WorldWideScience

Sample records for regulation industry structure

  1. Electricity supply industry. Structure, ownership and regulation in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This study surveys developments and implications in the electricity supply industries in OECD countries. Chapter 1 introduces the issues. (Competition or electricity supply for everybody?) Electricity markets are dynamic and the participants are restructuring and repositioning themselves in order to benefit from new opportunities or policy initiatives. These changes are described in chapter 2. Privatisation is being pursued by some governments, not only for reasons of economic efficiency. Arguments for and against privatisation and different ways of introducing it are discussed in chapter 3. Fair trade and competition legislation, as it applies to all corporate entities, creates the institutional framework within which the utility has to operate. Various approaches to regulation and recent developments are described in chapter 4; the implications of regulatory changes are analysed in chapter 5. Having surveyed recent developments and their direct consequences, this study then goes on to look at their broader implications for the achievement of a range of energy policy objectives. Chapter 6 looks at fuel choice and investment decisions. Chapter 7 considers the issue of security of electricity supply, which has many special characteristics for both suppliers and regulators. OECD countries use different approaches for ensuring security of supply. Chapter 8 looks at environmental protection. Chapter 9 looks at energy efficiency. Chapter 10 discusses pricing. The introduction of competition has significant effects: it tends to reduce costs, remove cross subsidies, and bring prices more closely in line with the structure of costs. But there is no clear evidence at this stage as to whether, in the long run, competition produces lower overall prices. Finally chapter 11 analyses risk. The electricity business, like every other business, is faced with a variety of risks that cover every financial and technical facet of electricity production, transport, and supply. (N.C.)

  2. The structure, regulation, and performance of pension funds in nine industrial countries

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, E.P.; DEC

    1993-01-01

    The author offers an overview of issues relating to the development of funded pension schemes in industrial countries. The analysis applies the economic theory of pension regulation to experience with the structure, regulation, and performance of funds in nine countries - Canada, Denmark, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States - seeking to shed light on the finance of old age security in developing countries and the reform of pension funds ...

  3. Australia's private health insurance industry: structure, competition, regulation and role in a less than 'ideal world'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsullah, Ardel

    2011-02-01

    Australia's private health insurance funds have been prominent participants in the nation's health system for 60 years. Yet there is relatively little public awareness of the distinctive origins of the health funds, the uncharacteristic organisational nature of these commercial enterprises and the peculiarly regulated nature of their industry. The conventional corporate responsibility to shareholders was, until recently, completely irrelevant, and remains marginal to the sector. However, their purported answerability to contributors, styled as 'members', was always doubtful for most health funds. After a long period of remarkable stability in the sector, despite significant shifts in health funding policy, recent years have brought notable changes, with mergers, acquisitions and exits from the industry. The research is based on the detailed study of the private health funds, covering their history, organisational character and industry structure. It argues that the funds have always been divorced from the disciplines of the competitive market and generally have operated complacently within a system of comprehensive regulation and generous subsidy. The prospect of the private health funds enjoying an expanded role under a form of 'social insurance', as suggested by the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, is not supported.

  4. Natural gas industry regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clo, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the reception of the EU Directive on the internal gas market, it is quite necessary to avoid the mistakes already made in the case of electricity. A possible cause is there suggested which may help rearrange the natural gas industry and market in Italy. It's four points are: general interests, national peculiarities, public policies, regulatory framework [it

  5. The structure and regulation of the Irish equine industries: Links to considerations of equine welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The equine industries in Ireland are vibrant and growing. They are broadly classified into two sectors: Thoroughbred racing, and sports and leisure. This paper describes these sectors in terms of governance, education and training in equine welfare, and available data concerning horse numbers, identification, traceability and disposal. Animal welfare, and specifically equine welfare, has received increasing attention internationally. There is general acceptance of concepts such as animal needs and persons' responsibilities toward animals in their care, as expressed in the 'Five Freedoms'. As yet, little has been published on standards of equine welfare pertaining to Ireland, or on measures to address welfare issues here. This paper highlights the central role of horse identification and legal registration of ownership to safeguard the health and welfare of horses. PMID:21851704

  6. The structure and regulation of the Irish equine industries: Links to considerations of equine welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The equine industries in Ireland are vibrant and growing. They are broadly classified into two sectors: Thoroughbred racing, and sports and leisure. This paper describes these sectors in terms of governance, education and training in equine welfare, and available data concerning horse numbers, identification, traceability and disposal. Animal welfare, and specifically equine welfare, has received increasing attention internationally. There is general acceptance of concepts such as animal needs and persons' responsibilities toward animals in their care, as expressed in the 'Five Freedoms'. As yet, little has been published on standards of equine welfare pertaining to Ireland, or on measures to address welfare issues here. This paper highlights the central role of horse identification and legal registration of ownership to safeguard the health and welfare of horses.

  7. Self regulation in the methanol industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hymas, R.; Wilkes, P.

    1995-01-01

    The methanol industry is not known for a high degree of self-regulation, as one can see from a glance at historic price volatility, and historic demand/supply curves. Industry enthusiasts spend considerable effort attempting to improve their understanding of the industry by analyzing the abundance of data produced within the industry about these topics, usually without resulting in any definitive correlations. Rational planning within the industry is hindered by these factors as well as the large number of new production facilities continuously being announced. Against this background however demand has significantly increased, supply has kept up with demand, methanol plants structured on a rational basis have continued to be built, and in spite of wildly fluctuating product prices all established members of the industry apparently flourish. Historic trends, new entrants, and industry achievements are discussed

  8. Industrialized timber structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    It was recently learned that a number of innovations in structural timber components are available to the construction industry, but that they were largely unknown to bridge designers. The purpose of this study was to develop for the Department a fea...

  9. New storm water regulations impact industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, C.

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990, new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations aimed at governing the discharge of storm water from industrial facilities became effective. Because some industrial runoff contains toxics and other pollutants, the EPA considers storm water a major source of water contamination. The new regulations will have a profound impact on the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for industry. This paper summarizes the new storm water regulations, focusing on the requirements for industrial facilities. It also presents suggestions for compliance

  10. Industrial Innovation and Environmental Regulation: Developing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    Mar 1, 2007 ... Book cover Industrial Innovation and Environmental Regulation: ... in steering the behaviour of economic agents in industrial production. ... IDRC congratulates first cohort of Women in Climate Change Science Fellows.

  11. Industrial Innovation and Environmental Regulation: Developing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    What role should governments play in protecting the environment and controlling the environmental impacts of industry? Do regulations benefit the environment, and how do they affect industrial innovation? Since the modern era of environmental management began in the early 1970s, regulations have been used with ...

  12. Self-regulation in the mining industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinding, Knud; Peck, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Many industries have established their own systems for self-regulation. They often do so when companies involved in the industry operate in countries where financial, technical, environmental and social regulation is weak and when the industry is challenged by legitimacy issues related to behaviour...... in one of these areas. One industry that has progressed unevenly down the road of self-regulation in these areas is mining. Developing self-regulation for mines and mining companies involves difficult questions of scope, rules, membership, assessment criteria and performance evaluation. While self-regulation...... may bring benefits to members, they are likely to take a long time coming; but when they do arrive they may be substantial. Using a range of theoretical and empirical results from research on self-regulation, performance rating and corporate strategy, this paper analyses the strategic and operational...

  13. Related regulation of quality control of industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This book introduce related regulation of quality control of industrial products, which includes regulations of industrial products quality control, enforcement ordinance of industrial products quality control, enforcement regulation of quality control of industrial products, designated items with industrial production quality indication, industrial production quality test, and industrial production quality test organization and management tips of factory quality by grade.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY - THE ELECTROPLATING INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 44-page Technology Transfer Environmental Regulations and Technology publication is an update of a 1980 EPA publication that has been revised to reflect changes in the EPA regulations, as well as in the pollution control technologies that affect the electroplating industry. ...

  15. Regulations for radiation protection in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    These Regulations specify that responsibility for applying radiation protection regulations in industrial radiography rests with the owner of the establishment who will designate a radiation protection officer to this effect. They provide for the organisation of radiation protection, including the measures to be observed, exposure limits, etc. The competent authority for these questions is the State Institute of Radiation Hygiene [fr

  16. How Does Environmental Regulation Affect Industrial Transformation? A Study Based on the Methodology of Policy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference of factor input structure determines different response to environmental regulation. This paper constructs a theoretical model including environmental regulation, factor input structure, and industrial transformation and conducts a policy simulation based on the difference of influencing mechanism of environmental regulation considering industrial heterogeneity. The findings show that the impact of environmental regulation on industrial transformation presents comparison of distortion effect of resource allocation and technology effect. Environmental regulation will promote industrial transformation when technology effect of environmental regulation is stronger than distortion effect of resource allocation. Particularly, command-control environmental regulation has a significant incentive effect and spillover effect of technological innovation on cleaning industries, but these effects do not exist in pollution-intensive industries. Command-control environmental regulation promotes industrial transformation. The result of simulation showed that environmental regulation of market incentives is similar to that of command-control.

  17. Federal radiation protection regulations: An industry viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harward, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    Regulations and standards to protect the public and workers from ionizing radiation have been in transition for a number of years, although most of the basic limits in use have remained essentially unchanged over the past 25 years or so. Legislation, political changes, new scientific data, advances in scientific concepts, and finally, public perception and resulting pressures have all been factors in the modifications that have been implemented or considered for radiation protection regulations in recent years. During this period, radiation exposures to both the public and the work force have been reduced through program management and improved technology. Based on activities of the AIF Subcommittee on Radiation Protection, this paper reviews pertinent NRC and EPA regulations, standards and guidance as well as NCRP recommendations and provide some analyses of these in terms of their potential effect on nuclear industry operations. Comments include suggestions where minor changes in Federal agency approaches to radiation regulation might be made for the public benefit

  18. Legal Regulation and Consumers: The RFID Industry's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzani, Daniel

    Many journal articles have presented research on the adoption and diffusion of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) from a regulatory or consumer perspective. This research takes a reverse viewpoint. It researches the industry's experience with regulation by law and its experience with consumers. First, semi-structured interviews with RFID industry stakeholders are conducted on the topics of (UHF) frequency law, database law, and privacy law. Second, the industry's experience with (i) regulation by law and (ii) the consumers is collected in a worldwide online survey with companies and organisations that research, produce, sell, and consult on RFID technology. Third, empirical data is evaluated by different territories and industries to discuss four observations about legal regulation and consumers made by the authors with four feedback observations from the online survey. Given the evaluation of the empirical data, this article recommends that the RFID industry engage in better constructive dialogue with the legal regulator , strengthen its knowledge on applicable legislation, and re-evaluate its information policy to the consumer.

  19. Essays on regulation, institutions, and industrial organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergara, Mario Esteban

    Essay I develops a comparative institutional analysis of network access price regulation and "light-handed" regulation. While the former is a specific-agency-based arrangement with higher political influence, the latter is a court-based system. Consequently, the main trade-off between both frameworks reflects the merits of having efficient political and judicial institutions. Price regulation is superior when distributional concerns are irrelevant and information asymmetries are lower. Poorly functioning political systems and high welfare costs of raising funds make price regulation less attractive. Light regulation is more attractive when potential rents are smaller, the monopolist is more risk averse, the judicial system is more efficient, and the threat of government intervention is more credible. The possibility of private transfers makes price regulation more advantageous. Higher information asymmetries among firms makes light-handed regulation more attractive. The main results are consistent with a plausible interpretation of the drastic deregulatory process in New Zealand. Essay II studies the preliminary effects of the deregulation of direct access in the New Zealand's electricity market. A slight improvement in quality standards and an overall efficiency increase took place after two years of deregulation. Retailers were able to successfully enter in large demand, dense areas, with a large proportion of industrial and commercial users, where incumbents were not distributing electricity efficiently. Pricing policies appears to be influenced by market forces (associated to economic and demographic characteristics) as expected in a light regulatory framework. Essay III focuses on the possibility of endogenous sunk costs and the introduction of new products. Firms that exert some monopoly power in one market and introduce a new good whose demand is determined by a broader set of consumers might be forced to change their competing strategies. If the new product

  20. Guide to the economic regulation of the electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Guide to the Economic Regulation of the Electricity Industry, part of the series of OXERA Guides to Regulation, is designed as an essential work of reference for those who work in regulation and for practitioners who need to understand the needs and mechanics of regulation. The 154-page document provides: comprehensive coverage of the institutional and legal framework which defines the regulation of the electricity industry; an examination of current regulatory issues and developments in the industry; explanations of the roles of the key players; a condensed account of all the relevant legal documents; coverage of the industry in Scotland and Northern Ireland. (Author)

  1. Product Differentiation and Industrial Structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaked, Avner; Sutton, John

    1987-01-01

    Some recent literature on "vertical product differentiation" has d eveloped the idea that if the nature of technology and tastes in some industry take a certain form, then the industry must necessarily be "concentrated" and must remain so, no matter how large the economy becomes. The present paper develops this idea further and looks at so me of its implications. This approach offers a simple unified framewo rk within which to reexplore many issues that arise in considering th e relationship ...

  2. Industrial sources in Norway -- Regulations and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxeboel, G.

    2001-01-01

    On 12 May 2000, a new Act on radiation protection passed the Norwegian parliament. The report explains the requirements for the licensing process of sealed industrial sources and provides information, in particular, on the national inventory of industrial gauges, industrial radiography and logging sources. (author)

  3. ANTITRUST REGULATION IN TERMS OF ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT CHLOR-ALKALI INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Grinyov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problems of antitrust regulation activities of processing enterprises. The necessity of improving the activity of enforcement to prevent the emergence of monopolistic market structures chlor-alkali industry.

  4. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoft-Christensen, P

    1998-06-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au) 32 refs.

  5. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoft-Christensen, P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au)

  6. Environmental regulation and competition in the U.S. electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.C.; Weyant, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The structural evolution of the electric utility industry, with reference to its dynamics with environmental regulation, is described, explicitly including suppliers to the industry, the consumers of the products of the industry, and the industries that produce substitutes for the products. The structure of the industry has changed dramatically over the years 1970-1990, and is likely to continue to evolve throughout the 1990s. This evolution has resulted from changes in the milieu within which the industry operates, for example changes in fuel and capital markets, as well as federal, state and local regulations governing its activities. The environmental regulations of the 1970s have had a significant impact on the structure, behavior and performance of the industry and changes in the structure have had a feedback effect on the types of environmental regulations likely to be successful within the industry in reducing emissions of SO 2 , NOx and CO 2 . This and numerous other studies using the framework designed by Michael Porter of the Harvard Business School have demonstrated that this expanded view of competition frequently provides a much better explanation for changes in industry structure and corporate strategy than conventional analyses. 10 refs., 3 figs

  7. Industrial safety: its structuring and content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Industrial development has led to an on-going increase in productivity, but the concept of safety has also become highly relevant. In this article, the authors address the structuring and content of industrial safety which involves laying down essential safety requirements, both in manufacturing and processes and in products. (Author)

  8. Guide to the economic regulation of the gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The guide provides: concise information on the institutional structure, legislation and licensing of the gas industry; a history of regulatory and commercial development in the industry; an examination of the current regulatory issues. (Author)

  9. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  10. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the ‘regulatory pyramid’, alcohol being less regulated than tobacco. PMID:28118411

  11. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentine Petronella Martino

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1 is unnecessary; (2 is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3 will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4 faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5 that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  12. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  13. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today's electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry's transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment

  14. Regulation, manufacturing and building industry consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Robert

    2012-11-01

    As has been true with many emerging technologies, successful clinical development and recruitment of capital sufficient to reach market approval is measured as an industry platform. Risk, failure and achievement by individual companies are shared by all in the context of access to enthusiastic capital markets and codevelopment partnerships.

  15. Electric utility strategies and the emerging industry structure - Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motupalli, S.

    1991-01-01

    The electric utility industry is our most capital intensive industry by far. Over the past few decades, socioeconomic and technological forces have been quietly revolutionizing the way the industry conducts itself. During the 1980s, these changes have been particularly intense, often catching both regulators and regulated ill-prepared to develop effective and profitable strategies to deal with such change. Much has already been written about these changes: independent power producers, competitive procurement of resources, incentive-based regulation, the benefits of affiliated company structures, mergers and consolidation, customer energy conservation, and marketing strategy development are all currently highly popular article and seminar topics. The author's object in this two-part series is to facilitate development of a decision framework to put these various changes in perspective, to help develop effective strategies through better focused and equipped planning methodologies. Gaining an understanding of the role, strengths and weaknesses of the various players in an industry and the structural constraints in which they operate is a necessary precursor to developing effective operating strategies to deal with change or to manipulate industry forces in your favor. Michael Port's popular five forces model provides a convenient way to develop such an understanding. It provides a way to map the industry forces driving profitability, through a review of the strengths, weaknesses and leverage of: current industry players, suppliers to the industry, customers for the industry's product, new entrants into the market, and substitute products providing equal or better value. Part 1 of this series reviews each of these five forces along some key dimensions to determine their direction of change or influence, and whether this change impacts a utility's competitive position favorably or unfavorably

  16. Legislative Committee Simulation: Regulation in the Automobile Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Alan J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined are ways to overcome obstacles which often prevent creative teaching of legislative decision-making processes to high school students. A simulation dealing with regulation in the automobile industry is used for illustrative purposes. (RM)

  17. Environmental regulations and industrial competitiveness: evidence from China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stavropoulos (Spyridon); R.S. Wall (Ronald); Xu, Y. (Yuanze)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractEconomic activities are closely related to real-world environmental issues. Currently, more attention is paid to the association between environmental regulations and industrial competitiveness (IC) because of pressures on economic development and environmental protection. In this study,

  18. Industrial structure and privatisation of the Slovenian electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovatin, N.

    1999-01-01

    The paper first analyses the existing structure of the Slovenian electricity industry and gives recommendations for its restructuring so as to conform to efficiency criteria and to comply with European Union provisions on the internal European electricity market. Then the paper outlines the necessity for privatisation and draws some conclusions on it such as determination of market values companies, the proportion for sale, privatisation methods and the general public's participation [it

  19. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.; Wiesenberger, H.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO 2 , NO x , CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , N 2 O, NH 3 , Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  20. Essays on industrial structure and economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordaas, Hildegunn Kyvik

    1997-01-01

    The book is a thesis submitted for the degree of dr. polit. at the University of Bergen. It has chapters on economic development and industrial structure, trade and growth with static and dynamic economies of scale, terms of trade and economic growth in a world of constrained capital mobility, how liberalization of trade in services may conserve natural reserves, some reasons why capital does not flow from rich to poor counties and finally on South African manufacturing industries - catching up or falling behind

  1. The state tax regulation in the oil and gas industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Cherkasova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian tax laws in petrochemical complex generally has a fiscal orientation now. The current system of taxation in the oil industry has the biggest tax burden in the world, amount of oil and gas revenues was more then 43-51% of all budget revenues over past decades, remaining its main source. Generally, there were changes in the ratios of incomes in the forms of export customs duty and tax on the extraction of minerals. State policy in the field of resource payments affects the entire industry, influencing the structure of oil and oil supplies on internal and external markets and realization of the programs for modernization and development in priority areas. Changes of structure of national production, increasing the contribution of agriculture, IT sphere and other branches to aggregate national product should be reflected in the revision of the tax burden on the industries, associated with the extraction and processing of minerals. It is necessary to reduce the fiscal direction of tax regulation in petrochemical sector with a simultaneous increasing the role of tools that stimulate modernization and updating of equipment, implementation of new processes and technologies, the maximum use of process-deepening processes as well as the development of deposits with severe production conditions. In the near future, it is planned to introduce new changes in taxation in field of oil production and refining - introduction of benefits for oil production in new fields or fields with difficult production conditions or poor quality of oil and introduction of a tax on additional income..

  2. Economic development and industrial structure - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordaas, Hildegunn Kyvik

    1997-09-01

    The essay offers a selective review of central issues related to economic growth. The interrelationship between technological progress, capital accumulation, specialisation and industrial structure is emphasised. It is concluded that, first, there is little evidence that industrial structure plays an independent role in growth. Second, economists have been more successful in explaining the consequence of technological progress than the determinants of technological progress. However, even the consequences are not well understood and there is still a long way to go before general and well-documented policy implications can be drawn. (Author)

  3. On Industrial Application of Structural Reliability Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real applications is much smaller than what one would expect. At the beginning most applications were in the design/analyses area especially...

  4. High performance structural ceramics for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Faker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A family of Saint-Gobain structural ceramic materials and products produced by its High performance Refractory Division is described. Over the last fifty years or so, Saint-Gobain has been a leader in developing non oxide ceramic based novel materials, processes and products for application in Nuclear, Chemical, Automotive, Defense and Mining industries

  5. Three Studies in Industrial Economics: Competition and Industry Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Jan

    Chapter 1 reviews alternative theories of competition - the standard Neoclassical view, the contribution of the Chicago School as well as the two dynamic lines of thought which are part of Austrian economics and Classical Political Economy. The latter is presented as a consistent alternative to the other existing theories. Of special interest is the question if and how industry structure matters in these approaches, how profitability differentials are explained and what role market share concentration and mobility barriers play. Their predictions and implications for empirical research are compared. Ways to test and evaluate these different approaches are described. Chapter 2 investigates econometrically how industry and micro level variables determine persistent differentials in the rate of return on assets in the U.S. The analysis is the first to use business segment data to explain long term profitability differentials. It presents new market concentration indicators that are superior to concentration ratios and allow to analyze an unpreceded amount of concentration and other data back to 1977. Critical concentration levels, non-linearities, interaction effects and previously ignored important control variables like industrial unionization are being considered. Concentration is found to have significant negative effects on profitability differentials. Barrier indicators are insignificant while market shares are positively correlated with long-run profitability. Concentration thus increases, not diminishes the degree of industrial competition. This is interpreted as evidence in support of Classical Political Economic competition theory. Chapter 3 presents a costs of production based industry analytical study that aims at consistency with Classical Political Economic thought. It investigates how growth of renewable electricity in Germany forces conventional power plants to shift towards more flexible operating regimes. The simulation of individual power plant load

  6. Regulation, Governance and Adaptation. Governance transformations in the Dutch and French liberalizing electricity industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niesten, E.M.M.I.

    2009-01-01

    For more than a decade, the European governments have focused their energy policies on creating one European competitive electricity market. Several regulations are introduced into the European electricity industries for this purpose: the energy firms have to unbundle the electricity networks from electricity generation and retail, and the consumers should be able to choose their electricity retailer. This thesis analyses which new governance structures emerged in the Dutch and French electricity industries as a result of these regulations for four types of electricity transactions: the network connection, network access, balancing and switching transactions. The parties in these electricity industries did not adopt a market, but hybrid forms of governance that remained extensively regulated. The efficiency of these new governance structures cannot be explained with the attributes of the transactions, as is proposed by transaction cost economics. This thesis therefore introduces the concept of adaptation into transaction cost economics. Adaptation is the adjustment by economic actors from one governance structure to another, and is characterized by three attributes: the identity of the future contracting party, the laterality of the adaption, and the type of response in the adaptation process. These attributes explain the governance transformations and the new governance structures in the two industries. Regulation continues to play a pervasive role in the liberalized electricity industries. It influences the attributes of the transactions, the new governance structures and the adaptation process.

  7. Regulation, Governance and Adaptation. Governance transformations in the Dutch and French liberalizing electricity industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niesten, E.M.M.I.

    2009-06-11

    For more than a decade, the European governments have focused their energy policies on creating one European competitive electricity market. Several regulations are introduced into the European electricity industries for this purpose: the energy firms have to unbundle the electricity networks from electricity generation and retail, and the consumers should be able to choose their electricity retailer. This thesis analyses which new governance structures emerged in the Dutch and French electricity industries as a result of these regulations for four types of electricity transactions: the network connection, network access, balancing and switching transactions. The parties in these electricity industries did not adopt a market, but hybrid forms of governance that remained extensively regulated. The efficiency of these new governance structures cannot be explained with the attributes of the transactions, as is proposed by transaction cost economics. This thesis therefore introduces the concept of adaptation into transaction cost economics. Adaptation is the adjustment by economic actors from one governance structure to another, and is characterized by three attributes: the identity of the future contracting party, the laterality of the adaption, and the type of response in the adaptation process. These attributes explain the governance transformations and the new governance structures in the two industries. Regulation continues to play a pervasive role in the liberalized electricity industries. It influences the attributes of the transactions, the new governance structures and the adaptation process.

  8. The uranium producing industry - its capital structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium mining industry has undergone a substantial change over the past decade. A few rather informal statistics relevant to this change have been gathered together, with particular emphasis on the corporate and capital structures which existed in the industry in the 1970s and 1980s. These data offer interesting insights on the availability of capital for new uranium mining ventures, and lead to a sketch of the finances of a hypothetical new venture. The results of this work suggest that there may be few producers likely to start work on a greenfield site in the next few years, even if the market recovers from its present doldrums. (author)

  9. Evaluating Industry Self-Regulation of Food Marketing to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Dale L; Castonguay, Jessica S; Filer, Christine R

    2015-08-01

    Concern has grown about the role of televised food advertising as a contributor to childhood obesity. In response, the food industry adopted a program of self-regulation, with participating companies pledging to limit child-targeted advertising to healthier products. The implicit promise of the industry initiative is a significant improvement in the overall nutritional quality of foods marketed to children, thereby negating the need for governmental regulation to accomplish that objective. This study assesses the efficacy of industry self-regulation by comparing advertising content on children's TV programs before and after self-regulation was implemented. A systematic content analysis of food advertisements (n=625 in 2007, n=354 in 2013) appearing in children's TV programs on the most popular cable and broadcast channels was conducted. All analyses were conducted in 2014. Findings indicated that no significant improvement in the overall nutritional quality of foods marketed to children has been achieved since industry self-regulation was adopted. In 2013, 80.5% of all foods advertised to children on TV were for products in the poorest nutritional category, and thus pose high risk for contributing to obesity. The lack of significant improvement in the nutritional quality of food marketed to children is likely a result of the weak nutritional standards for defining healthy foods employed by industry, and because a substantial proportion of child-oriented food marketers do not participate in self-regulation. The lack of success achieved by self-regulation indicates that other policy actions are needed to effectively reduce children's exposure to obesogenic food advertising. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A state regulator's perspective on the natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, F.O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the natural gas distribution industry and the role of state regulation in controlling pricing and supply. The paper discusses the results of national policies such as the Fuel Use Act and the subsequent Natural Gas Policy Act. It then discusses the resulting market and prices resulting from both regulation and deregulation of the natural gas industry. The paper goes on to discuss the market potential for natural gas and the reliability of this fuel source for future demand

  11. The gas industry in Britain: future structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a summary of the kind of structural changes to British Gas that can be considered in order to enable effective competition to develop in the gas market. It draws on an extensive analysis undertaken by the Office of Gas Supply (OFGAS) of recent developments in the gas market, the need to ensure the safety, efficiency and security of gas supplies under different structures and how regulation may change with different structures. Many of these issues covered are complex, and can each be discussed at length, but the intention of this paper is to provide an overview of the key options for a restructured gas market. OFGAS has also examined the regulatory environment within which competitors to British Gas who have emerged or who are likely to emerge in the future may be expected to operate. This paper describes the range of structural options we see. At one end of the spectrum there is the option of continuing with a vertically integrated but more heavily regulated monopoly; at the other end is a fully competitive structure with no or much reduced regulation. In between, there are various combinations between the degree of regulation and the extent of competition that can be considered. In analysing future structural options, we believe it necessary to consider the complete gas supply chain. The analysis therefore considers the offshore production or importation of gas, its purchase at the beach, its reception and processing at terminals, its transportation from terminal meters to customers' meters, its storage and sale to final customers. (author)

  12. Transport regulation of NORM - a threat to the industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.J.; Wickens, J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent changes to the IAEA regulations have led to an increasing number of cases of refusal to ship tantalite because of its radioactivity, which is in fact at a very low level. The consequence of denial of shipment is a disruption of the supply chain which is already being felt by the tantalum industry

  13. Obesity, international food and beverage industries and self-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Ronit, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how large international companies in the breakfast cereal, snack, and beverage industries address the issue of obesity, and how their strategies are governed by various forms of self-regulation. In a first step, we study websites of ten companies and identify five different...

  14. Activization of the Industrial Development on the Platform of Partnership: Measures of State Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Y. Nikitaeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of partnership and interaction of economic actors play an important role in activization of an industrial development, achieving a critical mass, necessary for generation of essential positive results, due to special measures of state regulation. According to this, the factors influencing the choice of measures of state regulation of partner interactions and formation of their complex structure are defined and analysed. On the example of clusters possible roles of the state in formation and development of partner associations of the appropriate type are presented. The potential risks arising in the course of development and implementation of measures of state regulation of integration structures are shown. The sequence of steps for determination of measures of state regulation of development of partnership in the industrial sphere taking into account local specifics is offered in the paper.

  15. Regulation of NORM industries and NORM residues in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermans, G.; Dehandschutter, B.; Pepin, S.; Sonck, M. [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    In the Belgian Royal Decree of 20 July 2001, which transposed the EU Directive 96/26/EURATOM (BSS) into national legislation regarding radiation protection regulations, a list of 'work activities involving natural radiation sources' (i.e. NORM industries) was defined based on the concept described in Article 40 of the Directive. These activities are subject to declaration to the Belgian radiation protection authority (Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC). The initial list was subsequently modified by a FANC decree in 2012 to reflect the increased knowledge about NORM in other industrial sectors, most of which have also been added in the recently published New Basic Safety Standards (Directive 2013/53/EURATOM). In March 2013, an additional decree was published by FANC regulating the acceptance of NORM residues by non-radioactive waste treatment facilities. This regulation was fitted within the framework described above by introducing NORM residue treatment into the existing NORM industry list. It introduces generic exemption levels above which the processing or disposal of NORM residues will be considered as a 'work activity' and submitted to declaration according to the Belgian radiation protection regulations. On basis of this declaration, specific acceptance criteria are assigned to the disposal or processing facility. FANC has published technical and methodological guides for the operators of the concerned facilities and industries to facilitate the declaration process, and has recently organized a round-table gathering both NORM industries and waste processing industries to identify the needs, uncertainties and concerns regarding the regulatory control of NORM in Belgium. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  16. Guide to the economic regulation of the energy industries in the European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This new addition to the series of OXERA Guides to Regulation provides an analysis of the electricity and gas sectors of each of the 15 EU member states, against the backdrop of the liberalisation of the electricity market and the anticipated liberalisation of the gas market. For each country, the guide provides details of: the industry and institutional structure; privatisation status; government policy; level of competition; licensing regimes; price and non-price regulation and; environmental policies. (Author)

  17. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corneli, Steve [Seventhwave, Madison, WI (United States); Kihm, Steve [Seventhwave, Madison, WI (United States); Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  18. Regulation and competition in United Kingdom electricity and gas industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, F.

    1992-01-01

    Focussing on the role of regulation in developing competition, this paper reviews the development of a regulation system to monitor and control prices, as well as, quality of service, in the UK's recently privatized electricity and gas industries. The review covers: the control mechanisms applied to the natural gas tariff and contract markets in the area of common carriage; performance monitoring and the concept of yardstick competition in the electric power industry; and the management and control, by OFFER (Office of Electricity Regulation), of the total 'pool' of generated electricity. It is noted that whereas Great Britain's particular energy supply situation permits this nation to attempt privatization/competition regulation, the energy balances of other European countries make similar attempts, for them, risky. The UK experience with privatization/competition regulation so far has shown that regulation is indispensable in guaranteeing competition, and that the incorporation of the controlling board within the framework of anti-trust legislation and the granting of full autonomy to this board has greatly favoured its effectiveness

  19. Guide to the economic regulation of the electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, M.; Lobban, S.

    1995-09-01

    This document is the fist edition of OXERA's Guide to the Economic Regulation of the Electricity Industry in the UK. It is primarily intended as a work of reference, summarising the key statutory controls of the industry and the most important features of the companies' licences. The main features of the guide are as follows. It provides comprehensive coverage of the institutional and legal framework which defines the regulation of the industry. The roles of the key players are explained and a condensed account of all the relevant legal documents is given. It aims to bring the reader up to date with current regulatory issues and possible developments in the industry. It presents the information in a clear and concise form. The emphasis is on identifying and highlighting the key points in each area so that readers can rapidly familiarise themselves with the subject matter. It does not examine the process by which businesses are valued and the various price caps are set. These are issues which are best approached within the context of utility regulation in general. (author)

  20. Coordinated risk informed regulation: a conceptual approach illustrated by the industry of phytosanitary radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory bodies control areas such as health, environment, safety, transportation, finance or any other area of strategic importance to the national sustainable development, where the free activity of economic agents will not lead to socially desirable results. In Brazil, industrial activities impacting on different social and economic segments may be subject to regulation by several governmental agencies, with different cultures, requirements, procedures, and deadlines. To approve an industrial undertaking, most often each regulator analyzes in isolation the aspect of its concern. Also in monitoring and enforcement, the agencies usually act individually. The proliferation and fragmentation of regulation have, in some cases, delayed or even inhibited the development of industrial activities, and thus, working against the very purpose of regulation. This thesis illustrates the current situation with the regulation on food irradiation services, proposes and justifies an organizational structure to enhance coordination among regulatory agencies by aligning their activities and avoiding inconsistencies, overlaps and omissions. This structure comprises, among other mechanisms, a single Internet portal on Federal Regulation, an integrated and dynamic risk analysis and the harmonization of decision-making. The purpose is to promote regulation predictability, regulatory action consistency, optimization of public resources, transparency in the agencies' decision making, and to bring benefits to the entrepreneurs by offering them real-time monitoring and more agile processes. (author)

  1. Energy Flexibility Potential of Industrial Processes in the Regulating Power Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Aabjerg Friis, Henrik Tønder; Gravers Mostrup, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    , and electric heating in replacement of conventional technologies. To enable the use of demand response, the consumers must have economical and practical incentives without loss of convenience. This study aims to investigate the demand-response market potential of a flexible industrial process in the current...... electricity market structure. The Danish West regulating power market is selected in this study with an ideal process simulation of an industrial roller press. By analysing market data, the value of flexible electricity consumption by the roller press in the regulating power market is demonstrated by an ideal...

  2. Impact of Environmental Regulation and Technical Progress on Industrial Carbon Productivity: An Approach Based on Proxy Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the main influencing factors of China’s industrial carbon productivity by incorporating environmental regulation and technical progress into an econometric model. The paper focuses on data from 35 of China’s industrial sectors and covers the period from 2006 to 2014, in order to examine the impact of environmental regulation and technical progress on carbon productivity. Methods applied include panel fixed effect model, panel random effect model and two stage least squares with instrumental variables (IV-2SLS. The effect of environmental regulation and technical progress has industrial heterogeneity. The paper subdivides industrial sectors into capital and technology intensive, resource intensive and labor intensive sectors according to factor intensiveness. The estimation results of the subgroups have uncovered that for capital and technology intensive and resource intensive sectors, environmental regulation has a more significant impact than technical progress; while for labor intensive sectors, innovation more significantly influences carbon productivity. In addition, foreign direct investment (FDI and industrialization level facilitate improving carbon productivity for the full sample. By contrast, industrial structure inhibits the overall industrial carbon productivity. The industry-specific results indicate that for capital and technology intensive sectors, optimizing of the industrial structure can improve carbon productivity; for resource intensive sectors, FDI and energy consumption structure should be emphasized more; for labor intensive sectors, industrialization levels help enhance carbon productivity. Finally the industrial sector-specific policy suggestions are proposed.

  3. OOA composite structures applicable in railway industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnáková Soňa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite sandwich structures offers several advantages over conventional structural materials such as lightweight, high bending and torsional stiffness, superior thermal insulation and excellent acoustic damping. In the aerospace industry, sandwich composites are commonly manufactured using the autoclave process which is associated with high operating cost. Out-of-autoclave (OOA manufacturing has been shown to be capable of producing low cost and high performance composites. In this paper we present results of experimental testing of various sandwich materials according various standards and actual requirements in transport industry. We compared the different types of surface and paint systems, because these layers are the most important in contact with the surrounding environment and load conditions. In the experimental measurements were used various materials. For the core of the sandwich structure were selected aluminium honeycomb, aramid honeycomb and PET (Polyethylene terephthalate foam core. Support layers were chosen two kinds of predimpregnated materials. The conditions of measurements were requirements for strength and rigidity, safety - flame resistance and reflectivity resistance. The samples were tested at the 3 - point bending test according to standard EN ISO 178, by modified test to determine the force required to rapture threaded insert, by test of reflectivity according to UIC CODE 844-4 R and according to standard EN 45545-2 fire protection of railway vehicles.

  4. Energy policy conference on the regulation of energy industries; Conference de politique energetique sur la regulation des industries energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This document is the report of the conference meeting jointly organized by the French general plan commission and the general direction of energy and raw materials on the regulation of energy industries: 1 - the changes in the regulation of public utilities in competition: harmonization, respect of impartiality and social cohesion, organization of a loyal competition, specialized regulation and regulation of competition, open debates; 2 - towards an homogenous model of regulatory authority?: the US model (collegial and hybrid organizations), the UK model (individual and independent), missions of regulation and institutional 'meccano', theory and practice, draft classification of the institutional approaches of IEA countries (role of ministries and regulatory agencies), independent regulatory authorities or not, significant differences in converging models, dominant types of regulation in the different sectors, situation of the French energy regulatory system (institutional plan, regulation processes, relations of the regulation authority with the government), reasons of the differences between different countries, expected evolution of the regulation systems in the coming years. (J.S.)

  5. Energy policy conference on the regulation of energy industries; Conference de politique energetique sur la regulation des industries energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This document is the report of the conference meeting jointly organized by the French general plan commission and the general direction of energy and raw materials on the regulation of energy industries: 1 - the changes in the regulation of public utilities in competition: harmonization, respect of impartiality and social cohesion, organization of a loyal competition, specialized regulation and regulation of competition, open debates; 2 - towards an homogenous model of regulatory authority?: the US model (collegial and hybrid organizations), the UK model (individual and independent), missions of regulation and institutional 'meccano', theory and practice, draft classification of the institutional approaches of IEA countries (role of ministries and regulatory agencies), independent regulatory authorities or not, significant differences in converging models, dominant types of regulation in the different sectors, situation of the French energy regulatory system (institutional plan, regulation processes, relations of the regulation authority with the government), reasons of the differences between different countries, expected evolution of the regulation systems in the coming years. (J.S.)

  6. Electrical energy industry regulation: trend in the international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Arriaga, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of the electric power industry is presently experiencing significative changes world-wide at an unprecedented pace. In these circumstances it is useless to attempt the preparation of a static snapshot of the current situation, because of the difficulties in capturing the exact position of each player and also because the picture would become obsolete in a very short time. This paper presents the specific features characterising power organisation, the regulatory approaches to the several services involved in supplying electricity, and alternative schemes for introduction of different levels of competition in traditionally regulated electric systems. (Author) 24 refs

  7. Safety regulations of radiation sources in industry in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, A M [Licensing and Evaluation Section, Nuclear Regulations Licensing and Safeguards Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    1992-12-31

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission established in 1958. This report aims to share the experiences of the PNRI on licensing and regulating the safe use of radioactive materials in industry, particularly in industrial gamma radiography, nuclear gauges and radioactive tracers. It enumerates the licensing and enforcement procedures. Some common problems encountered in the licensing and enforcement activities and comments of future plans to resolve the problems were also discussed. (Author).

  8. Safety regulations of radiation sources in industry in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission established in 1958. This report aims to share the experiences of the PNRI on licensing and regulating the safe use of radioactive materials in industry, particularly in industrial gamma radiography, nuclear gauges and radioactive tracers. It enumerates the licensing and enforcement procedures. Some common problems encountered in the licensing and enforcement activities and comments of future plans to resolve the problems were also discussed. (Author)

  9. Tariffs regulation experiences in the Italian electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, A.

    1997-01-01

    This work tries to explain the tariff regulation experiences in the Italian electricity industry from the end of the second world war to now. These events, shown in the following tables, are divided into four phases: 1) the progressive standardization of electric power prices (1945-61); 2) the price control (1961-74); 3) the 'interferences' in the tariff system (1974-95); 4) the present deregulation (price-cap)

  10. Firms' Response and Unintended Health Consequences of Industrial Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Hansman; Jonas Hjort; Gianmarco León

    2015-01-01

    Regulations that constrain firms' externalities in one dimension can distort incentives and worsen externalities in other dimensions. In Peru's industrial fishing sector, the world's largest, fishing boats catch anchovy that plants along the coast convert into fishmeal. Matching administrative daily data on plant production, ground-level air quality data, hospital admissions records, and survey data on individual health outcomes, we first show that fishmeal production worsens adult and child ...

  11. Firm's response and unintended health consequences of industrial regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Hansman; Jonas Hjort; Gianmarco León

    2015-01-01

    Regulations that constrain firms' externalities in one dimension can distort incentives and worsen externalities in other dimensions. In Peru's industrial fishing sector, the world's largest, fishing boats catch anchovy that plants along the coast convert into fishmeal. Matching administrative, daily data on plant production, ground-level air quality data, hospital admissions records, and survey data on individual health outcomes, we first show that fishmeal production negatively affects adul...

  12. Regulating Robo Advice across the Financial Services Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Tom; Dellaert, Benedict

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAutomated financial product advisors – “robo advisors” – are emerging across the financial services industry, helping consumers choose investments, banking products, and insurance policies. Robo advisors have the potential to lower the cost and increase the quality and transparency of financial advice for consumers. But they also pose significant new challenges for regulators who are accustomed to assessing human intermediaries. A well-designed robo advisor will be honest and comp...

  13. Evaluation on applicability of the rules, regulations, and industrial codes and standards for SMART development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Suhn; Lee, C C.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, K.K.; Kim, J.P.; Kim, J.H.; Cho, B.H.; Kang, D J.; Bae, G.H.; Chung, M.; Chang, M.H.

    1999-03-01

    In this report, evaluation on applicability of the rules, regulations, and industrial codes and standards for SMART has been made. As the first step, past-to-present status of licensing structures were reviewed. Then, the rules, regulations, and standards applied to YGN 3-6 were listed and reviewed. Finally, evaluation on applicability of such rules and standards for SMART are made in each design fields. During this step technical evaluations on each items of rules, regulations and standards are made and the possible remedies or comments are suggested. The results are summarized in a tabular form and enclosed as Appendix. (Author). 8 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  14. Access Regulation for Naturally Monopolistic Port Terminals: Lessons from Regulated Network Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Defilippi, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe problem of access arises in industries where inputs from monopolistic and competitive markets are complementarily needed to provide a service. In these circumstances, the firm controlling the monopolistic segment has incentives to deter competition in the competitive segments (markets) to recover profits foregone by regulation (Paredes, 1997). In the port industry, for example, a number of services need to be jointly provided to complete the logistics chain: pilotage, towage, ...

  15. Industrial structure at research reactor suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Bogusch, E.; Friebe, T.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the recent joining of the forces of Framatome S. A. from France and the Nuclear Division of Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU) from Germany to a Joint Venture named Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., the issue of the necessary and of the optimal industrial structure for nuclear projects as a research reactor is, was discussed internally often and intensively. That discussion took place also in the other technical fields such as Services for NPPs but also in the field of interest here, i. e. Research Reactors. In summarizing the statements of this presentation one can about state that: Research Reactors are easier to build than NPPs, but not standardised; Research Reactors need a wide spectrum of skills and experiences; to design and build Research Reactors needs an experienced team especially in terms of management and interfaces; Research Reactors need background from built reference plants more than from operating plants; Research Reactors need knowledge of suitable experienced subsuppliers. Two more essential conclusions as industry involved in constructing and upgrading research reactors are: Research Reactors by far are more than a suitable core that generates a high neutron flux; every institution that designs and builds a Research Reactor lacks quality or causes safety problems, damages the reputation of the entire community

  16. Industrial entrepreneurial network: Structural and functional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Berg, D. B.; Nazarova, J. J.; Parusheva, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Structure and functioning of two model industrial entrepreneurial networks are investigated in the present paper. One of these networks is forming when implementing an integrated project and consists of eight agents, which interact with each other and external environment. The other one is obtained from the municipal economy and is based on the set of the 12 real business entities. Analysis of the networks is carried out on the basis of the matrix of mutual payments aggregated over the certain time period. The matrix is created by the methods of experimental economics. Social Network Analysis (SNA) methods and instruments were used in the present research. The set of basic structural characteristics was investigated: set of quantitative parameters such as density, diameter, clustering coefficient, different kinds of centrality, and etc. They were compared with the random Bernoulli graphs of the corresponding size and density. Discovered variations of random and entrepreneurial networks structure are explained by the peculiarities of agents functioning in production network. Separately, were identified the closed exchange circuits (cyclically closed contours of graph) forming an autopoietic (self-replicating) network pattern. The purpose of the functional analysis was to identify the contribution of the autopoietic network pattern in its gross product. It was found that the magnitude of this contribution is more than 20%. Such value allows using of the complementary currency in order to stimulate economic activity of network agents.

  17. Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K.; Mallick, P.; Bierman, G.; Marshall, H.E.

    2006-01-01

    The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

  18. Regulation and information in the US uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis investigates the government control of the uranium industry, to see if any social inefficiencies induced by socially suboptimal exploration levels were reduced. The investigation develops a model of firm behavior where exploration yields discoveries of ore, and also produces information that may be used to predict future successes. Based on this model, it is shown that socially inefficient levels of exploration may result. A method for controlling such an industry is suggested: regulating future prices. A natural characterization of successful regulation is provided, to allow the testing of the question posed above. A statistical learning model is developed to characterize the incorporation of new information in agents' formations of their beliefs. Exploration and production cost functions are estimated from available data: together the model of industry behavior, and the statistical learning model, these estimates allow the testing of the main question of the thesis. The results of the test suggest that the government's actions did not induce firms to choose socially optimal levels of exploration. Firms tended to explore more than society would have liked, suggesting that firms were attempting to use exploration information to speculate on future markets

  19. 76 FR 1180 - FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ...] FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Transparency Initiative, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a report entitled ``FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry.'' The...

  20. Heterogeneity of the environmental regulation of industrial wastewater: European wineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Sánchez, Isabel M; Aznar-Sánchez, José A; Belmonte-Ureña, Luis J

    2015-01-01

    The European legislation of the pollution of industrial wastewater shows a high degree of heterogeneity. This fact implies that there is a market failure with relevant consequences. Within the European Union, each Member State performs a specific transposition of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60. The member states introduce different sanitation fees to correct water pollution. In this paper, the case of the European wine industry is analyzed. It studies the sanitation fees of the five major wine producing countries: France, Italy, Spain, Germany and Portugal. Results show significant differences among the wastewater fees and the study reveals how such heterogeneity leads to relevant market distortions. The research concludes that more homogeneous environmental regulation would promote more sustainable wine production processes with more efficient water management and purification systems, as well as the introduction of cutting edge technologies.

  1. Multi - party Game Analysis of Coal Industry and Industry Regulation Policy Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianqi

    2018-01-01

    In the face of the frequent occurrence of coal mine safety accidents, this paper analyses the relationship between central and local governments, coal mining enterprises and miners from the perspective of multi - group game. In the actual production, the decision of one of the three groups can affect the game strategy of the other of the three, so we should assume the corresponding game order. In this order, the game analysis of the income and decision of the three is carried out, and the game decision of the government, the enterprise and the workers is obtained through the establishment of the benefit matrix and so on. And then on the existing system to optimize the coal industry regulation proposed practical recommendations to reduce the frequency of industry safety accidents, optimize the industry production environment.

  2. Organization, structure, and performance in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Several propositions are advanced concerning the effects of industry organization and structure on the economic performance of the American commercial nuclear power industry. Both the electric utility industry and the nuclear power plant supply industry are relatively high degree of horizontal disaggregation. The latter is also characterized by an absence of vertical integration. The impact of each of these factors on construction and operating performance is discussed. Evidence is presented suggesting that the combination of horizontal and vertical disaggregation in the industry has had a significant adverse effect on economic performance. The relationship between industrial structure and regulatory behavior is also discussed. 43 references, 4 figures, 9 tables

  3. Accounting window dressing and template regulation: A case study of the Australian credit union industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, D.; Hodgson, A.; Stevenson-Clarke, P.; Lhaopadchan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the response of cooperative institutions that were required to adhere to new capital adequacy regulations traditionally geared for profit-maximising organisations. Using data from the Australian credit union industry, we demonstrate that the cooperative philosophy and internal corporate governance structure of cooperatives will lead management to increase capital adequacy ratios through the application of accounting window dressing techniques. This is opposite to the in...

  4. Sustainability Reporting in Fishing Industry Management - Regulation versus Voluntarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Wild

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of major corporations and industry organizations now overtly advocate thegeneral concept of corporate social and environmental responsibility, commonly emphasising the‘business case’ for such behaviour on the basis that it is ‘good for business’. Many now report totheir stakeholders on a voluntaristic basis a range of information regarding their impacts on thesocial and physical environment in which they operate.Intrinsic to the business case model is the argument that an optimal balance between the needs ofeconomic growth and the sustainable management of natural resources can best be attainedthrough the conventional mechanisms of corporate governance and voluntary corporate activity,rather than by imposition of governmental regulation. This view implies, however, that wherethe exigencies of environmental sustainability conflict with those of economic imperatives, thelatter must take precedence.A view oppositional to that of the business case instead promotes an intensified interventionistapproach towards natural resource management, advocating increased governmental regulationand control, including the mandating, standardization and independent verification of corporatesustainability reporting. This view gives precedence to public good concepts of natural resourcemanagement, prioritising intra- and inter-generational equity and human rights theories as tonatural resource distribution, and challenges traditional economic approaches to the relationalintersects of business, politics and environment science.This paper considers the relative claims for efficacy in achieving desirable corporateenvironmental behaviours of the business case and voluntary self-regulation model, vis-à-visthose for extended mandatory governmental control, utilizing the exemplar of voluntarysustainability reporting in the New Zealand fishing industry.

  5. Ownership and environmental regulation: Evidence from the European electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clò, Stefano; Ferraris, Matteo; Florio, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates how ownership affects the environmental performance in developed countries where environmental regulation is introduced in the form of market-based instrument. By looking at a cross-country panel dataset of 29 power markets around Europe over the period 1990–2012, we find empirical evidence that an increase of public ownership, as measured by the OECD ETCR index, is associated with a reduction of both greenhouse gas emissions and carbon intensity. We also find that the implementation of the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) had a limited impact on emissions' reduction due to lax allocation of allowances. The positive effect of public ownership on environmental performance has been significant even after the introduction of the ETS, giving additional incentives to mitigate emissions when the ETS cap was not stringent enough. This evidence suggests that government control over power companies in Europe can has created idiosyncratic incentives to improve environmental quality, complementing environmental regulation in the achievement of environmental goals when the latter was absent or sub-optimal. - Highlights: • We analyse the power industry's environmental performance in 29 European countries. • Public ownership is associated with lower emissions than private ownership. • Mixed oligopoly is superior to private oligopoly in environmental terms. • The ETS had a limited impact on emissions' reduction due to over-allocation. • Public ownership mitigates the effects of sub-optimal environmental regulation.

  6. The nuclear industry's transition to risk-informed regulation and operation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.; Matsuo, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study of the transition of the United States nuclear industry from a prescriptive regulatory structure to a more risk informed approach to operations and regulations. The transition occurred over a 20 yr period in which gradual changes were made in the fundamental regulations and to the approach to nuclear safety and operations. While the number of actual regulatory changes were few, they are continuing. The utilities that embraced risk informed operations made dramatic changes in the way they approached operations and outage management. Those utilities that used risk in operations showed dramatic improvement in safety based on Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) performance indicators. It was also shown that the use of risk did not negatively affect safety performance of the plants compared to standard prescriptive approaches. This was despite having greater flexibility in compliance to regulatory standards and the use of the newly instituted risk-informed reactor oversight process. Key factors affecting the successful transition to a more risk-informed approach to regulations and operations are: strong top management support and leadership both at the regulator and the utility; education and training in risk principles and probabilistic risk Assessment tools for engineers, operators and maintenance staff; a slow and steady introduction of risk initiatives in areas that can show value to both the regulator and the industry; a transparent regulatory foundation built around a safety goal policy and the development of a strong safety culture at the utility to allow for more independence in safety compliance and risk management. The experience of the United States shows positive results in both safety and economics. The INPO and NRC metrics presented show that the use of risk information in operations and regulation is marginally better with no degradation in safety when plants that have embraced risk-informed approaches are compared

  7. Industrial structural transformation and carbon dioxide emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    Using provincial panel data from the period 1995–2009 to analyze the relationship between the industrial structural transformation and carbon dioxide emissions in China, we find that the first-order lag of industrial structural adjustment effectively reduced the emissions; technical progress itself did not reduce the emissions, but indirectly led to decreasing emissions through the upgrading and optimization of industrial structure. Foreign direct investment and intervention by local governments reduced carbon dioxide emissions, but urbanization significantly increased the emissions. Thus, industrial structural adjustment is an important component of the development of a low-carbon economy. In the context of industrial structural transformation, an effective way to reduce a region’s carbon dioxide emissions is to promote the upgrading and optimization of industrial structure through technical progress. Tighter environmental access policies, selective utilization of foreign direct investment, and improvements in energy efficiency can help to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. - Highlights: ► Relationship between the transformation of industrial structure and CO 2 emissions in China. ► Dynamic panel data model. ► Industrial structural adjustments can effectively reduce current CO 2 emissions. ► Technical progress leads to decreasing CO 2 emissions through upgrading of industrial structure

  8. Education versus regulation: The case for regulating the indoor tanning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Suzeanne; Kraft, Frederic

    2016-05-01

    We examine marketing strategies for indoor tanning services that often target young adult females. Evidence of the addictive nature of indoor tanning suggests that young adults may be vulnerable to the promotion of indoor tanning and as a result deserve greater protection from the marketing of these services. As public awareness of the rising numbers of skin cancers linked to indoor tanning grows, we believe that the public will support increased regulation of this industry.

  9. Economic structure and performance of forest-based industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Laughlin, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the economic structure, conduct, and performance of industries dependent on the nation's forests that are topics of special importance for research. A major challenge to research involving industrial organization of forest-based industries is to link descriptions of structure, conduct, and industrial performance in ways that facilitate public and private policy making. Not to be overlooked is the need to continue efforts to monitor changes in structure and conduct dimensions at the national level and to conduct baseline studies of industry structure-conduct-performance at regional, state, and local levels. Specifically needed is research that will improve understanding of restructuring within the wood-based industry; definitions of the wood-based industry and segments thereof; linkages between structure and regional economic development; timberland as a managerial and economic variable; structural consequences of technological innovations; corporate strategies as related to performance; structural dimensions in an international setting; and structure and performance of nonwood-based forest industries. Economics research focused in such directions will go far toward improving the manner in which the nation's many forest industries organize and conduct their activities

  10. The Canadian Natural Health Products (NHP regulations: industry perceptions and compliance factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Heather

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of natural health products, such as vitamins, minerals, and herbs, by Canadians has been increasing with time. As a result of consumer concern about the quality of these products, the Canadian Department of Health created the Natural Health Products (NHP Regulations. The new Canadian regulations raise questions about whether and how the NHP industry will be able to comply and what impact they will have on market structure. The objectives of this study were to explore who in the interview sample is complying with Canada's new NHP Regulations (i.e., submitted product licensing applications on time; and explore the factors that affect regulatory compliance. Methods Twenty key informant interviews were conducted with employees of the NHP industry. The structured interviews focused on the level of satisfaction with the Regulations and perceptions of compliance and non-compliance. Interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed verbatim. Data were independently coded, using qualitative content analysis. Team meetings were held after every three to four interviews to discuss emerging themes. Results The major finding of this study is that most (17 out of 20 companies interviewed were beginning to comply with the new regulatory regime. The factors that contribute to likelihood of regulatory compliance were: perceptions and knowledge of the regulations and business size. Conclusion The Canadian case can be instructive for other countries seeking to implement regulatory standards for natural health products. An unintended consequence of the Canadian NHP regulations may be the exit of smaller firms, leading to industry consolidation.

  11. Structured Mathematical Modeling of Industrial Boiler

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Abdullah Nur; Nazaruddin, Yul Yunazwin; Siregar, Parsaulian; Bindar, Yazid

    2014-01-01

    As a major utility system in industry, boilers consume a large portion of the total energy and costs. Significant reduction of boiler cost operation can be gained through improvements in efficiency. In accomplishing such a goal, an adequate dynamic model that comprehensively reflects boiler characteristics is required. This paper outlines the idea of developing a mathematical model of a water-tube industrial boiler based on first principles guided by the bond graph method in its derivation. T...

  12. Service quality and asymmetric information in the regulation of monopolies: The Chilean electricity distribution industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Oscar Alfredo

    This study is an enquiry about the role that service quality, asymmetric information, scope of regulation and regulator's preferences play in the regulation of monopolies, with an application to the case of the Chilean electricity distribution industry. In Chapter 1, I present the problem of regulating a monopolist and introduce the special conditions that the electricity sector has. Later I discuss the main characteristics of the electricity system that operates in Chile. The literature on regulation is reviewed in Chapter 2. A special emphasis is given to the problems of quality and information, and the lack of its proper joint treatment. In Chapter 3, I develop four theoretical models of regulation that explicitly consider the regulation of price and quality versus price-only regulation, and a symmetric versus asymmetric information structure where only the regulator knows its true costs. In these models, I also consider the effect of a regulator that may have a preference between consumers and the regulated monopolistic firms. I conclude that with symmetric information and independent of the scope of regulation, having a regulator that prefers consumers or producers does not affect the efficiency of the outcome. I also show that the regulator's inability to set quality, thus regulating only price, leads to an inefficient outcome, away from the first best solution that can be achieved by regulating both price and quality, even with asymmetric information, as long as the regulator does not have a "biased" preference for consumers or the monopolistic producers. If the regulator has a "bias," then the equilibrium will be inefficient with asymmetric information. But the effect on equilibrium price and quality depends on the direction of the effect of quality on the marginal effect of price in demand. More importantly, no closed-form solution can be derived unless drastic simplifications are made. To further investigate the outcome of the models, I use numerical

  13. Nuclear regulation of South African mines: An industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wymer, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    South African mines have become subject to a rigid and prescriptive system of nuclear regulation that has its roots in the past when South Africa embarked upon a period of nuclear development spanning the full nuclear fuel cycle, and in which the South African gold mining industry once played a major part in the supply of uranium as a low grade by-product. Radiation hazards in the mines are generally very moderate, even in the few gold mines associated with uranium by-product, and to not warrant the type of regulatory attention normally applied to nuclear installations, or even to uranium mines. The continued imposition of strict nuclear regulatory requirements has caused severe financial hardship and threatens the survival of certain mining operations, while seemingly having little or no health benefits to workers or the public. With the development of modern, comprehensive mine health and safety legislation, a more appropriate, effective, and far less costly vehicle for controlling radiation hazards in mines now exists, utilizing the resources of the Mine Health and Safety Inspectorate. This approach is now being proposed, in the drafting of new legislation, as constituting a better alternative to the nuclear regulation of mines. (author)

  14. The 2014 Greeley, Colorado Earthquakes: Science, Industry, Regulation, and Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeck, W. L.; Sheehan, A. F.; Weingarten, M.; Nakai, J.; Ge, S.

    2014-12-01

    On June 1, 2014 (UTC) a magnitude 3.2 earthquake occurred east of the town of Greeley, Colorado. The earthquake was widely felt, with reports from Boulder and Golden, over 60 miles away from the epicenter. The location of the earthquake in a region long considered aseismic but now the locus of active oil and gas production prompted the question of whether this was a natural or induced earthquake. Several classic induced seismicity cases hail from Colorado, including the Rocky Mountain Arsenal earthquakes in the 1960s and the Paradox Valley earthquakes in western Colorado. In both cases the earthquakes were linked to wastewater injection. The Greeley earthquake epicenter was close to a Class II well that had been injecting waste fluid into the deepest sedimentary formation of the Denver Basin at rates as high as 350,000 barrels/month for less than a year. The closest seismometers to the June 1 event were more than 100 km away, necessitating deployment of a local seismic network for detailed study. IRIS provided six seismometers to the University of Colorado which were deployed starting within 3 days of the mainshock. Telemetry at one site allowed for real time monitoring of the ongoing seismic sequence. Local media interest was extremely high with speculation that the earthquake was linked to the oil and gas industry. The timetable of media demand for information provided some challenges given the time needed for data collection and analysis. We adopted a policy of open data and open communication with all interested parties, and made proactive attempts to provide information to industry and regulators. After 3 weeks of data collection and analysis, the proximity and timing of the mainshock and aftershocks to the C4A injection well, along with a sharp increase in seismicity culminating in an M 2.6 aftershock, led to a decision by the Colorado Oil and Gas Corporation Commission (COGCC) to recommend a temporary halt to injection at the C4A injection well. This was the

  15. Structured Mathematical Modeling of Industrial Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Nur Aziz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As a major utility system in industry, boilers consume a large portion of the total energy and costs. Significant reduction of boiler cost operation can be gained through improvements in efficiency. In accomplishing such a goal, an adequate dynamic model that comprehensively reflects boiler characteristics is required. This paper outlines the idea of developing a mathematical model of a water-tube industrial boiler based on first principles guided by the bond graph method in its derivation. The model describes the temperature dynamics of the boiler subsystems such as economizer, steam drum, desuperheater, and superheater. The mathematical model was examined using industrial boiler performance test data.It can be used to build a boiler simulator or help operators run a boiler effectively.

  16. Semiconductor industry: a survey of structure, conduct, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webbink, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    The study describes the structure, conduct, and performance of the semiconductor industry. The industry is characterized by a high rate of innovation and technological change, rapidly falling costs and prices, and rapidly rising sales in boom periods as well as large declines in sales in recession periods. These desirable performance characteristics take place in an industry that has moderately high domestic levels of concentration. However, there are many features that cause this industry to have behavior and performance that is markedly different from such highly concentrated industries as automobiles and steel. These features were investigated and are reported

  17. 75 FR 4565 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Industrial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Industrial Funding Fee and Sales Reporting AGENCY... Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve a reinstatement of a previously approved information collection requirement regarding industrial [[Page 4566

  18. Understanding inter-industry wage structures in the euro area

    OpenAIRE

    Genre, Véronique; Momferatou, Daphne; Kohn, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the euro area wage structure and its potential determinants from a sectoral viewpoint. Merging information from the OECD Structural Analysis database with data from the EU Labour Force Survey, we construct a cross-country panel of 22 industries in 8 euro area countries for 1991-2002. Data inspection confirms the existence of a fairly stable inter- industry wage structure that is similar across countries. We then apply panel data techniques to identify factors explaining ...

  19. Decree 182/013 It would regulate the management of industrial solid waste and similar expenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    It regulate of industrial solid waste management and similar expenses activities covered, exclusions, categorization, requirements, transportation, recycling and treatment, incineration, use as alternative fuel

  20. Nuclear Regulator Knowledge Management in a Dynamic Nuclear Industry Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper outlines the experiences to date in developing mature knowledge management within the UK’s nuclear regulatory body The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). In 2010 concerns over the loss of knowledge due to the age profile within the organization instigated a review of knowledge management and the development of a knowledge management initiative. Initially activities focused on knowledge capture but in order to move to through life knowledge transfer, knowledge management was then aligned with organizational resilience initiatives. A review of progress highlighted the need to better engage the whole organization to achieve the desired level of maturity for knowledge management. Knowledge management activities now cover organizational culture and environment and all aspects of organizational resilience. Benefits to date include clear understanding of core knowledge requirements, better specifications for recruitment and training and the ability to deploy new regulatory approaches. During the period of implementing the knowledge management programme ONR undertook several organizational changes in moving to become a separate statutory body. The UK nuclear industry was in a period of increased activity including the planning of new nuclear reactors. This dynamic environment caused challenges for embedding knowledge management within ONR which are discussed in the paper. (author

  1. Environmental Regulation and Innovation Dynamics in the Oil Tanker Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    The maritime industry is widely seen as less permeable to innovation than other industries. However, the industry is now recognizing that demands for increased environment protection can only be achieved by more innovation.This study demonstrates that environmental innovation has played a signifi......The maritime industry is widely seen as less permeable to innovation than other industries. However, the industry is now recognizing that demands for increased environment protection can only be achieved by more innovation.This study demonstrates that environmental innovation has played...

  2. Privatisation and regulation - the effect on the U.K. gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.K. gas industry is a monopolist, privatised in 1986 and subject to partial regulation and general monopoly policy. From April 1992 a new regulatory regime will be applied. This paper explores the impact of privatisation and partial regulation in the gas industry during the first quinquennium and illustrates the issues for regulation and pricing where costs are common to regulated and unregulated sectors. Attributable costs of gas supply are derived and a 'marginal cost' based tariff suggested. This is used as a basis for examining the industry's pricing policy in its several markets, and to analyse its response to privatisation and the regulation it has experienced. (Author)

  3. The structure of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaist, G.T.; Morisette, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1952, when Canadians began to study the application of reactors to power generation, the CANDU reactor design and the manufacturing and and engineering capability supporting it have evolved into a world-class technology. At present, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. works directly with provincial electrical utilities in developing their power reactor requirements. It assumes responsibility for the detailed design of the nuclear steam supply system of stations, undertakes some procurement activities, and may represent the utilities in licensing applications. The detailed design and supply of components for the remainder of the nuclear steam plant, as well as for the secondary plant, are provided in Ontario by Ontario Hydro together with manufacturers, and in Quebec and New Brunswick by private firms. Canadian utilities have always assumed the project managment function themselves, but with export sales AECL has taken turnkey responsiblity for either the nuclear steam plant or the complete power station. AECL owns design specifications and other documentation, the use of which it can license, but manufacturing technology resides with Canadian industry. Canadian manufacturers have supported AECL design licensing initiatives overseas. The Canadian nuclear industry's major problem is the current lack of a vigorous domestic market combined with an uncertain international one

  4. Structural biases in prudential regulation of banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tonveronachi

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Mario Tonveronachi, the Basle rules produce distortions that are no less serious than those attributed to the former structural regulation. Excessive competition is no less harmful than low competition, the level playing field approach helps the large dimension and “too big to fail” results, capital crunches produce serious effects on the economy while the regulatory costs go on absorbing important resources in small banks. It is a matter for further research to verify if the new approach to regulation has also fostered an increase in the part of GDP absorbed by the financial system without bringing about a better distribution of risks and a proportionate increase in what James Tobin (1984 termed full-insurance efficiency.

  5. Capital structure in the global shipping industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paun Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current economic crisis emerged from a particular financial crisis that started in the United States and being rapidly propagated all over the world. It did not affect a limited region or a limited economic sector. This crisis induced significant changes in all management areas, including financial management. This study is focused on financing strategies adopted by shipping companies during the crisis, analyzing relevant factors for a specific issue - the capital structure. The research methodology proposed for this analysis on relevant factors that could explain the capital structure of shipping is OLS regression applied on selected variables derived from the financial statements of the major shipping companies. The dependent variables reflecting capital structure are book value to total liabilities ratio and book value to total debt ratio. The explanatory variables are derived from the theory of capital structure. This study empirically illustrates the relevance of the capital structure theory for the studied economic sector and is a useful tool for the shipping companies, providing relevant information about the optimal capital structure adopted by shipping companies and about factors that influence this decision during a crisis period.

  6. Recent Trends in the Structure of the Cable Television Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Martin

    After a brief review of the growth of cable television from 1948 to 1965, the paper examines in more detail trends in the structure of the industry since 1965. Specifically, interest revolves around the apparent trends of concentration and vertical integration within the industry. Corporate histories of the leading firms are then used to…

  7. Market Structure, Financial Dependence and Industrial Growth: Evidence from the Banking Industry in Emerging Asian Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Habib Hussain; Ahmad, Rubi Binit; Gee, Chan Sok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine the role of market structure for growth in financially dependent industries from 10 emerging Asian economies over the period of 1995–2011. Our approach departs from existing studies in that we apply four alternative measures of market structure based on structural and non-structural approaches and compare their outcomes. Results indicate that higher bank concentration may slow down the growth of financially dependent industries. Bank competition on the other hand, allows financially dependent industries to grow faster. These findings are consistent across a number of sensitivity checks such as alternative measures of financial dependence, institutional factors (including property rights, quality of accounting standards and bank ownership), and endogeneity consideration. In sum, our study suggests that financially dependent industries grow more in more competitive/less concentrated banking systems. Therefore, regulatory authorities need to be careful while pursuing a consolidation policy for banking sector in emerging Asian economies. PMID:27490847

  8. Market Structure, Financial Dependence and Industrial Growth: Evidence from the Banking Industry in Emerging Asian Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Habib Hussain; Ahmad, Rubi Binit; Gee, Chan Sok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine the role of market structure for growth in financially dependent industries from 10 emerging Asian economies over the period of 1995-2011. Our approach departs from existing studies in that we apply four alternative measures of market structure based on structural and non-structural approaches and compare their outcomes. Results indicate that higher bank concentration may slow down the growth of financially dependent industries. Bank competition on the other hand, allows financially dependent industries to grow faster. These findings are consistent across a number of sensitivity checks such as alternative measures of financial dependence, institutional factors (including property rights, quality of accounting standards and bank ownership), and endogeneity consideration. In sum, our study suggests that financially dependent industries grow more in more competitive/less concentrated banking systems. Therefore, regulatory authorities need to be careful while pursuing a consolidation policy for banking sector in emerging Asian economies.

  9. Market Structure, Financial Dependence and Industrial Growth: Evidence from the Banking Industry in Emerging Asian Economies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Hussain Khan

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine the role of market structure for growth in financially dependent industries from 10 emerging Asian economies over the period of 1995-2011. Our approach departs from existing studies in that we apply four alternative measures of market structure based on structural and non-structural approaches and compare their outcomes. Results indicate that higher bank concentration may slow down the growth of financially dependent industries. Bank competition on the other hand, allows financially dependent industries to grow faster. These findings are consistent across a number of sensitivity checks such as alternative measures of financial dependence, institutional factors (including property rights, quality of accounting standards and bank ownership, and endogeneity consideration. In sum, our study suggests that financially dependent industries grow more in more competitive/less concentrated banking systems. Therefore, regulatory authorities need to be careful while pursuing a consolidation policy for banking sector in emerging Asian economies.

  10. Inter- and intra-industry variations of capital structure in the Czech manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Pinková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to investigate the existence of inter-industry variations in the capital structure of enterprises of the Czech manufacturing industry and to identify the intra-industry causes of these differences. Three measures of capital structure are employed to determine the inter-industry variations. These are total debt ratio, long-term debt and short-term debt ratios. The set of explanatory variables is included to clarify the intra-industry variations. These explanatory variables are size, asset structure, asset utilization, profitability, non-debt tax shield and growth. The paper reports the analysis of capital structure of five distinctive industrial branches, namely the manufacture of beverages, the manufacture of textiles, the manufacture of paper and paper products, the manufacture of chemicals and chemical products, and the manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products. The data come from the financial statements of selected companies and cover a period from 2008 to 2012. The analysis of variance, correlation and regression analyses are used to develop the statistical framework. The paper aims to study the impact of industry and firm characteristics on capital structure choice.

  11. ASPECTS REGARDING THE STRUCTURE OF GRADUATION PAPERS IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLOŞ Codruţa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents aspects regarding the structure, themes and content of graduation papers in the specialization of Industrial Design within Petru Maior University of Târgu Mures.

  12. Industry structure and the performance of the Global System for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    telecommunication operators in Nigeria. ... This study investigates industry structure and its relationship with the performance of GSM network operators in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey research design was adopted with the use of primary data, ...

  13. Industrial electricity demand for Turkey: A structural time series analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilaver, Zafer; Hunt, Lester C.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between Turkish industrial electricity consumption, industrial value added and electricity prices in order to forecast future Turkish industrial electricity demand. To achieve this, an industrial electricity demand function for Turkey is estimated by applying the structural time series technique to annual data over the period 1960 to 2008. In addition to identifying the size and significance of the price and industrial value added (output) elasticities, this technique also uncovers the electricity Underlying Energy Demand Trend (UEDT) for the Turkish industrial sector and is, as far as is known, the first attempt to do this. The results suggest that output and real electricity prices and a UEDT all have an important role to play in driving Turkish industrial electricity demand. Consequently, they should all be incorporated when modelling Turkish industrial electricity demand and the estimated UEDT should arguably be considered in future energy policy decisions concerning the Turkish electricity industry. The output and price elasticities are estimated to be 0.15 and - 0.16 respectively, with an increasing (but at a decreasing rate) UEDT and based on the estimated equation, and different forecast assumptions, it is predicted that Turkish industrial electricity demand will be somewhere between 97 and 148 TWh by 2020. -- Research Highlights: → Estimated output and price elasticities of 0.15 and -0.16 respectively. → Estimated upward sloping UEDT (i.e. energy using) but at a decreasing rate. → Predicted Turkish industrial electricity demand between 97 and 148 TWh in 2020.

  14. Obesity and industry self-regulation of food and beverage marketing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronit, K; Jensen, J D

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is a growing concern at national and international levels, and it is increasingly recognised that the industry has a role in and hence needs to be involved in halting the obesity epidemic. The objective of this study is to describe, analyse and evaluate research on industry self-regulation regarding food and beverage marketing and nutrition labelling. Five databases were searched for combinations of the search terms-obesity, nutrition, food, beverages, industry, self-regulation, labelling, advertising and marketing-and papers were selected on the basis of paper titles and, subsequently, on the basis of abstracts. Of the 4978 identified publications, 22 were included in the final review. The studies show that commitments in industry self-regulation schemes tend to be relatively vague and permissive, that the measurable effects of the self-regulations tend to be relatively small and that some extent of public regulation may catalyse the effectiveness of industry self-regulation. Although the reviewed studies vary in terms of analytic units and methods applied, they generally stress an ineffectiveness of existing self-regulation schemes. Food industry self-regulation in relation to obesity prevention is an emerging field of research, and further research is needed in such schemes' definitions of regulatory standards, their monitoring and sanctioning mechanisms, and their interactions with public regulation, if industry self-regulation of marketing behaviour is to become an effective and credible approach.

  15. New structural changes in Kazakhstan petroleum and gas industry management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadirov, N.K.; Konaev, Eh.N.

    1998-01-01

    The basic stags of structural changes in Kazakhstan petroleum and gas industry management are considered. It is shown, that in new economic situation the traditional branch scheme of management became out date and does not meet demands up the times. The spent structural changes in petroleum and gas industry management will promote to strengthening of strategic role of hydrocarbon raw material production and processing in prospect. (author)

  16. Review of Industrial Applications of Structural Reliability Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real practical applications is much smaller than what one would expect.......For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real practical applications is much smaller than what one would expect....

  17. How does the alcohol industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim To systematically review, using a qualitative, narrative synthesis approach, papers examining alcohol industry efforts to influence alcohol marketing policy, and compare with those used by the tobacco industry. Methods Literature searches were conducted between April and July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Papers were included if they: made reference to alcohol industry efforts to influence (a) policy debates concerning marketing regulations, (b) new specific marketing policies or (c) broad alcohol policy which included marketing regulations; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990–2013. Alcohol industry political activity was categorized into strategies/tactics and frames/arguments. Data extraction was undertaken by the lead author and 100% of the papers were fully second‐reviewed. Seventeen papers met the review criteria. Results Five main political strategies and five main frames were identified. The alcohol industry argues against marketing regulation by emphasizing industry responsibility and the effectiveness of self‐regulation, questioning the effectiveness of statutory regulation and by focusing on individual responsibility. Arguments relating to industry responsibility are often reinforced through corporate social responsibility activities. The industry primarily conveys its arguments through manipulating the evidence base and by promoting ineffective voluntary codes and non‐regulatory initiatives. Conclusions The alcohol industry's political activity is more varied than existing models of corporate political activity suggest. The industry's opposition to marketing regulation centres on claims that the industry is responsible and that self regulation is effective. There are considerable commonalities between tobacco and alcohol industry political activity, with differences due potentially to differences in policy contexts and perceived industry legitimacy. PMID:26173765

  18. How does the alcohol industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savell, Emily; Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna B

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review, using a qualitative, narrative synthesis approach, papers examining alcohol industry efforts to influence alcohol marketing policy, and compare with those used by the tobacco industry. Literature searches were conducted between April and July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Papers were included if they: made reference to alcohol industry efforts to influence (a) policy debates concerning marketing regulations, (b) new specific marketing policies or (c) broad alcohol policy which included marketing regulations; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990-2013. Alcohol industry political activity was categorized into strategies/tactics and frames/arguments. Data extraction was undertaken by the lead author and 100% of the papers were fully second-reviewed. Seventeen papers met the review criteria. Five main political strategies and five main frames were identified. The alcohol industry argues against marketing regulation by emphasizing industry responsibility and the effectiveness of self-regulation, questioning the effectiveness of statutory regulation and by focusing on individual responsibility. Arguments relating to industry responsibility are often reinforced through corporate social responsibility activities. The industry primarily conveys its arguments through manipulating the evidence base and by promoting ineffective voluntary codes and non-regulatory initiatives. The alcohol industry's political activity is more varied than existing models of corporate political activity suggest. The industry's opposition to marketing regulation centres on claims that the industry is responsible and that self regulation is effective. There are considerable commonalities between tobacco and alcohol industry political activity, with differences due potentially to differences in policy contexts and perceived industry legitimacy. © 2015 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of

  19. The relation between external governance environment and over-investment: Evidence from industry regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Law and Finance theory, and the regulatory capture theory, external governance environment and industrial regulations can exert a certain influence on corporate over-investment. On the basis of qualitative analysis of the relationship between external governance environment and corporate over-investment under different industrial regulation conditions, this paper, using data of non-financial companies listed in Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges in the period 2001-2010, describes the regional distribution characteristics of over-investment of Chinese listed companies, and establishes an OLS regression model of the relationship between external governance environment and over-investment. The study respectively groups data from regulated and non-regulated industries as a sample and empirically tests the OLS regression model. Results show that: from the perspective of economic geography, there exists a local spatial cluster phenomenon in the distribution of over-investment of listed companies in regulated industries, while non-regulated industries conform to no regularity. In regulated industries, external governance environment factors (level of government intervention, rule of law and financial development may exert a significant negative influence on the degree of over-investment of listed companies, but on non-regulated industries, their effect is reversed. Also, government intervention, legal enforcement and financial development are positively correlated to over-investment. Further research indicates that, compared with government intervention and financial development, legal enforcement influences over-investment the most.

  20. Reliability of structural materials in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1996-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear installations is a fundamental point for the exploitation of nuclear energy. It requires an extensive knowledge of the behaviour of materials in the operating conditions and during the expected service life of the installations. In nuclear power plants multiple risks of failure can exist and are expressed by corrosion and deformation phenomena or by modification in the mechanical characteristics of materials. The knowledge of the evolution with time of a given material requires to take into account the data relative to the material itself, to its environment and to the physical conditions of this environment. The study of materials aging needs a more precise knowledge of the kinetics of phenomena at any scale and of their interactions, and a micro- or macro-modeling of their behaviour during long periods of time. This paper gives an overview of the aging phenomena that occur in the structural materials involved in PWR and fast neutron reactors: thermal aging, generalized corrosion, corrosion under constraint, intergranular corrosion, crack growth under loading, wear, irradiation etc.. (J.S.)

  1. Adaptive compliant structures for flow regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeyer, Alex; Theunissen, Raf; M. Weaver, Paul; Pirrera, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces conceptual design principles for a novel class of adaptive structures that provide both flow regulation and control. While of general applicability, these design principles, which revolve around the idea of using the instabilities and elastically nonlinear behaviour of post-buckled panels, are exemplified through a case study: the design of a shape-adaptive air inlet. The inlet comprises a deformable post-buckled member that changes shape depending on the pressure field applied by the surrounding fluid, thereby regulating the inlet aperture. By tailoring the stress field in the post-buckled state and the geometry of the initial, stress-free configuration, the deformable section can snap through to close or open the inlet completely. Owing to its inherent ability to change shape in response to external stimuli—i.e. the aerodynamic loads imposed by different operating conditions—the inlet does not have to rely on linkages and mechanisms for actuation, unlike conventional flow-controlling devices. PMID:28878567

  2. Gas and power industries linking as regulation fades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, S.W.; Callender, T.

    1996-01-01

    Although the gas and electricity markets have their organizational and operational idiosyncrasies, the principles of a competitive market apply to both. The gas industry model of functional and services unbundling, and the elimination of the pipeline merchant function should be emulated. This process of one industry learning from another is inevitable as electricity and natural gas come to be traded in a nearly unified energy market. As their markets merge, two once-distinct industries will be come much more alike, each borrowing the best features of the other and leaving less-desirable features behind. Factors are discussed

  3. 75 FR 32791 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Compliance With Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR 10.115). The draft guidance, when finalized, will...] Draft Guidance for Industry: Compliance With Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of... Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco To Protect Children and...

  4. A Structured Light Scanner for Hyper Flexible Industrial Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kent; Pedersen, Jeppe; Sølund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A current trend in industrial automation implies a need for doing automatic scene understanding, from optical 3D sensors, which in turn imposes a need for a lightweight and reliable 3D optical sensor to be mounted on a collaborative robot e.g., Universal Robot UR5 or Kuka LWR. Here, we empirically...... contribute to the robustness of the system. Hereby, we demonstrate that structured light scanning is a technology well suited for hyper flexible industrial automation, by proposing an appropriate system....

  5. Resolution 12/2004 Guideline for implementation of safety regulations in the practice of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    1. This guide is intended to clarify, in relation to its application in practice Industrial Radiography, the provisions of: a) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, of December 15, 2002, Regulation: B asic Radiation Safety Standards , hereinafter Regulation NBS; b) Resolution No. 25/98 of CITMA Regulation. A uthorization Practices Associated with the use of ionizing radiation , hereinafter Resolution 25/98; c) Resolution 121/2000 CITMA Regulation: F or the Safe Transport of Radioactive materials , hereinafter Resolution 121/2000; and in d) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, Regulation: S election, Training and Authorization of personnel performing Employment Practices Associated Radiation Ionizing . 2. For the purposes of applying this Guide considers the practice of Industrial Radiography includes the following techniques: a) Industrial Radiography with use of gamma radiation sources; b) crawler radiography equipment; and c) Industrial Radiography with X-rays

  6. From franchise to state commission: Regulation of the electric utility industry, 1907 to 1932

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, Keith Alan

    1997-09-01

    Empirical research into the effects of regulation on industry has been around since the early 1960s. Over the last thirty plus years a number of interesting results have been brought to the fore. For instance, it has been found that regulation of the trucking industry limits entry and increases prices. A similar result has been pointed to in other industries such as commercial airlines and banking. The effect of the state commission form of regulation on the electric utility industry has been less conclusive. State commissions became dominant during the period 1910-1930, replacing local franchising as a method of regulating the electric utility industry. Two competing theories suggest why this transformation took place, the "capture" and "public interest" theories of regulation. The capture theory of regulation suggests that the electric utility industry demanded state regulation as a way to earn above normal profits and reduce competition. The public interest theory suggests the purpose of regulation by state commissions was to benefit the general public by forcing the industry to be competitive. Few studies have tried to determine which theory more aptly describes the actual events that took place. The empirical model developed in Chapter V, is an extension of the current literature. A set of simultaneous equations describing the natural gas and electricity markets is estimated using cross-sectional time-series data from 1907 to 1932. The effect of regulation on the electric utility industry is modeled with a dummy variable taking on a value of one to designate that a state commission had been established. The results suggest the capture theory of regulation best describes the period under study. The empirical estimates indicate that state commissions (1) reduced the rate at which the real price of electricity was falling, (2) had a negative impact on firms entering the industry, (3) had a positive influence on the cost of producing a kwh of electricity, and (4

  7. Marketing alcohol to young people: implications for industry regulation and research policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M C; Hastings, G; Wheeler, C; Eadie, D; Mackintosh, A M

    2000-12-01

    This paper focuses on the marketing of alcohol to young people in the United Kingdom, but the lessons that emerge have international significance. Alcohol is a global enterprise and recent consolidation means that it is controlled by a decreasing number of expanding multi-nationals. Alcohol companies are able to allocate significant resources to researching consumer preferences, developing new products and promoting them on an international level. Recent years have seen a growth in the value that youth culture attaches to brand labels and symbols and a move away from the healthy-living ethos. The alcohol industry's response to these trends has been to design alcoholic beverages that appeal to young people, using well-informed and precisely targeted marketing strategies. This has led to growing concerns about the implications for public health and a demand for tighter controls to regulate alcohol marketing practices. In the United Kingdom, controls on alcohol are piecemeal and reactive and the current system of voluntary regulation appears ineffective. This paper argues for more research to establish current industry practice and inform the development of a comprehensive regulatory structure and system of monitoring.

  8. Regional Institutional Structure in the Context of Innovative Industry Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Y. Nikitaeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper proves that successful innovation-oriented development of the industrial complex of the region can be ensured through the creation of adequate institutional structure. As a theoretical and conceptual platform for this task the use of regional institutionalism is suggested. It is reasoned that integration component plays an important role in providing of the innovative development of the industry in modern economic realities and the potential effects of integration on meso- and micro-levels of economy are provided. Integration of industrial structures potential at the same time assumes expansion of a partner segment of the entities relations in the market environment on the basis of network, cluster, and integration approaches convergence to management in the industrial development. On the basis of the international experience analysis it is illustrated that forming of multichannel partnership of actors in the industrial sphere with a vector on an innovatization requires creation of the corresponding institutional conditions. It is established that the main objectives of the relevant institutes consist in legitimization of various forms and technologies of partnership and stimulation of economic entities interactions. The first problem is solved by means of legal support of integration and partners’ interactions, the second one - with the use of a program and project approach. The basic structural elements and functional areas of regional institutional structure in the context of innovative industry development are determined. It is shown that the institutions of the partnership and monitoring of the obligations implementation by integration formations participants can have formal and informal nature, at the same time the trust institution is especially important. In work significant influence of regional specifics on institutional structure and integration of economic entities is proved.

  9. Local hierarchical control for industrial microgrids with improved frequency regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rey, Juan M.; Vergara, Pedro P.; Castilla, Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Local control strategies that operate without relying on communication systems enhance flexibility and reliability of AC industrial microgrids. Based on a previous work in which a secondary switched control was proposed, this paper presents a complementary strategy to improve the frequency......-use of communications. Experimental results obtained on a laboratory microgrid are presented to validate the performance of the proposed complementary control strategy....

  10. Regulating Robo Advice across the Financial Services Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baker (Tom); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAutomated financial product advisors – “robo advisors” – are emerging across the financial services industry, helping consumers choose investments, banking products, and insurance policies. Robo advisors have the potential to lower the cost and increase the quality and transparency of

  11. Environmental regulations: their impact on the battery and lead industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, John R.

    This paper presents a general overview of the past and current position of the lead industry in relation to environmental legislation and its impact. The lead industry has watched environmental lead levels being steadily reduced down to levels that, ten years ago, would have been considered unachievable. Nevertheless, the industry has managed to survive the effect of the ever-increasing demands of environmental controls. During the last ten to twenty years, lead producers and users have had to assess their future positions, as the cost implications of environmental laws have had a significant impact on their bottom lines. Without doubt, this consideration most definitely affected the viability of many plants. The need to be aware of the existence of new and proposed legislation is of paramount importance, as the threat from the vast array of EEC legislation is ever apparent. Lead companies have all considered environmental legislation to have no more than a nuisance value, but it is of vital importance to the future of the industry that such legislation is approached in a positive and sensible way in order to demonstrate a full commitment to protecting both employees and the general environment. Lead must receive the credit that it so richly deserves.

  12. Dendritic Actin Cytoskeleton: Structure, Functions, and Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Konietzny

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Actin is a versatile and ubiquitous cytoskeletal protein that plays a major role in both the establishment and the maintenance of neuronal polarity. For a long time, the most prominent roles that were attributed to actin in neurons were the movement of growth cones, polarized cargo sorting at the axon initial segment, and the dynamic plasticity of dendritic spines, since those compartments contain large accumulations of actin filaments (F-actin that can be readily visualized using electron- and fluorescence microscopy. With the development of super-resolution microscopy in the past few years, previously unknown structures of the actin cytoskeleton have been uncovered: a periodic lattice consisting of actin and spectrin seems to pervade not only the whole axon, but also dendrites and even the necks of dendritic spines. Apart from that striking feature, patches of F-actin and deep actin filament bundles have been described along the lengths of neurites. So far, research has been focused on the specific roles of actin in the axon, while it is becoming more and more apparent that in the dendrite, actin is not only confined to dendritic spines, but serves many additional and important functions. In this review, we focus on recent developments regarding the role of actin in dendrite morphology, the regulation of actin dynamics by internal and external factors, and the role of F-actin in dendritic protein trafficking.

  13. Determinants of Market Structure and the Airline Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raduchel, W.

    1972-01-01

    The general economic determinants of market structure are outlined with special reference to the airline industry. Included are the following facets: absolute size of firms; distributions of firms by size; concentration; entry barriers; product and service differentiation; diversification; degrees of competition; vertical integration; market boundaries; and economies of scale. Also examined are the static and dynamic properties of market structure in terms of mergers, government policies, and economic growth conditions.

  14. The Canadian Natural Health Products (NHP) regulations: industry compliance motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeque, Hina; Boon, Heather; Kachan, Natasha; Cohen, Jillian Clare; D'Cruz, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    This qualitative study explores corporations' motivations to comply with new natural health products (NHP) Regulations in Canada. Interviews were conducted with representatives from 20 Canadian NHP companies. Findings show that the rationale for compliance differs for large compared to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Large firms are motivated to comply with the regulations because of the deterrent fear of negative media coverage, social motivations, ability to comply and maintaining a competitive market advantage. In contrast, SMEs are motivated to comply due to the deterrent fear of legal prosecution and a sense of duty.

  15. Genetic modification and its impact on industry structure and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, P.W.L.; van Beek, P.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic modification has led to fierce debates around the world. Nevertheless, scientific evidence for its potential effects on the structure and performance of industries has hitherto remained rather meagre. In this article, we take some preliminary steps towards closing this gap by exploring the

  16. Measuring structural (un)safety in the Dutch building industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, K.C.; Waarts, P; E Rademaeker, de

    2010-01-01

    The last 10 years the Dutch Building Industry was shocked by several major accidents. In 2001 the steel structure of a theatre in Hoorn collapsed during erection. No one was hurt, because it collapsed during the night. In 2002 part of the parking deck of a hotel collapsed just some time after a

  17. Studies on the structure of industrial high methoxyl pectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravtchenko, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical structure of three industrial high methoxyl pectins (one extracted from apple pomace and two from lemon peels) has been extensively investigated. The apple pectin differs from the lemon ones by having a higher apparent molecular size, a higher neutral-sugar content, present

  18. Do Countries with Lax Environmental Regulations Have a Comparative Advantage in Polluting Industries?.

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Quiroga; Martin Persson; Thomas Sterner

    2009-01-01

    We study whether lax environmental regulations induce comparative advantages, causing the least-regulated countries to specialize in polluting industries. We seek to improve three areas in the empirical literature based on the Heckscher-Ohlin-Vanek’s factor content of trade, more specifically in Tobey’s (1990) approach: the measurement of environmental endowments, the possible endogeneity due to an omitted variable that has not been considered, and the influence of the industrial level of agg...

  19. Have Countries with Lax Environmental Regulations a Comparative Advantage in Polluting Industries?

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga, Miguel; Sterner, Thomas; Persson, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We aim to study whether lax environmental regulations induce comparative advantages, causing the least-regulated countries to specialize in polluting industries. The study is based on Trefler and Zhu’s (2005) definition of the factor content of trade. For the econometrical analysis, we use a cross-section of 71 countries in 2000 to examine the net exports in the most polluting industries. We try to overcome three weaknesses in the empirical literature: the measurement of environmental endowme...

  20. Dynamic analysis on market structure of China's coal industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    According to industrial organization theory, market structure is a crucial factor to market performance. Based on the VAR model and the data from 1994 to 2014, we revealed the dynamic response route of the market structure to these factors and the change process of contribution rate of these factors to the market structure. It shows that market structure is inertial adjustment; technology advance and industry policy have continuous effects on improvement of market concentration ratio; market size and production scale have sustained negative effects on market concentration ratio; fixed capital has barrier effect, which is mainly the entry barrier effect at the beginning, and then the exit barrier effect continues to play a leading role. Therefore, the government has no need to introduce special policies to encourage merger or expansion on the capacity as enterprises would do it spontaneously; it is necessary to make market access system stricter, to improve exit compensation mechanism and to promote technological innovation; all these policies need dynamic adjustment based on the stages of economic cycle. - Highlights: • The adjustment mechanism of China's coal market structure is revealed. • Technology and industry policy are significant factors to optimize the market structure. • The government need not introduce special policy to encourage merger. • The market access system should be stricter. • Policies strength should be dynamically adjusted based on the economic cycle.

  1. A comparison of the structure and organisation of the West German and the U. S. gas industries. Consequences for the status of gas utility companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirrheimer, M J; Teece, D J

    1989-03-01

    When comparing the West German gas industry to the United States one finds some striking differences in their structure and organisation. The German industry is small but growing, vertically integrated, efficient and scarcely regulated. The US-industry is big, hardly integrated and just recovering from years of frictions caused by successive waves of misguided regulations which were interrupted only by short periods of deregulation. Violation of contracts, price rises, price dumps, 'evasions', law suits are characteristic of today's American gas industry. The history of regulations in the U.S. gas industry is a nightmare other countries have fortunately been able to avoid. (orig.).

  2. The decision concerning the nuclear investment: influence of the industrial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillerminet, M.L.

    2000-10-01

    This report aims to analyze the investment behavior of an enterprise producing nuclear origin electric power in an european market opening to the competition. In this context, the industrial structure controlled by the governor decides the investment in a marginal equipment: either an integrated monopole structure which leads to a regulation at the cost price rate of return; or a pool structure in which the governor intervene to fix the cost price at the marginal cost level given by the main technology of the gas combined cycles. (A.L.B.)

  3. 78 FR 27239 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Industrial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Industrial Funding Fee and Sales... Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve a reinstatement of a previously approved information collection requirement regarding industrial funding fee and sales reporting. A notice was published in the...

  4. How does the tobacco industry attempt to influence marketing regulations? A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Savell

    Full Text Available The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control makes a number of recommendations aimed at restricting the marketing of tobacco products. Tobacco industry political activity has been identified as an obstacle to Parties' development and implementation of these provisions. This study systematically reviews the existing literature on tobacco industry efforts to influence marketing regulations and develops taxonomies of 1 industry strategies and tactics and 2 industry frames and arguments.Searches were conducted between April-July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Articles were included if they made reference to tobacco industry efforts to influence marketing regulations; supported claims with verifiable evidence; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990-2013. 48 articles met the review criteria. Narrative synthesis was used to combine the evidence.56% of articles focused on activity in North America, Europe or Australasia, the rest focusing on Asia (17%, South America, Africa or transnational activity. Six main political strategies and four main frames were identified. The tobacco industry frequently claims that the proposed policy will have negative unintended consequences, that there are legal barriers to regulation, and that the regulation is unnecessary because, for example, industry does not market to youth or adheres to a voluntary code. The industry primarily conveys these arguments through direct and indirect lobbying, the promotion of voluntary codes and alternative policies, and the formation of alliances with other industrial sectors. The majority of tactics and arguments were used in multiple jurisdictions.Tobacco industry political activity is far more diverse than suggested by existing taxonomies of corporate political activity. Tactics and arguments are repeated across jurisdictions, suggesting that the taxonomies of industry tactics and arguments developed in this paper are generalisable to multiple jurisdictions and can

  5. How industry can help us fight against botnets : Notes on regulating private-sector intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E Silva, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Could industry improve our response to botnet attacks? If so, how should this private sector participation be regulated? This paper examines how regulation could be used to facilitate private sector intervention against robot networks, also known as botnets. The first part of this paper is dedicated

  6. 78 FR 52203 - Guidance for Industry on Compliance With Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... guidance document consistent with FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR 10.115). The guidance...] Guidance for Industry on Compliance With Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of Cigarettes... Distribution of Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco to Protect Children and Adolescents.'' This guidance is...

  7. Regulation of occupational health and safety in the semiconductor industry: enforcement problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Reports of high incidences of occupational illnesses in the semiconductor industry should have triggered global investigations and rigorous inspection of the industry. Yet semiconductor plants remain essentially unregulated. Health and safety standards are inadequate and enforcement is lax. Roles for stakeholders in laying down good practice, monitoring, and regulating are proposed, and obstacles are described. Effective regulation has advantages for the industry as well as workers. Conditions for best practice include education at all levels, protection and support for labor inspectors, government commitment to enforcing laws, recognition of the right of workers to organize, and recognition of their rights.

  8. Environmental policy and industrialization: The politics of regulation in Puerto Rico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepcion, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of economic development on environmental regulation in Puerto Rico are examined. In particular, the research analyzes how the Puerto Rican industrialization process has affected implementation of the environmental-review process. Puerto Rico exemplifies an acute conflict between an industrialization process based on capital-intensive, highly polluting industries, and a regulatory framework of insular and US environmental laws and regulations. While industrialization has not solved unemployment problems on the island, environmental and health hazards have increased significantly, despite environmental regulations. The study focuses on a change in the environmental review process in response to economic development concerns. In particular, it examines the growth and extensive use of a new environmental review document, the Environmental Assessment. This study explains this policy shift and, more fundamentally, analyzes how and under what circumstances this change came about

  9. Value-impact analysis of regulations for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.; Judd, B.; Huntsman, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarizes a quantitative tool developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to aid the NRC in establishing Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) regulations for safeguarding Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Illustrative Value-Impact results of demonstrating the methodology at a facility handling SNM to evaluate alternative safeguards rules is given. The methodology developed also offers a useful framework for facility designers to choose safeguards measures that meet the NRC's criteria in a cost-effective manner. Furthermore, the methodology requires very modest computing capability and is straightforward to apply

  10. Assessing risks and regulating safety standards in the oil and gas industry: the Peruvian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano; Julio Salvador Jácome; Raúl Lizardo García Carpio; Victor Fernández Guzman

    2013-01-01

    Environmental regulation has usually focused on controlling continuous sources of pollution such as CO2 emissions through carbon taxes. However, the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has shown that accidents associated to safety failures can also generate bursts of pollution with serious environmental consequences. Regulating safety conditions to prevent accidents in the oil and gas industry is challenging because public regulators cannot perfectly observe whether firms comply with safety ...

  11. Analytical review of structure and regulation of hemopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development of knowledge on the structure of hemopoiesis and its regulation can be divided into four broad areas: descriptive morphology, kinetics of cell proliferation, regulation of rates of cell proliferation through interaction of molecular regulators and their cell surface receptors, and clinical applications. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Analytical review of structure and regulation of hemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development of knowledge on the structure of hemopoiesis and its regulation can be divided into four broad areas: descriptive morphology, kinetics of cell proliferation, regulation of rates of cell proliferation through interaction of molecular regulators and their cell surface receptors, and clinical applications. 60 refs., 6 figs

  13. The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation's air quality. The aspects of the President's plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below

  14. Structural fabrication quality as a factor of industrial facilities safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkov, E. V.; Kardaev, E. M.; Stolbova, S. Yu; Shishova, O. S.

    2018-04-01

    In the conditions of industrial facilities high wear degree, it is very important to ensure the possibility of their safe operation in order to avoid various kinds of accidents and catastrophes. As practice shows, industrial plant collapses can occur suddenly under normal operating conditions. Usually, such accidents can take place at different stages of structures life cycle. One of the reasons for this is the initially low quality of reinforced concrete structures fabrication. The article considers the factors contributing to the collapse of reinforced concrete structures of water purification tanks located on the territory of the Omsk Region. The main surveys results on tank structures after collapse with the use of ultrasonic and physical methods of investigation are presented. On the basis of the obtained data analysis, it was found that the main cause of the accidents was the insufficient load-bearing capacity of typical reinforced concrete structures, caused by defects in their fabrication in the factory conditions because of exceeding the standard displacement from the design position of the working reinforcement. Recommendations are given on the identification of defective structures and the prevention of similar accidents when operating similar tanks at manufacturing plants constructed from standard designs.

  15. Risk, Reward, and Regulations: Reshaping the Financial Services Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Ralph S.

    1984-01-01

    Deregulation has had much to do with the competitive drive and vitality of financial services within the United States. The risks and rewards of deregulation for financial institutions are discussed, and principles which should serve as a guide in building any new regulatory structure are examined. (RM)

  16. Semantic Web Approach to Ease Regulation Compliance Checking in Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Fies

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulations in the Building Industry are becoming increasingly complex and involve more than one technical area, covering products, components and project implementations. They also play an important role in ensuring the quality of a building, and to minimize its environmental impact. Control or conformance checking are becoming more complex every day, not only for industrials, but also for organizations charged with assessing the conformity of new products or processes. This paper will detail the approach taken by the CSTB (Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment in order to simplify this conformance control task. The approach and the proposed solutions are based on semantic web technologies. For this purpose, we first establish a domain-ontology, which defines the main concepts involved and the relationships, including one based on OWL (Web Ontology Language [1]. We rely on SBVR (Semantics of Business Vocabulary and Business Rules [2] and SPARQL (SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language [3] to reformulate the regulatory requirements written in natural language, respectively, in a controlled and formal language. We then structure our control process based on expert practices. Each elementary control step is defined as a SPARQL query and assembled into complex control processes “on demand”, according to the component tested and its semantic definition. Finally, we represent in RDF (Resource Description Framework [4] the association between the SBVR rules and SPARQL queries representing the same regulatory constraints.

  17. Monopolistic structures and industrial analysis in Spain: the case of the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, F

    1979-01-01

    This article seeks to illustrate the monopolistic structure of the Spanish pharmaceutical industry, focusing on its many dimensions. The basic conditions of technology and demand, product differentiation, effect of advertising, and barriers to entry are considered, as is financial and economic concentration. Although economic conditions are emphasized, the ways they affect public and private health, the quality of health services, and health education are also highlighted.

  18. Market size and vertical structure in the rail way industry

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushima, Noriaki; Mizutani, Fumitoshi

    2011-01-01

    We provide a theoretical framework to discuss the relation between market size and vertical structure in the railway industry. The framework is based on a simple downstream monopoly model with two input suppliers, labor forces and the rail infrastructure firm. The operation of the downstream firm (i.e., the train operating firm) generates costs on the rail infrastructure firm. We show that the downstream firm with a larger market size is more likely to integrate with the rail infrastructure f...

  19. An empirical investigation of governance structures in the hotel industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlstrom, Robert; Haugland, Sven Arne; Nygaard, Arne; Rokkan, Aksel Ivar

    2002-01-01

    The study investigates alternative governance forms in the hotel industry. We analyze the choice among independently owned firms, voluntary chains, franchising, and vertically integrated chains. Based on agency theory, we argue that the need for control over service quality, financial risk, and the market environment affect the choice of governance form. Prior agency research emphasizes alternative governance structures employed by principals given local market conditions, agent incentives, a...

  20. Structural reasons for vertical integration in the international oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, G.

    1991-01-01

    Once upon a time, the international oil industry was vertically integrated. A small group of companies controlled a very substantial share of international oil flows, extending their operations from the oil well to the gas pump, and relying on intracorporate transfers for most in-between transactions. The historical reasons for vertical disintegration, the market role, and structural reasons for vertical reintegration are examined. (author)

  1. Analysis of costs structure of the industrial enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy V. Kovtunenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Costs are an important factor that affects the economic activities of an industrial enterprise, because they affect the profits of the enterprise on production efficiency and competitiveness. The article aims to summarize approaches of the definition of “costs”, classification costs of the enterprise according to different characteristics and cost structure of industrial enterprises. Each scientist has his own opinion on the choice of the structure and classification of costs, which is based on his own experience and experience of other scientists. Economically justified classification of costs is an important factor for analysis and costs accounting. This paper examines the concept of “costs” in the interpretation of various authors based on research of scientists that highlight the main features of the classification of costs, give the cost structure of industrial enterprises. Based on the study it can be concluded that the standard classification of costs is not for all companies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a classification of costs according to the main features of the company.

  2. Obesity and industry self-regulation of food and beverage marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Karsten; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obesity is a growing concern at national and international levels, and it is increasingly recognized that the industry plays a role and needs to be involved to halt the obesity epidemic. The objective of this study is to describe, analyse and evaluate research on industry self-regulati......Objective: Obesity is a growing concern at national and international levels, and it is increasingly recognized that the industry plays a role and needs to be involved to halt the obesity epidemic. The objective of this study is to describe, analyse and evaluate research on industry self......-regulation regarding food and beverage marketing and nutrition labelling. Design: Five databases were searched for combinations of the search terms: obesity, nutrition, food, beverages, industry, self-regulation, labelling, advertising and marketing, and papers were selected on the basis of paper titles......, and subsequently on the basis of abstracts. Results: Of the 4978 identified publications, 22 were included in the final review. The studies show that commitments in industry self-regulation schemes tend to be relatively vague and permissive, that the measurable effects of the self-regulations tend to be relatively...

  3. The vital role of industry in contributing to the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, G.

    2004-01-01

    Industry has taken a key role in the development of radioactive transport regulation for many years. There are two main parties that need consideration in the regulatory process: the 'public and worker' interest, this responsibility is represented by the regulators: the 'industry' interest, these parties by their nature, give priority to representing their own interests. Any amendment or review of the regulations benefits greatly from the industry perspective. The opposite ends of the 'spectrum of opinion' suggests that insufficient industry involvement may lead to uneconomic transport, whereas, insufficient Competent Authority involvement may lead to unsafe transport. These seemingly polarised views are considered and discussed, but it becomes clear that the two parties complement each other, both ensuring each remains grounded. The basis for a regulation that compares the costs directly with the benefit in terms of reduced risk to the public or employees is at the heart of successful regulation. This balance is fragile and sensitive and underlines the importance of a harmonised approach by both Industry and Competent Authorities

  4. The vital role of industry in contributing to the IAEA transport regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, G. [BNFL (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Industry has taken a key role in the development of radioactive transport regulation for many years. There are two main parties that need consideration in the regulatory process: the 'public and worker' interest, this responsibility is represented by the regulators: the 'industry' interest, these parties by their nature, give priority to representing their own interests. Any amendment or review of the regulations benefits greatly from the industry perspective. The opposite ends of the 'spectrum of opinion' suggests that insufficient industry involvement may lead to uneconomic transport, whereas, insufficient Competent Authority involvement may lead to unsafe transport. These seemingly polarised views are considered and discussed, but it becomes clear that the two parties complement each other, both ensuring each remains grounded. The basis for a regulation that compares the costs directly with the benefit in terms of reduced risk to the public or employees is at the heart of successful regulation. This balance is fragile and sensitive and underlines the importance of a harmonised approach by both Industry and Competent Authorities.

  5. Regulatory policy and structural change in the natural gas industry: A transaction cost perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has recently promoted policy initiatives designed to substitute market responsive industry practices for the micro-management regulatory practices previously employed. These new policies are expected to generate a flexible gas pricing policy that more accurately reflects market supply and demand conditions. Historically, much of the regulation of this industry was enacted to ensure that pipeline companies would be able to recover the very large up-front investments in immobile equipment that characterize the production, transportation, storage, and distribution of natural gas. The institutional detail available from historical accounts of the development of the industry are used to describe structural change over time. Regulatory policy, the level of asset specificity, and the extent of secondary environmental uncertainty are all shown to exert significant effects on the level of integration into production, storage and marketing

  6. Foreign Banking in Ukraine: Development Trends and Ownership Structure Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhij Reverchuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to research the theoretical and practical aspects of foreign participation ownership structure of banks in Ukraine; to analyze the tendencies and challenges of structure regulation of bank ownership; to provide recommendations related to the role of enhancing the transparency of banking business. This research was conducted by way of review of the data on bank ownership and the regulation of the ownership structure of the banking sector in Ukraine.

  7. Analysis on effects of energy efficiency regulations & standards for industrial boilers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ren; Chen, Lili; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Meng

    2017-11-01

    The industrial boilers in China are featured by large quantity, wide distribution, high energy consumption and heavy environmental pollution, which are key problems faced by energy conservation and environmental protection in China. Meanwhile, industrial boilers are important equipment for national economy and people’s daily life, and energy conservation gets through all segments from type selection, purchase, installation and acceptance to fuel management, operation, maintenance and service. China began to implement such national mandatory standards and regulations for industrial boiler as GB24500-2009 The Minimum Allowable Values of Energy Efficiency and Energy Efficiency Grades of Industrial Boilers and TSG G002-2010 Supervision Regulation on Energy-Saving Technology for Boilers since 2009, which obviously promote the development of energy conservation of industrial boilers, but there are also some problems with the rapid development of technologies for energy conservation of industrial boilers. In this paper, the implementation of energy efficiency standards for industrial boilers in China and the significance are analyzed based on survey data, and some suggestions are proposed for the energy efficiency standards for industrial boilers. Support by Project 2015424050 of Special Fund for quality control Research in the Public Interest

  8. Regulation and efficiency: an empirical analysis of the United Kingdom continental shelf petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashani, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    The petroleum industry of the United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) has been subject to various degrees of regulation. Self-sufficiency, security of supply and developing offshore supply industry triggered government regulations that were seen as interventionary and protectionist. This paper tests the extent to which regulations targeting involvement of British offshore supply industry in the UKCS activity created inefficiencies. Data envelopment analysis (DEA), stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), Malmquist Indices, and standard regression analysis are used to measure the amount and address the source of inefficiencies. We will show that such inefficiencies could not be ruled out. The results provide an important insight into the UKCS production techniques and, more generally, into governments' abilities to influence private sector behaviour through contracts and tendering

  9. Negative Effects of Antimonopoly Regulation on the Russian Electric Power Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena NEPRINTSEVA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the antimonopoly regulation in the domestic economy getting more stringent an analysis of the current measures of antimonopoly regulation in terms of their efficiency is now becoming ever more relevant. The aim of the study - analyze how the measures of antimonopoly regulation affect competitive relationships in the electric power industry. The following methods have been used in this work: empirical method, cause-effect method and scientific abstraction method. The article sets out an analysis of the antimonopoly regulation measures that the antimonopoly authority applies. It also provides an assessment of consequences that follow from such methods being applied for the promotion of competitive relationships on the market of electric power and capacity. A conclusion has been reached that the antimonopoly regulation measures being applied impede the progress of competitive relationships on the market of electric power and capacity. The continuing process of reformation in electric power industry aims to liberalize relationships in the area of electric power production. Yet, as a result of this process, generating capacities are becoming increasingly more concentrated mainly around state companies. This is mainly caused by the lack of certainty regarding the results of the industry reformation and a more stringent state regulation over the last years of the reforms. At the same time, for the purposes of limiting the market force, measures of antimonopoly regulation are being applied to generating companies. Such measures have an adverse effect on competitive relationships and stimulate further concentration.

  10. Spatial Structures and Regulation in Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Pernille

    , and the other is the spatial regulation of biological systems, here related to different aspects of the inflammatory response. All systems are studied using computational modelling and mathematical analysis. The first part of the thesis explores different protein aggregation scenarios. In Chapter 1, we consider...... a previously studied and very general aggregation model describing frangible linear filaments. This model is especially relevant for the growth of amyloid fibres, that have been related to a number of serious human diseases, and which are known to grow in an accelerated self-enhanced manner.We derive...... model of the tissue and show how coupled cells are able to function as an excitable medium and propagate waves of high cytokine concentration through the tissue. If the internal regulation in the cells is over-productive, the model predicts a continuous amplification of cytokines, which spans the entire...

  11. Regulation and market power in the Spanish liquefied petroleum gas industry: Progress or failure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bello, Alejandro; Huerta, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of the structure, market power and competition in the distribution sector for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), within Spain. It is a segment of energy consumption and supply that is not often given serious attention, despite the fact that LPG is a crucial source of energy to many households, in many countries in Europe and in the rest of the world. Despite formally being an open and liberalized sector, the Spanish LPG market is characterized by high concentration within the industry; Repsol Butano, the dominant operator, practically controls the entire value chain. These structural characteristics probably justify state intervention in the form of price fixing, in order to guarantee accessible prices for final consumers. Nevertheless, applying this tool has had negative effects on the opening and liberalization process. On the one hand, it fails to encourage entry or an increase in the participation of new operators; on the other, it has considerably deteriorated the economic and financial performance of the distribution agents that are subjected to two strong forces. First, the dominant operator looks after its own interests and its income; and second, the Government tries to defend the interests of final consumers by fixing prices that inadequately remunerate the activity. This shows the contradictory regulatory actions that try to promote competition, and then establish mechanisms to regulate activity by fixing prices that act as price limits. These government set prices discourage new competitors from entering. (author)

  12. Regulation and market power in the Spanish liquefied petroleum gas industry: Progress or failure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Alejandro; Huerta, Emilio [Departamento de Gestion de Empresas, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents a detailed study of the structure, market power and competition in the distribution sector for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), within Spain. It is a segment of energy consumption and supply that is not often given serious attention, despite the fact that LPG is a crucial source of energy to many households, in many countries in Europe and in the rest of the world. Despite formally being an open and liberalized sector, the Spanish LPG market is characterized by high concentration within the industry; Repsol Butano, the dominant operator, practically controls the entire value chain. These structural characteristics probably justify state intervention in the form of price fixing, in order to guarantee accessible prices for final consumers. Nevertheless, applying this tool has had negative effects on the opening and liberalization process. On the one hand, it fails to encourage entry or an increase in the participation of new operators; on the other, it has considerably deteriorated the economic and financial performance of the distribution agents that are subjected to two strong forces. First, the dominant operator looks after its own interests and its income; and second, the Government tries to defend the interests of final consumers by fixing prices that inadequately remunerate the activity. This shows the contradictory regulatory actions that try to promote competition, and then establish mechanisms to regulate activity by fixing prices that act as price limits. These government set prices discourage new competitors from entering. (author)

  13. Analisis Loyalitas Pelanggan Industri Jasa Pengiriman Menggunakan Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Zuhri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Customer loyalty is important for both product and service industries. A loyal customer keeps using the company’s product and services. For a shipping service company, retaining existing customers in order to remain faithful will certainly be very crucial. This study was to determine relationship between variables affecting customer loyalty at PT. Pos Indonesia-Banda Aceh, a shipping service industry. The research used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM and with samples of 153 questionnaires obtained through a non-probability sampling technique. By using AMOS software, it can be concluded that the perceived quality does affect customer satisfaction, perceived value has influence on the customer satisfaction, the customer satisfaction is influential to trust and the trust itself has positive influence on customer loyalty.

  14. Market structure, price rigidity, and performance in the Indonesian food and beverages industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: industrial concentration, price rigidity, technical efficiency, price-cost margin, Structure-Conduct-Performance (SCP), new empirical industrial organization (NEIO), Indonesian food and beverages industry, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), system of equations

  15. Decree 831/976 Industry and Energy Ministry approve an organic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The ordinance 831 of 1976 approve the organic regulation of the Ministry of Industry and Energy and organization manuals and functions according to the principle and elaborated technical approaches and systematized by the National Office of the Civil Service. Among some of their made they are projecting the industrial politics and energetics of the country exercising supervision and control, as well as the development of the industry and diverse energy sources, to propitiate the use of the atomic energy in the Uruguay coordinating the activities that are carried out

  16. Access Regulation for Naturally Monopolistic Port Terminals: Lessons from Regulated Network Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. Defilippi (Enzo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe problem of access arises in industries where inputs from monopolistic and competitive markets are complementarily needed to provide a service. In these circumstances, the firm controlling the monopolistic segment has incentives to deter competition in the competitive segments

  17. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrer, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  18. Environmental Regulation, Foreign Direct Investment and Green Technological Progress—Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangfeng; Wang, Zhao; Lian, Yuehan; Huang, Qinghua

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the spillover effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) on green technology progress rate (as measured by the green total factor productivity). The analysis utilizes two measures of FDI, labor-based FDI and capital-based FDI, and separately investigates four sets of industry classifications—high/low discharge regulation and high/low emission standard regulation. The results indicate that in the low discharge regulation and low emission standard regulation industry, labor-based FDI has a significant negative spillover effect, and capital-based FDI has a significant positive spillover effect. However, in the high-intensity environmental regulation industry, the negative influence of labor-based FDI is completely restrained, and capital-based FDI continues to play a significant positive green technological spillover effects. These findings have clear policy implications: the government should be gradually reducing the labor-based FDI inflow or increasing stringency of environmental regulation in order to reduce or eliminate the negative spillover effect of the labor-based FDI. PMID:29382112

  19. Environmental Regulation, Foreign Direct Investment and Green Technological Progress—Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the spillover effects of foreign direct investment (FDI on green technology progress rate (as measured by the green total factor productivity. The analysis utilizes two measures of FDI, labor-based FDI and capital-based FDI, and separately investigates four sets of industry classifications—high/low discharge regulation and high/low emission standard regulation. The results indicate that in the low discharge regulation and low emission standard regulation industry, labor-based FDI has a significant negative spillover effect, and capital-based FDI has a significant positive spillover effect. However, in the high-intensity environmental regulation industry, the negative influence of labor-based FDI is completely restrained, and capital-based FDI continues to play a significant positive green technological spillover effects. These findings have clear policy implications: the government should be gradually reducing the labor-based FDI inflow or increasing stringency of environmental regulation in order to reduce or eliminate the negative spillover effect of the labor-based FDI.

  20. Environmental Regulation, Foreign Direct Investment and Green Technological Progress-Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangfeng; Wang, Zhao; Lian, Yuehan; Huang, Qinghua

    2018-01-29

    This study examines the spillover effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) on green technology progress rate (as measured by the green total factor productivity). The analysis utilizes two measures of FDI, labor-based FDI and capital-based FDI, and separately investigates four sets of industry classifications-high/low discharge regulation and high/low emission standard regulation. The results indicate that in the low discharge regulation and low emission standard regulation industry, labor-based FDI has a significant negative spillover effect, and capital-based FDI has a significant positive spillover effect. However, in the high-intensity environmental regulation industry, the negative influence of labor-based FDI is completely restrained, and capital-based FDI continues to play a significant positive green technological spillover effects. These findings have clear policy implications: the government should be gradually reducing the labor-based FDI inflow or increasing stringency of environmental regulation in order to reduce or eliminate the negative spillover effect of the labor-based FDI.

  1. Trade, Industry Structure and Different Sources of Firm-heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan Guldager

    Recently the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has been augmented with heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. In principle there exist various sources of heterogeneity, yet the literature appears -- for convenience or other reasons -- to settle on marginal cost heterogeneity...... as the preferred modelling device. The present paper develops a unified model framework allowing a systematic comparison of marginal and fixed cost heterogeneity. We find that both types of heterogeneity are in fact able to capture the central stylized facts of international trade. For example can either source...

  2. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stefanou, Spiro E

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change.

  3. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change. PMID:26057878

  4. Accounting window dressing and template regulation: A case study of the Australian credit union industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillier, D.; Hodgson, A.; Stevenson-Clarke, P.; Lhaopadchan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the response of cooperative institutions that were required to adhere to new capital adequacy regulations traditionally geared for profit-maximising organisations. Using data from the Australian credit union industry, we demonstrate that the cooperative philosophy and internal

  5. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in non-nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The volume and concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material is large across a variety of industries commonly thought not to involve radioactive material. The regulation of naturally occurring radioactive material in the United States is in a state of flux. Inventory of naturally occurring radioactive materials is given, along with a range of concentrations. Current and proposed regulatory limits are presented. (author)

  6. The civil society and the regulation of the extractive industry in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on the role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in impacting on trends and developments in the extractive industry in Nigeria. For example, CSOs take on the government to promote accountability and probity in the management of the sector that is beset by ineffectual regulation; alleged collusion with ...

  7. The Russian oil industry re-structuration: towards the emergence of western type enterprises?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, C

    1999-01-01

    The Russian oil industry has undergone fundamental changes since the collapse of the Soviet Empire and its bureaucratic administrative structure, dominated by its various Branch Ministries. The monopoly in the Soviet oil industry has now been replaced by a number of ''oil companies'', some of which are very powerful, the best known of them being Lukoil. These ''joint stock companies'' are the product of a reform aimed essentially at implanting, out of all the numerous organisational arrangements developed in the West, the model of the vertically integrated private firm. Beyond the legal reforms in the Russian oil industry sector, however, the nature of the organisational model that has actually emerged in Russia begs several questions. Many entities, which are complex and highly diversified, are involved in this industry. There are, of course, the many private structures in which the banks sometimes carry a considerable amount of weight. There are also some vertically integrated organisations, but the degree of integration is variable and their method of centralization is based on a specific form of economic logic. It should not be considered, however, that these actors are similar to capitalist-type private enterprises, whose behaviour is regulated by the demands of international competition. Reform of property rights has not been sufficient to create true private enterprise in Russia. (author)

  8. The Russian oil industry re-structuration: towards the emergence of western type enterprises?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Russian oil industry has undergone fundamental changes since the collapse of the Soviet Empire and its bureaucratic administrative structure, dominated by its various Branch Ministries. The monopoly in the Soviet oil industry has now been replaced by a number of ''oil companies'', some of which are very powerful, the best known of them being Lukoil. These ''joint stock companies'' are the product of a reform aimed essentially at implanting, out of all the numerous organisational arrangements developed in the West, the model of the vertically integrated private firm. Beyond the legal reforms in the Russian oil industry sector, however, the nature of the organisational model that has actually emerged in Russia begs several questions. Many entities, which are complex and highly diversified, are involved in this industry. There are, of course, the many private structures in which the banks sometimes carry a considerable amount of weight. There are also some vertically integrated organisations, but the degree of integration is variable and their method of centralization is based on a specific form of economic logic. It should not be considered, however, that these actors are similar to capitalist-type private enterprises, whose behaviour is regulated by the demands of international competition. Reform of property rights has not been sufficient to create true private enterprise in Russia. (author)

  9. The optimal vertical structure in the electricity industry when the incumbent has a cost advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakawa, Yukihide

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies how the vertical structure of the electricity industry affects the social welfare when the incumbent has a cost advantage in generation relative to the entrants. The model consists of a generation sector and a transmission sector. In the generation sector the incumbent and entrants compete in a Cournot fashion taking as given the access charge to the transmission network set in advance by the regulator to maximize the social welfare. Two vertical structures, integration and separation, are considered. Under vertical separation the transmission network is established as an organization independent of every generator, whereas under vertical integration it is a part of the incumbent's organization. The optimal vertical structure is shown to depend on the number of entrants. If the number of entrants is smaller than a certain threshold, vertical separation is superior in welfare to vertical integration, and vice versa. This is because the choice of vertical structure produces a trade-off in the effects on competition promotion and production efficiency. If a break-even constraint is imposed in the transmission sector, however, vertical integration is shown to be always superior in welfare. - Highlights: • We examine the optimal vertical structure in the electricity industry. • We model a generation sector in which the incumbent has a cost advantage. • A trade-off between production efficiency and competition promotion occurs. • The optimal vertical structure depends on the number of entrants. • Vertical integration is always superior if a break-even constraint is imposed

  10. Sustainability of Governing Structures in Bulgarian Farming Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrabrin Bachev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of assessment of absolute and comparative sustainability of major governing structures in agrarian and farming industries is among the most topical issues for researchers, farmers, investors, administrators, politicians, interests groups, and the public worldwide. Despite this issue, practically there are no assessments on the sustainability level of the major types of Bulgarian farming enterprises in the conditions of European Union Common Agricultural Policy implementation. This study applies a holistic framework and assesses the absolute and comparative sustainability of major governing structures in Bulgarian farming industry—unregistered holdings, sole traders, cooperatives, and companies of various types. In this paper, the method of the study is outlined, the inclusion of a novel “governance aspect” of sustainability is justified, and the overall characteristics of the surveyed farming enterprises are presented. Then, the integral, governance, economic, social, and environmental sustainability of the farming structures of different juridical types is assessed. Next, the structure of farming enterprises with different sustainability levels is analyzed. Finally, the conclusion from this study and the directions for further research and amelioration of sustainability assessments are presented.

  11. Assessment of Technogenic Accident Risk of Industrial Building Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiburin, D. A.; Baiburin, A. Kh

    2017-11-01

    A methodology for assessing the risk of an industrial building accident was developed taking into account the damage caused by various localization of collapse. Before the beginning of the survey of a facility technical condition, groups including the same type of building structures are selected. Further, assessment is made for the reduction in their load-carrying capacity from the strength and stability conditions taking into account defects. The characteristics of the influence of defects and structural damage on a building safety is the degree of compliance with the standards expressed by the reliability level. Reliability levels assignment is carried out on the basis of calculations, operating experience and inspection of a particular type of structure according to the formalized rules. The risk of collapse according to a separate scenario is calculated for structures that are capable and incapable of causing a progressive ossification. The results of the technique application are based on the analysis of the accident risk at the welding shop “Vysota (Height) 239” of the Chelyabinsk Pipe Rolling Plant.

  12. Impact of the Application of Exemption Regulation to the Non-nuclear Industry in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eri-Hiswara

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN) as a nuclear regulatory authority in Indonesia has published the exemption regulation that establishes the value of activity, activity concentration, and dose rate for practices that their operations do not require a licence. From an assessment it was found that the value of activity concentration and dose rate have been exceeded by technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) present in the raw material and product/waste of some mining and mineral industries known so far as non-nuclear industry. The result has the impact that those industries should be categorized as nuclear industry, with the implication that they need to have licence from regulatory authority, and their activities need to be inspected regularly from the radiation safety point of view by the authority. (author)

  13. The Food Industry and Self-Regulation: Standards to Promote Success and to Avoid Public Health Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lisa L.; Teret, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Threatened by possible government regulation and critical public opinion, industries often undertake self-regulatory actions, issue statements of concern for public welfare, and assert that self-regulation is sufficient to protect the public. The food industry has made highly visible pledges to curtail children's food marketing, sell fewer unhealthy products in schools, and label foods in responsible ways. Ceding regulation to industry carries opportunities but is highly risky. In some industries (e.g., tobacco), self-regulation has been an abject failure, but in others (e.g., forestry and marine fisheries), it has been more successful. We examined food industry self-regulation in the context of other self-regulatory successes and failures and defined 8 standards that should be met if self-regulation is to be effective. PMID:20019306

  14. Genetics and Insurance in Australia: Concerns around a Self-Regulated Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Ainsley J; Tiller, Jane; Keogh, Louise A; Otlowski, Margaret; Lacaze, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Regulating the use of genetic information in insurance is an issue of ongoing international debate. In Australia, providers of life and other mutually rated insurance products can request applicants to disclose all results from any genetic test. Insurers can then use this information to adjust premiums and make policy decisions. The Australian Financial Services Council (FSC; an industry body) developed and maintains the relevant industry standard, which was updated in late 2016. Aims/Objective: To review the 2016 FSC Standard in light of relevant research and determine the legitimacy of the Australian regulatory environment regarding use of genetic information by insurers. We identified five concerns arising from the 2016 FSC Standard: (1) use of results obtained from research; (2) the requirement for an applicant to disclose whether they are "considering" a genetic test; (3) failure to account for genome sequencing and other technology developments; (4) limited evidence regarding adverse selection; and (5) the inappropriateness of industry self-regulation. Industry self-regulation of the use of genetic information by life insurers, combined with a lack of government oversight, is inappropriate and threatens to impede the progress of genomic medicine in Australia. At this critical time, Australia requires closer government oversight of the use of genetic information in insurance. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. What are the alternatives available to Hong Kong in structuring the electricity supply industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Chi Tak

    2006-01-01

    The Hong Kong (HK) Government is conducting a review on the regulatory and market model of the electricity supply industry (ESI), in light of the expiry of the existing Scheme of Control Agreements with the vertical integrated utilities in 2008. Although the explicit agreements provided a stable regulatory environment to facilitate the past development of the electricity industry, it was found to become inadequate to deal with the increasing demand for economic efficiency and consumer protection. As such, there is an immediate opportunity to review the current situation and, if appropriate, consider changes to the regulatory and market structure of the ESI. The objective of this paper is to examine the desirable sector policy objectives in HK and consider different instruments and strategies to meet these objectives. The first part of the policy analysis suggests that a more balanced set of policy objectives should be pursued to elevate the priority of economic efficiency but recognizing the inherit limitations in local context. The latter part of the paper reviews the regulatory instruments for their applicability and acceptability in HK. They include rate-of-return regulation, performance-based regulation, competitive bidding and wholesale market competition. With the objective of keeping risks and uncertainties to a minimum, the paper devises strategies to pursue these instruments, allowing HK to improve its regulatory framework and at the same time prepare the industry for potential introduction of competition in the future

  16. What are the alternatives available to Hong Kong in structuring the electricity supply industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    The Hong Kong (HK) Government is conducting a review on the regulatory and market model of the electricity supply industry (ESI), in light of the expiry of the existing Scheme of Control Agreements with the vertical integrated utilities in 2008. Although the explicit agreements provided a stable regulatory environment to facilitate the past development of the electricity industry, it was found to become inadequate to deal with the increasing demand for economic efficiency and consumer protection. As such, there is an immediate opportunity to review the current situation and, if appropriate, consider changes to the regulatory and market structure of the ESI. The objective of this paper is to examine the desirable sector policy objectives in HK and consider different instruments and strategies to meet these objectives. The first part of the policy analysis suggests that a more balanced set of policy objectives should be pursued to elevate the priority of economic efficiency but recognizing the inherit limitations in local context. The latter part of the paper reviews the regulatory instruments for their applicability and acceptability in HK. They include rate-of-return regulation, performance-based regulation, competitive bidding and wholesale market competition. With the objective of keeping risks and uncertainties to a minimum, the paper devises strategies to pursue these instruments, allowing HK to improve its regulatory framework and at the same time prepare the industry for potential introduction of competition in the future. (author)

  17. Market structure, industrial organisation and technological development: the case of the Japanese electronics-based nc-machine tool industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, S

    1983-01-01

    ILO pub-WEP pub. Working paper on the impact of market structure and business organization on technological change in the automatic control machine tool industry in Japan - based on a 1982 sample survey of 40 industrial enterprises, discusses research and development trends, demand, production, subcontracting, competition, etc.; investigates the impact of electronics Innovation on small scale industry, the international division of labour and on developing countries. Bibliography and graphs.

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle bringing about opportunity for industrial structure conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Taiki

    1991-01-01

    Three facilities of nuclear fuel cycle, that is, uranium enrichment, fuel reprocessing and low level radioactive waste storage and burying, are being constructed by electric power industry in Rokkasho Village, Kamikita County, Aomori Prefecture. These are the large scale project of the total investment of 1.2 trillion yen. It is expected that the promotion of this project exerts not a little effect to the social economy of the surrounding districts. Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, carried out the social environment survey on the location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In this report, the outline of the economical pervasive effect due to the construction and operation of the three facilities in the report of this survey is described. The method of survey and the organization, the outline of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the economical pervasive effect, the effect to the local social structure, and the direction of arranging occupation, residence and leisure accompanying the location of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Industry structures in private dental markets in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, E; Mikkola, H

    2012-12-01

    To use industrial organisation and organisational ecology research methods to survey industry structures and performance in the markets for private dental services and the effect of competition. Data on practice characteristics, performance, and perceived competition were collected from full-time private dentists (n = 1,121) using a questionnaire. The response rate was 59.6%. Cluster analysis was used to identify practice type based on service differentiation and process integration variables formulated from the questionnaire. Four strategic groups were identified in the Finnish markets: Solo practices formed one distinct group and group practices were classified into three clusters Integrated practices, Small practices, and Loosely integrated practices. Statistically significant differences were found in performance and perceived competitiveness between the groups. Integrated practices with the highest level of process integration and service differentiation performed better than solo and small practices. Moreover, loosely integrated and small practices outperformed solo practises. Competitive intensity was highest among small practices which had a low level of service differentiation and was above average among solo practises. Private dental care providers that had differentiated their services from public services and that had a high number of integrated service production processes enjoyed higher performance and less competitive pressures than those who had not.

  20. Determinants of capital structure: evidence from the Czech automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Pinková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to identify the determinants influencing the capital structure of large and medium-sized enterprises of the automotive industry in the Czech Republic. The sample consists of 100 companies belonging to NACE division 29. The data come from financial statements of selected companies and cover a period from 2006 to 2010. For the purpose of the paper quantitative research is used. The selection of appropriate dependent and independent is realized on the basis of secondary research on studies of capital structure. The analysis of variance, correlation and regression analyses have been performed to see the nature of relationship between variables. Size, tangibility, profitability and liquidity appear to be relevant determinants of capital structure. Growth is not a statistically significant determinant of leverage. It has been observed that the maturity of debt has to be considered, since the investigation of total debt only does not provide precious results. The findings do not unequivocally support either the static trade-off theory or the pecking order theory.

  1. Natural hazards, vulnerability and structural resilience: tsunamis and industrial tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mebarki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an integrated framework which deals with natural hazards (tsunamis, physical vulnerability modelling, risk of failure for industrial structures (metal structures and structural resilience provided by plastic adaptation. Simplified models are proposed to describe the run-up and wave height attenuation in case of tsunamis. The results are calibrated in the case of important tsunamis having taken place in Asian region. The mechanical vulnerability of cylindrical metal tanks erected near the shoreline is also investigated. The fragility curves are then developed in order to describe the multimodal failure: overturning, rupture of anchorages and sliding, buoyancy, excessive bending effects or buckling. Corresponding fragility curves are developed under various conditions: height of tsunami waves, filling ratios and service conditions of the tanks, friction tank/ground as well as dimensions effects. Probabilistic description of the natural hazard and the fragility curves are presented. Sensitivity analysis is also performed in order to investigate the effect of various governing parameters. Furthermore, resilience concepts and metrics are proposed. Theoretical description of the damages and post-disaster recovery functions are discussed: plastic adaptation as well as elastic and plastic attractors.

  2. Estimating WACC for Regulated Industries on Developing Financial Markets and in Times of Market Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stubelj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the estimation of weighted average cost of capital (WACC for regulated industries in developing financial markets from the perspective of the current financial-economic crisis. In current financial market situation some evident changes have occurred: risk-free rates in solid and developed financial markets (e. g. USA, Germany have fallen, but due to increased market volatility, the risk premiums have increased. The latter is especially evident in transition economies where the amplitude of market volatility is extremely high. In such circumstances, there is a question of how to calculate WACC properly. WACC is an important measure in financial management decisions and in our case, business regulation. We argue in the paper that the most accurate method for calculating WACC is the estimation of the long-term WACC, which takes into consideration a long-term stable yield of capital and not the current market conditions. Following this, we propose some solutions that could be used for calculating WACC for regulated industries on the developing financial markets in times of market uncertainty. As an example, we present an estimation of the capital cost for a selected Slovenian company, which operates in the regulated industry of electric distribution.

  3. Squeezing the middleman: ending underhanded dealing in the pharmacy benefit management industry through regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacy benefit management (PBM) companies are the middlemen of the pharmaceutical industry, designing plans for sponsors and insurers and pushing the products of manufacturers. Their unique position can often create conflicts of interest, which has been the basis of much litigation. This article reviews the structure of the PBM industry and analyzes concerns arising from its handling of prescription drug pricing, manufacturer rebates and discounts, and mail order pharmacies. After surveying several legislative proposals, it concludes with a comprehensive outline for legislation to eliminate underhanded dealing in the industry and lower the cost of prescription drugs.

  4. A novel back-up control structure to manage nonroutine steam upsets in industrial methanol distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udugama, Isuru A.; Zander, Cornina; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Industrial methanol production plants have extensive heat integration to achieve energy efficient operations where steam generated from these heat integration operations are used to provide reboiler duty for methanol distillation columns that purify crude methanol produced into industrial AA grade...... supervisory layer to control the column during these non-routine process upsets. These control schemes were tested against realistic reboiler duty disturbances that can occur in an industrial process. The tests revealed that both the MPC and supervisory systems control structures are able to regulate...... the process, even during sudden drops in reboiler duty. However, the cost of implementation and the relative simplicity will likely favour the implementation of the supervisory control structure in an industrial environment....

  5. Misleading advertising for antidepressants in Sweden: a failure of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Zetterqvist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alleged efficacy of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation has been used to repudiate increased government oversight over promotional activity. European politicians and industry have cited Sweden as an excellent example of self-regulation based on an ethical code. This paper considers antidepressant advertising in Sweden to uncover the strengths and weaknesses of self-regulation. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed all antidepressant advertisements in the Swedish Medical Journal, 1994-2003. The regulation of these advertisements was analyzed using case reports from self-regulatory bodies. The authors independently reviewed this material to investigate: (1 extent of violative advertising; (2 pattern of code breaches; (3 rate at which the system reacted to violative advertising; (4 prevalence of and oversight over claims regarding antidepressant efficacy and disease causality, and (5 costs for manufactures associated with violative advertising. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Self-regulatory bodies identified numerous code breaches. Nonetheless, they failed to protect doctors from unreliable information on antidepressants, since as many as 247 of 722 (34% advertisements breached the industry code. Self-regulatory bodies repeatedly failed to challenge inflated claims of antidepressant efficacy, lending evidence of lax oversight. On average, 15 weeks elapsed between printing and censure of a wrongful claim, and in 25% of cases 47 weeks or more elapsed. Industry paid roughly €108000 in fines for violative advertising, adding an estimated additional average cost of 11% to each purchased violative advertisement, or amounting to as little as 0.009% of total antidepressant sales of around €1.2 billion. CONCLUSIONS: Lax oversight, combined with lags in the system and low fines for violations, may explain the Swedish system's failure to pressure companies into providing reliable antidepressants information. If these shortcomings prove to be consistent across

  6. Misleading advertising for antidepressants in Sweden: a failure of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterqvist, Anna V; Mulinari, Shai

    2013-01-01

    The alleged efficacy of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation has been used to repudiate increased government oversight over promotional activity. European politicians and industry have cited Sweden as an excellent example of self-regulation based on an ethical code. This paper considers antidepressant advertising in Sweden to uncover the strengths and weaknesses of self-regulation. We analyzed all antidepressant advertisements in the Swedish Medical Journal, 1994-2003. The regulation of these advertisements was analyzed using case reports from self-regulatory bodies. The authors independently reviewed this material to investigate: (1) extent of violative advertising; (2) pattern of code breaches; (3) rate at which the system reacted to violative advertising; (4) prevalence of and oversight over claims regarding antidepressant efficacy and disease causality, and (5) costs for manufactures associated with violative advertising. Self-regulatory bodies identified numerous code breaches. Nonetheless, they failed to protect doctors from unreliable information on antidepressants, since as many as 247 of 722 (34%) advertisements breached the industry code. Self-regulatory bodies repeatedly failed to challenge inflated claims of antidepressant efficacy, lending evidence of lax oversight. On average, 15 weeks elapsed between printing and censure of a wrongful claim, and in 25% of cases 47 weeks or more elapsed. Industry paid roughly €108000 in fines for violative advertising, adding an estimated additional average cost of 11% to each purchased violative advertisement, or amounting to as little as 0.009% of total antidepressant sales of around €1.2 billion. Lax oversight, combined with lags in the system and low fines for violations, may explain the Swedish system's failure to pressure companies into providing reliable antidepressants information. If these shortcomings prove to be consistent across self-regulatory settings, and if appropriate measures are not taken to

  7. Misleading Advertising for Antidepressants in Sweden: A Failure of Pharmaceutical Industry Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterqvist, Anna V.; Mulinari, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Background The alleged efficacy of pharmaceutical industry self-regulation has been used to repudiate increased government oversight over promotional activity. European politicians and industry have cited Sweden as an excellent example of self-regulation based on an ethical code. This paper considers antidepressant advertising in Sweden to uncover the strengths and weaknesses of self-regulation. Methodology We analyzed all antidepressant advertisements in the Swedish Medical Journal, 1994–2003. The regulation of these advertisements was analyzed using case reports from self-regulatory bodies. The authors independently reviewed this material to investigate: (1) extent of violative advertising; (2) pattern of code breaches; (3) rate at which the system reacted to violative advertising; (4) prevalence of and oversight over claims regarding antidepressant efficacy and disease causality, and (5) costs for manufactures associated with violative advertising. Principal Findings Self-regulatory bodies identified numerous code breaches. Nonetheless, they failed to protect doctors from unreliable information on antidepressants, since as many as 247 of 722 (34%) advertisements breached the industry code. Self-regulatory bodies repeatedly failed to challenge inflated claims of antidepressant efficacy, lending evidence of lax oversight. On average, 15 weeks elapsed between printing and censure of a wrongful claim, and in 25% of cases 47 weeks or more elapsed. Industry paid roughly €108000 in fines for violative advertising, adding an estimated additional average cost of 11% to each purchased violative advertisement, or amounting to as little as 0.009% of total antidepressant sales of around €1.2 billion. Conclusions Lax oversight, combined with lags in the system and low fines for violations, may explain the Swedish system’s failure to pressure companies into providing reliable antidepressants information. If these shortcomings prove to be consistent across self

  8. S.Yu. Witte's Customs Policy and Regulation of State Import of Industrial Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Антон Юрьевич Петров

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers state import of industrial equipment in the context of the customs regulation of Russia’s foreign trade under S.Yu. Witte as the Minister of Finance (1892–1903. The analysis of archival data reveals the motives which drove various ministries of the Russian empire when they gave preference to foreign producers rather than domestic ones. In the 1890s the Ministry of Finance, on the one hand, and other ministries, on the other hand, were debating the necessity of orders for foreign industrial equipment made by the Russian governmental bodies. The article studies the course and results of this interdepartmental struggle.

  9. Effect on industry structure by fossil fuel burden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Young [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    Multi-industrial sector dynamic operation general equilibrium model of Korean economy has been developed. It is able to analyze carbon dioxide emission, energy use and macro economy, and reciprocal actions between each industrial sector and to measure economic effects by environmental policy for the purpose of reducing carbon dioxide. Using this model, it analyzed its effect on industries in Korea of limiting carbon dioxide emission by experimenting each policy instrument, policy object, application of tax revenue for limiting carbon dioxide. The spreading effect on each industry has a large difference for each industry. The production reduction of energy industry or large energy consuming industry (basic chemical industry, transportation and storage, steel industry, construction) shows relatively huge to other industries. Production reduction for each industry, i.e. a wide difference of economic burden between industries, will need some consideration when introducing energy carbon tax, especially in the initial stage, since it could cause an equity problem between industries. Moreover, studies on differentiating tax rate, tax return and exemption that can mitigate an equity problem between industries should be implemented. (author). 66 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Structure, function, and regulation of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takeo

    2017-11-01

    Amino acids are essential components in all organisms because they are building blocks of proteins. They are also produced industrially and used for various purposes. For example, L-glutamate is used as the component of "umami" taste and lysine has been used as livestock feed. Recently, many kinds of amino acids have attracted attention as biological regulators and are used for a healthy life. Thus, to clarify the mechanism of how amino acids are biosynthesized and how they work as biological regulators will lead to further effective utilization of them. Here, I review the leucine-induced-allosteric activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Thermus thermophilus and the relationship with the allosteric regulation of GDH from mammals. Next, I describe structural insights into the efficient production of L-glutamate by GDH from an excellent L-glutamate producer, Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, I review the structural biology of lysine biosynthesis of thermophilic bacterium and archaea.

  11. Glass-ceramics with multibarrier structure obtained from industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzina, L.; Cimdins, R.; Rozenstrauha, I. [Riga Tech. Univ. (Latvia). Fac. of Chem. Technol.; Bossert, J. [Technisches Inst.: Materialwissenschaft, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany); Kravtchenko, I. [Inst. for Problems of Material Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Recycling problem for various kind of waste is solved by processing the waste to ecological depositable products with multibarrier structure. In order to form a multibarrier structure the ecologically incompatible substances may be diluted and chemically bound until their recycling products gain a structure like natural mineral or glass (I. barrier). After that, remineralized materials are converted into a new product by melting or powder technology using an ecological compatible type of waste as a matrix phase (II. barrier). Waste which are treated this way could be applied to produce ceramic building materials and goods such as floor tiles, stone pavement and casting products. Industrial waste from the metallurgical factory in Latvia ``Liepajas metalurgs`` are metallurgical slag, filter dust, etching waste and sewage used in technologies. The main constituents of chemical compositions of these waste are: Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, Al, Mn etc. In some types of waste a small amount of ecologically risky elements such as Cr, Ni, Zr, Sn and Pb can occur. The combination of metallurgical waste with peat ashes from Riga thermal power station, oil shale ashes or glass waste under controlled sintering procedure gives bulk materials with surface or/and bulkcrystallization. The structure of glass-ceramics built this way may prevent the migration of ecologically risky elements into environment due to corrosion or friction. Physical-chemical properties and thermal behaviour (DTA, dilatometry, melting) of waste define the range of sintering for production of glass-ceramics (powder technology) and decorative glass-ceramic materials (melting and powder technology). (orig.) 5 refs.

  12. Energy abatement in Chinese industry: Cost evaluation of regulation strategies and allocation alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, X.H.; Chen, G.Q.

    2012-01-01

    For Chinese industry, the costs of different energy consumption abatement scenarios are evaluated by the method of directional distance function. These scenarios are based on the combinations of regulation strategies and allocation alternatives—the former are sectors and provinces, and the latter include the five principles of average, intensity share, absolute share, discriminatory absolute and discriminatory intensity. For all the scenarios, the quantitative impacts in terms of output potential loss are calculated and compared. Due to less output potential loss for all the allocation alternatives, the sector regulation strategy is shown to be more effective than the province regulation strategy. It is also demonstrated that, among all the scenarios considered, the sector regulation based on the intensity share principle and the province regulation based on the absolute share principle are the two optimal. The performances of energy abatement allocation of the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans of China are assessed against the simulated scenarios. - Highlights: ► The costs of different energy consumption abatement scenarios are evaluated for Chinese industry. ► The impacts on all entities under all allocation alternatives are calculated and compared. ► The optimal scenarios for the different strategies are identified. ► The performances of the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans are assessed.

  13. Entry Regulations, Product Differentiation and Determinants of Market Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Maican, Florin; Orth, ´Matilda

    2013-01-01

    We use a dynamic oligopoly model of entry and exit to evaluate how entry regulations affect profitability and market structure in retail. The model incorporates demand and store-level heterogeneity. Based on unique data for all retail food stores in Sweden, we find that the average entry costs for small and large stores are 10 and 18 percent lower, respectively, in markets with liberal compared with restrictive regulations. Counterfactual simulations show that lower entry costs in restrictive...

  14. Cultural regulation of emotion: Individual, relational, and structural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozefien eDe Leersnyder

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The most prevalent and intense emotional experiences differ across cultures. These differences in emotional experience can be understood as the outcomes of emotion regulation, because emotions that fit the valued relationships within a culture tend to be most common and intense. We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships. These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships—close others shape people’s environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways—and are afforded by structural conditions—people’s daily lives limit the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals. The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

  15. Cultural regulation of emotion: individual, relational, and structural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leersnyder, Jozefien; Boiger, Michael; Mesquita, Batja

    2013-01-01

    The most prevalent and intense emotional experiences differ across cultures. These differences in emotional experience can be understood as the outcomes of emotion regulation, because emotions that fit the valued relationships within a culture tend to be most common and intense. We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships. These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships-close others shape people's environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways-and are afforded by structural conditions-people's daily lives "limit" the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals. The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

  16. Application of the EC eco-audit regulation in the energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    1994-01-01

    The eco-audit regulation isolates the precision of goals to improve operational environmental protection for observation, particularly with a view to the industrial energy economy. It is not wise without an investigation into the possible repercussions with other EU and national regulatory laws. Keywords here are: design of a heat application regulation according to the BImSchG, discussion over the introduction of an EC CO 2 Energy tax as well as the EC guidelines on reducing CO 2 emissions (SAVE). (orig./HP) [de

  17. The redefinition of the american and british gas industries: the regulation of the access load to the gas pipelines networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.

    2000-10-01

    The transport and distribution networks regulation is the main stakes of the regulation reform of the gas industries. This thesis analyzes the models applied in The Usa and in the United Kingdom. The first part deals with the gas industries deregulation in these two countries, the impacts on the economy and the organization of the gas industries. The second part presents a theoretical approach of the regulation applied to the prices of the natural ags transport by gas pipelines. Regulation by the service cost price and by price cap are compared. (A.L.B.)

  18. Dynamics of competitive strategies in de-regulated industries: the case of the electricity industry in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cateura, O.

    2007-11-01

    This research work is focused on the competitive dynamics approach and rivalry studies between competitors. It develops theses recent perspectives and particularly multi-market competition (also called multipoint competition) in de-regulated industries (network utilities). Indeed, competitive behaviours in liberalized industries are still badly-known. To conduct this research, we decided to analyze a selection of companies (EDF, Electrabel, Endesa, Enel, Gaz de France, Poweo, Direct Energie..) settled on the French electricity market presently in the course of liberalization (1996 - 2006). This qualitative research, through longitudinal case studies, has been developed thanks to a CIFRE agreement (between the French Ministry of Research and the firm Electrabel France) including action research and participant observation. Using multidimensional strategic sequences, we identified two periods, the first one characterized by a confrontation movement and a second one by mutual forbearance. We argue that after learning the rules of a newly liberalized market (confrontation, diversification, internationalization), competitors rapidly and collectively shift there positions towards a focused European strategy based on the gas-electricity convergence. The development of multi-market competition has conducted to mutual forbearance, which was particularly profitable to the major participants. Integrated strategy (market and non-market) appears as an important driver for legitimizing theses behaviours. (author)

  19. The costs of uncertainty: regulating health and safety in the Canadian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.

    1982-04-01

    Federalism, and particularly federal/provincial jurisdictional relationships, have led to considerable uncertainty in the regulation of occupational health and safety and of environmental protection in the Canadian uranium mining industry. The two principal uranium producing provinces in Canada are Saskatchewan and Ontario. Since 1978, in an attempt to avoid constitutional issues, both these provinces and the federal government as well have proceeded unilaterally with health and safety reforms for the industry. In Saskatchewan this has resulted in areas of overlapping jurisdiction, which have led to uncertainty over the legal enforceability of the provincial regulations. In Ontario, the province has left significant gaps in the protection of both workers and the environment. Little progress can be expected in eliminating these gaps and overlaps until the current administrative and jurisdictional arrangements are understood

  20. Data sources on landscape structure in a highly industrialized area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazurek Kinga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Landscape may be described as a part of space characterized by a certain physiognomy, which is a dynamic system subject to evolution. An important factor influencing the type and condition of the landscape is human activity which shapes or rebuilds its structure. Interesting results may be obtained on comparison of archival cartographic materials with contemporary studies and zoning plans. The Upper Silesian Coal Basin is a region with a clearly transformed landscape. The determinant of the geographical environment transformation here is the anthropogenic factor. The study area includes the upper part of the Kłodnica catchment (229.6 sq km. The study is a review, and its aim is to systematize data sources used in the research on the transformation of landscape structure of a heavily industrialized area. In the first half of the nineteenth century created the "Urmesstischblätter" in the scale of 1:25 000. Afterwards preparations began to take new topographic images of the country (the "Messtischblätter". In the 1990s initiated the development of a new topographic map (in the scale of 1:10 000. Recent data source is for example the project CORINE Land Cover 2006. There are many of various sources of data on land cover. An important aspect is the proper selection of documents and maps, and their proper interpretation.

  1. Structural analysis of engineering consulting and design industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Sorin STROE

    2013-01-01

    Strategic management models have been evolving in the business domain on a continuous basis but the overwhelming majority of works in this field gives the impression that it is only the manufacturing industry that needs strategy and strategic models, or that the strategy in the professional services industry is the same as in the manufacturing industry despite their distinctive characteristics and managerial implications. By using the Porter’s Five Forces framework for industry analysis, whic...

  2. New requirements embodied in expert knowledge regulations for industrial radiation protection officers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    Expert knowledge standards and certification requirements of health physics responsible persons or radiation safety officers in industry or in health care are laid down in Germany in administrative regulations. Now the new Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV) contains a specific section exclusively devoted to all aspects of expert knowledge in industrial radiation protection, which inter alia demonstrates the special significance of education and further training of radiation protection specialists. It is expected that the forthcoming new X-ray Ordinance (RoeV) will contain a similar amendment. The article explains the implications of the new Radiation Protection Ordinance for the education and further training of industrial radiation protection officers, but does not address specific aspects of nuclear engineering. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Industry Consolidation and Future Airline Network Structures in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    In the current downturn in demand for air travel, major airlines are revising and rationalizing their networks in an attempt to improve financial performance and strengthen their defences against both new entrants and traditional rivals. Expansion of commercial agreements or alliances with other airlines has become a key reaction to the increasingly competitive marketplace. In the absence, for regulatory reasons, of cross-border mergers these are the principal means by which the industry can consolidate internationally. This paper analyzes the developments which have been taking place and attempts to itentify the implications for airline network structures and the function of different hub airports. The range of services available to passengers in long-haul markets to/from Europe is evaluated before and after recent industry reorganization. Hubs are crucial to interlink the route networks of parmers in an alliance. However, duplication between nearby hub airports that find themselves within the same airline alliance can lead to loss of service at the weaker locations. The extent to which the alliance hubs in Europe duplicate or complement each other in terms of network coverage is assessed and this methodology also enables the optimal partnerships for "unattached" airlines to be identified. The future role of the various European hubs is considered under different scenarios of global alliance development. The paper concludes by considering possible longer-term developments. In an environment where the low-cost carriers will provide a major element of customer choice, it is suggested that the traditional airlines will retrench around their hubs, surrendering many secondary cities to the low-cost sector. Further reduction in the number of alliances could threaten more of the European hubs. For both regulatory and commercial reasons, the end result may be just one airline alliance - so recreating in the deregulated market the historic rule of IATA.

  4. Political and economic structure and energy industry status of Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.Y. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Looking at the composition of energy resources import of Korea per each country, Australian-made import takes up 11.8% of total energy resources import. It possesses the highest import composition of 30.5% when petroleum sector is excluded. In the order of Korea`s mineral import per each country, Australia still keep the number one position every year though Korea keep promoting the diversification of import sources. In the mean time, reflecting on the treatment aspect of import country of Australia, when Korea`s energy, the import size of resources, import intensity of Australia`s primary raw material resources and international resources situation are considered, Korea is thought to receive less treatment from Australia as the second export country of Australia than Japan who is the number one export country of Australia, relatively. Though the increase ratio of Korean tourists in Australia is the highest for the past few years and international promotion effect shows big with the IMF financial support of Korea who faces sudden economic crisis recently as a momentum, sincere evaluation through in-depth analysis between Korea and Australia is still in the initial stage. The necessity to diagnosis the general political and economic structure of Australia more in detail emerges as trade volume between two countries keep growing, esp. in the import of energy and resources sectors, the number of visits between two countries keep increasing. Therefore, the purpose of this study lies mainly in the structure of the new Australian government, general macroeconomics structure and the understanding of energy industry-related status such as energy supply and demand, development status of energy, related laws, and government`s energy agencies, etc. 6 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. 76 FR 35912 - Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... structure of the global industry, including supply chain relationships and foreign direct investment; 2. An... competitiveness of the business jet aircraft industry in the United States, Brazil, Canada, Europe, and China. To...

  6. Structural analysis of ceramic blocks sealing or structural incorporated with the industrial laundry sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, P.H.S.; Grippe, V.Y.Q.; Goulart, J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Industrial and commercial development of recent decades has led to an increase in waste generation. Thus, it is necessary to develop alternative and effective methods of treatment, replacing the simple disposal of these wastes in landfills. The objective of this work is to study the incorporation of textile industrial laundries sludge in ceramic blocks sealing or structural. Samples of ceramic blocks were produced using formulation with 20% sludge, the mass of ceramic clay. Structural analysis of the block was observed the tendency of most empty emergence (pores) during the firing of the blocks, as textile sludge was added in the ceramic paste composition. The mechanical testing of blocks compressive strength was above the minimum 3.0 MPa specified by the standard limit. The physical test water absorption of the blocks was within the range 8 to 22% specified by the standard. (author)

  7. Credibility engineering in the food industry: linking science, regulation, and marketing in a corporate context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart; Nelis, Annemiek P

    2011-12-01

    We expand upon the notion of the "credibility cycle" through a study of credibility engineering by the food industry. Research and development (R&D) as well as marketing contribute to the credibility of the food company Unilever and its claims. Innovation encompasses the development, marketing, and sales of products. These are directed towards three distinct audiences: scientific peers, regulators, and consumers. R&D uses scientific articles to create credit for itself amongst peers and regulators. These articles are used to support health claims on products. However, R&D, regulation, and marketing are not separate realms. A single strategy of credibility engineering connects health claims to a specific public through linking that public to a health issue and a food product.

  8. Recent developments in environmental regulations and their impact on the U.S. refining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmassebi, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Public concern over the environment has heightened considerably since the hot, dry summer of 1988. Responding to these concerns, the administration and Congress have initiated a number of measures to address such issues as acid rain, ozone depletion, smog, and global climate change. Most of these measures are aimed at the oil industry or energy-producing companies. They cone on the heels of other costly environmental legislation, to phase out lead in gasoline and reduce gasoline volatility. Additional measures aimed at different segments of the oil industry (production, refining, and retailing) are expected. In analyzing the merits of these policies, one must address the following issues: the feasibility of reaching an optimum point for these regulatory measures, considering the potential costs and benefits; the ramifications of such measures on the U.S. oil industry, particularly on the U.S. refining industry; the costs to the final consumer and the economy; and the effects of the implementation of such regulations by other countries and our trading partners. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the concerns raised above, particularly as they relate to the U.S. refining industry

  9. The changing structure of the international commercial nuclear power reactor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Hill, L.J.; Reich, W.J.; Rowan, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an understanding of the international commercial nuclear power industry today and how the industry is evolving. This industry includes reactor vendors, product lines, and utility customers. The evolving structure of the international nuclear power reactor industry implies different organizations making decisions within the nuclear power industry, different outside constraints on those decisions, and different priorities than with the previous structure. At the same time, cultural factors, technical constraints, and historical business relationships allow for an understanding of the organization of the industry, what is likely, and what is unlikely. With such a frame of reference, current trends and future directions can be more readily understood

  10. Alkaloids in the pharmaceutical industry: Structure, isolation and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Milan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available By the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century a new era began in medicine, pharmaceutics and chemistry that was strongly connected with alkaloids and alkaloid drugs. Even before that it was known that certain drugs administered in limited doses were medicines, and toxic if taken in larger doses (opium, coke leaves, belladonna roots, monkshood tubers crocus or hemlock seeds. However, the identification, isolation and structural characterization of the active ingredients of the alkaloid drugs was only possible in the mid 20th century by the use of modern extraction equipment and instrumental methods (NMR, X-ray diffraction and others.In spite of continuing use over a long time, there is still great interest in investigating new drugs, potential raw materials for the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the more detailed investigation and definition of bio-active components and the indication of their activity range, and the partial synthesis of new alkaloid molecules based on natural alkaloids. The scope of these investigations, especially in the field of semi-synthesis is to make better use of the bio-active ingredients of alkaloid drugs, i.e. to improve the pharmacological effect (stronger and prolonged effect of the medicine, decreased toxicity and side effects, or to extend or change the applications. A combined classification of alkaloids was used, based on the chemical structure and origin, i.e. the source of their isolation to study alkaloid structure. For practical reasons, the following classification of alkaloids was used: ergot alkaloids, poppy alkaloids, tropanic alkaloids purine derivative alkaloids, carbon-cyclic alkaloids, and other alkaloids. The second part of this report presents a table of general procedures for alkaloid isolation from plant drugs (extraction by water non-miscible solvents, extraction by water-miscible solvents and extraction by diluted acid solutions. Also, methods for obtaining chelidonine and

  11. The trilogy nuclear technology-quality-reliability in nuclear energy: the interface technical regulation/industrial norm in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Jose Ribeiro da

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, it is tried to find out a compatibility among Regulations (mandatory) documents governing Quality Assurance Requirements for the Nuclear Industry (like IAEA/50-C-QA, IAEA/50-SG-QA1, IAEA/50-SG-QA7, and others), with similar documents prescribing same requirements for COnventional Industry (like ISO/900 Series), using the technical support of the prescriptions contained in the IAEA/TR-328 documents. Harmonization and compatibility of these documents is a great deal for Industries engaged -directly or indirectly - in the Nuclear Technology, taking into account that such compatibility can avoid troubles for already ISO/9000 Series Certified Industries in the fulfillment of its contract requirements in the nuclear field. Its also represents in that field a symbiosis between Technical Regulations (mandatory) and Voluntary Standards (Industrial, Consensual Standards). (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Structural remedies in merger regulation in a Cournot framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medvedev, Andrei

    -, 2004-006 (2004), s. 1-21 ISSN 1572-4042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : merger regulation * structural remedies * auction Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.tilburguniversity.nl/tilec/publications/discussionpapers/2004-006.pdf

  13. Compliance of anti-smoking regulations by cigarette industry in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, A.; Rasool, M.; Shah, Z.; Hammad, M.; Utmanzai, A.; Wahab, F.; Siddique, I.; Ahmad, J.; Ahmad, S.; Farooq, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The hazards of cigarette smoking and its increasing consumption are well known despite the ongoing tussle between the tobacco industry and global governments. To curb the menace of smoking, anti-smoking laws have been enforced from time to time by various governments. In 2003, Ministry of Health (MoH) Government of Pakistan has imposed certain regulations on cigarette manufacturing industry. The aim of this study was to highlight the compliance of the industry with these regulations. Methods: A cross-sectional study of major cigarette selling shops was conducted in Abbottabad. It was aimed at determining the availability of total cigarette brands and their compliance with the regulations and also to find out attributes of cigarette customers. Results: A total of 39 varieties of 18 cigarette brands are available in Abbottabad city, out of which 71.8% are imported varieties. A total of 38.4% varieties have displayed health warnings (28.2% pictorial health warning, 10.2% have written health warning. Majority of cigarette customers are between 20-40 years of age, while 5.6% customers include youngsters between 10-20 years of age. Female customers, accounting for 8% of total cigarette customers, buy only those brands which have not displayed the health warning. Conclusions: Observed compliance with governmental regulation for displaying health warning is 39% which is far less than desired. Sale of cigarette to children is also practiced. Ministry of Health (MoH) should assure the display of these warnings on all the brands so that smokers must be fully aware about the risk involved in smoking. (author)

  14. Strategic Management of Technology and the Structuring of Industrial Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole H.

    The thesis explores the following question: 'How do actants in industrial companies partake in the enactment of locally embedded and globally reaching industrial networks through participation in technology development activities?' It draws on Actor Netwok Theories and analyses three case stories...... from the hearing aid industry. In one of the case stories is shown how three Danish companies became a 'centre of translation' by collaborating on the development of the software standard NOAH....

  15. Industry interactions of the electronic structure research community in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Goldbeck, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This report explores the interactions of the academic Psi-k community with industry. The evidence presented is mainly based on a semi-quantitative survey and interviews of network members. All Psi-k board, working group and advisory group members, a total of about 120 people were invited to take part in the study, and 40 people responded, representing more than 400 scientists from 33 different institutions in 12 European countries. 90% of respondents work with industry. Main industry sectors ...

  16. Regulator and industry Co-operation on safety research: challenges and opportunities. Final report and answers to questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    A Group has been set up by the CSNI to identify and review the issues which hinder closer co-operation on research between regulators and industry, and to propose possible ways for resolving such issues while maintaining regulatory independence in decision-making. The Group has analyzed the potential advantages and disadvantages of regulator-industry collaboration in safety research and has also provided indications on how to overcome possible difficulties that can arise from such collaboration. The Group focused in particular on the issue of regulator independence, on means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry

  17. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  18. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either by facilitat...... describes the steps in the analysis of the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA and its possible relation to splicing. As a working example, we use the case of yeast and the problem of the recognition of the 3' splice site (3'ss).......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either...

  19. consumer preparedness, knowledge, and opinions about practices and regulations of the funeral industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, E T; Kidd, C A

    1983-01-01

    This study focuses on consumers' level of knowledge, opinions, and degree of preparedness concerning selected practices and regulations of the funeral industry. Questionnaires were returned by 75 percent of the sample of faculty and staff at a large university. Opinions of respondents rejected the status quo concerning various practices and regulations of the funeral industry, indicating a desire to support newly suggested changes in the industry. Preparedness scores indicated that almost 9 out of 10 of the respondents were quite unprepared for their own funerals. The mean achievement score regarding knowledge as measured by the Consumer Funeral Test, which was developed for this study, was 4.0, representing 57 percent correct. Significant statistical relationships existed between knowledge scores and the age, education, and sex of the respondents; those who were older and had more education scored higher, and men scored higher than women. No relationships existed, however, among knowledge, opinion, and preparedness scores and the demographic variables of age, education, income, sex, and religion, raising the fundamental question of the value of funeral information programs for consumers.

  20. The decision concerning the nuclear investment: influence of the industrial structure; La decision d'investissement nucleaire: l'influence de la structure industrielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerminet, M.L

    2000-10-01

    This report aims to analyze the investment behavior of an enterprise producing nuclear origin electric power in an european market opening to the competition. In this context, the industrial structure controlled by the governor decides the investment in a marginal equipment: either an integrated monopole structure which leads to a regulation at the cost price rate of return; or a pool structure in which the governor intervene to fix the cost price at the marginal cost level given by the main technology of the gas combined cycles. (A.L.B.)

  1. Equity, tariffing, regulation: analysis of the cost allocation policies of an electric utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezzina, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, an analysis in terms of equity of policies of tariffing regulation and cost allocation of a multi-products electric company (organized as a natural monopoly) is proposed. The goal is double. In a standard point of view, the first goal is to show that today's literature in the domains of public economy, industrial organization and regulation (traditionally based on efficiency considerations) is able to supply reading keys for the analysis of moral philosophy problems. In a positive point of view, the second goal is to demonstrate that the equity criterion is operational enough to judge tariffing management practices in a particular industrial environment and can be used as a regulatory instrument by an ethics-concerned authority. The document is organized in two parts. An ethical and economical analysis of the equity concepts between allocation efficiency, production efficiency and tariffing practices of companies is proposed first. A particular equity concept is considered which is ready to be implemented for the regulation of a public utility, and the ins and outs expected with an equity theory of tariffing practices are evoked. In a second part, an analysis of goal conflicts between the authority and the regulated company is made in a point of view of equity regulation and cost allocation. An improved equity criterion is defined first, from which a measure is built and becomes a tool for the regulatory authority. Then, its use by a regulatory authority fully informed or encountering information asymmetry problems are analyzed in order to show its stakes on the cost allocation and tariffing policies of the company. (J.S.)

  2. Effect of industrial effluents on the growth and anatomical structures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors investigated the impact of industrial effluents from 5 different industrial concerns in Lagos, Nigeria on Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus). During the study, it was observed that these effluents induced detrimental effects on the flowering, fruiting, stem length, leaf width and leaf length of okra. Other parameters ...

  3. Growth and Structure of Tanzania's Industrial Sector Investment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... agro-based industrial activities. Tanzania being basically an agricultural country such investment will have a multiplier effect in terms of employment generation partly due to the linkages effects which such industries might have to the rest of the economy. African Journal of Finance and Management Vol.8(2) 2000: 46-54 ...

  4. How biotechnology is changing the structure of the seed industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijman, W.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    The seed industry has been in a state of restructuring for many years now. New firms have entered the industry and old players have merged. Firms from various backgrounds now compete in supplying seed to agriculture and horticulture: Traditional seed companies, new biotechnology firms, agrochemical

  5. Gasoline risk management: a compendium of regulations, standards, and industry practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    This paper is part of a special series of publications regarding gasoline toxicology testing and gasoline risk management; this article covers regulations, standards, and industry practices concerning gasoline risk management. Gasoline is one of the highest volume liquid fuel products produced globally. In the U.S., gasoline production in 2013 was the highest on record (API, 2013). Regulations such as those pursuant to the Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) and many others provide the U.S. federal government with extensive authority to regulate gasoline composition, manufacture, storage, transportation and distribution practices, worker and consumer exposure, product labeling, and emissions from engines and other sources designed to operate on this fuel. The entire gasoline lifecycle-from manufacture, through distribution, to end-use-is subject to detailed, complex, and overlapping regulatory schemes intended to protect human health, welfare, and the environment. In addition to these legal requirements, industry has implemented a broad array of voluntary standards and best management practices to ensure that risks from gasoline manufacturing, distribution, and use are minimized. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Industry self-regulation to improve student health: quantifying changes in beverage shipments to schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, Robert F; Fitzpatrick, Brendan M; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    We developed a data collection and monitoring system to independently evaluate the self-regulatory effort to reduce the number of beverage calories available to children during the regular and extended school day. We have described the data collection procedures used to verify data supplied by the beverage industry and quantified changes in school beverage shipments. Using a proprietary industry data set collected in 2005 and semiannually in 2007 through 2010, we measured the total volume of beverage shipments to elementary, middle, and high schools to monitor intertemporal changes in beverage volumes, the composition of products delivered to schools, and portion sizes. We compared data with findings from existing research of the school beverage landscape and a separate data set based on contracts between schools and beverage bottling companies. Between 2004 and the 2009-2010 school year, the beverage industry reduced calories shipped to schools by 90%. On a total ounces basis, shipments of full-calorie soft drinks to schools decreased by 97%. Industry self-regulation, with the assistance of a transparent and independent monitoring process, can be a valuable tool in improving public health outcomes.

  7. Top priorities for alcohol regulators in the United States: protecting public health or the alcohol industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, Sarah M

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes alcohol industry involvement in the 2010 annual conference proceedings of the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators (NCSLA) in the United States. The author attended the conference, observed conference attendees and panelists and identified key themes in the panel sessions. The NCSLA Annual Meeting took place 20-24 June 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. NCSLA meeting attendees and panelists were professionals from state alcohol control systems; federal government agencies; and companies representing the alcohol industry. The total number of conference attendees and participants were counted as well as the number of attendees and participants from regulator, industry and public health sectors. More than two-thirds (72.2%) of the 187 conference attendees were from alcohol producers, importers, wholesalers, retailers or their attorneys. Nearly two-thirds (65.0%) of the 40 panelists were from the alcohol industry. The author of this paper was the only attendee, and the only panelist, representing public health policy. The National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in the United States is dominated by the global companies that produce, import, distribute and sell alcohol, highlighting a lack of public health considerations within the Association's liquor control agenda [corrected]. © 2012 Alcohol Justice.

  8. Recommendations for a coordinated approach to regulating the uranium recovery industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, K.; Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Gormley, P.; Kim, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    A number of regulatory positions that are of central importance to the uranium recovery industry today have their origins in regulatory interpretations that were developed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) staff almost two decades ago, shortly after Congress first granted the Commission the direct authority to regulate uranium mill tailings and related wastes by enacting the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) as an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Consequently, several key regulatory positions that govern uranium recovery activities today were developed at a time when the regulatory programme for uranium milling operations, including the management and disposition of uranium mill tailings and related wastes, was in the earliest stages of conception, and when the uranium recovery industry was at or near peak levels of production. Often, the policies and positions that were developed by the Commission staff dining this period, and subsequently, were developed in an ad hoc manner, rather than being formulated as part of a deliberate, coordinated regulatory strategy. Moreover, many of these positions and policies were based on assumptions that would later turn out to be completely incorrect regarding the future development of the uranium recovery industry and of the regulatory programme governing the industry. In the twenty years that have elapsed since Congress first enacted UMTRCA, a robust programme has been created for the comprehensive regulation of uranium recovery activities. At the same time, the nature of the uranium recovery industry has changed dramatically. As a result, some of the policies and positions that were developed by Commission staff almost two decades ago, that may have seemed reasonable at the time they were developed, appear increasingly unreasonable and inappropriate today, given the current regulatory framework and the realities of the modern uranium recovery industry. This raises concerns

  9. The Norwegian electricity industry: a deregulated market in a regulated Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diesen, E

    1994-12-01

    According to the 1990 Energy Act, the hydro power based Norwegian electricity supply industry was deregulated. The main aim of the act was to promote efficient utilisation of resources through introduction of competition. The act introduced open access for everyone to the network and fair and non-discriminatory pricing for network services. The consumers have now a free choice of suppliers. The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration, NVE, has the responsibility for regulating the monopolized parts of the industry - the network - As well as supervising the competitive parts - production and trading. The Norwegian transmission grid has several connections with the neighbouring countries. Connections to Germany and the Netherlands are planned. The foreign power exchange is primarily based on exploiting the specific properties of the hydro based system by exporting peak power at high prices and import base load in off peak periods. (author).

  10. Establishing a Nuclear Industrial Structure The Spanish Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, L.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear industry is nationalistic all over the world. This fact is at first glance rather surprising, since one would guess that the localization drive should start with segments of industry of a less sophisticated nature. The reason probably lies on the fact that nuclear disciplines are new and can be conceived as an easier task for planners than other techniques where industrial relationships are already established. The process of increasing domestic content has important implications and crucial decisions have to be made. A general process of technology transfer has to be assured, investments have to be made in new plant and a sizable number of engineers and technicians has to be trained. Technology transfer in the nuclear field seems to be the practical extent dictated by the availability of raw materials and the economy of scale for some components. Table V lists the content achieved in specific classes of equipment. The process has been successful and has enabled Spanish Industry to be present in the world market. Countries embarking in similar programs have expressed interest in the Spanish process as representative of medium development industry that, by determination and serious work, has achieved an advanced status, overcoming deficiencies that are not normally encountered in more developed societies. Spanish Industry is of course ready to share its experience with interested parties, thus contributing to orient local industries by advising them on the successes achieved as an example to follow, and the mistakes made, to prevent occurrence

  11. A study of hierarchical structure on South China industrial electricity-consumption correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Can-Zhong; Lin, Ji-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Based on industrial electricity-consumption data of five southern provinces of China from 2005 to 2013, we study the industrial correlation mechanism with MST (minimal spanning tree) and HT (hierarchical tree) models. First, we comparatively analyze the industrial electricity-consumption correlation structure in pre-crisis and after-crisis period using MST model and Bootstrap technique of statistical reliability test of links. Results exhibit that all industrial electricity-consumption trees of five southern provinces of China in pre-crisis and after-crisis time are in formation of chain, and the "center-periphery structure" of those chain-like trees is consistent with industrial specialization in classical industrial chain theory. Additionally, the industrial structure of some provinces is reorganized and transferred in pre-crisis and after-crisis time. Further, the comparative analysis with hierarchical tree and Bootstrap technique demonstrates that as for both observations of GD and overall NF, the industrial electricity-consumption correlation is non-significant clustered in pre-crisis period, whereas it turns significant clustered in after-crisis time. Therefore we propose that in perspective of electricity-consumption, their industrial structures are directed to optimized organization and global correlation. Finally, the analysis of distance of HTs verifies that industrial reorganization and development may strengthen market integration, coordination and correlation of industrial production. Except GZ, other four provinces have a shorter distance of industrial electricity-consumption correlation in after-crisis period, revealing a better performance of regional specialization and integration.

  12. The politics and strategy of industry self-regulation: the pharmaceutical industry's principles for ethical direct-to-consumer advertising as a deceptive blocking strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Denis G; Oakley, James L

    2013-06-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry lobbies European regulators to permit direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs in the European Union, we found that five leading companies violated industry-developed and -promulgated standards for ethical advertising in the United States. Utilizing multiple data sources and methods, we demonstrate a consistent failure by companies that market erectile dysfunction drugs to comply with the industry's guiding principles for ethical DTCA over a four-year period despite pledges of compliance by company leaders. Noncompliance resulted in children being exposed to sexually themed promotional messages more than 100 billion times. We argue that the guidelines are a coordinated effort by the industry to prevent unwanted federal regulation, and we introduce the concept of a blocking strategy to explain company behavior and to advance theoretical understanding of firms' public affairs strategies. We recommend policy responses to prevent deceptive practices, protect children from adult content, and promote genuine health care education.

  13. Regional tourist industry in context of principles of regional socioeconomic systems self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Gennadyevich Shelomentsev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with basic principles of self-regulation of tourist complexes as regional socio-economic systems on the example of Sverdlovsk region. These include the principles of goal setting and the necessary diversity of economic entropy: in this case, these are important for the tourism industry and the human and natural resource and ecological potential. Is it shown how a tourist complex influences the socio-economic development of regional economic systems. In particular, tourism influences some of migration processes. Tourism development strategy in the Russian Federation at the tourist center level is analyzed. The need to develop such a strategy is due to the transition to market relations and, as a consequence, complexity of governmental regulation. It is substantiated that Sverdlovsk region is a subject to following strategy and might be successful in various sectors of tourism: business and congress and exhibition, urban entertainment, family and shopping tourism, sports, medical and recreational tourism.

  14. Regulating specific organic substances and heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharged to municipal wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Munk, L.; Pedersen, F.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the extension of wastewater treatment plants to nutrient removal and the development towards reuse of sludge m agriculture, new guidelines for regulating industrial discharges m Denmark were needed. The paper describes how a concept for regulating the discharge of specific organic substances...... substances, present knowledge of fate and effects in biological treatment plants is too scarce to underpin the setting of general standards. Therefore, it has been decided to base the developed priority system on the data used in the EEC-system for classification of hazardous chemicals. This includes ready...... degradability, defined by the OECD-test, bio-sorption and bio-accumulation, defined by the octanol/water distribution coefficient and toxic effects on water organisms. Several potential effects of seven heavy metals have been evaluated, and the most critical effects were found to be the quality criteria...

  15. The Impact of Uniform Prudential Regulations Implemented at the Level of European Insurance Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elly Naghi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While the financial markets have to face systemic and systematic risks, especially the insurance industries, the national supervisory authorities intend to implement regulation systems as uniform as possible at regional level and in the same time as conservatory as possible from the point of view of the risks accepted. The present paper intends to accurately analyze the regulation systems of important insurance markets (as tradition or volume of premiums – such as RBC, SST, Solvency II in order to stress the similarities of these models but more important the differences that generated a different rigidity degree of the insurance companies, in other words, a different minimum capital requirement. The paper intends to illustrate the financial and organizational impact of the European model Solvency has on the insurance companies, through its supplemental requirements, introduced by the supervisory authorities as a reaction to the recent financial crises.

  16. Dynamic analysis of an industrial structure with fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper deals with the dynamic analysis of a nuclear reactor subjected to a shock loading with fluid-structure interaction modeling. The general framework of the study is that of linear vibrations, which are investigated for coupled fluid-structure problems. From a methodological point of view, energy deformation and modal mass calculation are exposed for elasto-acoustic systems. From an industrial point of view, the influence of elasto-acoustic coupling effects are highlighted for the studied structure. The dynamic analysis of the coupled system is carried out with various procedures (static, spectral and temporal methods), which are exposed and compared. As a general result, the spectral method is proved to be the most effective for the industrial problem. From the numerical point of view, the discretization procedure is based on a finite element method for the coupled problem, using a displacement and pressure-displacement potential coupled formulation with axi-symmetric representation of the problem unknowns. A finite element code is developed within MATLAB for the specific study, the numerical calculations presented in the paper are used as reference test cases for integration of the (u,p,φ) formulation in the commercial finite element code Ansys. (author)

  17. The adventitia: essential regulator of vascular wall structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Yeager, Michael E; El Kasmi, Karim C; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V; Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette R; Frid, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The vascular adventitia acts as a biological processing center for the retrieval, integration, storage, and release of key regulators of vessel wall function. It is the most complex compartment of the vessel wall and is composed of a variety of cells, including fibroblasts, immunomodulatory cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), progenitor cells, vasa vasorum endothelial cells and pericytes, and adrenergic nerves. In response to vascular stress or injury, resident adventitial cells are often the first to be activated and reprogrammed to influence the tone and structure of the vessel wall; to initiate and perpetuate chronic vascular inflammation; and to stimulate expansion of the vasa vasorum, which can act as a conduit for continued inflammatory and progenitor cell delivery to the vessel wall. This review presents the current evidence demonstrating that the adventitia acts as a key regulator of vascular wall function and structure from the outside in.

  18. Federal regulation of the pipeline industry: a summary review. [Effects on use of energy-conservation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W. F.

    1977-05-31

    The principal purposes of this report are: (1) identification of the jurisdiction areas of the Federal pipeline-regulating agencies, and (2) examination of the amenability of the regulatory system to the introduction of energy-conservative new technology into the pipeline industry. The history, scope, and agency structure of state and Federal regulation are recounted and some gaps, overlaps, and ambiguities are identified. The only significant inhibitory effects upon technological innovation are found to derive from the FPC and ICC limits upon profit, the 1941 Justice Department consent decree limiting dividends to shipper-owned pipelines, and the income tax rules governing recovery of investment credits and startup losses. Effects of these limits are explored by simulation studies using the Systems, Science and Software pipeline economic model (PEM). Two new concepts of regulation are proposed which would neutralize the inhibitory effect of the present regulatory system and would motivate pipeline operators to conserve energy: (1) use of a ''national equivalent value'' in the economic tradeoff analyses which justify entry of a technological innovation into the rate base (valuation), and (2) a ''valuation allowance'' which would reverse the presently often-existing situation and insure that the pipeline operator would realize a greater profit from saving energy than from wasting it.

  19. Soil structural quality assessment for soil protection regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Soil quality assessment is rapidly developing worldwide, though mostly focused on the monitoring of arable land and soil fertility. Soil protection regulations assess soil quality differently, focusing on priority pollutants and threshold values. The soil physical properties are weakly considered, due to lack of consensus and experimental difficulties faced with characterization. Non-disputable, easy to perform and inexpensive methods should be available for environmental regulation to be applied, which is unfortunately not the case. As a consequence, quantitative soil physical protection regulation is not applied, and inexpensive soil physical quality indicators for arable soil management are not available. Overcoming these limitations was the objective of a research project funded by the Swiss federal office for environment (FOEN). The main results and the perspectives of application are given in this presentation. A first step of the research was to characterize soils in a good structural state (reference soils) under different land use. The structural quality was assessed with field expertise and Visual Evaluation of the Soil Structure (VESS), and the physical properties were assessed with Shrinkage analysis. The relationships between the physical properties and the soil constituents were linear and highly determined. They represent the reference properties of the corresponding soils. In a second step, the properties of physically degraded soils were analysed and compared to the reference properties. This allowed defining the most discriminant parameters departing the different structure qualities and their threshold limits. Equivalent properties corresponding to these parameters but inexpensive and easy to determine were defined and tested. More than 90% of the samples were correctly classed with this method, which meets, therefore, the requirements for practical application in regulation. Moreover, result-oriented agri-environmental schemes for soil quality

  20. Entry regulations, welfare and determinants of market structure

    OpenAIRE

    Maican, Florin; Orth, Matilda

    2015-01-01

    We use a dynamic oligopoly model of entry and exit with store-type differentiation to evaluate how entry regulations affect profitability, market structure and welfare. Based on unique data for all retail food stores in Sweden, we estimate demand, recover variable profits, and estimate entry costs and fixed costs by store type. Counterfactual policy experiments show that welfare increases when competition is enhanced by lower entry costs. Protecting small stores by imposing licensing fees on ...

  1. Structural financing and management of investment projects in the Nigerian mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akingbola, E. B. O.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral industry is attractive because of the diversity and abundance of the deposits. The economic and financial implications of exploiting these are considered. The issues discussed include capital requirement, international outlook, investment opportunities in the mineral industry, oil and gas, solid minerals, attracting investment into the mineral industry,structural financing, macro economic stability. The paper concludes that the ability of the industry to continue attracting foreign capital is crucial to its survival, growth and development

  2. The indoor UV tanning industry: a review of skin cancer risk, health benefit claims, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jody A; Sorace, Michael; Spencer, James; Siegel, Daniel M

    2005-12-01

    Nearly 30 million people tan indoors in the United States annually, including 2.3 million adolescents. Despite increased evidence on the dangers of artificial UV radiation, the popularity of indoor tanning is growing. We aim to assess the following 3 entities: (1) the association of indoor tanning with skin cancer; (2) statements regarding the health benefits of indoor tanning, especially regarding the production of vitamin D; and (3) current regulation of the tanning industry in the United States. We conducted a narrative review of the literature. Indoor tanning poses great risks. Studies support the role of artificial UV radiation in cutaneous carcinogenesis. Despite claims by the tanning industry, artificial tanning is not a safe or necessary way to increase systemic vitamin D levels. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization have acknowledged the risks of indoor tanning. Nonetheless, regulations limiting tanning in the United States are surprisingly sparse. Systematic review of the literature was not performed. Health care providers must increase efforts to warn and educate the public and government about the dangers of UV radiation.

  3. Some design lessons from market-based greenhouse gas regulation in the restructured Australian electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGill, Iain; Outhred, Hugh; Nolles, Karel

    2006-01-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in the use of market-based policy instruments for climate change regulation in the electricity sector. These mechanisms would seem to offer some efficiency and flexibility advantages over more traditional regulatory approaches, while being highly compatible with competitive market-based electricity industries. Australia has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of both electricity industry restructuring and market-based environmental instruments. This paper first outlines some of these recent policy developments. In particular, we describe the objectives, design and outcomes to date of electricity industry restructuring, the Mandatory Renewable Energy Target, the NSW Greenhouse Benchmarks, the Queensland 13% Gas scheme and Government accredited Green Power. From this, we draw some key design lessons for such market-based instruments. These include the perils of abstraction in scheme design, the vital importance of setting appropriate baselines in 'baseline and credit' schemes, the possibility that such measures may interact in ways that reduce their environmental effectiveness, 'market for lemon' risks with tradable instruments that have measurement, verification or 'additionality' difficulties, and the challenges of creating transparent liquid markets for these mechanisms. The mixed performance of these Australian schemes to date illustrates the need for great care in designing such market-based approaches

  4. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  5. Some design lessons from market-based greenhouse gas regulation in the restructured Australian electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGill, Iain [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)] e-mail: i.macgill@unsw.edu.au; Outhred, Hugh [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Nolles, Karel [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2006-01-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in the use of market-based policy instruments for climate change regulation in the electricity sector. These mechanisms would seem to offer some efficiency and flexibility advantages over more traditional regulatory approaches, while being highly compatible with competitive market-based electricity industries. Australia has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of both electricity industry restructuring and market-based environmental instruments. This paper first outlines some of these recent policy developments. In particular, we describe the objectives, design and outcomes to date of electricity industry restructuring, the Mandatory Renewable Energy Target, the NSW Greenhouse Benchmarks, the Queensland 13% Gas scheme and Government accredited Green Power. From this, we draw some key design lessons for such market-based instruments. These include the perils of abstraction in scheme design, the vital importance of setting appropriate baselines in 'baseline and credit' schemes, the possibility that such measures may interact in ways that reduce their environmental effectiveness, 'market for lemon' risks with tradable instruments that have measurement, verification or 'additionality' difficulties, and the challenges of creating transparent liquid markets for these mechanisms. The mixed performance of these Australian schemes to date illustrates the need for great care in designing such market-based approaches.

  6. Some design lessons from market-based greenhouse gas regulation in the restructured Australian electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iain MacGill; Hugh Outhred; Karel Nolles [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications

    2006-01-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in the use of market-based policy instruments for climate change regulation in the electricity sector. These mechanisms would seem to offer some efficiency and flexibility advantages over more traditional regulatory approaches, while being highly compatible with competitive market-based electricity industries. Australia has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of both electricity industry restructuring and market-based environmental instruments. This paper first outlines some of these recent policy developments. It then describes the objectives, design and outcomes to date of electricity industry restructuring, the Mandatory Renewable Energy Target, the NSW Greenhouse Benchmarks, the Queensland 13% Gas scheme and Government accredited Green Power. From this, some key design lessons are drawn for such market-based instruments. These include the perils of abstraction in scheme design, the vital importance of setting appropriate baselines in 'baseline and credit' schemes, the possibility that such measures may interact in ways that reduce their environmental effectiveness, 'market for lemon' risks with tradable instruments that have measurement, verification or 'additionality' difficulties, and the challenges of creating transparent liquid markets for these mechanisms. The mixed performance of these Australian schemes to date illustrates the need for great care in designing such market-based approaches. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Hazardous emissions, operating practices, and air regulations at industrial wood-fired facilities in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Since October of 1988 the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulated over four hundred substances as hazardous air pollutants. The rule regulates new as well as existing sources of air pollution in Wisconsin. Consequently, all permits to operate an air pollution source in Wisconsin must address the hazardous air emissions potential of the source. While widely perceived as a clean-burning fuel, wood is often burned in a manner which clearly results in significant emissions of very hazardous air pollutants. Research conducted on a 20 million BTU per hour wood-fired spreader stoker boiler in northern Wisconsin showed that this boiler has the potential to emit 0.022 pound of benzene and 0.012 pound of formaldehyde per ton (lb/ton) of wood fired. Recent stack tests at more than a dozen other small industrial wood-fired facilities in Wisconsin show a range of formaldehyde emissions of 0.0007--0.1950 lb/ton. Work at Birchwood Lumber ampersand Veneer showed that the benzene and formaldehyde emission rates under good firing conditions are an order of magnitude lower than the benzene and formaldehyde emission rates under poor firing conditions. This finding has supported Wisconsin's regulatory approach of encouraging wood-fired facilities to enhance the quality of the combustion process as a technique to minimize the hazardous air pollution potential of industrial wood combustion. The Wisconsin strategy is to define open-quotes good combustion technologyclose quotes through easily measurable combustion parameters rather than emission standards. This paper presents several techniques in use in Wisconsin to comply with open-quotes good combustion technologyclose quotes for industrial wood-fired furnaces. These techniques include fuel blending overfire air, furnace insulation, and proper grate design

  8. Engineering structural integrity issues in the pulp and paper industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, A.; Singbeil, D.

    2002-01-01

    ESI issues for Pulp and Paper (P and P) plant are reviewed. Five typical processes are covered, namely: Chemical Pulping, Bleaching, Chemical Recovery, Mechanical Pulping and Papermaking. Equipment, chemical environments and failure modes are summarized with examples from each process. Pressure, temperature, corrosion and rotation are typical sources of risk, which is managed by appropriate inspection. The nature of the P and P Industry and its technology supply is summarized: current trends are consolidation and outsourcing. Three examples are presented to illustrate typical ESI issues: deaerator cracking where the P and P Industry alerted others to this serious cross-industry problem; pressure vessel safety factors and inconsistent international codes; and caustic cracking in continuous kraft digesters, which required rapid and concerted action to diagnose and control. In the future better predictability, data-bases, more formal risk based inspection and fitness-for-service assessments are envisaged. (author)

  9. An assessment of the regulatory arrangements in the minibus taxi industry in South Africa: a primer for self-regulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlanga, Lebogang S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available through the introduction of governance i.e. self-regulation. Based on the assessment of the interaction between regulation, and industry governance; it is argued that newer forms of management and control must be explored, embraced and appreciated...

  10. Productivity and environmental regulations. A long run analysis of the Swedish industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braennlund, Runar

    2008-01-15

    The aim with this study is to evaluate the potential effects on productivity development in the Swedish manufacturing industry due to changes in environmental regulations over a long time period. The issue is closely related to the so called Porter hypothesis, i.e. whether environmental regulations (of the right kind) that usually is associated with costs triggers mechanisms that enhances efficiency and productivity that finally outweighs the initial cost increase. To test our hypothesis we use historical data spanning over the period 1913-1999 for the Swedish manufacturing sector. The model used is a two stage model were the total factor productivity is calculated in the first stage, and is then used in a second stage as the dependent variable in a regression analysis where one of the independent variables is a measure of regulatory intensity. The results show that the productivity growth has varied considerably over time. The least productive period was the second world war period, whereas the period with the highest productivity growth was the period after the second world war until 1970. Development of emissions follows essentially the same path as productivity growth until 1970. After 1970, however, there is a decoupling in the sense that emissions are decreasing, both in absolute level and as emissions per unit of value added. A rather robust conclusion is that there is no evident relationship between environmental regulations and productivity growth. One explanation is that regulations and productivity actually is unrelated. Another potential explanation is that the regulatory measure used does not capture perceived regulations in a correct way

  11. Changes in the North American ferroalloys industry structure and trends in the industry during the past 20 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didaleusky, J.R.; Jorgenson, J.D.; Corathers, L.A.; Fenton, M.D.; Kuck, P.H.; Papp, J.F.; Polyak, D.E.; Shedd, Kim B.

    2010-01-01

    This analysis of changes in the North American (Canada, Mexico, and the United States) ferroalloys industry between 1987 and 2007 includes the locations and types of ferroalloy plants in North America and the changes in production, imports, exports, pricing, and the structure of ownership since 1987, which was just prior to the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Significant events affect the supply of and demand for North American ferroalloys -- changes in end uses, global industry structure, political stability, and technology. Mergers and acquisitions in the ferroalloys industries of North America and their impact on trade are other significant issues in international trade as are antidumping and countervailing duty orders, and trade agreements and policies related to ferroalloys occurring during this period and affecting the North American region. Raw materials and energy supply to the ferroalloy industry, the logistics involved in the trade of North American ferroalloys, and the use of ferroalloys within major downstream industries are also important factors. Emphasis is placed on the bulk ferroalloys—ferrochromium, ferromanganese, ferrosilicon, and silicomanganese. Other ferroalloys investigated include those of boron, molybdenum, nickel, niobium, titanium, tungsten, and vanadium.

  12. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Wendi L.; Love, H. Alan; Capps, Oral, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Determinants of merger and acquisition activity in the food industry are analyzed using logit regression analysis. Factors affecting the food processing, food retailing and food service sectors are considered. Results indicate merger and acquisition activity in all three sectors are significantly influenced by antitrust activity, profitability and real gross domestic product.

  13. Structure, dynamics and movement patterns of the Australian pig industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, I J; Davis, J; Sergeant, E S G; Garner, M G

    2014-03-01

    To assess management practices and movement patterns that could influence the establishment and spread of exotic animal diseases (EAD) in pigs in Australia. A literature review of published information and a telephone survey of 370 pig producers owning >10 pigs who were registered with the PigPass national vendor declaration scheme. The movement and marketing patterns of Australian pig producers interviewed were divided into two groups based predominantly on the size of the herd. Major pig producers maintain closed herds, use artificial insemination and market direct to abattoirs. Smaller producers continue to purchase from saleyards and market to other farms, abattoirs and through saleyards in an apparently opportunistic fashion. The role of saleyards in the Australian pig industry continues to decline, with 92% of all pigs marketed directly from farm to abattoir. This survey described movement patterns that will assist in modelling the potential spread of EAD in the Australian pig industry. Continued movement towards vertical integration and closed herds in the Australian pig industry effectively divides the industry into a number of compartments that mitigate against the widespread dissemination of disease to farms adopting these practices. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Changes in Business Structures: Challenges for Management of Libyan Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abouazoum, Alafi; de Bruijn, E.J.; Steenhuis, H.J.; Kaynak, E.; Harcar, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    Libya has become a transition economy due to global industrial and political changes in the past decades. Being for long time under government control has created a number of challenges for the management of the SOEs. The most challenging aspect is firm performance improvement. Based on a pilot

  15. Industrial robots application in the construction of buildings and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzhbovskiy Gennady

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposals on the use of modernized industrial robots in the construction of low-rise buildings are formulated. The necessary parameters of such a mechanism are established. The time necessary for building the walls of a two-story house is determined. Features of the robots use on the construction site are described.

  16. Pollution prevention and industrial transformation; Evoking structural changes within companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Theo; Hofman, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Pollution prevention has developed as an attractive method for improving the environmental performance of companies. Often the concept is promoted in a project format, for instance in a regional perspective or for a specific sector of industry. This article analyzes the contribution of pollution

  17. Whom Should We Imitate? Imitation Strategy and Industry Knowledge Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posen, Hart E.; Yi, Sangyoon; Lee, Jeho

    Imitation is a common practice within and across industries. Recent research has begun to explore the potential of imitation as a purposeful strategy. But the question of what constitutes a “good” imitation strategy is as yet not well understood. This study examines the efficacy of two canonical ...

  18. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  19. Problems of standardizing and technical regulation in the electric power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabchak, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    A mandatory condition to ensure normal operation of a power system and efficiency in the sector is standardization and legal regulation of technological activities of electric power engineering entities and consumers. Compared to the times of USSR, the present-time technical guidance documents are not mandatory to follow in most cases, being of an advisory nature due to the lack of new ones. During the last five years, the industry has been showing a deterioration of the situation in terms of ensuring reliability and engineering controllability as a result of the dominant impact of short-term market stimuli and the differences in basic technological policies. In absence of clear requirements regarding the engineering aspects of such activities, production operation does not contribute to the preserving of technical integrity of the Russian power system, which leads to the loss of performance capability and controllability and causes disturbances in the power supply to consumers. The result of this problem is a high rate of accident incidence. The dynamics of accidents by the type of equipment is given, indicating a persisting trend of growth in the number of accidents, which are of a systematic nature. Several problematic aspects of engineering activities of electric power engineering entities, requiring standardization and legal regulation are pointed out: in the domestic power system, a large number of power electrotechnical and generating equipment operate along with systems of regulation, which do not comply with the principles and technical rules representing a framework where the Energy System of Russia is built and functioning

  20. Structure, inhibition, and regulation of essential lipid A enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Zhao, Jinshi

    2017-11-01

    The Raetz pathway of lipid A biosynthesis plays a vital role in the survival and fitness of Gram-negative bacteria. Research efforts in the past three decades have identified individual enzymes of the pathway and have provided a mechanistic understanding of the action and regulation of these enzymes at the molecular level. This article reviews the discovery, biochemical and structural characterization, and regulation of the essential lipid A enzymes, as well as continued efforts to develop novel antibiotics against Gram-negative pathogens by targeting lipid A biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Market Structure and Distribution of Benefits from Agricultural Exports: the Case of the Philippine Mango Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Briones, Roehlano M.

    2013-01-01

    To illuminate the role of agro-export industry in inclusive growth, this case study on Philippine mango focuses on the role of market structure in the distribution of export benefits. It is based on review of industry trends and related studies, open-ended interviews of key informants, and structured interviews of respondents situated along the value chain. The distribution of trade benefits is hypothesized to depend on both vertical and horizontal market structure. The former implies that a ...

  2. Structural changes in industrial electricity use. The case of the pulp and paper industry in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksson, E.; Lundmark, R. [Economics Unit, Department of Business Administration and Social Science, Luleaa University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse altering energy demand patterns and energy factor substitution possibilities over time in the pulp and paper industry in order to increase our understanding of suitable policy options for increasing energy efficiency. The investigation employs a flexible translog cost function and an unbalanced panel data set covering 32 pulp and paper mills over the time period 1974-2005 in Sweden. Specifically, we test whether energy factor demand patterns in the industry for the period 1974-1990 differ from those during the latter period, 1991-2005. The empirical results reveal that even though the Swedish pulp and paper industry is relatively insensitive to changes in energy factor input prices in the short run, we find evidence of significant changes over time. According to the results, the own-price sensitivity of fuel has increased since the 1970s and the 1980s, thus indicating that fuel demand has become more sensitive to short-run changes in relative prices. The estimated cross-price elasticities between electricity and fuel also support the hypothesis of increased substitutability over time. However, the null hypothesis of an equal own-price elasticity of electricity demand across the two time periods cannot be rejected.

  3. Structural change in European power and gas industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    After decades of stability the European power and gas industries are now undergoing fundamental changes. Made possible by policy reforms and technological developments, these changes are largely driven by commercial forces which have developed their own momentum and dynamics. New commercial risks are a key feature of the emerging market order and companies cannot protect themselves through a ''no move strategy''. This report explores the key changes and examines the emerging commercial strategies in response to the new environment. (author)

  4. Transformation of Bread Industry Structure by Consumer Tastes and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    丸山, 泰広; 豊, 智行; 福田, 晋; 甲斐, 諭

    2003-01-01

    Bread industry is classfied two types of business. One type is Bread manufacturer which makes bread and sells them to retailer and supermarket. Another type is Bread self-making bakery which makes bread by themselves and directly sells them to consumer. Bread consumer tastes are freshness and diversification. Bread manufacturar copes with diversification by naking many items. Bread self-making bakery copes with freshness by directly providing consumer. But by a innovation a new group is organ...

  5. Biopolimers – structure, properties and applicability in the foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grabowska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A review of literature data concerning physicochemical properties and possibilities of practical utilisation of the most important natural biopolymers (proteins, celluloses, starch, chitozan are presented in the paper. Biopolymers being renewable natural polymers characterised by several required physicochemical properties (adhesivity, activity, no toxicity, biodegradability constitute more and more interesting processing raw material for various industrial utilisations including environment friendly binding agents for moulding sands. Protein and starch compositions are used as binding agents for moulding and core sands in the foundry industry. Preliminary tests – performed within own research - of modification and utilisation of biopolymers as binding agents for moulding sands are promising from many aspects: technological (adequate properties of moulding sands, ecological (no toxicity, biodegradability and economic (low price. Starch from the polysaccharide group seems to be especially interesting since it is abundant, easily obtainable, biodegradable and the cheapest polymer. At its actual low price and the possibility of using agricultural wastes in the production, problem of utilising starch in many industry branches can become significant, especially in Poland.

  6. Estimating the Contribution of Industry Structure Adjustment to the Carbon Intensity Target: A Case of Guangdong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Industry structure adjustment is an effective measure to achieve the carbon intensity target of Guangdong Province. Accurately evaluating the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target is helpful for the government to implement more flexible and effective policies and measures for CO2 emissions reduction. In this paper, we attempt to evaluate the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target. Firstly, we predict the gross domestic product (GDP with scenario forecasting, industry structure with the Markov chain model, CO2 emissions with a novel correlation mode based on least squares support vector machine, and then we assess the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target of Guangdong during the period of 2011–2015 under nine scenarios. The obtained results show, in the ideal scenario, that the economy will grow at a high speed and the industry structure will be significantly adjusted, and thus the carbon intensity in 2015 will decrease by 25.53% compared to that in 2010, which will make a 130.94% contribution to the carbon intensity target. Meanwhile, in the conservative scenario, the economy will grow at a low speed and the industry structure will be slightly adjusted, and thus the carbon intensity in 2015 will decrease by 23.89% compared to that in 2010, which will make a 122.50% contribution to the carbon intensity target.

  7. Governance and regulation of the tourism industry: An internet marketing perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebambo, M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this qualitative study is to establish governance and regulation issues pertaining to Internet marketing approaches within the South African tourism sector. The study focuses on the norms and practices of Internet marketing among small-scale lodging establishments in Bushbuckridge – a small tourist town in northeast South Africa. In-depth interviews were collected from eight participating bed and breakfast (B&B owners. Findings revealed that, while Internet awareness was quite high, only a few B&Bs utilised the Internet for marketing. Participants cited lack of clear industry guidelines on Internet marketing approaches as well as limited Internet experience, among others, as barriers to adoption. Implications and recommendations of the study are presented within the ambit of the existing literature

  8. The Clean Air Act implementation and the coal industry: A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolka, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Utility regulators are responsible for insuring that there is a sufficient supply of electricity to meet consumers needs at a reasonable price. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission Act (CAA) compliance strategies are effective at the lowest possible cost. Those potential compliance costs in Pennsylvania may exceed $3 billion by the end of the decade. This does not include worst case estimates of over $750 million per year in added operations and maintenance costs. In the face of these expenses, concerns such as jobs and the health of Pennsylvania's coal industry may carry little weight. The Commission cannot relieve companies of their responsibility for complying. Thus, in order to maintain its market among electric companies, coal will have to be competitive both in offering solutions to the emissions requirements of the CAA and in providing acceptable alternatives for future, new generating plants

  9. Analysis of the Potential Impacts on China’s Industrial Structure in Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushen Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial structure is one of the main factors that determine energy consumption. Based on China’s energy consumption in 2015 and the goals in 13th Five-Year Plan for Economic and Social Development of the People’s Republic of China (The 13th Five-Year Plan, this paper established an input–output fuzzy multi-objective optimization model to estimate the potential impacts of China’s industrial structure on energy consumption in 2015. Results showed that adjustments to industrial structure could save energy by 19% (1129.17 million ton standard coal equivalent (Mtce. Second, China’s equipment manufacturing industry has a large potential to save energy. Third, the development of several high energy intensive and high carbon intensive sectors needs to be strictly controlled, including Sector 25 (electricity, heat production, and supply industry, Sector 11 (manufacture of paper and stationery, printing, and Sector 14 (non-metallic mineral products industry. Fourth, the territory industry in China has a great potential for energy saving, while its internal structure still needs to be upgraded. Finally, we provide policy suggestions that may be adopted to reduce energy consumption by adjusting China’s industrial structure.

  10. Structural health monitoring and lifecycle-management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities; Zustandsueberwachung und Lebensdauermanagement von baulichen Einrichtungen in Kraftwerken und Industrieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnen, Dieter; Demmer, Martin; Pfister, Tobias [ZERNA Planen und Pruefen GmbH, Bochum (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    In contrast to other fields of engineering, structural health monitoring and lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities have to be developed yet. The necessity of this development immediately arises from the building regulations law with its extensive set of regulations as well as from economic constraints. Approaches and methods of structural health monitoring and lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities could be improved intensively during recent years. The paper focuses on practical examples that show the necessity of comprehensive and strategic structural health monitoring in conjunction with lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities unambiguously und clear. (orig.)

  11. Regulation and competition in public utilities: Electric utility management in Italy and other industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraquelli, G.

    1992-01-01

    In industrialized countries, electric power has become a vital energy resource requiring significant efforts on the part of national institutions to establish and maintain sound management and energy supply strategies. The situation in Italy reflects world trends in that electric power in this country now accounts for over one-third of total energy consumption and this percentage is expected to increase steadily through to the year 2000. This endorsement of electric power is having a strong impact on quality of life and on international relations as Italy, in order to ensure security of energy supplies, is actively pursuing of strategy of energy source and supplier diversification. With reference to recent proposals, in line with European Communities free market strategies, to deregulate the Italian electric power industry, this paper briefly analyzes the current institutional nature of ENEL (the Italian National Electricity Board) and compares the Italian electric power industry and market situation with that of Japan and the USA. The various aspects taken into consideration include investment, rate structure, quality of service, management methods and competition. An analysis is made of the most pressing difficulties currently troubling ENEL and suggestions are made as to the best courses of action to be taken

  12. Study on Web-Based Tool for Regional Agriculture Industry Structure Optimization Using Ajax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Yeping

    According to the research status of regional agriculture industry structure adjustment information system and the current development of information technology, this paper takes web-based regional agriculture industry structure optimization tool as research target. This paper introduces Ajax technology and related application frameworks to build an auxiliary toolkit of decision support system for agricultural policy maker and economy researcher. The toolkit includes a “one page” style component of regional agriculture industry structure optimization which provides agile arguments setting method that enables applying sensitivity analysis and usage of data and comparative advantage analysis result, and a component that can solve the linear programming model and its dual problem by simplex method.

  13. The structural changes of the food industry in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajderllari, Luljeta; Karantininis, Konstantinos

    This paper studies the structural changes of food industry in the EU-27. We first provide a detailed description of the relative importance of the various sectors in the food industry. The structure is studied by calculating Gini coefficients for the EU members with regard to food industry. We find...... that the food industry is one of the most important components of the manufacturing sectors in terms of turnover and employment. Enterprises in the EU are relatively large in terms of turnover but small in the number of enterprises with the dairy and meat sectors being the most important branches of the food...... industry regarding the share of turnover, employment and enterprises. During the eight years 2000-2007, the Gini coefficient of the food industry in the EU is very close to 1, indicating a high degree of concentration....

  14. Structural insights into central hypertension regulation by human aminopeptidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-08-30

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3' subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors.

  15. Structural Insights into Central Hypertension Regulation by Human Aminopeptidase A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3′ subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors. PMID:23888046

  16. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    . African states as ... regarded as the most important ingredients that went to add value to land and labour in order for countries ... B. Sutcliffe Industry and Underdevelopment (Massachusetts Addison – Wesley Publishing Company. 1971), pp.

  17. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    scholar, Walt W. Rostow presented and supported this line of thought in his analysis of ... A Brief Historical Background of Industrialization in Africa ... indicative) The western model allowed for the political economy to be shaped by market.

  18. Skill Structure and Labour Mobility in Outsourcing Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Østergaard, Christian Richter

    difference on a set of employment characteristics, i.e. employment growth, growth in high skilled employees, and growth in employees with a background in science and engineering by using a partial propensity score matching approach. The findings of the analyses show that there are clear differences between......In this paper, we investigate, by merging the Danish linked employer-employee database with a Danish offshoring survey, the difference in employment between offshoring and non-offshoring firms that are active in manufacturing industries and business services in Denmark. We measure the mean...

  19. Views of health journalists, industry employees and news consumers about disclosure and regulation of industry-journalist relationships: an empirical ethical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian; Morrell, Bronwen; Forsyth, Rowena; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2015-03-01

    Bioethicists and policymakers are increasingly concerned about the effects on health journalism of relationships between journalists and private corporations. The concern is that relationships between journalists and manufacturers of medicines, medical devices, complementary medicines and food can and do distort health reporting. This is a problem because health news is known to have a major impact on the public's health-related expectations and behaviour. Commentators have proposed two related approaches to protecting the public from potential harms arising from industry-journalist interactions: greater transparency and external regulation. To date, few empirical studies have examined stakeholders' views of industry-journalist relationships and how these should be managed. We conducted interviews with 13 journalists and 12 industry employees, and 2 focus groups with consumers. Our findings, which are synthesised here, provide empirical support for the need for greater transparency and regulation of industry-journalist relationships. Our findings also highlight several likely barriers to instituting such measures, which will need to be overcome if transparency and regulation are to be accepted by stakeholders and have their intended effect on the quality of journalism and the actions of news consumers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. A sign of change in industrial structure under stable growth: economic status of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The real economical growth rate in fiscal year 1983 in Japan was 3.7 %, and the business trend showed the sign of restoration. The status of primary energy supply in Japan turned to 4.5 % increase as compared with the previous year. Petroleum increased by 3.5 %, coal by 1.6 %, and nuclear power by 11.1 %. As the result, the proportion of petroleum to total primary energy supply slightly decreased to 61 %. Electric power demand increased by 6.3 %, and the proportion of nuclear power to total generated power quantity increased to 20.4 %. As to the status of atomic energy industry in fiscal 1983, one nuclear power plant started the operation, and the construction of three nuclear power plants began. The investment for nuclear fuel cycle was enthusiastic, and the business progressed favorably. The total outlay related to atomic energy was 2.89 trillion yen, 14 % increase as compared with the previous year. The sales of mining and manufacturing industries was 1.367 trillion yen, 17 % increase. The number of workers related to atomic energy was 65,997, 2 % decrease. The mean capacity ratio of the production facilities for atomic energy products in fiscal 1983 was 66.5 %, far below the target 72 %. (Kako, I.)

  1. An emissions trading scheme design for power industries facing price regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Gun; Lim, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The electricity market, monopolistic in nature, with government price regulation, poses a serious challenge for policy makers with respect to the cost-effectiveness of emissions trading, particularly in Asian countries. This paper argues that a cap-and-trade regulatory system for indirect emissions combined with a rate-based allocation system for direct emissions can achieve market efficiency even in the presence of price and quantity controls in the electricity market. This particular policy mix could provide appropriate incentives for industries to reduce their electricity consumption while inducing power producers to reduce their direct carbon emissions cost-effectively in conditions where there is strict government control of electricity prices. Another advantage of the suggested policy mix is that it allows carbon leakage in cross-border power trades to be effectively eliminated. - Highlights: • A rate-based allocation induces power producers to minimize direct emissions. • A cap-and-trade on indirect emission induces firms to reduce electricity consumption. • These two can jointly achieve market efficiency even in the regulated power market

  2. A regulator's viewpoint on the use of AI in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, N.

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory position within the UK places the responsibility for safety on a nuclear site with the licensee. The licensee must produce a safety case that demonstrates that the plant is safe. Assessment of this safety case is performed by the regulator in the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) using HSE's published Safety Assessment Principles. This paper presents the personal views of a regulator on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the nuclear industry. The AI-based system considered are restricted to expert systems, neural networks and fuzzy logic. Some of the safety issues are discussed. The particular concerns associated with software-based systems are compounded by some of the inherent problems of AI-based systems. Such is the nature of these concerns that an acceptable safety case will be difficult to mount for safety systems and post-accident monitoring systems. However, given the present maturity of the technology, acceptable safety cases might be formulated in the areas of operator advisory systems designed to reduce accident frequencies, and robotics where dose reduction is important. There are also arguments that suggests that suitable safety cases could be formulated for AI-based plant control systems. Nevertheless, AI-based systems should be treated with caution - further research is required into suitable designs and safety demonstration techniques. (author)

  3. THE PHILOSOPHY - TOOL CONTINUUM: PROVIDING STRUCTURE TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Van Dyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Industrial Engineering concepts are often referred to as either a tool, technique, method, approach or philosophy. These terminologies can be positioned on a continuum according to their meaning as defined by the Oxford English dictionary (tools B techniques Bmethods B approaches B philosophies. The philosophy of Total Quality Management is used as example to show how the appropriate naming of Industrial Engineering concepts can enhance the understanding and application thereof. This continuum is used to show that although the philosophies of TQM and Scientific Management may differ, the same pool of tools and techniques are used by both of these philosophies.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Bedryfsingenieurs verwys dikwels na filosofiee, benaderings, metodes, tegnieke en gereedskap. Hierdie terminologiee kan kan op 'n kontinuum geposisioneer word na aanleiding van hulle woordeboekbetekenis (gereedskap f-t tegniek f-t metode f-t benadering f-t filosofie. Die filosofie .van Totale Kwaliteitsbeheer (TQM word as voorbeeld gebruik om te wys dat die gepaste benaming van Bedryfsingenieurskonsepte die begrip en toepassing daarvan verhoog . Hierdie kontinuum word gebruik om te wys dat, alhoewel die filosofie van TQM en Wetenskaplike Bestuur ("Scientific Management" verskil, dieselfde versameling vail gereedskap en tegnieke deur beide gebruik word.

  4. Advertising of fast food to children on Australian television: the impact of industry self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, Lana A; King, Lesley; Grunseit, Anne; Kelly, Bridget; Chapman, Kathy

    2011-07-04

    To assess the impact of the quick-service restaurant industry (QSRI) self-regulatory initiative on fast-food advertising to children on Australian commercial television. Analysis of advertisements for foods on the three main free-to-air commercial television channels (channels 7, 9 and 10) in Sydney, Australia, over 4 days in both May 2009 and April 2010 in terms of: number of advertisements; types of food (coded core [healthy] foods, non-core [unhealthy] foods, miscellaneous foods; or fast foods); whether advertised meals were intended for children; whether advertisements were broadcast during children's peak viewing times; and whether the company in question was a signatory to the QSRI initiative. Change in the mean frequency and rate of food advertisements per hour from 2009 to 2010; change in the types of fast-food meals (healthier alternatives [at least one nutrient-dense, low-energy food considered part of a healthy diet for children], non-core [high in undesirable nutrients and not considered part of a healthy diet for children], and other) being advertised; and proportion of children's energy requirements provided by fast-food meals. From 2009 to 2010, the mean frequency of fast-food advertisements increased from 1.1 to 1.5 per hour. While non-core fast foods comprised a lesser share of fast-food advertising in 2010 than 2009, the mean frequency at which they were advertised during times when the largest numbers of children were watching television remained the same (1.3 per hour in both 2009 and 2010). Family meals advertised for children's consumption in 2010 provided energy far in excess of children's requirements. Children's exposure to unhealthy fast-food advertising has not changed following the introduction of self-regulation, and some fast foods advertised for children's consumption contain excessive energy. The limited impact of self-regulation suggests that governments should define the policy framework for regulating fast-food advertising to

  5. Industry self-regulation of alcohol marketing: a systematic review of content and exposure research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jonathan K; Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    With governments relying increasingly upon the alcohol industry's self-regulated marketing codes to restrict alcohol marketing activity, there is a need to summarize the findings of research relevant to alcohol marketing controls. This paper provides a systematic review of studies investigating the content of, and exposure to, alcohol marketing in relation to self-regulated guidelines. Peer-reviewed papers were identified through four literature search engines: SCOPUS, Web of Science, PubMed and PsychINFO. Non-peer-reviewed reports produced by public health agencies, alcohol research centers, non-governmental organizations and government research centers were also identified. Ninety-six publications met the inclusion criteria. Of the 19 studies evaluating a specific marketing code and 25 content analysis studies reviewed, all detected content that could be considered potentially harmful to children and adolescents, including themes that appeal strongly to young men. Of the 57 studies of alcohol advertising exposure, high levels of youth exposure and high awareness of alcohol advertising were found for television, radio, print, digital and outdoor advertisements. Youth exposure to alcohol advertising has increased over time, even as greater compliance with exposure thresholds has been documented. Violations of the content guidelines within self-regulated alcohol marketing codes are highly prevalent in certain media. Exposure to alcohol marketing, particularly among youth, is also prevalent. Taken together, the findings suggest that the current self-regulatory systems that govern alcohol marketing practices are not meeting their intended goal of protecting vulnerable populations. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Cost and return structure in sawmill industry in Ijebu Ode, Ogun state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost and return structure in sawmill industry in Ijebu Ode, Ogun state, Nigeria. ... The finding showed that 32.6% of the industries were retailers while 30.4% were wholesalers of timbers and both had regular supply of the products. The working capital among the timbers business was N3,641,905.6 and the average annual ...

  7. A Review of International Telecommunications Industry Issues, Structure, and Regulatory Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jack E.; And Others

    Industry structure studies prior to 1968 are briefly reviewed, and an overview of industrial and technological developments up to the present is provided through synopses of more recent studies. Areas covered include overseas telephone and record carriers; the creation of the Communications Satellite Corporation; the current regulatory and…

  8. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  9. Strategies of diversification in regulated energy markets: the natural gas and electric power industries in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan Gonzalez, Gerado; Elizalde Baltierra, Alberto; Eibenschutz Hartman, Juan

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to show a structured and systematic approach to analyze the strategies of diversification undertaken by the State-owned companies Petroleos Mexicanos and Comision Federal de Electricidad, during the period 1938-2006, in the Mexican energy market that has been strongly dominated by the State control. Furthermore, we explore the future of these strategies by using a Strengthens, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) matrix. This analyze also include changes in regulation that should happen in order to consolidated the proposed strategies. (auth)

  10. RNA polymerase III transcription - regulated by chromatin structure and regulator of nuclear chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascali, Chiara; Teichmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription is regulated by modifications of the chromatin. DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation have been linked to Pol III transcriptional activity. In addition to being regulated by modifications of DNA and histones, Pol III genes and its transcription factors have been implicated in the organization of nuclear chromatin in several organisms. In yeast, the ability of the Pol III transcription system to contribute to nuclear organization seems to be dependent on direct interactions of Pol III genes and/or its transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIIB with the structural maintenance of chromatin (SMC) protein-containing complexes cohesin and condensin. In human cells, Pol III genes and transcription factors have also been shown to colocalize with cohesin and the transcription regulator and genome organizer CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF). Furthermore, chromosomal sites have been identified in yeast and humans that are bound by partial Pol III machineries (extra TFIIIC sites - ETC; chromosome organizing clamps - COC). These ETCs/COC as well as Pol III genes possess the ability to act as boundary elements that restrict spreading of heterochromatin.

  11. Structure analysis and core community detection of embodied resources networks among regional industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xijun; Dong, Yanbo; Wu, Yuying; Wei, Guodan; Xing, Lizhi; Yan, Jia

    2017-08-01

    To address the double pressure of scarce resources and regional industrial isomorphism, this paper applied the concepts of exergy and embodied resources based on economic input-output (I-O) data. We constructed the embodied resources networks among the regional industries of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (also known as Jing-Jin-Ji) in China. We analyzed the rules of embodied resources consumption in the area's industries, identified the core community structures, and studied the characteristics of industrial homogeneity through regional comparisons. The results showed that the dependence on scarce resources of industrial operations in Beijing was less than in Jin-Ji, while the dependence on finance, technology, information, and other service resources in Beijing was higher than in Jin-Ji. The I-O efficiency of embodied resources among industries and the agglomeration of correlation relationships in industries with large embodied resources were higher than in Jin-Ji. The industrial coincidence degree in the ;bridge; industries and in the core community in Jin-Ji was higher than in Jing-Jin and Jing-Ji, which means the industrial homogeneous competition of Jin-Ji was higher, too. This study makes a significant contribution toward promoting the dislocation development of regional industries, accelerating the coordination of resources, and reducing homogeneity competition.

  12. PATENTS, R&D, AND MARKET STRUCTURE IN THE U.S. FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Gopinath, Munisamy; Vasavada, Utpal

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of market structure and research and development (R&D) on the innovation activities of firms. Fixed and random effects count data models are estimated with firm-level data for the U.S. food processing industry. Results show a positive association between patents and R&D, and patents and market structure, suggesting that firms which exhibit noncompetitive behavior are likely to develop new products and processes. Significant intra-industry spillovers of know...

  13. Development of a web based instrument on higher education structures of industrial engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Tarba Ioan-Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The research and development of assisted operational instruments on higher education structures of industrial engineering represent a continuous and complex process. The present paper contributes to the building up of support elements and an assisted operational instrument on higher education structures of industrial engineering, with focus on the specific curricula. The use of tested and validated constructive solutions from other projects, as base for the new design, reduces the design time.

  14. The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline of Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazumi; Katsuya, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline was constructed by the Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis which was established in April 2001. The consortium is composed of 22 pharmaceutical companies affiliating with the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. The beamline is the first exclusive on that is owned by pharmaceutical enterprises at SPring-8. The specification and equipments of the Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline is almost same as that of RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamline I and II. (author)

  15. Agro-food industry growth and obesity in China: what role for regulating food advertising and promotion and nutrition labelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, C

    2008-03-01

    Taking a food supply chain approach, this paper examines the regulation of food marketing and nutrition labelling as strategies to help combat obesity in China in an era of rapid agro-food industry growth. China is the largest food producer and consumer in the world. Since the early 1980s, the agro-food industry has undergone phenomenal expansion throughout the food supply chain, from agricultural production to trade, agro-food processing to food retailing, and from food service to advertising and promotion. This industry growth, alongside related socioeconomic changes and government policies, has encouraged a 'nutrition transition'. China's population, especially in urban areas, is now consuming significantly more energy from dietary fat, which is leading to higher rates of obesity. Regulation of food advertising and promotion and nutrition labelling has the potential to help prevent the further growth of obesity in China and encourage the agro-food industry to supplier healthier foods. Government legislation and guidance, as well as self-regulation and voluntary initiatives, are needed to reduce children's exposure to food advertising and promotion, and increase the effectiveness of nutrition labelling. Policies on food marketing and nutrition labelling should be adapted to the China context, and accompanied by further action throughout the food supply chain. Given China's unique characteristics and position in the world today, there is an opportunity for the government and the agro-food industry to lead the world by creating a balanced, health promoting model of complementary legislation and industry action.

  16. Reducing information asymmetry in the power industry: Mandatory and voluntary information disclosure regulations of sulfur dioxide emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xufeng; Zhang Chao

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the institutional framework for sulfur dioxide emission information disclosure (SDEID) in power industries. The authors argue that mandatory and voluntary SDEID are two complementary regulatory instruments for emission reduction in the power industry. An analytical framework of SDEID with six facets is suggested in this paper to demonstrate relevant legal provisions and regulatory policies of mandatory and voluntary SDEID of power industries in the US. Empirical research shows that mandatory and voluntary SDEID of the power industry have been regulated simultaneously in the US. The foundation of power companies' willingness to disclose emission information voluntarily is the combination of mandatory scientific monitoring with market regulation in the current SDEID system in the US. In comparison, the SDEID of power industries has yet to be widely implemented in developing countries. Finally, the paper provides some implications to developing countries that plan to learn institutional arrangements from developed countries. - Highlights: ► Mandatory and voluntary SDEID are two complementary regulatory instruments. ► An analytical framework is suggested to demonstrate SDEID of power industry in the US. ► Voluntary disclosure can be attributed to scientific monitoring and market regulation. ► We provide implications to developing countries learning from developed countries.

  17. Banking on industry: the impact of financial services on regional industrial structure and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jaap W.B.; Degl'Innocenti, Marta

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which local banking market characteristics can explain where small enterprises (SEs) are located and how they thrive. We start from a simple theory that explains the channels along which local banking market structure can affect the growth of SEs. Subsequently, we make

  18. Analysis of regulatory structure for a potential fusion reactor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The report is divided into eight sections. The preface describes the authors of the report, the methodology used in its preparation, and some basic legal terms. The summary describes the principal features of the proposed regulatory system and also includes two flow charts comparing our model with present NRC practices and a summary table briefly outlining the reasoning behind our recommendations. The main body of the report is divided into six sections. This part of the report discusses the existing federal and state programs for regulating electric energy, describes NRC operations and the criticisms of that agency, discusses the features of our proposed regulatory model, recommends certain steps for implementing the proposed model, and states the conclusions of the report.

  19. Some impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act and state clean-air regulations on the fertilizer industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breed, C.E.; Kerns, O.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 will intensify national efforts to reduce air pollution. They will have major impacts on governmental agencies and on industrial and commercial facilities throughout the country. As with other industries, it is essential for fertilizer dealers and producers to understand how these changes to the Clean Air Act can significantly change the way they do business. This paper is proffered as an overview of ways in which the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act may impact the fertilizer industry. The nonattainment, toxics, and permit provisions of the amended act will be three areas of particular concern to the fertilizer industry. Implementation of the new regulatory requirements of this legislation promises to be a long and onerous process for all concerned. However, it appears that state and local regulations may have a much more profound impact on the fertilizer industry than the new Clean Air Act

  20. Market structure in the US electricity industry: a long-term perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerschen, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate changes in market structure in the US electric power industry during the last three decades using two independent approaches. First, we estimate an industry-wide conjectural-variations parameter. We find that industry concentration was generally rising during the 1970s but has been gradually and consistently falling since the early 1980s. To check the robustness of these results, we then use a translog production function to estimate the Lerner Index. The results confirm that the industry was becoming less concentrated during the 1980s, though the Lerner Index tended to fluctuate during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Our results suggest that the current state of the electricity industry may have more to do with long-term changes in market structure than recent attempts to establish competitive wholesale electricity markets. (author)

  1. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  2. Financing reform and structural change in the health services industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C W; Phillips, B U

    1986-08-01

    This paper reviews the major trends in financing reform, emphasizing their impact on those characteristics of the market for health services that economists have viewed as monopolistic, and discusses the implications of structural change for the allied health professions. Hopefully, by understanding the fundamental forces of change and responding to uncertainty with flexibility and imagination, the allied health professions can capitalize on the opportunities afforded by structural change. Overall, these trends should result in the long-term outlook for use of allied health services to increase at an average annual rate of 9% to 10%. Allied health professionals may also witness an increase in independent practice opportunities. Finally, redistribution of jobs will likely occur in favor of outpatient facilities, home health agencies, and nontraditional settings. This in turn will have an impact on allied health education, which will need to adapt to these types of reforms.

  3. An overview of Class I Structures license renewal Industry Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statton, J.A.; Renfro, L.J.; Peeifer, B.W.; Deng, D.Z.; Byron, J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of this evaluation indicate that license renewal of Class I Structures is technically achievable and that most age-related degradation can be managed by existing effective programs such that the continued safe operation of the plant is assured. Existing effective programs are satisfactory as long as plant-unique verification of design and operating features is performed. Thus, the conclusions of this IR can be applied to individual plants. (author)

  4. Industry structure and collusion with uniform yardstick competition : theory and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter; Haan, Marco A.; Mulder, Machiel

    2014-01-01

    We study cartel stability in an industry that is subject to uniform yardstick regulation. In a theoretical model, we show that the number of symmetric firms does not affect collusion. In a laboratory experiment, however, we do find an effect. If anything, increasing the number of firms facilitates

  5. Fighting childhood obesity through performance-based regulation of the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Stephen D; Sandman, Nirit

    2007-04-01

    That childhood obesity is an alarming public health problem is clear and widely appreciated. What is altogether unclear is what our society should do about it. Some people think the solution lies in using tort law to sue McDonald's, Coca-Cola, and other corporations. We reject that notion. Others believe that government should order specific changes in the behavior of food companies and school officials--and yet, there is little reason for confidence that these "command and control" strategies will make a difference. Instead, we propose "performance-based regulation" of the food industry. This is analogous to the approach our country is now taking with respect to elementary and secondary education (most prominently in the No Child Left Behind legislation). Schools are not told how to achieve better educational results, but better outcomes are demanded of them. This strategy has also been used in the environmental context to reduce harmful power plant emissions, and it has been briefly proposed as a way of regulating cigarette companies. In this Article, we propose that large firms selling food and drink that is high in sugar or fat will be assigned the responsibility of reducing obesity rates in a specific pool of children. A firm's share of the overall responsibility will be based on its share of the "bad' food market, and the children assigned to it will be organized by geographically proximate schools where obesity rates are currently above the plan's nationwide target rate of 8 percent (the actual childhood obesity rate today is approximately 16 percent). Firms that fail to achieve their goals will be subject to serious financial penalties.

  6. Industrial Structure, Menu Costs and the Non-Neutrality of Money

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, Huw David; Hansen, Claus Thustrup

    by perfect competition. The mixed industrial structure implies that there is a misallocation of the input (labour) between sectors. Following a 5% monetary expansion, the menu costs required for price rigidity in the monopolistic sector can be 50 times smaller than in the symmetric case, while the ratio......New Keynesian literature assumes symmetric industrial structure when analysing explanations of monetary non-neutrality. We analyse the impact of modifying this assumption by allowing for a mixed industrial structure; some industries are characterized by monopolistic competition, and others...... of welfare gain to private loss can be as large as 200 times the corresponding symmetric case. This implies that in real world economies, menu costs may be even more significant than previously thought...

  7. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation's economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures

  8. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  9. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Hsp90 Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is essential in eukaryotes. It is required for the activation and stabilization of a wide variety of client proteins and many of them are involved in important cellular pathways. Since Hsp90 affects numerous physiological processes such as signal transduction, intracellular transport, and protein degradation, it became an interesting target for cancer therapy. Structurally, Hsp90 is a flexible dimeric protein composed of three different domains which adopt structurally distinct conformations. ATP binding triggers directionality in these conformational changes and leads to a more compact state. To achieve its function, Hsp90 works together with a large group of cofactors, termed co-chaperones. Co-chaperones form defined binary or ternary complexes with Hsp90, which facilitate the maturation of client proteins. In addition, posttranslational modifications of Hsp90, such as phosphorylation and acetylation, provide another level of regulation. They influence the conformational cycle, co-chaperone interaction, and inter-domain communications. In this review, we discuss the recent progress made in understanding the Hsp90 machinery.

  10. Self-regulating star formation and disk structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation processes determine the disk structure of galaxies. Stars heavier than about 1 solar mass determine the chemical evolution of the system and are produced at a rate which maintains (by the momentum input of the stars) the phase structure, pressure, and vertical velocity dispersion of the gas. Low mass stars are produced quiescently within molecular clouds, and their associated T-Tauri winds maintain the support of molecular clouds and regulate the star formation rate. Inefficient cooling suppresses this mode of star formation at low metallicity. Applied to the solar neighborhood, such a model can account for age/metallicity relationships, the increase in the O/Fe ratio at low metallicity, the paucity of metal-poor G and K dwarf stars, the missing mass in the disk and, possibly, the existence of a metal-poor thick disk. For other galaxies, it accounts for constant w-velocity dispersion of the gas, the relationship between gas content and specific rates of star formation, the surface brightness/metallicity relationship and for the shallow radial gradients in both star formation rates and HI content. 71 references

  11. Economic regulation of Canada's natural gas delivery industry : policy and regulatory principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormley, B.

    2006-03-01

    This policy paper demonstrated how restoring balance and clarity to Canada's regulatory environment will ensure the continued strength of the economy, environment, and communities. It was noted that regulatory outcomes that reflect the broad public interest can be achieved if 4 basic principles for economic regulation are pursued. These principles include strength, balance, efficiency, and clarity. In particular, this paper addressed the challenge facing Canada's natural gas delivery industry in terms of increased energy demand, tight supply, ageing infrastructure and increasing cost pressures on the energy system. It emphasized that transparent, efficient energy policy developed through informed debate can provide the foundation for a reliable, environmentally acceptable and sustainable energy future. It was suggested that immediate attention be given to rebalancing the regulatory processes that have placed short term considerations above the longer term strength of the natural gas system; improving the support for new natural gas supply development; reconsidering pricing in some energy markets where information has been distorted; and revisiting the regulatory processes that have become inefficient

  12. Comparative studies of oil product regulation in polluted soil for several industrialized countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccassoni, F.; Kalnina, D.; Piga, L.

    2017-10-01

    Oil contaminated sites are the consequence of a long period of industrialization. Oil is a complex mixture including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to have negative effects on human health and the environment. Dividing oil products in groups (fractions) of petroleum hydrocarbons that act alike in soil and water, one can better know what happens to them. Being able to understand the behaviour of oil products in soil, it will allow to implement prevention and remediation actions. Interventions on contaminated sites are bound to comply with regulatory limits that each country has set in their own environmental legislation. The different concentration thresholds of oil products in soil for several EU countries and Canada has led to compare: limit values, analytical method, soil characteristics and/or land use. This will allow to evaluate what could be the best regulation approach, assessing if it is better to consider soil matrix in the site or the specific land use or both of them. It will also assess what is the best analytical methodology to be adopted to achieve the pollutant concentrations in the soil in order to have comparable results among different countries, such as: Baltic countries (Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania), Nordic countries (Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark), Western countries (Italy and The Netherlands) and Canada, like gaschromatography in the range from C10 - C50. The study presents an overview of environmental regulatory system of several EU countries and Canada and the correlation between different parameters about oil products indicated in each environmental legislation.

  13. Exemption and clearance of radioactive waste from non-nuclear industry: A UK regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    In the UK radioactive substances are regulated by means of registrations and authorizations issued under the Radioactive Substances Act. For certain practices and types of radioactive materials, there are orders which allow exemption from registration/authorization, conditionally or unconditionally. The seventeen Exemption Orders in force cover a wide variety of types of radioactive materials and practices. Conditional Exemption Orders allow a degree of regulatory control without imposing undue burdens on users of radioactivity. For most orders, radiation doses to individuals would be about 1OμSv or less, and collective doses would be less than 1 man - Sievert. The UK is reviewing the exemption orders against the requirements of the 1996 Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive. It intends to develop a coherent strategy for exemption and to rationalize the current orders. Recently there has been a degree of public concern over the release of items from the nuclear industry. Careful presentation of exemption and clearance concepts is necessary if public confidence in the regulatory system is to be maintained. (author)

  14. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism.

  15. The impact of firm and industry characteristics on small firms' capital structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; de Goeij, P. C.; Kappert, P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the impact of firm and industry characteristics on small firms’ capital structure, employing a proprietary database containing financial statements of Dutch small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from 2003 to 2005. The firm characteristics suggest that the capital structure decision is

  16. The domestic supply outlook, how the producing industry is reacting, and the challenge to regulators and policy makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses three main topics which include an overview of the nation's natural gas reserves; a discussion of the challenges the natural gas industry faces in extracting these reserves in the realm of regulations and cost-effective extraction; and a discussion on how the industry, regulators, and policy makers can work together to extract these reserves in an economic manner while effectively operating within existing regulations. The paper also promotes methods to update and change regulations when necessary as a result of technological change or advancement. The results of the reserve study have shown that there are over 2,000 trillion cubic feet of natural gas still available in the US and Canada, not including undiscovered or additional extraction brought about by new technology. The paper goes on to discuss the historical wellhead pricing of natural gas and what these new reserve figures mean to future natural gas costs. The paper then discusses the adequacy of current distribution systems to meet an increasing demand for natural gas. Finally the paper discusses the need for more deregulation of the gas industry to make it more competitive and keep the development of these resources alive in this country. The author presents information on the decline of exploration and development in this country as a result of increased regulation

  17. Does the regulation of the insurance industry have a pernicious effect on innovation by the sector in South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Zingwevu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Financial regulation could be a double edged sword in that despite its major thrust being that to secure the financial sector and bring about financial stability; it might have the unintended consequence of stifling innovation by the sector. We investigate the nexus between financial regulation and innovation by specifically focusing on the insurance industry in South Africa. We demonstrate that there are plethora pieces of legislation that govern the insurance industry in South Africa. As such this has driven the cost of compliance to unsustainable levels thereby curtailing the spending by companies on innovation. We thus would like to caution the policy makers’ that this “heavy-touch” regulatory mode is having a pernicious effect on research and development by the insurance sector. As such we encourage them to embrace the “light-touch” regulatory mode whereby self-regulation and moral suasion are other avenues to be considered.

  18. Does industry self-regulation protect young people from exposure to alcohol marketing? A review of compliance and complaint studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jonathan K; Babor, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol marketing is considered to be potentially harmful to adolescents. In addition to statutory regulation, industry self-regulation is a common way to protect adolescents from alcohol marketing exposures. This paper critically reviews research designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the alcohol industry's compliance procedures to manage complaints when alcohol marketing is considered to have violated a self-regulatory code. Peer-reviewed papers were identified through four literature search engines: PubMed, SCOPUS, PsychINFO and CINAHL. Non-peer-reviewed reports produced by public health agencies, alcohol research centers, non-governmental organizations, government research centers and national industry advertising associations were also included. The search process yielded three peer-reviewed papers, seven non-peer reviewed reports published by academic institutes and non-profit organizations and 20 industry reports. The evidence indicates that the complaint process lacks standardization across countries, industry adjudicators may be trained inadequately or biased and few complaints are upheld against advertisements pre-determined to contain violations of a self-regulatory code. The current alcohol industry marketing complaint process used in a wide variety of countries may be ineffective at removing potentially harmful content from the market-place. The process of determining the validity of complaints employed by most industry groups appears to suffer from serious conflict of interest and procedural weaknesses that could compromise objective adjudication of even well-documented complaints. In our opinion the current system of self-regulation needs major modifications if it is to serve public health objectives, and more systematic evaluations of the complaint process are needed. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. The Forecast of Baoding’s Industrial Structure in Different Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Shu

    2018-01-01

    In November 12th, 2014, Chinese government officially announced reaching the peak of CO2 emissions around 2030. Baoding, as one of the first low-carbon pilot cities in China, bore an important mission and set an example to other cities to reach the peak of carbon emissions before 2030. This paper employed a computable general equilibrium model to simulate the industrial structure and social welfare of Baoding in different scenarios. And the calculation results have shown that on the principle of the optimal industrial structure and the minimum social welfare loss and a consideration of industrial economic development, the best time of CO2 emissions peak for Baoding was 2025 when its total emissions would reach 2.84 million tons. Finally, some suggestions were given to guide this city to reduce carbon emissions in industrial development.

  20. Research Investments and Market Structure in the Food Processing, Agricultural Input, and Biofuel Industries Worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Fuglie, Keith O.; Heisey, Paul W.; King, John L.; Day-Rubenstein, Kelly A.; Schimmelpfennig, David E.; Wang, Sun Ling

    2011-01-01

    Meeting growing global demand for food, fiber, and biofuel requires robust investment in agricultural research and development (R&D) from both public and private sectors. This study examines global R&D spending by private industry in seven agricultural input sectors, food manufacturing, and biofuel and describes the changing structure of these industries. In 2007 (the latest year for which comprehensive estimates are available), the private sector spent $19.7 billion on food and agricultural ...

  1. Market structure and the incentives to innovate in the Norwegian music industry

    OpenAIRE

    Engstrand, Andreas Prestegaard

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I study market structure and incentives to innovate in the Norwegian music industry. The industry has gone through significant changes since the year 2000. Every part of the value chain has been disrupted by technology, and the barriers to entry have decreased. However, major labels seem to have kept their market share. I define product and process innovation as respectively the release of a new artist and the release of a subsequent album. A product innovation ...

  2. FORMATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATED STRUCTURES IN THE ALUMINUM INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Kazbekova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the theoretical foundations of economic efficiency of production and integrated structures formation. Their advantages are demonstrated by the example of the formation of vertically integrated structures in the aluminium industry in the framework created by smelting aluminium cluster inKazakhstan. Also examines the valuable experience gained in the organization of such structures in theRussian Federationin recent years

  3. Food industry structure in Norway and Denmark since the 1990s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimek, Bjørn; Hansen, Henning Otte

    2017-01-01

    Structural changes in Norwegian and Danish food industry since the 1990s is analysed as a path dependent response to the neo-liberal turn. Norway entered the 1990s as a protected market and Denmark as case of an export oriented industry. These developmental strategies are rooted in early 20th...... ‘varieties of capitalism’ framework with corporate strategy theories on food industry M&As. We identify two different types of path dependent development, a self-reinforcing in Denmark and a transformative ‘breaking point’ in Norway....

  4. Experience of regulatory body functioning in energy industry of Ukraine: Prospects for future development of state regulation of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oruskaya, M.

    2002-01-01

    Materials collected (presented) in the paper introduce to (familiarise) the audience with the main forms, methods and phases of the state regulation of energy industry in Ukraine in the period of transition to market economy. Special attention was paid to the following aspects: 1. Necessity and history of establishment of special regulatory body in Ukraine - The National Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC); 2. The main tasks and authorities of NERC according to the Ukraine Law on Energy Sector; 3. Regulation mechanisms of the main processes in the energy industry used by the Commission on the current level of energy sector development and economic results of its introduction; 4. Problems with functioning of the wholesale energy market specifically as the main component of the Ukraine energy industry and trends of future development (improvement of energy industry's financial situation, intensification of competition between energy producers and suppliers, improvement of tariff and investment policies, etc.); 5. Necessity and ways of future improvement of the standards and legal basis for regulation in Ukraine. (author)

  5. Coordinated risk informed regulation: a conceptual approach illustrated by the industry of phytosanitary radiation treatment; Articulacao regulatoria com informacao sobre riscos: abordagem conceitual ilustrada com a industria de tratamento fitossanitario com radiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, Patricia

    2012-07-01

    Regulatory bodies control areas such as health, environment, safety, transportation, finance or any other area of strategic importance to the national sustainable development, where the free activity of economic agents will not lead to socially desirable results. In Brazil, industrial activities impacting on different social and economic segments may be subject to regulation by several governmental agencies, with different cultures, requirements, procedures, and deadlines. To approve an industrial undertaking, most often each regulator analyzes in isolation the aspect of its concern. Also in monitoring and enforcement, the agencies usually act individually. The proliferation and fragmentation of regulation have, in some cases, delayed or even inhibited the development of industrial activities, and thus, working against the very purpose of regulation. This thesis illustrates the current situation with the regulation on food irradiation services, proposes and justifies an organizational structure to enhance coordination among regulatory agencies by aligning their activities and avoiding inconsistencies, overlaps and omissions. This structure comprises, among other mechanisms, a single Internet portal on Federal Regulation, an integrated and dynamic risk analysis and the harmonization of decision-making. The purpose is to promote regulation predictability, regulatory action consistency, optimization of public resources, transparency in the agencies' decision making, and to bring benefits to the entrepreneurs by offering them real-time monitoring and more agile processes. (author)

  6. Comparing welfare effects of different regulation schemes: An application to the electricity distribution industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsakangas-Savolainen, Maria; Svento, Rauli

    2010-01-01

    We compare the welfare effects of different regulation schemes of electricity distribution utilities. The compared regulation schemes are Fixed Price regulation, Cost of Service regulation, Menu of Cost-Contingent Contracts and Simple Menu of Contracts. In our calculations we utilize the information of a firm's potential to improve cost efficiency. The firm-specific cost information of Finnish electricity distribution utilities is obtained by using various Stochastic Frontier models. Our basic result is that welfare can be improved by changing the Cost of Service regulation scheme to the Menu of Contracts regulation. Welfare also increases in the case of Fixed Price regulation and Simple Menu of Contract regulation. There is however, a significant difference among regulation regimes on how this improved welfare is distributed to consumers and producers.

  7. Class I structures license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, D.; Renfro, J.; Statton, J.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures, and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). This IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. nuclear power plant Class I structures, with the IR evaluating which structures are Class I. Seventeen structures are explicitly described and evaluated in this IR. These structures are not necessarily classified as Class I at all plants, therefore the license renewal applicant should consult this IR for correct identification

  8. The structure of Canada's uranium industry and its future market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Production of uranium in Canada began in the 1940s to supply the needs of US weapons development. After 1966 a growing demand for uranium for nuclear power production stimulated exploration, and since then the health of the Canadian uranium industry has been tied to the state of the nuclear power industry. Uranium exploration in Canada is carried out mainly by private enterprise, although the federal and two provincial governments compete through crown corporations. Seven companies produce ore, and six have processing plants. Expansion is underway at several existing operations, and some new projects are underway. The industry is strongly dependent on export markets; only about 15 percent of Canadian production is used in the country. There is one uranium refinery which produces UO 2 powder for CANDU reactor fuel and UF 6 for export. The uranium hexafluoride facility is being expanded. Federal government policy affects the uranium industry in the fields of regulation, ownership, safeguards, protection of the domestic industry, and international marketing. The short-term outlook for the industry is deteriorating, with declining uranium prices, but prospects seem considerably brighter in the longer term. Canada has about 12 percent of the world's uranium reserves, and is the second-largest producer. Discovery potential is believed to be excellent

  9. Impact of Environmental Regulation on Productivity: Case Studies of Three Industries in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Chalermthanakom, Adisak; Ueta, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Although fi rms bear the cost of compliance, strict but fl exible environmental regulation may benefi t them by spurring the innovation process. However, the relationship between environmental regulation and productivity is unclear. We calculate productivity growth by using data envelopment analysis; we then conduct regression analysis, using panel data on productivity growth by environmental regulation stringency. A one-year lag of environmental regulation stringency is included in the model...

  10. Preparing for climate change regulation : an assessment of the current state of date reliability in the Canadian electrical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, C.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation provided an overview of current Canadian greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting requirements, predictions about GHG regulations, and the current state of GHGs data reliability in the Canadian electrical industry. The author argued that while potential management strategies are necessary, they are not sufficient to meet Kyoto or similar types of initiatives because they do not provide incentives for reductions, they do not establish accountability, nor do they encourage reliable data. It was predicted that the first climate change regulation will be a sectoral agreement enacted at the federal/provincial level. It was also predicted that future regulations will include a requirement to report GHG emissions in a reliable manner and that regulators will use the data to track performance. The final prediction was that the onus will be on the companies to prove that the data is reliable as regulators will have limited resources to check the data. It was noted that the current state of data is not suitable for analytical testing because of a lack of clear definitions, a lack of industry comparison, inability to compare between companies, inability to compare between different types of power generation, and the inability to compare between years. It was suggested that data reliability could be improved by having the regulators review and monitor the reported data, or by having a third party review and provide assurance on the reported data. It was concluded that there will have to be agreement at the industry level on common measurement and calculation methodology, as well as an agreement on a common scope of reporting. 4 figs

  11. The 'constructive regulation' of phosphates and phosphogypsum : a new, evidence-based approach to regulating a NORM industry vital to the global community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, Julian; Birky, Brian; Johnston, A.E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: IAEA has included phosphate production among twelve NORM industries identified for scrutiny and possible regulation. 'Wet' production results in 1) phosphoric acid, as phosphate essential for world-wide food production; and 2) phosphogypsum (PG), which in some countries is used in both agriculture and construction. Phosphate deposits contain 238 U and 232 Th and their decay products; some have sufficient U content for commercial recovery. This puts the industry within the scope of the IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles, and of the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS). Phosphogypsum is a test case for defining and managing NORM industry residues and wastes as typical activity concentrations are extremely low but worldwide stockpiles amount to billions of tonnes. In some jurisdictions, phosphogypsum is regulated as a hazardous, radioactive waste rather than as a resource - with costly results. The phosphate industry is undergoing its most profound change since World War II, led by surging demand from Brazil, Russia, India and China, Established production centres, such as Morocco, are increasing capacity; major new facilities are being built, such as Ma'aden, Saudi Arabia. In consequence, many local jurisdictions face unfamiliar challenges and seek guidance on how to proceed. New research both on phosphate and phosphogypsum has significantly changed our understanding of the domain. A five year study of phosphogypsum use in Huelva, Spain, presents a model of a coherent, evidence-based approach, grounded in sound policy, good science and best practices. The 'constructive regulation' approach builds directly on evidence and lessons learned from a long, continuous tradition of PG use in Spain, Brazil and the United States. It draws on the results of the Stack Free by '53? project to modify John Nash's cooperative game and bargaining theory as a basis for defining a new sustainable point of equilibrium in which phosphogypsum production and consumption are

  12. The regulation of hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Effects on the Portland cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikols, E.H.; Gill, A.S.; Dougherty, A.

    1996-01-01

    Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) addresses the control of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from major sources of air pollution in the US. In the CAAA, Congress defined 189 compounds as hazardous air pollutants in need of additional control by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Congress directed EPA to identify the major source categories which emit HAPs and to prepare regulations that would reduce and control future HAP emissions. This paper outlines the activities undertaken by EPA to regulate HAP emissions from Portland cement plants and the program developed by the Portland cement manufacturing industry to cope with Title III

  13. Economics of regulation. New rules for capital markets and grid industries. Congress documentation; Oekonomie der Regulierung. Neue Spielregeln fuer Kapitalmaerkte und Netzindustrien. Kongress-Dokumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picot, Arnold [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Information, Organisation und Management; Schenck, Marcus (eds.) [E.ON AG, Duesseldorf (Germany). Unternehmenskommunikation

    2010-07-01

    In industries subject to intensive regulation, especially grid-based industries (telecommunication, energy, railways, postal services), the current regulation framework must be reviewed and updated. This book provides deeper expert knowledge and empirical knowledge in the field of regulation and attempts to enhance awareness of the importance of regulation for corporate policy and national economy. It contains the papers presented by renowned experts and decision-makers of industry, politics and economy at the 63rd German Business Experts Day 2009 (Deutscher Betriebswirtschafter-Tag).

  14. Deregulation, market structure and gas prices in the Canadian Natural Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhler, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    During the course of the development of the natural gas industry in Canada, gas purchase and sales markets have evolved from being relatively free of regulation to being highly regulated and back again. Though pipeline transport charges were regulated, the pipeline companies, or their subsidiaries, owned the gas that they transported and price and other provisions of purchase and sales contracts were freely negotiated with the producers at one end and distributing utilities or industrial users at the other end. The Western Accord of 1985 set the process of deregulation of the Canadian natural gas industry in motion. On November 1, 1986, natural gas prices in interprovincial trade were deregulated in that domestic natural gas prices were to be freely negotiated. Although not stated explicitly, government policy is to permit export prices to be freely negotiated so long as they do not fall below domestic prices. The deregulation process has dramatically changed the relationship between buyers and sellers. Of particular importance is that deregulation has permitted companies to negotiate gas purchase contracts directly with producers with the pipeline company acting solely as a gas transporter. The purpose of this paper is to examine the forces that have led to shorter term contracts and to examine the likely effect of these contract terms on reservoir development investment incentives. 5 refs., 3 figs

  15. The structure of atomic power industry with allowance for energy production other than electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.P.; Legasov, V.A.; Sidorenko, V.A.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protsenko, A.N.; Grebennik, V.N.; Glushkov, E.S.

    1977-01-01

    The important tendency in the development of nuclear power is broadening the scope of its application for substitution of mineral fuel by the nuclear one not only at the electrical power production but in other energy consuming fields of industry. The development of large-scale nuclear power plants permits the provision of the significant part of energy supply of all kinds and save on oil and gas. Scales and rates of development of nuclear power are estimated for the model society on the basis of predicted need energy consumption per capita. The possible rates and scales of nuclear power development are determined at some alternative amounts of potential reserves of organic fuel (oil, gas) per capita and within the economically and ecologically reasonable scales of coal utilization. There has been given the analysis of possible scopes of application of nuclear power industry: for production of electricity, central heating, hydrogen generation, gasification of coals, metallurgy, chemistry by means of medium- and high-temperature reactors. The conceivable relation between electrical energy and heat production in energetics and the nuclear power industry and the dynamics of change in this relation is being forecasted. The promising development of high temperature helium reactors has been discussed. Considerations on possible effect of thorium cycle on the structure of nuclear power industry are outlined. The nuclear power industry is being developed mainly on the basis of nuclear power plants with thermal reactors and it should not be expected for the next decade that its structure is to change significantly. However, the development of only this type reactors will require, as early as the end of this century, the significant consumption of natural uranium and considerable increase in capacities of uranium output and uranium enrichment industry. Therefore, in the following stages of development of nuclear power industry it is necessary to introduce fast breeders

  16. Dampak Liberalisasi Perdagangan Terhadap Kinerja Industri Manufaktur di Indonesia (Pendekatan Structure-Conduct-Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Aprilian Hidayat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influx of imported goods in the domestic market will pressure domestic producers to be more efficient. The more effiecient the domestic firm, the more competitive it becomes. This competitive firm is expected to have opportunities to expand to a larger market. This study analyzed the effect of trade liberalization to industrial performance in Indonesia. This study exploited data at the industry level, ie: 38 industries of three digits International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC during 2000-2009. The analysis was conducted within Structure Conduct Performance (SCP framework. Industrial performance was measured by price-costmargin and trade liberalization was measured by export share and a dummy indicating implementation of Asean Free Trade Area (AFTA. Using the fixed effect model, the result showed weak evidence of the effect of trade liberalization to industrial performance in Indonesia. Dummy AFTA was negative and significant to industrial performance while export share was insignificant. The results might indicate that the adoption of AFTA endangered domestic firms’ performance.

  17. Two essays on electricity markets: Entry into hydroelectric generation industry and the political cycle of regulated prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moita, Rodrigo Menon Simoes

    This dissertation is about the electricity industry and the problems that arise with the liberalization and de-regulation of the industry. Characteristics intrinsic to the electricity market create problems that can compromise an efficient functioning of this market. Each of the two chapters of this dissertation focus on a specific aspect of this industry. The first chapter analyzes entry in the hydroelectric generation industry. The operation of a generator upstream regularizes the river flow for generators located downstream on the same river, increasing the production capacity of the latter. This positive externality increases the attractiveness of the locations downstream whenever a generator decides to enter upstream. Therefore, the entry decision of a generator in a given location may affect all entry decisions in potential locations for plants located downstream. I first model the problem of generators located in cascade on the same river and show the positive effect of the externality. Second, I use a panel of data on investment decisions of hydro-generation firms to estimate an entry model that takes into account the effect of the externality generated by entry upriver. The results show a positive incentive to locate downstream from existing plants and from locations where entry is likely to occur. Location characteristics also play an important role on the entrants' decisions. The model provides estimates of the average expected market price across the different years covered by the sample and shows that it rose one year before the energy crisis of 2001, evidencing that the market anticipated the crisis. This result has important implications on the evaluation of the Brazilian market design. It shows that entry responded to a rise in expectations about excess demand in the future, contradicting the argument that the crisis was a consequence of mis-designed market institutions. The second chapter deals with the problem of the political cycle in regulated

  18. Effects of SO2 emission regulations and fuel prices on levellized energy costs for industrial steam generation options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdogan, Sibel; Arikol, Mahir

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the impacts of SO 2 emission regulations and fuel prices on levellized energy costs of industrial steam generation options. A computer model called INDUSTEAM has been utilized. The steam-supply options comprise conventional grate-firing, bubbling and circulating fluidized beds, fuel-oil, and natural-gas-fired systems. Fuels of different SO 2 pollution potential have been evaluated assuming six environmental scenarios and varying fuel prices. A capacity range of 10-90 MW th is covered. (author)

  19. Quantitative Analysis of the Impact of Changes in Policies and Regulations for Electricity and Town Gas Supply Industries (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    KAINOU Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, a series of changes were made to policies and regulations governing electricity and town gas supply industries in Japan. To evaluate how such regulatory changes, channeled through the behavior of power/gas companies, have affected the economic welfare of the electricity and town gas markets, it is necessary to first quantitatively analyze how the power/gas companies reacted to the regulatory changes in terms of management behavior. Specifically, it must be examined what decision...

  20. Ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs in a restructuredelectri city industry: Issues and options for regulators andlegislators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph; Goldman, Charles; Nadel, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Electric industry restructuring requires state regulators and legislators to re-examine the purposes served by and the continuing need for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs, as well as the mechanisms to collect funds for these programs and the institutions appropriate to administer them. This paper offers background to these issues and a series of recommendations based on analysis of recent state experiences. Our recommendations are summarized.

  1. Structure, conduct, and sustainability of the international low-enriched fuel fabrication industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the cost structures of fabricating Low-Enriched Uranium fuel (LEU, enriched to 5% enrichment) light water reactor fuels. The LEU industry is decades old, and (except for high entry cost, i.e., the cost of designing and licensing a fuel fabrication facility and its fuel), labor and additional fabrication lines can be added by industry incumbents at Nth-of-a-Kind cost to the maximum capacity allowed by the license. On the other hand, new entrants face higher First-of-a-Kind costs and high new-facility licensing costs, increasing the scale required for entry thus discouraging small scale entry by countries with only a few nuclear power plants. Therefore, the industry appears to be competitive with sustainable investment in fuel-cycle states, and structural barriers-to-entry increase its proliferation resistance. (author)

  2. Study on Laws, Regulations and Standards on Energy Efficiency, Energy Conserving and Emission Reduction of Industrial Boilers in EU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ren; Zhao, Yuejin; Chen, Haihong; Liang, Xiuying; Yang, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Industrial boilers are widely applied in such fields as factory power, building heating, and people’s lives; China is the world’s largest producer and user of industrial boilers, with very high annual energy consumption; clear requirements have been put forward by China on the energy efficiency since the “11th Five-year Plan” with the hope to save energy and reduce emission by means of energy efficiency standards and regulations on the supervision and control of various special equipment. So far, the energy efficiency of industrial boilers in China has been improved significantly but there is still a gap with the EU states. This paper analyzes the policies of energy efficiency, implementation models and methods of supervision and implementation at the EU level from laws, regulations, directives as well as standards; the paper also puts forward suggestions of energy conserving and emission reduction on the improvement of energy conserving capacity of industrial boilers in China through studying the legislations and measures of the developed countries in energy conserving of boilers.

  3. Effects of regulation and economic environment on the electricity industry's competitiveness: A study based on OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Chulwoo; Jung, Euy-Young; Lee, Jeong-Dong

    2014-01-01

    We propose a competitiveness index for the electricity industry based on efficiency, stability, and growth factors identified from previous studies subject to data accessibility. These are then weighted appropriately through the application of the analytical hierarchy process. This index is an alternative tool to capture the diverse characteristics of the electricity industry in order to analyze performance after deregulation. Using the competitiveness index, we analyze the effect of regulation change in specific economic environments represented by the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share, for example. According to the results, deregulation generally increases competitiveness, but the effect depends on the economic environment and the type of regulation. Deregulating entry and vertical integration to increase competitiveness is more effective in countries where the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share are low. The manner in which the privatization effect is related to the economic environment is, however, unclear. - Highlights: • This study proposes a competitiveness index for the electricity industry. • It examines the effects of electricity industry deregulation in OECD countries. • It suggests an economic environment in which deregulation can contribute to competitiveness

  4. Optimizing the structure of financial resources of industrial enterprises in the market economy mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the optimization of the structure of financial resources of industrial enterprises in the market economy mechanism. The slowdown of the Russian economy force companies to promote more accurate system financial planning its activities. In modern economic conditions the company's performance is largely dependent on the ability of management to more accurately predict financial flows, as well as more accurately predict the financial and human resources to ensure solvency of the enterprise, thus more competent to form the strategy of development of the organization.Goal / task. The aim of the article the search for the optimal structure of financial resources of industrial enterprises in the market economy mechanism and to develop proposals for the sustainable development of the enterprise. The task of this article is to investigate the structure of financial resources of the enterprise, in a deteriorating economic situation that must be considered in the sustainable development of industrial enterprises.Methodology. In conducting this study the main sources of the original data were the materials of the state statistics, the works of famous economists. The basis of the methodological developments based on comparative methods of analysis.Results. Given the concept of optimizing the structure of financial resources of the industrial enterprises. It shows the influence of external and internal factors affecting the stability of the industrial enterprises. Highlighted the impact of the economic situation on the role of these factors.Conclusions / significance. In the current economic conditions of the state and the new economic realities, it is necessary to focus to industrial enterprises to conduct an effective economic policy, thereby improving the financial stability of the enterprise.

  5. Intensity of Competition and Market Structure in the Italian Banking Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannetti, C.

    2008-01-01

    This work tests the predictions of Sutton’s model of independent submarkets for the Italian retail banking industry. In the first part of this paper, I develop a model of endogenous mergers to evidence the relationship between firms’ conduct, market entry and market structure. In the second part, I

  6. The telecommunications industry and economic growth: how the market structure matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jerbashian, Vahagn

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 42 (2011), s. 1-68 ISSN N R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Grant - others:UK(CZ) GAUK 79310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : telecommunication industry * market structure * economic growth Subject RIV: AH - Economic s

  7. The telecommunications industry and economic growth: how the market structure matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jerbashian, Vahagn

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, December (2015), s. 515-523 ISSN 0264-9993 Grant - others:UK(CZ) GAUK 79310 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : telecommunications industry * market structure * economic growth Subject RIV: AH - Economic s Impact factor: 0.997, year: 2015

  8. STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION OF SHAPES IN THE DESIGN OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS, USING GEOMETRICAL TRANSFORMATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    MARIN Dumitru

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the major contribution of geometrical transformations in the structure and organization of the shapes which compose industrial products. Geometrical transformations, such as symmetry, translation, rotation, homology etc. are frequently used in the design activity for filling the plane and the space (plane and spatial equipartitions), in ornaments and also in creating shapes, which are functional and aesthetical at the same time.

  9. Structures of mobilization and resistance: Confronting the oil and gas industries in Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierk, Simone; Tysyachnyouk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on recent developments in the problematic relationship between the oil industry and local communities in the Republic of Komi, we develop a case study of environmental grassroots mobilization in northwest Russia. Using a qualitative methodology comprising semi-structured interviews and

  10. Determinants of Rural Industrial Entrepreneurship of Farmers in West Bengal : A Structural Equations Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Henk; Dutta, Subrata; Oud, Han

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a structural equations model of rural industrial entrepreneurship (RIE) among farmers in the Bardhaman district, West Bengal, India. It identifies the determinants of RIE but also analyzes impacts of RIE on its endogenous determinants. Age, education, marital status, number of

  11. Determinants of rural industrial entrepreneurship of farmers in West Bengal: A structural equations approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, H.; Dutta, S.; Oud, J.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a structural equations model of rural industrial entrepreneurship (RIE) among farmers in the Bardhaman district, West Bengal, India. It identifies the determinants of RIE but also analyzes impacts of RIE on its endogenous determinants. Age, education, marital status, number of

  12. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  13. Structure of the US gas market, regulation and pricing of the third party access to the network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Mirabel, F.

    2000-06-01

    The opening of the US natural gas market to competition is followed by deep changes in the implemented regulations for an efficient organization and operation of the gas industry. The transformations of the industrial structures and the strategic behavior of the actors characterize the mutations of the gas markets in the USA. The aim of this paper is to transcribe in a synthetic form the characteristics of the gas market in North America and to model the structure of the industry in this sector opened to competition in its back-end. Two main questions are analyzed: the role and position of the former monopoly (utility) in this back-end market (should the local distribution companies continue to sell gas to end users?), and what kind of regulation should be implemented by the authorities in order to avoid the former monopoly to use its market power and make excessive profits. The analysis is made in two steps: the first part explains the hypotheses of the analysis using the characteristics of the North American market. It presents the general framework of the model and explains the two 'regulatory scenarios' retained in the study. The main steps of the resolution of the model are detailed in the second part. (J.S.)

  14. The current state of taxation and regulation of land plot size of industrial areas in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.А. Malashevskyy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the domestic legal and regulatory framework for land taxation has been performed. The ratio of industry land within the land resources of Ukraine has been investigated. The legal basis for determination of land plot areas necessary for implementation of industrial activities has been considered. The legal regime of industry land has been investigated. The conclusion of the need for improvement of methods for determining excess areas for taxation purposes has been made and optimization of land use in populated areas.

  15. Inconvenient and Unnecessary? Regulations in the U.S. Taxi Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Colton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN is a common requirement for a new business owner in services such as utilities, communications, healthcare, and transportation. However, studies have called into question the effectiveness and purpose of these laws when applied in certain industries. This study chronicles the development of and justifications provided for the enactment of CPCN laws. It then empirically tests the effectiveness of these laws in the taxi industry. This paper finds no evidence that the CPCN laws in the taxi industry are meeting their objectives. Some evidence suggests that CPCN laws achieve the opposite of their intention.

  16. Structural Basis for Bc12-Regulated Mitochondrion-Dependent Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marassi, Francesca M

    2005-01-01

    ...; by dimerization with other Bcl-2 family members; by binding to other non-homologous proteins; and by formation of membrane pores that are believed to regulate apoptosis by perturbing mitochondrial physiology...

  17. Operator/regulator interface: Organizational structure and responsibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, J S [American Electric Power Service Corp. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In the context of promotion of safety culture for the nuclear power plants the following aspects are briefly described: operator/regulator interface regulatory organization; policy making body; operating organization; regulatory interface.

  18. Atomic Energy Control Regulations: interpretation of revisions relating to industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to those affected by section 18 to 18.23 of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Regulations. Words, phrases, and concepts that are specific to these Regulations are explained herein. However, the corresponding sections of the Regulations should be examined to obtain the exact wording. Although sections 18 to 18.23 of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Regulations apply to both neutron and gamma radiography, this guide has been written for only the latter. Persons engaged in neutron radiography should consult the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB)

  19. Cultural regulation of emotion: Individual, relational, and structural sources

    OpenAIRE

    De Leersnyder, Jozefien; Boiger, Michael; Mesquita, Batja

    2013-01-01

    The most prevalent and intense emotional experiences differ across cultures. These differences in emotional experience can be understood as the outcomes of emotion regulation, because emotions that fit the valued relationships within a culture tend to be most common and intense. We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals th...

  20. Impact of European Union Timber Regulation on Forest Certification Strategies in the Finnish Wood Industry Value Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Holopainen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this explorative study is to find out how the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR has affected the forest and chain of custody (CoC certification strategies and practices among the Finnish wood industry companies. We are especially interested to find out whether more integrated strategies and collaborative networks have emerged for enhanced communications throughout the industry value chains. This qualitative interview study included both EUTR ex ante and ex post analysis, based on three rounds of managerial and expert interviews during 2011–2015. The results indicate that the EUTR appears to have enforced the supplier–client relations in the Finnish wood industry value chain. The sector still lacks integrated communication strategies with better understanding of customer and stakeholder values, which could contribute to more cohesive communication and marketing efforts reflecting the values of the whole industry. The certification practices are fairly spontaneously implemented following the traditional industry culture, which is not supportive of innovations and gaining competitive advantages in the broader material markets. Furthermore, the existence of two parallel forest certificates (Forest Stewardship Council (FSC and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC seems to hamper the effective communication and building of an image of sustainable wood products among customers and end consumers, groups that are also exposed to more general environmental communication, e.g., in the building material markets.

  1. Motives of corporate political donations: industry regulation, subjective judgement and the origins of pragmatic and ideological corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Nicholas M

    2017-12-01

    What motivates corporate political action? Are corporations motivated by their own narrow economic self-interest; are they committed to pursuing larger class interests; or are corporations instruments for status groups to pursue their own agendas? Sociologists have been divided over this question for much of the last century. This paper introduces a novel case - that of Australia - and an extensive dataset of over 1,500 corporations and 7,500 directors. The paper attempts to understand the motives of corporate political action by examining patterns of corporate political donations. Using statistical modelling, supported by qualitative evidence, the paper argues that, in the Australian case, corporate political action is largely motivated by the narrow economic self-interest of individual corporations. Firms' interests are, consistent with regulatory environment theory, defined by the nature of government regulation in their industry: those in highly regulated industries (such as banking) and those dependent on government support (such as defence) tend to adopt a strategy of hedging their political support, and make bipartisan donations (to both major parties). In contrast, firms facing hostile regulation (such as timber or mining), and those without strong dependence on state support (such as small companies) tend to adopt a strategy of conservative partisanship, and make conservative-only donations. This paper argues that regulatory environment theory needs to be modified to incorporate greater emphasis on the subjective political judgements of corporations facing hostile regulation: a corporation's adoption of conservative partisanship or hedging is not just a product of the objective regulation they face, but also whether corporate leaders judge such regulation as politically inevitable or something that can be resisted. Such a judgement is highly subjective, introducing a dynamic and unpredictable dimension to corporate political action. © London School of

  2. The new EU approach to sector regulation in the network infrastructure industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cawley, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effect of linking sector regulation with competition law in the electronic communications sector in the European Union. It examines two questions. The first is whether, on balance, aligning sector regulation with competition law helps or hinders the achievement of

  3. An overview of the class I structures license renewal industry report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, L.J.; Statton, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    License renewal of a commercial nuclear power plant requires verification that systems, structures and components important to license renewal can perform their intended safety functions throughout the license renewal term. The verification of this continuing performance includes a technical evaluation of the effects of age-related degradation. An industry report (IR) sponsored by the nuclear industry was developed which identifies potentially significant age-related degradation mechanisms that may affect Class I structures and evaluates their impact on the ability of the structures to continue to perform their safety functions. Preventive and/or mitigative options are outlined for managing degradation mechanisms that could significantly affect plant performance during the license renewal period. This paper provides a summary of the IR. (author)

  4. Is self-regulation possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's increasingly prescriptive regulation of the nuclear industry can have deleterious effects, perhaps the most serious being the shift in responsibility for safety from the utility to the NRC. Several factors account for this type of regulation including the nature and structure of the nuclear industry, public opinion and bureaucratic incentives, and the nature of the technology itself. The opportunities to create heightened industry self-regulation (performance-based regulation) deserve further examination. The key to self-regulation is to structure incentives so that it is clearly within the nuclear utilities' interests to build and operate nuclear power facilities in the safest manner possible. 27 references

  5. A structural self-regulation of functioning macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristoforov, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    An approach to describing the functional structural changes of macromolecules processing the flows of low-mass agents is formulated. The latter appear as a source of a discrete noise whose defining parameters depend on structural variables. We derive a forward evolution equation and then, by adiabatic elimination, effective Fokker-Planck's equation for the structural modes. Within the dichotomous case, we discuss noise-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions reflecting the regulatory role of the structural subsystem

  6. The Structural Configurations of Alcohol in Denmark: Policy, Culture, and Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob; Krarup, Troels Magelund

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes recent developments in Danish alcohol policy, culture, and industry. It reveals cross-sector dynamics and complexities often downplayed in existing literature. It traces how a stable “structural configuration” emerged in the 1960s-1980s between the three domains based...... on liberalization. However, in the 1990s, a particular adolescent alcohol culture of intoxication had emerged, raising public awareness and call for policy intervention. Contrary to what may have been expected, this rupture did not mean a break with the liberal alcohol configuration in policy, culture, and industry...

  7. Agglomeration externalities, market structure and employment growth in high-tech industries: Revisiting the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieślik Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the existing empirical evidence on the effects of various agglomeration externalities and the market structure on employment growth in the high-tech industries of the European Economic Area (EEA. Our study is based on the dynamic panel dataset of two-digit NACE rev 1.1. industries in 285 regions of the European Economic Area for the period 1995-2007. We find that employment growth is negatively related to competition, while localization and urbanization externalities do not seem to affect growth.

  8. A discussion on the interpretation of the International Atomic Energy Agency regulations for the transport of NORM associated with the South African mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichsen, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    South Africa has an extensive mining industry, with total mineral sales in 2002 being R140 billion and total mineral exports being R110 billion. In this same year, the industry employed over 400 000 workers. When the International Atomic Energy Agency Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1 [ST-1 Revised]) (the Regulations), was adopted by the regulatory body, the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR), in June 2001, the Industry requested the drafting of a guide on the interpretation of these regulations for NORM. This paper has arisen from the drafting of such a guide, drafted with the end-user in mind, giving an interpretation of the application of the Regulations to NORM. The paper is more ''Qualitative'' than ''Quantitative'' and raises a number of ''peculiar'' aspects of the application of the Regulations to NORM

  9. Interpretive Structural Model of Key Performance Indicators for Sustainable Maintenance Evaluatian in Rubber Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrina, E.; Yulianto, A.

    2018-03-01

    Sustainable maintenance is a new challenge for manufacturing companies to realize sustainable development. In this paper, an interpretive structural model is developed to evaluate sustainable maintenance in the rubber industry. The initial key performance indicators (KPIs) is identified and derived from literature and then validated by academic and industry experts. As a result, three factors of economic, social, and environmental dividing into a total of thirteen indicators are proposed as the KPIs for sustainable maintenance evaluation in rubber industry. Interpretive structural modeling (ISM) methodology is applied to develop a network structure model of the KPIs consisting of three levels. The results show the economic factor is regarded as the basic factor, the social factor as the intermediate factor, while the environmental factor indicated to be the leading factor. Two indicators of social factor i.e. labor relationship, and training and education have both high driver and dependence power, thus categorized as the unstable indicators which need further attention. All the indicators of environmental factor and one indicator of social factor are indicated as the most influencing indicator. The interpretive structural model hoped can aid the rubber companies in evaluating sustainable maintenance performance.

  10. the civil society and the regulation of the extractive industry in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    in Global Environmental Governance” in Daniel Esty & Maria Ivanova (eds.) ... 7 Bridget Hutter & Joan O'Mahony, “Business Regulation: Reviewing the Regulatory. Potential of ... Institutions in oil Communities” (2008) 55 (1) Africa Today, p. 89.

  11. Post-industrial Objects and Buildings in the Structure of the Contemporary City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopotowski, Maciej; Zagroba, Marek

    2017-12-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, provincial Bialystok became the largest industrial city in the eastern territories of the former Republic of Poland. The cause of this economic growth was the development of the railway network and changing customs policy in the Russian Empire. Over a dozen or so years, several dozens of textile factories and numerous craft workshops were established in the city. The industrial prosperity of the city development was interrupted by the First and Second World War. The second half of the twentieth century also brought political and economic changes. They resulted from the nationalization of industry and the introduction of a socialist economy. In the following decades, heavy and light industries developed in the city. Metallurgical plants and factories of houses, furniture, carpets, packaging, electronics, glassworks and food processing were established. On the outskirts of the city appeared industrial districts, which except the factories concentrated also storage facilities. Economic changes that took place in Poland after 1989 caused another change in the area of Białystok industry. Many state-owned factories went bankrupt and the remaining facilities and areas had to change their intended use. The conducted research compares the methods of dealing with the currently unnecessary structure. This has taken into account its location value in the city’s structure and its cultural characteristics. Analyses allowed to indicate new use of post-industrial facilities. There were selected post-industrial buildings that currently serve residential, office, educational and commercial purposes or house cultural institutions. There are also indicated facilities that have not found their new destination and have been demolished or are not currently in use. In conclusion, the research found that the city’s post-industrial legacy is equal to its heritage - it builds the identity of the place and it is also the difficult urban problem of

  12. Entrepreneurial orientation and corporate governance structures at the firm level in the South African oil and gas industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent B. Molokwu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Corporate governance systems (CGS have been observed as one of the most important structures and mechanisms that regulate the relationships between executives and shareholders. By having well-defined and established CGS, company board members and executives are able to shape company vision and increase managerial commitment towards formulating strategies that espouse an entrepreneurial orientation (EO. Firms with high levels of EO tend to be innovative and encourage creative initiatives in new products and technology developments. Research purpose: In an emerging economy such as South Africa, one of the primary goals of an organisation is growth and good governance, which can be achieved through wellgoverned structures and continuous innovation in the face of challenges. This study identified potential links between the multidimensional constructs of CGS and EO at the firm level in the South African oil and gas industry. Motivation for the study: One of the greatest challenges faced by organisations when implementing CGS is to ensure compliance. Research design, approach and method: Board members and senior decision-makers were surveyed in the South African oil and gas industry, using a structured questionnaire. A series of correlational analyses were used to determine the strength of relationships between the dimensions of EO and CGS. Main findings: By drawing extensively on existing theory on EO, this study found that the different dimensions of CGS have a significant and positive relationship with each of the EO dimensions – innovation, risk-taking and proactiveness. Practical/managerial implications: Corporate boards supportive of entrepreneurship must provide appropriate reward systems, top management support, explicit goals and appropriate organisational values which signal to employees that entrepreneurial behaviour action is desirable. Practitioners should scrutinise their governance structures in their organisations to

  13. Entrepreneurial orientation and corporate governance structures at the firm level in the South African oil and gas industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent B. Molokwu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Corporate governance systems (CGS have been observed as one of the most important structures and mechanisms that regulate the relationships between executives and shareholders. By having well-defined and established CGS, company board members and executives are able to shape company vision and increase managerial commitment towards formulating strategies that espouse an entrepreneurial orientation (EO. Firms with high levels of EO tend to be innovative and encourage creative initiatives in new products and technology developments.Research purpose: In an emerging economy such as South Africa, one of the primary goals of an organisation is growth and good governance, which can be achieved through wellgoverned structures and continuous innovation in the face of challenges. This study identified potential links between the multidimensional constructs of CGS and EO at the firm level in the South African oil and gas industry.Motivation for the study: One of the greatest challenges faced by organisations when implementing CGS is to ensure compliance.Research design, approach and method: Board members and senior decision-makers were surveyed in the South African oil and gas industry, using a structured questionnaire. A series of correlational analyses were used to determine the strength of relationships between the dimensions of EO and CGS.Main findings: By drawing extensively on existing theory on EO, this study found that the different dimensions of CGS have a significant and positive relationship with each of the EO dimensions – innovation, risk-taking and proactiveness.Practical/managerial implications: Corporate boards supportive of entrepreneurship must provide appropriate reward systems, top management support, explicit goals and appropriate organisational values which signal to employees that entrepreneurial behaviour action is desirable. Practitioners should scrutinise their governance structures in their organisations to ensure

  14. Regulating industrial wastewater discharged to public wastewater treatment plants - A conceptual approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes some of the basic principles behind the DEPA Guidelines for discharge of industrial wastewater to public sewers set in operation in 1995 and evaluates some of the experiences with the implementation. It is described how such guidelines support the approach of pollution...... prevention and the implementation of cleaner technology by putting a stress on the industry. Further an approach for the balance between environmental and technological considerations is introduced. The need for easily understandable environmental priorities is stressed and a concept for this is presented...

  15. Estimation of avoidable skin cancers and cost-savings to government associated with regulation of the solarium industry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Nicholas; Gordon, Louisa; Gies, Peter; Green, Adèle C

    2009-03-01

    In Australia there is growing concern about the expanding solarium industry, and the additive effect of persons seeking exposure to artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR) against already intense background levels of solar UVR. We estimated the numbers of potential skin cancers prevented through regulation of solaria and the associated cost-savings to the Federal Government. A lifetime decision-analytic model was created using relative risk estimates based on a meta-analysis of the literature assessing the link between skin cancer risk and solarium use. The costs were limited to those incurred by Medicare Australia, for the medical care of individuals treated for skin cancer. With stricter regulations, we estimated between 18 and 31 melanomas, 200-251 squamous cell carcinomas and associated costs of $AU 256,054 would be avoided per 100,000 persons. Our base findings were sensitive to estimates for prevalence of use, skin cancer risk and discounting rates. Continued growth in the Australian solarium industry is likely to inflate the already substantial skin cancer burden. Subject to some limitations, our study indicates that by successfully enforcing solarium regulations to prohibit use by minors and by those with fair skin colour, the Federal Government could expect favourable cost and health benefits.

  16. Structural fire resistance experimental research priority needs of U.S. industry

    CERN Document Server

    Almand, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Structural Fire Resistance Experimental Research – Priority Needs of U.S. Industry provides a synthesis of stakeholder input to a prioritized agenda for research at the National Fire Research Laboratory (NFRL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) designed to accelerate the implementation of performance-based fire engineering for structures. The NFRL presents a broad range of unanswered questions regarding the performance of real structures in fire conditions, and informs performance-based design methods and standards in this field. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review of large-scale structural fire testing and compiled research needs from a variety of sources. The book addresses major issues of broad concern in the fire community, such as real fire exposure and structural response, composite floor system performance, enhancing modeling performance, and understanding the embedded safety features in design methods. It concludes with a prioritized set of research reco...

  17. An Overview of the Regulation of Low Dose Radiation in the Nuclear and Non-nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Shankar; Valencia, Luis; Teunckens, Lucien

    2003-01-01

    Now that increasing numbers of nuclear power stations are reaching the end of their commercially useful lives, the management of the large quantities of very low level radioactive material that arises during their decommissioning has become a major subject of discussion, with very significant economic implications. Much of this material can, in an environmentally advantageous manner, be recycled for reuse without radiological restrictions. Much larger quantities--2-3 orders of magnitude larger--of material, radiologically similar to the candidate material for recycling from the nuclear industry, arise in non-nuclear industries like coal, fertilizer, oil and gas, mining, etc. In such industries, naturally occurring radioactivity is artificially concentrated in products, by-products or waste to form TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material). It is only in the last decade that the international community has become aware of the prevalence of TENORM, specially the activity levels and quantities arising in so many non-nuclear industries. The first reaction of international organizations seems to have been to propose different standards for the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, with very stringent release criteria for radioactive material from the regulated nuclear industry and up to thirty to a hundred times more liberal criteria for the release/exemption of TENORM from the as yet unregulated non-nuclear industries. There are significant strategic issues that need to be discussed and resolved. Some examples of these are: - Disposal aspects of long-lived nuclides, - The use of radioactive residues in building materials, - Commercial aspects of differing and discriminating criteria in competing power industries in a world of deregulated electric power production. Of even greater importance is the need for the discussion of certain basic issues, such as - The quantitative risk levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, - The need for in

  18. STRUCTURAL ALTERNATIVES OF RUSSIAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES AND ARCHITECTURE OF TECHNOLOGICAL MODERNIZATION. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izryadnova O. I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuing stagnation in the Russian economy makes a compelling case for structural reforms and transition to new technologies in non-financial sector. Given the backdrop of investor choice to wait out the situation and pause their investments, stagnation threatens to remain for longer. The biggest concerns are related to the slowdown in the range of high-tech non-resource manufacturing industries. These industries should become the cornerstone to foster the development of scientific, technical, and innovative potential of the country, overcoming the technical deficit, and implementation of modern technologies of the sixth technological generation. The article assesses the place and role of manufacturing industries in Russia’s economy and presents an analysis of dynamic shifts in their structure during the business cycle. The article demonstrates the results of empirical study of monitoring of innovative receptiveness of manufacturing industries. We discuss the directions of expanded cooperation between business and state. We also outline opportunities for correcting policies and tools directed at activating innovative functioning of the manufacturing sector in the view of the growth of geopolitical tensions, forms and methods of effective institutional management of the modernization of business units. It appears that the issues of investment maneuver to single out some types of economic activities, which manufacture products and services with high added value and increasing competitiveness of the Russian economy, call for the change in the model of economic development.

  19. STRUCTURAL ALTERNATIVES OF RUSSIAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES AND ARCHITECTURE OF TECHNOLOGICAL MODERNIZATION. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izryadnova O. I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuing stagnation in the Russian economy makes a compelling case for structural reforms and transition to new technologies in non-financial sector. Given the backdrop of investor choice to wait out the situation and pause their investments, stagnation threatens to remain for longer. The biggest concerns are related to the slowdown in the range of high-tech non-resource manufacturing industries. These industries should become the cornerstone to foster the development of scientific, technical, and innovative potential of the country, overcoming the technical deficit, and implementation of modern technologies of the sixth technological generation. The article assesses the place and role of manufacturing industries in Russia’s economy and presents an analysis of dynamic shifts in their structure during the business cycle. The article demonstrates the results of empirical study of monitoring of innovative receptiveness of manufacturing industries. We discuss the directions of expanded cooperation between business and state. We also outline opportunities for correcting policies and tools directed at activating innovative functioning of the manufacturing sector in the view of the growth of geopolitical tensions, forms and methods of effective institutional management of the modernization of business units. It appears that the issues of investment maneuver to single out some types of economic activities, which manufacture products and services with high added value and increasing competitiveness of the Russian economy, call for the change in the model of economic development.

  20. Non-Price Competition and the Structure of the Online Information Industry: Q-Analysis of Medical Databases and Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Roy

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of the online information industry emphasizes the effects of non-price competition on its structure and the firms involved. Q-analysis is applied to data on medical databases and hosts, changes over a three-year period are identified, and an optimum structure for the industry based on economic theory is considered. (Author/LRW)

  1. Integration of heterogeneous industrial consumers to provide regulating power to the smart grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahnama, Samira; Stoustrup, Jakob; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to utilize the flexibility of consumers in the future smart grid with a high share of fluctuating power. Focus is on industrial cases, where a total power consumption of a few number of consumers are large enough in order to bid in the market. Heterogeneous...

  2. Industrial Pollution Regulation in the EU and in Macedonia, Serbia And Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Chavleski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial pollution control has substantial impact in the protection of the environment. In the European Union, there’s vast legislation in this field consisting mainly of the Directive on industrial emissions of 2010 aimed at consolidating the so far existing legislation in this field. The new Directive on industrial emissions aims to establish an integrated prevention and control of the pollution arising from industrial activities and it lays down rules designed to prevent or, where that is not practicable, to reduce emissions into air, water and land and to prevent the generation of waste, in order to achieve a high level of protection of the environment taken as a whole. Macedonia, Serbia and Croatia have made significant progress in this field in the recent years as part of their obligations under the Stabilization and Association Process. The purpose of this particular article is to evaluate the degree of alignment and implementation of the environmental legislation in this particular area with the legislation of EU as well its practical application, and to identify the existing deficiencies and necessary steps for action

  3. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  4. Utility regulation-The scope and structure of electrical safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, Malcolm; Cohen, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of policies in Australia and New Zealand to increase competition in the utilities sector, regulatory agencies have been created in each state to provide independent and authorative advice on matters such as electricity pricing, access to infrastructure, service quality and security of supply. In addition arrangements have been established to maintain safety standards in the industry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the major issues that have arisen in the creation of regulatory agencies responsible for electrical safety standards in Australia and New Zealand, and how they have impacted on liberalised electricity markets. - Highlights: → Policies in Australia and New Zealand to increase competition have led to the creation of electrical safety agencies. → These agencies have been created in response to perceived market failures. → There is a variance in agencies in terms of their independence and industry coverage. → These agencies have been created at a time of falling fatalities.

  5. FACTORS INFLUENCING ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE IN THE FOOD MANUFACTURING, CHEMICAL, AGRICULTURAL WHOLESALING AND BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Maude Roucan-Kane

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors determining a business investment strategy (i.e., the choice of investment commitment and form of organizational structure) in the food manufacturing, chemical, agricultural wholesaling and biotechnology industries. Propositions regarding strategic alliance theories are tested on over 400 inter-firm collaborative agreements using secondary data from major US and European companies for the 1994-97 period. Results suggest that transactions with...

  6. Investigating Food and Beverage Industry Market Structure and Market Power Based on Leo and Bresnahan’s Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nabishahikitash

    2016-03-01

    lower quantity of demand. The decrease in supply as a result of the exercise of market power creates an economic deadweight loss which is often viewed as socially undesirable. As a result, many countries have anti-trustor other legislation to limit the ability of firms to create market power. Such legislation often regulates mergers and sometimes introduces a judicial power to compel divestiture. A firm usually has market power by virtue of controlling a large portion of the market. In extreme cases—monopoly and monopsony—the firm controls the entire market. However, market size alone is not the only indicator of market power. Highly concentrated markets may be contestable if there are no barriers to entry or exit, limiting the incumbent firm's ability to raise its price above competitive levels. Market power gives firms the ability to engage in unilateral anti-competitive behavior.[1] Some of the behaviors that firms with market power are accused of engaging in include predatory pricing, product tying, and creation of overcapacity or other barriers to entry. If no individual participant in the market has significant market power, then anti-competitive behavior can take place only through collusion, or the exercise of a group of participants' collective market power. The Lerner index and Herfindahl index may be used to measure market power. Examination of market power of different industries provides possibility that policymakers design and deliver model for processing food and beverage producers to guide them to the product that has the most social benefits. Materials and Methods: The main purpose of this study is to assess and identify market structure and market power and estimate coefficient of collusion in the food and beverage industry. Estimates of market power in the food and beverage industry in Iran are few when compared with similar studies overseas. For local studies we can cite papers such as Alijani&Sabuhi (4, Sheikh zeinodin&Bakhshude (3

  7. The Utilization Of Resources And Regulation Along With Companys Strategies In Managing Oil And Natural Gas Industry In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Rahardjo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas production in Indonesia has been declined since 1995 up to now the effort to increase the production has been done but it does not result yet. In contrast day by day the investment is getting increased and huge on the other hands it becomes a problem and a challenge for Indonesia to meet oil needs as raw material for refined fuel oil either for transportation or industries. Day by day the needs of refined fuel oil is getting increased and huge as it is correlated to the increasing of the number of motorcycles either two-wheeled or four-wheeled as well as the increasing of oil and gas or non-oil and gas industries. Oil and natural industry Resource Base has specific characteristics those are internal factor that uses resource such as high technology huge investment cost as well as competent human resources. Besides the external factor those are good regulations either in the central and regional levels as well as the sector which is very important toward the production performance and the of company managements strategies to manage this industry. This paper attempts to figure out the impact of internal factor in the form of resources and external factor in the form of regulation as well as the effect of production performance toward petroleum companies of upstream sectors in Indonesia and managements role especially petroleum industrialists in managing the company. The wane of oil production and the increasing of refined fuel oil need in Indonesia as well as the increasing of oil production cost then it will affect the industrialists strategies in managing the companies. The resources consist of human resource oil reserve as well as petroleum technologies. While regulation consists of law central and regional government regulations and rules in oil and gas sector. Whereas the companys strategies are explained by production volume and selling volume of oil. Companys performance which sets to work in upstream sector is influenced by

  8. Implications for the Venezuelan oil industry of new environmental regulations in consumer countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez M, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    New and tighter environmental regulations are being enacted in major oil consumer countries, inducing a reshaping of oil business strategies and operations in oil exporting countries. The priority areas include air and water pollution control, waste management, conservation of natural resources and oil spill control among others. This paper summarizes the more significant of those regulations in the U.S.A. and Europe, their aims, as well as the implications for Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA) in terms of investment in new product specifications and pollution prevention programmes. A review of the Venezuelan environmental regulations has also been done recently, and the necessary investment to comply with the new national standards in existing installations are estimated in US$500 million for the period 1992-1996. Investment in local environmental protection, associated with the new installations in Venezuela for manufacturing cleaner products during the same period, are included in the costs of these installations presented in this document. (author)

  9. Climate change and the macroeconomic structure in pre-industrial europe: new evidence from wavelet analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Qing; Zhang, David D; Li, Guodong; Lee, Harry F

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between climate change and the macroeconomy in pre-industrial Europe has attracted considerable attention in recent years. This study follows the combined paradigms of evolutionary economics and ecological economics, in which wavelet analysis (spectrum analysis and coherence analysis) is applied as the first attempt to examine the relationship between climate change and the macroeconomic structure in pre-industrial Europe in the frequency domain. Aside from confirming previous results, this study aims to further substantiate the association between climate change and macroeconomy by presenting new evidence obtained from the wavelet analysis. Our spectrum analysis shows a consistent and continuous frequency band of 60-80 years in the temperature, grain yield ratio, grain price, consumer price index, and real wage throughout the study period. Besides, coherence analysis shows that the macroeconomic structure is shaped more by climate change than population change. In addition, temperature is proven as a key climatic factor that influences the macroeconomic structure. The analysis reveals a unique frequency band of about 20 years (15-35 years) in the temperature in AD1600-1700, which could have contributed to the widespread economic crisis in pre-industrial Europe. Our findings may have indications in re-examining the Malthusian theory.

  10. Application of information technology in the process analysis of structural subdivisions of light industry enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тарана Тахир кызы Мусаева

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The problems of application of information technologies in the process analysis of structural subdivisions of the enterprises of light industry enterprises are considered. For the functional cost analysis in the company it was prepared a computerized structure of the workplace and its principle of operation is described. The functionality of the computerized workplace is tested for textile enterprises. The results showed that the use of information technology has good prospects at the implementation of the quality management system at the textile enterprises

  11. Financial and environmental behavior of the regulated firm: A case study of the US nuclear power industry, 1974-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    This study of the US commercial nuclear power industry from 1974-1984 covers the operations of 87 power plants. It seeks to help explain the actions of a regulated firm faced with environmental constraints from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and financial constraints from State regulatory bodies. Theoretical and applied conceptions of the regulated monopoly are reviewed in a historical and integrated format using both the neoclassical and institutional positions. For the neoclassical approach, the author seeks empirical support for the Averch-Johnson hypothesis by including profit-maximizing and environmental constraints in his econometric model. For the institutionalist approach, he tries to look into the institutional reasons for the behavior exhibited by the firms. A date base which consists of financial, radioactive emissions, and technical operations information has been compiled in order to allow testing of various hypotheses drawn from theoretical and applied sources. The results of the analysis support five very clear conclusions which are presented

  12. Using natural and synthetic growth regulators of plants in industrial mycology and malting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kuznetcova

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on the expansion of the use the plants growth regulators in different areas are presented. The positive impact of the growth stimulators on the development of the Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium’s on agar nutrient media during surface cultivation is shown. The results for growth regulators stimulating effect on the fungus biosynthetic activity in submerged cultures are obtained. The possibility of using fumar and heteroauxin for malting is considered. The decline of malting time and increase of amylolytic activity of the malt are recorded.

  13. Food Safety Regulation and Firm Productivity: Evidence from the French Food Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Requillart, Vincent; Nauges, Celine; Simioni, Michel; Bontemps, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess whether food safety regulations imposed by the European Union in the 2000s may have induced a slow-down in the productivity of firms in the food processing sector. The impact of regulations on costs and productivity has seldom been studied. This article contributes to the literature by measuring productivity change using a panel of French food processing firms for the years 1996 to 2006. To do so, we develop an original iterative testing procedure b...

  14. Governance and regulation in the Venezuelan petroleum industry: an analysis of the evolution of the relations between the State and the oil companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhassine, A.A.

    2008-12-01

    Oil is an extremely desired strategic resource which is in the center of the cooperation, the tensions and the conflicts between the producing States and the consumers, between the owners of deposits and oil companies and also between oil companies and consumers. The preoccupation of the political economy is exactly to report the interweaving of the economic and political factors in the formation and in the evolution of the structures of the national petroleum industries. Any change concerning the access to the oil resource and to its rent engenders a redefining of the behaviour, the strategies and the objectives of the main actors. So, by analyzing the process of structuralization of the industry of hydrocarbons in Venezuela, the author attempts to explain the evolution of his mode of organization according to his strategy of regulation. The functional relation which stands out from it becomes identified as a balance of power enters the Venezuelan State, the leaders of the national oil company PDVSA, the international oil companies, the consumers and the international organizations. The thesis reconstitutes the interaction between the maximization of the profits pursued by the oil companies and the forms of appropriation of the rents by the State. The control of the mechanisms of creation and appropriation of the rents allows then the main actors of the oil system to direct the oil Venezuelan policy according to their own interests. (author)

  15. The measurement and regulation of cross subsidy. The case of the Scottish water industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkins, John W.; Reid, Scott

    2007-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that significant cross subsidies exist in the water, gas and electricity utility industries, particularly those under public ownership. In this paper we discuss the measurement of cross subsidy and its regulatory implications in the context of a publicly owned utility on the verge of being opened up to product market competition. Using the case of the publicly owned Scottish water industry the paper outlines the definition and measurement of cross subsidy in theoretical terms before reviewing the policy debate over the desirability of cross subsidy between different customer groups and services. It then explains the approach to measurement recently adopted by the Scottish Executive. Having established the size and direction of cross subsidy the regulatory implications are considered. (author)

  16. Recommendations for the safe use and regulation of radiation sources in industry, medicine, research and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The use of radiation sources of various types and activities is widespread in industry, medicine, research and teaching, and is increasing yearly. The safety record has been admirable, although incidents have occurred where loss of control of radiation sources has given rise to unplanned exposures to workers, medical patients and members of the public, sometimes with fatal results, while in other situations exposure may not have been as low as reasonably achievable. This publication is intended as a practical aid for all concerned with operational radiation protection connected with the use of radiation sources in industry, medicine, research and teaching, from the point of view of both the user of such sources and the regulatory bodies. Refs, figs

  17. Industry self-regulation and TV advertising of foods to Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Lisa G; Lynch, John W; Merlin, Tracy

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the amount of non-core (unhealthy) food advertising currently on Australian television (i) during children's programmes and viewing times; (ii) since the introduction of food industry self-regulatory initiatives in 2009; and (iii) whether advertising differs according to signatory status to industry initiatives. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase.com and JSTOR (media/marketing) databases; grey literature; and reference lists of relevant articles for studies published since 2009 that reported on food advertising on Australian television. The title and abstract of 316 articles were screened, yielding 25 articles considered potentially eligible, of which eight met the pre-defined selection criteria. Meta-analysis was not possible because of temporal and methodological differences across studies. The advertising of non-core foods was found to be negligible during programmes with a C-(children's) classification but ranged from 1.5 to 6.5/h during children's peak viewing times. From 2006 to 2011, non-core food advertising decreased by 0.18 advertisements per hour every year, whereas fast food advertising increased by 0.09/h; however, these analyses are based on one study with only five time points. During children's viewing times, signatories to industry initiatives advertise non-core foods at higher rates than non-signatories. Although it is not possible to determine whether advertising has changed since the industry initiatives were introduced, signatories to the initiatives continue to advertise non-core foods at times when many children watch television. Future efforts to reduce children's exposure to food advertising should be focused on advertising during children's peak viewing times rather than by programme classifications. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. Effects of industrial processing on essential elements and regulated and emerging contaminant levels in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Bøge Søndergaard, Annette; Bøknæs, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of contaminants in industrial processing was studied for prawns (cooked and peeled), Greenland halibut (cold smoked) and Atlantic salmon (cold smoked and trimmed). Raw prawns had significantly higher cadmium, chromium, iron, selenium and zinc content in autumn than in spring, while...... summer levels typically were intermediate. Peeling raw prawns increased mercury concentration but reduced the concentration of all other elements including inorganic arsenic, total arsenic, chromium, zinc, selenium but especially cadmium, copper and iron (p

  19. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  20. Energy efficiency and fuel switching in Canadian industry under greenhouse gas regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolick, M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of financial instruments to greenhouse gas control, particularly a greenhouse gas tax, is discussed. As of June 1991, Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Norway have imposed taxes on greenhouse gas emissions, while taxes are imminent in Denmark and Germany. A study has been carried out to model the effects of such taxes on greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, using the Intra-Sectoral Technology Use Model (ISTUM) and an end-use energy demand computer model. Only carbon dioxide and methane were considered. The limitations of the ISTUM model are discussed. Industry results are presented by sector, including an overview of greenhouse gas-producing processes, emission reduction measures possible, energy and greenhouse emissions, and results of taxes at varying levels. Different basic physical and chemical processes among industries would cause widely varying responses to a greenhouse gas tax. Issues which bear directly on greenhouse gas emissions include the burning of biomass fuels in the pulp and paper industry, strategic choices between existing and new technologies in the iron and steel sector, the possibility of a nearly greenhouse gas-free aluminum smelting sector, and the advent of reformulated gasoline requirements and declining crude oil quantity in the petroleum refining sector. 15 refs., 6 figs

  1. Business Conflict and Risk Regulation: Understanding the Influence of the Pesticide Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Kees

    2017-01-01

    Despite the criticism, frequent in the literature, of business influence on the formulation of pesticide risk regulation, there has been remarkably little systematic study of this practice. This article discusses Costa Rica pesticide producers’ business influence on global and national efforts to

  2. 76 FR 16424 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Compliance With Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Tobacco to Protect Children and Adolescents.'' It does not create or confer any rights for or on any... Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco To Protect Children and Adolescents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Regulations Restricting the Sale and Distribution of Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco to Protect Children and...

  3. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B Meyer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships. Methods We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Results Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. Conclusions We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards to facilitate the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  4. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Wilson, Annabelle M; Calnan, Michael; Henderson, Julie; Coveney, John; McCullum, Dean; Pearce, Alex R; Ward, Paul; Webb, Trevor

    2017-02-13

    Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships. We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards) to facilitate the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  5. Regulation of the natural gas distribution sector: a comparison of Brazilian and Colombian industries; Regulacao do setor de distribuicao de gas natural: uma comparacao dos casos brasileiro e colombiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingues, Mariana Peralva; Ferraro, Marcelo Colomer [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Bolivia oil industry nationalization in 2006 and the high price of oil on the international market called the public and government attention to the problems of the natural gas industry regulation in Brazil. Recently, the establishment of a specific law for the natural gas industry had been debated in academic circles and in government institutions. In Brazil, the absence of an integrated energy policy and the absence of a homogeneous regulatory framework interfere with natural gas industry development, especially in distribution. Thus, the objective of the work will be contrast the Colombia distribution natural gas regulatory structure sector to the Brazilian natural gas regulatory framework. The comparison of the Brazilian regulatory framework and the Colombian natural gas regulation shows that the existence of different kinds of concession contracts in distribution is one of the explanations for the different levels of investment in Brazil. The contract with exclusive right to explore the distribution service in geographic territories also contributes to explain the low coverage rate of public distribution companies. Thus, the rapid expansion of the natural gas distribution network in Colombia after the regulatory reforms shows the importance of the establishment of a regulatory structure to push private investment. The Colombian case can be considered a good model for other countries in South America, especially to the natural gas distribution regulation. (author)

  6. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  7. Structural interaction and functional regulation of polycystin-2 by filamin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    Full Text Available Filamins are important actin cross-linking proteins implicated in scaffolding, membrane stabilization and signal transduction, through interaction with ion channels, receptors and signaling proteins. Here we report the physical and functional interaction between filamins and polycystin-2, a TRP-type cation channel mutated in 10-15% patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down experiments demonstrated that the C-termini of filamin isoforms A, B and C directly bind to both the intracellular N- and C-termini of polycystin-2. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that endogenous polycystin-2 and filamins are in the same complexes in renal epithelial cells and human melanoma A7 cells. We then examined the effect of filamin on polycystin-2 channel function by electrophysiology studies with a lipid bilayer reconstitution system and found that filamin-A substantially inhibits polycystin-2 channel activity. Our study indicates that filamins are important regulators of polycystin-2 channel function, and further links actin cytoskeletal dynamics to the regulation of this channel protein.

  8. Approaches to evaluation of changes in capital structure in industrial branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Landa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Capital structure is described as a relation between equity and debts while the mutual consequences among items of company’s assets and resources employed as well as the cost of capital are also taken into account. Both, the theory and practice, at evaluation of approaches to capital structure are focu­sed on creation and optimization of capital structure. Relatively less frequent approach is the analy­sis of a state and of changes in capital structure on the level of whole business branch. But on this basis, it is possible to investigate some “average” approaches to selection of financial resources. At ca­pi­tal structure optimization (the proportion between equity and debts, a wide range of criteria plays a substantial role, e.g. cost of capital, risk, expected profitability, liquidity, dividend policy. These criteria have joint effect. This way, a logic question which criteria are preferred more and which criteria are preferred less appears. The article deals with the analysis of capital structure of three branches of manufacturing industry (the branch of production of plastics, the branch of production of electric equipments, the branch of production of textile in the years 2007–2009 with the special focus on development of financial structure, capital structure and on cost of capital.

  9. Regulation and the Ownership Structure of European Listed Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Marc Steffen; Trinchera, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore an extensive panel data set covering more than 4,000 listed firms in 16 European countries to study the effects of shareholder protection on ownership structure and firm performance. We document a negative firm-level correlation between shareholder protection and ownersh...

  10. Study on environmental results improvement plan through flexible industrial environmental regulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hyun Joo; Chang, Kee Bok; Lee, Young Soon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    As the economic environment has been changed to the direction of decentralization and diversification, there shows various changes in the area and method of market intervention by the government. In the environmental sector, it has been discussed to extend its use of economic incentive coming out of an existing direct regulation policy. Recently the importance on the new forms of government role such as voluntary agreements and information opening have been emphasized. Although the existing direct regulation policy has an advantage of visible and direct effect, it blocked the chance to explore technological and economical alternatives toward environmental problems by business sector. Therefore it is recognized that there is a fundamental limit on inducing the efficient pollution resisting activities from the business sector. Therefore this study analyzed and recommended theoretical characteristics on mechanism that a voluntary approach can bring appropriate results on policy objectives. 98 refs. 7 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Optimization of process for creating porous structure of materials from industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangutova-Stoilkovska, Bianka

    2005-01-01

    Republic of Macedonia, as many European countries, possesses great quantities of industrial waste materials from thermo electrical power stations and metallurgical capacities. The powder from waste fly ash and metallurgical slag was specified from chemical, geometrical, structural and thermochemical aspects. After the consolidation, the compacts were specified from structural, mechanical and thermophysical aspects. Using three kinds of waste glasses (TV glass, window and flask), the sintering temperature was significantly reduced and ecologically risky components were fixed molecularly in the matrix based on fly ash and metallurgical slag. The glass was characterized from chemical, geometrical and thermophysical point of view. The amount of glass in the composites varied from 10%-50%. The mechanical and thermal expansion properties of the sintered compacts, in the temperature region from 800 o -1200 o C were determined. The thermodynamic stability, mechanical properties and chemical inertness have been used as criterion for selection of the consolidated compacts. Special attention was given to the creation of highly porous structure. For the purpose to obtain a high joint porous structure, several types of porosity have been used: polyurethane foam, hydrogen peroxide, limestone, carbon ash and carbon fibres. The obtained glass-ceramic materials could be used in the building industry, for making filters for gases and liquids as well as diffusers for waste water aeration. (Author)

  12. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters...... for the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, and norepinephrine, and the amino acid neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. The SLC6 NTTs are widely expressed in the mammalian brain and play an essential role in regulating neurotransmitter signaling and homeostasis by mediating uptake...... of released neurotransmitters from the extracellular space into neurons and glial cells. The transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutic drugs used in treatment of psychiatric diseases, including major depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy...

  13. Competition and regulation in the European network industries. From general case to the case of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonquieres, F.

    1995-01-01

    The paper focuses on the institutional arrangements present situation in the European Electricity Supply Industry, which is characterized by its diversity. There is unquestionably, a trend to put pressure on the national electricity systems by the European Union organisms to accept the unbundling, Third Party Access to the network, deregulation etc. An opposing reaction appears, trying to underline the potential important drawbacks of such a trend. The conclusion of the author can be summarised as follows: Competition at the generation level? Yes[ Access to the network ? No[ (author)

  14. Long-term contract auctions and market power in regulated power industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soledad Arellano, M.; Serra, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    A number of countries with oligopolistic power industries have used marginal cost pricing to set the price of energy for small customers. This course of action, however, does not necessarily ensure an efficient outcome when competition is imperfect. The purpose of this paper is to study how the auction of long-term contracts could reduce market power. We do so in a two-firm, two-technology, linear-cost, static model where demand is summarized by a price inelastic load curve. In this context we show that the larger the proportion of total demand auctioned in advance, the lower are both the contract and the average spot price of energy.

  15. Economic governance in the Chinese PV industry: Structural and individual factors influencing market development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruss, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the new millennium, the global production of photovoltaic (PV modules has been experiencing a rapid growth. In 2008, China already had 50 times more producers than in 2001 and three Chinese companies ranked amongst the top 10 PV producers worldwide. However, overcapacities and international trade disputes have challenged the success story of the Chinese PV industry. In order to try to tackle the mechanisms which have fostered the overall development of the Chinese PV industry since the 2000s, I have conducted a qualitative case study on Chinese PV modules producers. Following the logic of a qualitative research design, theories on cluster development have been used as an analytical device for structuring the causal narrative. In a circular research process design, structural factors, such as local growth fetishism and rebalancing, as well as individual factors, such as herd behaviour and wishful thinking, have been identified as drivers along the line of the life cycle of clusters. In this respect, this paper contests the still popular idea of the Chinese central government as the omnipotent and rational director of the Chinese economy and takes the consequences of past decentralization policies as well as bounded rationality into consideration. Since the political emphasis of regional development for global competitiveness had similar policy effects in different countries, the findings call for a context sensitive comparison between industries and countries.

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF EXPORT PORTFOLIO CURRENCY STRUCTURE OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES IN REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Коrоbiyna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of currency portfolio structure of export industrial enterprises in the Republic of Belarus, by which we shall understand a currency structure of export contracts of an international enterprise, is considered as one of the most important problems in the financial management of an enterprise. Statement and analysis of industrial enterprise alternative costs and simultaneous investigation of tendencies pertaining to changes in the exchange rates give the possibility (under other equal status to reduce non-systematic risks in foreign trade. Diversification of industrial enterprise currency portfolios with the purpose to decrease financial risks and with due account of exchange rate correlation can lead to an increase of payments in Russian currency and Eurocurrency under enterprise export contracts. The given changes decrease currency risks in the foreign trade however they entail possible increase of the export share of products to the Russian Federation in total export volume of the Republic of Belarus that increases dependence of the Republic of Belarus on the Russian Federation as the main foreign trade partner.

  17. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  18. Structural Elements Regulating AAA+ Protein Quality Control Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Wen; Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T F

    2017-01-01

    Members of the ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities (AAA+) superfamily participate in essential and diverse cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life by harnessing the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to drive their biological functions. Although most AAA+ proteins share a ring-shaped architecture, AAA+ proteins have evolved distinct structural elements that are fine-tuned to their specific functions. A central question in the field is how ATP binding and hydrolysis are coupled to substrate translocation through the central channel of ring-forming AAA+ proteins. In this mini-review, we will discuss structural elements present in AAA+ proteins involved in protein quality control, drawing similarities to their known role in substrate interaction by AAA+ proteins involved in DNA translocation. Elements to be discussed include the pore loop-1, the Inter-Subunit Signaling (ISS) motif, and the Pre-Sensor I insert (PS-I) motif. Lastly, we will summarize our current understanding on the inter-relationship of those structural elements and propose a model how ATP binding and hydrolysis might be coupled to polypeptide translocation in protein quality control machines.

  19. Effects of industrial processing on essential elements and regulated and emerging contaminant levels in seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Søndergaard, Annette Bøge; Bøknæs, Niels; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Granby, Kit

    2017-06-01

    Mitigation of contaminants in industrial processing was studied for prawns (cooked and peeled), Greenland halibut (cold smoked) and Atlantic salmon (cold smoked and trimmed). Raw prawns had significantly higher cadmium, chromium, iron, selenium and zinc content in autumn than in spring, while summer levels typically were intermediate. Peeling raw prawns increased mercury concentration but reduced the concentration of all other elements including inorganic arsenic, total arsenic, chromium, zinc, selenium but especially cadmium, copper and iron (p processing was observed. Non-toxic organic arsenic in raw Greenland halibut (N = 10) and salmon (N = 4) did not transform to carcinogenic inorganic arsenic during industrial cold smoking. Hence inorganic arsenic was low (Processing salmon did not significantly change any levels (calculated both per wet weight, dry weight or lipid content). Cold smoking decreased total arsenic (17%) and increased PCB congeners (10-22%) in Greenland halibut (wet weight). However PFOS, PCB and PBDE congeners were not different in processed Greenland halibut when corrected for water loss or lipid content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Problems in complying with regulations related to low activity materials: Industry, medical, research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, J. van der

    1997-01-01

    The new Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources contain nuclide specific exemption levels on reporting. In many cases, these exemption levels differ orders of magnitude, higher or lower, compared to those from the old standards. For the natural radionuclides, the exempted specific activity is much lower (10 or even 1 Bq/g, depending on the radionuclide, compared to 500 Bq/g in the old BSS). As a consequence, industrial activities with certain minerals or raw materials containing elevated concentrations of radionuclides, which were exempted from the radiation protection control system under the old BSS, may have to be declared as radiologically relevant activities and may now come under regulatory control. Examples of these activities are the phosphate ore processing, the refining of a number of metals, the use of slag, and the oil and natural gas production. This might give rise, in some cases, to large volumes of waste which should be treated, conditioned and disposed of in a controlled way. For artificial radionuclides with higher exemption levels, the use of such radionuclides for industrial, medical or research purposes, such as tracers, sealed sources and beta lights, may increase considerably without being controlled any longer by the regulatory system. (author)

  1. The changing structure of the electric power industry, 1970--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Section 205(a)(2) of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95--91) requires the Administrator of the Energy information Administration (EIA) to carry out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data information program that will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information relevant to energy resources, reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic and statistical information. To assist in meeting these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, The Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry, 1970--1991. The purpose of the this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the US electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects

  2. Structuring Requirements in a Multi-Project Environment in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wörösch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Being in control of requirements in building projects is vital, since it helps securing the often small profit margins and the reputation of the responsible company. Hence this research aims to introduce requirements management to the construction industry. By means of case study and action...... in this industry, yet, success is here defined as an accomplished and accepted implementation of requirements management processes that are used by the relevant project members in their daily work and where the benefits of implementing requirements management outweighs the cost of invested resources. Furthermore...... it is argued that when running technology development, product development, product platform development, and a portfolio of building projects at the same time the use of requirements management is advantageous and an intelligent way of structuring requirements is needed. This article also demonstrates...

  3. The Swiss automobile industry - Situation, structure, trends, challenges and chances; Automobilindustrie Schweiz. Branchenanalyse 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, A.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic takes a look at the situation of the Swiss automobile industry in 2008. The results of the study are presented and include figures on the automobile industry, its history, structure, turn-over, employment and its position from the international point of view. Research and development in the sector, investments and challenges faced are discussed. The products and services offered are looked at and the relevant strategies examined. The sector's competitive environment and possibilities for growth are looked at and the advantages offered by strategic partnerships and geographical location are noted. Finally, interviews with important actors in the business are presented.

  4. Nature and regulation of the insulin receptor: structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Native, cell-surface insulin receptor consists of two glycoprotein subunit types with apparent masses of about 125,000 daltons (alpha subunit) and 90,000 daltons (beta subunit). The alpha and beta insulin-receptor subunits seem to have distinct functions such that alpha appears to bind hormone whereas beta appears to possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. In detergent extracts, insulin activates receptor autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues on its beta subunit, whereas in the presence of reductant, the alpha subunit is also phosphorylated. In intact cells, insulin activates serine/threonine phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta subunit as well as tyrosine phosphorylation. The biological role of the receptor-associated tyrosine kinase is not known. The insulin receptor kinase is regulated by beta-adrenergic agonists and other agents that elevate cAMP in adipocytes, presumably via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Such agents decrease receptor affinity for insulin and partially uncouple receptor tyrosine kinase activity from activation by insulin. These effects appear to contribute to the biological antagonism between insulin and beta-agonists. These data suggest the hypothesis that a complex network of tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylations on the insulin receptor modulate its binding and kinase activities in an antagonistic manner

  5. Earnings management under price regulation. Empirical evidence from the Spanish electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill-de-Albornoz, Belen; Illueca, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of price regulation on the accounting policy of Spanish electricity companies over the period 1991-2001. As predicted by the political costs hypothesis (Watts and Zimmerman, 1986) (Watts, R.L., Zimmerman, J.L. 1986. Positive accounting theory, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ), managers artificially reduce reported earnings when the government establishes tariff increases. In this way, companies attempt to diminish their political visibility and counteract social outcry arising from the government's decision. Several abnormal accruals models existent in the literature are used to obtain a proxy for managerial accounting discretion on earnings

  6. Historical review of European gasoline lead content regulations and their impact on German industrial markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, C. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    1999-07-01

    Environmental protection policies in the automobile market were not implemented until the motorisation of the masses in the 1960s caused an increasing environmental burden. The rising air pollution was considered a latent danger for humans, animals and plants. In the years up to 1985 the EU passed several regulations to limit the mass pollutants CO, CxHy and NOx. Germany was the first EU-member nation to also be concerned with lead in gasoline, passing reduction regulations as early as in 1971. In 1986, several EU-member nations implemented the supply of unleaded gasoline. This decision was predominantly based on information about widespread forest damage. The reduction of lead emissions due to these regulations could be verified in different environmental systems. An example of this was the decline of atmospheric lead concentrations and human blood lead levels in Germany. The German mineral oil and automobile markets were also affected. The price trend of unleaded fuel was heavily influenced by tax incentives which benefited not only the gasoline traders but also the consumers. With regard to the distribution system, the market positions particularly of the medium-sized traders and the independent importers were weakened. In the automobile market, favourable terms of competition were experienced by producers who had already gained experience with catalyst systems in the U.S.-market. The gasoline lead content regulations had no effects on further economic indicators, except for competition. (orig.) [German] Infolge der Massenmotorisierung in den 60er Jahren stieg die Umweltbelastung durch den Automobilverkehr stark an. Luftverschmutzung durch Kraftfahrzeuge wurde erstmalig als latente Gefahr fuer die Gesundheit von Mensch, Tier und Pflanze wahrgenommen. Dies charakterisierte den Beginn der Umweltpolitik im Automobilsektor. Bis 1985 verabschiedete die Europaeische Union (EU) mehrere Rahmenrichtlinien zur Reduktion der Luftschadstoffe CO, CxHy und NOx. 1971 war

  7. The effects of rate of return and environmental regulations on the productivity performance in the US electric utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durongkaveroj, P.

    1991-01-01

    Productivity growth in the US electric power industry has been declining since the late 1960's. Rate of return regulation and environmental regulations are hypothesized to adversely affect the productivity performance. Employing a Divisa index of the total factor productivity (TEP) an electric utility's performance is measured based on a profit maximization framework subject to both regulatory constraints. The empirical analysis attempts to analyze the effects of these regulations on the productivity growth employing data from privately-owned, fossil-fueled electric utilities. Results show a consistent decline in productivity growth over time averaging at 2% annually during 1977 and 1982, as well as the existence of regional differences in TFP growth among utilities. It shows positive and significant relationships between TFP growth and the rate of return, regulatory lag, the use of future test year, and deferred tax credit in the rate-making process. In the environmental case, results show that a stringent emission standard, using scrubbers for sulfur reduction and the utilization of aging power plants all contribute to the decline in productivity growth

  8. Could the Pharmaceutical Industry Benefit from Full-Scale Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology with New Regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustasse, Alberto; Kimble, Craig A; Stanton, Robert B; Naylor, Mariah

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare regulators are directing attention to the pharmaceutical supply chain with the passage of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) and the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has the ability to improve compliance, reduce costs, and improve safety in the supply chain but its implementation has been limited; primarily because of hardware and tag costs. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the benefits to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system of the adoption of RFID technology as a result of newly implemented supply chain regulations. The methodology was a review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 96 sources used. With the DSCSA, pharmaceutical companies must track and trace prescription drugs across the supply chain, and RFID can resolve many track-and-trace issues with manufacturer control of data. The practical implication of this study is that pharmaceutical companies must continue to have the potential to increase revenues, decrease associated costs, and increase compliance with new FDA regulations with RFID. Still, challenges related to regulatory statute wording, implementation of two-dimensional barcode technology, and the variety of interfaces within the pharmaceutical supply chain have delayed adoption and its full implementation.

  9. Bank regulation and financial fragility in developing countries: Does bank structure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Klomp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data for 1238 banks located in 94 developing and emerging countries, we explore whether the impact of bank regulation and supervision on banking risk (measured by the banks’ Z-scores depends on bank structure. Our findings suggest that stricter regulation and supervision increases the banks’ Z-scores. Notably capital requirements and supervisory control diminish banking risk. However, the effectiveness of other dimensions of regulation and supervision depends on the organizational structure of banks. Notably activity restrictions reduce risk of large and foreign owned banks, while liquidity restrictions have most effect on the Z-scores of unlisted and commercial banks.

  10. Renewable resource regulation and uncertain prices: The role of financial structure and bankruptcy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damania, Richard; Bulte, Erwin H.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the interaction between regulatory policies and the financial structure of a fishery and show that firms with debts may respond differently to regulations than firms that have not accumulated debts. There are conditions where more stringent regulation is counterproductive, providing a perverse incentive to increase harvesting effort. We show that optimal regulation depends on the sector's financial structure, and demonstrate that there are cases when intervention is counterproductive, or too costly to implement. There are also cases where successful regulatory intervention can only be implemented when accompanied by a sufficiently large subsidy. (author)

  11. [Industry regulation and its relationship to the rapid marketing of medical devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    In the market of medical devices, non-Japanese products hold a large part even in Japan. To overcome this situation, the Japanese government has been announcing policies to encourage the medical devices industry, such as the 5-year strategy for medical innovation (June 6, 2012). The Division of Medical Devices has been contributing to rapid marketing of medical devices by working out the standards for approval review and accreditation of medical devices, guidances on evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and test methods for biological safety evaluation of medical devices, as a part of practice in the field of regulatory science. The recent outcomes are 822 standards of accreditation for Class II medical devices, 14 guidances on safety evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and the revised test methods for biological safety evaluation (MHLW Notification by Director, OMDE, Yakushokuki-hatsu 0301 No. 20 "Basic Principles of Biological Safety Evaluation Required for Application for Approval to Market Medical Devices").

  12. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  13. Orchestrated structure evolution: modeling growth-regulated nanomanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Shaghayegh; Boehringer, Karl F [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States); Kitayaporn, Sathana; Schwartz, Daniel T, E-mail: karlb@washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Orchestrated structure evolution (OSE) is a scalable manufacturing method that combines the advantages of top-down (tool-directed) and bottom-up (self-propagating) approaches. The method consists of a seed patterning step that defines where material nucleates, followed by a growth step that merges seeded islands into the final patterned thin film. We develop a model to predict the completed pattern based on a computationally efficient approximate Green's function solution of the diffusion equation plus a Voronoi diagram based approach that defines the final grain boundary structure. Experimental results rely on electron beam lithography to pattern the seeds, followed by the mass transfer limited growth of copper via electrodeposition. The seed growth model is compared with experimental results to quantify nearest neighbor seed-to-seed interactions as well as how seeds interact with the pattern boundary to impact the local growth rate. Seed-to-seed and seed-to-pattern interactions are shown to result in overgrowth of seeds on edges and corners of the shape, where seeds have fewer neighbors. We explore how local changes to the seed location can be used to improve the patterning quality without increasing the manufacturing cost. OSE is shown to enable a unique set of trade-offs between the cost, time, and quality of thin film patterning.

  14. BIOINDICATION USING VEGETATION OF THREE REGULATED RIVERS UNDER AGRO-INDUSTRIAL PRESSURE IN WESTERN FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. BERNEZ

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The longitudinal changes of richness and composition of aquatic plants have been studied from headwaters to the fifth stream order in three near-by rivers or Western Brittany (France, the Orne, Sélune and Rance. All rivers were regulated years ago with dams located on the lower third of the studies river stretches. A shifting evolution of the macrophyte richness was revealed in a previous study along the river continuum, related 10 habitat heterogeneity. influences of regulated sectors and geological changes. Nutrient enrichment and organic pollution influences were the main secondary gradients. On this basis we improved a methodology to complete a biotic index used in Europe for water trophy assessment, following the European water frame work directive the IBMR based on aquatic plant survey: a validation with classical statistical tests and a comparison to a canonical analysis were performed. Finally this approach permitted to make a proposition of adaptation of the index to the Local particularities of each three high anthropised rivers

  15. BIOINDICATION USING VEGETATION OF THREE REGULATED RIVERS UNDER AGRO-INDUSTRIAL PRESSURE IN WESTERN FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. LE COEUR

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The longitudinal changes of richness and composition of aquatic plants have been studied from headwaters to the fifth stream order in three near-by rivers or Western Brittany (France, the Orne, Sélune and Rance. All rivers were regulated years ago with dams located on the lower third of the studies river stretches. A shifting evolution of the macrophyte richness was revealed in a previous study along the river continuum, related 10 habitat heterogeneity. influences of regulated sectors and geological changes. Nutrient enrichment and organic pollution influences were the main secondary gradients. On this basis we improved a methodology to complete a biotic index used in Europe for water trophy assessment, following the European water frame work directive the IBMR based on aquatic plant survey: a validation with classical statistical tests and a comparison to a canonical analysis were performed. Finally this approach permitted to make a proposition of adaptation of the index to the Local particularities of each three high anthropised rivers

  16. Investigating Food and Beverage Industry Market Structure and Market Power Based on Leo and Bresnahan’s Approach

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nabishahikitash; E. Gholipoorbolasi; A. Mohammadzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Food processing industries are one of the major industrial groups in developing countries which play an important role in the economic development of these countries. With the Developed and Developing Food Industry on the other hand, food security and providing food are very important in each country. In an overview, markets are divided into two groups: The first group is a market with perfect competition. And second group is markets with monopoly structure.One of the importa...

  17. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation. PMID:24346024

  18. The changing structure of the US coal industry: An update, July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Section 205(a)(2) of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 requires the Administrator of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to carry out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program that will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information relevant to energy resources, reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic and statistical information. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of changes in the structure of the US coal industry between 1976 and 1991. The structural elements examined include the number of mines, average mine size, the size distribution of mines, and the size distribution of coal firms. The report measures changes in the market shares of the largest coal producers at the national level and in various regions. The Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal market is given special attention, and the market for coal reserves is examined. A history of mergers in the coal industry is presented, and changes in the proportions of US coal output that are produced by various types of companies, including foreign-controlled firms, are described. Finally, the impact of post-1991 mergers on the structure of the industry is estimated. The legislation that created the EIA vested the organization with an element of statutory independence. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA's responsibility is to provide timely, high-quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of deliberations by both public and private decisionmakers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration

  19. The changing structure of the US coal industry: An update, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-29

    Section 205(a)(2) of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 requires the Administrator of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to carry out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program that will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information relevant to energy resources, reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic and statistical information. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of changes in the structure of the US coal industry between 1976 and 1991. The structural elements examined include the number of mines, average mine size, the size distribution of mines, and the size distribution of coal firms. The report measures changes in the market shares of the largest coal producers at the national level and in various regions. The Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal market is given special attention, and the market for coal reserves is examined. A history of mergers in the coal industry is presented, and changes in the proportions of US coal output that are produced by various types of companies, including foreign-controlled firms, are described. Finally, the impact of post-1991 mergers on the structure of the industry is estimated. The legislation that created the EIA vested the organization with an element of statutory independence. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high-quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of deliberations by both public and private decisionmakers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

  20. Hormonal regulation of alveolarization: structure-function correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinez Marye H

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dexamethasone (Dex limits and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA promotes alveolarization. While structural changes resulting from such hormonal exposures are known, their functional consequences are unclear. Methods Neonatal rats were treated with Dex and/or RA during the first two weeks of life or were given RA after previous exposure to Dex. Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and radial alveolar counts. Function was evaluated by plethysmography at d13, pressure volume curves at d30, and exercise swim testing and arterial blood gases at both d15 and d30. Results Dex-treated animals had simplified lung architecture without secondary septation. Animals given RA alone had smaller, more numerous alveoli. Concomitant treatment with Dex + RA prevented the Dex-induced changes in septation. While the results of exposure to Dex + RA were sustained, the effects of RA alone were reversed two weeks after treatment was stopped. At d13, Dex-treated animals had increased lung volume, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. On d15, both RA- and Dex-treated animals had hypercarbia and low arterial pH. By d30, the RA-treated animals resolved this respiratory acidosis, but Dex-treated animals continued to demonstrate blood gas and lung volume abnormalities. Concomitant RA treatment improved respiratory acidosis, but failed to normalize Dex-induced changes in pulmonary function and lung volumes. No differences in exercise tolerance were noted at either d15 or d30. RA treatment after the period of alveolarization also corrected the effects of earlier Dex exposure, but the structural changes due to RA alone were again lost two weeks after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that both RA- and corticosteroid-treatments are associated with respiratory acidosis at d15. While RA alone-induced changes in structure andrespiratory function are reversed, Dex-treated animals continue to demonstrate increased respiratory rate, minute

  1. LIGNIN, STRUCTURE AND APPLICATIONS: DEPOLYMERIZATION METHODS FOR OBTAINING AROMATIC DERIVATIVES OF INDUSTRIAL INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Chávez-Sifontes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article significant data related to the structural characteristics of lignin, the extraction and isolation processes from biomass, and also the characteristics of different types of commercial lignins are presented. The review focuses on the different depolymerization processes (hydrolysis, hydrogenolysis, hydrodeoxygenation, pyrolysis, among others up to now developed and investigated analyzing the different aromatic derivatives obtained in each case, as well as the interesting reactions some of them may undergo. Application possibilities for lignin and its derivatives in new industrial processes integrated into the bio-refinery of the future are finally assessed

  2. The structural configurations of alcohol in Denmark: Policy, culture, and industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob Johan; Krarup, Troels

    2013-01-01

    , based on liberalization. A particular adolescent alcohol culture of intoxication, however, emerged in the 1990s, raising public awareness and calls for policy intervention. Contrary to what may have been expected, this did not represent a break with the liberal alcohol configuration in policy, culture......This article analyzes recent developments in Danish alcohol policy, culture, and industry. It reveals cross-sector dynamics and complexities that are often downplayed in existing literature. It traces how a stable “structural configuration” emerged in the 1960s-1980s between the three domains...

  3. Regulation in the electric power industry. A practical manual. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salje, Peter; Schmidt-Preuss, Matthias; Baur, Juergen F.

    2016-01-01

    The energy transition is taking place with dynamism and breakneck pace. The legislation and process of regulations, European legislation and the practice of FNA and courts form a regulatory framework, which means growing challenges for all players in the energy sector. the cutting-edge issues and developments of practice and theory discussed Edition - After the encouraging uptake of the 1st edition of the best practice manual ''regulation in the energy sector'' the current questions and developments for practice and theory are dealed in a new - second edition. The specifics of the work to be maintained: On the one hand the interdisciplinary - regulatory economic as well as economic - anchoring and on the other hand taking into account the European requirements which are becoming more and more important. Against this background, in particular, the problems raised by the energy transition issues of excellent writers are explained. Here numerous additional topics are included in the manual, such as the investment stimulatory instruments (as the decommissioning ban). Moreover, in the last part, the energy of civil law has been newly added to its width. The same applies to the increasingly important topic of metrology. Other highly topical - in the new edition treated first - Topics include among others the easement agreements and the 20-year time limit and re-allocation of concession contracts, customer equipment, and closed distribution systems. As part of the energy transition the EEG 2014 with conceptual new approaches is a reason for a significant expansion of the relevant chapter. Finally is pointed to the entirely new network planning - from network development plan over the federal requirements planning to final project approval -, which will now be discussed in depth. Authors: Proven experts from science and practice Audience: courts, public authorities and institutions in the energy sector, energy businesses, advocacy and science. [de

  4. Structural elements regulating amyloidogenesis: a cholinesterase model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization into amyloid fibrils is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative syndromes. Amyloid assembly is governed by properties of the sequence backbone and specific side-chain interactions, since fibrils from unrelated sequences possess similar structures and morphologies. Therefore, characterization of the structural determinants driving amyloid aggregation is of fundamental importance. We investigated the forces involved in the amyloid assembly of a model peptide derived from the oligomerization domain of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, AChE(586-599, through the effect of single point mutations on beta-sheet propensity, conformation, fibrilization, surfactant activity, oligomerization and fibril morphology. AChE(586-599 was chosen due to its fibrilization tractability and AChE involvement in Alzheimer's disease. The results revealed how specific regions and residues can control AChE(586-599 assembly. Hydrophobic and/or aromatic residues were crucial for maintaining a high beta-strand propensity, for the conformational transition to beta-sheet, and for the first stage of aggregation. We also demonstrated that positively charged side-chains might be involved in electrostatic interactions, which could control the transition to beta-sheet, the oligomerization and assembly stability. Further interactions were also found to participate in the assembly. We showed that some residues were important for AChE(586-599 surfactant activity and that amyloid assembly might preferentially occur at an air-water interface. Consistently with the experimental observations and assembly models for other amyloid systems, we propose a model for AChE(586-599 assembly in which a steric-zipper formed through specific interactions (hydrophobic, electrostatic, cation-pi, SH-aromatic, metal chelation and polar-polar would maintain the beta-sheets together. We also propose that the stacking between the strands in the beta-sheets along the fiber axis could

  5. Education, Skills and Industrial Development in the Structural Transformation of Africa. Innocenti Occasional Papers Number 3. Special Subseries: Structural Adjustment in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Sanjaya

    Industrial expansion remains essential for the development and structural transformation of most sub-Saharan African economies. The advantages of industrialization go beyond the provision of manufactured goods and the diversification of exports to the modernization of society. Growth rates in formal manufacturing tell little about the economic…

  6. Petroleum movements and investments in the refining industry: The impact of worldwide environmental regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guariguata U., G.

    1995-01-01

    Since the enactment of the US Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the worldwide refining industry has aligned itself to become increasing attuned to the future well-being of the environment. Refiners must now develop strategies which address careful selection of crude slates, significant increases and changes in product movements, and upgrading of facilities to meet growing demand--in short, strategies which allow them to make substantial increases in capital investments. The objective of this paper is to determine the regional capital investments refiners must make in order to comply with environmental legislation. The methodology in making this determination was founded on a comprehensive analysis of worldwide petroleum supply/demand and distribution patterns for the coming five years, and included evaluation of a set of linear programming (LP) models based on forecasts for regional product demands and projections of regional specifications. The models considered two scenarios, in which either (1) refinery expansion occurs chiefly in the market consuming regions, or (2) crude producers take control of incremental crude volumes and further expand their planned refining projects and the marketing of refined products. The results of these models, coupled with an understanding of geopolitical situations and economic analyses, provided estimates for capital expenditures for the coming decade. In specific, the following issues were addressed, and are discussed in this paper: refined product trade outlook; crude supply; crude quality; shipping; and capital investments

  7. Under the Influence: The Interplay among Industry, Publishing, and Drug Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Lisa; Vannoy, Steven; Mintzes, Barbara; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2016-01-01

    The relationships among academe, publishing, and industry can facilitate commercial bias in how drug efficacy and safety data are obtained, interpreted, and presented to regulatory bodies and prescribers. Through a critique of published and unpublished trials submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for approval of a new antidepressant, vortioxetine, we present a case study of the "ghost management" of the information delivery process. We argue that currently accepted practices undermine regulatory safeguards aimed at protecting the public from unsafe or ineffective medicines. The economies of influence that may intentionally and unintentionally produce evidence-biased-rather than evidence-based-medicine are identified. This is not a simple story of author financial conflicts of interest, but rather a complex tale of ghost management of the entire process of bringing a drug to market. This case study shows how weak regulatory policies allow for design choices and reporting strategies that can make marginal products look novel, more effective, and safer than they are, and how the selective and imbalanced reporting of clinical trial data in medical journals results in the marketing of expensive "me-too" drugs with questionable risk/benefit profiles. We offer solutions for neutralizing these economies of influence.

  8. This land is their land : an audit of the regulation of the oil and gas industry in BC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, T.; Parfitt, B.; King, J.; Milligan, J. [Sierra Legal Defence Fund, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an audit of the regulation of the oil and gas industry in British Columbia (BC) with a particular look at the following 5 areas: landowner rights; strength and independence of the regulator, the Oil and Gas Commission (OGC); environmental protection; protection of First Nations' rights; and management of revenues. It provides an analysis of the province's progress in each area, along with a final grade for each category. The audit includes a comparison between BC, Alberta and Colorado, and showed that unlike Alberta, landowners in British Columbia cannot appeal a decision, such as pipeline approval, even if it directly affects their land. They have no right to compensation if seismic surveys damage their water wells, they can have polluted waste spread on their lands without their permission, and run the risk of having to pay for clean-up of a contaminated well site. Landowners are exposed to unacceptable levels of risk by rules that allow a company to site a sour gas well as close as 80 metres to a family home. The grade assigned for landowner rights was an F. In terms of strength and independence of the regulator, the audit showed that the OGC budget and staffing have not kept pace with industry growth. Industry expenditures have grown by 271 per cent from 1999 to 2003, while OGC staff have only increased by 46 per cent in the same time period. Joint federal-provincial field audits show that 20 per cent of operations are either in disregard for the law, or pose an immediate threat to the environment. OGC field audit statistics reveal a non-compliance rate of 64 per cent. In addition, the OGC Commissioner has ruled against landowners and First Nations on every complaint that has been recommended for dispute resolution. The grade assigned for the OGC was a C +. The audit showed that most of BC's environmental protection rules are not enforceable because they have never been made into laws. The province gives less protection to

  9. Breakfast cereal industry pledges to self-regulate advertising to youth: will they improve the marketing landscape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Marlene B; Ross, Craig; Harris, Jennifer L; Jernigan, David H; Siegel, Michael; Ostroff, Joshua; Brownell, Kelly D

    2010-04-01

    In 2007, the Council of Better Business Bureaus created the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative to improve the nutritional profile of products marketed to children in the United States. We provide quantitative baseline data describing (a) the amount of child-directed breakfast cereal advertising in 2007; (b) an assessment of the nutritional value for all cereals advertised on television; and (c) the relationship between nutrition quality and child exposure to television advertising for major cereal brands. In 2007, the average American child viewed 757 cereal ads, and 98 per cent of these ads promoted unhealthy cereals that would be prohibited from advertising to children in the United Kingdom. Healthy cereals were advertised in 2007 in the United States, but adults, not children, were predominantly exposed to these ads. These quantitative methods can be used in the future to evaluate the impact of industry self-regulation efforts to improve the marketing landscape.

  10. Oil on the water: Government regulation of a carcinogen in the twentieth-century Lancashire cotton spinning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David; Tweedale, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In the Lancashire cotton textile industry, mule spinners were prone to a chronic and sometimes fatal skin cancer (often affecting the groin). The disease had reached epidemic proportions by the 1920s, which necessitated action by the government, employers, and trade unions. In contrast to previous accounts, this article focuses on the government's reaction to mule spinners' cancer. Using official records in the National Archives, the slow introduction of health and safety measures by the government is explored in detail. Although obstructionism by the employers played a key role, one of the reasons for government inaction was the ambiguity of scientific research on engineering oils. On the other hand, prolonged scientific research suited a government policy that was framed around self regulation - a policy that had proved largely ineffective by the 1950s.

  11. Src protein-tyrosine kinase structure and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Src and Src-family protein kinases are proto-oncogenes that play key roles in cell morphology, motility, proliferation, and survival. v-Src (a viral protein) is encoded by the chicken oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus, and Src (the cellular homologue) is encoded by a physiological gene, the first of the proto-oncogenes. From the N- to C-terminus, Src contains an N-terminal 14-carbon myristoyl group, a unique segment, an SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a protein-tyrosine kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail. The chief phosphorylation sites of Src include tyrosine 416 that results in activation from autophosphorylation and tyrosine 527 that results in inhibition from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase. In the restrained state, the SH2 domain forms a salt bridge with phosphotyrosine 527, and the SH3 domain binds to the kinase domain via a polyproline type II left-handed helix. The SH2 and SH3 domains occur on the backside of the kinase domain away from the active site where they stabilize a dormant enzyme conformation. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases such as PTPα displace phosphotyrosine 527 from the Src SH2 domain and mediate its dephosphorylation leading to Src kinase activation. C-terminal Src kinase consists of an SH3, SH2, and kinase domain; it lacks an N-terminal myristoyl group and a C-terminal regulatory tail. Its X-ray structure has been determined, and the SH2 lobe occupies a position that is entirely different from that of Src. Unlike Src, the C-terminal Src kinase SH2 and SH3 domains stabilize an active enzyme conformation. Amino acid residues in the αD helix near the catalytic loop in the large lobe of C-terminal Src kinase serve as a docking site for the physiological substrate (Src) but not for an artificial substrate (polyGlu 4 Tyr)

  12. Evaluation of fatigue cracks in FSW joints of industrial structural materials by laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Masaki, Kiyotaka; Kajiwara, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an emerging technology for joining flat and thin metal materials and has been applied in manufacturing in aviation and automotive industries. Fatigue property is one of the most important items to be evaluated for the structural integrity of the products, and therefore, it is necessary to visualize the three-dimensional (3D) behavior of fatigue cracks propagating in the non-homogeneous and anisotropic stirred zone of FSW joints. We have applied laminography with synchrotron radiation of SPring-8 to the FSW joints of aluminum alloy as a typical structural material. The results showed that the fatigue cracks propagated in a unique way depending on the stirred material. (author)

  13. Reliability of structures of industrial installations. Theory and applications of probabilistic mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccia, H.; Morilhat, P.; Carle, R.; Menjon, G.

    1996-01-01

    The management of the service life of mechanical materials implies an evaluation of their risk of failure during their use. To evaluate this risk the following methods are used: the classical frequency statistics applied to experience feedback data concerning failures noticed during operation of active parts (pumps, valves, exchangers, circuit breakers etc..); the Bayesian approach in the case of scarce statistical data and when experts are needed to compensate the lack of information; the structures reliability approach when no data are available and when a theoretical model of degradation must be used, in particular for passive structures (pressure vessels, pipes, tanks, etc..). The aim of this book is to describe the principles and applications of this third approach to industrial installations. Chapter 1 recalls the historical aspects of the probabilistic approach to the reliability of structures and the existing codes. Chapter 2 presents the level 1 deterministic method applied so far for the conceiving of passive structures. The Cornell reliability index, already used in civil engineering codes, is defined in chapter 3. The Hasofer and Lind reliability index, a generalization of the Cornell index, is defined in chapter 4. Chapter 5 concerns the application of probabilistic approaches to optimization studies with the introduction of the economical variables linked to the risk and the possible actions to limit this risk (in-service inspection, maintenance, repairing etc..). Chapters 6 and 7 describe the Monte Carlo simulation and approximation methods for failure probabilistic calculations, and recall the fracture mechanics basis and the models of load and degradation of industrial installations. Some applications are given in chapter 9 with the cases of the safety margins quantization of a fissured pipe and the optimizing of the in-service inspection policy of a steam generator. Chapter 10 raises the problem of the coupling between mechanical and reliability

  14. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    Starch is the major reserve polysaccharide in nature and accounts for the majority of the caloric intact of humans. It is also gaining importance as a renewable and biodegradable industrial material. There is burgeoning interest in increasing the amount and altering the properties of the plant starches by plant genetic modification. A rational approach to this effort will require a detailed, atomic-level understanding of the enzymatic processes that produce the starch granule. The starch granule is a complex particle made up of alternating layers of crystalline and amorphous lamellae. It consists of two types of polymer, amylose, a polymer of relatively long chains of α-1,4-linked glucans that contain virtually no branches, and amylopectin, which is highly branched and contains much shorter chains. This complex structure is synthesized by the coordinate activities of the starch synthases (SS), which elongate the polysaccharide chain by addition of glucose units via α-1,4 linkages using ADP- glucose as a donor, and branching enzymes (BE), which branch the polysaccharide chain by cleavage of α₋1,4 linkages and subsequent re-attachment via α₋1,6 linkages. Several isoforms of both starch synthase (SS) and branching enzyme (BE) are found in plants, including SSI, SSII, SSIII and granule- bound SS (GBSS), and SBEI, SBEIIa and SBEIIb. These isoforms have different activities and substrate and product specificities and play different roles in creating the granule and determining the properties of the resulting starch. The overarching goal of this proposal is to begin to understand the regulation and specificities of these enzymes at the atomic level. High-resolution X-ray structures of these enzymes bound to substrates and products will be determined to visualize the molecular interactions responsible for the properties of the enzymes. Hypotheses regarding these issues will then be tested using mutagenesis and enzyme assays. To date, we have determined the

  15. PM-HIP research for structural and pressuring retaining applications within the electric power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandy, David W.

    2015-01-01

    For more than 60 years now, the nuclear power industry has relied on structural and pressure retaining materials generated via established manufacturing practices such as casting, plate rolling-and-welding, forging, drawing, and/or extrusion. During the past three years, EPRI has been leading the development and introduction of another established process, powder metallurgy and hot Isostatic pressing (PM/HIP), for pressure retaining applications in electric power industry. The research includes assessment of two primary alloys: 316L stainless steel and Grade 91 creep-strength enhanced ferritic steels, for introduction into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Continuing DOE and EPRI research on other structural/pressure retaining alloys such as Alloy 690, SA 508 Class 1, Alloy 625, hard-facing materials, and others are also underway. This research will have a tremendous impact as we move forward over the next few decades on the selection of new alloys and components for advanced light water reactors and small modular reactors. Furthermore, fabrication of high alloy materials/components may require the use of new manufacturing processes to achieve acceptable properties for higher temperature applications such as those in Generation IV applications. Current research by EPRI and DOE will be reviewed and emphasis will be targeted at advanced applications where PM/HIP may be applied in the future. (authors)

  16. The Determinants of Capital Structure: an Empirical Study of Omani Listed Industrial Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawih Al Ani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates five determinants of capital structure (leverage in three subsectors of the Omani Industrial companies (food, construction and chemical listed on Muscat Securities Market for the period 2008–2012. According to available information and literature review, the determinants are profitability measured by return on assets (ROA, risk measured by the standard deviation of return on assets, the size of the company measured by the natural logarithm of total assets, rate of growth measured by the market-book value ratio (P/E and assets tangibility measured by fixed assets to total assets ratio. The capital structure or leverage is measured by total debt ratio. In the industrial sector as whole; the findings of the study indicate that there is a statistically positive association between risk and tangibility and leverage. Also, there is a statistically negative association between growth rate and profitability and leverage, while there is no association with size. Regression analysis indicates that size, tangibility and risk have a statistically significant effect on leverage.

  17. Industrial CO2 emissions from energy use in Korea: A structural decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hea-Jin; Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Kwak, Seung-Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to quantify energy consumption and CO 2 emissions in the industrial sectors of Korea. The sources of the changes in CO 2 emissions for the years 1990-2003 are investigated, in terms of a total of eight factors, through input-output structural decomposition analysis: changes in emission coefficient (caused by shifts in energy intensity and carbon intensity); changes in economic growth; and structural changes (in terms of shifts in domestic final demand, exports, imports of final and intermediate goods, and production technology). The results show that the rate of growth of industrial CO 2 emissions has drastically decreased since the 1998 financial crisis in Korea. The effect on emission reductions due to changes in energy intensity and domestic final demand surged in the second period (1995-2000), while the impact of exports steeply rose in the third period (2000-2003). Of all the individual factors, economic growth accounted for the largest increase in CO 2 emissions. The results of this analysis can be used to infer the potential for emission-reduction in Korea

  18. Intellectual Property and the Tourism Industry: From ACTA Protests towards a Restrictive Interpretation of Innovation Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speriusi-Vlad Alin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 became reality James Boyle’s desire exposed in his essay from 1997 regarding a politics of intellectual property concerning the great deal of attention that must be paid to the Intellectual Property. At that time Boyle was disappointed by the lack of attention from lawyers, scholars, legal academics and the media for the Clinton administration’s proposal for copyright on the Net, a document that provided the blueprint of domestic and international regulatory efforts to expand intellectual property rights. Certainly this was not the case with ACTA where the public media forced by the private citizen’s protests tried to weight both the benefits and the costs of the new protection standards brought by the new international convention. After those moments Intellectual Property regulations are no more an esoteric and arcane field, something that is only interesting and comprehensible to the practitioners in the field, but a matter of public interests like the environment which arouse the attention of all the persons. In this way we all become aware that intellectual property radiates beyond the legal frame and interferes with several aspects of our lives, including our free time and the tourism consequently.

  19. Seismic margin assessment of spanish nuclear power plants: a perspective from industry and regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Monge, Juan; Beltran, Francisco; Sanchez-Cabanero, Jose G.

    2001-01-01

    The worldwide experience with probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) of nuclear power plants shows that the risk derived from earthquakes can be a significant contributor to core damage frequency in some instances. As a consequence, no severe accident safety assessment can be considered complete without giving, due consideration to seismic risk. This fact has been recognized by some regulators. in particular, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), who has included seismic risk assessment in its severe accident policy. The NRC severe accident policy was adopted by the Spanish nuclear regulator. the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN). As a result. all plants in Spain were asked to perform a seismic risk analysis according to Supplements No. 4 and 5 of Generic Letter 88-20 and NUREG-1407, which included the containment failure analysis. At present in Spain there arc nine operating reactors at seven sites: six Westinghouse-PWR, two GE-BWR and one Siemens/KW U-PWR. The vintages are very different: the oldest plant started commercial operation in 1968 and the most recent, in 1988. In this framework, the Spanish Owners Group (SOG) proposed to CSN in 1994 to carry out the seismic risk analysis of the plants using seismic margin methodologies. This kind of methods requires, as a starting point, the definition of a seismic margin earthquake (SNIE), also called review level earthquake (RLL). For this purpose, tile SOG sponsored a general Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) for the seven Spanish sites. The results of this PSHA were used by the SOG to define tile RLE and the scope of the study for each plant (binning of plants). The proposal was submitted to the CSN for evaluation. The CSN evaluation was based on the NRC practical experience and was helped by the technical advise of US Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The review showed that the uncertainties on seismic hazard had not been fully captured and that it would have been justified to consider a

  20. Current Approaches of Regulating Radiological Safety of Medical and Industrial Practices in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, C.

    2016-01-01

    The principal document regulating the radiological safety of ionizing radiation application in Romania is the “Fundamental Norms for Radiological Safety”. These norms establish the requirements concerning the assurance of radiological safety of occupational exposed workers, population and environment, in accordance with the provisions of Law 111/1996 on the safe deployment of nuclear activities, republished. Justification of practices for all new practices which lead to exposure to ionizing radiation shall be justified in writing by their initiator, underlining their economic, social or other nature advantages, in comparison with the detriment which they could cause to health. CNCAN authorise these practices, provided that they consider the justification as being thorough. The applicant, respectively the authorisation holder, has to demonstrate that all actions to ensure radiation protection optimization are undertaken, with a view to ensure that all exposures, including the potential ones, within the framework of practice developed are maintained at the lowest reasonable achievable level, taking into account the economic and social factors: ALARA principle.

  1. Industry self-regulation of food marketing to children: reading the fine print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, Lana; King, Lesley; Kelly, Bridget; Chapman, Kathy; Innes-Hughes, Christine

    2010-12-01

    despite the evidence showing the negative influences of food marketing on children's dietary beliefs and behaviours, and risk of adiposity, regulatory action to limit unhealthy food marketing has made little progress within Australia. Our aim was to describe and critically examine the Australian Food and Grocery Council's (AFGC) approach to self-regulate food marketing to Australian children through the Responsible Marketing to Children Initiative (Initiative). the Initiative's core principles and the commitments of the 16 signatory companies (as at December 2009) were assessed in terms of their capacity to limit unhealthy food advertising in media accessed by children. All information was publicly available from AFGC and signatory company websites (September- December 2009). limitations of the Initiative included inadequate definitions for when and where food marketing to children can occur, and permissive definitions of foods considered appropriate for advertising. The study also identified numerous examples of ongoing food marketing to children by AFGC companies that illustrate these limitations. until one reads the fine print, the self-regulatory commitments of companies signed to the AFGC Initiative may appear to be responsible. However, this study shows that the commitments are permissive and allow companies to circumvent the stated intent of the Initiative.

  2. Integration of the market of the European Community and the change of the industrial structure; EC shijo togo to sangyo kozo no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T; Uno, K; Tanimoto, T; Yamashita, T [Osaka Sangyo University, Osaka (Japan). Institute for Industrial Research

    1994-11-22

    This paper describes progress of the cooperation as to the integration of EC market and the change of industrial structure. For the structural change in the industry and economy accompanied by the integration of EC, effects of the Maastricht Treaty on the economic structure of EC are described. It is considered that the EC countries are affected by the political and economical restrictions due to the agreement of this treaty. For the change in the distribution structure accompanied by the integration of EC, obstruction factors of the deregulation of EC transportation market are especially investigated. Differences in the distribution capacity, various regulations and standards, and labor condition among individual countries are pointed out as the obstruction factors. For the unity of Germany and its economical and administrative influence, various problems are pointed out as to the economical confusion, progress in the de-nationalization of enterprises, management of real estate and land, etc. For the structural change in the road freight market in the member nations of EC, the structure of road freight market is made clear for the previous West Germany before the integration of European market. It is confirmed that the internationalization of the German domestic market is being promoted.

  3. An assessment of whole effluent toxicity testing as a means of regulating waters produced by the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.L.; Bergman, H.L.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 500 million barrels of produced water are discharged to Wyoming's surface waters by the oil and gas industry. This discharges are of two types: direct and indirect. The direct discharges have been issued NPDES permits requiring whole effluent toxicity testing. Toxicity testing requirements have not been incorporated into permits written for indirect discharges because of the applicability of toxicity testing for regulating these waters has not been determined. Preliminary testing has shown that most produced waters are toxic at the point of discharge because of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, but that the toxicity of an indirect discharge is often lost before it reaches a receiving stream. Thus, whole effluent toxicity testing of an indirect discharge may be overly stringent, resulting in treatment or reinjection of the water or closure of the well. Any of these options would have severe economic consequences for oil producers and the state's agricultural industry. The purpose of this study was to determine whether whole effluent toxicity testing actually predicts the in-stream effects of indirect discharges on water quality and benthic invertebrate populations. The authors will report the results of short-term ambient toxicity tests and in-stream bioassessments performed upstream and downstream of six indirect discharges located in four drainages in Wyoming

  4. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rachel; De Wever, Bart; Fuchs, Horst W; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Krul, Cyrille; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin L

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15-16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of the art in alternative methods, how companies have, can, and will need to adapt and what drives and hinders regulatory acceptance and use. Several key messages arose from the meeting. First, industry and regulatory bodies should not wait for complete suites of alternative tests to become available, but should begin working with methods available right now (e.g., mining of existing animal data to direct future studies, implementation of alternative tests wherever scientifically valid rather than continuing to rely on animal tests) in non-animal and animal integrated strategies to reduce the numbers of animals tested. Sharing of information (communication), harmonization and standardization (coordination), commitment and collaboration are all required to improve the quality and speed of validation, acceptance, and implementation of tests. Finally, we consider how alternative methods can be used in research and development before formal implementation in regulations. Here we present the conclusions on what can be done already and suggest some solutions and strategies for the future.

  5. The use of acoustic monitoring to manage concrete structures in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, P.O.; Tozser, O.; Wit, M. de

    2003-01-01

    Concrete and steel are widely used in containment vessels within the nuclear industry. Both are excellent acoustic transmitters. In many structures tensioned wire elements are used within containment structures. However, tensioned wire can be vulnerable to corrosion. To reduce the probability of corrosion sophisticated protection systems are used. To confirm that the design strength is available through time, extensive inspection and maintenance regimes are implemented. These regimes include tests to confirm the condition of the post-tensioning, and pressure tests (leak tests) to verify the performance of vessel. This paper presents an acoustic monitoring technology which uses widely distributed sensors to detect and locate wire failures using the energy released at failure. The technology has been used on a range of structures including post-tensioned concrete bridges, suspension bridges, buildings, pre-cast concrete cylinder pipelines (PCCP) and prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCV), where it has increased confidence in structures and reduced maintenance costs. Where the level of ambient noise is low then SoundPrint acoustic monitoring can detect concrete cracking. This has been shown in PCCP pipelines, on laboratory test structures and also in nuclear structures. The programme has shown that distributed sensors can locate internal cracking well before there is any external evidence. Several projects have been completed on nuclear vessels. The first has been completed on an Electricite de France (EDF) concrete test pressure vessel at Civaux in France. The second at the Sandia PCCV Test Vessel in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, which involved the testing of a steel lined concrete vessel. The third was on a PCCV in Maryland, USA. Acoustic monitoring is also able to monitor the deterioration of post-tensioned concrete structures as a result of seismic activity. Summary details of a case history are presented. (author)

  6. Self-regulation by industry of food marketing is having little impact during children's preferred television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin Kent, Monique; Dubois, Lise; Wanless, Alissa

    2011-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of self-regulation of food marketing to children by comparing, during children's preferred viewing on television, the differences in food/beverage marketing between two groups of corporations: 17 corporations participating in the Canadian Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CAI) and 35 corporations not participating (non-CAI) in this initiative. The food/beverage marketing activities of CAI and non-CAI corporations during 99.5 hours of children's preferred viewing on television were compared. First, the preferred television viewing of 272 children aged 10-12 years from Ontario and Quebec who completed TV viewing journals for a seven-day period was determined. A total of 32 television stations were simultaneously recorded, and a content analysis of children's preferred viewing was conducted and included coding all food/beverage promotions and their nutritional content. Each food/beverage promotion was classified by corporation type (i.e., CAI or non-CAI). The CAI was responsible for significantly more food/beverage promotions, and used media characters and repetition more frequently in their food/beverage promotions than the non-CAI group. Nutritionally, the CAI food/beverage promotions were higher in fats, sugar, sodium and energy per 100 grams. A significantly greater proportion of the CAI food/beverage promotions were considered 'less healthy' compared to the non-CAI promotions. With the exception of the four corporations that did not market to children at all, the commitments that have been made in the CAI are not having a significant impact on the food and beverage marketing environment on television which is viewed by 10-12-year-olds.

  7. Innovation incentives or corrupt conflicts of interest? Moving beyond Jekyll and Hyde in regulating biomedical academic-industry relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    The most contentious, unresolved issue in biomedicine in the last twenty-five years has been how to best address compensated partnerships between academic researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. Law and policy deliberately promote these partnerships through intellectual property law, research funding programs, and drug and device approval pathways while simultaneously condemning them through conflict-of-interest (COI) regulations. These regulations have not been subjected to the close scrutiny that is typically utilized in administrative law to evaluate and improve regulatory systems. This Article suggests that the solution to this standoff in biomedical law and policy lies in an informed, empirical approach. Such an approach must both recognize such partnerships' legal and practical variations, as well as classify them based on their benefit to innovation and their harm to research biases. Ultimately, this approach must facilitate administrative reforms that would convert what is now an inherently arbitrary, yet widespread, regulatory regime into an epistemically rich mechanism for distinguishing between harmful and beneficial partnerships.

  8. Automatic control of negative emotions: evidence that structured practice increases the efficiency of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou-Champi, Spyros; Farrow, Tom F D; Webb, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) is vital to everyday functioning. However, the effortful nature of many forms of ER may lead to regulation being inefficient and potentially ineffective. The present research examined whether structured practice could increase the efficiency of ER. During three training sessions, comprising a total of 150 training trials, participants were presented with negatively valenced images and asked either to "attend" (control condition) or "reappraise" (ER condition). A further group of participants did not participate in training but only completed follow-up measures. Practice increased the efficiency of ER as indexed by decreased time required to regulate emotions and increased heart rate variability (HRV). Furthermore, participants in the ER condition spontaneously regulated their negative emotions two weeks later and reported being more habitual in their use of ER. These findings indicate that structured practice can facilitate the automatic control of negative emotions and that these effects persist beyond training.

  9. Effects of Federal Regulation on the Financial Structure and Performance of the Domestic Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (Source Document)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY : The increasing government regulation of automative transportation : industries in the United States has produced the need for : financial and economic studies of the effects of such policies. : The purpose of this document is t...

  10. The influence of structural changes to the tourist industry in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Slavica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transition on the society has reflected on the entire social-economic circumstances in Montenegro. This complex and long process has changed the stability of economic growth and the development of the national economy and has effectuated the structural changes in the economy of Montenegro. Beside transition, the war in the surroundings, international isolation and numerous other problems, which have changed flows of the social and economic development, have affected the condition of the economy system. On the example of other surrounding countries, Montenegro has persevered to provide, through the process of structural reforms, more rational and efficient company market business dealings. This paper investigates to which extent and in which manner the structural changes have reflected onto the tourist industry and which results have been achieved on the basis of reforms which should provide for the joining with the flows of European and World development. By changing the company's state-legal status, the state has strived to provide a greater level of economical activity, productivity growth, degree of participation in the social product, national revenue and employment. According to national economy aggregate indicators, the structural changes have not yet provided the balance of the entire economy to a sufficient extent. Social, economic and political stability are the assumptions for tourism development which is very sensitive to numerous changes in economy and in the society.

  11. Dynamics of competitive strategies in de-regulated industries: the case of the electricity industry in France; Dynamique des strategies concurrentielles dans un contexte de liberalisation: le cas de l'industrie electrique en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cateura, O

    2007-11-15

    This research work is focused on the competitive dynamics approach and rivalry studies between competitors. It develops theses recent perspectives and particularly multi-market competition (also called multipoint competition) in de-regulated industries (network utilities). Indeed, competitive behaviours in liberalized industries are still badly-known. To conduct this research, we decided to analyze a selection of companies (EDF, Electrabel, Endesa, Enel, Gaz de France, Poweo, Direct Energie..) settled on the French electricity market presently in the course of liberalization (1996 - 2006). This qualitative research, through longitudinal case studies, has been developed thanks to a CIFRE agreement (between the French Ministry of Research and the firm Electrabel France) including action research and participant observation. Using multidimensional strategic sequences, we identified two periods, the first one characterized by a confrontation movement and a second one by mutual forbearance. We argue that after learning the rules of a newly liberalized market (confrontation, diversification, internationalization), competitors rapidly and collectively shift there positions towards a focused European strategy based on the gas-electricity convergence. The development of multi-market competition has conducted to mutual forbearance, which was particularly profitable to the major participants. Integrated strategy (market and non-market) appears as an important driver for legitimizing theses behaviours. (author)

  12. Dynamics of competitive strategies in de-regulated industries: the case of the electricity industry in France; Dynamique des strategies concurrentielles dans un contexte de liberalisation: le cas de l'industrie electrique en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cateura, O

    2007-11-15

    This research work is focused on the competitive dynamics approach and rivalry studies between competitors. It develops theses recent perspectives and particularly multi-market competition (also called multipoint competition) in de-regulated industries (network utilities). Indeed, competitive behaviours in liberalized industries are still badly-known. To conduct this research, we decided to analyze a selection of companies (EDF, Electrabel, Endesa, Enel, Gaz de France, Poweo, Direct Energie..) settled on the French electricity market presently in the course of liberalization (1996 - 2006). This qualitative research, through longitudinal case studies, has been developed thanks to a CIFRE agreement (between the French Ministry of Research and the firm Electrabel France) including action research and participant observation. Using multidimensional strategic sequences, we identified two periods, the first one characterized by a confrontation movement and a second one by mutual forbearance. We argue that after learning the rules of a newly liberalized market (confrontation, diversification, internationalization), competitors rapidly and collectively shift there positions towards a focused European strategy based on the gas-electricity convergence. The development of multi-market competition has conducted to mutual forbearance, which was particularly profitable to the major participants. Integrated strategy (market and non-market) appears as an important driver for legitimizing theses behaviours. (author)

  13. Efficiency in the United States electric industry: Transaction costs, deregulation, and governance structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carl

    Transaction costs economics (TCE) posits that firms have an incentive to bypass the market mechanisms in situations where the cost of using the market is prohibitive. Vertical integration, among other governance mechanisms, can be used to minimize the transactions costs associated with the market mechanism. The study analyses different governance mechanisms, which range from complete vertical integration to the use of market mechanisms, for firms in the US electric sector. This sector has undergone tremendous change in the past decade including the introduction of retail competition in some jurisdictions. As a result of the push toward deregulation of the industry, vertically integration, while still significant in the sector, has steadily been replaced by alternative governance structures. Using a sample of 136 investor-owned electric utilities that reported data the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission between 1996 and 2002, this study estimates firm level efficiency using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and relates these estimates to governance structure and public policies. The analysis finds that vertical integration is positively related to firm efficiency, although in a non-linear fashion suggesting that hybrid governance structures tend to be associated with lower efficiency scores. In addition, while some evidence is found for negative short-term effects on firm efficiency from the choice to deregulate, this result is sensitive to DEA model choice. Further, competition in retail markets is found to be positively related to firm level efficiency, but the retreat from deregulation, which occurred after 2000, is negatively associated with firm-level efficiency. These results are important in the ongoing academic and public policy debates concerning deregulation of the electric section and indicate that vertical economies remain in the industry, but that competition has provided incentives for improving firm level efficiency.

  14. The mutual extraction industry: drug use and the normative structure of social capital in the Russian far north.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Hilary; Sharifullina, El'vira

    2009-05-01

    The article contributes to the literature on the role of social networks and social capital in young people's drug use. It considers the structural and cultural dimensions of the 'risk environment' of post-Soviet Russia, the micro risk-environment of a de-industrializing city in the far north of the country and the kind of social capital that circulates in young people's social networks there. Its focus is thus on social capital at the micro-level, the 'bridging' networks of peer friendship groups and the norms that govern them. The research is based on a small ethnographic study of the friendship groups and social networks of young people in the city of Vorkuta in 2006-2007. It draws on data from 32 respondents aged 17-27 in the form of 17 semi-structured audio and video interviews and field diaries. Respondents were selected from friendship groups in which drug use was a regular and symbolically significant practice. The risk environment of the Russian far north is characterised by major de-industrialization, poor health indicators, low life expectancy and limited educational and employment opportunities. It is also marked by a 'work hard, play hard' cultural ethos inherited from the Soviet period when risk-laden manual labour was well-rewarded materially and symbolically. However, young people today often rely on informal economic practices to generate the resource needed to fulfil their expectations. This is evident from the social networks among respondents which were found to be focused around a daily routine of generating and spending income, central to which is the purchase, sale and use of drugs. These practices are governed by norms that often invert those normally ascribed to social networks: reciprocity is replaced by mutual exploitation and trust by cheating. Social networks are central to young people's management of the risk environment associated with post-Soviet economic transformation. However, such networks are culturally as well as structurally

  15. A multi-regional structural path analysis of the energy supply chain in China's construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jingke; Shen, Qiping; Xue, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The construction industry in China exerts significant environmental impacts and uses considerable resources because of rapid urbanization. This study conducted a structural path analysis (SPA) based on the multi-regional input–output table to quantify environmental impact transmission in the entire supply chain. Results indicated that the direct resource input (the first stage) along with on-site construction (the zeroth stage) consumed the highest amount of energy in the supply chain and accounted for approximately 50% of total energy consumption. Regional analysis showed that energy consumption in the construction industry at the provincial level was self-sufficient. Sectoral analysis demonstrated that the direct inputs from the sectors of “manufacture of non-metallic mineral products” and “smelting and pressing of metals” generated the most important energy flows, whereas the sectors of “production and distribution of electric power and heat power” and “extraction of petroleum and natural gas” significantly but indirectly influenced energy use. Sensitivity analysis exhibited that the system boundary of SPA could be narrowed down into the first two upstream stages that contained nearly 50% of energy flow information or expanded toward the first five upstream stages that represented 80% of total energy consumption. - Highlights: •We designed an optimized algorithm for multi-regional SPA. •We extracted energy-intensive paths throughout the upstream supply chain. •We explored self-sufficiency characteristic for provincial construction industries. •We identified energy-intensive sectors hidden in higher-order supply chain. •We developed an effective strategy for narrowing down the system boundary of SPA.

  16. Laminated wood as an alternative to wood poles : Engineered wood structures for electric utility and telecommunications industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisdorff, R. [Laminated Wood Systems Inc., Seward, NE (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In this PowerPoint presentation, the author discusses the major advantages of laminated structures, for both the electric and telecommunication industries. The advantages include economy, quick delivery, climbing and field modifications, dimensional uniformity and stability. A series of pictures was displayed which showed the manufacturing process. Laminated structures have a proven history. They were developed in Europe in 1890, and introduced to the United States in 1934. Framing members were introduced in the late 1940s, while poles were introduced in 1963, two years ahead of steel poles. Some of the electrical utility applications include: (1) distribution structures, (2) transmission structures such as single-pole, phase over phase switch structures, tangent structures, and H-Frame construction. The applications for the telecommunication industry consist of joint use structures, such as electric and telecommunication, lighting and telecommunication, overhead telephone and wireless; mono-pole applications; three-pole Bell Towers; and tree poles. Examples of each type were shown. figs.

  17. Calibration of a flexible measurement system based on industrial articulated robot and structured light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nan; Wang, Kun; Xie, Zexiao; Ren, Ping

    2017-05-01

    To realize online rapid measurement for complex workpieces, a flexible measurement system based on an articulated industrial robot with a structured light sensor mounted on the end-effector is developed. A method for calibrating the system parameters is proposed in which the hand-eye transformation parameters and the robot kinematic parameters are synthesized in the calibration process. An initial hand-eye calibration is first performed using a standard sphere as the calibration target. By applying the modified complete and parametrically continuous method, we establish a synthesized kinematic model that combines the initial hand-eye transformation and distal link parameters as a whole with the sensor coordinate system as the tool frame. According to the synthesized kinematic model, an error model is constructed based on spheres' center-to-center distance errors. Consequently, the error model parameters can be identified in a calibration experiment using a three-standard-sphere target. Furthermore, the redundancy of error model parameters is eliminated to ensure the accuracy and robustness of the parameter identification. Calibration and measurement experiments are carried out based on an ER3A-C60 robot. The experimental results show that the proposed calibration method enjoys high measurement accuracy, and this efficient and flexible system is suitable for online measurement in industrial scenes.

  18. Structural analysis of the Danish windmill industry. Strukturanalyse af dansk vindmoelleindustri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-15

    Most Danish windmill manufacturers have experienced a grave economic crisis during the last three years. In 1987, the total windmill industry in this country ran at a loss of 40 million Danish crowns where the turnover was 550 million crowns. Danish firms are too small and seem to lack professional management. Production costs are too high and there is an urgent need for structural rationalization. Danish windmills cannot at the present time compete with the foreign market, largely because of lack of marketing know-how and financial backing. Yet today, many countries energy policies include the development of renewable energy resources, especially in the case of wind power. This should mean that the world market for windmills will increase, but so will the number of foreign competitors. The authors suggest the merging of Danish windmill manufacturing firms, and these mergers should include corporations that produce electricity. Possibilities for raising financial backing for running costs and export activities are mentioned, and ideas for rationalizing and reconstructing the whole Danish windmill industry are described in detail. (AB).

  19. Delay Mitigation in the Malaysian Housing Industry: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Saar Chai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The housing industry is one of the major contributors to the economy in Malaysia due to the constantly high housing demand. The housing demand has increased due to the rapid growth in population and urbanisation in the country. One of the major challenges in the housing industry is the late delivery of housing supply, which in some instances leads to sick and abandoned housing projects. Despite being extensively investigated, th in a negative impact, there is a strong need to review the housing delay mitigation measures practised in Malaysia. This paper aims to evaluate the current delay mitigation measures and its main objective is to explore the relationship between the mitigation measures and delay in housing via a Structural Equation Modelling (SEM approach. A questionnaire survey through an online survey tool was conducted across 13 states and three Federal Territories in Malaysia. The target respondents are the local authorities, developers, consultants (principal submitting persons and contractors. The findings show that 17 predictive, preventive, organisational or corrective. This paper demonstrates that preventive measures are the most influential mitigation measures for housing delivery delay.

  20. The Changing Structure of Retail Industry: Case Studies on Competitive Advantage of Small Companies in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Knežević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are two key trends in retail industry since 1990s till nowadays: rapid internationalization and intensive retail concentration. In such a dynamic environment, small companies are striving to preserve their markets and to maintain their business activity. The objectives of the paper are twofold: (1 to explain trends of retail internationalization and concentration and (2 to highlight the possibilities for improving the competitive ability of small retailers. Research Design & Methods: The paper is based on analysis of secondary data available in research papers, studies and official statistics. Firstly, the consequences of retail internationalization and concentration are described. Then, the literature on competitive advantage creation is systemized. In addition, the case study method is used to illustrate successful strategies of competitive advantage creation. Findings:  In a changed retail market, small retailers seek the way to improve their competitiveness. As suitable competitiveness strategies, authors describe: (1 retail alliances and (2 differentiation by assortment. Implications & Recommendations: The key trends and their impact on small companies in retail industry are scrutinized. Recommendations to small retailers how to adjust to new market conditions, together with some practical examples, are given. Contribution & Value Added: The paper gives an insight into dynamics of changes in retail structure. Retail alliances and differentiation by assortment are described as two key streams of competitiveness improvement suitable for small retailers.