on December 22, 1993

  20. New technologies to meet regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, C.; Harmon, L.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has set the ambitious goal of having all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations by the year 2019. This goal is ambitious both because of the magnitude of the effort required and because, in many cases, the means for attaining the goal do not now exist. The DOE's strategy for reaching its goal is based on applied research and development, education, and cooperation with regulators. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has instituted a program to assess the magnitude of the cleanup effort and to evaluate the potential technologies to be used. The OTD has program responsibility for providing new and more effective technologies for meeting DOE's goal for compliance and cleanup. Included are research and development of new technologies; demonstration, testing, and evaluation of technologies developed elsewhere; transportation; and educational programs to produce the scientists and engineers needed to maintain the momentum of research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) until the job is complete

  1. A Discrete-Time Recurrent Neural Network for Solving Rank-Deficient Matrix Equations With an Application to Output Regulation of Linear Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Jie

    2017-04-17

    This paper presents a discrete-time recurrent neural network approach to solving systems of linear equations with two features. First, the system of linear equations may not have a unique solution. Second, the system matrix is not known precisely, but a sequence of matrices that converges to the unknown system matrix exponentially is known. The problem is motivated from solving the output regulation problem for linear systems. Thus, an application of our main result leads to an online solution to the output regulation problem for linear systems.

  2. Regulation Development for Drinking Water Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    To explain what process and information underlies regulations including how the Safe Drinking Water Act applies to regulation development i.e. how does the drinking water law translate into regulations.

  3. 77 FR 4887 - DOE Patent Licensing Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... administered by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for NNSA facilities. The NNSA Deputy... issue a Family Policymaking Assessment for any rule or policy that may affect family well being. This rule will have no impact on family, the autonomy or integrity of the family as an institution...

  4. Application of a support vector machine algorithm to the safety precaution technique of medium-low pressure gas regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuejun; An, Xaioran; Wu, Bo; He, Shaoping

    2018-02-01

    In the gas pipeline system, safe operation of a gas regulator determines the stability of the fuel gas supply, and the medium-low pressure gas regulator of the safety precaution system is not perfect at the present stage in the Beijing Gas Group; therefore, safety precaution technique optimization has important social and economic significance. In this paper, according to the running status of the medium-low pressure gas regulator in the SCADA system, a new method for gas regulator safety precaution based on the support vector machine (SVM) is presented. This method takes the gas regulator outlet pressure data as input variables of the SVM model, the fault categories and degree as output variables, which will effectively enhance the precaution accuracy as well as save significant manpower and material resources.

  5. Final Project Report for DOE/EERE High-Capacity and Low-Cost Hydrogen-Storage Sorbents for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hong-Cai [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Liu, Di-Jia [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-12-01

    sites oriented towards MOF pores help to surpass the predicted hydrogen uptakes described by Chahine’s rule.4 These observations are believed to have a major impact on the hydrogen storage community, and may potentially lead to the development of a material that could meet the DOE goals for hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications.

  6. Ocean Dumping Control Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These Regulations were made further to the Ocean Dumping Control Act which provides for restrictions in dumping operations. The Regulations contain model applications for permits to dump or load a series of materials. (NEA)

  7. DOE standard: Firearms safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Information in this document is applicable to all DOE facilities, elements, and contractors engaged in work that requires the use of firearms as provided by law or contract. The standard in this document provides principles and practices for implementing a safe and effective firearms safety program for protective forces and for non-security use of firearms. This document describes acceptable interpretations and methods for meeting Order requirements

  8. DOE standard: Firearms safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Information in this document is applicable to all DOE facilities, elements, and contractors engaged in work that requires the use of firearms as provided by law or contract. The standard in this document provides principles and practices for implementing a safe and effective firearms safety program for protective forces and for non-security use of firearms. This document describes acceptable interpretations and methods for meeting Order requirements.

  9. DOE`s integrated low-level waste management program and strategic planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, G. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management; Hwang, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1993-03-01

    To meet the DOE`s commitment to operate its facilities in a safe, economic, and environmentally sound manner, and to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local rules, regulations, and agreements, DOE created the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in 1989 to focus efforts on controlling waste management and cleaning up contaminated sites. In the first few years of its existence, the Office of Waste Management (EM-30) has concentrated on operational and corrective activities at the sites. In 1992, the Office of Waste Management began to apply an integrated approach to managing its various waste types. Consequently, DOE established the Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP) to properly manage its complex-wide LLW in a consistent manner. The objective of the LLWMP is to build and operate an integrated, safe, and cost-effective program to meet the needs of waste generators. The program will be based on acceptable risk and sound planning, resulting in public confidence and support. Strategic planning of the program is under way and is expected to take two to three years before implementation of the integrated waste management approach.

  10. Application of the New Decommissioning Regulation to the Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Nuclear Center (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauret, Josiane; Piketty, Laurence; Jeanjacques, Michel

    2008-01-01

    This abstract describes the application of the new decommissioning regulation on all Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF is to say INB in French) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center (CEA/FAR). The decommissioning process has been applied in six buildings which are out of the new nuclear perimeter proposed (buildings no 7, no 40, no 94, no 39, no 52/1 and no 32) and three buildings have been reorganized (no 54, no 91 and no 53 instead of no 40 and no 94) in order to increase the space for temporary nuclear waste disposal and to reduce the internal transports of nuclear waste on the site. The advantages are the safety and radioprotection improvements and a lower operating cost. A global safety file was written in 2002 and 2003 and was sent to the French Nuclear Authority on November 2003. The list of documents required is given in the paragraph I of this paper. The main goals were two ministerial decrees (one decree for each NLF) getting the authorization to modify the NLF perimeter and to carry out cleaning and dismantling activities leading to the whole decommissioning of all NLF. Some specific authorizations were necessary to carry out the dismantling program during the decommissioning procedure. They were delivered by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (FNSA) or with limited delegation by the General Executive Director (GED) on the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center, called internal authorization. Some partial dismantling or decontamination examples are given below: - evaporator for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53): FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2002/2003. - disposal tanks for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53) FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2004, - incinerator for the radioactive solid waste treatment station (building no 07): FNSA authorization: operation realised in 2004, - research equipments in the building no. 54 and building no. 91: internal authorization ; realised in 2005, - sample

  11. DOE's Pollution Prevention Information Clearinghouse (EPIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otis, P.T.

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Pollution Prevention Information Clearinghouse (EPIC) is a computer system intended for the exchange of pollution prevention information DOE-wide. EPIC is being developed as a distributed system that will allow access to other databases and applications. The first prototype of EPIC (Prototype I) was put on-line in January 1994. Prototype I contains information on EM-funded pollution prevention projects; relevant laws, regulations, guidance, and policy; facility and DOE contacts; and meetings and conferences. Prototype I also gives users access to the INEL Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS) and to information contained on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPNS) Pollution Prevention Infbrmation Exchange System (PIES) as a test of the distributed system concept. An initial user group of about 35 is testing and providing feedback on Prototype I. Prototype II, with a Graphical User Interface (GUI), is planned for the end of CY94. This paper describes the current state of EPIC in terms of architecture, user interface, and information content. Plans for Prototype II and the final system are then discussed. The EPIC development effort is being coordinated with EPA and US Department of Defense (DoD) efforts to develop or upgrade their pollution prevention information exchange systems

  12. 41 CFR 102-37.185 - How does a SASP obtain screening authorization for itself or its donees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a SASP obtain... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT... Form 92 (with the signature and an affixed passport-style photograph of the screener applicant) and a...

  13. Application of the regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material to bulk shipments of materials in minerals industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurikov, Nick; Hinrichsen, Paul John; Omar, M.; Fernandes, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The following discussion is based on the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (T S -R-1,2005)[1] and Advisory Material for these Regulations (T S -G-1.1,2003)[2]. There were many amendments to the first issue of T S -R-1 (1996-2000) [3], several changes were also made when the Regulations were adopted in Australia [4]. The marks [->] or [->?] have been used in the text to indicate where a change has occurred between the references [1, 2, 3 and 4]. The mark [->] indicates that there is a difference in wording between 2000 and 2005 editions, the mark indicates that if in a particular jurisdiction 1996-2000 Transport Regulations are in force, additional consultation with an appropriate regulatory authority is required.

  14. Analysis of the soil amplification factor in NCSE-02 and Eurocode-8 regulations: application to the 11th May , 2011 Lorca earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsino Fernandez, C.; Garcia-Mayordomo, J.

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes are one of the geological hazards which have produced more human and material loses in the history of manking. Seismic engineering has the purpose of studying the soil dynamic behavior in order to desing structures and buildings adapted to the effects triggered by earthquakes. Within this purpose, one of the most important tasks has been the sutdy of the amplifying effect of seismic movement due to ground characteristics, which is often a major cause responsible of the damage produced by earthquakes, even when their magnitude is not very high. In this article, the soil amplifying effects is considered according to two official sismorresistant regulations in Spain: the current Norma de Construccion Sismorresistente Espanola (NCSE-02) and the European regulation Eurocode 8 (EC-8). First, soils classification different criteria is analyzed and how this affects the soil factor and, particularly, the design seismic action in the form of response spectra. Subsequently, we compared the result of apllying both regulations to typical geological scenarios where the application of either regulation may cause notable differences. The second part of the paper deals with the comparison of NCSE-02 and EC-8 applied in the frame of a real case: the 11 t h May, 2011 Lorca earthquake. We compare the response spectra from both regulations to the actual response spectra derived from the accelerometric record of the earthquake at the Lorca station, and discuss which one fits it better. (Author)

  15. DOE natural phenomena hazards mitigation conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The conference includes sessions which present an overview of DOE programs, available codes, standards and criteria, examples of designs and upgrades from the DOE complex, lessons learned from past natural phenomena, ground motion, seismic evaluation of equipment, and applications of probabilistic risk assessment techniques to DOE facilities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers

  16. 27 CFR 6.3 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Scope of Regulations § 6.3 Application. (a) General. This part applies only to transactions between industry members and retailers. It does not apply to transactions between two industry members (for example, between a producer and a wholesaler), or to transactions between an industry...

  17. 27 CFR 8.3 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Scope of Regulations § 8.3 Application. (a) General. This part applies only to transactions between industry members and retailers. It does not apply to transactions between two industry members; for example, between a producer and a wholesaler. (b) Transactions involving...

  18. Refinement, testing, and application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program. Final report for period September 20, 1990 - May 8, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, David B.

    2002-04-09

    This report describes work done by NCAR under the ''Refinement, Testing, and Application of an Integrated Data Assimilation/Sounding System (IDASS) for the DOE/ARM Experimental Program''. It includes a discussion of the goals, findings and a list of 27 journal articles, 92 non-refereed papers and 30 other presentations not associated with a formal publication.

  19. Lessons learned implementing environmental regulations at non-Department of Energy sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, R.B.; Dippo, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) has been involved in the implementation of environmental regulations at non-Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for > 5 years. If any common thread has been identified in working at these sites, it is that no two sites can be treated the same. Each site and its associated wastes, governing regulations, and environmental conditions are different. The list of technical lessons learned is long, and their applicability to other sites must be looked at for each specific case. That is far too large a task to undertake here. The most important lesson HAZWRAP learned is not technical. Implementing environmental regulations at non-DOE sites is not any different from implementing regulations or anything else done at DOE facilities. The key to success lies in quality, planning, and communication. Taking the time to implement a good quality program based on sound planning and open communication will ensure program success

  20. Potential CERCLA reauthorization issues relevant to US DOE's Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.; Jaksch, J.A.; Dailey, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is currently scheduled to be reauthorized in 1994. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a significant stake in CERCLA reauthorization. CERCLA, along with its implementing regulation, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), is the principal legal authority governing DOE's environmental restoration program. The manner in which CERCLA-related issues are identified, evaluated, and dispatched may have a substantial impact on DOE's ability to conduct its environmental restoration program. A number of issues that impact DOE's environmental restoration program could be addressed through CERCLA reauthorization. These issues include the need to (1) address how the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) should be integrated into DOE CERCLA actions, (2) facilitate the streamlining of the Superfund process at DOE sites, (3) address the conflicts between the requirements of CERCLA and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) that are especially relevant to DOE, (4) examine the criteria for waiving applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) at DOE sites, and (5) delineate the appropriate use of institutional controls at DOE sites

  1. DOE New Technology: Sharing New Frontiers, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, A.T.; Henline, D.M. [eds.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of DOE New Technology is to provide information on how to access specific technologies developed through research sponsored by DOE and performed by DOE laboratories or by DOE-contracted researchers. This document describes technologies identified as having potential for commercial applications in addition to a catalog of current patent applications and patents available for licensing from DOE and DOE contractors.

  2. Application of accelerated evaluation method of alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation on bipolar linear regulator LM317

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei; Wu Xue; Wang Xin; Zhang Jinxin; Zhang Xiaofu; Zheng Qiwen; Ma Wuying; Lu Wu; Guo Qi; He Chengfa

    2014-01-01

    With different irradiation methods including high dose rate irradiation, low dose rate irradiation, alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, and US military standard constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, the ionizing radiation responses of bipolar linear regulator LM317 from three different companies were investigated under the operating and zero biases. The results show that compared with constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method, the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method can not only very rapidly and accurately evaluate the dose rate effect of three bipolar linear regulators, but also well simulate the damage of low dose rate irradiation. Experiment results make the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method successfully apply to bipolar linear regulator. (authors)

  3. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  4. Rethinking regulations for disposal criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.; Doering, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides the basis for the position that the current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criticality regulation is in need of revision to address problems in implementing it for the postclosure period in a geologic high-level waste repository. The authors believe that the applicant for such a facility should be able to demonstrate that postulated postclosure criticality events will not cause unacceptable risk of deleterious effects on public health and safety. In addition, the applicant should be expected to take practical and feasible measures to reduce the probability of a criticality occurring, even if (as expected) the consequences of such a criticality for repository performance and public health and safety would be negligible. This approach, while recognizing the probabilistic nature of analyses of events and conditions in the distant future, is also arguably consistent with the defense in depth concept that has been successfully applied to nuclear reactor regulation. The authors believe regulations for postclosure criticality control should support this dual approach, rather than require a deterministic prohibition of criticality as does the current rule. The existing rule seems appropriate for the preclosure period, as long as it is clearly specified to apply only to that period

  5. Economic Value of Li-ion Energy Storage System in Frequency Regulation Application from Utility Firm’s Perspective in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonchang Hur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy Storage Systems (ESSs have recently been highlighted because of their many benefits such as load-shifting, frequency regulation, price arbitrage, renewables, and so on. Among those benefits, we aim at evaluating their economic value in frequency regulation application. However, unlike previous literature focusing on profits obtained from participating in the ancillary service market, our approach concentrates on the cost reduction from the perspective of a utility firm that has an obligation to pay energy fees to a power exchange. More specifically, we focus on the payments between the power exchange market and the utility firm as a major source of economic benefits. The evaluation is done by cost- benefit analysis (CBA with a dataset of the Korean market while considering operational constraint costs as well as scheduled energy payments, and a simulation algorithm for the evaluation is provided. Our results show the potential for huge profits to be made by cost reduction. We believe that this research can provide a guideline for a utility firm considering investing in ESSs for frequency regulation application as a source of cost reduction.

  6. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'', and DOE 6430.1A, ''General Design Criteria''. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ''Glove Box Fire Protection'' and ''Filter Plenum Fire Protection''. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities

  7. Study of Effects of Time, Quantity and Application Method of Benzylaminopurine and Gibberellic Acid Growth Regulators on Breaking Seed Dormancy of Kelussia odoratissima M.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zafarian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Karafs Kouhi (Kelussia odoratissima M. is one of the important medicinal plants of umbelliferae family and native of Zagros Mountains range, which is endangered due to illegal harvests. In order to accelerate breaking the seed dormancy of this plant, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with four replications, was carried in Faculty of Agriculture, Shahrekord University. The seeds of Karafs Kouhi from Saraghaseyed ecotype were treated under three time periods (25, 50, 75 and 100 days after planting, combination of enzylaminopurine (BAP (concentrations of 0, 0.75 and 1.5 mg/L and gibberellic acid (GA3 (concentrations of 0, 250 and 500 mg/L and application methods of these growth regulators (soaking seeds in the growth regulators and use of growth regulators directly on the medium. In this experiment, germination percentage, rootlet length and hypocotyl length were studied. The results indicated that 100 days after planting significantly (P≥0.01 showed the highest rates in the three studied traits. In this treatment, the germination percentage was 86.94%, rootlet length was 9.43 cm and hypocotyl length was 11.64 cm. Moreover, the interaction of the factors was not significant for all the traits. The best combination to increase germination percent, rootlet length and germination rate, was 0.75 mg/L BAP, 500 mg/L GA3 and direct use of growth regulators. To increase hypocotyl length, only 500 mg/L GA3 is recommended.

  8. Maize yield and quality in response to plant density and application of a novel plant growth regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, L.; Evers, J.B.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, W.; Duan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Farmers in China have gradually increased plant density in maize to achieve higher yields, but this has increased risk of lodging due to taller and weaker stems at higher plant densities. Plant growth regulators can be used to reduce lodging risk. In this study, for the first time, the performance

  9. A model for describing the eutrophication in a heavily regulated coastal lagoon. Application to the Albufera of Valencia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio Fernández, Pilar; Gómez, Andrés García; Alba, Javier García; Díaz, César Álvarez; Revilla Cortezón, José Antonio

    2012-12-15

    A simplified two-dimensional eutrophication model was developed to simulate temporal and spatial variations of chlorophyll-a in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. This model considers the hydrodynamics of the whole study area, the regulated connexion of the lagoon with the sea, the variability of the input and output nutrient loads, the flux from the sediments to the water column, the phytoplankton growth and mortality kinetics, and the zooplankton grazing. The model was calibrated and validated by applying it to the Albufera of Valencia, a hypertrophic system whose connection to the sea is strongly regulated by a system of sluice-gates. The calibration and validation results presented a significant agreement between the model and the data obtained in several surveys. The accuracy was evaluated using a quantitative analysis, in which the average uncertainty of the model prediction was less than 6%. The results confirmed an expected phytoplankton bloom in April and October, achieving mean maximum values around 250 μg l(-1) of chlorophyll-a. A mass balance revealed that the eutrophication process is magnified by the input loads of nutrients, mainly from the sediments, as well as by the limited connection of the lagoon with the sea. This study has shown that the developed model is an efficient tool to manage the eutrophication problem in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  11. Results on the application of the methodology for power diagnoses Iac-DOE to Mexican companies; Resultados de la aplicacion de la metodologia de diagnosticos energeticos Iac-DOE a empresas mexicanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz Garcia, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This work presents an analysis of the results of eight industrial power audits made in Mexico by a team of professors and students of the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Ixtapalapa (UAM), following the methodology of the Centers of Industrial Consultant's office and Analyses and Power Diagnoses sponsored by the Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy of the United Studies (IAC-DOE Program). In these diagnosis studies, that could be classified as of fast execution, it was possible to find and to evaluate from 6 to 13 actions by company to increase their energy efficiency. This represents at the moment between 6 and 29% of the currently used energy, being the average 18.4%. The equivalent economic saving ascends to a value between 7 and 31% of the total paid, with an average value of 13.8%. Finally, the simple period of return for the saving recommendations is of 0.87 years, with an average number of 0.51 years for the actions focused to the saving of thermal energy and 1.52 years for the actions that improve the use of the electric energy. [Spanish] Este trabajo se presenta un analisis de los resultados de ocho auditorias energeticas industriales realizadas en Mexico por un equipo de profesores y estudiantes de la Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (UAM), siguiendo la metodologia de los Centros de Asesoria Industrial y de Analisis y Diagnosticos Energeticos patrocinados por la Oficina de Tecnologias Industriales del Departamento de Energia de los Estudios Unidos (Programa IAC-DOE). En estos estudios de diagnostico, que podrian ser clasificados como de rapida ejecucion, fue posible encontrar y evaluar de 6 a 13 acciones por empresa para incrementar su eficiencia energetica. Esto representa entre 6 y 29% de la energia empleada actualmente, siendo el promedio del 18.4%. El ahorro economico equivalente asciende a un valor entre 7 y 31% del total pagado, con un valor promedio de 13.8%. Finalmente, e periodo simple de retorno para

  12. Application of the principles of systems biology and Wiener's cybernetics for analysis of regulation of energy fluxes in muscle cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzun, Rita; Saks, Valdur

    2010-03-08

    The mechanisms of regulation of respiration and energy fluxes in the cells are analyzed based on the concepts of systems biology, non-equilibrium steady state kinetics and applications of Wiener's cybernetic principles of feedback regulation. Under physiological conditions cardiac function is governed by the Frank-Starling law and the main metabolic characteristic of cardiac muscle cells is metabolic homeostasis, when both workload and respiration rate can be changed manifold at constant intracellular level of phosphocreatine and ATP in the cells. This is not observed in skeletal muscles. Controversies in theoretical explanations of these observations are analyzed. Experimental studies of permeabilized fibers from human skeletal muscle vastus lateralis and adult rat cardiomyocytes showed that the respiration rate is always an apparent hyperbolic but not a sigmoid function of ADP concentration. It is our conclusion that realistic explanations of regulation of energy fluxes in muscle cells require systemic approaches including application of the feedback theory of Wiener's cybernetics in combination with detailed experimental research. Such an analysis reveals the importance of limited permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane for ADP due to interactions of mitochondria with cytoskeleton resulting in quasi-linear dependence of respiration rate on amplitude of cyclic changes in cytoplasmic ADP concentrations. The system of compartmentalized creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes functionally coupled to ANT and ATPases, and mitochondrial-cytoskeletal interactions separate energy fluxes (mass and energy transfer) from signalling (information transfer) within dissipative metabolic structures - intracellular energetic units (ICEU). Due to the non-equilibrium state of CK reactions, intracellular ATP utilization and mitochondrial ATP regeneration are interconnected by the PCr flux from mitochondria. The feedback regulation of respiration occurring via cyclic fluctuations of

  13. Peculiarities of toxic effects exerted by hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid and grounds for working our regulations of its safe production and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.К. Vlasenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our research object was hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid applied as plants growth regulator which was synthe-sized with an original technology by Bioorganic Chemistry Institute of Belarus National Academy of science. Our research goal was to determine peculiarities of toxic effects exerted by this new plants protector on experimental models in vivo/in vitro and to give grounds for hygienic standards of its contents in various media which were to provide its safe production and application. We conducted our research with the use of toxicological, physiological, hematological, biochemical, immu-nologic, cytogenetic, cytological, and statistical methods. We were the first to perform toxicological assessment of this new plants growth regulator under different regimes, doses and ways of introduction into laboratory animals' bodies and it helped us to detect its toxicometric parameters and peculiarities of its biological effects which became apparent through skin-resorptive and cumulative properties, irritating impacts on mucous tunics, moderate reproductive toxicity without sub-stantial signs of gonadotropic, mutagenic, and allergenic impacts on a body. We detected that toxic impacts exerted by the examined substance on a body was combined with membrane-tropic and cytotoxic effects. We determined criteria and limit-ing parameters of hazardous effects exerted by hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid in the course of a chronic experiment, and it gave us grounds for fixing allowable daily dose for a man and for working out a number of regulations on the sub-stance contents in environmental objects (working area air, water, and soil, in food raw materials, and in food products (grain, rape, rape and linen oil. The obtained results were used as a basis for fixing 9 hygienic standards and were used for the state registration of this plant growth regulator; it will provide its safe production and application in agriculture.

  14. Application of the Principles of Systems Biology and Wiener’s Cybernetics for Analysis of Regulation of Energy Fluxes in Muscle Cells in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzun, Rita; Saks, Valdur

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of regulation of respiration and energy fluxes in the cells are analyzed based on the concepts of systems biology, non-equilibrium steady state kinetics and applications of Wiener’s cybernetic principles of feedback regulation. Under physiological conditions cardiac function is governed by the Frank-Starling law and the main metabolic characteristic of cardiac muscle cells is metabolic homeostasis, when both workload and respiration rate can be changed manifold at constant intracellular level of phosphocreatine and ATP in the cells. This is not observed in skeletal muscles. Controversies in theoretical explanations of these observations are analyzed. Experimental studies of permeabilized fibers from human skeletal muscle vastus lateralis and adult rat cardiomyocytes showed that the respiration rate is always an apparent hyperbolic but not a sigmoid function of ADP concentration. It is our conclusion that realistic explanations of regulation of energy fluxes in muscle cells require systemic approaches including application of the feedback theory of Wiener’s cybernetics in combination with detailed experimental research. Such an analysis reveals the importance of limited permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane for ADP due to interactions of mitochondria with cytoskeleton resulting in quasi-linear dependence of respiration rate on amplitude of cyclic changes in cytoplasmic ADP concentrations. The system of compartmentalized creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes functionally coupled to ANT and ATPases, and mitochondrial-cytoskeletal interactions separate energy fluxes (mass and energy transfer) from signalling (information transfer) within dissipative metabolic structures – intracellular energetic units (ICEU). Due to the non-equilibrium state of CK reactions, intracellular ATP utilization and mitochondrial ATP regeneration are interconnected by the PCr flux from mitochondria. The feedback regulation of respiration occurring via cyclic fluctuations

  15. Glial TNFα in the spinal cord regulates neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Handong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN is one of the most common forms of peripheral neuropathy, affecting about 30% of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The symptoms of HIV-SN are dominated by neuropathic pain. Glia activation in the spinal cord has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. This study will investigate the role of spinal TNFα released from glia in HIV-related neuropathic pain. Results Peripheral gp120 application into the rat sciatic nerve induced mechanical allodynia for more than 7 weeks, and upregulated the expression of spinal TNFα in the mRNA and the protein levels at 2 weeks after gp120 application. Spinal TNFα was colocalized with GFAP (a marker of astrocytes and Iba1 (a marker of microglia in immunostaining, suggesting that glia produce TNFα in the spinal cord in this model. Peripheral gp120 application also increased TNFα in the L4/5 DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of TNFα siRNA or soluble TNF receptor reduced gp120 application-induced mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα in the spinal cord and the DRG are involved in neuropathic pain, following the peripheral HIV gp120 application, and that blockade of the glial product TNFα reverses neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application.

  16. Oncogenic pathways and myrna: effects on messenger's turnover, regulation by synthetic oligo ribonucleotides and therapeutic applications in experimental settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The project has been focusing on molecular mechanisms determining the rate of RNA degradation eventually important to regulate gene expression and phenotype at post transcription level. Exogenous synthetic oligonucleotides targeting the relevant domains of b- RNA degradation could stabilize the transcript, efficiently enhance gene expression and alter the cellular phenotype accordingly. The experimental model was the bcl2 RNA (b-RNA), its molecular mechanisms of degradation and the functional effects of turnover modifications by exogenous means

  17. Self-regulated shear flow turbulence in confined plasmas: Basic concepts and potential applications to the L → H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Shapiro, V.; Schevchenko, V.; Kim, Y.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Carreras, B.A.; Sidikman, K.; Lynch, V.E.; Garcia, L.; Terry, P.W.; Sagdeev, R.Z.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes developments in the theory of edge plasma turbulence in a differentially rotating plasma. The thesis that such systems are dynamically self-regulating is presented. Results indicate that relevant fluctuations will generate a predominantly curved flow. Similar, curvature is shown to be the predominant flow profile effect on fluctuations. A system fixed point is identified, the eigenfrequencies for small oscillations around it are calculated, and an over-all stability criterion is determined

  18. Public involvement in multi-objective water level regulation development projects-evaluating the applicability of public involvement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaentaenen, Ari; Marttunen, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Public involvement is a process that involves the public in the decision making of an organization, for example a municipality or a corporation. It has developed into a widely accepted and recommended policy in environment altering projects. The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) took force in 2000 and stresses the importance of public involvement in composing river basin management plans. Therefore, the need to develop public involvement methods for different situations and circumstances is evident. This paper describes how various public involvement methods have been applied in a development project involving the most heavily regulated lake in Finland. The objective of the project was to assess the positive and negative impacts of regulation and to find possibilities for alleviating the adverse impacts on recreational use and the aquatic ecosystem. An exceptional effort was made towards public involvement, which was closely connected to planning and decision making. The applied methods were (1) steering group work, (2) survey, (3) dialogue, (4) theme interviews, (5) public meeting and (6) workshops. The information gathered using these methods was utilized in different stages of the project, e.g., in identifying the regulation impacts, comparing alternatives and compiling the recommendations for regulation development. After describing our case and the results from the applied public involvement methods, we will discuss our experiences and the feedback from the public. We will also critically evaluate our own success in coping with public involvement challenges. In addition to that, we present general recommendations for dealing with these problematic issues based on our experiences, which provide new insights for applying various public involvement methods in multi-objective decision making projects

  19. Differential regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in two Chlorella species in response to nitrate treatments and the potential of binary blending microalgae oils for biodiesel application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Thye San; Chen, Jian Woon; Goh, Eng Giap; Aziz, Ahmad; Loh, Saw Hong

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different nitrate concentrations in culture medium on oil content and fatty acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris (UMT-M1) and Chlorella sorokiniana (KS-MB2). Results showed that both species produced significant higher (pdifferentially regulated fatty acid accumulation patterns in response to nitrate treatments at early stationary growth phase. Their potential use for biodiesel application could be enhanced by exploring the concept of binary blending of the two microalgae oils using developed mathematical equations to calculate the oil mass blending ratio and simultaneously estimated the weight percentage (wt.%) of desirable fatty acid compositions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Survey of legal aspects, regulations, standards and guidelines applicable to radioactive waste management of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvetti, T.C.; Marumo, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    In Brazil, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) are the agencies responsible for the execution, regulation and control of nuclear and environmental policies, respectively. Such regulatory activities are very comprehensive (IBAMA) or too specific (CNEN), revealing other aspects that would, also, need to be observed so that the management could be carried out efficiently (quality) and effectively (safety), including the three governmental administrative levels: Federal, State and Municipal. In addition to laws, regulations, decrees and resolutions, there are also national and international standards and guides that provide guidelines for structuring the current management and the use of best regulatory practices. The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor Enterprise (RMB) is a CNEN project, complying with a Multi-Year Plan of the Brazilian Ministry of Planning, Development and Management (MPDG). The Enterprise is being developed under the responsibility of the Directorate of Research and Development - DPD of CNEN and will have a facility for treatment and initial temporary storage of the radioactive waste generated by the operation of the research reactor and the activities carried out in the associated laboratories. The RMB will be built in the city of IPERÓ, located in the state of São Paulo, near ARAMAR Experimental Center of the Brazilian Navy. This work aims to present the research results regarding the various aspects that regulate, legislate and standardize the practices proposed to the Radioactive Waste Management of the RMB project. (author)

  1. Survey of legal aspects, regulations, standards and guidelines applicable to radioactive waste management of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvetti, T.C.; Marumo, J.T., E-mail: salvetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In Brazil, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) are the agencies responsible for the execution, regulation and control of nuclear and environmental policies, respectively. Such regulatory activities are very comprehensive (IBAMA) or too specific (CNEN), revealing other aspects that would, also, need to be observed so that the management could be carried out efficiently (quality) and effectively (safety), including the three governmental administrative levels: Federal, State and Municipal. In addition to laws, regulations, decrees and resolutions, there are also national and international standards and guides that provide guidelines for structuring the current management and the use of best regulatory practices. The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor Enterprise (RMB) is a CNEN project, complying with a Multi-Year Plan of the Brazilian Ministry of Planning, Development and Management (MPDG). The Enterprise is being developed under the responsibility of the Directorate of Research and Development - DPD of CNEN and will have a facility for treatment and initial temporary storage of the radioactive waste generated by the operation of the research reactor and the activities carried out in the associated laboratories. The RMB will be built in the city of IPERÓ, located in the state of São Paulo, near ARAMAR Experimental Center of the Brazilian Navy. This work aims to present the research results regarding the various aspects that regulate, legislate and standardize the practices proposed to the Radioactive Waste Management of the RMB project. (author)

  2. Application of decision-making theory to the regulation of muscular work rate during self-paced competitive endurance activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfree, Andrew; Martin, Louise; Micklewright, Dominic; St Clair Gibson, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Successful participation in competitive endurance activities requires continual regulation of muscular work rate in order to maximise physiological performance capacities, meaning that individuals must make numerous decisions with regards to the muscular work rate selected at any point in time. Decisions relating to the setting of appropriate goals and the overall strategic approach to be utilised are made prior to the commencement of an event, whereas tactical decisions are made during the event itself. This review examines current theories of decision-making in an attempt to explain the manner in which regulation of muscular work is achieved during athletic activity. We describe rational and heuristic theories, and relate these to current models of regulatory processes during self-paced exercise in an attempt to explain observations made in both laboratory and competitive environments. Additionally, we use rational and heuristic theories in an attempt to explain the influence of the presence of direct competitors on the quality of the decisions made during these activities. We hypothesise that although both rational and heuristic models can plausibly explain many observed behaviours in competitive endurance activities, the complexity of the environment in which such activities occur would imply that effective rational decision-making is unlikely. However, at present, many proposed models of the regulatory process share similarities with rational models. We suggest enhanced understanding of the decision-making process during self-paced activities is crucial in order to improve the ability to understand regulation of performance and performance outcomes during athletic activity.

  3. Application of Physiological Self-Regulation and Adaptive Task Allocation Techniques for Controlling Operator Hazardous States of Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Pope, Alan T.; Freeman, Frederick G.

    2001-01-01

    Prinzel, Hadley, Freeman, and Mikulka found that adaptive task allocation significantly enhanced performance only when used at the endpoints of the task workload continuum (i.e., very low or high workload), but that the technique degraded performance if invoked during other levels of task demand. These researchers suggested that other techniques should be used in conjunction with adaptive automation to help minimize the onset of hazardous states of awareness (HSA) and keep the operator 'in-the-loop.' The paper reports on such a technique that uses psychophysiological self-regulation to modulate the level of task engagement. Eighteen participants were assigned to three groups (self-regulation, false feedback, and control) and performed a compensatory tracking task that was cycled between three levels of task difficulty on the basis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) record. Those participants who had received self-regulation training performed significantly better and reported lower NASA-TLX scores than participants in the false feedback and control groups. Furthermore, the false feedback and control groups had significantly more task allocations resulting in return-to-manual performance decrements and higher EEG difference scores. Theoretical and practical implications of these results for adaptive automation are discussed.

  4. Drum inspection robots: Application development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, F.B.; Warner, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE), drums containing mixed and low level stored waste are inspected, as mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and other regulations. The inspections are intended to prevent leaks by finding corrosion long before the drums are breached. The DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) has sponsored efforts towards the development of robotic drum inspectors. This emerging application for mobile and remote sensing has broad applicability for DOE and commercial waste storage areas. Three full scale robot prototypes have been under development, and another project has prototyped a novel technique to analyze robotically collected drum images. In general, the robots consist of a mobile, self-navigating base vehicle, outfitted with sensor packages so that rust and other corrosion cues can be automatically identified. They promise the potential to lower radiation dose and operator effort required, while improving diligence, consistency, and documentation

  5. The effects of simultaneous application of plant growth regulators and bioaugmentation on improvement of phytoremediation of pyrene contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Saeid; Azhdarpoor, Abooalfazl; Rostami, Majid; Samaei, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) refer to a wide group of soil contaminants whose presence in the environment is a cause of concern. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Indole Acetic Acid (IAA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the phytoremediation activities of sorghum bicolor and increase in pyrene removal efficiency in the soil. The initial concentration of pyrene was 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) in this experiment. The treatments included unplanted soil (T0), planted soil with sorghum (T1), planted soil with application of IAA (T2), planted soil with application of Pseudomonas sp. (T3), and planted soil with simultaneous application of IAA and Pseudomonas sp. (T4). The pyrene removal rate in the soil was measured every 30 days. Moreover, plant biomass and soil bacteria were measured after 90 days. The results showed that pyrene removal rate significantly increased in the planted treatments compared to the unplanted ones. After 90 days, at the initial concentration of 150-300 mg kg(-1), pyrene removal efficiency was 52-92% in T1-T4 and 35-47% in the unplanted treatment (T0). Application of IAA and Pseudomonas sp. significantly increased plant biomass, soil bacteria, and pyrene removal rate in T2, T3, and T4 compared to T1. Therefore, application of IAA in the planted treatments with sorghum could have a significant effect on increasing the removal efficiency of pyrene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.G.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Roberson, K.; Meloin, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE's SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE's national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references

  7. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun; Kang, Hie Chan

    2016-01-01

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins

  8. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins.

  9. Request for Concurrence as to Applicability of PSD and NSPS Regulations to Marblehead Lime Company Proposed Lime Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  10. Investing without credible inter-period regulations. A bargaining approach with application to investments in natural resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordal, Kjell Bjoern

    2002-01-01

    A government's lack of credibility when promising future taxation and regulation of foreign direct investment is often regarded as an obstacle to foreign investment. As shown in this paper, the total lack of inter-period credibility may not necessarily prevent investments from taking place. Both the government and the investor can benefit from negotiating a series of short-lived agreements in which the investor obtains a share of the revenue generated from previous investments against the undertaking of making new investments. This assumes that intra-period agreements are respected by the parties

  11. The unbearable bureaucratization of the Internet: The OSIPTEL’s proffer to regulate the “neutrality of red” in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Zúñiga Palomino, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the reasons for the so-called “network neutrality” and its regulation in Peru (including the laws regulating as a proffer recently presented by OSIPTEL); consisting primarily of equal treatment of all traffic, content or application by internet service providers. From Economic Analysis of Law’sperspective, it has been concluded that the Internet access does not present market failures that justify regulating the conditions of service provision. The author explains why ne...

  12. Antioxidant capacity changes and phenolic profile of Echinacea purpurea, nettle (Urtica dioica L.), and dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) after application of polyamine and phenolic biosynthesis regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, Jozef; Burdová, Mária; Kobida, L'ubomír; Komora, Ladislav; Macho, Vendelín; Kogan, Grigorij; Turianica, Ivan; Kochanová, Radka; Lozek, Otto; Habán, Miroslav; Chlebo, Peter

    2007-07-11

    The changes of the antioxidant (AOA) and antiradical activities (ARA) and the total contents of phenolics, anthocyanins, flavonols, and hydroxybenzoic acid in roots and different aerial sections of Echinacea purpurea, nettle, and dandelion, after treatment with ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, a polyamine inhibitor (O-phosphoethanolamine, KF), and a phenol biosynthesis stimulator (carboxymethyl chitin glucan, CCHG) were analyzed spectrophotometrically; hydroxycinnamic acids content was analyzed by RP-HPLC with UV detection. Both regulators increased the AOA measured as inhibition of peroxidation (IP) in all herb sections, with the exception of Echinacea stems after treatment with KF. In root tissues IP was dramatically elevated mainly after CCHG application: 8.5-fold in Echinacea, 4.14-fold in nettle, and 2.08-fold in dandelion. ARA decrease of Echinacea leaves treated with regulators was in direct relation only with cichoric acid and caftaric acid contents. Both regulators uphold the formation of cinnamic acid conjugates, the most expressive being that of cichoric acid after treatment with CCHG in Echinacea roots from 2.71 to 20.92 mg g(-1). There was a strong relationship between increase of the total phenolics in all sections of Echinacea, as well as in the studied sections of dandelion, and the anthocyanin content.

  13. A 200 mA CMOS low-dropout regulator with double frequency compensation techniques for SoC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Qianqian; Chen Zhiming; Gong Zheng; Shi Yin

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a 200 mA low-dropout (LDO) linear regulator using two modified techniques for frequency compensation. One technique is that the error amplifier uses a common source stage with variable load, which is controlled by the output current, is served as the second stage for a stable frequency response. The other technique is that the LDO uses a pole-zero tracking compensation technique at the error amplifier to achieve a good frequency response. The proposed circuit was fabricated and tested in HJTC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The designed LDO linear regulator works under the input voltage of 2.8–5 V and provides up to 200 mA load current for an output voltage of 1.8 V. The total error of the output voltage due to line and load variation is less than 0.015%. The LDO die area is 630 × 550 μm 2 and the quiescent current is 130 μA. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  14. 34 CFR 606.13 - How many applications for a development grant may an institution submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many applications for a development grant may an institution submit? 606.13 Section 606.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM How Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 606.13 How many applications for a...

  15. 34 CFR 607.13 - How many applications for a development grant may an institution submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many applications for a development grant may an institution submit? 607.13 Section 607.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 607.13 How many applications for a development grant may an...

  16. SOR/88-144, Atomic Energy Control Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These amendments dated 25 February 1988 mainly concern naturally-occurring radioactive prescribed substances (namely, uranium, thorium, radium, etc.). Any naturally-occurring radioactive material in a mineral or other material which has not been related to an activity associated with the development, application or use of atomic energy, is exempted from the scope of the Regulations. The Regulations will therefore not apply to such radioactive substances present in building materials or in minerals commonly used in industrial activities which are not associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. This exemption does not apply to such material in connection with import control and preparation for transport. (NEA)

  17. Design and Application of a Solar Mobile Pond Aquaculture Water Quality-Regulation Machine Based in Bream Pond Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingguo; Xu, Hao; Ma, Zhuojun; Zhang, Yongjun; Tian, Changfeng; Cheng, Guofeng; Zou, Haisheng; Lu, Shimin; Liu, Shijing; Tang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Bream pond aquaculture plays a very important role in China's aquaculture industry and is the main source of aquatic products. To regulate and control pond water quality and sediment, a movable solar pond aquaculture water quality regulation machine (SMWM) was designed and used. This machine is solar-powered and moves on water, and its primary components are a solar power supply device, a sediment lifting device, a mechanism for walking on the water's surface and a control system. The solar power supply device provides power for the machine, and the water walking mechanism drives the machine's motion on the water. The sediment lifting device orbits the main section of the machine and affects a large area of the pond. Tests of the machine's mechanical properties revealed that the minimum illumination necessary for the SMWM to function is 13,000 Lx and that its stable speed on the water is 0.02-0.03 m/s. For an illumination of 13,000-52,500 Lx, the sediment lifting device runs at 0.13-0.35 m/s, and its water delivery capacity is 110-208 m(3)/h. The sediment lifting device is able to fold away, and the angle of the suction chamber can be adjusted, making the machine work well in ponds at different water depths from 0.5 m to 2 m. The optimal distance from the sediment lifting device to the bottom of the pond is 10-15 cm. In addition, adjusting the length of the connecting rod and the direction of the traction rope allows the SMWM to work in a pond water area greater than 80%. The analysis of water quality in Wuchang bream (Parabramis pekinensis) and silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) culture ponds using the SMWM resulted in decreased NH3(+)-N and available phosphorus concentrations and increased TP concentrations. The TN content and the amount of available phosphorus in the sediment were reduced. In addition, the fish production showed that the SMWM enhanced the yields of Wuchang bream and silver carp by more than 30% and 24%, respectively. These results

  18. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Ricardo; Shah, Anand; Kuo, Paul; Harker, Matthew; McCready, Mariana; Butler, Christeen; Martins, Henrique; Moorman, C T; Jacobs, Danny O

    2006-07-27

    Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC), to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text), searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task), and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task). The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its release as an open-source application will promote improved

  19. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Henrique

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC, to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. Results The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text, searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task, and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task. Conclusion The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its

  20. Rate and Timing Effects of Growth Regulating Herbicides Applications on Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry E. Besançon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicamba and 2,4-D are among the most common and inexpensive herbicides used to control broadleaf weeds. However, different studies have pointed the risk of crop injury and grain sorghum yield reduction with postemergence applications of 2,4-D. No research data on grain sorghum response to 2,4-D or dicamba exists in the Southeastern United States. Consequently, a study was conducted to investigate crop growth and yield response to 2,4-D (100, 220, and 330 g acid equivalent ha−1 and dicamba (280 g acid equivalent ha−1 applied on 20 to 65 cm tall sorghum. Greater stunting resulted from 2,4-D applied at 330 g acid equivalent ha−1 or below 45 cm tall sorghum whereas lodging prevailed with 2,4-D at 330 g acid equivalent ha−1 and dicamba applied beyond 35 cm tall crop. Regardless of local environmental conditions, 2,4-D applied up to 35 cm tall did not negatively impact grain yield. There was a trend for yields to be somewhat lower when 2,4-D was applied on 45 or 55 cm tall sorghum whereas application on 65 cm tall sorghum systematically decreased yields. More caution should be taken with dicamba since yield reduction has been reported as early as applications made on 35 cm tall sorghum for a potentially dicamba sensitive cultivar.

  1. Failure modes of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for electric bicycle applications in deep discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yonglang; Tang, Shengqun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Meng, Gang; Yang, Shijun [Hubei Camel Storage Battery Co. Ltd., Gucheng 441705 (China)

    2009-06-01

    The 36 or 48 V valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery packs have been widely applied to the power sources of electric bicycles or light electric scooters in China. The failure modes of the 12 V/10 Ah VRLA batteries have been studied by the cycle life test at C{sub 2} discharge rate and 100% depth of discharge (DOD). It indicates that the main cause of the battery failure in this cycle duty is the softening and shedding of positive active mass (PAM) rather than individual water loss, recombination efficiency or sulfation, etc. When the electrolyte saturation falls to a certain extent, the high oxygen recombination current leads to the depolarization of the negative plate and the shift of the positive plate to a higher potential. The violent oxygen evolution accelerates the softening of PAM and the end of cycle life. (author)

  2. Development and application of a mobile laboratory for measuring emissions from diesel engines. 1. Regulated gaseous emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, David R; Shah, Sandip D; Johnson, Kent; Miller, J Wayne; Norbeck, Joseph M

    2004-04-01

    Information about in-use emissions from diesel engines remains a critical issue for inventory development and policy design. Toward that end, we have developed and verified the first mobile laboratory that measures on-road or real-world emissions from engines at the quality level specified in the U.S. Congress Code of Federal Regulations. This unique mobile laboratory provides information on integrated and modal regulated gaseous emission rates and integrated emission rates for speciated volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and particulate matter during real-world operation. Total emissions are captured and collected from the HDD vehicle that is pulling the mobile laboratory. While primarily intended to accumulate data from HDD vehicles, it may also be used to measure emission rates from stationary diesel sources such as back-up generators. This paper describes the development of the mobile laboratory, its measurement capabilities, and the verification process and provides the first data on total capture gaseous on-road emission measurements following the California Air Resources Board (ARB) 4-mode driving cycle, the hot urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), the modified 5-mode cycle, and a 53.2-mi highway chase experiment. NOx mass emission rates (g mi(-1)) for the ARB 4-mode driving cycle, the hot UDDS driving cycle, and the chase experimentwerefoundto exceed current emission factor estimates for the engine type tested by approximately 50%. It was determined that congested traffic flow as well as "off-Federal Test Procedure cycle" emissions can lead to significant increases in per mile NOx emission rates for HDD vehicles.

  3. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations

  4. Improvement of antioxidant activities and yield of spring maize through seed priming and foliar application of plant growth regulators under heat stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress during reproductive and grain filling phases adversely affects the growth of cereals through reduction in grain’s number and size. However, exogenous application of antioxidants, plant growth regulators and osmoprotectants may be helpful to minimize these heat induced yield losses in cereals. This two year study was conducted to evaluate the role of exogenous application of ascorbic acid (AsA, salicylic acid (SA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 applied through seed priming or foliar spray on biochemical, physiological, morphological and yield related traits, grain yield and quality of late spring sown hybrid maize. The experiment was conducted in the spring season of 2007 and 2008. We observed that application of AsA, SA and H2O2 applied through seed priming or foliar spray improved the physiological, biochemical, morphological and yield related traits, grain yield and grain quality of late spring sown maize in both years. In both years, we observed higher superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and peroxidase (POD activity in the plants where AsA, SA and H2O2were applied through seed priming or foliar spray than control. Membrane stability index (MSI, relative water contents (RWC, chlorophyll contents, grain yield and grain oil contents were also improved by exogenous application of AsA, SA and H2O2 in both years. Seed priming of AsA, SA and H2O2was equally effective as the foliar application. In conclusion, seed priming with AsA, SA and H2O2 may be opted to lessen the heat induced yield losses in late sown spring hybrid maize. Heat tolerance induced by ASA, SA and H2O2 may be attributed to increase in antioxidant activities and MSI which maintained RWC and chlorophyll contents in maize resulting in better grain yield in heat stress conditions.

  5. DOE regulatory reform initiative vitrified mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.J.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with responsibly managing the largest volume of mixed waste in the United States. This responsibility includes managing waste in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and in a cost-effective, environmentally responsible manner. Managing certain treated mixed wastes in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage and disposal units (specifically those mixed wastes that pose low risks from the hazardous component) is unlikely to provide additional protection to human health and the environment beyond that afforded by managing these wastes in storage and disposal units subject to requirements for radiological control. In October, 1995, the DOE submitted a regulatory reform proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relating to vitrified mixed waste forms. The technical proposal supports a regulatory strategy that would allow vitrified mixed waste forms treated through a permit or other environmental compliance mechanism to be granted an exemption from RCRA hazardous waste regulation, after treatment, based upon the inherent destruction and immobilization capabilities of vitrification technology. The vitrified waste form will meet, or exceed the performance criteria of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass that has been accepted as an international standard for immobilizing radioactive waste components and the LDR treatment standards for inorganics and metals for controlling hazardous constituents. The proposal further provides that vitrified mixed waste would be responsibly managed under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) while reducing overall costs. Full regulatory authority by the EPA or a State would be maintained until an acceptable vitrified mixed waste form, protective of human health and the environment, is produced

  6. An application of deviance regulation theory to reduce alcohol-related problems among college women during spring break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Robert D; Kramer, Matthew P; Stevenson, Brittany L; Sargent, Emily M; Kilwein, Tess M

    2017-05-01

    Spring break (SB) can lead to heavy episodic drinking and increased alcohol-related risks. This may be especially relevant for women. The current study utilized deviance regulation theory to increase the use of protective behavioral strategies (PBSs) among female college students on SB. Female college students going on SB (n = 62) completed a screening, a pre-SB intervention (where they were randomly assigned to receive either a positively or negatively framed message about individuals who do or do not use PBS), and a post-SB assessment that provided alcohol and PBS use data for each day of SB (n = 620 person-days). Data were analyzed using a multilevel structural equation model. In the negative frame, SB PBS use was higher among those who perceived SB PBS norms to be more common on SB relative to non-SB. In the positive frame, SB PBS use was higher among those who perceived SB PBS norms to be less common on SB relative to non-SB. These associations did not result in lower alcohol consumption, but did result in a lower likelihood of experiencing alcohol-related problems during SB. These results suggest that a brief online intervention, that utilizes targeted messages based on normative perceptions of SB PBS use, could be an effective strategy for reducing alcohol-related consequences among college student women during SB. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Evaluation of a Mathematical Model of Rat Body Weight Regulation in Application to Caloric Restriction and Drug Treatment Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimkhanov, Jangir; Thompson, W Clayton; Patterson, Terrell A; Hadcock, John R; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S; Musante, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model of energy balance and body weight regulation that can predict species-specific response to common pre-clinical interventions. To this end, we evaluate the ability of a previously published mathematical model of mouse metabolism to describe changes in body weight and body composition in rats in response to two short-term interventions. First, we adapt the model to describe body weight and composition changes in Sprague-Dawley rats by fitting to data previously collected from a 26-day caloric restriction study. The calibrated model is subsequently used to describe changes in rat body weight and composition in a 23-day cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist (CB1Ra) study. While the model describes body weight data well, it fails to replicate body composition changes with CB1Ra treatment. Evaluation of a key model assumption about deposition of fat and fat-free masses shows a limitation of the model in short-term studies due to the constraint placed on the relative change in body composition components. We demonstrate that the model can be modified to overcome this limitation, and propose additional measurements to further test the proposed model predictions. These findings illustrate how mathematical models can be used to support drug discovery and development by identifying key knowledge gaps and aiding in the design of additional experiments to further our understanding of disease-relevant and species-specific physiology.

  8. Evaluation of a Mathematical Model of Rat Body Weight Regulation in Application to Caloric Restriction and Drug Treatment Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangir Selimkhanov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model of energy balance and body weight regulation that can predict species-specific response to common pre-clinical interventions. To this end, we evaluate the ability of a previously published mathematical model of mouse metabolism to describe changes in body weight and body composition in rats in response to two short-term interventions. First, we adapt the model to describe body weight and composition changes in Sprague-Dawley rats by fitting to data previously collected from a 26-day caloric restriction study. The calibrated model is subsequently used to describe changes in rat body weight and composition in a 23-day cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist (CB1Ra study. While the model describes body weight data well, it fails to replicate body composition changes with CB1Ra treatment. Evaluation of a key model assumption about deposition of fat and fat-free masses shows a limitation of the model in short-term studies due to the constraint placed on the relative change in body composition components. We demonstrate that the model can be modified to overcome this limitation, and propose additional measurements to further test the proposed model predictions. These findings illustrate how mathematical models can be used to support drug discovery and development by identifying key knowledge gaps and aiding in the design of additional experiments to further our understanding of disease-relevant and species-specific physiology.

  9. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis. PMID:24570653

  10. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis.

  11. 10 CFR 2.107 - Withdrawal of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... application does not authorize the removal of any document from the files of the Commission. (c) The Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Director, Office of New Reactors, or Director, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, as appropriate, will cause to be published in the Federal Register a notice...

  12. 16 CFR 1610.1 - Purpose, scope and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose, scope and applicability. 1610.1 Section 1610.1 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS... form an integral part of another garment; (3) Footwear, provided it does not consist of hosiery in...

  13. Application of Regulation for recycling metals arising from Decommissioning of an Italian Nuclear Facility - Application of national regulations for metallic materials' recycling from the decommissioning of an Italian nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varasano, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Leonardo; Petagna, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    The start of the decommissioning of nuclear Italian sites requires proper management of clearance for large volumes of metallic materials. This paper describes the current legal framework relating to the Italian regulatory system of reference for the verification of the conditions of unconditional release of materials from nuclear installations, with particular reference to the recycling of metals. The definition of clearance levels, whether general or specific, ensures the clearance of materials arising from nuclear sites without further examinations. The Italian legislation on radiation protection requires that the removal of materials from authorized practices be subject to special requirements included in the authorization provisions. These requirements provide clearance levels that take account of the recommendations and technical guidelines supplied by the European Commission. The regulatory framework requires compliance with current technical and managerial requirements, issued by the National Regulatory Authority and annexed to the Ministerial Authorization, in which are shown the levels of surface activity and specific activity established for the unconditional release of metals from nuclear sites. The real challenge for the nuclear operator is the management of large amounts of waste materials arising from decommissioning activities. For the Italian operator SOGIN SpA is of extreme importance the correct application of national regulatory framework, in order to allow the most effective reduction of the amount of radioactive waste during decommissioning activities. (authors)

  14. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

  15. DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level

  16. Regulation of Dynamical Systems to Optimal Solutions of Semidefinite Programs: Algorithms and Applications to AC Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Anese, Emiliano; Dhople, Sairaj V.; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2015-07-01

    This paper considers a collection of networked nonlinear dynamical systems, and addresses the synthesis of feedback controllers that seek optimal operating points corresponding to the solution of pertinent network-wide optimization problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the solution of semidefinite programs (SDPs). The design of the feedback controller is grounded on a dual e-subgradient approach, with the dual iterates utilized to dynamically update the dynamical-system reference signals. Global convergence is guaranteed for diminishing stepsize rules, even when the reference inputs are updated at a faster rate than the dynamical-system settling time. The application of the proposed framework to the control of power-electronic inverters in AC distribution systems is discussed. The objective is to bridge the time-scale separation between real-time inverter control and network-wide optimization. Optimization objectives assume the form of SDP relaxations of prototypical AC optimal power flow problems.

  17. Control of grasshoppers by combined application of Paranosema locustae and an insect growth regulator (IGR) (cascade) in rangelands in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanyan; An, Zhao; Shi, Wangpeng

    2012-12-01

    The relatively low direct mortality caused by Paranosema locustae (Canning) has limited its application for controlling grasshopper when densities are high, and this study sought to determine if the simultaneous use of this pathogen and the IGR, Flufenoxuron (Cascade) could provide effective control. Nine treatments were tested: 45% Malathion EC at 1500 ml/ha, 5% Cascade at 150 ml/ha, 5% Cascade at 75 ml/ha, 5% Cascade at 37.5 ml/ha, P. locustae at 7.5 x 10(9) spores/ha, combinations of 5% Cascade at 75 ml/ha and P. locustae at 7.5 x 10(9) spores/ha, applied in different rations (1:1, 1:2, 1:3) in the same plot, the untreated control. P. locustae was applied on nonoverlapping plots with the IGR. The different in-plot combinations of P. locustae and Cascade in different ratios provided significantly better overall control of grasshoppers (all species) than the treatment of 5% Cascade of 150 ml/ha after 5d, but combinations were not significantly different from the other concentrations of Cascade after 12 and 31 d. When results were examined separately for specific species of grasshoppers, reduction of Dasyhippus harbipes (Fischer-Waldheim), was higher than that of Myrmeleotettix palpalis (Zubovsky). While combinations showed significant differences in the infection of different grasshopper species at 5 and 12 d posttreatment, no significant differences in rate of infection among the primary species (M. palpalis, D. harbipes, and Oedaleus asiaticus Bei-Bienko) were detected 31 d posttreatment. Our study found that P. locustae by itself could control grasshopper populations at medium densities but the combined application of P. locustae and Cascade at a ratio of 1:2 was more effective against high-density grasshopper populations.

  18. Cesium-137 in ash from combustion of biofuels. Application of regulations from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SSM, has issued an ordinance on ash contaminated with Cesium-137. It implies amongst other things that ash containing 0,5 - 10 kBq/kg Cesium-137 (so-called contaminated ash) can be used for geotechnical purposes provided that the content in a near-by well does not exceed 1 Bq/litre and that the increase in a near-by fish producing recipient does not exceed 0,1 Bq/litre. The initial plan with the presently reported work was to provide a compilation of how the ordinance for Cesium-137 can be applied in practical work. It became evident, however, in the course of the work that issues related to the co-variation between potassium and Cesium needed further investigation. As a result, the present report comprises also a compilation of this extended information search. Cesium-137 is present in ash as a result of the accident in a nuclear power reactor in Chernobyl in 1986 during which material having a very small grain size was spread to a high altitude. A few days later, Cesium-137 was deposited during rains over large parts of Sweden. This activity penetrated to a depth of one or a few decimetres during the course of the subsequent few days and weeks, after which it was partially taken up by plants and spread in the ecosystem. Section 2 has the character of a handbook. It provides basic information on radiation, and also about the ordinance and other material from the SSI. Section 3 comprises compilations of relevant international status of knowledge. This regards how potassium and Cesium behave in soil and ash, and also how spreading of Cesium can be modelled. Cesium behaves similarly to Potassium but with the difference that Cesium is bonded much more strongly to mineral soil and ash. Potassium and Cesium appears in soil in four different forms: dissolved in the pore water, exchangeable, non-exchangeable and as bonded to minerals. The amount dissolved in the pore water is the smallest and that bonded to minerals is the largest

  19. Considerations on the applicability of as low as reasonably achievable analysis to the regulation of radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with the continued use in the United States' regulations of international recommendations on radioactive materials transport which have not undergone review in accordance with US Federal Radiation Protection Guidance. This Guidance, published in the Federal Register (25 FR 4402) in 1960 by the Federal Radiation Council, called for Federal agencies to maintain radiation exposure, as far below the Federal Radiation Protection guides as practicable. The concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) seems, afirst, to be a relatively straight-forward concept. One needs only to identify what factors are pertinent and determine whether each is a cost or a benefit, where, in this case, benefit refers strictly to health effect reduction, in relation to the final product or output. These costs and benefits are then arranged in combinations employing varying magnitudes of the factors until the combination is found which maximizes the benefits while minimizing the costs. The difficulties are found to mount rapidly as one proceeds to implement this concept however. Because radiation is both beneficial and detrimental to health, the factors to be employed must include social considerations as well as economic values. The difficulty, if not impossibility, of quantifying social factors, such as the value of life or the value of personal inconvenience, into terms directly comparable with the dollar values of economic factors is the largest impediment to a conclusive demonstration of ALARA in strictly economic terms. Until society finds some mechanism for defining such terms as the value of life in economic units, the ALARA process can serve only as an input to decision-making with subjective value judgments necessarily being made

  20. Tapping the energy storage potential in electric loads to deliver load following and regulation, with application to wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, Duncan S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops new methods to model and control the aggregated power demand from a population of thermostatically controlled loads, with the goal of delivering services such as regulation and load following. Previous work on direct load control focuses primarily on peak load shaving by directly interrupting power to loads. In contrast, the emphasis of this paper is on controlling loads to produce relatively short time scale responses (hourly to sub-hourly), and the control signal is applied by manipulation of temperature set points, possibly via programmable communicating thermostats or advanced metering infrastructure. To this end, the methods developed here leverage the existence of system diversity and use physically-based load models to inform the development of a new theoretical model that accurately predicts - even when the system is not in equilibrium - changes in load resulting from changes in thermostat temperature set points. Insight into the transient dynamics that result from set point changes is developed by deriving a new exact solution to a well-known hybrid state aggregated load model. The eigenvalues of the solution, which depend only on the thermal time constant of the loads under control, are shown to have a strong effect on the accuracy of the model. The paper also shows that load heterogeneity - generally something that must be assumed away in direct load control models - actually has a positive effect on model accuracy. System identification techniques are brought to bear on the problem, and it is shown that identified models perform only marginally better than the theoretical model. The paper concludes by deriving a minimum variance control law, and demonstrates its effectiveness in simulations wherein a population of loads is made to follow the output of a wind plant with very small changes in the nominal thermostat temperature set points.

  1. Integrated application of transcriptomics and metabolomics provides insights into glycogen content regulation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Song, Kai; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-11

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important marine fishery resource, which contains high levels of glycogen that contributes to the flavor and the quality of the oyster. However, little is known about the molecular and chemical mechanisms underlying glycogen content differences in Pacific oysters. Using a homogeneous cultured Pacific oyster family, we explored these regulatory networks at the level of the metabolome and the transcriptome. Oysters with the highest and lowest natural glycogen content were selected for differential transcriptome and metabolome analysis. We identified 1888 differentially-expressed genes, seventy-five differentially-abundant metabolites, which are part of twenty-seven signaling pathways that were enriched using an integrated analysis of the interaction between the differentially-expressed genes and the differentially-abundant metabolites. Based on these results, we found that a high expression of carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), indicative of increased fatty acid degradation, is associated with a lower glycogen content. Together, a high level of expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and high levels of glucogenic amino acids likely underlie the increased glycogen production in high-glycogen oysters. In addition, the higher levels of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase (HK) and pyruvate kinase (PK), as well as of the TCA cycle enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), imply that there is a concomitant up-regulation of energy metabolism in high-glycogen oysters. High-glycogen oysters also appeared to have an increased ability to cope with stress, since the levels of the antioxidant glutathione peroxidase enzyme 5 (GPX5) gene were also increased. Our results suggest that amino acids and free fatty acids are closely related to glycogen content in oysters. In addition, oysters with a high glycogen content have a greater energy production capacity and a greater ability to cope with

  2. Algae façade as green building method: application of algae as a method to meet the green building regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerbo, Heru W.; Martokusumo, Widjaja; Donny Koerniawan, M.; Aulia Ardiani, Nissa; Krisanti, Susan

    2017-12-01

    The Local Government of Bandung city has stipulated a Green Building regulation through the Peraturan Walikota Number 1023/2016. Signed by the mayor in October 2016, Bandung became the first city in Indonesia that put green building as mandatory requirement in the building permit (IMB) process. Green Building regulation is intended to have more efficient consumption of energy and water, improved indoor air quality, management of liquid and solid waste etc. This objective is attained through various design method in building envelope, ventilation and air conditioning system, lighting, indoor transportation system, and electrical system. To minimize energy consumption of buildings that have large openings, sun shading device is often utilized together with low-E glass panes. For buildings in hot humid tropical climate, this method reduces indoor air temperature and thus requires less energy for air conditioning. Indoor air quality is often done by monitoring the carbon dioxide levels. Application of algae as part of building system façade has recently been introduced as replacement of large glass surface in the building façade. Algae are not yet included in the green building regulation because it is relatively new. The research will investigate, with the help of the modelling process and extensive literature, how effective is the implementation of algae in building façade to reduce energy consumption and improve its indoor air quality. This paper is written based on the design of ITB Innovation Park as an ongoing architectural design-based research how the algae-integrated building façade affects the energy consumption.

  3. DOE regulation of mixed waste. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power and the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H. R. 2009 and H. R. 2593, April 10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Testimony by representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, citizen environmental organizations, DOE, and universities on the Mixed Hazardous Waste Amendment Act of 1985 (H.R. 2009) and the Military Radioactive Emissions Control Act of 1985 (H.R. 2593) focused on safety aspects of mixed wastes at DOE facilities from the point of view of the general public and the implications for tourism and recreation in affected areas. H.R. 2593 calls for standards and continuous independent monitoring, while H.R. 2009 ensures that wastes the Solid Waste Management Act covers solid wastes containing radioactive material. The testimony covered definitions and interpretations by byproduct material and the problems associated with self-regulation. The testimony of the 10 witnesses follows the text of the two bills.

  4. DOE regulation of mixed waste. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power and the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 2009 and H.R. 2593, April 10, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Testimony by representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, citizen environmental organizations, DOE, and universities on the Mixed Hazardous Waste Amendment Act of 1985 (H.R. 2009) and the Military Radioactive Emissions Control Act of 1985 (H.R. 2593) focused on safety aspects of mixed wastes at DOE facilities from the point of view of the general public and the implications for tourism and recreation in affected areas. H.R. 2593 calls for standards and continuous independent monitoring, while H.R. 2009 ensures that wastes the Solid Waste Management Act covers solid wastes containing radioactive material. The testimony covered definitions and interpretations by byproduct material and the problems associated with self-regulation. The testimony of the 10 witnesses follows the text of the two bills

  5. General transfer matrix formalism to calculate DNA-protein-drug binding in gene regulation: application to OR operator of phage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2007-01-01

    The transfer matrix methodology is proposed as a systematic tool for the statistical-mechanical description of DNA-protein-drug binding involved in gene regulation. We show that a genetic system of several cis-regulatory modules is calculable using this method, considering explicitly the site-overlapping, competitive, cooperative binding of regulatory proteins, their multilayer assembly and DNA looping. In the methodological section, the matrix models are solved for the basic types of short- and long-range interactions between DNA-bound proteins, drugs and nucleosomes. We apply the matrix method to gene regulation at the O(R) operator of phage lambda. The transfer matrix formalism allowed the description of the lambda-switch at a single-nucleotide resolution, taking into account the effects of a range of inter-protein distances. Our calculations confirm previously established roles of the contact CI-Cro-RNAP interactions. Concerning long-range interactions, we show that while the DNA loop between the O(R) and O(L) operators is important at the lysogenic CI concentrations, the interference between the adjacent promoters P(R) and P(RM) becomes more important at small CI concentrations. A large change in the expression pattern may arise in this regime due to anticooperative interactions between DNA-bound RNA polymerases. The applicability of the matrix method to more complex systems is discussed.

  6. Physiochemical and Phytochemical Properties of Wax Apple (Syzygium samarangense [Blume] Merrill & L. M. Perry var. Jambu Madu as Affected by Growth Regulator Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study represents the first paper of the effects of growth regulators on the physiochemical and phytochemical properties of the wax apple fruit, a widely cultivated fruit tree in southeast Asia. Net photosynthesis, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS activity, peel color, fruit firmness, juice content, pH value, total soluble solids (TSSs, and the sugar acid ratio were all significantly increased in growth regulators (PGRs treated fruits. The application of gibberellin (GA3, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D significantly reduced titratable acidity and increased total sugar and carbohydrate content compared to the control. The 50 mg/L GA3, 10 mg/L NAA, and 5 mg/L 2,4-D treatments produced the greatest increases in phenol and flavonoid content; vitamin C content was also higher for these treatments. PGR treatment significantly affected chlorophyll, anthocyanin, and carotene content and produced higher phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and antioxidant activity levels. There was a positive correlation between peel color and TSS and antioxidant activity and both phenol and flavonoid content and PAL activity and anthocyanin formation. A taste panel assessment was also performed, and the highest scores were given to fruits that had been treated with GA3 or auxin. The study showed that application of 50 mg/L GA3, 10 mg/L NAA, and 5 mg/L 2,4-D once a week from bud development to fruit maturation increased the physiochemical and phytochemical properties of wax apple fruits.

  7. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Regulations concerning Safety in connection with the Disposal of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Waste. General Recommendations concerning the Application of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Regulations above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    An english translation of the original Swedish regulations concerning the safety in disposal of nuclear wastes is published in this booklet, together with recommendations on how these regulations can be applied

  8. Regulating the Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-26

    The article reports on a challenge to the UK electricity regulator to defend his record by the Coalition for Fair Electricity Regulation (COFFER). The challenge centres on whether the obligation for the regional electric companies (REC) to purchase power from the cheapest source is being enforced. This is related to the wider issue of whether the REC's support of combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) is economic. COFFER considers that uneconomic gas-fired power plants are being allowed to displace economic coal-fired stations. Aspects discussed include the background to the dispute and the costs of CCGT and coal fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. 25 CFR 1000.29 - What happens if a Tribe/Consortium is selected from the applicant pool but does not execute a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Admission into the Applicant Pool... compact and annual funding agreement at any time unless: (1) It notifies the Director in writing that it no longer wishes to be eligible to participate in the Tribal Self-Governance Program; (2) Fails to...

  10. Regulatory standards applicable or relevant to the independent Hanford environmental surveillance and oversight program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.E.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Siegel, M.R.; Woodruff, M.G.; Belfiglio, J.; Elliott, R.W.

    1990-03-01

    The authors reviewed federal and state statutes and regulations, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other guidance material, for potential applicability to the environmental surveillance program conducted for the Hanford site by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). There are no federal or state statutes or regulations which are directly applicable to the environmental surveillance program. However, other regulatory schemes, while not directly applicable to the environmental surveillance program, are important insofar as they are indicative of regulatory concern and direction. Because of the evolving nature of environmental regulations, this area needs to be closely monitored for future impact on environmental surveillance activities. 9 refs.,

  11. Exogenous application of rutin and gallic acid regulate antioxidants and alleviate reactive oxygen generation in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    The effect of rutin and gallic acid on growth, phytochemical and defense gene activation of rice ( Oryza sativa L.) was investigated. The seeds of rice were primed with different concentrations of rutin and gallic acid (10-60 µg mL -1 ) to explicate the effect on germination on water agar plates. Further, to study the effect of most effective concentrations of gallic acid (60 µg mL -1 ) and rutin (50 µg mL -1 ), greenhouse pot experiment was set up to determine the changes in growth, antioxidant and defense parameters. The results revealed more pronounced effect of gallic acid on total chlorophyll and carotenoids as well as on total flavonoid content and free radical scavenging activities. Gene expression analysis of OsWRKY71, PAL, CHS and LOX genes involved in strengthening the plant defense further validated the results obtained from the biochemical analysis. Microscopic analysis also confirmed reduction in total reactive oxygen species, free radicals like H 2 O 2 and O 2 - by exogenous application of gallic acid and rutin. The data obtained thus suggest that both gallic acid and rutin can affect the growth and physiology of rice plants and therefore can be used to develop effective plant growth promoters and as substitute of biofertilizers for maximizing their use in field conditions.

  12. Use of the SSHAC methodology within regulated environments: Cost-effective application for seismic characterization at multiple sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Bommer, Julian J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SSHAC processes provide high levels of regulatory assurance in hazard assessments for purposes of licensing and safety review. ► SSHAC projects provide structure to the evaluation of available data, models, and methods for building hazard input models. ► Experience on several nuclear projects in the past 15 years leads to the identification of key essential procedural steps. ► Conducting a regional SSHAC Level 3 study, followed by Level 2 site-specific studies can be time and cost effective. - Abstract: Essential elements of license applications and safety reviews for nuclear facilities are quantifications of earthquake and other natural hazards. A Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 or 4 process provides regulatory assurance that the hazard assessment considers all data and models proposed by members of the technical community and the associated uncertainties have been properly quantified. The SSHAC process has been endorsed as an acceptable hazard assessment methodology in US NRC regulatory guidance. Where hazard studies are required for multiple sites, regional SSHAC Level 3 or 4 studies followed by site-specific Level 2 refinements can provide major benefits in cost and duration.

  13. Resolution of regulatory issues facing the DOE in situ vitrification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corathers, L.A.

    1992-03-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being developed by researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a technology for remediating soils, underground storage tank residuals, and buried materials that have been contaminated with hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes (i.e., wastes containing both radioactive and hazardous wastes) at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the DOE ISV technology development program (i.e., the ISV Integrated Program) is to ensure that ISV is a workable technology for environmental restoration applications for DOE and other agencies. A DOE complex-wide plan was prepared during Fiscal Year 1991 to coordinate all levels of activities associated with the deployment of ISV. As part of this plan, a programmatic regulatory strategy was developed which focused on the federal environmental, health, safety, and nuclear regulations, including the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DOE regulations, believed to have the most significant near-term impact on the use of ISV as a remediation technology. The portion of the programmatic regulatory strategy addressing compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, as amended, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, is presented in this paper

  14. Sor/88-114, 25 February 1988, Atomic Energy Control Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The amendments to the Regulations mainly concern naturally-occurring radioactive prescribed substances (namely, uranium, thorium, radium, etc.). Any naturally-occurring radioactive material in a mineral or other material which has not been related to an activity associated with the development, application or use of atomic energy, is exempted from the scope of the Regulations. The Regulations will therefore not apply to radioactive substances such as uranium or thorium present in building materials or in minerals commonly used in industrial activities which are not associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. This exemption does not apply to such material in connection with import control and preparation for transport [fr

  15. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  16. The decision on the application to carry out a decommissioning project at Hinkley Point A Power Station under the Nuclear Reactors (Environmental Impact Assessment for Decommissioning) Regulations 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    European Council Directive 85/337/EEC, as amended by Council Directive 97/1 I/EC, sets out a framework on the assessment of the effects of certain public and private projects on the environment. The Directive is implemented in Great Britain for decommissioning nuclear reactor projects by the Nuclear Reactors (Environmental Impact Assessment for Decommissioning) Regulations 1999. The intention of the Directive and Regulations is to involve the public through consultation in considering the potential environmental impacts of a decommissioning project, and to make the decision-making process on granting consent open and transparent. The Regulations require the licensee to undertake an environmental impact assessment, prepare an environmental statement that summarises the environmental effects of the project, and apply to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for consent to carry out a decommissioning project. There is an optional stage where the licensee may request from HSE an opinion on what the environmental statement should contain (called a pre-application opinion). The licensee of Hinkley Point A Power Station, Magnox Electric pie, requested a pre-application opinion and provided information in a scoping report in December 2000. HSE undertook a public consultation on the scoping report and provided its pre- application opinion in April 2001. The licensee applied to HSE for consent to carry out a decommissioning project and provided an environmental statement in December 2001. Following a public consultation on the environmental statement, HSE requested further information that was subsequently provided by the licensee. A further public consultation was undertaken on the further information that ended in March 2003. All these public consultations involved around 60 organisations. HSE granted consent to carry out a decommissioning project at Hinkley Point A Power Station under the Regulations in July 2003, and attached conditions to the Consent. HSE took relevant

  17. Quality Assurance Grading Guidelines for Research and Development at DOE Facilities (DOE Order 5700.6C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, T.B.

    1992-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  18. Oversight and enforcement at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, I.E., Christopher, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses recent changes to the independent oversight and enforcement programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and applications to criticality safety. DOE's Office of Oversight (Oversight hereafter), in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH), independently evaluates whether management systems ensure adequate protection of the worker, public, and environment. Oversight has adopted a new approach to performing evaluations based on the guiding principles for safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy. The principles Oversight evaluates are line management responsibility for safety and health, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibilities. Recently, the DOE codified the implementation of integrated safety management, further expounding on these basic guiding principles and Oversight's role. The Office of Enforcement and Investigations in EH (Enforcement hereafter) is responsible for enforcement, and relevant documents describe its role. This paper briefly discusses criticality safety aspects of the twin initiatives of Oversight and Enforcement

  19. Improving CS regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  20. Micro-hybrid electric vehicle application of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in absorbent glass mat technology: Testing a partial-state-of-charge operation strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A.O.; Hockgeiger, E. [BMW Group, Powertrain Development, Energy Storage, Hufelandstrasse 4, 80788 Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-05-01

    The BMW Group has launched two micro-hybrid functions in high volume models in order to contribute to reduction of fuel consumption in modern passenger cars. Both the brake energy regeneration (BER) and the auto-start-stop function (ASSF) are based on the conventional 14 V vehicle electrical system and current series components with only little modifications. An intelligent control algorithm of the alternator enables recuperative charging in braking and coasting phases, known as BER. By switching off the internal combustion engine at a vehicle standstill the idling fuel consumption is effectively reduced by ASSF. By reason of economy and package a lead-acid battery is used as electrochemical energy storage device. The BMW Group assembles valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology in the micro-hybrid electrical power system since special challenges arise for the batteries. By field data analysis a lower average state-of-charge (SOC) due to partial state-of-charge (PSOC) operation and a higher cycling rate due to BER and ASSF are confirmed in this article. Similar to a design of experiment (DOE) like method we present a long-term lab investigation. Two types of 90 Ah VRLA AGM batteries are operated with a test bench profile that simulates the micro-hybrid vehicle electrical system under varying conditions. The main attention of this lab testing is focused on capacity loss and charge acceptance over cycle life. These effects are put into context with periodically refresh charging the batteries in order to prevent accelerated battery aging due to hard sulfation. We demonstrate the positive effect of refresh chargings concerning preservation of battery charge acceptance. Furthermore, we observe moderate capacity loss over 90 full cycles both at 25 C and at 3 C battery temperature. (author)