WorldWideScience

Sample records for regulates transport activity

  1. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  2. BORC Regulates the Axonal Transport of Synaptic Vesicle Precursors by Activating ARL-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke; Tao, Li; Lu, Sharon Y; Liew, Gerald M; Feng, Wei; Nachury, Maxence V; Shen, Kang

    2017-09-11

    Axonal transport of synaptic vesicle precursors (SVPs) is essential for synapse development and function. The conserved ARF-like small GTPase ARL-8 is localized to SVPs and directly activates UNC-104/KIF1A, the axonal-transport kinesin for SVPs in C. elegans. It is not clear how ARL-8 is activated in this process. Here we show that part of the BLOC-1-related complex (BORC), previously shown to regulate lysosomal transport, is required to recruit and activate ARL-8 on SVPs. We found mutations in six BORC subunits-blos-1/BLOS1, blos-2/BLOS2, snpn-1/Snapin, sam-4/Myrlysin, blos-7/Lyspersin, and blos-9/MEF2BNB-cause defects in axonal transport of SVPs, leading to ectopic accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the proximal axon. This phenotype is suppressed by constitutively active arl-8 or unc-104 mutants. Furthermore, SAM-4/Myrlysin, a subunit of BORC, promotes the GDP-to-GTP exchange of ARL-8 in vitro and recruits ARL-8 onto SVPs in vivo. Thus, BORC regulates the axonal transport of synaptic materials and synapse formation by controlling the nucleotide state of ARL-8. Interestingly, the other two subunits of BORC essential for lysosomal transport, kxd-1/KXD1 and blos-8/Diaskedin, are not required for the SVP transport, suggesting distinct subunit requirements for lysosomal and SVP trafficking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein Kinases C-Mediated Regulations of Drug Transporter Activity, Localization and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayati, Abdullah; Moreau, Amélie; Le Vée, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Drug transporters are now recognized as major actors in pharmacokinetics, involved notably in drug–drug interactions and drug adverse effects. Factors that govern their activity, localization and expression are therefore important to consider. In the present review, the implications of protein kinases C (PKCs) in transporter regulations are summarized and discussed. Both solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters can be regulated by PKCs-related signaling pathways. PKCs thus target activity, membrane localization and/or expression level of major influx and efflux drug transporters, in various normal and pathological types of cells and tissues, often in a PKC isoform-specific manner. PKCs are notably implicated in membrane insertion of bile acid transporters in liver and, in this way, are thought to contribute to cholestatic or choleretic effects of endogenous compounds or drugs. The exact clinical relevance of PKCs-related regulation of drug transporters in terms of drug resistance, pharmacokinetics, drug–drug interactions and drug toxicity remains however to be precisely determined. This issue is likely important to consider in the context of the development of new drugs targeting PKCs-mediated signaling pathways, for treating notably cancers, diabetes or psychiatric disorders. PMID:28375174

  4. A systems approach to hemostasis: 3. Thrombus consolidation regulates intrathrombus solute transport and local thrombin activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, John D.; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Wu, Jie; Colace, Thomas V.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Hemostatic thrombi formed after a penetrating injury have a distinctive structure in which a core of highly activated, closely packed platelets is covered by a shell of less-activated, loosely packed platelets. We have shown that differences in intrathrombus molecular transport emerge in parallel with regional differences in platelet packing density and predicted that these differences affect thrombus growth and stability. Here we test that prediction in a mouse vascular injury model. The studies use a novel method for measuring thrombus contraction in vivo and a previously characterized mouse line with a defect in integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling that affects clot retraction ex vivo. The results show that the mutant mice have a defect in thrombus consolidation following vascular injury, resulting in an increase in intrathrombus transport rates and, as predicted by computational modeling, a decrease in thrombin activity and platelet activation in the thrombus core. Collectively, these data (1) demonstrate that in addition to the activation state of individual platelets, the physical properties of the accumulated mass of adherent platelets is critical in determining intrathrombus agonist distribution and platelet activation and (2) define a novel role for integrin signaling in the regulation of intrathrombus transport rates and localization of thrombin activity. PMID:24951426

  5. Regulation of the creatine transporter by AMP-activated protein kinase in kidney epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Thali, Ramon F.; Smolak, Christy; Gong, Fan; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Wallimann, Theo; Scholz, Roland; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates several transport proteins, potentially coupling transport activity to cellular stress and energy levels. The creatine transporter (CRT; SLC6A8) mediates creatine uptake into several cell types, including kidney epithelial cells, where it has been proposed that CRT is important for reclamation of filtered creatine, a process critical for total body creatine homeostasis. Creatine and phosphocreatine provide an intracellular, high-energy phosphate-buffering system essential for maintaining ATP supply in tissues with high energy demands. To test our hypothesis that CRT is regulated by AMPK in the kidney, we examined CRT and AMPK distribution in the kidney and the regulation of CRT by AMPK in cells. By immunofluorescence staining, we detected CRT at the apical pole in a polarized mouse S3 proximal tubule cell line and in native rat kidney proximal tubules, a distribution overlapping with AMPK. Two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEV) measurements of Na+-dependent creatine uptake into CRT-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that AMPK inhibited CRT via a reduction in its Michaelis-Menten Vmax parameter. [14C]creatine uptake and apical surface biotinylation measurements in polarized S3 cells demonstrated parallel reductions in creatine influx and CRT apical membrane expression after AMPK activation with the AMP-mimetic compound 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside. In oocyte TEV experiments, rapamycin and the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl 5′-monophosphate (ZMP) inhibited CRT currents, but there was no additive inhibition of CRT by ZMP, suggesting that AMPK may inhibit CRT indirectly via the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. We conclude that AMPK inhibits apical membrane CRT expression in kidney proximal tubule cells, which could be important in reducing cellular energy expenditure and unnecessary creatine reabsorption under conditions of local

  6. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Le Vee

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP, whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute

  7. Activated fluid transport regulates bacterial-epithelial interactions and significantly shifts the murine colonic microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keely, Simon; Kelly, Caleb J.; Weissmueller, Thomas; Burgess, Adrianne; Wagner, Brandie D.; Robertson, Charles E.; Harris, J. Kirk; Colgan, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Within the intestinal mucosa, epithelial cells serve multiple functions to partition the lumen from the lamina propria. As part of their natural function, intestinal epithelial cells actively transport electrolytes with passive water movement as a mechanism for mucosal hydration. Here, we hypothesized that electrogenic Cl- secretion, and associated mucosal hydration, influences bacterial-epithelial interactions and significantly influences the composition of the intestinal microbiota. An initial screen of different epithelial secretagogues identified lubiprostone as the most potent agonist for which to define these principles. In in vitro studies using cultured T84 cells, lubiprostone decreased E. coli translocation in a concentration-dependent manner (p lubiprostone delivered orally to mice fundamentally shifted the intestinal microbiota, with notable changes within the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla of resident colonic bacteria. Such findings document a previously unappreciated role for epithelial Cl- secretion and water transport in influencing bacterial-epithelial interactions and suggest that active mucosal hydration functions as a primitive innate epithelial defense mechanism. PMID:22614705

  8. Achieving global perfect homeostasis through transporter regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient homeostasis—the maintenance of relatively constant internal nutrient concentrations in fluctuating external environments—is essential to the survival of most organisms. Transcriptional regulation of plasma membrane transporters by internal nutrient concentrations is typically assumed to be the main mechanism by which homeostasis is achieved. While this mechanism is homeostatic we show that it does not achieve global perfect homeostasis—a condition where internal nutrient concentrations are completely independent of external nutrient concentrations for all external nutrient concentrations. We show that the criterion for global perfect homeostasis is that transporter levels must be inversely proportional to net nutrient flux into the cell and that downregulation of active transporters (activity-dependent regulation) is a simple and biologically plausible mechanism that meets this criterion. Activity-dependent transporter regulation creates a trade-off between robustness and efficiency, i.e., the system's ability to withstand perturbation in external nutrients and the transporter production rate needed to maintain homeostasis. Additionally, we show that a system that utilizes both activity-dependent transporter downregulation and regulation of transporter synthesis by internal nutrient levels can create a system that mitigates the shortcomings of each of the individual mechanisms. This analysis highlights the utility of activity-dependent regulation in achieving homeostasis and calls for a re-examination of the mechanisms of regulation of other homeostatic systems. PMID:28414718

  9. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Fishwick

    Full Text Available Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD, and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT, but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization.

  10. cGMP-activating peptides do not regulate electrogenic electrolyte transport in principal cells of rat CCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, E; Cermak, R; Forssmann, W G; Hirsch, J R; Kleta, R; Kuhn, M; Sun, D; Schafer, J A

    1996-12-01

    K+ channels in the basolateral membrane of rat cortical collecting duct (CCD) are regulated by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (J. Hirsch and E. Schlatter. Pfluegers Arch. 429: 338-344, 1995). Conflicting data exist on the effects of cGMP-activating agonists on Na+ transport in these cells. Thus we tested members of the family of peptides that increase intracellular cGMP [cardiodilatin/atrial natriuretic peptide (CDD/ANP), brain natriuretic peptide, C-type natriuretic peptide, urodilatin, guanylin, and uroguanylin], as well as bradykinin +/- CDD/ANP on membrane voltages (Vm) of principal cells of isolated rat CCD using the slow whole cell patch-clamp technique (E. Schlatter, U. Fröbe, and R. Greger. Pfluegers Arch. 421: 381-387, 1992). None of the agonists tested changed Vm significantly. There was also no effect of dibutyryl guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (DBcGMP) on AVP-dependent lumen-to-bath Na+ flux, transepithelial voltage, or osmotic water permeability in isolated perfused rat CCD. Finally, CDD/ANP increased intracellular cGMP only in glomeruli but not in CCD. Thus the findings provide no evidence for control of electrogenic electrolyte transport by these natriuretic peptides in principal cells of rat CCD, and the agonist that physiologically regulates the cGMP-dependent K+ channels remains to be identified.

  11. The metal chaperone Atox1 regulates the activity of the human copper transporter ATP7B by modulating domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Yang, Nan; Bothe, Jameson; Tonelli, Marco; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Dolgova, Natalia V; Braiterman, Lelita; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-11-03

    The human transporter ATP7B delivers copper to the biosynthetic pathways and maintains copper homeostasis in the liver. Mutations in ATP7B cause the potentially fatal hepatoneurological disorder Wilson disease. The activity and intracellular localization of ATP7B are regulated by copper, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is largely unknown. We show that the copper chaperone Atox1, which delivers copper to ATP7B, and the group of the first three metal-binding domains (MBD1-3) are central to the activity regulation of ATP7B. Atox1-Cu binding to ATP7B changes domain dynamics and interactions within the MBD1-3 group and activates ATP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism linking Atox1-MBD interactions and enzyme activity, we have determined the MBD1-3 conformational space using small angle X-ray scattering and identified changes in MBD dynamics caused by apo-Atox1 and Atox1-Cu by solution NMR. The results show that copper transfer from Atox1 decreases domain interactions within the MBD1-3 group and increases the mobility of the individual domains. The N-terminal segment of MBD1-3 was found to interact with the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B, thus physically coupling the domains involved in copper binding and those involved in ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, the data suggest a regulatory mechanism in which Atox1-mediated copper transfer activates ATP7B by releasing inhibitory constraints through increased freedom of MBD1-3 motions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Lian He,1 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3 Juan-Juan Yin,2 Chang-Qiang He,1 Shu-Feng Zhou,2,3 Yang Yu1 1College of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs and drug transporters are regulated via epigenetic, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational and posttranslational modifications. Phase I and II DMEs and drug transporters play an important role in the disposition and detoxification of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 is a critical regulator of a variety of important cytoprotective genes that are involved in disposition and detoxification of xenobiotics. Schisandra chinensis (SC is a commonly used traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been primarily used to protect the liver because of its potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. SC can modulate some DMEs and drug transporters, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of Nrf2 in the regulatory effect of SC extract (SCE on selected DMEs and drug transporters in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2 cells. The results showed that SCE, schisandrin A, and schisandrin B significantly increased the expression of NAD(PH: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-oxidase or:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase-1, glutamate–cysteine ligase, and glutathione S-transferase A4 at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Incubation of HepG2 cells with SCE resulted in a significant

  13. Interleukin-1 receptor activation by systemic lipopolysaccharide induces behavioral despair linked to MAPK regulation of CNS serotonin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chong-Bin; Lindler, Kathryn M; Owens, Anthony W; Daws, Lynette C; Blakely, Randy D; Hewlett, William A

    2010-12-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been implicated in regulation of mood. Medications that block the neuronal 5-HT transporter (SERT) are used as major pharmacological treatment for mood disorders. Conversely, stimuli that enhance SERT activity might be predicted to diminish synaptic 5-HT availability and increase the risk for 5-HT-related CNS disorders. We have shown that the inflammatory cytokines enhance brain SERT activity in cultured serotonergic cells and nerve terminal preparations in vitro. In this study, we establish that intraperitoneal injection of the cytokine-inducer lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates brain SERT activity, acting at doses below those required to induce overt motor suppression. SERT stimulation by LPS is paralleled by increased immobility in both the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST); antidepressant-sensitive alterations are thought to model aspects of behavioral despair. Both the stimulation of SERT activity and induced immobility are absent when LPS is administered to interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-deficient mice and in the presence of SB203580, an inhibitor of IL-1R-stimulated p38 MAPK. Moreover, the ability of LPS to enhance immobility in TST is lost in SERT knockout mice. These findings reveal an ability of peripheral inflammatory stimuli to enhance brain SERT activity through IL-1R and p38 MAPK pathways in vivo and identify a requirement for SERT expression in immune-system-modulated despair behaviors. Our studies identify IL-1R- and p38 MAPK-dependent regulation of SERT as one of the mechanisms by which environmentally driven immune system activation can trigger despair-like behavior in an animal model, encouraging future analysis of the pathway for risk factors in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport during gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoichi; Boag, Peter R; Hime, Gary R; Loveland, Kate L

    2012-06-01

    Gametogenesis is the process by which sperm or ova are produced in the gonads. It is governed by a tightly controlled series of gene expression events, with some common and others distinct for males and females. Nucleocytoplasmic transport is of central importance to the fidelity of gene regulation that is required to achieve the precisely regulated germ cell differentiation essential for fertility. In this review we discuss the physiological importance for gamete formation of the molecules involved in classical nucleocytoplasmic protein transport, including importins/karyopherins, Ran and nucleoporins. To address what functions/factors are conserved or specialized for these developmental processes between species, we compare knowledge from mice, flies and worms. The present analysis provides evidence of the necessity for and specificity of each nuclear transport factor and for nucleoporins during germ cell differentiation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Transport and RNA Processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Boron transport in plants: co-ordinated regulation of transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Background The essentiality of boron (B) for plant growth was established >85 years ago. In the last decade, it has been revealed that one of the physiological roles of B is cross-linking the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in primary cell walls. Borate cross-linking of pectic networks serves both for physical strength of cell walls and for cell adhesion. On the other hand, high concentrations of B are toxic to plant growth. To avoid deficiency and toxicity problems, it is important for plants to maintain their tissue B concentrations within an optimum range by regulating transport processes. Boron transport was long believed to be a passive, unregulated process, but the identification of B transporters has suggested that plants sense and respond to the B conditions and regulate transporters to maintain B homeostasis. Scope Transporters responsible for efficient B uptake by roots, xylem loading and B distribution among leaves have been described. These transporters are required under B limitation for efficient acquisition and utilization of B. Transporters important for tolerating high B levels in the environment have also been identified, and these transporters export B from roots back to the soil. Two types of transporters are involved in these processes: NIPs (nodulin-26-like intrinsic proteins), boric acid channels, and BORs, B exporters. It is demonstrated that the expression of genes encoding these transporters is finely regulated in response to B availability in the environment to ensure tissue B homeostasis. Furthermore, plants tolerant to stress produced by low B or high B in the environment can be generated through altered expression of these transporters. Conclusions The identification of the first B transporter led to the discovery that B transport was a process mediated not only by passive diffusion but also by transporters whose activity was regulated in response to B conditions. Now it is evident that plants sense internal and external B

  16. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2014-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥ 5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.-Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases. © FASEB.

  17. Coordinated maturational regulation of PHEX and renal phosphate transport inhibitory activity: evidence for the pathophysiological role of PHEX in X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, T; Fujiwara, I; Thomas, R; Xiao, Z S; Quarles, L D; Drezner, M K

    1999-12-01

    The mechanism by which inactivating mutations of PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) cause X-linked hypophosphatemia remains unknown. However, recent reports suggest errant PHEX activity in osteoblasts may fail to inactivate a phosphaturic factor produced by these cells. To test this possibility, we examined coordinated maturational expression of PHEX and production of phosphate transport inhibitory activity in osteoblasts from normal and hyp-mice. We assessed the inhibitory activity in conditioned medium by examining the effects on opossum kidney cell phosphate transport and osteoblast PHEX expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction during a 17-day maturational period. Inhibitory activity increased as a function of osteoblast maturational stage, with no activity after 3 days and persistent activity by 6 days of culture. More significantly, equal phosphate transport inhibitory activity in conditioned medium from normal and hyp-mouse osteoblasts (control 1.90 +/- 0.12, normal 1.48 +/- 0.10, hyp 1.45 +/- 0.04 nmol/mg of protein/minute) was observed at 6 days. However, by 10 days hyp-mouse osteoblasts exhibited greater inhibitory activity than controls, and by 17 days the difference in phosphate transport inhibition maximized (control 2.08 +/- 0.09, normal 1.88 +/- 0.06, hyp 1.58 +/- 0.06 nmol/mg of protein/minute). Concurrently, we observed absent PHEX expression in normal osteoblasts after 3 days, limited production at 6 days, and significant production by day 10 of culture, while hyp-mouse osteoblasts exhibited limited PHEX activity secondary to an inactivating mutation. The data suggest that the presence of inactivating PHEX mutations results in the enhanced renal phosphate transport inhibitory activity exhibited by hyp-mouse osteoblasts.

  18. Transactivation activity and nucleocytoplasmic transport of β-catenin are independently regulated by its C-terminal end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, J L; Niechi, I; Silva, E; Huerta, H; Cataldo, R; Härtel, S; Barros, L F; Galindo, M; Tapia, J C

    2015-11-15

    The key protein in the canonical Wnt pathway is β-catenin, which is phosphorylated both in absence and presence of Wnt signals by different kinases. Upon activation in the cytoplasm, β-catenin can enter into the nucleus to transactivate target gene expression, many of which are cancer-related genes. The mechanism governing β-catenin's nucleocytoplasmic transport has been recently unvealed, although phosphorylation at its C-terminal end and its functional consequences are not completely understood. Serine 646 of β-catenin is a putative CK2 phosphorylation site and lies in a region which has been proposed to be important for its nucleocytoplasmic transport and transactivation activity. This residue was mutated to aspartic acid mimicking CK2-phosphorylation and its effects on β-catenin activity as well as localization were explored. β-Catenin S6464D did not show significant differences in both transcriptional activity and nuclear localization compared to the wild-type form, but displayed a characteristic granular nuclear pattern. Three-dimensional models of nuclei were constructed which showed differences in number and volume of granules, being those from β-catenin S646D more and smaller than the wild-type form. FRAP microscopy was used to compare nuclear export of both proteins which showed a slightly higher but not significant retention of β-catenin S646D. Altogether, these results show that C-terminal phosphorylation of β-catenin seems to be related with its nucleocytoplasmic transport but not transactivation activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Threonine 28 Regulates Electron Transport Chain Activity in Kidney: IMPLICATIONS FOR AMP KINASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Gargi; Varughese, Ashwathy; Ji, Qinqin; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Vaishnav, Asmita; Sinkler, Christopher; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Moraes, Carlos T.; Sanderson, Thomas H.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Edwards, Brian F. P.; Hüttemann, Maik

    2016-10-07

    Mammalian cytochrome c (Cytc) plays a key role in cellular life and death decisions, functioning as an electron carrier in the electron transport chain and as a trigger of apoptosis when released from the mitochondria. However, its regulation is not well understood. We show that the major fraction of Cytc isolated from kidneys is phosphorylated on Thr28, leading to a partial inhibition of respiration in the reaction with cytochrome c oxidase. To further study the effect of Cytc phosphorylation in vitro, we generated T28E phosphomimetic Cytc, revealing superior behavior regarding protein stability and its ability to degrade reactive oxygen species compared with wild-type unphosphorylated Cytc. Introduction of T28E phosphomimetic Cytc into Cytc knock-out cells shows that intact cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and ROS levels are reduced compared with wild type. As we show by high resolution crystallography of wild-type and T28E Cytc in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, Thr28 is located at a central position near the heme crevice, the most flexible epitope of the protein apart from the N and C termini. Finally, in silico prediction and our experimental data suggest that AMP kinase, which phosphorylates Cytc on Thr28 in vitro and colocalizes with Cytc to the mitochondrial intermembrane space in the kidney, is the most likely candidate to phosphorylate Thr28 in vivo. We conclude that Cytc phosphorylation is mediated in a tissue-specific manner and leads to regulation of electron transport chain flux via “controlled respiration,” preventing ΔΨm hyperpolarization, a known cause of ROS and trigger of apoptosis.

  20. Astrocytic GABA transporter activity modulates excitatory neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Jensen, Thomas P.; Magloire, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are ideally placed to detect and respond to network activity. They express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, and can release gliotransmitters. Astrocytes also express transporters that regulate the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters. Here we report a previously unrec...

  1. MicroRNA-144 regulates hepatic ATP binding cassette transporter A1 and plasma high-density lipoprotein after activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A

    2013-06-07

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by variouscomplex and incompletely understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here, we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lowers hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified 2 complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3' untranslated region of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I protein, whereas overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we used tissue-specific FXR-deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal, FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144, and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL-cholesterol.

  2. Low RNA Polymerase III activity results in up regulation of HXT2 glucose transporter independently of glucose signaling and despite changing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Adamczyk

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to glucose availability in the environment, inducing the expression of the low-affinity transporters and high-affinity transporters in a concentration dependent manner. This cellular decision making is controlled through finely tuned communication between multiple glucose sensing pathways including the Snf1-Mig1, Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 (SRR and cAMP-PKA pathways.We demonstrate the first evidence that RNA Polymerase III (RNAP III activity affects the expression of the glucose transporter HXT2 (RNA Polymerase II dependent-RNAP II at the level of transcription. Down-regulation of RNAP III activity in an rpc128-1007 mutant results in a significant increase in HXT2 mRNA, which is considered to respond only to low extracellular glucose concentrations. HXT2 expression is induced in the mutant regardless of the growth conditions either at high glucose concentration or in the presence of a non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, we found an increased association of Rgt1 and Tup1 transcription factors with the highly activated HXT2 promoter in the rpc128-1007 strain. Furthermore, by measuring cellular abundance of Mth1 corepressor, we found that in rpc128-1007, HXT2 gene expression was independent from Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 (SRR signaling. The Snf1 protein kinase complex, which needs to be active for the release from glucose repression, also did not appear perturbed in the mutated strain.These findings suggest that the general activity of RNAP III can indirectly affect the RNAP II transcriptional machinery on the HXT2 promoter when cellular perception transduced via the major signaling pathways, broadly recognized as on/off switch essential to either positive or negative HXT gene regulation, remain entirely intact. Further, Rgt1/Ssn6-Tup1 complex, which has a dual function in gene transcription as a repressor-activator complex, contributes to HXT2 transcriptional activation.

  3. Plant nutrient transporter regulation in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen; Bechmann, I.E.

    2002-01-01

    This review discusses the role arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play in the regulation of plant nutrient transporter genes. Many plant nutrient transporter genes appear to be transcriptionally regulated by a feed-back mechanism that reduces their expression when the plant reaches an optimal level...... of nutrition. Their down-regulation in mycorrhizal roots, therefore, would be predicted as a result of symbiotic function. A variety of studies on Pi- Zn- and ammonium- or nitrate-transporter genes from two plant species indirectly support this model. For example, one study showed that the expression...... of the high-affinity Pi-transporter MtPT2 within mycorrhizal roots of Medicago truncatula was inversely correlated with the concentration of P within the shoots, which suggested that P supply from the fungus influenced this gene's expression. However, there is some evidence that these plant nutrient...

  4. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-09

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled.

  5. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level.

  6. Experimental evidence of turbulent transport regulation by zonal flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmeier, G; Ramisch, M; Schmid, B; Stroth, U

    2013-04-05

    The regulation of turbulent transport by zonal flows is studied experimentally on a flux surface of the stellarator experiment TJ-K. Data of 128 Langmuir probes at different toroidal and poloidal positions on a single flux surface enable us to measure simultaneously the zonal flow activity and the turbulent transport in great detail. A reduction of turbulent transport by 30% during the zonal flow phase is found. It is shown that the reduction process is initiated by a modification in the cross phase between density and electric field followed by a reduction in the fluctuation levels, which sustain low transport levels on larger time scales than the zonal flow lifetime.

  7. Metabolon disruption: a mechanism that regulates bicarbonate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Bernardo V; Vilas, Gonzalo L; Casey, Joseph R

    2005-07-20

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) catalyze the reversible conversion of CO2 to HCO3-. Some bicarbonate transporters bind CA, forming a complex called a transport metabolon, to maximize the coupled catalytic/transport flux. SLC26A6, a plasma membrane Cl-/HCO3- exchanger with a suggested role in pancreatic HCO3- secretion, was found to bind the cytoplasmic enzyme CAII. Mutation of the identified CAII binding (CAB) site greatly reduced SLC26A6 activity, demonstrating the importance of the interaction. Regulation of SLC26A6 bicarbonate transport by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated. Angiotensin II (AngII), which activates PKC, decreased Cl-/HCO3- exchange in cells coexpressing SLC26A6 and AT1a-AngII receptor. Activation of PKC reduced SLC26A6/CAII association in immunoprecipitates. Similarly, PKC activation displaced CAII from the plasma membrane, as monitored by immunofluorescence. Finally, mutation of a PKC site adjacent to the SLC26A6 CAB site rendered the transporter unresponsive to PKC. PKC therefore reduces CAII/SLC26A6 interaction, reducing bicarbonate transport rate. Taken together, our data support a mechanism for acute regulation of membrane transport: metabolon disruption.

  8. Regulation of transport processes across the tonoplast membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eTrentmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the vacuole builds up the cellular turgor and represents an important component in cellular responses to diverse stress stimuli. Rapid volume changes of cells, particularly of motor cells, like guard cells, are caused by variation of osmolytes and consequently of the water contents in the vacuole. Moreover, directed solute uptake into or release out of the large central vacuole allows adaptation of cytosolic metabolite levels according to the current physiological requirements and specific cellular demands. Therefore, solute passage across the vacuolar membrane, the tonoplast, has to be tightly regulated. Important principles in vacuolar transport regulation are changes of tonoplast transport protein abundances by differential expression of genes or changes of their activities, e.g. due to post-translational modification or by interacting proteins. Because vacuolar transport is in most cases driven by an electro-chemical gradient altered activities of tonoplast proton pumps significantly influence vacuolar transport capacities. Intense studies on individual tonoplast proteins but also unbiased system biological approaches have provided important insights into the regulation of vacuolar transport. This short review refers to selected examples of tonoplast proteins and their regulation, with special focus on protein phosphorylation.

  9. Regulation of myo-inositol transport during the growth and differentiation of thyrocytes: a link with thyroid-stimulating hormone-induced phospholipase A2 activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Grafton, G; Baxter, M. A.; Sheppard, M C; Eggo, M C

    1995-01-01

    The Vmax of myo-inositol transport increased 3-fold during epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced growth and thyroid-stimulating hormone. (TSH)-induced differentiation in primary cultures of sheep and human thyrocytes. The Km remained unaltered. This up-regulation required the presence of insulin. The TSH-induced rise in myo-inositol transport commenced 8 to 16 h after the initial stimulus and achieved a plateau at 24 h. In human thyrocytes the change in Vmax was accompanied by an increase in ...

  10. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  11. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... in heterologous cells and in cultured DA neurons. DAT has been shown to be regulated by the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), the primary target foranti-psychotics, through a direct interaction. D2R is among other places expressed as an autoreceptor in DA neurons. Transient over-expression of DAT with D2R in HEK293...

  12. ATPase activity regulation by leader peptide processing of ABC transporter maturation and secretion protein, NukT, for lantibiotic nukacin ISK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sen; Nagao, Jun-Ichi; Nishie, Mami; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    Lantibiotic nukacin ISK-1 is produced by Staphylococcus warneri ISK-1. The dual functional transporter NukT, an ABC transporter maturation and secretion protein, contributes to cleavage of the leader peptide from the prepeptide (modified NukA) and the final transport of nukacin ISK-1. NukT consists of an N-terminal peptidase domain (PEP), a C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), and a transmembrane domain (TMD). In this study, NukT and its peptidase-inactive mutant were expressed, purified, and reconstituted into liposomes for analysis of their peptidase and ATPase activities. The ATPase activity of the NBD region was shown to be required for the peptidase activity of the PEP region. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that leader peptide cleavage by the PEP region significantly enhanced the ATPase activity of the NBD region. Taken together, the presented results offer new insights into the processing mechanism of lantibiotic transporters and the necessity of interdomain cooperation.

  13. Regulation and roles of bicarbonate transport in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej eGorbatenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A unifying feature of solid tumors is a markedly altered pH profile compared to normal tissues. This reflects that solid tumors, despite completely different origins, often share several phenotypic properties with implications for intra- and extracellular pH. These include: a metabolic shift in most cancer cells towards more acid-producing pathways, reflecting both oncogenic signaling and the development of hypoxia in poorly perfused regions of the tumors; the poorly perfused and often highly dense tumor microenvironment, reducing the diffusive flux of acid equivalents compared to that in normal tissues; and the markedly altered regulation of the expression and activity of pH-regulatory transport proteins in the cancer cells. While some of these properties of tumors have been well described in recent years, the great majority of the research in this clinically important area has focused on proton transport, in particular via the Na+/H+-exchanger 1 (SLC9A1, NHE1 and various H+ ATPases. We have, however, recently demonstrated that at least under some conditions, including in vitro models of HER2 positive breast cancer, and measurements obtained directly in freshly dissected human mammary tumors, bicarbonate transporters such as the electroneutral Na+,HCO3--cotransporter (SLC4A7, NBCn1, are upregulated and play central roles in pH regulation. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding the regulation and roles of bicarbonate transport in cancer.

  14. Cinnamic acid, from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, regulates glucose transport via activation of GLUT4 on L6 myotubes in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Baddireddi Subhadra; Sujatha, Sundaresan; Anand, Singaravelu; Sangeetha, Kadapakkam Nandhabalan; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Katiyar, Chandrakanth; Kanaujia, Anil; Duggar, Rajeev; Singh, Yogendra; Srinivas, Konasubrahmanya; Bansal, Vinay; Sarin, Simi; Tandon, Ruchi; Sharma, Suchitra; Singh, Suchita

    2009-06-01

    Cinnamomum cassia (Family: Lauraceae) is an Ayurvedic medicinal plant used traditionally for the treatment of a number of diseases, including diabetes. The hypoglycemic effect of this plant has been established in vivo. However, the effects of cinnamic acid, isolated from C. cassia, on the insulin signaling cascade in an in vitro model have not been elucidated. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-diabetic effect of cinnamic acid on glucose transport by L6 myotubes. The mechanism of action of cinnamic acid was determined using specific targets in the insulin signaling pathway, including protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and the glucose transporter GLUT4. After differentiation of myoblast to myotubes, the cells were serum deprived for 5 h and then treated with 1 ng/mL cinnamic acid and 50 μmol/L rosiglitazone for 18 h and 100 nmol/L insulin for 20 min for gene expression studies. Expression of GLUT4 mRNA was increased following treatment of L6 myotubes with 1 ng/mL cinnamic acid. Furthermore, cinnamic acid inhibited PTP1B activity (by 96.5%), but had no significant effect on PI3-K activity. On the basis of the results of the present study, we postulate that cinnamic acid isolated from the hydro-alcoholic extract of Cinnamomum cassia activates glucose transport by a PI3-K-independent pathway. However, the detailed mechanism of action requires further analysis.

  15. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  16. 78 FR 76098 - Rail Transportation of Grain, Rate Regulation Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Surface Transportation Board 49 CFR Chapter X Rail Transportation of Grain, Rate Regulation Review AGENCY... shippers and provide effective protection against unreasonable freight rail transportation rates. DATES.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On November 2, 2006, the Board held a hearing in Rail Transportation of Grain, Docket...

  17. The ABC of Biofilm Drug Tolerance: the MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Is an Activator of ABC Transport Systems, with PA1874-77 Contributing to the Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms to Tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Bandita; Sauer, Karin

    2018-02-01

    A hallmark of biofilms is their tolerance to killing by antimicrobial agents. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm drug tolerance requires the c-di-GMP-responsive MerR transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm drug tolerance has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that BrlR activates the expression of at least 7 ABC transport systems, including the PA1874-PA1875-PA1876-PA1877 (PA1874-77) operon, with chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter region of PA1874-77. Insertional inactivation of the 7 ABC transport systems rendered P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms susceptible to tobramycin or norfloxacin. Susceptibility was linked to drug accumulation, with BrlR contributing to norfloxacin accumulation in a manner dependent on multidrug efflux pumps and the PA1874-77 ABC transport system. Inactivation of the respective ABC transport system, furthermore, eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by tobramycin but not norfloxacin, indicating that drug accumulation is not linked to biofilm drug tolerance. Our findings indicate for the first time that BrlR, a MerR-type transcriptional activator, activates genes encoding several ABC transport systems, in addition to multiple multidrug efflux pump genes. Moreover, our data confirm a BrlR target contributing to drug tolerance, likely countering the prevailing dogma that biofilm tolerance arises from a multiplicity of factors. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Signal focusing through active transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  19. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders Bue

    2013-01-01

    is highly expressed in the prefrontal cortex areas, playing an important role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). This makes it an interesting potential pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric modes characterized by lack of inhibitory control...

  20. 76 FR 36095 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... be found on the Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr... into the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR 4500.9R). These program requirements do... have an economic impact of $100 million or more. A complete version of the DTR is available via the...

  1. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/phaseiii.cfm (DPM SECTION... published in the Federal Register and incorporated into the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR 4500.9R). These program requirements do not impose a legal requirement, obligation, sanction or...

  2. Regulations related to the transport of radioactive material in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahyun, Adelia; Sordi, Gian-Maria A.A. [ATOMO Radioprotecao e Seguranca Nuclear, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: atomo@atomo.com.br; Sanches, Matias P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: msanches@net.ipen.br

    2001-07-01

    The transport of radioactive material has raised great interest on the part of national regulatory authorities, thus resulting in a safety measures improvement for all kinds of transportation. The transport of radioactive material is regulated by safety criteria much more than those applied to conventional hazardous material. All radioactive material transportation run in Brazilian territory must be in accordance with what is established by the CNEN-NE 5.01 - Transport of Radioactive Material. There are other national and international regulations for radioactive material transportation, which have to be accomplished with and adopted during the operation of radioactive material transportation. The aim of this paper is to verify the criteria set up in the existing regulations and propose a consensus for all the intervening organizations in the regulation process for land, air or sea transportation. This kind of transportation can not depend on the efforts of only one person, a group of workers or even any governmental body, but must be instead a shared responsibility among workers, transport firms and all regulative transportation organizations. (author)

  3. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64) in six European cities. We conducted a health...... reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists...... and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation....

  4. The innovation inducement impact of environmental regulations on maritime transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Repka, Sari

    2016-01-01

    Maritime transport is facing wide-ranking challenges due to stricter environmental regulations. It has been positioned that these stricter environmental regulations will significantly hamper the competitiveness of the shipping industry and other export/import oriented industries. However...... of environmental regulations on maritime transport. Therefore, the review concludes in suggestions for further studies on the use of marine scrubber systems as an illustrative case study example....

  5. CLP Regulation and the transport of dangerous goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Benassai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulations concerning different modes of transport of dangerous goods are well harmonized at global level: they were then looked at as a model for developing Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS, (on which CLP Regulations is based. Transport regulations do not cover some hazard classes, such as germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, having been evaluated that such hazards are not relevant in transport because in general, in case of accident, no repeated and prolonged exposure takes place. Other differences with CLP Regulation are related to the use of "building block approach". Transport labels, which were used as a basis for GHS, can be used, instead of CLP pictograms, on packages during transport.

  6. CLP Regulation and the transport of dangerous goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Regulations concerning different modes of transport of dangerous goods are well harmonized at global level: they were then looked at as a model for developing Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS), (on which CLP Regulations is based). Transport regulations do not cover some hazard classes, such as germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, having been evaluated that such hazards are not relevant in transport because in general, in case of accident, no repeated and prolonged exposure takes place. Other differences with CLP Regulation are related to the use of "building block approach". Transport labels, which were used as a basis for GHS, can be used, instead of CLP pictograms, on packages during transport.

  7. Investment in transport infrastructure, regulation, and gas-gas competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasmi, Farid [Toulouse School of Economics (ARQADE and IDEI), Universite Toulouse 1 Capitole (France); Oviedo, Juan Daniel [Universidad del Rosario (Colombia)

    2010-05-15

    This paper develops a simple model in which a regulated (upstream) transporter provides capacity to a marketer competing in output with an incumbent in the (downstream) gas commodity market. The equilibrium outcome of the firms' interaction in the downstream market is explicitly taken into account by the regulator when setting the transport charge. We consider various forms of competition in this market and derive the corresponding optimal transport charge policies. We then run simulations that allow us to perform a comparative welfare analysis of these transport infrastructure investment policies based on different assumptions about the intensity of the competition that prevails in the gas commodity market. (author)

  8. Extracellular creatine regulates creatine transport in rat and human muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Loike, J D; Zalutsky, D L; Kaback, E; Miranda, A F; Silverstein, S C

    1988-01-01

    Muscle cells do not synthesize creatine; they take up exogenous creatine by specific Na+-dependent plasma membrane transporters. We found that extracellular creatine regulates the level of expression of these creatine transporters in L6 rat muscle cells. L6 myoblasts maintained for 24 hr in medium containing 1 mM creatine exhibited 1/3rd of the creatine transport activity of cells maintained for 24 hr in medium without creatine. Down-regulation of creatine transport was partially reversed whe...

  9. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorenpää, Anne Elina; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jorgensen, Trine N.

    2016-01-01

    in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated...... in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation...

  10. Is contraction-stimulated glucose transport feedforward regulated by Ca2+?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Angin, Yeliz; Sylow, Lykke

    2014-01-01

    feedforward regulator of the translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the cell surface to facilitate transmembrane glucose transport. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the Ca(2+) feedforward model and its proposed signalling links to regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle and other...... cell types. The literature is contrasted against our recent findings suggesting that SR Ca(2+) release is neither essential nor adequate to stimulate glucose transport in muscle. Instead, feedback signals through AMPK and mechanical stress are likely to account for most of contraction......-stimulated glucose transport. A revised working model is proposed, in which muscle glucose transport during contraction is not directly regulated by SR Ca(2+) release but rather responds exclusively to feedback signals activated secondary to cross-bridge cycling and tension development....

  11. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Alternatives to the canonical insulin signaling pathway for glucose transport are muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle and passive stretch has been shown to increase muscle glucose transport. However, the signaling mechanism...... regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1 was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport but its role in stretch......-stimulated glucose transport and signaling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton...

  12. Collecting duct principal cell transport processes and their regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pearce, D; Soundararajan, R; Trimpert, C; Kashlan, O.B; Deen, P.M.T; Kohan, D.E

    2015-01-01

    .... The effects of hormonal, autocrine, and paracrine factors to regulate principal cell transport processes are central to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the face of wide variations...

  13. Molecular Basis and Regulation of Ammonium Transporter in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-zhen LI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice grows in flooded paddy fields and takes up ammonium as the preferred nitrogen (N source. Ammonium uptake is facilitated by a family of integral membrane proteins known as ammonium transporters found in all domains of life. However, the molecular mechanism and functional characteristics of the ammonium transporters (AMT in rice have not been determined in detail yet. In this review, we report a genome-wide search for AMT genes in rice, resulting in the increase of the number of potential AMT proteins to at least 12, including members of both the alpha and beta sub-groups. Analysis of the predicted protein sequences for the 12 OsAMT proteins identified many conserved phosphorylation sites in both the alpha and beta group members, which could potentially play a role in controlling the activity of the transporters. Present knowledge of the expression of rice AMT genes is also summarized in detail. Future studies should focus on the structural and functional characteristics of OsAMT proteins to provide insight into the mechanism of ammonium uptake and its regulation in rice. Such research could improve utilization and decrease wastage of N fertilizer in rice cultivation.

  14. Force Triggers YAP Nuclear Entry by Regulating Transport across Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Andreu, Ion; Beedle, Amy E M; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Uroz, Marina; Kosmalska, Anita J; Oria, Roger; Kechagia, Jenny Z; Rico-Lastres, Palma; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Shanahan, Catherine M; Trepat, Xavier; Navajas, Daniel; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2017-11-30

    YAP is a mechanosensitive transcriptional activator with a critical role in cancer, regeneration, and organ size control. Here, we show that force applied to the nucleus directly drives YAP nuclear translocation by decreasing the mechanical restriction of nuclear pores to molecular transport. Exposure to a stiff environment leads cells to establish a mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, allowing forces exerted through focal adhesions to reach the nucleus. Force transmission then leads to nuclear flattening, which stretches nuclear pores, reduces their mechanical resistance to molecular transport, and increases YAP nuclear import. The restriction to transport is further regulated by the mechanical stability of the transported protein, which determines both active nuclear transport of YAP and passive transport of small proteins. Our results unveil a mechanosensing mechanism mediated directly by nuclear pores, demonstrated for YAP but with potential general applicability in transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. STATE REGULATION AS A TOOL FOR MAINTAINING QUALITY OF SERVICES IN THE AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Soluyanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Issues of state regulation of the air transport industry as a means of ensuring a high level of quality of the services provided by the enterprises of the industry. Explains the role of the state in regulation of activity of enterprises of the air transport industry, as well as the analysis of problems of the Russian legislation in this area. Proposed concrete steps to solve the problem.

  16. Information provision by regulated public transport companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deborger, Bruno; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between pricing, frequency of service and information provision by public transport firms offering scheduled services, and we do so under various regulatory regimes. The model assumes that users can come to the bus stop or rail station at random or they can plan their tri...

  17. Defense Transportation Regulation Part 2, Cargo Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Administration MARFORRES Marine Forces Reserve MATA Military Air Transportation Agreement MBA Military Bus Agreement MBBLs Thousands of Barrels MCC Movement...EA 1 Cyprus CY EA 1 Denmark DA EA 1 Dominica DO EA 1 Dominican Republic DR EA 1 Ecuador EC EA 1 El Salvador ES EA 1 Faeroe Islands FO EA 1 Falkland

  18. Rapid transporter regulation prevents substrate flow traffic jams in boron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotta, Naoyuki; Duncan, Susan; Tanaka, Mayuki; Sato, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient uptake by roots often involves substrate-dependent regulated nutrient transporters. For robust uptake, the system requires a regulatory circuit within cells and a collective, coordinated behaviour across the tissue. A paradigm for such systems is boron uptake, known for its directional transport and homeostasis, as boron is essential for plant growth but toxic at high concentrations. In Arabidopsis thaliana, boron uptake occurs via diffusion facilitators (NIPs) and exporters (BORs), each presenting distinct polarity. Intriguingly, although boron soil concentrations are homogenous and stable, both transporters manifest strikingly swift boron-dependent regulation. Through mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that slower regulation of these transporters leads to physiologically detrimental oscillatory behaviour. Cells become periodically exposed to potentially cytotoxic boron levels, and nutrient throughput to the xylem becomes hampered. We conclude that, while maintaining homeostasis, swift transporter regulation within a polarised tissue context is critical to prevent intrinsic traffic-jam like behaviour of nutrient flow. PMID:28870285

  19. 75 FR 51392 - Federal Management Regulation; Transportation Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... to agency management and personnel. List of Subjects in 41 CFR Part 102-117 Accounting, Claims... 1] RIN 3090-AJ03 Federal Management Regulation; Transportation Management AGENCY: Office of... Administration (GSA) is amending the Federal Management Regulation (FMR) by updating its coverage on...

  20. Flavonoids act as negative regulators of auxin transport in vivo in arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. E.; Rashotte, A. M.; Murphy, A. S.; Normanly, J.; Tague, B. W.; Peer, W. A.; Taiz, L.; Muday, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth and development. A number of synthetic compounds have been shown to block the process of auxin transport by inhibition of the auxin efflux carrier complex. These synthetic auxin transport inhibitors may act by mimicking endogenous molecules. Flavonoids, a class of secondary plant metabolic compounds, have been suggested to be auxin transport inhibitors based on their in vitro activity. The hypothesis that flavonoids regulate auxin transport in vivo was tested in Arabidopsis by comparing wild-type (WT) and transparent testa (tt4) plants with a mutation in the gene encoding the first enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis, chalcone synthase. In a comparison between tt4 and WT plants, phenotypic differences were observed, including three times as many secondary inflorescence stems, reduced plant height, decreased stem diameter, and increased secondary root development. Growth of WT Arabidopsis plants on naringenin, a biosynthetic precursor to those flavonoids with auxin transport inhibitor activity in vitro, leads to a reduction in root growth and gravitropism, similar to the effects of synthetic auxin transport inhibitors. Analyses of auxin transport in the inflorescence and hypocotyl of independent tt4 alleles indicate that auxin transport is elevated in plants with a tt4 mutation. In hypocotyls of tt4, this elevated transport is reversed when flavonoids are synthesized by growth of plants on the flavonoid precursor, naringenin. These results are consistent with a role for flavonoids as endogenous regulators of auxin transport.

  1. Road Transport Management System (RTMS): a self regulation initiative in heavy vehicle transport in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the most recent developments of an initiative to introduce meaningful self-regulation in the heavy vehicle transport industry through a Road Transport Management System (RTMS) with the aim of contributing to the road authorities...

  2. Arfaptin-1 negatively regulates Arl1-mediated retrograde transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien-Hung Huang

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Arf-like protein 1 (Arl1 is well known for its role in intracellular vesicular transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN. In this study, we used differential affinity chromatography combined with mass spectrometry to identify Arf-interacting protein 1b (arfaptin-1b as an Arl1-interacting protein and characterized a novel function for arfaptin-1 (including the arfaptin-1a and 1b isoforms in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport. Using a Shiga-toxin subunit B (STxB transportation assay, we demonstrated that knockdown of arfaptin-1 accelerated the retrograde transport of STxB from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus, whereas Arl1 knockdown inhibited STxB transport compared with control cells. Arfaptin-1 overexpression, but not an Arl1 binding-defective mutant (arfaptin-1b-F317A, consistently inhibited STxB transport. Exogenous arfaptin-1 expression did not interfere with the localization of the Arl1-interacting proteins golgin-97 and golgin-245 to the TGN and vice versa. Moreover, we found that the N-terminal region of arfaptin-1 was involved in the regulation of retrograde transport. Our results show that arfaptin-1 acts as a negative regulator in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport and suggest that different functional complexes containing Arl1 form in distinct microdomains and are responsible for different functions.

  3. Specific character of sustainable innovative development of transport construction in self-regulation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumba, Khuta; Belyaeva, Svetlana

    2017-10-01

    The providing of sustainable development is impossible without activating the innovative activity of backbone economical sectors, in particular of transport construction. The system of self-regulation of activities is a specific feature of the transport industry development. The authors carried out the correlation analysis of innovative activity of construction enterprises, which proved the necessity of improving the normative and technical documents. The authors proposed and calculated the index of the legislation stability in the industry. The article suggests recommendations on the activation of innovative development in construction industry basing on the results of the modeling.

  4. Role of the transporter regulator protein (RS1) in the modulation of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs) in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Fernández-Calotti, Paula; Veyhl-Wichmann, Mayke; Diepold, Maximilian; Pinilla-Macua, Itziar; Pérez-Torras, Sandra; Kipp, Helmut; Koepsell, Hermann; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2012-07-01

    SLC28 genes encode three plasma membrane transporter proteins, human concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT)1, CNT2, and CNT3, all of which are implicated in the uptake of natural nucleosides and a variety of nucleoside analogs used in the chemotherapy of cancer and viral and inflammatory diseases. Mechanisms determining their trafficking toward the plasma membrane are not well known, although this might eventually become a target for therapeutic intervention. The transporter regulator RS1, which was initially identified as a short-term, post-transcriptional regulator of the high-affinity, Na(+)-coupled, glucose transporter sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1, was evaluated in this study as a candidate for coordinate regulation of membrane insertion of human CNT-type proteins. With a combination of studies with mammalian cells, Xenopus laevis oocytes, and RS1-null mice, evidence that RS1 down-regulates the localization and activity at the plasma membrane of the three members of this protein family (CNT1, CNT2, and CNT3) is provided, which indicates the biochemical basis for coordinate regulation of nucleoside uptake ability in epithelia and probably in other RS1-expressing cell types.

  5. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  6. Modeling activity transport in the CANDU heat transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzonas, D.A.; Qiu, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The release and transport of corrosion products from the surfaces of primary coolant system components is a serious concern for all water-cooled nuclear power plants. The consequences of high levels of corrosion product transport are twofold: a) increased corrosion product (crud) deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, leading to reduced heat transfer and the possibility of fuel failures, and b) increased production of radioactive species by neutron activation, resulting in increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose. In recent years, a semi-empirical activity transport model has been successfully developed to predict the deposition of radionuclides, including {sup 60}Co, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 124}Sb and fission products, around the CANDU® primary Heat Transport System (HTS), and to predict radiation fields at the steam generators and reactor face. The model links corrosion of the carbon steel outlet feeders to magnetite and radionuclide deposition on steam generator and inlet piping surfaces. This paper will describe the model development, key assumptions, required inputs, and model validation. The importance of reactor artefact characterization in the model development will be highlighted, and some key results will be presented, including oxide morphology and loadings, and radionuclide distributions within the oxide. The predictive capabilities of the model will also be described, including predictions of oxide thickness and the effects of changes in chemistry parameters such as alkalinity. While the model was developed primarily for the CANDU® HTS, the information gained during model development regarding corrosion product and radionuclide transport and deposition can also provide insights into activity transport in other water-cooled reactor systems. (author)

  7. Endocrine regulation of ion transport in the avian lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, Gary; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sighvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    The lower intestine (colon and coprodeum) of the domestic fowl maintains a very active, transporting epithelium, with a microvillus brush border, columnar epithelial cells, and a variety of transport systems. The colon of normal or high salt-acclimated hens expresses sodium-linked glucose and amino...

  8. Active transportation measurement : Minneapolis case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This research examines longitudinal bicycle count data to better understand the impact of new bicycle facilities on use. The study site is Minneapolis which has invested close to $25 million over 8 years to improve active transportation facilities as...

  9. ATM and GLUT1-S490 phosphorylation regulate GLUT1 mediated transport in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Andrisse

    Full Text Available The glucose and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA transporter GLUT1 contains a phosphorylation site, S490, for ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM. The objective of this study was to determine whether ATM and GLUT1-S490 regulate GLUT1.L6 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscles were used to study the effects of ATM inhibition, ATM activation, and S490 mutation on GLUT1 localization, trafficking, and transport activity.In myoblasts, inhibition of ATM significantly diminished cell surface GLUT1, glucose and DHA transport, GLUT1 externalization, and association of GLUT1 with Gα-interacting protein-interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC1, which has been implicated in recycling of endosomal proteins. In contrast, ATM activation by doxorubicin (DXR increased DHA transport, cell surface GLUT1, and the GLUT1/GIPC1 association. S490A mutation decreased glucose and DHA transport, cell surface GLUT1, and interaction of GLUT1 with GIPC1, while S490D mutation increased transport, cell surface GLUT1, and the GLUT1/GIPC1 interaction. ATM dysfunction or ATM inhibition reduced DHA transport in extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles and decreased glucose transport in EDL and soleus. In contrast, DXR increased DHA transport in EDL.These results provide evidence that ATM and GLUT1-S490 promote cell surface GLUT1 and GLUT1-mediated transport in skeletal muscle associated with upregulation of the GLUT1/GIPC1 interaction.

  10. FTIP1 is an essential regulator required for florigen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Chang; Hou, Xingliang; Xi, Wanyan; Shen, Lisha; Tao, Zhen; Wang, Yue; Yu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to respond to day length, photoperiodism, is crucial for flowering plants to adapt to seasonal change. The photoperiodic control of flowering in plants is mediated by a long-distance mobile floral stimulus called florigen that moves from leaves to the shoot apex. Although the proteins encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis and its orthologs in other plants are identified as the long-sought florigen, whether their transport is a simple diffusion process or under regulation remains elusive. Here we show that an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, FT-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1 (FTIP1), is an essential regulator required for FT protein transport in Arabidopsis. Loss of function of FTIP1 exhibits late flowering under long days, which is partly due to the compromised FT movement to the shoot apex. FTIP1 and FT share similar mRNA expression patterns and subcellular localization, and they interact specifically in phloem companion cells. FTIP1 is required for FT export from companion cells to sieve elements, thus affecting FT transport through the phloem to the SAM. Our results provide a mechanistic understanding of florigen transport, demonstrating that FT moves in a regulated manner and that FTIP1 mediates FT transport to induce flowering.

  11. 75 FR 70217 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... on the USTRANSCOM Web site (under misc) at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/misc.cfm . Additional... Register Announcement and incorporated into the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR 4500... complete version of the DTR is available via the Internet on the USTRANSCOM homepage at http://www.transcom...

  12. Cytokinin response factors regulate PIN-FORMED auxin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimášková, Mária; O'Brien, José Antonio; Khan, Mamoona; Van Noorden, Giel; Ötvös, Krisztina; Vieten, Anne; De Clercq, Inge; Van Haperen, Johanna Maria Adriana; Cuesta, Candela; Hoyerová, Klára; Vanneste, Steffen; Marhavý, Peter; Wabnik, Krzysztof; Van Breusegem, Frank; Nowack, Moritz; Murphy, Angus; Friml, Jiří; Weijers, Dolf; Beeckman, Tom; Benková, Eva

    2015-11-06

    Auxin and cytokinin are key endogenous regulators of plant development. Although cytokinin-mediated modulation of auxin distribution is a developmentally crucial hormonal interaction, its molecular basis is largely unknown. Here we show a direct regulatory link between cytokinin signalling and the auxin transport machinery uncovering a mechanistic framework for cytokinin-auxin cross-talk. We show that the CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTORS (CRFs), transcription factors downstream of cytokinin perception, transcriptionally control genes encoding PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transporters at a specific PIN CYTOKININ RESPONSE ELEMENT (PCRE) domain. Removal of this cis-regulatory element effectively uncouples PIN transcription from the CRF-mediated cytokinin regulation and attenuates plant cytokinin sensitivity. We propose that CRFs represent a missing cross-talk component that fine-tunes auxin transport capacity downstream of cytokinin signalling to control plant development.

  13. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30–50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40–50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30–40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscles in which force development was prevented. Our findings suggest that Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton regulate stretch-stimulated glucose transport and that Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Key

  14. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Compendium of federal and state radioactive materials transportation laws and regulations: Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB) is an on-line information service containing detailed information on legislation and regulations regarding the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The system is dedicated to serving the legislative and regulatory information needs of the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies; state, tribal, and local governments; the hazardous materials transportation industry; and interested members of the general public. In addition to the on-line information service, quarterly and annual Legal Developments Reports are produced using information from the TLDB. These reports summarize important changes in federal and state legislation, regulations, administrative agency rulings, and judicial decisions over the reporting period. Information on significant legal developments at the tribal and local levels is also included on an as-available basis. Battelle's Office of Transportation Systems and Planning (OTSP) will also perform customized searches of the TLDB and produce formatted printouts in response to specific information requests.

  16. Transport and transcriptional regulation of oil production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Sehrish; Chen, Beibei; She, Guangbiao; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhao, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) serves as an energy reservoir and phospholipids as build blocks of biomembrane to support plant life. They also provide human with foods and nutrients. Multi-compartmentalized biosynthesis, trafficking or cross-membrane transport of lipid intermediates or precursors and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent progress has aided our understanding of how fatty acids (FAs) and phospholipids are transported between the chloroplast, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and how the ins and outs of lipids take place in the peroxisome and other organelles for lipid metabolism and function. In addition, information regarding the transcriptional regulation network associated with FA and TAG biosynthesis has been further enriched. Recent breakthroughs made in lipid transport and transcriptional regulation has provided significant insights into our comprehensive understanding of plant lipid biology. This review attempts to highlight the recent progress made on lipid synthesis, transport, degradation, and their regulatory mechanisms. Metabolic engineering, based on these knowledge-powered technologies for production of edible oils or biofuels, is reviewed. The biotechnological application of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and transporters, for oil production and composition improvement, are discussed in a broad context in order to provide a fresh scenario for researchers and to guide future research and applications.

  17. Regulation of fatty acid transport and membrane transporters in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonen, Arend; Luiken, Joost J F P; Glatz, Jan F C

    2002-10-01

    Long chain fatty acid uptake across the plasma membrane occurs, in part, via a protein-mediated process involving a number of fatty acid binding proteins known as fatty acid transporters. A critical step in furthering the understandings of fatty acid transport was the discovery that giant vesicles, prepared from tissues such as muscle and heart, provided a suitable system for measuring fatty acid uptake. These vesicles are large (10-15 microm diameter), are oriented fully right side out, and contain cytosolic FABP in the lumen, which acts as a fatty acid sink, while none of the fatty acid taken up is metabolized or associated with the plasma membrane. The key fatty acid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm are expressed in muscle and heart and their plasma membrane content is positively correlated with rates of fatty acid transport. These transporters are regulated acutely (within minutes) and chronically (days). For instance, both muscle contraction and insulin can translocate FAT/CD36 from an intracellular pool to the plasma membrane, thereby increasing fatty acid transport. With obesity, fatty acid transport is increased along with a concomitant increase in plasmalemmal FAT/CD36 (heart, muscle) and FABPpm (heart only), but without change in the expression of these transporters. This latter observation suggests that some of the fatty acid transporters are permanently relocated to the plasma membrane. In other studies it also appears that fatty acid transport rates are altered in a reciprocal manner to glucose transport. Since disorders in lipid metabolism appear to be an important factor contributing to the etiology of a number of common human diseases such as diabetes and obesity, our evidence that protein-mediated fatty acid transport is a key step in lipid metabolism allows the speculation that malfunctioning of the fatty acid transport process could be a common critical factor in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  18. The Study of Function and Regulation of Renal Drug Transporters in Human Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caetano Pinto, P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The study of renal function is crucial to understand and developed novel strategies to cope with renal diseases. This thesis was devoted to study renal proximal tubule function in vitro, focusing on the activity and regulation of renal drug transporters. Chapter 1 offers a rational of the study in

  19. Paroxetine prevented the down-regulation of astrocytic L-Glu transporters in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Koki; Takaki, Junpei; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Sekino, Yuko; Suzuki, Takeshi; Sato, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular L-glutamate (L-Glu) concentration is elevated in neuroinflammation, thereby causing excitotoxicity. One of the mechanisms is down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters. Some antidepressants have anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore investigated effects of various antidepressants on the down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters in the in vitro neuroinflammation model. Among these antidepressants, only paroxetine was effective. We previously demonstrated that the down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters was caused by L-Glu released from activated microglia. We here clarified that only paroxetine inhibited L-Glu release from microglia. This is the novel action of paroxetine, which may bring advantages on the therapy of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Paroxetine prevented the down-regulation of astrocytic L-Glu transporters in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Fujimori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular L-glutamate (L-Glu concentration is elevated in neuroinflammation, thereby causing excitotoxicity. One of the mechanisms is down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters. Some antidepressants have anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore investigated effects of various antidepressants on the down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters in the in vitro neuroinflammation model. Among these antidepressants, only paroxetine was effective. We previously demonstrated that the down-regulation of astrocyte L-Glu transporters was caused by L-Glu released from activated microglia. We here clarified that only paroxetine inhibited L-Glu release from microglia. This is the novel action of paroxetine, which may bring advantages on the therapy of neuroinflammation.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation and Transport of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid in Catharanthus roseus: Exploration of New Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Cai, Junjun; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shihai

    2016-12-28

    As one of the model medicinal plants for exploration of biochemical pathways and molecular biological questions on complex metabolic pathways, Catharanthus roseus synthesizes more than 100 terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) used for clinical treatment of various diseases and for new drug discovery. Given that extensive studies have revealed the major metabolic pathways and the spatial-temporal biosynthesis of TIA in C. roseus plant, little is known about subcellular and inter-cellular trafficking or long-distance transport of TIA end products or intermediates, as well as their regulation. While these transport processes are indispensable for multi-organelle, -tissue and -cell biosynthesis, storage and their functions, great efforts have been made to explore these dynamic cellular processes. Progress has been made in past decades on transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis by transcription factors as either activators or repressors; recent studies also revealed several transporters involved in subcellular and inter-cellular TIA trafficking. However, many details and the regulatory network for controlling the tissue-or cell-specific biosynthesis, transport and storage of serpentine and ajmalicine in root, catharanthine in leaf and root, vindoline specifically in leaf and vinblastine and vincristine only in green leaf and their biosynthetic intermediates remain to be determined. This review is to summarize the progress made in biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and transport of TIAs. Based on analysis of organelle, tissue and cell-type specific biosynthesis and progresses in transport and trafficking of similar natural products, the transporters that might be involved in transport of TIAs and their synthetic intermediates are discussed; according to transcriptome analysis and bioinformatic approaches, the transcription factors that might be involved in TIA biosynthesis are analyzed. Further discussion is made on a broad context of transcriptional and

  2. Transcriptional Regulation and Transport of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid in Catharanthus roseus: Exploration of New Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the model medicinal plants for exploration of biochemical pathways and molecular biological questions on complex metabolic pathways, Catharanthus roseus synthesizes more than 100 terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs used for clinical treatment of various diseases and for new drug discovery. Given that extensive studies have revealed the major metabolic pathways and the spatial-temporal biosynthesis of TIA in C. roseus plant, little is known about subcellular and inter-cellular trafficking or long-distance transport of TIA end products or intermediates, as well as their regulation. While these transport processes are indispensable for multi-organelle, -tissue and -cell biosynthesis, storage and their functions, great efforts have been made to explore these dynamic cellular processes. Progress has been made in past decades on transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis by transcription factors as either activators or repressors; recent studies also revealed several transporters involved in subcellular and inter-cellular TIA trafficking. However, many details and the regulatory network for controlling the tissue-or cell-specific biosynthesis, transport and storage of serpentine and ajmalicine in root, catharanthine in leaf and root, vindoline specifically in leaf and vinblastine and vincristine only in green leaf and their biosynthetic intermediates remain to be determined. This review is to summarize the progress made in biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and transport of TIAs. Based on analysis of organelle, tissue and cell-type specific biosynthesis and progresses in transport and trafficking of similar natural products, the transporters that might be involved in transport of TIAs and their synthetic intermediates are discussed; according to transcriptome analysis and bioinformatic approaches, the transcription factors that might be involved in TIA biosynthesis are analyzed. Further discussion is made on a broad context of

  3. Cytokinin response factors regulate PIN-FORMED auxin transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Šimášková, M.; O'Brien, J A; Khan, M.; Van Noorden, G.; Ötvös, K.; Vieten, A.; de Clercq, E; Van Haperen, J.M.A.; Cuesta, C.; Hoyerová, K.; Vanneste, S; Marhavý, P.; Wabnik, K.; Breusegem, F; Nowack, M.

    2015-01-01

    Auxin and cytokinin are key endogenous regulators of plant development. Although cytokinin-mediated modulation of auxin distribution is a developmentally crucial hormonal interaction, its molecular basis is largely unknown. Here we show a direct regulatory link between cytokinin signalling and the auxin transport machinery uncovering a mechanistic framework for cytokinin-auxin cross-talk. We show that the CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTORS (CRFs), transcription factors downstream of cytokinin percept...

  4. PIN-Dependent Auxin Transport: Action, Regulation, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowski, Maciek; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Auxin participates in a multitude of developmental processes, as well as responses to environmental cues. Compared with other plant hormones, auxin exhibits a unique property, as it undergoes directional, cell-to-cell transport facilitated by plasma membrane-localized transport proteins. Among them, a prominent role has been ascribed to the PIN family of auxin efflux facilitators. PIN proteins direct polar auxin transport on account of their asymmetric subcellular localizations. In this review, we provide an overview of the multiple developmental roles of PIN proteins, including the atypical endoplasmic reticulum-localized members of the family, and look at the family from an evolutionary perspective. Next, we cover the cell biological and molecular aspects of PIN function, in particular the establishment of their polar subcellular localization. Hormonal and environmental inputs into the regulation of PIN action are summarized as well. PMID:25604445

  5. Regulation of serotonin transport in human platelets by tyrosine kinase Syk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanetto, Martina; Zarpellon, Alessandro; Borgo, Christian; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Deana, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter involved in the regulation of numerous neuro-physiological processes. The circulating level of 5-HT is regulated by the membrane transporter SERT present both in the presynaptic nerve terminals and blood platelets. 5-HT transport is a process tightly regulated by a variety of factors including protein phosphorylation. Aim of this study was to ascertain if also the SERT Tyr-phosphorylation mediated by Syk-kinase concurs to the regulation of SERT activity. Indeed we found that 5-HT uptake decreased upon platelet exposure to piceatannol or Syk-inhibitor II, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of the tyrosine-kinase Syk. Tyr-phosphorylation of anti-SERT-immuno-stained proteins in membrane extracts and in anti-SERT-immuno-precipitates, decreased upon platelet treatment with piceatannol, in parallel with a reduction of Syk-activity. Syk was immuno-revealed in the anti-SERT immuno-precipitates, which displayed a piceatannol-sensitive kinase activity towards SERT itself and the Syk-substrate α-sinuclein. Syk inhibitors also caused a decrease of the monensin-induced 5-HT-efflux from platelets and of imipramine binding to them. It is concluded that, in addition to the phosphorylation of SERT mediated by various other kinases, also that catalyzed by Syk might play an important role in the 5-HT transport, likely favoring the transporter conformation exposing the neurotransmitter binding sites. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA) Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA)); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  7. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  8. Regulation of dopamine transporter function by protein-protein interactions: new discoveries and methodological challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Gether, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    -synaptic neurons. This has led to the identification of a plethora of different kinases, receptors and scaffolding proteins that interact with DAT and hereby either modulate the catalytic activity of the transporter or regulate its trafficking and degradation. Several new tools for studying DAT regulation in live...... cells have also recently become available such as fluorescently tagged cocaine analogues and fluorescent substrates. Here we review the current knowledge about the role of protein-protein interactions in DAT regulation as well as we describe the most recent methodological developments that have been......The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a key role in regulating dopaminergic signalling in the brain by mediating rapid clearance of dopamine from the synaptic clefts. The psychostimulatory actions of cocaine and amphetamine are primarily the result of a direct interaction of these compounds with DAT...

  9. Negative Regulation of the Creatine Transporter SLC6A8 by SPAK and OSR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Fezai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transport regulation involves several kinases including SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1, which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys] kinases. The present study explored whether SPAK and/or OSR1 participate in the regulation of the creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8, which accomplishes Na+ coupled cellular uptake of creatine in several tissues including kidney, intestine, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Methods: cRNA encoding SLC6A8 was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, WNK insensitive T233ASPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1, WNK insensitive T185AOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Transporter activity was determined from creatine (1 mM induced current utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Coexpression of wild-type SPAK and of T233ESPAK, but not of T233ASPAK or of D212ASPAK was followed by a significant decrease of creatine induced current in SLC6A8 expressing oocytes. Coexpression of SPAK significantly decreased maximal transport rate. Coexpression of wild-type OSR1, T185EOSR1 and T185AOSR1 but not of D164AOSR1 significantly negatively regulated SLC6A8 activity. OSR1 again decreased significantly maximal transport rate. Conclusions: Both, SPAK and OSR1, are negative regulators of the creatine transporter SLC6A8.

  10. Negative regulation of the creatine transporter SLC6A8 by SPAK and OSR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fezai, Myriam; Elvira, Bernat; Borras, Jose; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Hoseinzadeh, Zohreh; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Transport regulation involves several kinases including SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1), which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys]) kinases. The present study explored whether SPAK and/or OSR1 participate in the regulation of the creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8), which accomplishes Na+ coupled cellular uptake of creatine in several tissues including kidney, intestine, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. cRNA encoding SLC6A8 was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active (T233E)SPAK, WNK insensitive (T233A)SPAK, catalytically inactive (D212A)SPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active (T185E)OSR1, WNK insensitive (T185A)OSR1 and catalytically inactive (D164A)OSR1. Transporter activity was determined from creatine (1 mM) induced current utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Coexpression of wild-type SPAK and of (T233E)SPAK, but not of (T233A)SPAK or of (D212A)SPAK was followed by a significant decrease of creatine induced current in SLC6A8 expressing oocytes. Coexpression of SPAK significantly decreased maximal transport rate. Coexpression of wild-type OSR1, (T185E)OSR1 and (T185A)OSR1 but not of (D164A)OSR1 significantly negatively regulated SLC6A8 activity. OSR1 again decreased significantly maximal transport rate. Both, SPAK and OSR1, are negative regulators of the creatine transporter SLC6A8.

  11. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rojas-Rueda

    Full Text Available Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64 in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76-163 annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29-104, Barcelona 37 (24-56, Paris 37 (18-64 and Basel 5 (3-9. An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris resulted in 19 (3-42 deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3-21 in Prague, 6 (4-9 in Basel, 3 (2-6 in Copenhagen and 3 (2-4 in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year. Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation.

  12. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Hung, Mien-Chie, E-mail: mhung@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Center for Molecular Medicine and Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, China Medical University and Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  13. Fatty acid transport and transporters in muscle are critically regulated by Akt2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati S; Luiken, Joost J F P; Snook, Laelie A; Han, Xiao Xia; Holloway, Graham P; Glatz, Jan F C; Bonen, Arend

    2015-09-14

    Muscle contains various fatty acid transporters (CD36, FABPpm, FATP1, FATP4). Physiological stimuli (insulin, contraction) induce the translocation of all four transporters to the sarcolemma to enhance fatty acid uptake similarly to glucose uptake stimulation via glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation. Akt2 mediates insulin-induced, but not contraction-induced, GLUT4 translocation, but its role in muscle fatty acid transporter translocation is unknown. In muscle from Akt2-knockout mice, we observed that Akt2 is critically involved in both insulin-induced and contraction-induced fatty acid transport and translocation of fatty acid translocase/CD36 (CD36) and FATP1, but not of translocation of fatty acid-binding protein (FABPpm) and FATP4. Instead, Akt2 mediates intracellular retention of both latter transporters. Collectively, our observations reveal novel complexities in signaling mechanisms regulating the translocation of fatty acid transporters in muscle. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The main directions of adaptation regulation of admission to market of road transport in Ukraine according to European Union standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Balin

    2014-10-01

    The peculiarities of legal regulation of individual elements of the transport sector, in particular concerning common rules for access to the market of transport services. In this regard, special attention is paid to the analysis of the Law of Ukraine «On the State Program of Adaptation of Ukraine to the European Union», the Association Agreement between Ukraine and the European Union and the relevant regulations of the European Union. Reveals the order in which the following requirements for companies involved in the activities of road transport operator. Considerable attention is paid to the coverage of liberalization road transport.

  15. Evaluation of Neighbourhood Characteristics and Active Transport Mode Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Tayebeh Saghapour; Sara Moridpour; Russell George Thompson

    2017-01-01

    One of the common aims of transport policy makers is to switch people’s travel to active transport. For this purpose, a variety of transport goals and investments should be programmed to increase the propensity towards active transport mode choice. This paper aims to investigate whether built environment features in neighbourhoods could enhance the odds of active transportation. The present study introduces an index measuring public transport accessibility (PTAI), and a walkability index alon...

  16. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  17. Regulation of Nitrate Transport in Citrus Rootstocks Depending on Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Miguel; Camañes, Gemma; Flors, Víctor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported that in Citrus plants, nitrate influx through the plasmalemma of roots cells follows a biphasic pattern, suggesting the existence of at least two different uptake systems, a high and low affinity transport system (HATS and LATS, respectively). Here, we describe a novel inducible high affinity transport system (iHATS). This new nitrate transport system has a high capacity to uptake nitrate in two different Citrus rootstocks (Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange). The iHATS was saturable, showing higher affinity than constitutive high affinity transport system (cHATS) to the substrate NO3−. The Vmax for this saturable component iHATS was higher than cHATS, reaching similar values in both rootstocks. Additionally, we studied the regulation of root NO3− uptake mediated by both HATS (iHATS and cHATS) and LATS. In both rootstocks, cHATS is constitutive and independent of N-status. Concerning the regulation of iHATS, this system is upregulated by NO3− and down-regulated by the N status and by NO3− itself when plants are exposed to it for a longer period of time. LATS in Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange rootstocks is repressed by the N-status. The use of various metabolic uncouplers or inhibitors indicated that NO3− net uptake mediated by iHATS and LATS was an active transport system in both rootstocks. PMID:19516998

  18. Active transportation measurement and benchmarking development : New Orleans state of active transportation report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a surge in bicycle and pedestrian use in communities that have invested in active transportation infrastruc-ture and programming. While these increases show potentially promising trends, many of the cities that ha...

  19. Induction events and short-term regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at different levels of structural and functional organization of photosynthetic apparatus provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. This review begins with a brief overview of the chloroplast electron transport chain. Then two noninvasive biophysical methods (measurements of slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence and EPR signals of oxidized P700 centers) are exemplified to illustrate the possibility of monitoring induction events in chloroplasts in vivo and in situ. Induction events in chloroplasts are considered and briefly discussed in the context of short-term mechanisms of the following regulatory processes: (i) pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport; (ii) the light-induced activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle; (iii) optimization of electron transport due to fitting alternative pathways of electron flow and partitioning light energy between photosystems I and II; and (iv) the light-induced remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus and thylakoid membranes.

  20. 50 CFR 404.7 - Regulated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulated activities. 404.7 Section 404.7... MARINE NATIONAL MONUMENT § 404.7 Regulated activities. Except as provided in §§ 404.8, 404.9 and 404.10, the following activities are prohibited and thus unlawful for any person to conduct or cause to be...

  1. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Signaling Regulates Cholesterol Transport in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Petteri; Rami, Martina; Nuutinen, Salla; Santovito, Donato; van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Raitoharju, Emma; Oksala, Niku; Ring, Larisa; Cai, Minying; Hruby, Victor J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Weber, Christian; Steffens, Sabine

    2017-07-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1-R) is expressed by monocytes and macrophages, where it exerts anti-inflammatory actions on stimulation with its natural ligand α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The present study was designed to investigate the specific role of MC1-R in the context of atherosclerosis and possible regulatory pathways of MC1-R beyond anti-inflammation. Human and mouse atherosclerotic samples and primary mouse macrophages were used to study the regulatory functions of MC1-R. The impact of pharmacological MC1-R activation on atherosclerosis was assessed in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Characterization of human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques revealed that MC1-R expression localizes in lesional macrophages and is significantly associated with the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, which are responsible for initiating reverse cholesterol transport. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages, we observed that α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and selective MC1-R agonists similarly promoted cholesterol efflux, which is a counterregulatory mechanism against foam cell formation. Mechanistically, MC1-R activation upregulated the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in cell surface CD36 expression and in cholesterol uptake, further protecting macrophages from excessive lipid accumulation. Conversely, macrophages deficient in functional MC1-R displayed a phenotype with impaired efflux and enhanced uptake of cholesterol. Pharmacological targeting of MC1-R in atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice reduced plasma cholesterol levels and aortic CD36 expression and increased plaque ABCG1 expression and signs of plaque stability. Our findings identify a novel role for MC1-R in macrophage cholesterol transport. Activation of MC1-R confers protection against macrophage foam cell formation through a dual mechanism: It prevents cholesterol uptake while concomitantly promoting ABCA1- and ABCG1-mediated reverse

  2. Active Transportation Surveillance - United States, 1999-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Paul, Prabasaj; Wendel, Arthur M

    2015-08-28

    Physical activity is a health-enhancing behavior, and most U.S. adults do not meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Active transportation, such as by walking or bicycling, is one way that persons can be physically active. No comprehensive, multiyear assessments of active transportation surveillance in the United States have been conducted. 1999-2012. Five surveillance systems assess one or more components of active transportation. The American Community Survey and the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) both assess the mode of transportation to work in the past week. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who reported walking or bicycling to work can be calculated. NHTS and the American Time Use Survey include 1-day assessments of trips or activities. With that information, the proportion of respondents who report any walking or bicycling for transportation can be calculated. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey both assess recent (i.e., in the past week or past month) habitual physical activity behaviors, including those performed during active travel. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who report any recent habitual active transportation can be calculated. The prevalence of active transportation as the primary commute mode to work in the past week ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. The 1-day assessment indicated that the prevalence of any active transportation ranged from 10.5% to 18.5%. The prevalence of any habitual active transportation ranged from 23.9% to 31.4%. No consistent trends in active transportation across time periods and surveillance systems were identified. Among systems, active transportation was usually more common among men, younger respondents, and minority racial/ethnic groups. Among education groups, the highest prevalence of active transportation was usually among the least or most educated groups, and active transportation tended to be more

  3. Transcellular Pathways in Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Regulate Changes in Solute Transport by Fluid Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triacca, Valentina; Güç, Esra; Kilarski, Witold W; Pisano, Marco; Swartz, Melody A

    2017-04-28

    The transport of interstitial fluid and solutes into lymphatic vessels is important for maintaining interstitial homeostasis and delivering antigens and soluble factors to the lymph node for immune surveillance. Transendothelial transport across lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) is commonly considered to occur paracellularly, or between cell-cell junctions, and driven by local pressure and concentration gradients. However, emerging evidence suggests that LECs also play active roles in regulating interstitial solute balance and can scavenge and store antigens, raising the possibility that vesicular or transcellular pathways may be important in lymphatic solute transport. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of transcellular (vesicular) versus paracellular transport pathways by LECs and how mechanical stress (ie, fluid flow conditioning) alters either pathway. We demonstrate that transcellular transport mechanisms substantially contribute to lymphatic solute transport and that solute uptake occurs in both caveolae- and clathrin-coated vesicles. In vivo, intracelluar uptake of fluorescently labeled albumin after intradermal injection by LECs was similar to that of dermal dendritic cells. In vitro, we developed a method to differentially quantify intracellular solute uptake versus transendothelial transport by LECs. LECs preconditioned to 1 µm/s transmural flow demonstrated increased uptake and basal-to-apical solute transport, which could be substantially reversed by blocking dynamin-dependent vesicle formation. These findings reveal the importance of intracellular transport in steady-state lymph formation and suggest that LECs use transcellular mechanisms in parallel to the well-described paracellular route to modulate solute transport from the interstitium according to biomechanical cues. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  5. Down-regulation of the myoinositol transporter SMIT by JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Bhavsar, Shefalee K; Lang, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Janus-activated kinase-2 JAK2 is activated by energy depletion and hyperosmotic shock and modifies the activity of several Na(+) coupled transporters. The Na(+) coupled osmolyte transporter SMIT (myoinositol transporter) is upregulated by osmotic shock and downregulated by energy depletion. The present study thus explored whether JAK2 contributes to the regulation of SMIT activity. To this end, cRNA encoding SMIT was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild type JAK2, constitutively active (V617F)JAK2 or inactive (K882E)JAK2. Inositol-induced current (I(SMIT)) was determined by dual electrode voltage clamp and taken as measure for electrogenic inositol transport. No appreciable I(SMIT) was observed in water injected oocytes. In SMIT expressing oocytes I(SMIT) was significantly decreased by additional coexpression of JAK2 or (V617F)JAK2, but not by coexpression of (K882E)JAK2. According to kinetic analysis coexpression of JAK2 decreased maximal I(SMIT) without significantly modifying the concentration required for halfmaximal I(SMIT) (K(M)). In oocytes expressing both, SMIT and JAK2, ISMIT was gradually increased by JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (40 µM). Disruption of carrier insertion with brefeldin A (5 µM) was followed by a decline of I(SMIT) to a similar extent in Xenopus oocytes expressing SMIT with JAK2 and in Xenopus oocytes expressing SMIT alone, suggesting that JAK2 did not affect carrier stability in the cell membrane. JAK2 contributes to the regulation of the inositol transporter SMIT. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Function and Regulation of the Plant COPT Family of High-Affinity Copper Transport Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Puig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotes because it participates as a redox active cofactor in multiple biological processes, including mitochondrial respiration, photosynthesis, oxidative stress protection, and iron (Fe transport. In eukaryotic cells, Cu transport toward the cytoplasm is mediated by the conserved CTR/COPT family of high-affinity Cu transport proteins. This outlook paper reviews the contribution of our research group to the characterization of the function played by the Arabidopsis thaliana COPT1–6 family of proteins in plant Cu homeostasis. Our studies indicate that the different tissue specificity, Cu-regulated expression, and subcellular localization dictate COPT-specialized contribution to plant Cu transport and distribution. By characterizing lack-of-function Arabidopsis mutant lines, we conclude that COPT1 mediates root Cu acquisition, COPT6 facilitates shoot Cu distribution, and COPT5 mobilizes Cu from storage organelles. Furthermore, our work with copt2 mutant and COPT-overexpressing plants has also uncovered Cu connections with Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock, respectively. Future studies on the interaction between COPT transporters and other components of the Cu homeostasis network will improve our knowledge of plant Cu acquisition, distribution, regulation, and utilization by Cu-proteins.

  7. Transport on prescription: How can GPs contribute to the promotion of active transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistoll, Chance; Furler, John

    2017-10-01

    Active transport (ie walking, cycling, using public transport) can play a part in reducing non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Very little is known about how general practitioners (GPs) can contribute to promoting active transport. We explored GPs' ideas around active transport, and potential barriers and facilitators to its promotion in the clinical setting. Using a maximal variation sample, we conducted 10 semi-structured interviews with GPs in Victoria, Australia. The socioecological model informed data collection and analysis. The idea of active transport resonated with GPs. Limited awareness around active transport and safety concerns regarding commuter cycling were barriers to clinical promotion. GPs believed patients' health, cultural norms, socioeconomic position and access to supportive environments could facilitate participation. Future efforts should prioritise awareness of active transport among GPs. The perspectives of GPs would be valuable to policymakers, particularly in designing programs to mitigate inequalities around active transport access and use.

  8. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active......, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...

  9. Multilevel regulation of an α-arrestin by glucose depletion controls hexose transporter endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepian, Junie; Defenouillère, Quentin; Albanèse, Véronique; Váchová, Libuše; Garcia, Camille; Palková, Zdena; Léon, Sébastien

    2017-06-05

    Nutrient availability controls the landscape of nutrient transporters present at the plasma membrane, notably by regulating their ubiquitylation and subsequent endocytosis. In yeast, this involves the Nedd4 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 and arrestin-related trafficking adaptors (ARTs). ARTs are targeted by signaling pathways and warrant that cargo ubiquitylation and endocytosis appropriately respond to nutritional inputs. Here, we show that glucose deprivation regulates the ART protein Csr2/Art8 at multiple levels to trigger high-affinity glucose transporter endocytosis. Csr2 is transcriptionally induced in these conditions through the AMPK orthologue Snf1 and downstream transcriptional repressors. Upon synthesis, Csr2 becomes activated by ubiquitylation. In contrast, glucose replenishment induces CSR2 transcriptional shutdown and switches Csr2 to an inactive, deubiquitylated form. This glucose-induced deubiquitylation of Csr2 correlates with its phospho-dependent association with 14-3-3 proteins and involves protein kinase A. Thus, two glucose signaling pathways converge onto Csr2 to regulate hexose transporter endocytosis by glucose availability. These data illustrate novel mechanisms by which nutrients modulate ART activity and endocytosis. © 2017 Hovsepian et al.

  10. PIKfyve in the SGK1 mediated regulation of the creatine transporter SLC6A8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Shojaiefard, Manzar; Christie, David; Tavare, Jeremy; Seebohm, Guiscard; Lang, Florian

    2007-01-01

    The Na(+),Cl(-),creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8) mediates concentrative cellular uptake of creatine into a wide variety of cells. Previous observations disclosed that SLC6A8 transport activity is enhanced by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at least partially through the serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase isoforms SGK1 and SGK3. As SLC6A8 does not contain a putative SGK consensus motif, the mechanism linking SGK1 with SLC6A8 activity remained elusive. A candidate kinase is the mammalian phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-5-kinase PIKfyve (PIP5K3), which has previously been shown to regulate the glucose transporter GLUT4. The present experiments explored the possibility that SLC6A8 is regulated by PIKfyve. In Xenopus oocytes expressing SLC6A8 but not in water injected oocytes creatine induced a current which was significantly enhanced by coexpression of PIKfyve. The effect of PIKfyve on SLC6A8 was blunted by additional coexpression of the inactive mutant of the serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase (K127N)SGK1. The stimulating effect of PIKfyve was abrogated by replacement of the serine in the SGK consensus sequence by alanine ((S318A)PIKfyve). Moreover, coexpression of ( S318A)PIKfyve blunted the effect of SGK1 on SLC6A8 activity. The observations suggest that SGK1 regulates the creatine transporter SLC6A8 at least partially through phosphorylation and activation of PIKfyve and subsequent formation of PI(3,5)P(2).

  11. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  12. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Davydova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namely, contracts, production sharing agreement, lease, joint venture. Promising areas of application of the PPP identified the transport sector, housing and utilities, energy and tourism sector. The features of cluster formations in the country and the prospects for tourism clusters.

  13. Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Human Hepatoma HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Jouan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatoma cells may represent a valuable alternative to the use of human hepatocytes for studying hepatic drug transporters, which is now a regulatory issue during drug development. In the present work, we have characterized hepatic drug transporter expression, activity and regulation in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells, in order to determine the potential relevance of these cells for drug transport assays. HuH-7 cells displayed notable multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP activity, presumed to reflect expression of various hepatic MRPs, including MRP2. By contrast, they failed to display functional activities of the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, and of the canalicular transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Concomitantly, mRNA expressions of various sinusoidal and canalicular hepatic drug transporters were not detected (NTCP, OATP1B1, organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2, OCT1 and bile salt export pump or were found to be lower (OATP1B3, OATP2B1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, BCRP and MRP3 in hepatoma HuH-7 cells than those found in human hepatocytes, whereas other transporters such as OAT7, MRP4 and MRP5 were up-regulated. HuH-7 cells additionally exhibited farnesoid X receptor (FXR- and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-related up-regulation of some transporters. Such data indicate that HuH-7 cells, although expressing rather poorly some main hepatic drug transporters, may be useful for investigating interactions of drugs with MRPs, notably MRP2, and for studying FXR- or Nrf2-mediated gene regulation.

  14. Glutamylation Regulates Transport, Specializes Function, and Sculpts the Structure of Cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Robert; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Zhang, Winnie; Bellotti, Sebastian; Ramadan, Yasmin H; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2017-11-20

    Ciliary microtubules (MTs) are extensively decorated with post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as glutamylation of tubulin tails. PTMs and tubulin isotype diversity act as a "tubulin code" that regulates cytoskeletal stability and the activity of MT-associated proteins such as kinesins. We previously showed that, in C. elegans cilia, the deglutamylase CCPP-1 affects ciliary ultrastructure, localization of the TRP channel PKD-2 and the kinesin-3 KLP-6, and velocity of the kinesin-2 OSM-3/KIF17, whereas a cell-specific α-tubulin isotype regulates ciliary ultrastructure, intraflagellar transport, and ciliary functions of extracellular vesicle (EV)-releasing neurons. Here we examine the role of PTMs and the tubulin code in the ciliary specialization of EV-releasing neurons using genetics, fluorescence microscopy, kymography, electron microscopy, and sensory behavioral assays. Although the C. elegans genome encodes five tubulin tyrosine ligase-like (TTLL) glutamylases, only ttll-11 specifically regulates PKD-2 localization in EV-releasing neurons. In EV-releasing cephalic male (CEM) cilia, TTLL-11 and the deglutamylase CCPP-1 regulate remodeling of 9+0 MT doublets into 18 singlet MTs. Balanced TTLL-11 and CCPP-1 activity fine-tunes glutamylation to control the velocity of the kinesin-2 OSM-3/KIF17 and kinesin-3 KLP-6 without affecting the intraflagellar transport (IFT) kinesin-II. TTLL-11 is transported by ciliary motors. TTLL-11 and CCPP-1 are also required for the ciliary function of releasing bioactive EVs, and TTLL-11 is itself a novel EV cargo. Therefore, MT glutamylation, as part of the tubulin code, controls ciliary specialization, ciliary motor-based transport, and ciliary EV release in a living animal. We suggest that cell-specific control of MT glutamylation may be a conserved mechanism to specialize the form and function of cilia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TDA : Transportation Development Act : statutes and California codes of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Mills-Alquist-Deddeh Act (SB 325) was enacted by the California Legislature to improve : existing public transportation services and encourage regional transportation coordination. : Known as the Transportation Development Act (TDA) of 1971, this...

  16. Active transportation and public transportation use to achieve physical activity recommendations? A combined GPS, accelerometer, and mobility survey study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaix, Basile; Kestens, Yan; Duncan, Scott; Merrien, Claire; Thierry, Benoît; Pannier, Bruno; Brondeel, Ruben; Lewin, Antoine; Karusisi, Noëlla; Perchoux, Camille; Thomas, Frédérique; Méline, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Accurate information is lacking on the extent of transportation as a source of physical activity, on the physical activity gains from public transportation use, and on the extent to which population...

  17. Regulation of glucose transport by thyroid hormone in rat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Tian, Ye; Guo, Meng; Liu, Juan; Heng, Dai; Zhu, Baochang; Yang, Yanzhou; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) plays an important role in regulating ovarian development. However, the mechanism involved remains unclear. Evidence suggests that glucose is essential for ovarian development, and its uptake is mediated by several glucose transporter proteins (Glut). We have investigated the effects of TH on Glut in rat ovary. Immature rats were treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil or L-thyroxine to induce hypothyroidism (hypo) or hyperthyroidism (hyper), respectively. Ovarian weights significantly decreased in both treated groups compared with the control group, although the body weights were not markedly altered. Glut1 expression significantly decreased without further changes being detected in the other Glut isforms in the hypo group and was accompanied by minimal change in mRNA content. The expression of Glut1 decreased in the hyper group. In contrast, L-thyroxine significantly increased Glut4 mRNA level and protein content but had little effect on Glut2 and Glut3 expression. Serum glucose concentrations in the hyper group were dramatically reduced compared with those in the control group. However, the serum glucose levels in the hypo group were not significantly changed. In addition, equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) increased ovarian weights in both the hypo and hyper groups compared with those in the rats without eCG injection. Glut2-4 protein content was significantly increased by eCG in hyper rats. Only the Glut4 mRNA content was significantly increased by eCG in the hyper group. Although the mRNA levels were not significantly changed by eCG in the hypo group, the protein level of Glut4 was markedly up-regulated. Serum glucose levels were not significantly altered by eCG in the two groups. Thus, dysfunction of the thyroid gland changes Glut expression in rat ovary and ovarian growth, both of which are also regulated by gonadotropin.

  18. Characterisation of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Manganese Transport Regulator Orthologue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available PgMntR is a predicted member of the DtxR family of transcriptional repressors responsive to manganese in the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our bioinformatic analyses predicted that PgMntR had divalent metal binding site(s with elements of both manganous and ferrous ion specificity and that PgMntR has unusual twin C-terminal FeoA domains. We produced recombinant PgMntR and four variants to probe the specificity of metal binding and its impact on protein structure and DNA binding. PgMntR dimerised in the absence of a divalent transition metal cation. PgMntR bound three Mn(II per monomer with an overall dissociation constant Kd 2.0 x 10(-11 M at pH 7.5. PgMntR also bound two Fe(II with distinct binding affinities, Kd1 2.5 x 10(-10 M and Kd2 ≤ 6.0 x 10(-8 M at pH 6.8. Two of the metal binding sites may form a binuclear centre with two bound Mn2+ being bridged by Cys108 but this centre provided only one site for Fe2+. Binding of Fe2+ or Mn2+ did not have a marked effect on the PgMntR secondary structure. Apo-PgMntR had a distinct affinity for the promoter region of the gene encoding the only known P. gingivalis manganese transporter, FB2. Mn2+ increased the DNA binding affinity of PgMntR whilst Fe2+ destabilised the protein-DNA complex in vitro. PgMntR did not bind the promoter DNA of the gene encoding the characterised iron transporter FB1. The C-terminal FeoA domain was shown to be essential for PgMntR structure/function, as its removal caused the introduction of an intramolecular disulfide bond and abolished the binding of Mn2+ and DNA. These data indicate that PgMntR is a novel member of the DtxR family that may function as a transcriptional repressor switch to specifically regulate manganese transport and homeostasis in an iron-dependent manner.

  19. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and epigenetics of Nrf2-regulated xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and transporters by dietary phytochemical and cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Lee, Jong Hun; Cheung, Ka Lung; Shu, Limin; Chen, Chi; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2013-07-01

    Cancer chemopreventive activities of various phytochemicals have been attributed to the modulation of xenobiotic disposition, which includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. The interaction between xenobiotics and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) is bidirectional. XMEs are responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics such as bioactivation and detoxification. Conversely, xenobiotics affect XMEs through transcriptional regulation (induction or suppression) and post-translational interactions (inhibition or activation). Similar relationships also exist between xenobiotics and their transporters. Studies conducted over the past decade have demonstrated that the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), plays a critical role in the regulation of detoxifying enzymes and transporters through a signaling system that senses and responds to redox imbalance. The role of Nrf2 in the interaction between chemopreventive phytochemicals and detoxifying enzymes/transporters has become an important topic in cancer chemoprevention. In this review, the genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to Nrf2-mediated regulation of detoxifying XMEs and transporters are discussed in the context of cancer chemoprevention. Phytochemicals may modulate the genome as well as epigenome, altering the regulation of XMEs and transporters, which may be critical for both cancer chemoprevention and the prevention of other oxidative stress- and inflammatory-related diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological pathologies. The pharmacogenomic expression of XMEs and transporters, with an emphasis on both genomics and epigenetics, will also be discussed.

  20. A general method for determining secondary active transporter substrate stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A

    2017-01-25

    The number of ions required to drive substrate transport through a secondary active transporter determines the protein's ability to create a substrate gradient, a feature essential to its physiological function, and places fundamental constraints on the transporter's mechanism. Stoichiometry is known for a wide array of mammalian transporters, but, due to a lack of readily available tools, not for most of the prokaryotic transporters for which high-resolution structures are available. Here, we describe a general method for using radiolabeled substrate flux assays to determine coupling stoichiometries of electrogenic secondary active transporters reconstituted in proteoliposomes by measuring transporter equilibrium potentials. We demonstrate the utility of this method by determining the coupling stoichiometry of VcINDY, a bacterial Na + -coupled succinate transporter, and further validate it by confirming the coupling stoichiometry of vSGLT, a bacterial sugar transporter. This robust thermodynamic method should be especially useful in probing the mechanisms of transporters with available structures.

  1. Platelet serotonin transporter function predicts default-mode network activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scharinger

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence.A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD activity and platelet Vmax.The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity.This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation.

  2. NPC2 regulates biliary cholesterol secretion via stimulation of ABCG5/G8-mediated cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Yoshihide; Takada, Tappei; Yoshikado, Takashi; Shoda, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion helps maintain cholesterol homeostasis; it is regulated by the cholesterol exporter adenosine triphosphate-binding cassettes G5 and G8 (ABCG5/G8) and the cholesterol importer Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). We studied another putative regulator of cholesterol secretion into bile, Niemann-Pick C2 (NPC2)--a cholesterol-binding protein secreted by the biliary system--and determined its effects on transporter-mediated biliary secretion of cholesterol. Mice with hepatic knockdown of Npc2 or that overexpressed NPC2 were created using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer; biliary lipids were characterized. The effects of secreted NPC2 on cholesterol transporter activity were examined in vitro using cells that overexpressed ABCG5/G8 or NPC1L1. Studies of mice with altered hepatic expression of NPC2 revealed that this expression positively regulates the biliary secretion of cholesterol, supported by the correlation between levels of NPC2 protein and cholesterol in human bile. In vitro analysis showed that secreted NPC2 stimulated ABCG5/G8-mediated cholesterol efflux but not NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake. Consistent with these observations, no significant changes in biliary cholesterol secretion were observed on hepatic overexpression of NPC2 in ABCG5/G8-null mice, indicating that NPC2 requires ABCG5/G8 to stimulate cholesterol secretion. Analyses of NPC2 mutants showed that the stimulatory effect of biliary NPC2 was independent of the function of lysosomal NPC2 as a regulator of intracellular cholesterol trafficking. NPC2 is a positive regulator of biliary cholesterol secretion via stimulation of ABCG5/G8-mediated cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    -induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent...... alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic...... redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A...

  4. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  5. Regulation of p21ras activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowy, D R; Zhang, K; DeClue, J E

    1992-01-01

    The ras genes encode GTP/GDP-binding proteins that participate in mediating mitogenic signals from membrane tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. The activity of p21ras is determined by the concentration of GTP-p21ras, which is tightly regulated by a complex array of positive and negative control...

  6. Price cap regulation: the case of natural gas transport in the UK; La reglementation par price cap: le cas du transport de gaz naturel au Royaume Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, L. [ATER, Paris-1 Univ., 75 (France)

    1999-09-01

    The transport and storage activities of British Gas company are controlled by a distinct organization named Transco. The access charges paid by the suppliers for the use of Transco's network are regulated by a price cap since October 1, 1994. However, Ofgas, the office of gas supply which is the regulation authority in charge of the control of competition and of British Gas activities, considers this control system as inefficient and has chosen a RPI (retail price index)-X (expected productivity factor)-type price cap for the control of gas transport tariffs. This has led to a disagreement between Transco and Ofgas which has delayed the implementation of the new system up to February 1998. This article compares the choices made by Ofgas for the control of gas transport tariffs with the economical theory. It recalls first, the reasons why the price cap appears as more efficient than the service cost regulation, the alternate method used by regulation authorities to control the tariffs of natural monopolies. Then, the difficulties linked with the implementation of the price cap for the transport of natural gas in the UK are analyzed in order to explain the reasons that led Ofgas to change its formula. Finally, the bases of an optimum hybrid formula are proposed. (J.S.)

  7. Continuous transport of a small fraction of plasma membrane cholesterol to endoplasmic reticulum regulates total cellular cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Rodney Elwood; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2017-04-17

    Cells employ regulated transport mechanisms to ensure that their plasma membranes (PMs) are optimally supplied with cholesterol derived from uptake of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and synthesis. To date, all inhibitors of cholesterol transport block steps in lysosomes, limiting our understanding of post-lysosomal transport steps. Here, we establish the cholesterol-binding domain 4 of anthrolysin O (ALOD4) as a reversible inhibitor of cholesterol transport from PM to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using ALOD4, we: (1) deplete ER cholesterol without altering PM or overall cellular cholesterol levels; (2) demonstrate that LDL-derived cholesterol travels from lysosomes first to PM to meet cholesterol needs, and subsequently from PM to regulatory domains of ER to suppress activation of SREBPs, halting cholesterol uptake and synthesis; and (3) determine that continuous PM-to-ER cholesterol transport allows ER to constantly monitor PM cholesterol levels, and respond rapidly to small declines in cellular cholesterol by activating SREBPs, increasing cholesterol uptake and synthesis.

  8. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  9. KCNQ1, KCNE2, and Na+-coupled solute transporters form reciprocally regulating complexes that affect neuronal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W; Tai, Kwok-Keung; Neverisky, Daniel L; Hansler, Alex; Hu, Zhaoyang; Roepke, Torsten K; Lerner, Daniel J; Chen, Qiuying; Liu, Li; Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos; Haynes, Robin; Huang, Xiaoping; Demirbas, Didem; Buccafusca, Roberto; Gross, Steven S; Kanda, Vikram A; Berry, Gerard T

    2014-03-04

    Na(+)-coupled solute transport is crucial for the uptake of nutrients and metabolic precursors, such as myo-inositol, an important osmolyte and precursor for various cell signaling molecules. We found that various solute transporters and potassium channel subunits formed complexes and reciprocally regulated each other in vitro and in vivo. Global metabolite profiling revealed that mice lacking KCNE2, a K(+) channel β subunit, showed a reduction in myo-inositol concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. Increased behavioral responsiveness to stress and seizure susceptibility in Kcne2(-/-) mice were alleviated by injections of myo-inositol. Suspecting a defect in myo-inositol transport, we found that KCNE2 and KCNQ1, a voltage-gated potassium channel α subunit, colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with SMIT1, a Na(+)-coupled myo-inositol transporter, in the choroid plexus epithelium. Heterologous coexpression demonstrated that myo-inositol transport by SMIT1 was augmented by coexpression of KCNQ1 but was inhibited by coexpression of both KCNQ1 and KCNE2, which form a constitutively active, heteromeric K(+) channel. SMIT1 and the related transporter SMIT2 were also inhibited by a constitutively active mutant form of KCNQ1. The activities of KCNQ1 and KCNQ1-KCNE2 were augmented by SMIT1 and the glucose transporter SGLT1 but were suppressed by SMIT2. Channel-transporter signaling complexes may be a widespread mechanism to facilitate solute transport and electrochemical crosstalk.

  10. 75 FR 24434 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Transportation in Conjunction With Official Travel and Relocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Transportation in Conjunction With Official Travel and Relocation AGENCY... final rule amends the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR), by adding new terms and definitions for ``Official travel'' and ``Transit system''; clarifies reimbursement for transportation at an official station...

  11. The expression and regulation of glucose transporters in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter proteins are involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In particular, the high expressions of sodium-glucose cotransporter and glucose transporter proteins in tumor cells show that these two transporters play a key role in tumor cell metabolism. Studying the crystal structure and conformation of human glucose transporter proteins has enabled the development of drugs based on specific binding sites, opening up a new path towards more effective cancer treatments. This mini review serves to summarize our existing understanding of the metabolic pathways of tumor cells, focusing on the roles of glucose transporter proteins.

  12. 75 FR 38168 - Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1); Draft Revision Available for Comment AGENCY... International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ``Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' (TS-R... Radioactive Material (TS-R-1), to promote the safe and secure transportation of radioactive material. The IAEA...

  13. 27-Hydroxycholesterol regulates cholesterol synthesis and transport in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yu; Zhang, Dan-Di; Yu, Huan-Ling; Ma, Wei-Wei; Lu, Yan-Hui; Liu, Quan-Ri; Xiao, Rong

    2017-03-01

    The oxysterol 27-Hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is a major cholesterol metabolite that can cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) from peripheral circulation to the brain. Currently, the role of 27-OHC on cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes and the underlying mechanisms are not defined. Since all brain cholesterol is essentially synthesized in brain itself and astrocytes as net producers of cholesterol are essential for normal brain function, here we investigated the effects of 27-OHC on cholesterol synthesis and transport in C6 glioma cells. C6 cells were treated with 5, 10 and 20μM 27-OHC for 24h and the cell viability and apoptosis, the cholesterol levels and metabolism-related mediators, genes and proteins were subsequently assessed using cell-counting kit (CCK)-8, Amplex red, ELISA, real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. We found that 27-OHC decreased cholesterol levels by down-regulating the expression of sterol-regulated element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1a), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CR) and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and promoted cholesterol transport by up-regulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ (PPAR-γ), liver X receptor-α (LXR-α), ATP-binding cassette transporter protein family member A1 (ABCA1) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE)genes. Our results suggested that 27-OHC may represent a sensitive modulator of cholesterol metabolism disorder by suppressing cholesterol synthesis and stimulating cholesterol transport in astrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. Regulation of Na,K-pump-mediated transport by prolactin in cultured human prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, M J; Chosseler, M; Pressley, TA

    2004-11-01

    The prostate gland is unique in its ability to secrete large amounts of zinc and citrate, suggesting that it employs unusual transport mechanisms. Intracellular ionic homeostasis in prostate is likely to be mediated by the Na,K-pump, yet there have been few studies of its regulation in this tissue. Accordingly, we explored the expression of the Na,K-pump in PC3 cells, an established cell line of human prostate epithelial cells. Total RNA from confluent monolayers of PC3 cells was isolated, reverse transcribed, and the resulting complementary DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for each of the pump's constituent subunits. The amplification revealed a complex pattern of Na,K-pump expression, with detection of mRNAs encoding the alpha1-, alpha3-, alpha4-, betal-, beta2- and beta3-isoforms. We next examined the effect on pump activity of prolactin, an important mediator of cell proliferation in prostate cancer. Monolayers exposed to 10 nM prolactin for 24 hr revealed an inhibition of 40% in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, a sensitive measure of pump-mediated transport. These experiments suggest that the unique transport properties of prostate may depend, at least in part, on a complicated pattern of Na,K-pump expression and regulation.

  16. Conserved ABC Transport System Regulated by the General Stress Response Pathways of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W.; Czyz, Daniel M.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus sigma(E1) is an EcfG family sigma factor that regulates the transcription of dozens of genes in response to diverse stress conditions and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. A putative ATP-binding cassette transporter operon, bab1_0223-bab1_0226, is among the most highly activated gene sets in the sigma(E1) regulon. The proteins encoded by the operon resemble quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers but are most similar in sequence to the broadly conserved YehZYXW system, which remains largely uncharacterized. Transcription of yehZYXW is activated by the general stress sigma factor sigma(S) in Enterobacteriaceae, which suggests a functional role for this transport system in bacterial stress response across the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. We present evidence that B. abortus YehZYXW does not function as an importer of known compatible solutes under physiological conditions and does not contribute to the virulence defect of a sigma(E1)- null strain. The sole in vitro phenotype associated with genetic disruption of this putative transport system is reduced growth in the presence of high Li+ ion concentrations. A crystal structure of B. abortus YehZ revealed a class II periplasmic binding protein fold with significant structural homology to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ProX, which binds glycine betaine. However, the structure of the YehZ ligand-binding pocket is incompatible with high-affinity binding to glycine betaine. This is consistent with weak measured binding of YehZ to glycine betaine and related compatible solutes. We conclude that YehZYXW is a conserved, stress-regulated transport system that is phylogenetically and functionally distinct from quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers

  17. Interaction between insulin and estradiol in regulation of cardiac glucose and free fatty acid transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepavcevic, S; Koricanac, G; Zakula, Z; Milosavljevic, T; Stojiljkovic, M; Isenovic, E R

    2011-07-01

    The estrogen binding to specific extranuclear receptors (ER) activates several intracellular pathways that are activated by insulin as well. Moreover, insulin and estradiol (E2) influence cardiac energy substrates, blood glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), and both hormones exert cardio-beneficial effects. In view of these facts, we suggest that cross-talk between their signaling pathways might have an important role in regulation of cardiac energy substrate transport. Ovariectomized rats were treated with insulin, estradiol (E2), or their combination 20, 30, or 40 min before analysis of blood glucose and FFA level, as well as cardiac plasma membranes (PM) and low density microsomes (LDM) content of glucose (GLUT4 and GLUT1) and FFA (CD36) transporters. Insulin, given alone, or in combination with E2, decreased plasma glucose level at all time points, but did not influence FFA level, while E2 treatment itself did not change glucose and FFA concentration. Insulin increased PM GLUT4 and GLUT1 content 30 and 40 min after treatment and the increases were partially accompanied by decrease in transporter LDM content. E2 increased PM content and decreased LDM content only of GLUT4 at 30 min. Insulin generally, and E2 at 20 min increased CD36 content in PM fraction. Both hormones decreased CD36 LDM content 20 min after administration. Effect of combined treatment mostly did not differ from single hormone treatment, but occasionally, particularly in distribution of GLUT4, combined treatment emphasized single hormone effect, suggesting that insulin and E2 act synergistically in regulation of energy substrate transporters in cardiac tissue. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · NewYork.

  18. Pedelecs as a physically active transportation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, James E; Morris, Kalee L; Kram, Rodger; Byrnes, William C

    2016-08-01

    Pedelecs are bicycles that provide electric assistance only when a rider is pedaling and have become increasingly popular. Our purpose was to quantify usage patterns over 4 weeks of real-world commuting with a pedelec and to determine if pedelec use would improve cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty sedentary commuters visited the laboratory for baseline physiological measurements [body composition, maximum oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), blood lipid profile, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)]. The following 4 weeks, participants were instructed to commute using a pedelec at least 3 days week(-1) for 40 min day(-1) while wearing a heart rate monitor and a GPS device. Metabolic equivalents (METS) were estimated from heart rate data. Following the intervention, we repeated the physiological measurements. Average total distance and time were 317.9 ± 113.8 km and 15.9 ± 3.4 h, respectively. Participants averaged 4.9 ± 1.2 METS when riding. Four weeks of pedelec commuting significantly improved 2-h post-OGTT glucose (5.53 ± 1.18-5.03 ± 0.91 mmol L(-1), p pedelec in the real world at a self-selected moderate intensity, which helped them meet physical activity recommendations. Pedelec commuting also resulted in significant improvements in 2-h post-OGTT glucose, [Formula: see text], and power output. Pedelecs are an effective form of active transportation that can improve some cardiometabolic risk factors within only 4 weeks.

  19. Src regulates the activity of SIRT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, You Hee [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hangun [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ho [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yun-Hye, E-mail: jinyune@hanmail.net [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang Youl, E-mail: kwanglee@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Src decreases the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src inhibitor and knockdown of Src increase the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src interacts with and phosphorylates Sirt2. • Src regulate the activity of Sirt2. - Abstract: SIRT2 is a mammalian member of the Sirtuin family of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, leading to the induction of DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal reorganization. The function of SIRT2 is modulated by post-translational modifications; however, the precise molecular signaling mechanism of SIRT2 through interactions with c-Src has not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of SIRT2 function by c-Src. We found that the protein levels of SIRT2 were decreased by c-Src, and subsequently rescued by the addition of a Src specific inhibitor, SU6656, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Src. The c-Src interacts with and phosphorylates SIRT2 at Tyr104. c-Src also showed the ability to regulate the deacetylation activity of SIRT2. Investigation on the phosphorylation of SIRT2 suggested that this was the method of c-Src-mediated SIRT2 regulation.

  20. Active transport among Czech school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pavelka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active transport is a very important factor for increasing the level of physical activity in children, which is significant for both their health and positive physical behaviour in adult age. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to establish the proportion of Czech children aged 11 to 15 who select active transport to and from school and, at the same time, describe socio-economic and socio-demographic factors influencing active transport to and from school among children. METHODS: To establish the socio-demographic factors affecting active transport, data of a national representative sample of 11 to 15 year-old elementary school children in the Czech Republic (n = 4,425. Research data collection was performed within an international research study called Health Behaviour in School Aged Children in June 2010. Statistical processing of the results was made using a logistic regression analysis in the statistical programme IBM SPSS v 20. RESULTS: Active transport to and from school is opted for in the Czech Republic by approximately 2/3 of children aged 11 to 15. Differences between genders are not statistically significant; most children opting for active transport are aged 11 (69%. An important factor increasing the probability of active transport as much as 16 times is whether a child's place of residence is in the same municipality as the school. Other factors influencing this choice include BMI, time spent using a computer or a privateroom in a family. A significant factor determining active transport by children is safety; safe road crossing, opportunity to leave a bicycle safely at school, no fear of being assaulted on the way or provision of school lockers where children can leave their items. CONCLUSIONS: Active transport plays an important role in increasing the overall level of physical activity in children. Promotion of active transport should focus on children who spend more time using a computer; attention should also be

  1. Complement activation and regulation in preeclamptic placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Inkeri eLokki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a common disorder of pregnancy originating in the placenta. We examined whether excessive activation or poor regulation of the complement system at the maternal-fetal interface could contribute to the development of PE. Location and occurrence of complement components and regulators in placentae were analyzed. Cryostat sections of placentae were processed from 7 early-onset PE (diagnosis <34 weeks of gestation, 5 late-onset PE and 10 control pregnancies and immunostained for 6 complement activators and 6 inhibitors. Fluorescence was quantified and compared between PE and control placentae. Gene copy numbers of complement components C4A and C4B were assessed by a quantitative PCR method. Maternal C4 deficiencies (≥1 missing or non-functional C4 were most common in the early-onset PE group (71%, and more frequent in late-onset PE compared to healthy controls (60% vs. 38%. Complement C1q deposition differed significantly between control and patient groups: controls and early-onset PE patients had more C1q than late-onset PE patients (mean p=0.01 and p=0.005, respectively. C3 activation was analyzed by staining for C3b/iC3b and C3d. C3d was mostly specific to the basal syncytium and C3b/iC3b diffuse in other structures, but there were no clear differences between the study groups. Activated C4 and membrane-bound regulators CD55, CD46 and CD59 were observed abundantly in the syncytiotrophoblast. Syncytial knots, structures enriched in PE, stained specifically for the classical pathway inhibitor C4bp, whereas the key regulator alternative pathway, Factor H showed a wider distribution in the placenta. Differences in C1q deposition between late- and early-onset PE groups may be indicative of the different aetiology of PE symptoms in these patients. Irregular distribution of the complement regulators C4bp and FH in the PE placenta and a higher frequency of C4A deficiencies suggest a disturbed balance between complement activation

  2. Gene and functional up-regulation of the BCRP/ABCG2 transporter in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukowati, Caecilia Hc; Rosso, Natalia; Pascut, Devis; Anfuso, Beatrice; Torre, Giuliano; Francalanci, Paola; Crocè, Lory S; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2012-11-15

    The Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is one member of ABC transporters proteins super family responsible of drug resistance. Since data on ABCG2 expression in liver malignances are scanty, here we report the expression of ABCG2 in adult human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in both in vivo and in vitro models with different degree of malignancy. In cell lines derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma, ABCG2 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR and function by Hoechst 33342 efflux assay; protein content was assessed by SDS-PAGE Western blot. ABCG2 expression was found to be highest in the most undifferentiated cell lines, and this was related with a higher functional activity. ABCG2 expression was sensitive to antineoplastic drugs since exposure to 5 μM doxorubicin for 24 hours resulted in significant up-regulations of ABCG2 in all cell lines, particularly in those lines with low basal ABCG2 expression (pexpression was also investigated in 51 adult liver tissues with HCC and related cirrhosis; normal liver tissue was used as control. ABCG2 gene expression was higher in HCC than both cirrhotic paired tissue and normal tissue. This up-regulation was greater (pexpression and differentiation stage both in human and HCC derived cell lines. The rapid up-regulation of ABCG2 to exposure to doxorubicin emphasizes the importance of this transporter in accounting for drug resistance in liver tumors.

  3. XIAP Regulates Caspase Activity in Degenerating Axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Unsain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the destructive events that regulate axonal degeneration is rudimentary. Here, we examine the role of caspases and their endogenous inhibitor, the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, in axonal degeneration of dorsal root ganglion (DRG axons. We show that caspase-3, caspase-6, and caspase-9 are present in axons and are cleaved upon nerve growth factor (NGF withdrawal. We observed that caspase-3 activity is high in NGF-withdrawn axons and that CASP3−/− axons are protected from degeneration. XIAP−/− DRG sensory neurons degenerate more rapidly and contain more active caspase-3 than their wild-type counterparts, indicating that axonal caspases are normally regulated by XIAP. Importantly, axonal XIAP levels drop sharply after NGF withdrawal; if XIAP levels are maintained by overexpression, axonal caspase-3 activation and axonal degeneration are suppressed. Finally, we show that XIAP−/− embryos have stunted dermal innervation. We propose that XIAP-mediated caspase inhibition plays an important role in regulating morphogenic events that shape the nervous system during development.

  4. Active transportation and public transportation use to achieve physical activity recommendations? A combined GPS, accelerometer, and mobility survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Basile; Kestens, Yan; Duncan, Scott; Merrien, Claire; Thierry, Benoît; Pannier, Bruno; Brondeel, Ruben; Lewin, Antoine; Karusisi, Noëlla; Perchoux, Camille; Thomas, Frédérique; Méline, Julie

    2014-09-27

    Accurate information is lacking on the extent of transportation as a source of physical activity, on the physical activity gains from public transportation use, and on the extent to which population shifts in the use of transportation modes could increase the percentage of people reaching official physical activity recommendations. In 2012-2013, 234 participants of the RECORD GPS Study (French Paris region, median age = 58) wore a portable GPS receiver and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days and completed a 7-day GPS-based mobility survey (participation rate = 57.1%). Information on transportation modes and accelerometry data aggregated at the trip level [number of steps taken, energy expended, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and sedentary time] were available for 7,644 trips. Associations between transportation modes and accelerometer-derived physical activity were estimated at the trip level with multilevel linear models. Participants spent a median of 1 h 58 min per day in transportation (8.2% of total time). Thirty-eight per-cent of steps taken, 31% of energy expended, and 33% of MVPA over 7 days were attributable to transportation. Walking and biking trips but also public transportation trips with all four transit modes examined were associated with greater steps, MVPA, and energy expenditure when compared to trips by personal motorized vehicle. Two simulated scenarios, implying a shift of approximately 14% and 33% of all motorized trips to public transportation or walking, were associated with a predicted 6 point and 13 point increase in the percentage of participants achieving the current physical activity recommendation. Collecting data with GPS receivers, accelerometers, and a GPS-based electronic mobility survey of activities and transportation modes allowed us to investigate relationships between transportation modes and physical activity at the trip level. Our findings suggest that an increase in active transportation

  5. Source to sink transport and regulation by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi eLemoine

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Source-to-sink transport of sugar is one of the major determinants of plant growth and relies on the efficient and controlled distribution of sucrose (and some other sugars such as raffinose and polyols across plant organs through the phloem. However, sugar transport through the phloem can be affected by many environmental factors that alter source/sink relationships. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge about the phloem transport mechanisms and review the effects of several abiotic (water and salt stress, mineral deficiency, CO2, light, temperature, air and soil pollutants and biotic (mutualistic and pathogenic microbes, viruses, aphids and parasitic plants factors. Concerning abiotic constraints, alteration of the distribution of sugar among sinks is often reported, with some sinks as roots favoured in case of mineral deficiency. Many of these constraints impair the transport function of the phloem but the exact mechanisms are far from being completely known. Phloem integrity can be disrupted (e.g. by callose deposition and under certain conditions, phloem transport is affected, earlier than photosynthesis. Photosynthesis inhibition could result from the increase in sugar concentration due to phloem transport decrease. Biotic interactions (aphids, fungi, viruses… also affect crop plant productivity. Recent breakthroughs have identified some of the sugar transporters involved in these interactions on the host and pathogen sides. The different data are discussed in relation to the phloem transport pathways. When possible, the link with current knowledge on the pathways at the molecular level will be highlighted.

  6. Regulation of amino acid arginine transport by lipopolysaccharide and nitric oxide in intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, QingHe; Choudry, Haroon A; Souba, Wiley W; Karinch, Anne M; Huang, JingLi; Lin, ChengMao; Vary, Thomas C; Pan, Ming

    2005-12-01

    As a precursor for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and an immune-enhancing nutrient, amino acid L-arginine plays a critical role in maintaining intestine mucosal integrity and immune functions in sepsis. However, the relationship between intestinal arginine transport and NO synthesis in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and NO on the arginine transport in cultured rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell. Near-confluent IEC-6 cells were incubated with LPS (0-50 microg/ml) in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagles's medium, in the presence and absence of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0-500 micromol/L) and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor N-omega-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, 0-1000 micromol/L) for various periods of time (0-48 hours). Arginine transport activity, arginine transporter CAT1 mRNA and protein levels were measured with transport assay, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis, respectively. LPS increased arginine transport activity in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Prolonged incubation of LPS (24 hours, 25 microg/ml) resulted in a 3-fold increase of arginine transport activity (control: 28 +/- 5; LPS: 92 +/- 20 pmol/mg/min, P System y(+) as the predominant arginine transport system, and a 2-fold increase of System y(+)CAT1 mRNA and transporter protein levels (P System y(+) maximal velocity (V(max), control: 1484 +/- 180; LPS: 2800 +/- 230 pmol/mg/min, P System y(+) mRNA levels and transporter protein levels. The LPS-stimulated arginine transport activity is regulated by the availability of nitric oxide.

  7. Regulation of the neuronal norepinephrine transporter by endothelin-1 and -3 in the rat anterior and posterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sandra I; Schmipp, Josefina; Rossi, Andres H; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that endothelin-1 and endothelin-3 modulate norepinephrine neuronal release and tyrosine hydroxylase activity and expression in the hypothalamus. In the present study we sought to establish the role of endothelin-1 and -3 in the regulation of norepinephrine uptake in the anterior and posterior hypothalamus. Results showed that in the anterior hypothalamus endothelin-3 increased neuronal norepinephrine uptake whereas endothelin-1 decreased it. Conversely, in the posterior hypothalamic region both endothelins diminished the neuronal uptake of the amine. Endothelins response was concentration dependent and maintained at all studied times. Endothelins also modified the kinetic and internalization of the NE neuronal transporter. In the anterior hypothalamic region endothelin-3 increased the V(max) and the B(max) whereas endothelin-1 decreased them. However, in the posterior hypothalamic region both endothelins diminished the V(max) as well as B(max). Neither endothelin-1 nor endothelin-3 modified neuronal norepinephrine transporter K(d) in the studied hypothalamic regions. These findings support that in the posterior hypothalamic region both endothelins diminished neuronal norepinephrine transporter activity by reducing the amine transporter expression on the plasmatic membrane. Conversely, in the anterior hypothalamic region endothelin-3 enhanced neuronal norepinephrine transporter activity by increasing the expression of the transporter on the presynaptic membrane, whereas endothelin-1 induced the opposite effect. Present results permit us to conclude that both endothelins play an important role in the regulation of norepinephrine neurotransmission at the presynaptic nerve endings in the hypothalamus.

  8. (−-Epicatechin-3-O-β-d-allopyranoside from Davallia formosana, Prevents Diabetes and Hyperlipidemia by Regulation of Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Shih

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to determine the antidiabetic and lipid-lowering effects of (−-epicatechin-3-O-β-d-allopyranoside (BB from the roots and stems of Davallia formosana in mice. Animal treatment was induced by high-fat diet (HFD or low-fat diet (control diet, CD. After eight weeks of HFD or CD exposure, the HFD mice were treating with BB or rosiglitazone (Rosi or fenofibrate (Feno or water through gavage for another four weeks. However, at 12 weeks, the HFD-fed group had enhanced blood levels of glucose, triglyceride (TG, and insulin. BB treatment significantly decreased blood glucose, TG, and insulin levels. Moreover, visceral fat weights were enhanced in HFD-fed mice, accompanied by increased blood leptin concentrations and decreased adiponectin levels, which were reversed by treatment with BB. Muscular membrane protein levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 were reduced in HFD-fed mice and significantly enhanced upon administration of BB, Rosi, and Feno. Moreover, BB treatment markedly increased hepatic and skeletal muscular expression levels of phosphorylation of AMP-activated (adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (phospho-AMPK. BB also decreased hepatic mRNA levels of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, which are associated with a decrease in hepatic glucose production. BB-exerted hypotriglyceridemic activity may be partly associated with increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα, and with reduced hepatic glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT mRNA levels in the liver, which decreased triacylglycerol synthesis. Nevertheless, we demonstrated BB was a useful approach for the management of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia in this animal model.

  9. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yates, Darran M

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  10. Transporting Radioactive Waste: An Engineering Activity. Grades 5-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an engineering activity for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that examines the transportation of radioactive waste. The activity is designed to inform students about the existence of radioactive waste and its transportation to disposal sites. Students experiment with methods to contain the waste and…

  11. 75 FR 16445 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508 Scott Drive, Scott Air Force Base, IL... V.F--Best Value Score Attachment V.G--Electronic Bill Payment Attachment V.H--TSP Ranking Attachment...

  12. 77 FR 53873 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... CONTACT: Mr. Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508 Scott Drive, Scott Air Force... Tender of Service (TOS) Attachment V.E.1--Customer Satisfaction Survey Attachment V.F.1--Best Value Score...

  13. Inverse pH regulation of plant and fungal sucrose transporters: a mechanism to regulate competition for sucrose at the host/pathogen interface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Wippel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant sucrose transporter activities were shown to respond to changes in the extracellular pH and redox status, and oxidizing compounds like glutathione (GSSG or H(2O(2 were reported to effect the subcellular targeting of these proteins. We hypothesized that changes in both parameters might be used to modulate the activities of competing sucrose transporters at a plant/pathogen interface. We, therefore, compared the effects of redox-active compounds and of extracellular pH on the sucrose transporters UmSRT1 and ZmSUT1 known to compete for extracellular sucrose in the Ustilago maydis (corn smut/Zea mays (maize pathosystem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present functional analyses of the U. maydis sucrose transporter UmSRT1 and of the plant sucrose transporters ZmSUT1 and StSUT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in Xenopus laevis oocytes in the presence of different extracellular pH-values and redox systems, and study the possible effects of these treatments on the subcellular targeting. We observed an inverse regulation of host and pathogen sucrose transporters by changes in the apoplastic pH. Under none of the conditions analyzed, we could confirm the reported effects of redox-active compounds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that changes in the extracellular pH but not of the extracellular redox status might be used to oppositely adjust the transport activities of plant and fungal sucrose transporters at the host/pathogen interface.

  14. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  15. Arabidopsis choline transporter-like 1 (CTL1 regulates secretory trafficking of auxin transporters to control seedling growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Auxin controls a myriad of plant developmental processes and plant response to environmental conditions. Precise trafficking of auxin transporters is essential for auxin homeostasis in plants. Here, we report characterization of Arabidopsis CTL1, which controls seedling growth and apical hook development by regulating intracellular trafficking of PIN-type auxin transporters. The CTL1 gene encodes a choline transporter-like protein with an expression pattern highly correlated with auxin distribution and is enriched in shoot and root apical meristems, lateral root primordia, the vascular system, and the concave side of the apical hook. The choline transporter-like 1 (CTL1 protein is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN, prevacuolar compartment (PVC, and plasma membrane (PM. Disruption of CTL1 gene expression alters the trafficking of 2 auxin efflux transporters-Arabidopsis PM-located auxin efflux transporter PIN-formed 1 (PIN1 and Arabidopsis PM-located auxin efflux transporter PIN-formed 3 (PIN3-to the PM, thereby affecting auxin distribution and plant growth and development. We further found that phospholipids, sphingolipids, and other membrane lipids were significantly altered in the ctl1 mutant, linking CTL1 function to lipid homeostasis. We propose that CTL1 regulates protein sorting from the TGN to the PM through its function in lipid homeostasis.

  16. Pedometer-determined physical activity and active transport in girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Grant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the risk of insufficient physical activity is greater in girls than in boys, especially during the adolescent years. The promotion of active transport (AT to and from school has been posited as a practical and convenient solution for increasing girls' total daily activity. However, there is limited information describing the associations between AT choices and girls' physical activity across a range of age, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. The objectives of this study were to (1 investigate physical activity patterns in a large multiethnic sample of female children and adolescents, and to (2 estimate the physical activity associated with AT to and from school. Methods A total of 1,513 girls aged 5–16 years wore sealed multiday memory (MDM pedometers for three weekdays and two weekend days. The ethnic composition of this sample was 637 European (42.1%, 272 Pacific Island (18.0%, 207 East Asian (13.7%, 179 Maori (11.8%, 142 South Asian (9.4%, and 76 from other ethnic groups (5%. Pedometer compliance and school-related AT were assessed by questionnaire. Results Mean weekday step counts (12,597 ± 3,630 were higher and less variable than mean weekend steps (9,528 ± 4,407. A consistent decline in daily step counts was observed with age: after adjustment for ethnicity and SES, girls in school years 9–10 achieved 2,469 (weekday and 4,011 (weekend fewer steps than girls in years 1–2. Daily step counts also varied by ethnicity, with Maori girls the most active and South Asian girls the least active. Overall, 44.9% of participants used AT for school-related travel. Girls who used AT to and from school averaged 1,052 more weekday steps than those who did not use AT. However, the increases in steps associated with AT were significant only in older girls (school years 5–10 and in those of Maori or European descent. Conclusion Our data suggest that adolescent-aged girls and girls of Asian descent are

  17. Regulation of pokemon 1 activity by sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee-Eun; Lee, Min-Nyung; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Yu, Mi-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Pokemon 1 is a proto-oncogenic transcriptional regulator that contains a POZ domain at the N-terminus and four Kruppel-like zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Pokemon 1 plays an important role in adipogenesis, osteogenesis, oncogenesis, and transcription of NF-kB responsive genes. Recent reports have shown that biological activities of transcription factors are regulated by sumolylation. We investigated whether Pokemon 1 is post-translationally modified by sumoylation and whether the modification affects Pokemon 1's transcriptional properties. We found that Pokemon 1 is sumoylated in vitro and in vivo. Upon careful analysis of the amino acid sequence of Pokemon 1, we found ten potential sumoylation sites located at lysines 61, 354, 371, 379, 383, 396, 486, 487, 536 and 539. We mutated each of these amino acids into arginine and tested whether the mutation could affect the transcriptional properties of Pokemon 1 on the Pokemon 1 responsive genes, such as ADH5/FDH and pG5-FRE-Luc. Wild-type Pokemon 1 potently represses transcription of ADH5/FDH. Most of the mutants, however, were weaker transcription repressors and repressed transcription 1.3-3.3 fold less effective. Although potential sumoylation sites were located close to the DNA binding domain or the nuclear localization sequence, the mutations did not alter nuclear localization or DNA binding activity. In addition, on the pG5-FRE-Luc test promoter construct, ectopic SUMO-1 repressed transcription in the presence of Pokemon 1. The sumoylation target lysine residue at amino acid 61, which is located in the middle of the POZ-domain, is important because K61R mutation resulted in a much weaker molecular interaction with corepressors. Our data suggest that Pokemon 1's activity as a transcription factor may involve sumoylation, and that sumoylation might be important in the regulation of transcription by Pokemon 1.

  18. Local translation and retrograde axonal transport of CREB regulates IL-6-induced nociceptive plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melemedjian, Ohannes K; Tillu, Dipti V; Moy, Jamie K; Asiedu, Marina N; Mandell, Edward K; Ghosh, Sourav; Dussor, Gregory; Price, Theodore J

    2014-07-04

    Transcriptional regulation of genes by cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is essential for the maintenance of long-term memory. Moreover, retrograde axonal trafficking of CREB in response to nerve growth factor (NGF) is critical for the survival of developing primary sensory neurons. We have previously demonstrated that hindpaw injection of interleukin-6 (IL-6) induces mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming that is prevented by the local injection of protein synthesis inhibitors. However, proteins that are locally synthesized that might lead to this effect have not been identified. We hypothesized that retrograde axonal trafficking of nascently synthesized CREB might link local, activity-dependent translation to nociceptive plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we determined if IL-6 enhances the expression of CREB and if it subsequently undergoes retrograde axonal transport. IL-6 treatment of sensory neurons in vitro caused an increase in CREB protein and in vivo treatment evoked an increase in CREB in the sciatic nerve consistent with retrograde transport. Importantly, co-injection of IL-6 with the methionine analogue azido-homoalanine (AHA), to assess nascently synthesized proteins, revealed an increase in CREB containing AHA in the sciatic nerve 2 hrs post injection, indicating retrograde transport of nascently synthesized CREB. Behaviorally, blockade of retrograde transport by disruption of microtubules or inhibition of dynein or intrathecal injection of cAMP response element (CRE) consensus sequence DNA oligonucleotides, which act as decoys for CREB DNA binding, prevented the development of IL-6-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming. Consistent with previous studies in inflammatory models, intraplantar IL-6 enhanced the expression of BDNF in dorsal root ganglion (DRG). This effect was blocked by inhibition of retrograde axonal transport and by intrathecal CRE oligonucleotides. Collectively, these findings

  19. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Giudetti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs. The citrate carrier (CiC and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism.

  20. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  1. Interplay of vacuolar transporters for coupling primary and secondary active transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Siek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondary active transporters are driven by the proton motif force which is generated by primary active transporters such as the vacuolar proton pumps V-ATPase and V-PPase. The vacuole occupies up to 90 % of the mature cell and acidification of the vacuolar lumen is a challenging and energy-consuming task for the plant cell. Therefore, a direct coupling of primary and secondary active transporters is expected to enhance transport efficiency and to reduce energy consumption by transport processes across the tonoplast. This has been addressed by analyzing physical and functional interactions between the V-ATPase and a selection of vacuolar transporters including the primary active proton pump AVP1, the calcium ion/proton exchanger CAX1, the potassium ion/proton symporter KUP5, the sodium ion/proton exchanger NHX1, and the anion/proton exchanger CLC-c. Physical interaction was demonstrated in vivo for the V-ATPase and the secondary active transporters CAX1 and CLC-c, which are responsible for calcium- and anion-accumulation in the vacuole, respectively. Measurements of V-ATPase activity and vacuolar pH revealed a functional interaction of V-ATPase and CAX1, CLC-c that is likely caused by the observed physical interaction. The complex of the V-ATPase further interacts with the nitrate reductase 2, and as a result, nitrate assimilation is directly linked to the energization of vacuolar nitrate accumulation by secondary active anion/proton exchangers.

  2. Spontaneous EEG activity and spontaneous emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella-Feliu, M; Morillas-Romero, A; Balle, M; Llabrés, J; Bornas, X; Putman, P

    2014-12-01

    Variability in both frontal and parietal spontaneous EEG activity, using α and β band power and θ/β and δ/β ratios, was explored in a sample of 96 healthy volunteers as a potential correlate of individual differences in spontaneous emotion regulation (SER). Following a baseline EEG recording, participants were asked to continuously rate their discomfort while looking at affective pictures, as well as for a period of time after exposure. Greater spontaneous β band power in parietal locations, lower frontal and parietal δ/β ratios, and lower parietal θ/β ratio were associated with lower ratings of discomfort after the offset of unpleasant pictures. Moreover, lower parietal δ/β ratio was also related to less time needed to recover from discomfort after exposure to aversive pictures, while only a greater frontal and parietal α band power appeared to be associated with faster recovery from discomfort induced by normative-neutral pictures. However, parietal δ/β ratio was the only predictor of both minimum discomfort ratings and time needed to downregulate following exposure to unpleasant pictures, and frontal α band power the only spontaneous EEG index that predicted variability in spontaneous down-regulation after the exposure to normative-neutral pictures. Results are discussed focusing on the utility of diverse spontaneous EEG measures in several cortical regions when capturing trait-like individual differences in emotion regulation capabilities and processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulated transport into the nucleus of herpesviridae DNA replication core proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtiero, Alvisi; Jans, David A; Camozzi, Daria; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Ripalti, Alessandro; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-09-16

    The Herpesvirdae family comprises several major human pathogens belonging to three distinct subfamilies. Their double stranded DNA genome is replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by a number of host and viral products. Among the latter the viral replication complex, whose activity is strictly required for viral replication, is composed of six different polypeptides, including a two-subunit DNA polymerase holoenzyme, a trimeric primase/helicase complex and a single stranded DNA binding protein. The study of herpesviral DNA replication machinery is extremely important, both because it provides an excellent model to understand processes related to eukaryotic DNA replication and it has important implications for the development of highly needed antiviral agents. Even though all known herpesviruses utilize very similar mechanisms for amplification of their genomes, the nuclear import of the replication complex components appears to be a heterogeneous and highly regulated process to ensure the correct spatiotemporal localization of each protein. The nuclear transport process of these enzymes is controlled by three mechanisms, typifying the main processes through which protein nuclear import is generally regulated in eukaryotic cells. These include cargo post-translational modification-based recognition by the intracellular transporters, piggy-back events allowing coordinated nuclear import of multimeric holoenzymes, and chaperone-assisted nuclear import of specific subunits. In this review we summarize these mechanisms and discuss potential implications for the development of antiviral compounds aimed at inhibiting the Herpesvirus life cycle by targeting nuclear import of the Herpesvirus DNA replicating enzymes.

  4. Involvement of Histidine Residue His382 in pH Regulation of MCT4 Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Sasaki

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4 is a pH-dependent bi-directional lactate transporter. Transport of lactate via MCT4 is increased by extracellular acidification. We investigated the critical histidine residue involved in pH regulation of MCT4 function. Transport of lactate via MCT4 was measured by using a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. MCT4-mediated lactate transport was inhibited by Zn2+ in a pH physiological condition but not in an acidic condition. The histidine modifier DEPC (diethyl pyrocarbonate reduced MCT4 activity but did not completely inactivate MCT4. After treatment with DEPC, pH regulation of MCT4 function was completely knocked out. Inhibitory effects of DEPC were reversed by hydroxylamine and suppressed in the presence of excess lactate and Zn2+. Therefore, we performed an experiment in which the extracellular histidine residue was replaced with alanine. Consequently, the pH regulation of MCT4-H382A function was also knocked out. Our findings demonstrate that the histidine residue His382 in the extracellular loop of the transporter is essential for pH regulation of MCT4-mediated substrate transport activity.

  5. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  6. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    of released neurotransmitters from the extracellular space into neurons and glial cells. The transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutic drugs used in treatment of psychiatric diseases, including major depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy....... Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology...

  7. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A; Salameh, Ahlam I; Boron, Walter F; Parker, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (J L) and extrusion (J E). The balance between J E and J L determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to J L (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and J E (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na(+)- coupled HCO3 (-) transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions.

  8. Intracellular pH regulation by acid/base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon A. Ruffin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH (pHi regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: [1] The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. [2] pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL and extrusion (JE. The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g. metabolic acidosis. [3] The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3 and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3 and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2. [4] The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions.

  9. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  10. Modelling Proteasome and Proteasome Regulator Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Liepe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are key proteases involved in a variety of processes ranging from the clearance of damaged proteins to the presentation of antigens to CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Which cleavage sites are used within the target proteins and how fast these proteins are degraded have a profound impact on immune system function and many cellular metabolic processes. The regulation of proteasome activity involves different mechanisms, such as the substitution of the catalytic subunits, the binding of regulatory complexes to proteasome gates and the proteasome conformational modifications triggered by the target protein itself. Mathematical models are invaluable in the analysis; and potentially allow us to predict the complex interactions of proteasome regulatory mechanisms and the final outcomes of the protein degradation rate and MHC class I epitope generation. The pioneering attempts that have been made to mathematically model proteasome activity, cleavage preference variation and their modification by one of the regulatory mechanisms are reviewed here.

  11. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna J. Broome

    2013-02-01

    The Cajal body (CB is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation.

  12. 76 FR 18737 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508 Scott Drive, Scott Air Force Base, IL 62225-5357; (618) 256-9605...; Attachment V.E.3--Customer Satisfaction Survey; Attachment V.F.3--Best Value Score; Attachment V.G.3...

  13. 77 FR 36932 - Transportation of Household Goods in Interstate Commerce; Consumer Protection Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Administration 49 CFR Part 375 [Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0119] RIN 2126-AB52 Transportation of Household Goods in... Administration (FMCSA) amends the regulations governing the transportation of household goods to remove an... household goods motor carriers. DATES: This final rule is effective August 20, 2012, unless an adverse...

  14. Penta-EF-Hand Protein Peflin Is a Negative Regulator of ER-To-Golgi Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariah Rayl

    Full Text Available Luminal calcium regulates vesicle transport early in the secretory pathway. In ER-to-Golgi transport, depletion of luminal calcium leads to significantly reduced transport and a buildup of budding and newly budded COPII vesicles and vesicle proteins. Effects of luminal calcium on transport may be mediated by cytoplasmic calcium sensors near ER exits sites (ERES. The penta-EF-hand (PEF protein apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2 stabilizes sec31A at ER exit sites (ERES and promotes the assembly of inner and outer shell COPII components. However, in vitro and intact cell approaches have not determined whether ALG-2 is a negative or positive regulator, or a regulator at all, under basal physiological conditions. ALG-2 interacts with another PEF protein, peflin, to form cytosolic heterodimers that dissociate in response to calcium. However, a biological function for peflin has not been demonstrated and whether peflin and the ALG-2/peflin interaction modulates transport has not been investigated. Using an intact, single cell, morphological assay for ER-to-Golgi transport in normal rat kidney (NRK cells, we found that depletion of peflin using siRNA resulted in significantly faster transport of the membrane cargo VSV-G. Double depletion of peflin and ALG-2 blocked the increased transport resulting from peflin depletion, demonstrating a role for ALG-2 in the increased transport. Furthermore, peflin depletion caused increased targeting of ALG-2 to ERES and increased ALG-2/sec31A interactions, suggesting that peflin may normally inhibit transport by preventing ALG-2/sec31A interactions. This work identifies for the first time a clear steady state role for a PEF protein in ER-to-Golgi transport-peflin is a negative regulator of transport.

  15. In vitro characterization and endocrine regulation of cholesterol and phospholipid transport in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontsouka, Corneille Edgar; Huang, Xiao; Aliyev, Eldar; Albrecht, Christiane

    2017-01-05

    Cell-based studies previously showed that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) transfers cholesterol across mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Data for phospholipid transport are lacking, and it is unclear from which cellular source the transported cholesterol stems, whether this transport activates signaling pathways, and how lactogenic hormones regulate it. To clarify these aspects, lipid transport and expressional analyses were performed in bovine primary (bMEC) and/or immortalized (MAC-T) MEC cultures. Lipid efflux and ABCA1, ABCG1 and liver X receptorα mRNA levels were higher in MAC-T than bMEC. In MAC-T, the transported cholesterol originated mainly from the plasma membrane. ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux was higher than phosphatidylcholine efflux, was suppressed by probucol (ABCA1 inhibitor), AG490 (janus kinase-2 inhibitor), PD98059 (mitogen activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor) and pretreatment with β-cyclodextrin (lowering membrane cholesterol). Insulin was the only hormone significantly increasing cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, this study gives novel mechanistic and regulatory insights into the transport of cholesterol and phospholipids in MEC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Topology Optimization of Active Transport Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2017-01-01

    optimization to the design of multiphase flow components. The work is a natural extension of the density based topology optimization procedure applied to design of passive mixers and coolers where the transported matter is not influencing the properties of the governing fluid flow model. In this work thee...... effective properties of the fluid is changing with concentration. In this work a multiphase fluid flow model is combined with a Brinkman penalizationin order to introduce the design of the fluid component. Gradient based optimization is applied in order to optimize the performance of flow components......Fluid flows with particle transport are common in many industrial processes and components. The design of components for addition or removal of particles as well as mixing or stratification is of great importance in the specific processes. This work presents a methodology to apply topology...

  17. Regulation of transport in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this overview article is to summarize recent findings in renal epithelial transport, focusing chiefly on the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Mammalian CCD and CNT are involved in fine tuning of electrolyte and fluid balance through reabsorption and secretion. Specific transporters and channels mediate vectorial movements of water and solutes in these segments. Although only a small percent of the glomerular filtrate reaches the CNT and CCD, these segments are critical for water and electrolyte homeostasis since several hormones, e.g. aldosterone and arginine vasopressin, exert their main effects in these nephron sites. Importantly, hormones regulate the function of the entire nephron and kidney by affecting channels and transporters in the CNT and CCD. Knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of transport in the CNT and CCD and particular roles of specific channels/transporters has increased tremendously over the last two decades. Recent studies shed new light on several key questions concerning the regulation of renal transport. Precise distribution patterns of transport proteins in the CCD and CNT will be reviewed, and their physiological roles and mechanisms mediating ion transport in these segments will be also covered. Special emphasis will be given to pathophysiological conditions appearing as a result of abnormalities in renal transport in the CNT and CCD. PMID:23227301

  18. Modeling of active transmembrane transport in a mixture theory framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T

    2010-05-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature.

  19. Conserved ABC Transport System Regulated by the General Stress Response Pathways of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W.; Czy; #380; , Daniel M.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2016-12-19

    ABSTRACT

    Brucella abortusσE1is an EcfG family sigma factor that regulates the transcription of dozens of genes in response to diverse stress conditions and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. A putative ATP-binding cassette transporter operon,bab1_0223-bab1_0226, is among the most highly activated gene sets in the σE1regulon. The proteins encoded by the operon resemble quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers but are most similar in sequence to the broadly conserved YehZYXW system, which remains largely uncharacterized. Transcription ofyehZYXWis activated by the general stress sigma factor σSinEnterobacteriaceae, which suggests a functional role for this transport system in bacterial stress response across the classesAlphaproteobacteriaandGammaproteobacteria. We present evidence thatB. abortusYehZYXW does not function as an importer of known compatible solutes under physiological conditions and does not contribute to the virulence defect of a σE1-null strain. The solein vitrophenotype associated with genetic disruption of this putative transport system is reduced growth in the presence of high Li+ion concentrations. A crystal structure ofB. abortusYehZ revealed a class II periplasmic binding protein fold with significant structural homology toArchaeoglobus fulgidusProX, which binds glycine betaine. However, the structure

  20. 77 FR 48460 - Transportation of Household Goods in Interstate Commerce; Consumer Protection Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Household Goods in Interstate Commerce; Consumer Protection Regulations AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... the effective date for its June 20, 2012, direct final rule concerning household goods consumer protection. The direct final rule amended the regulations governing the transportation of household goods to...

  1. 75 FR 41994 - Federal Management Regulation; Home-to-Work Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... Administration is amending the Federal Management Regulation (FMR) to clarify existing Home-to-Work... ADMINISTRATION 41 CFR Part 102-5 [FMR Amendment 2010-02; FMR Case 2010-102-4; Docket 2010-0013, Sequence 1] RIN 3090-AJ05 Federal Management Regulation; Home-to-Work Transportation AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide...

  2. The cationic amino acid transporter 2 is induced in inflammatory lung models and regulates lung fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothenberg Marc E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine is an amino acid that serves as a substrate for the enzymes nitric oxide synthase (NOS and arginase, leading to synthesis of NO and ornithine, respectively. As such, arginine has the potential to influence diverse fundamental processes in the lung. Methods We used mice deficient in cationic amino acid transporter (CAT 2 in models of allergic airway inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. Results We report that the arginine transport protein CAT2 was over-expressed in the lung during the induction of allergic airway inflammation. Furthermore, CAT2 mRNA was strongly induced by transgenically over-expressed IL-4, and allergen-induced expression was dependent upon signal-transducer-and-activator-of-transcription (STAT 6. In situ mRNA hybridization demonstrated marked staining of CAT2, predominantly in scattered mononuclear cells. Analysis of allergic airway inflammation and bleomycin-induced inflammation in CAT2-deficient mice revealed that while inflammation was independent of CAT2 expression, bleomycin-induced fibrosis was dependent upon CAT2. Mechanistic analysis revealed that arginase activity in macrophages was partly dependent on CAT2. Conclusion Taken together, these results identify CAT2 as a regulator of fibrotic responses in the lung.

  3. Swelling-Induced Taurine Transport: Relationship with Chloride Channels, Anion-Exchangers and Other Swelling-Activated Transport Pathways

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shennan, David B

    2008-01-01

    Cells have to regulate their volume in order to survive. Moreover, it is now evident that cell volume per se and the membrane transport processes which regulate it, comprise an important signalling unit...

  4. Cytokinin response factors regulate PIN-FORMED auxin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šimášková, M.; O'Brien, J.A.; Khan, M.; Noorden, van G.; Ötvös, K.; Vieten, A.; Clercq, de I.; Haperen, van J.M.A.; Cuesta, C.; Hoyerová, K.; Vanneste, S.; Marhavý, P.; Wabnik, K.; Breusegem, Van F.; Nowack, M.; Murphy, A.; Friml, J.; Weijers, D.; Beeckman, T.; Benková, E.

    2015-01-01

    Auxin and cytokinin are key endogenous regulators of plant development. Although cytokinin-mediated modulation of auxin distribution is a developmentally crucial hormonal interaction, its molecular basis is largely unknown. Here we show a direct regulatory link between cytokinin signalling and the

  5. LRRK2 transport is regulated by its novel interacting partner Rab32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Waschbüsch

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a multi-domain 280 kDa protein that is linked to Parkinson's disease (PD. Mutations especially in the GTPase and kinase domains of LRRK2 are the most common causes of heritable PD and are also found in sporadic forms of PD. Although the cellular function of LRRK2 is largely unknown there is increasing evidence that these mutations cause cell death due to autophagic dysfunction and mitochondrial damage. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism of LRRK2 binding and transport, which involves the small GTPases Rab32 and Rab38. Rab32 and its closest homologue Rab38 are known to organize the trans-Golgi network and transport of key enzymes in melanogenesis, whereas their function in non-melanogenic cells is still not well understood. Cellular processes such as autophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, phagocytosis or inflammatory processes in the brain have previously been linked to Rab32. Here, we demonstrate that Rab32 and Rab38, but no other GTPase tested, directly interact with LRRK2. GFP-Trap analyses confirmed the interaction of Rab32 with the endogenous LRRK2. In yeast two-hybrid experiments we identified a predicted coiled-coil motif containing region within the aminoterminus of LRRK2 as the possible interacting domain. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated a co-localization of Rab32 and LRRK2 at recycling endosomes and transport vesicles, while overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of Rab32 led to an increased co-localization with Rab7/9 positive perinuclear late endosomes/MVBs. Subcellular fractionation experiments supported the novel role of Rab32 in LRRK2 late endosomal transport and sorting in the cell. Thus, Rab32 may regulate the physiological functions of LRRK2.

  6. Cytokinins are central regulators of cambial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto-Kitano, Miho; Kusumoto, Takami; Tarkowski, Petr; Kinoshita-Tsujimura, Kaori; Václavíková, Katerina; Miyawaki, Kaori; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2008-12-16

    The roots and stems of dicotyledonous plants thicken by the cell proliferation in the cambium. Cambial proliferation changes in response to environmental factors; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate cambial activity are largely unknown. The quadruple Arabidopsis thaliana mutant atipt1;3;5;7, in which 4 genes encoding cytokinin biosynthetic isopentenyltransferases are disrupted by T-DNA insertion, was unable to form cambium and showed reduced thickening of the root and stem. The atipt3 single mutant, which has moderately decreased levels of cytokinins, exhibited decreased root thickening without any other recognizable morphological changes. Addition of exogenously supplied cytokinins to atipt1;3;5;7 reactivated the cambium in a dose-dependent manner. When an atipt1;3;5;7 shoot scion was grafted onto WT root stock, both the root and shoot grew normally and trans-zeatin-type (tZ-type) cytokinins in the shoot were restored to WT levels, but isopentenyladenine-type cytokinins in the shoot remained unchanged. Conversely, when a WT shoot was grafted onto an atipt1;3;5;7 root, both the root and shoot grew normally and isopentenyladenine-type cytokinins in the root were restored to WT levels, but tZ-type cytokinins were only partially restored. Collectively, it can be concluded that cytokinins are important regulators of cambium development and that production of cytokinins in either the root or shoot is sufficient for normal development of both the root and shoot.

  7. Regulation of Na+/K+ ATPase transport velocity by RNA editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Colina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Because firing properties and metabolic rates vary widely, neurons require different transport rates from their Na(+/K(+ pumps in order to maintain ion homeostasis. In this study we show that Na(+/K(+ pump activity is tightly regulated by a novel process, RNA editing. Three codons within the squid Na(+/K(+ ATPase gene can be recoded at the RNA level, and the efficiency of conversion for each varies dramatically, and independently, between tissues. At one site, a highly conserved isoleucine in the seventh transmembrane span can be converted to a valine, a change that shifts the pump's intrinsic voltage dependence. Mechanistically, the removal of a single methyl group specifically targets the process of Na(+ release to the extracellular solution, causing a higher turnover rate at the resting membrane potential.

  8. THE TIME FACTOR IN MARITIME TRANSPORT AND PORT LOGISTICS ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin NICOLAE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Execution of the carriage contract requires compliance to all the conditions in it, by all those involved in the transport. Main obligations incumbent upon the vessel, and obviously, to other transporters, who must provide transportation according to deadlines and safety. Contract compliance is certifying transport participants about their seriousness and an appropriate market quotation. Therefore, present work pragmatically sets schematics reference time associated implementation of the carriage contract. Also, are demonstrated relationships established between maritime transport “players” and sequence of activities related to the operation of the vessel in port. The authors propose a set of concepts and terms whose utility is established to solve practical problems in this area of activity.

  9. abc3+ encodes an iron-regulated vacuolar ABC-type transporter in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Benoît; Jbel, Mehdi; Mercier, Alexandre; Labbé, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown the fundamental contribution of the yeast vacuole as a site for storage and detoxification of metals. Whereas the transmembrane proteins responsible for iron transport into and out of the vacuole have been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, less information is available concerning the mobilization of vacuolar iron stores in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we report the identification of a gene designated abc3(+) that encodes a protein which exhibits sequence homology with the ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The transcription of abc3(+) is induced by low concentrations of iron but repressed by high levels of iron. The iron-mediated repression of abc3(+) required a functional fep1(+) gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fep1 associates with the abc3(+) promoter in vivo, in an iron-dependent manner. Microscopic analyses revealed that a functional Abc3-green fluorescent protein localizes to the membrane vacuole when iron levels were low. Abc3 was required for growth in low-iron medium in the absence of the transport system mediated by Fio1 and Fip1. abc3Delta cells exhibited increased levels of expression of the frp1(+)-encoded ferric reductase, suggesting a loss of Fep1 repression and, consequently, the activation of Fep1-regulated genes. When abc3(+) was expressed using the nmt1(+) promoter system, its induction led to a reduced transcriptional activity of the frp1(+) gene. Because S. pombe does not possess vacuolar membrane-localized orthologs to S. cerevisiae Fth1, Fet5, and Smf3, our findings suggested that Abc3 may be responsible for mobilizing stored iron from the vacuole to the cytosol in response to iron deficiency.

  10. abc3+ Encodes an Iron-Regulated Vacuolar ABC-Type Transporter in Schizosaccharomyces pombe▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Benoît; Jbel, Mehdi; Mercier, Alexandre; Labbé, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown the fundamental contribution of the yeast vacuole as a site for storage and detoxification of metals. Whereas the transmembrane proteins responsible for iron transport into and out of the vacuole have been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, less information is available concerning the mobilization of vacuolar iron stores in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we report the identification of a gene designated abc3+ that encodes a protein which exhibits sequence homology with the ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The transcription of abc3+ is induced by low concentrations of iron but repressed by high levels of iron. The iron-mediated repression of abc3+ required a functional fep1+ gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fep1 associates with the abc3+ promoter in vivo, in an iron-dependent manner. Microscopic analyses revealed that a functional Abc3-green fluorescent protein localizes to the membrane vacuole when iron levels were low. Abc3 was required for growth in low-iron medium in the absence of the transport system mediated by Fio1 and Fip1. abc3Δ cells exhibited increased levels of expression of the frp1+-encoded ferric reductase, suggesting a loss of Fep1 repression and, consequently, the activation of Fep1-regulated genes. When abc3+ was expressed using the nmt1+ promoter system, its induction led to a reduced transcriptional activity of the frp1+ gene. Because S. pombe does not possess vacuolar membrane-localized orthologs to S. cerevisiae Fth1, Fet5, and Smf3, our findings suggested that Abc3 may be responsible for mobilizing stored iron from the vacuole to the cytosol in response to iron deficiency. PMID:19915076

  11. Active transportation safety features around schools in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Bryn; Rosu, Andrei; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William

    2013-10-31

    The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and quality of active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments that relate to pedestrian and bicycle safety. Variations in these features and associated traffic concerns as perceived by school administrators were examined by geographic status and school type. The study was based on schools that participated in 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. ArcGIS software version 10 and Google Earth were used to assess the presence and quality of ten different active transportation safety features. Findings suggest that there are crosswalks and good sidewalk coverage in the environments surrounding most Canadian schools, but a dearth of bicycle lanes and other traffic calming measures (e.g., speed bumps, traffic chokers). Significant urban/rural inequities exist with a greater prevalence of sidewalk coverage, crosswalks, traffic medians, and speed bumps in urban areas. With the exception of bicycle lanes, the active transportation safety features that were present were generally rated as high quality. Traffic was more of a concern to administrators in urban areas. This study provides novel information about active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments. This information could help guide public health efforts aimed at increasing active transportation levels while simultaneously decreasing active transportation injuries.

  12. Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn Pinkerton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and quality of active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments that relate to pedestrian and bicycle safety. Variations in these features and associated traffic concerns as perceived by school administrators were examined by geographic status and school type. The study was based on schools that participated in 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC survey. ArcGIS software version 10 and Google Earth were used to assess the presence and quality of ten different active transportation safety features. Findings suggest that there are crosswalks and good sidewalk coverage in the environments surrounding most Canadian schools, but a dearth of bicycle lanes and other traffic calming measures (e.g., speed bumps, traffic chokers. Significant urban/rural inequities exist with a greater prevalence of sidewalk coverage, crosswalks, traffic medians, and speed bumps in urban areas. With the exception of bicycle lanes, the active transportation safety features that were present were generally rated as high quality. Traffic was more of a concern to administrators in urban areas. This study provides novel information about active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments. This information could help guide public health efforts aimed at increasing active transportation levels while simultaneously decreasing active transportation injuries.

  13. Suppression of adenosine-activated chloride transport by ethanol in airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V Raju

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is associated with increased lung infections. Molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is not complete. Airway epithelial ion transport regulates the homeostasis of airway surface liquid, essential for airway mucosal immunity and lung host defense. Here, air-liquid interface cultures of Calu-3 epithelial cells were basolaterally exposed to physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM for 24 hours and adenosine-stimulated ion transport was measured by Ussing chamber. The ethanol exposure reduced the epithelial short-circuit currents (I(SC in a dose-dependent manner. The ion currents activated by adenosine were chloride conductance mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. Alloxazine, a specific inhibitor for A(2B adenosine receptor (A(2BAR, largely abolished the adenosine-stimulated chloride transport, suggesting that A(2BAR is a major receptor responsible for regulating the chloride transport of the cells. Ethanol significantly reduced intracellular cAMP production upon adenosine stimulation. Moreover, ethanol-suppression of the chloride secretion was able to be restored by cAMP analogs or by inhibitors to block cAMP degradation. These results imply that ethanol exposure dysregulates CFTR-mediated chloride transport in airways by suppression of adenosine-A(2BAR-cAMP signaling pathway, which might contribute to alcohol-associated lung infections.

  14. Active urea transport in lower vertebrates and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankir, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Some unicellular organisms can take up urea from the surrounding fluids by an uphill pumping mechanism. Several active (energy-dependent) urea transporters (AUTs) have been cloned in these organisms. Functional studies show that active urea transport also occurs in elasmobranchs, amphibians, and mammals. In the two former groups, active urea transport may serve to conserve urea in body fluids in order to balance external high ambient osmolarity or prevent desiccation. In mammals, active urea transport may be associated with the need to either store and/or reuse nitrogen in the case of low nitrogen supply, or to excrete nitrogen efficiently in the case of excess nitrogen intake. There are probably two different families of AUTs, one with a high capacity able to establish only a relatively modest transepithelial concentration difference (renal tubule of some frogs, pars recta of the mammalian kidney, early inner medullary collecting duct in some mammals eating protein-poor diets) and others with a low capacity but able to maintain a high transepithelial concentration difference that has been created by another mechanism or in another organ (elasmobranch gills, ventral skin of some toads, and maybe mammalian urinary bladder). Functional characterization of these transporters shows that some are coupled to sodium (symports or antiports) while others are sodium-independent. In humans, only one genetic anomaly, with a mild phenotype (familial azotemia), is suspected to concern one of these transporters. In spite of abundant functional evidence for such transporters in higher organisms, none have been molecularly identified yet.

  15. FOXM1 regulates glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma by transactivating glucose transporter 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Runze; Pu, Meng; Li, Yu; Wang, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    The Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor plays crucial roles in the initiation and progression of various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism by which FOXM1 regulates cancer metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches were used to investigate the role of FOXM1 in the regulation of glycolysis in vitro. Luciferase reporter assays were used to explore the transcriptional regulation of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) promoter by FOXM1. Then, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine the expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 in 100 paired HCC and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association between FOXM1 and GLUT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Our data showed that FOXM1 promoted glycolysis in the HCC cells. FOXM1 knockdown significantly reduced the expression of GLUT1 among key glycolysis-related molecules in the different HCC cell lines. Glucose uptake and lactate production assay showed that FOXM1 positively regulated glycolysis based on GLUT1 expression. Moreover, FOXM1 overexpression increased and knockdown decreased GLUT1 expression. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the -206 to -199 bp region of the GLUT1 promoter is important for FOXM1 to enhance GLUT1 promoter activity. The results of the IHC analysis showed that the protein expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 was closely related to the tumor histological grade and TNM stage. In addition, GLUT1 expression was also related to microvascular invasion. In conclusion, overexpression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 may play critical roles in HCC. FOXM1 promotes HCC glycolysis by transactivating GLUT1 expression.

  16. Sialic acid transport and catabolism are cooperatively regulated by SiaR and CRP in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport and catabolism of sialic acid, a critical virulence factor for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, is regulated by two transcription factors, SiaR and CRP. Results Using a mutagenesis approach, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P was identified as a co-activator for SiaR. Evidence for the cooperative regulation of both the sialic acid catabolic and transport operons suggested that cooperativity between SiaR and CRP is required for regulation. cAMP was unable to influence the expression of the catabolic operon in the absence of SiaR but was able to induce catabolic operon expression when both SiaR and GlcN-6P were present. Alteration of helical phasing supported this observation by uncoupling SiaR and CRP regulation. The insertion of one half-turn of DNA between the SiaR and CRP operators resulted in the loss of SiaR-mediated repression of the transport operon while eliminating cAMP-dependent induction of the catabolic operon when GlcN-6P was present. SiaR and CRP were found to bind to their respective operators simultaneously and GlcN-6P altered the interaction of SiaR with its operator. Conclusions These results suggest multiple novel features for the regulation of these two adjacent operons. SiaR functions as both a repressor and an activator and SiaR and CRP interact to regulate both operons from a single set of operators.

  17. Novel Roles for the Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transporter-4 in Hippocampally Dependent Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C

    2016-11-23

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) is critical for insulin- and contractile-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. GluT4 is also expressed in some hippocampal neurons, but its functional role in the brain is unclear. Several established molecular modulators of memory processing regulate hippocampal GluT4 trafficking and hippocampal memory formation is limited by both glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that hippocampal GluT4 might be involved in memory processes. Here, we show that, in male rats, hippocampal GluT4 translocates to the plasma membrane after memory training and that acute, selective intrahippocampal inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport impaired memory acquisition, but not memory retrieval. Other studies have shown that prolonged systemic GluT4 blockade causes insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, we found that prolonged hippocampal blockade of glucose transport through GluT4-upregulated markers of hippocampal insulin signaling prevented task-associated depletion of hippocampal glucose and enhanced both working and short-term memory while also impairing long-term memory. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of hippocampal AMPA GluR1 subunits and the neuronal GluT3, but decreased expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, consistent with impaired ability to form long-term memories. Our findings are the first to show the cognitive impact of brain GluT4 modulation. They identify GluT4 as a key regulator of hippocampal memory processing and also suggest differential regulation of GluT4 in the hippocampus from that in peripheral tissues. The role of insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) in the brain is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrate that GluT4 is a critical component of hippocampal memory processes. Memory training increased hippocampal GluT4 translocation and memory acquisition was impaired by GluT4 blockade. Unexpectedly, whereas long

  18. Promoter Analysis of the Human Ascorbic Acid Transporters SVCT1 & 2: Mechanisms of Adaptive Regulation in Liver Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidling, Jack C.; Rubin, Stanley A.

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid, the active form of vitamin C, is a vital antioxidant in the human liver, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ascorbic acid transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) in liver cells are poorly understood. Therefore, we characterized the minimal promoter regions of hSVCT1 & 2 in cultured human liver epithelial cells (HepG2) and examined the effects of ascorbic acid deprivation and supplementation on activity and regulation of the transport systems. Identified minimal promoters required for basal activity were found to include multiple cis-regulatory elements, whereas mutational analysis demonstrated that HNF-1 sites in the hSVCT1 promoter and KLF/Sp1 sites in the hSVCT2 promoter were essential for activities. When cultured in ascorbic acid deficient or supplemented media, HepG2 cells demonstrated significant (P Ascorbic acid uptake, and in hSVCT1 mRNA and protein levels as well as hSVCT1 promoter activity. However, no significant changes in hSVCT2 expression or promoter activity were observed during ascorbic acid deficient or supplemented conditions. We mapped the ascorbic acid responsive region in the hSVCT1 promoter and determined that HNF-1 sites are important for the adaptive regulation response. The results of these studies further characterize the hSVCT1 and 2 promoters, establish that ascorbic acid uptake by human liver epithelial cells is adaptively regulated, and show that transcriptional mechanisms via HNF-1 in the hSVCT1 promoter may, in part, be involved in this regulation. PMID:20471816

  19. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Girls' perception of physical environmental factors and transportation: reliability and association with physical activity and active transport to school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Kimberly

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preliminary evidence suggests that the physical environment and transportation are associated with youth physical activity levels. Only a few studies have examined the association of physical environmental factors on walking and bicycling to school. Therefore, the purpose of this study was (1 to examine the test-retest reliability of a survey designed for youth to assess perceptions of physical environmental factors (e.g. safety, aesthetics, facilities near the home and transportation, and (2 to describe the associations of these perceptions with both physical activity and active transport to school. Methods Test and retest surveys, administered a median of 12 days later, were conducted with 480 sixth- and eighth-grade girls in or near six U.S. communities. The instrument consisted of 24 questions on safety and aesthetics of the perceived environment and transportation and related facilities. Additionally, girls were asked if they were aware of 14 different recreational facilities offering structured and unstructured activities, and if so, whether they would visit these facilities and the ease with which they could access them. Test-retest reliability was determined using kappa coefficients, overall and separately by grade. Associations with physical activity and active transport to school were examined using mixed model logistic regression (n = 610, adjusting for grade, race/ethnicity, and site. Results Item-specific reliabilities for questions assessing perceived safety and aesthetics of the neighborhood ranged from 0.31 to 0.52. Reliabilities of items assessing awareness of and interest in going to the 14 recreational facilities ranged from 0.47 to 0.64. Reliabilities of items assessing transportation ranged from 0.34 to 0.58. Some items on girls' perceptions of perceived safety, aesthetics of the environment, facilities, and transportation were important correlates of physical activity and, in some cases, active transport

  1. Promoting active community environments through land use and transportation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytur, Semra A; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Evenson, Kelly R; Catellier, Diane J; Rosamond, Wayne D

    2007-01-01

    To examine the role of land use and transportation plans as policy instruments for promoting active community environments. Cross-sectional analysis using multilevel models to examine whether active community environment scores were associated with leisure and transportation-related physical activity (PA) and whether associations varied by household income. 67 North Carolina counties Adults (n = 6694) from pooled 2000 and 2002 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys. Active community environment scores, derived from a 2003 survey of planning directors, representing the presence of nonmotorized transportation improvements, mixed land use classification, and comprehensiveness of implementation tools. Dependent variables were self-reported PA measures from the BRFSS. Sociodemographic variables were derived from the 2000 U.S. Census of Population. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, more favorable active community environment scores were significantly associated with leisure PA (p = .001), transportation PA (p land use and transportation planning. Plans may provide a means to incorporate community support for active living into public policy.

  2. Identification of an Efflux Transporter LmrB Regulating Stress Response and Extracellular Polysaccharide Synthesis in Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Efflux transporters have been implicated in regulating bacterial virulence properties such as resistance to antibiotics, biofilm formation and colonization. The pathogenicity of Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of human dental caries, relies on the bacterium’s ability to form biofilms on tooth surface. However, the studies on efflux transporters in S. mutans are scare and the function of these transporters remained to be clarified. In this study, we identified an efflux transporter (LmrB in S. mutans through cloning the lmrB gene into Escherichia coli. Introducing lmrB into E. coli conferred a multidrug-resistant phenotype and resulted in higher EtBr efflux activity which could be suppressed by efflux inhibitor. To explore whether LmrB was involved in S. mutans virulence properties regulation, we constructed the lmrB inactivation mutant and examined the phenotypes of the mutant. It was found that LmrB deficiency resulted in increased IPS storage and prolonged acid production. Enhanced biofilm formation characterized by increased extracellular polysaccharides (EPS production and elevated resistance to hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobials were also observed in lmrB mutant. To gain a better understanding of the global role of LmrB, a transcriptome analysis was performed using lmrB mutant strain. The expression of 107 genes was up- or down-regulated in the lmrB mutant compared with the wild type. Notably, expression of genes in several genomic islands was differentially modulated, such as stress-related GroELS and scnRK, sugar metabolism associated glg operons and msmREFGK transporter. The results presented here indicate that LmrB plays a vital global role in the regulation of several important virulence properties in S. mutans.

  3. Parkinson's disease-associated kinase PINK1 regulates Miro protein level and axonal transport of mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liu

    Full Text Available Mutations in Pten-induced kinase 1 (PINK1 are linked to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease (FPD. PINK1 has previously been implicated in mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics, quality control, and electron transport chain function. However, it is not clear how these processes are interconnected and whether they are sufficient to explain all aspects of PINK1 pathogenesis. Here we show that PINK1 also controls mitochondrial motility. In Drosophila, downregulation of dMiro or other components of the mitochondrial transport machinery rescued dPINK1 mutant phenotypes in the muscle and dopaminergic (DA neurons, whereas dMiro overexpression alone caused DA neuron loss. dMiro protein level was increased in dPINK1 mutant but decreased in dPINK1 or dParkin overexpression conditions. In Drosophila larval motor neurons, overexpression of dPINK1 inhibited axonal mitochondria transport in both anterograde and retrograde directions, whereas dPINK1 knockdown promoted anterograde transport. In HeLa cells, overexpressed hPINK1 worked together with hParkin, another FPD gene, to regulate the ubiquitination and degradation of hMiro1 and hMiro2, apparently in a Ser-156 phosphorylation-independent manner. Also in HeLa cells, loss of hMiro promoted the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria and facilitated autophagy of damaged mitochondria, effects previously associated with activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These newly identified functions of PINK1/Parkin and Miro in mitochondrial transport and mitophagy contribute to our understanding of the complex interplays in mitochondrial quality control that are critically involved in PD pathogenesis, and they may explain the peripheral neuropathy symptoms seen in some PD patients carrying particular PINK1 or Parkin mutations. Moreover, the different effects of loss of PINK1 function on Miro protein level in Drosophila and mouse cells may offer one explanation of the distinct phenotypic manifestations of PINK1

  4. Extra-nuclear telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) regulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Fozia; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K; Müller, Jürgen; Zammit, Victor A; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is a key component of the telomerase complex. By lengthening telomeres in DNA strands, TERT increases senescent cell lifespan. Mice that lack TERT age much faster and exhibit age-related conditions such as osteoporosis, diabetes and neurodegeneration. Accelerated telomere shortening in both human and animal models has been documented in conditions associated with insulin resistance, including T2DM. We investigated the role of TERT, in regulating cellular glucose utilisation by using the myoblastoma cell line C2C12, as well as primary mouse and human skeletal muscle cells. Inhibition of TERT expression or activity by using siRNA (100nM) or specific inhibitors (100nM) reduced basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake by ~50%, in all cell types, without altering insulin responsiveness. In contrast, TERT over-expression increased glucose uptake by 3.25-fold. In C2C12 cells TERT protein was mostly localised intracellularly and stimulation of cells with insulin induced translocation to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in C2C12 cells showed that TERT was constitutively associated with glucose transporters (GLUTs) 1, 4 and 12 via an insulin insensitive interaction that also did not require intact PI3-K and mTOR pathways. Collectively, these findings identified a novel extra-nuclear function of TERT that regulates an insulin-insensitive pathway involved in glucose uptake in human and mouse skeletal muscle cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  6. 78 FR 75672 - New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of Regulated Medical Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... Regulated Medical Waste AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION... than 20 cc), and other regulated medical waste; 2. N.J.A.C. 7:26-3A.11(d) which allows a generator to ship oversized medical waste without placing it in a packaging as required by the HMR; 3. N.J.A.C. 7:26...

  7. 76 FR 70220 - New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of Regulated Medical Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ..., Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Program, Mail Code 401-02C, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420. A... (``oversized'' regulated medical waste that is ``too large to be placed in a plastic bag or standard container... Regulated Medical Waste AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION...

  8. Microchamber Device for Detection of Transporter Activity of Adherent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamiko eTsugane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to detect the transporter activity of intact adherent cells using a microchamber device. When adherent cells are seeded onto the poly-di-methyl siloxane (PDMS substrate having microchambers with openings smaller than the size of a cell, the cells form a confluent layer that covers the microchambers, creating minute, confined spaces. As substances exported across the cell membrane accumulate, transporter activity can be detected by observing the fluorescence intensity increase in the microchamber. We tested the microchamber device with HeLa cells overexpressing MDR1, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter, and succeeded in detecting the transport of fluorescence-conjugated paclitaxel, the anti-cancer drug, at the single-cell level.

  9. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  10. Stress regulated members of the plant organic cation transporter family are localized to the vacuolar membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis six genes group into the gene family of the organic cation transporters (OCTs. In animals the members of the OCT-family are mostly characterized as polyspecific transporters involved in the homeostasis of solutes, the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters and the transport of choline and carnitine. In plants little is known about function, localisation and regulation of this gene family. Only one protein has been characterized as a carnitine transporter at the plasma membrane so far. Findings We localized the five uncharacterized members of the Arabidopsis OCT family, designated OCT2-OCT6, via GFP fusions and protoplast transformation to the tonoplast. Expression analysis with RNA Gel Blots showed a distinct, organ-specific expression pattern of the individual genes. With reporter gene fusion of four members we analyzed the tissue specific distribution of OCT2, 3, 4, and 6. In experiments with salt, drought and cold stress, we could show that AtOCT4, 5 and 6 are up-regulated during drought stress, AtOCT3 and 5 during cold stress and AtOCT 5 and 6 during salt stress treatments. Conclusion Localisation of the proteins at the tonoplast and regulation of the gene expression under stress conditions suggests a specific role for the transporters in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  11. Negative Regulation of the Creatine Transporter SLC6A8 by SPAK and OSR1

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Fezai; Bernat Elvira; Jose Borras; Mossadok Ben-Attia; Zohreh Hoseinzadeh; Florian Lang

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Transport regulation involves several kinases including SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1), which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys]) kinases. The present study explored whether SPAK and/or OSR1 participate in the regulation of the creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8), which accomplishes Na+ coupled cellular uptake of creatine in several tissues including kidney, intestine, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Met...

  12. Activity-dependent transport of the transcriptional coactivator CRTC1 from synapse to nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Toh Hean; Uzgil, Besim; Lin, Peter; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Martin, Kelsey C

    2012-07-06

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, such as those underlying long-term memory, require transcription. Activity-dependent transport of synaptically localized transcriptional regulators provides a direct means of coupling synaptic stimulation with changes in transcription. The CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1), which is required for long-term hippocampal plasticity, binds CREB to potently promote transcription. We show that CRTC1 localizes to synapses in silenced hippocampal neurons but translocates to the nucleus in response to localized synaptic stimulation. Regulated nuclear translocation occurs only in excitatory neurons and requires calcium influx and calcineurin activation. CRTC1 is controlled in a dual fashion with activity regulating CRTC1 nuclear translocation and cAMP modulating its persistence in the nucleus. Neuronal activity triggers a complex change in CRTC1 phosphorylation, suggesting that CRTC1 may link specific types of stimuli to specific changes in gene expression. Together, our results indicate that synapse-to-nuclear transport of CRTC1 dynamically informs the nucleus about synaptic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of Activity of GABA Transporter GAT1 by δ-Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Pu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia is a well-documented effect of acupuncture. A critical role in pain sensation plays the nervous system, including the GABAergic system and opioid receptor (OR activation. Here we investigated regulation of GABA transporter GAT1 by δOR in rats and in Xenopus oocytes. Synaptosomes of brain from rats chronically exposed to opiates exhibited reduced GABA uptake, indicating that GABA transport might be regulated by opioid receptors. For further investigation we have expressed GAT1 of mouse brain together with mouse δOR and μOR in Xenopus oocytes. The function of GAT1 was analyzed in terms of Na+-dependent [3H]GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated currents. Coexpression of δOR led to reduced number of fully functional GAT1 transporters, reduced substrate translocation, and GAT1-mediated current. Activation of δOR further reduced the rate of GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated current. Coexpression of μOR, as well as μOR activation, affected neither the number of transporters, nor rate of GABA uptake, nor GAT1-mediated current. Inhibition of GAT1-mediated current by activation of δOR was confirmed in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on rat brain slices of periaqueductal gray. We conclude that inhibition of GAT1 function will strengthen the inhibitory action of the GABAergic system and hence may contribute to acupuncture-induced analgesia.

  14. Dynamics of the metal binding domains and regulation of the human copper transporters ATP7B and ATP7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Dolgova, Natalia V; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-04-01

    Copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B regulate copper levels in the human cells and deliver copper to the biosynthetic pathways. ATP7A and ATP7B belong to the P-type ATPases and share much of the domain architecture and the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis with the other, well-studied, enzymes of this type. A unique structural feature of the copper ATPases is the chain of six cytosolic metal-binding domains (MBDs), which are believed to be involved in copper-dependent regulation of the activity and intracellular localization of these enzymes. Although the structures of all the MBDs have been solved, the mechanism of copper-dependent regulation of ATP7B and ATP7A, the roles of individual MBDs, and the relationship between the regulatory and catalytic copper binding are still unknown. We describe the structure and dynamics of the MBDs, review the current knowledge about their functional roles and propose a mechanism of regulation of ATP7B by copper-dependent changes in the dynamics and conformation of the MBD chain. Transient interactions between the MBDs, rather than transitions between distinct static conformations are likely to form the structural basis of regulation of the ATP-dependent copper transporters in human cells. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):226-235, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Verapamil inhibits the glucose transport activity of GLUT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louters, Larry L; Stehouwer, Nathan; Rekman, Janelle; Tidball, Andrew; Cok, Alexandra; Holstege, Christopher P

    2010-06-01

    Calcium channel blocker toxicity has been associated with marked hyperglycemia responsive only to high-dose insulin therapy. The exact mechanism(s) of this induced hyperglycemia has not been clearly delineated. The glucose transporter GLUT1 is expressed in a wide variety of cell types and is largely responsible for a basal level of glucose transport. GLUT1 also is activated by cell stress. The specific purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the calcium channel blocker verapamil on the glucose uptake activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblasts cells. Dose-dependent effects of verapamil on glucose uptake were studied using L929 fibroblast cells with 2-deoxyglucose. Verapamil had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both basal and stress-activated transport activity of GLUT1. Basal activity was inhibited 50% by 300 μM verapamil, while 150 μM verapamil completely inhibited the activation induced by the stress of glucose deprivation. These effects were reversible and required verapamil to be present during the stress. Alteration of calcium concentrations by addition of 5 mM CaCl₂ or 4 mM EDTA had no effect on verapamil action. This study reveals the unique finding that verapamil has inhibitory effects on the transport activity of GLUT1 independent of its effects on calcium concentrations. The inhibition of GLUT1 may be one of the contributing factors to the hyperglycemia observed in CCB poisoning.

  16. Norepinephrine transporter function and desipramine: residual drug effects versus short-term regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Gregory A; Jia, Weihong; Li, Jing; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Mandela, Prashant; Pan, Jun

    2005-04-30

    Previous research has shown that exposure of norepinephrine transporter (NET)-expressing cells to desipramine (DMI) downregulates the norepinephrine transporter, although changes in the several transporter parameters do not demonstrate the same time course. Exposures to desipramine for effects of residual desipramine on norepinephrine transporter binding and uptake were re-evaluated following exposures of PC12 cells to desipramine using different methods to remove residual drug. Using a method that minimizes residual drug, exposure of intact PC12 cells to desipramine for 4h had no effect on uptake capacity or [(3)H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter, while exposures for > or =16 h reduced uptake capacity. Desipramine-induced reductions in binding to the transporter required >24 h or greater periods of desipramine exposure. This study confirms that uptake capacity of the norepinephrine transporter is reduced earlier than changes in radioligand binding, but with a different time course than originally shown. Special pre-incubation procedures are required to abolish effects of residual transporter inhibitor when studying inhibitor-induced transporter regulation.

  17. Novel Roles for the Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transporter-4 in Hippocampally Dependent Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C.

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) is critical for insulin- and contractile-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. GluT4 is also expressed in some hippocampal neurons, but its functional role in the brain is unclear. Several established molecular modulators of memory processing regulate hippocampal GluT4 trafficking and hippocampal memory formation is limited by both glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that hippocampal GluT4 might be invo...

  18. The Shoelace Antenna: Measurements of Driven Transport and Prospects for Active Edge Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Terry, J. L.; Baek, S. G.; Ennever, P.; Edlund, E.; Han, W.; Burke, W. M.; Wolfe, S. M.; Irby, J. H.; Hughes, J. W.; Fitzgerald, E. W.; Granetz, R. S.; Greenwald, M. J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Pierson, S. Z.; Porkolab, M.; Vieira, R. F.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    The Shoelace antenna was built to drive edge fluctuations in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, matching the wavenumber (k = 1.5/cm) and frequency (50< f<200 kHz) of the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM). This fluctuation is responsible for regulating transport across the plasma boundary in the steady-state, ELM-free Enhanced D α(EDA) H-mode; the goal of the Shoelace antenna is to regulate edge transport actively via the same mechanism. Initial experiments demonstrated that the antenna drove a resonant response in the edge plasma in steady-state EDA and transient, non-ELMy H-modes, but transport measurements were unavailable. In 2016, the Shoelace antenna was relocated to enable direct measurements of driven transport by a reciprocating Mirror Langmuir Probe, while also making available gas puff imaging and reflectometer data to provide radial localization of the driven fluctuation. This talk will describe these measurements, and compare them to those of the intrinsic QCM in the context of assessing the feasibility of achieving active control of edge transport using direct coupling to edge modes. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  19. Collaboration between physical activity researchers and transport planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crist, Katie; Bolling, Khalisa; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between physical activity (PA) researchers and transport planners is a recommended strategy to combat the physical inactivity epidemic. Data collected by PA researchers could be used to identify, implement and evaluate active transport (AT) projects. However, despite aligned interests...... expertise in health or transport planning. A thematic analysis was conducted following structural coding by two researchers. The analysis revealed that geographic and physical activity data that are current, local, objective and specific to individual AT trips would improve upon currently available data...... sources. Informants believed that research collaboration could increase capacity by providing unbiased data and access to students to assist with targeted research. Collaboration could also increase the relevance of academic research in applied settings. Identified barriers included: setting up contracts...

  20. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenby Marieah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport

  1. Presentation and exhibition activities for promoting theexportof transport services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Vladimirovna Nesterova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of presentation and exhibition activities is considered as an important factor in providing new competitive advantages at the strategic markets for exporting of transportation services. A specific role for exhibition activities as a factor to overcome market failures arose from imperfect information and incomplete markets is displayed. Exhibitions are considered as a true reflection of most market parameters, as a means to get correct information concerning market capacity and its borders, as an instrument to access to new markets. At the firm level presentation and branding activities should be considered as a modern technology (especially it concerns Russian companies which provide to hold up already existed markets and to conquer new ones. Presentation and branding activities are an effective technology to promote company trade-mark, competitive advantages for market demand increasing. Comparative analysis of the main exhibitions on transport and logistics issues is fulfilled on the data basecollected by authors. Data observes geographical distribution of transport exhibition and exhibition facilities development at several regions for the last years. The analyses allow to revealing a geographical structure of the exhibitions and its distribution by type of transport. The most promising and economically favorable exhibition areas for the promotion of Russian transport services are shown.

  2. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  3. Activation and Regulation of Cellular Eicosanoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Brock

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the wide variety of physiological responses that are regulated by lipid messengers. One particular group of lipid messengers, the eicosanoids, plays a central role in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in a receptor-mediated fashion. These mediators are related in that they are all derived from one polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. However, the various eicosanoids are synthesized by a wide variety of cell types by distinct enzymatic pathways, and have diverse roles in immunity and inflammation. In this review, the major pathways involved in the synthesis of eicosanoids, as well as key points of regulation, are presented.

  4. Regulation of placental calcium transport and offspring bone health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGoodfellow

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis causes considerable morbidity and mortality in later life, and the risk of the disease is strongly determined by peak bone mass, which is achieved in early adulthood. Poor intrauterine and early childhood growth are associated with reduced peak bone mass, and increased risk of osteoporotic fracture in older age. In this review we describe the regulatory aspects of intrauterine bone development, and then summarise the evidence relating early growth to later fracture risk. Physiological systems include vitamin D, PTH; leptin; GH/ IGF-1; finally the potential role of epigenetic processes in the underlying mechanisms will be explored. Thus factors such as maternal lifestyle, diet, body build, physical activity and vitamin D status in pregnancy all appear to influence offspring bone mineral accrual. These data demonstrate a likely interaction between environmental factors and gene expression, a phenomenon ubiquitous in the natural world (developmental plasticity, as the potential key process. Intervention studies are now required to test the hypotheses generated by these epidemiological and physiological findings, to inform potential novel public health interventions aimed at improving childhood bone health and reducing the burden of osteoporotic fracture in future generations.

  5. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and

  6. Volume regulation of intestinal cells of echinoderms: Putative role of ion transporters (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Giovanna C; Souza, Marta M; Freire, Carolina A

    2016-11-01

    Echinoderms are exclusively marine osmoconformer invertebrates. Some species occupy the challenging intertidal region. Upon salinity changes, the extracellular osmotic concentration of these animals also varies, exposing tissues and cells to osmotic challenges. Cells and tissues may then respond with volume regulation mechanisms, which involve transport of ions and water into and/or out of the cells, through ion transporters, such as the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC. The goal of this study was to relate the cell volume regulation capacity of echinoderm intestinal cells Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC activities, in three echinoderm species: Holothuria grisea, Arbacia lixula, and Echinometra lucunter. Isolated cells of these species displayed some control of their cell volume upon exposure to anisosmotic media (isolated intestinal cells, calcein fluorescence as indicator of volume change), with a distinct higher capacity shown by H. grisea, which did not swell even upon 50% hyposmotic shock. The holothuroid cells showed indirect evidence (effect of furosemide) of the participation of NKCC in this process, with a secretory function, and of a secondary role by the NKA (effect of ouabain). Other mechanisms are probably responsible for this function in the urchins. Variable expression of these transporters, and others not examined here, may to some extent account for the variability in cell volume regulation capacity in echinoderm cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression and regulation of Na-dependent P(i) transport in matrix vesicles produced by osteoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessuit, C; Bonjour, J P; Caverzasio, J

    1995-04-01

    Extracellular matrix vesicles (MV) are the loci of initial mineralization in several calcifying tissues. We recently reported that MV isolated from chicken epiphyseal cartilage are equipped with a Na-dependent P(i) transport (NaPiT) system. The activity of the NaPiT system appeared to be crucial for the development of MV-mediated calcification. In the present study we investigated the expression of NaPiT activity in MV produced by the osteoblast-like cells MC3T3-E1. The relationship between changes in NaPiT activity in the intact cells and in the released MV was also examined. NaPiT activity in MV harvested from cultured MC3T3-E1 cells was transiently expressed. It was markedly increased between Days 8 and 10 (5- to 6-fold), and then gradually decreased. NaPiT activity was enriched in MV as compared with the parent osteoblast-like cells, while the Na-dependent transport system for alanine (NaAlaT) was not. When NaPiT activity was enhanced in osteoblast-like cells by fetal calf serum (FCS) or P(i) depletion, P(i) transport stimulation was observed in the derived MV as well. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) was differentially expressed and regulated in MV from MC3T3-E1 cell cultures, as compared with NaPiT. In contrast to the transient expression of NaPiT, AP activity in MV increased continuously with time in culture. It was stimulated by FCS treatment of the parent cells, but decreased in MV obtained from P(i)-depleted cultures. These results suggest that the presence in osteogenic cells of selective regulatory mechanisms for the insertion and enrichment of P(i) transport activity in released MV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Methamphetamine increases locomotion and dopamine transporter activity in dopamine d5 receptor-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Hayashizaki

    Full Text Available Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behavioral response to methamphetamine. Interestingly, D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice displayed increased ambulation in response to methamphetamine. Furthermore, dopamine transporter threonine phosphorylation levels, which regulate amphetamine-induced dopamine release, were elevated in D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice. The increase in methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity was eliminated by pretreatment with the dopamine transporter blocker GBR12909. Taken together, these results suggest that dopamine transporter activity and threonine phosphorylation levels are regulated by D5 dopamine receptors.

  9. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foyer, C.H.; Neukermans, J.; Queval, G.; Noctor, G.; Harbinson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘photosynthetic control’ describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these

  10. Regulation of ion transport via apical purinergic receptors in intact rabbit airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Pedersen, Peter Steen

    2005-01-01

    We investigated purinergic receptors involved in ion transport regulation in the intact rabbit nasal airway epithelium. Stimulation of apical membrane P2Y receptors with ATP or UTP (200 microM) induced transient increases in short-circuit current (Isc) of 13 and 6% followed by sustained inhibitions...

  11. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

  12. 26 CFR 1.172-8 - Net operating loss carryovers for regulated transportation corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intrastate, suburban, municipal, or interurban electric railroad, (b) On an intrastate, municipal, or suburban trackless trolley system, (c) On a municipal or suburban bus system, or (d) By motor vehicle not... and are substantially as favorable to users and consumers as are the regulated rates, transportation...

  13. Localization of the calcium-regulated citrate transport process in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Mao, Weibo; Schiro, Faith R; Coleman-Barnett, Joycelynn; Pajor, Ana M; Hamm, L Lee

    2014-06-01

    Urinary citrate is an important inhibitor of calcium-stone formation. Most of the citrate reabsorption in the proximal tubule is thought to occur via a dicarboxylate transporter NaDC1 located in the apical membrane. OK cells, an established opossum kidney proximal tubule cell line, transport citrate but the characteristics change with extracellular calcium such that low calcium solutions stimulate total citrate transport as well as increase the apparent affinity for transport. The present studies address several fundamental properties of this novel process: the polarity of the transport process, the location of the calcium-sensitivity and whether NaDC1 is present in OK cells. OK cells grown on permeable supports exhibited apical >basolateral citrate transport. Apical transport of both citrate and succinate was sensitive to extracellular calcium whereas basolateral transport was not. Apical calcium, rather than basolateral, was the predominant determinant of changes in transport. Also 2,3-dimethylsuccinate, previously identified as an inhibitor of basolateral dicarboxylate transport, inhibited apical citrate uptake. Although the calcium-sensitive transport process in OK cells is functionally not typical NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in OK cells by Western blot and PCR. By immunolocalization studies, NaDC1 was predominantly located in discrete apical membrane or subapical areas. However, by biotinylation, apical NaDC1 decreases in the apical membrane with lowering calcium. In sum, OK cells express a calcium-sensitive/regulated dicarboxylate process at the apical membrane which responds to variations in apical calcium. Despite the functional differences of this process compared to NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in these cells, but predominantly in subapical vesicles.

  14. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates the active transport of serotonin into human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosin, T.R. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the active transport of serotonin (5-HT) by human platelets was investigated. Platelets were exposed to either a single dose of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by the glucose/glucose oxidase or xanthine/xanthine oxidase enzyme systems. H{sub 2}{sub 2} produced a rapid, dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in 5-HT transport which was maximal after a 2 min incubation and decreased with continued incubation. Catalase completely prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stimulation and fluoxetine totally blocked 5-HT uptake into stimulated platelets. The glucose/glucose oxidase and the xanthine/xanthine oxidase generating systems produced a similar response to that of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, superoxide dismutase failed to alter the stimulation, while catalase effectively prevented the response. The kinetics of 5-HT transport indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment did not alter the K{sub m} of 5-HT transport but significantly increased the maximal rate of 5-HT transport. These data demonstrated that exposure of human platelets to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in a stimulation of the active transport of 5-HT and suggested that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may function to regulate this process.

  16. Down-regulation of protein kinase C by parathyroid hormone and mezerein differentially modulates cAMP production and phosphate transport in opossum kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J A

    1997-08-01

    We examined the effects of prolonged exposure to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the protein kinase C (PKC) activator mezerein (MEZ) on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, PKC activity, and Na(+)-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) transport in an opossum kidney cell line (OK/E). A 5 minute exposure to PTH stimulated, while a 6 h incubation reduced, cAMP production, Na/Pi transport was maximally inhibited under desensitizing conditions and was not affected by reintroduction of the hormone. MEZ pretreatment (6 h) enhanced PTH-, cholera toxin (CTX)-, and forskolin (FSK)-stimulated cAMP production, suggesting enhanced Gs alpha coupling and increased adenylyl cyclase activity. However, PKA- and PKC-dependent regulation of Na/Pi were blocked in MEZ-treated cells. The PTH-induced decrease in cAMP production was associated with a reduction in membrane-associated PKC activity while MEZ-induced increases in cAMP production were accompanied by decreases in membrane and cytosolic PKC activity. Enhanced cAMP production was not accompanied by significant changes in PTH/PTH related peptide (PTHrP) receptor affinity or number, nor was the loss of Na/Pi transport regulation associated with changes in PKA activity. The results indicate that down-regulation of PKC by PTH or MEZ differentially modulates cAMP production and regulation of Na/Pi transport. The distinct effects of PTH and MEZ on PKC activity suggest that agonist-specific activation and/or down-regulation of PKC isozyme(s) may be involved in the observed changes in cAMP production and Na/Pi transport.

  17. Nedd4-2 and the regulation of epithelial sodium transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eRotin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nedd4-2 is a ubiquitin ligase previously demonstrated to regulate endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC and other ion channels and transporters. Recent studies using Nedd4-2 knockout mice specifically in kidney or lung epithelia has revealed a critical role for this E3 ubiquitin ligase in regulating salt and fluid transport in these tissues/organs and in maintaining homeostasis of body blood pressure. Interestingly, the primary targets for Nedd4-2 may differ in these two organs: while in the lung Nedd4-2 targets ENaC, and loss of Nedd4-2 leads to excessive ENaC function and to cystic fibrosis – like lung disease, in the kidney, Nedd4-2 targets the Na+/Cl- cotransporter (NCC in addition to targeting ENaC. In accord, loss of Nedd4-2 in the distal nephron leads to increased NCC abundance and function. The aldosterone-responsive kinase, Sgk1, appears to be involved in the regulation of NCC by Nedd4-2 in the kidney, similar to its regulation of ENaC. Collectively, these new findings underscore the physiological importance of Nedd4-2 in regulating epithelial salt and fluid transport and balance.

  18. Capsaicinoids regulate airway anion transporters through Rho kinase- and cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yoshitaka; Morise, Masahiro; Ito, Yasushi; Mizutani, Takefumi; Matsuno, Tadakatsu; Ito, Satoru; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Sato, Mitsuo; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicinoids on airway anion transporters, we recorded and analyzed transepithelial currents in human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells. Application of capsaicin (100 μM) attenuated vectorial anion transport, estimated as short-circuit currents (I(SC)), before and after stimulation by forskolin (10 μM) with concomitant reduction of cytosolic cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was also observed in the response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM, a cell-permeable cAMP analog) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1 mM, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases). The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was attributed to suppression of bumetanide (an inhibitor of the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1)- and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (an inhibitor of basolateral HCO(3)(-)-dependent anion transporters)-sensitive components, which reflect anion uptake via basolateral cAMP-dependent anion transporters. In contrast, capsaicin potentiated apical Cl(-) conductance, which reflects conductivity through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel. All these paradoxical effects of capsaicin were mimicked by capsazepine. Forskolin application also increased phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, and the phosphorylation was prevented by capsaicin and capsazepine, suggesting that these capsaicinoids assume aspects of Rho kinase inhibitors. We also found that the increments in apical Cl(-) conductance were caused by conventional Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 (20 μM) and HA-1077 (20 μM), with selective inhibition of basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1. Collectively, capsaicinoids inhibit cAMP-mediated anion transport through down-regulation of basolateral anion uptake, paradoxically accompanied by up-regulation of apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion conductance. The latter is mediated by inhibition of Rho

  19. Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    I COPY AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM .q TECHNICAL REPORT A-90-7 >AD-A226 125 BIOASSAY OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATOR ACTIVITY ON AQUATIC PLANTS... Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lembi, Carole A.; Netherland, Michael D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...OF THIS PAGE 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continued). Aquatic plants Hydrilla Bensulfuron methyl Paclobutrazol Bioassay Plant growth regulator Eurasian

  20. The Type VI Secretion System Engages a Redox-Regulated Dual-Functional Heme Transporter for Zinc Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiru Si

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The type VI secretion system was recently reported to be involved in zinc acquisition, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that Burkholderia thailandensis T6SS4 is involved in zinc acquisition via secretion of a zinc-scavenging protein, TseZ, that interacts with the outer membrane heme transporter HmuR. We find that HmuR is a redox-regulated dual-functional transporter that transports heme iron under normal conditions but zinc upon sensing extracellular oxidative stress, triggered by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond. Acting as the first line of defense against oxidative stress, HmuR not only guarantees an immediate response to the changing environment but also provides a fine-tuned mechanism that allows a gradual response to perceived stress. The T6SS/HmuR-mediated active zinc transport system is also involved in bacterial virulence and contact-independent bacterial competition. We describe a sophisticated bacterial zinc acquisition mechanism affording insights into the role of metal ion transport systems.

  1. The role of volume-sensitive ion transport systems in regulation of epithelial transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Schettino, T; Marshall, W S

    2007-01-01

    described in the renal cortex thick ascending limb (cTAL)) we have focused on the role of swelling-activated K+- and anion-conductive pathways in response to hypotonicity, and on the role of the apical (luminal) Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC2) in the response to hypertonicity. The shrinkage...... on the apical side and the Na+/K+ ATPase, NKCC1 and a K+ channel on the basolateral side. Osmotic control of Cl- secretion across the operculum epithelium includes: (i) hyperosmotic shrinkage activation of NKCC1 via PKC, MLCK, p38, OSR1 and SPAK; (ii) deactivation of NKCC by hypotonic cell swelling...

  2. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in... TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61 Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. (a) A public entity shall operate a designated...

  3. Regulation of ER-Golgi Transport Dynamics by GTPases in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins are synthesized de novo in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. They are transported through the Golgi apparatus and then delivered to their proper destinations. The ER and the Golgi play a central role in protein processing and sorting and show dynamic features in their forms. Ras super family small GTPases mediate the protein transport through and between these organelles. The ER-localized GTPase, Sar1, facilitates the formation of COPII transport carriers at the ER exit sites (ERES on the ER for the transport of cargo proteins from the ER to the Golgi. The Golgi-localized GTPase, Arf1, controls intra-Golgi, and Golgi-to-ER transport of cargo proteins by the formation of COPI carriers. Rab GTPases localized at the Golgi, which are responsible for fusion of membranes, are thought to establish the identities of compartments. Recent evidence suggests that these small GTPases regulate not only discrete sites for generation/fusion of transport carriers, but also membrane dynamics of the organelles where they locate to ensure the integrity of transport. Here we summarize the current understandings about the membrane traffic between these organelles and highlight the cutting-edge advances from super-resolution live imaging of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  4. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  5. Roles of auxin transport and action in the gravity-regulated morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Shimizu, M.; Hotta, T.; Dai-Hee, K.; Yanai, K.; Kamada, M.; Fujii, N.; Miyazawa, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    Cucumber Cucumis sativus L seedlings develop a specialized protuberance peg on the lower side of the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root when seeds germinate in a horizontal position The peg plays an important role in pulling seedling out from the seed coat We have reported that cucumber seedlings potentially develop a peg on each side of the transition zone but peg development on the upper side is suppressed in response to gravity Auxin is the primary factor responsible for the induction or the suppression of peg formation Here we investigated the roles of auxin transport and action in the gravity-regulated formation suppression of the peg in cucumber seedlings When cucumber seedlings were treated with inhibitors of auxin efflux carrier a peg was formed not only on the lower side but also on the upper side of the gravistimulated transition zone suggesting that activation of auxin efflux carriers is required for the suppression of peg formation To identify auxin efflux carriers involved in the suppression of peg formation by graviresponse we isolated six cucumber cDNAs of PIN auxin efflux carrier genes and investigated their mRNA accumulation and protein expression Our results show that CsPIN1 and CsPIN6 could play a role in the redistribution of auxin in the transition zone To understand auxin action on peg formation suppression we next examined the transcriptional regulators for the expressions of auxin-responsive genes The results suggest that a higher level of auxin in the lower side of the

  6. Arachidonic acid metabolism and regulation of ion transport in rabbit Clara cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scott, M.R.; McIntire, M.R.; Henke, D.C. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Sonicates of freshly isolated Clara cells produced thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin (PG) D2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT), and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) as detected using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sonicates of Clara cells cultured on collagen matrices produced the same metabolites. Rates of (3H)arachidonic acid metabolism increased in culture, but the changes were not associated with changes in cell number. Sonicates of freshly isolated tracheal cells produced mainly 12-HETE. Cyclooxygenase products were not produced consistently. Sonicates of tracheal cultures produced significant quantities of TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and HHT, but 12-HETE remained the major metabolite. Equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) across cultured Clara cell epithelia was unaffected by bilateral exposure to TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, HHT, or 12-HETE. A minor (1%) decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rt) followed exposure to PGD2. Indomethacin had no significant effect on Rt or Ieq, but exposure of indomethacin-pretreated preparations to PGE2 revealed a minor (2%) increase in Ieq. In contrast, tracheal cell epithelia exhibited significant changes in Rt and Ieq in response to PGF2 alpha, PGE2, and HHT. These results indicate that Clara cells metabolize arachidonic acid to biologically active eicosanoids, but the resulting products do not play a major role in regulation of transepithelial ion transport by this cell type.

  7. Angiotensin II up-regulates monocarboxylate transporters expression in the rat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirat, D; Shousha, S

    2016-01-11

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major regulator of aldosterone secretion in the adrenal zona glomerulosa because it up-regulates the expression of a large number of genes involved in aldosterone biosynthesis. The transport of acetate across adrenocortical cells is a crucial step in the de novo synthesis of cholesterol, the steroid precursor of aldosterone. However, whether Ang II can affect this transport remains unknown. The current study aims to investigate the effect of in vivo infusion of Ang II on monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4) gene expression in the rat adrenal gland. Immunohistochemical analysis and real-time PCR were used to examine the expression of MCTs at the protein and mRNA levels, respectively. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that higher numbers of cells expressed MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 proteins in the zona glomerulosa and zona fasiculata of the adrenal cortex of Ang II-infused rats. Furthermore, real-time PCR indicated that in vivo infusion of Ang II increased the mRNA levels of MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 in the rat adrenal gland. MCT up-regulation might maximize the intracellular transport of acetate in response to the stimulatory effect of Ang II on aldosterone secretion by the adrenal zona glomerulosa..

  8. Regulation of GLUT4 activity in myotubes by 3-O-methyl-d-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamni, Ofer; Cohen, Guy; Gruzman, Arie; Zaid, Hilal; Klip, Amira; Cerasi, Erol; Sasson, Shlomo

    2017-10-01

    The rate of glucose influx to skeletal muscles is determined primarily by the number of functional units of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) in the myotube plasma membrane. The abundance of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane is tightly regulated by insulin or contractile activity, which employ distinct pathways to translocate GLUT4-rich vesicles from intracellular compartments. Various studies have indicated that GLUT4 intrinsic activity is also regulated by conformational changes and/or interactions with membrane components and intracellular proteins in the vicinity of the plasma membrane. Here we show that the non-metabolizable glucose analog 3-O-methyl-d-glucose (MeGlc) augmented the rate of hexose transport into myotubes by increasing GLUT4 intrinsic activity without altering the content of the transporter in the plasma membrane. This effect was not a consequence of ATP depletion or hyperosmolar stress and did not involve Akt/PKB or AMPK signal transduction pathways. MeGlc reduced the inhibitory potency (increased Ki) of indinavir, a selective inhibitor of GLUT4, in a dose-dependent manner. Kinetic analyses indicate that MeGlc induced changes in GLUT4 or GLUT4 complexes within the plasma membrane, which enhanced the hexose transport activity and reduced the potency of indinavir inhibition. Finally, we present a simple kinetic analysis for screening and discovering low molecular weight compounds that augment GLUT4 activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulations for storage and transport of biofuels; Regler foer foervaring och transport av biodrivmedel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmefors, Elin; Karlsson, Emelie

    2012-07-01

    The trend towards a fossil-free agriculture is of great importance. Partly due to the fossil fuel energy is finite but also because of the importance of agriculture to reduce the environmental impact of food production. There are also an economic aspect. It is likely that in the near future will be economically burdensome being limited to fossil fuels. Therefore, it is important that agriculture is well prepared to move towards alternative biofuels. The introduction of alternative fuels in agriculture as a substitute for diesel has proven more difficult than in other industrial sectors, depending on both the specific technical conditions and a regulatory framework that may not have been written with agriculture as target. LRF, Farmers' Association, has instructed the JTI, Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, identifying which rules, laws and regulations that will affect farmers at the farm level that for their own use stores and manages one of the most likely future biofuels for agricultural tractors.

  10. mTOR Regulates Endocytosis and Nutrient Transport in Proximal Tubular Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahammer, Florian; Ramakrishnan, Suresh K; Rinschen, Markus M; Larionov, Alexey A; Syed, Maryam; Khatib, Hazim; Roerden, Malte; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Helmstaedter, Martin; Osenberg, Dorothea; Kühne, Lucas; Kretz, Oliver; Wanner, Nicola; Jouret, Francois; Benzing, Thomas; Artunc, Ferruh; Huber, Tobias B; Theilig, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Renal proximal tubular cells constantly recycle nutrients to ensure minimal loss of vital substrates into the urine. Although most of the transport mechanisms have been discovered at the molecular level, little is known about the factors regulating these processes. Here, we show that mTORC1 and mTORC2 specifically and synergistically regulate PTC endocytosis and transport processes. Using a conditional mouse genetic approach to disable nonredundant subunits of mTORC1, mTORC2, or both, we showed that mice lacking mTORC1 or mTORC1/mTORC2 but not mTORC2 alone develop a Fanconi-like syndrome of glucosuria, phosphaturia, aminoaciduria, low molecular weight proteinuria, and albuminuria. Interestingly, proteomics and phosphoproteomics of freshly isolated kidney cortex identified either reduced expression or loss of phosphorylation at critical residues of different classes of specific transport proteins. Functionally, this resulted in reduced nutrient transport and a profound perturbation of the endocytic machinery, despite preserved absolute expression of the main scavenger receptors, MEGALIN and CUBILIN. Our findings highlight a novel mTOR-dependent regulatory network for nutrient transport in renal proximal tubular cells. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Fostering member state implementation of the IAEA's transport regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brittinger, M.T.M.; Wangler, M.E. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Based on a 1959 mandate from the United Nations Economic and Social Council, international safety requirements are embodied in the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' that were first published by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1961 and revised in 1967, 1973, 1985 and 1996 to keep them abreast of scientific and technical developments. The requirements are incorporated into the regulatory documents of the International Civil Aviation Organization for air transport, and the International Maritime Organization for marine transport. As the requirements of the latter documents are legally-binding for the member states of the corresponding organizations, the IAEA safety requirements thus also become mandatory in those countries. The same situation applies for the surface modes in Europe, by means of the regulatory documents of the European Community for rail, road and inland waterways. Nevertheless, the IAEA has not relaxed its efforts to ensure that its Transport Regulations stay abreast of scientific and technical developments; on the contrary, it has been undertaking a regular and vigorous review of its safety requirements, and continues to do so with the assistance of Member States and relevant international organizations. Beyond providing the regulatory basis for the safe transport of radioactive material, however, the IAEA also offers a work programme under which it assists Member States in complying with the regulatory requirements. This assistance comes in the form of providing training on the safety requirements, and publishing documents that facilitate the exchange of information.

  12. Analysis of Charge Carrier Transport in Organic Photovoltaic Active Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of charge carrier transport in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on phenomenological, deterministic charge carrier transport models. The models describe free electron and hole transport, trapping, and detrapping, as well as geminate charge-pair dissociation and geminate and bimolecular recombination, self-consistently with Poisson's equation for the electric field in the active layer. We predict photocurrent evolution in devices with active layers of P3HT, P3HT/PMMA, and P3HT/PS, as well as P3HT/PCBM blends, and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) relations in these devices at steady state. Charge generation propensity, zero-field charge mobilities, and trapping, detrapping, and recombination rate coefficients are determined by fitting the modeling predictions to experimental measurements. We have analyzed effects of the active layer morphology for layers consisting of both pristine drop-cast films and of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, as well as effects on device performance of insulating NP doping in conducting polymers and of specially designed interlayers placed between an electrode and the active layer. The model predictions provide valuable input toward synthesis of active layers with prescribed morphology that optimize OPV device performance.

  13. Energy use in the Marine Transportation Industry. Task II. Regulations and tariffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    The regulatory framework of the commercial marine transportation industry is defined and these regulations are evaluated in terms of their energy impact. The approach used in the evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs was structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Each of these three steps is described in detail. The report is organized around nine chapters. Chapter I contains an introduction and summary of the results and conclusions. Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes: a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction; and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the seven existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. The results of each of these seven case studies are summarized. (MCW)

  14. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  15. Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

  16. Effects of taurine on plasma glucose concentration and active glucose transport in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yo; Kawamata, Koichi

    2017-11-01

    Taurine lowers blood glucose levels and improves hyperglycemia. However, its effects on glucose transport in the small intestine have not been investigated. Here, we elucidated the effect of taurine on glucose absorption in the small intestine. In the oral glucose tolerance test, addition of 10 mmol/L taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations. To investigate whether the suppressive effect of taurine occurs via down-regulation of active glucose transport in the small intestine, we performed an assay using the everted sac of the rat jejunum. Addition of taurine to the mucosal side of the jejunum suppressed active glucose transport via sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). After elimination of chloride ions from the mucosal solution, taurine did not show suppressive effects on active glucose transport. These results suggest that taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations via suppression of SGLT1 activity in the rat jejunum, depending on chloride ions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Active transport of Ca2+ by an artificial photosynthetic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ira M; Farfano, Hebe M Vanegas; Bogani, Federica; Primak, Alex; Liddell, Paul A; Otero, Luis; Sereno, Leonides; Silber, Juana J; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens

    2002-11-28

    Transport of calcium ions across membranes and against a thermodynamic gradient is essential to many biological processes, including muscle contraction, the citric acid cycle, glycogen metabolism, release of neurotransmitters, vision, biological signal transduction and immune response. Synthetic systems that transport metal ions across lipid or liquid membranes are well known, and in some cases light has been used to facilitate transport. Typically, a carrier molecule located in a symmetric membrane binds the ion from aqueous solution on one side and releases it on the other. The thermodynamic driving force is provided by an ion concentration difference between the two aqueous solutions, coupling to such a gradient in an auxiliary species, or photomodulation of the carrier by an asymmetric photon flux. Here we report a different approach, in which active transport is driven not by concentration gradients, but by light-induced electron transfer in a photoactive molecule that is asymmetrically disposed across a lipid bilayer. The system comprises a synthetic, light-driven transmembrane Ca2+ pump based on a redox-sensitive, lipophilic Ca2+-binding shuttle molecule whose function is powered by an intramembrane artificial photosynthetic reaction centre. The resulting structure transports calcium ions across the bilayer of a liposome to develop both a calcium ion concentration gradient and a membrane potential, expanding Mitchell's concept of a redox loop mechanism for protons to include divalent cations. Although the quantum yield is relatively low (approximately 1 per cent), the Ca2+ electrochemical potential developed is significant.

  18. No Pasaran! Role of the axon initial segment in the regulation of protein transport and the maintenance of axonal identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Christophe; Dargent, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    The transmission of information in the brain depends on the highly polarized architecture of neurons. A number of cellular transport processes support this organization, including active targeting of proteins and passive corralling between compartments. The axon initial segment (AIS), which separates the somatodendritic and axonal compartments, has a key role in neuronal physiology, as both the initiation site of action potentials and the gatekeeper of the axonal arborization. Over the years, the AIS main components and their interactions have been progressively unraveled, as well as their role in the AIS assembly and maintenance. Two mechanisms have been shown to contribute to the regulation of protein transport at the AIS: a surface diffusion barrier and an intracellular traffic filter. However, a molecular understanding of these processes is still lacking. In the view of recent results on the AIS cytoskeleton structure, we will discuss how a better knowledge of the AIS architecture can help understanding its role in the regulation of protein transport and the maintenance of axonal identity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cholesterol metabolism, transport, and hepatic regulation in dairy cows during transition and early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, E C; Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M; Albrecht, C

    2014-09-01

    The transition from the nonlactating to the lactating state represents a critical period for dairy cow lipid metabolism because body reserves have to be mobilized to meet the increasing energy requirements for the initiation of milk production. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview on cholesterol homeostasis in transition dairy cows by assessing in parallel plasma, milk, and hepatic tissue for key factors of cholesterol metabolism, transport, and regulation. Blood samples and liver biopsies were taken from 50 multiparous Holstein dairy cows in wk 3 antepartum (a.p.), wk 1 postpartum (p.p.), wk 4 p.p., and wk 14 p.p. Milk sampling was performed in wk 1, 4, and 14 p.p. Blood and milk lipid concentrations [triglycerides (TG), cholesterol, and lipoproteins], enzyme activities (phospholipid transfer protein and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase) were analyzed using enzymatic assays. Hepatic gene expression patterns of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGC) synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and HMGC reductase (HMGCR), sterol regulatory element-binding factor (SREBF)-1 and -2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 and ABCG1, liver X receptor (LXR) α and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Plasma TG, cholesterol, and lipoprotein concentrations decreased from wk 3 a.p. to a minimum in wk 1 p.p., and then gradually increased until wk 14 p.p. Compared with wk 4 p.p., phospholipid transfer protein activity was increased in wk 1 p.p., whereas lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity was lowest at this period. Total cholesterol concentration and mass, and cholesterol concentration in the milk fat fraction decreased from wk 1 p.p. to wk 4 p.p. Both total and milk fat cholesterol concentration were decreased in wk 4 p.p. compared with wk 1 and 14 p.p. The mRNA abundance of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (SREBF-2, HMGCS1, and

  20. The Canadian approach to science-based regulation of the long distance transport of animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Doonan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Government regulators face numerous challenges when considering economic necessities (real and perceived, societal expectations on how animals should be treated, scientific research into the needs of various animal species and daily transport practices in the 'real world'. Do we regulate to promote economic competitiveness, to appease animal welfare interest groups and satisfy industry lobbying organisations, or to meet the needs of the animals? In Canada, a recipe to blend regulatory intervention with voluntary, industry-derived standards is the approach of choice.

  1. Maternal immune activation epigenetically regulates hippocampal serotonin transporter levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali N. Reisinger

    2016-10-01

    Based on these results we propose a model in which the long-lasting impact of MIA on depression-like behavior and associated molecular and cellular aberrations in the offspring is brought about by the modulation of epigenetic processes and consequent enduring changes in gene expression. These data provide additional insights into the principles underlying the impact of early infectious stress on the development of MDD and may contribute to the development of new targets for antidepressant therapy.

  2. Butyrate transcriptionally enhances peptide transporter PepT1 expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Dalmasso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PepT1, an intestinal epithelial apical di/tripeptide transporter, is normally expressed in the small intestine and induced in colon during chronic inflammation. This study aimed at investigating PepT1 regulation by butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by commensal bacteria and accumulated inside inflamed colonocyte. RESULTS: We found that butyrate treatment of human intestinal epithelial Caco2-BBE cells increased human PepT1 (hPepT1 promoter activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with maximal activity observed in cells treated with 5 mM butyrate for 24 h. Under this condition, hPepT1 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression levels were increased as assessed by luciferase assay, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. hPepT1 transport activity was accordingly increased by approximately 2.5-fold. Butyrate did not alter hPepT1 mRNA half-life indicating that butyrate acts at the transcriptional level. Molecular analyses revealed that Cdx2 is the most important transcription factor for butyrate-induced increase of hPepT1 expression and activity in Caco2-BBE cells. Butyrate-activated Cdx2 binding to hPepT1 promoter was confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, Caco2-BBE cells overexpressing Cdx2 exhibited greater hPepT1 expression level than wild-type cells. Finally, treatment of mice with 5 mM butyrate added to drinking water for 24 h increased colonic PepT1 mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as enhanced PepT1 transport activity in colonic apical membranes vesicles. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that butyrate increases PepT1 expression and activity in colonic epithelial cells, which provides a new understanding of PepT1 regulation during chronic inflammation.

  3. Rhythmic potassium transport regulates the circadian clock in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Erin A; Crosby, Priya; Kitcatt, Stephen J; Parry, Jack S W; Bernardini, Andrea; Abdallat, Rula G; Braun, Gabriella; Fatoyinbo, Henry O; Harrison, Esther J; Edgar, Rachel S; Hoettges, Kai F; Reddy, Akhilesh B; Jabr, Rita I; von Schantz, Malcolm; O'Neill, John S; Labeed, Fatima H

    2017-12-07

    Circadian rhythms organize many aspects of cell biology and physiology to a daily temporal program that depends on clock gene expression cycles in most mammalian cell types. However, circadian rhythms are also observed in isolated mammalian red blood cells (RBCs), which lack nuclei, suggesting the existence of post-translational cellular clock mechanisms in these cells. Here we show using electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches that human RBCs display circadian regulation of membrane conductance and cytoplasmic conductivity that depends on the cycling of cytoplasmic K+ levels. Using pharmacological intervention and ion replacement, we show that inhibition of K+ transport abolishes RBC electrophysiological rhythms. Our results suggest that in the absence of conventional transcription cycles, RBCs maintain a circadian rhythm in membrane electrophysiology through dynamic regulation of K+ transport.

  4. Development, deployment, and assessment of activity-based transportation courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This project developed four new activitybased transportation courses including Traffic Signal Systems Operations and : Design, Understanding and Communicating Transportation Data, Introduction to Freight Transportation, and Ru...

  5. Self-regulation as a type of managerial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Algazina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 342.9The subject. In the context of the ongoing administrative reform in the Russian Federation the issue of self-regulation is becoming increasingly important.Introduction of Institute of self-regulation is intended to reduce the degree of state intervention in private spheres of professional activity, to eliminate excessive administrative barriers, reduce government expenditures on regulation and control in their respective areas of operation, which is especially important in the current economic conditions.However, in Russian legal science is no recognized definition of "self-regulation", but a unity of views on the question of the relationship between self-regulation and state regulation of business relations.In this regard, the author attempts to examine the concept of "self-regulation" through the prism of knowledge about public administration.The purpose of the article is to identify the essential features and to articulate the concept of self-regulation by comparing it with other varieties of regulation.Methodology. The methodological basis for the study: general scientific methods (analysis, synthesis, comparison, description; private and academic (interpretation, formal-legal.Results, scope. Based on the analysis allocated in the science of administrative law approaches to the system of public administration justifies the conclusion that the notion "regulation" is specific in relation to the generic concept of "management" and is a kind of management, consisting in the drafting of rules of conduct and sanctions for non-compliance or inadequate performance.In addition, the article highlights the problem of the genesis of self-regulation, building a system of principles of self-regulation, comparison of varieties of self-regulatory organizations among themselves.Conclusions. The comparison of self-regulation other types of regulation (such as state regulation and co-regulation highlighted the essential features of this phenomenon

  6. The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Hardaway, J Andrew; Refai, Osama; Marks, Christian R; Snider, Sam L; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Spencer, William C; Colbran, Roger J; Miller, David M; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-09-20

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly in vivo, remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function dat-1 mutations. Here, we report the identity of swip-13, which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly in vivo Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may

  7. DETERMINED MODEL FOR COORDINATED REGULATION OF MOTOR TRANSPORT MOVEMENT ON HIGHWAY WITH T-SHAPE CROSSROADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Shut

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines variants of higher control efficiency in respect of road traffic by creating coordinated regulation  with the help of a determined module. Model application conditions have been determined for specific traffic situations with due account of transport-pedestrian load. The paper contains proposals for the model optimization directed on reduction of  motor vehicle delay in front of the in-traffic light  stop-line along the main highway direction.

  8. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  9. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  10. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  11. Transportable, Low-Dose Active Fast-Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, John T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wright, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McConchie, Seth M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palles, Blake A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document contains a description of the method of transportable, low-dose active fast-neutron imaging as developed by ORNL. The discussion begins with the technique and instrumentation and continues with the image reconstruction and analysis. The analysis discussion includes an example of how a gap smaller than the neutron production spot size and detector size can be detected and characterized depending upon the measurement time.

  12. Active Power Regulation based on Droop for AC Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Coelho, Ernane A. A.; Firoozabadi, Mehdi Savaghebi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two different control strategies are proposed to address the active power regulation issue in AC microgrids. The principle of power regulation in the droop controller is firstly introduced. Frequency scheduling and droop gain scheduling on top of droop control is proposed to succes...

  13. Mea6 controls VLDL transport through the coordinated regulation of COPII assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqing; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Fan, Junwan; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Mei; Shi, Lei; Yang, Lin; Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaowei; Wang, Yingchun; Gao, Fei; Shui, Guanghou; Xu, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation, which may be caused by the disturbance in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion in the liver, can lead to fatty liver disease. VLDL is synthesized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to Golgi apparatus for secretion into plasma. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for VLDL transport is still poorly understood. Here we show that hepatocyte-specific deletion of meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (Mea6)/cutaneous T cell lymphoma-associated antigen 5C (cTAGE5C) leads to severe fatty liver and hypolipemia in mice. Quantitative lipidomic and proteomic analyses indicate that Mea6/cTAGE5 deletion impairs the secretion of different types of lipids and proteins, including VLDL, from the liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that Mea6/cTAGE5 interacts with components of the ER coat protein complex II (COPII) which, when depleted, also cause lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Our findings not only reveal several novel factors that regulate lipid transport, but also provide evidence that Mea6 plays a critical role in lipid transportation through the coordinated regulation of the COPII machinery. PMID:27311593

  14. How is active transport associated with children's and adolescents' physical activity over time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carver Alison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As few longitudinal studies have examined how active transport is associated with physical activity among children and adolescents over time, and how active transport tracks through childhood and adolescence, it is important to understand whether physically active children retain their activity patterns through adolescence. This study aimed to examine (a tracking of active transport and of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA across childhood and adolescence in two age cohorts; and (b associations between active transport and MVPA at three distinct time-points, over five years. Methods This longitudinal study of two cohorts aged 5-6 years (n = 134 and 10-12 years (n = 201 at baseline (T1, in Melbourne, Australia, gathered follow-up data at three (T2 and five years (T3. Walking/cycling to local destinations was survey-reported; while MVPA was recorded using accelerometers and mean time spent daily in MVPA on week days and on weekends was computed. Tracking of these behaviours was examined over five years using General Estimating Equations. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine associations between active transport and MVPA at each time-point. Results Active transport tracked moderately among children (boys, βs = 0.36; girls, βs = 0.51 but not among adolescents. Physical activity tracked moderately (βs value range: 0.33-0.55 for both cohorts. Active transport was not associated with children's MVPA at any time-point, but was associated with adolescent boys' MVPA on week days at T1 (B = 1.37 (95% CI: 0.15, 2.59, at T2 (B = 1.27 (95% CI: 0.03, 2.51 and at T3 (B = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.01, 1.47, and with adolescent girls' MVPA on week days (B = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.76 and on weekends (B = 0.54 (95% CI: 0.16, 0.93 at T3 only. Conclusion Active transport was associated only with boys' MVPA during early adolescence and with boys' and girls' MVPA during late adolescence. While active transport should be encouraged

  15. Caco-2 cells - expression, regulation and function of drug transporters compared with human jejunal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, S; Strohmeier, J; Busch, D; Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2017-03-01

    Induction or inhibition of drug transporting proteins by concomitantly administered drugs can cause serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, in vitro assays currently available are mostly for studying the inhibitory potential of drugs on intestinal transporter proteins, rather than induction. Therefore, this study investigated the suitability of the frequently used intestinal Caco-2 cell line to predict transporter-mediated DDIs as caused by induction via activation of nuclear receptors. TaqMan® low density arrays and LC-MS/MS based targeted proteomics were used to evaluate transporter expression in Caco-2 cells in comparison with jejunal tissue, in culture-time dependence studies and after incubation with different known inducers of drug metabolism and transport. Additionally, studies on ABCB1 function were performed using Transwell® assays with [3 H]-digoxin and [3 H]-talinolol as substrates after incubation with the prototypical inducers rifampicin, St John's wort, carbamazepine and efavirenz. The gene and protein expression pattern of drug transporters in Caco-2 cells and jejunal tissue differed considerably. For some transporters culture-time dependent differences in mRNA expression and/or protein abundance could be determined. Finally, none of the studied prototypical inducers showed an effect either on mRNA expression and protein abundance or on the function of ABCB1. Differences in transporter expression in Caco-2 cells compared with jejunal tissue, as well as expression dependence on culture time must be considered in in vitro studies to avoid under- or overestimation of certain transporters. The Caco-2 cell model is not suitable for the evaluation of DDIs caused by transporter induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Notch 1 signaling regulates peripheral T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Todd N; Tang, Qizhi; Wolfe, Michael; He, Yiping; Pear, Warren S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2004-04-01

    Notch signaling has been identified as an important regulator of leukocyte differentiation and thymic maturation. Less is known about the role of Notch signaling in regulating mature T cells. We examined the role of Notch 1 in regulating peripheral T cell activity in vitro and in vivo. Coligation of Notch 1 together with TCR and CD28 resulted in a dramatic inhibition of T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. This effect was dependent on presenilin activity and induced the expression of HES-1, suggestive of Notch 1 signaling. Biochemical analysis demonstrated an inhibition of AKT and GSK3beta phosphorylation following Notch 1 engagement while other biochemical signals such as TCR and ERK phosphorylation remained intact. Similar effects were observed in vivo in an adoptive transfer model. Therefore, Notch 1 signaling may play an important role in regulating naive T cell activation and homeostasis.

  17. School physical activity policies and active transport to school among pupils in the Czech Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollein, Tomas; Vasickova, Jana; Bucksch, Jens; Kalman, Michal; Sigmundova, Dagmar; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    Background: Previous studies indicate that the level of physical activity (PA) significantly affects children's health. Active transport to school is PA on a daily basis that may contribute substantially to the overall volume of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Aim of our study was to

  18. Effects of cyclosporine on osteoclast activity: inhibition of calcineurin activity with minimal effects on bone resorption and acid transport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John P; McKenna, Margaret A; Thames, Allyn M; McDonald, Jay M

    2003-03-01

    Cyclosporine results in rapid and profound bone loss in transplant patients, an effect ascribed to osteoclasts. Cyclosporine, complexed with the appropriate immunophilin, inhibits calcineurin (the calcium/calmodulin dependent serine/threonine phosphatase) activity. We tested the hypothesis that cyclosporine inhibits calcineurin activity in osteoclasts, resulting in stimulation of osteoclast activity. We compared the effects of cyclosporine A and the calmodulin antagonist, tamoxifen, on bone resorption by avian osteoclasts. Tamoxifen inhibits bone resorption approximately 60%, whereas cyclosporine A only inhibited bone resorption 12%. One-hour treatment with 100 nM cyclosporine inhibited osteoclast calcineurin activity 70% in whole cell lysates, whereas 10 microM tamoxifen only inhibited calcineurin activity 25%. We compared the effects of cyclosporine A and tamoxifen on acid transport activity in isolated membrane vesicles and in isolated membrane vesicles obtained from osteoclasts treated with cyclosporine A or tamoxifen under conditions that inhibit calcineurin activity. Direct addition of cyclosporine A in the acid transport assay, or pretreatment of cells with cyclosporine A followed by membrane isolation, had no effect on acid transport activity in membrane vesicles. In contrast, direct addition of tamoxifen to membranes inhibits acid transport activity, an effect that can be prevented by addition of exogenous calmodulin. Furthermore, acid transport activity was also inhibited in membrane vesicles isolated from cells treated with tamoxifen. In conclusion, cyclosporine A inhibits osteoclast calcineurin activity; however, calcineurin inhibition does not correspond to a significant effect on acid transport activity in isolated membrane vesicles or bone resorption by osteoclasts.

  19. [Cloning and expression analysis of a zinc-regulated transporters (ZRT), iron-regulated transporter (IRT)-like protein encoding gene in Dendrobium officinale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Li, Yi-Min; Li, Biao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The zinc-regulated transporters (ZRT), iron-regulated transporter (IRT)-like protein (ZIP) plays an important role in the growth and development of plant. In this study, a full length cDNA of ZIP encoding gene, designed as DoZIP1 (GenBank accession KJ946203), was identified from Dendrobium officinale using RT-PCR and RACE. Bioinformatics analysis showed that DoZIP1 consisted of a 1,056 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoded a 351-aa protein with a molecular weight of 37.57 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.09. The deduced DoZIP1 protein contained the conserved ZIP domain, and its secondary structure was composed of 50.71% alpha helix, 11.11% extended strand, 36.18% random coil, and beta turn 1.99%. DoZIP1 protein exhibited a signal peptide and eight transmembrane domains, presumably locating in cell membrane. The amino acid sequence had high homology with ZIP proteins from Arabidopsis, alfalfa and rice. A phylogenetic tree analysis demonstrated that DoZIP1 was closely related to AtZIP10 and OsZIP3, and they were clustered into one clade. Real time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription level of DoZIP1 in D. officinale roots was the highest (4.19 fold higher than that of stems), followed by that of leaves (1.12 fold). Molecular characters of DoZIP1 will be useful for further functional determination of the gene involving in the growth and development of D. officinale.

  20. Chloride transport in human fibroblasts is activated by hypotonic shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugolo, M.; Mastocola, T.; Flamigni, A.; Lenaz, G. (Universita' di Bologna (Italy))

    1989-05-15

    Incubation of human skin fibroblasts in hypotonic media induced the activation of {sup 36}Cl- efflux which was roughly proportional to the decrease in the osmolality of the media. The efflux of {sup 36}Cl- was insensitive to DIDS plus furosemide and inhibited by addition of a Cl- channel blocker such as 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB). We propose that a conductive pathway for Cl- transport, almost silent in isotonic conditions, is activated by exposing human fibroblasts to hypotonic shock, this conclusion being supported by evidence that also {sup 36}Cl- influx was enhanced by hypotonic medium.

  1. Tributary Reservoir Regulation Activities (August 1991 - July 1992)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    construction of relocations for transportation facilities and utilities. Lake Audubon, a subimpoundment of Lake Sakakawea , is located just northeast...Audubon from Lake Sakakawea . The pool was maintained as close to the target pool of 1847.2 as possible. Maximums of Record: Minimums of Record...AUDUBON LAKE SAKAKAWEA SUBIMPOUNDMENT MISSOURI RIVER BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA 1991-1992 REGULATION A 10-year pool elevation hydrograph is shown below

  2. Tributary Reservoir Regulation Activities: Summary of 1985-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    for transportation facilities and utilities. Lake Audubon, a subimpoundment of Lake Sakakawea , is located . just northeast of Riverdale, North... Sakakawea , approximately 12 miles northeast of Garrison Dam, North Dakota. Purpose - The dam and reservoir are a relocation route for trans- portation...facilities and utilities which were inundated by Lake Sakakawea , a regulating reservoir for the Bureau’s Garrison Divorsion Unit, and provide for fish

  3. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 9 through 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-nine learning activities grouped…

  4. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 6 through 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 6-9. It contains forty-two learning activities grouped…

  5. Characterization of a developmentally regulated amino acid transporter (AAT1p) of the rust fungus Uromyces fabae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Christine; Ernst, Michael; Hahn, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    summary In the rust fungus Uromyces fabae, invasion of the host plant and haustorium formation are accompanied by the activation of many genes (PIGs =in planta induced genes). In addition to the previously described AAT2 (PIG2), AAT1 (PIG27) was found to encode a protein with a high similarity to fungal amino acid permeases. AAT1 transcripts are present in germinated hyphae and throughout the mycelium later in the infection process, but occur at the highest levels in haustoria. Expression of AAT1p in a histidine uptake-defective yeast mutant revealed energy-dependent transport of (14)C-histidine, with a K(M) value of 25.8 microm. In addition, complementation analysis revealed AAT1-dependent transport for lysine. Using Xenopus oocytes as expression system, AAT1p-dependent symport of protons with a broad spectrum of amino acids was observed, with the highest activities obtained with histidine and lysine. These results confirm that in rust fungi, the expression of amino acid transporters is developmentally regulated and occurs preferentially in the parasitic phase of development.

  6. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  7. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  8. Roles of Renal Proximal Tubule Transport in Acid/Base Balance and Blood Pressure Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motonobu Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium-coupled bicarbonate absorption from renal proximal tubules (PTs plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of systemic acid/base balance. Indeed, mutations in the Na+-HCO3- cotransporter NBCe1, which mediates a majority of bicarbonate exit from PTs, cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis associated with ocular and other extrarenal abnormalities. Sodium transport in PTs also plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. For example, PT transport stimulation by insulin may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension associated with insulin resistance. Type 1 angiotensin (Ang II receptors in PT are critical for blood pressure homeostasis. Paradoxically, the effects of Ang II on PT transport are known to be biphasic. Unlike in other species, however, Ang II is recently shown to dose-dependently stimulate human PT transport via nitric oxide/cGMP/ERK pathway, which may represent a novel therapeutic target in human hypertension. In this paper, we will review the physiological and pathophysiological roles of PT transport.

  9. Sugar regulation of SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1 (STP1) expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise Lizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Alma Fabiola; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Sugars regulate the expression of many genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, sugars induce or repress the expression of >1800 genes, including the STP1 (SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1) gene, which encodes an H+/monosaccharide cotransporter. STP1 transcript levels decrease more rapidly after the addition of low concentrations of sugars than the levels of other repressed genes, such as DIN6 (DARK-INDUCED 6). We found that this regulation is exerted at the transcriptional level and is initiated by phosphorylatable sugars. Interestingly, the sugar signal that modulates STP1 expression is transmitted through a HEXOKINASE 1-independent signalling pathway. Finally, analysis of the STP1 5′ regulatory region allowed us to delimit a region of 309bp that contains the cis elements implicated in the glucose regulation of STP1 expression. Putative cis-acting elements involved in this response were identified. PMID:25281700

  10. Regulation of the Na+,Cl- Coupled Creatine Transporter CreaT (SLC6A8) by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fezai, Myriam; Warsi, Jamshed; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8), a Na+,Cl- coupled transporter is expressed in diverse tissues including the brain. Genetic defects of SLC6A8 result in mental retardation with seizures. The present study explored the regulation of CreaT by Janus kinase JAK3, which is expressed in a variety of tissues including the brain and participates in the regulation of cell survival and differentiation of neuronal precursor cells. CreaT was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with or without wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568V JAK3 and inactive K851A JAK3. Creatine transport in those oocytes was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Electrogenic creatine transport was observed in CreaT expressing oocytes but not in water-injected oocytes. In CreaT expressing oocytes co-expression of JAK3 or A568VJAK3, but not co-expression of K851A JAK3 was followed by a significant decrease of creatine induced current. According to kinetic analysis JAK3 significantly decreased the maximal creatine transport rate. In CreaT and JAK3 expressing oocytes the creatine induced current was significantly increased by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM). JAK3 is a powerful negative regulator of the creatine transporter CreaT. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Regulation of the Na+,Cl- Coupled Creatine Transporter CreaT (SLC6A8 by the Janus Kinase JAK3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Fezai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The creatine transporter CreaT (SLC6A8, a Na+,Cl- coupled transporter is expressed in diverse tissues including the brain. Genetic defects of SLC6A8 result in mental retardation with seizures. The present study explored the regulation of CreaT by Janus kinase JAK3, which is expressed in a variety of tissues including the brain and participates in the regulation of cell survival and differentiation of neuronal precursor cells. Methods: CreaT was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with or without wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568VJAK3 and inactive K851AJAK3. Creatine transport in those oocytes was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Electrogenic creatine transport was observed in CreaT expressing oocytes but not in water-injected oocytes. In CreaT expressing oocytes co-expression of JAK3 or A568VJAK3, but not co-expression of K851AJAK3 was followed by a significant decrease of creatine induced current. According to kinetic analysis JAK3 significantly decreased the maximal creatine transport rate. In CreaT and JAK3 expressing oocytes the creatine induced current was significantly increased by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM. Conclusion: JAK3 is a powerful negative regulator of the creatine transporter CreaT.

  12. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  13. A small group activity about bacterial regulation and complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Susan; Hanson, Buck; Parks, Adam

    2010-01-01

    As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open-book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  14. Synapse-Assembly Proteins Maintain Synaptic Vesicle Cluster Stability and Regulate Synaptic Vesicle Transport in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stacey L; Yorks, Rosalina M; Morrison, Logan M; Hoover, Christopher M; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The functional integrity of neurons requires the bidirectional active transport of synaptic vesicles (SVs) in axons. The kinesin motor KIF1A transports SVs from somas to stable SV clusters at synapses, while dynein moves them in the opposite direction. However, it is unclear how SV transport is regulated and how SVs at clusters interact with motor proteins. We addressed these questions by isolating a rare temperature-sensitive allele of Caenorhabditis elegans unc-104 (KIF1A) that allowed us to manipulate SV levels in axons and dendrites. Growth at 20° and 14° resulted in locomotion rates that were ∼3 and 50% of wild type, respectively, with similar effects on axonal SV levels. Corresponding with the loss of SVs from axons, mutants grown at 14° and 20° showed a 10- and 24-fold dynein-dependent accumulation of SVs in their dendrites. Mutants grown at 14° and switched to 25° showed an abrupt irreversible 50% decrease in locomotion and a 50% loss of SVs from the synaptic region 12-hr post-shift, with no further decreases at later time points, suggesting that the remaining clustered SVs are stable and resistant to retrograde removal by dynein. The data further showed that the synapse-assembly proteins SYD-1, SYD-2, and SAD-1 protected SV clusters from degradation by motor proteins. In syd-1, syd-2, and sad-1 mutants, SVs accumulate in an UNC-104-dependent manner in the distal axon region that normally lacks SVs. In addition to their roles in SV cluster stability, all three proteins also regulate SV transport. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  16. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  17. An aposymbiotic primary coral polyp counteracts acidification by active pH regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshikazu; Iguchi, Akira; Shinzato, Chuya; Inoue, Mayuri; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Corals build their skeletons using extracellular calcifying fluid located in the tissue-skeleton interface. However, the mechanism by which corals control the transport of calcium and other ions from seawater and the mechanism of constant alkalization of calcifying fluid are largely unknown. To address these questions, we performed direct pH imaging at calcification sites (subcalicoblastic medium, SCM) to visualize active pH upregulation in live aposymbiotic primary coral polyps treated with HCl-acidified seawater. Active alkalization was observed in all individuals using vital staining method while the movement of HPTS and Alexa Fluor to SCM suggests that certain ions such as H+ could diffuse via a paracellular pathway to SCM. Among them, we discovered acid-induced oscillations in the pH of SCM (pHSCM), observed in 24% of polyps examined. In addition, we discovered acid-induced pH up-regulation waves in 21% of polyps examined, which propagated among SCMs after exposure to acidified seawater. Our results showed that corals can regulate pHSCM more dynamically than was previously believed. These observations will have important implications for determining how corals regulate pHSCM during calcification. We propose that corals can sense ambient seawater pH via their innate pH-sensitive systems and regulate pHSCM using several unknown pH-regulating ion transporters that coordinate with multicellular signaling occurring in coral tissue.

  18. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Orr H; Fernandez, Vicente I; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Debaillon-Vesque, François P; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-09-16

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1-2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs.

  19. Health impact assessment of active transportation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Natalie; Rojas-Rueda, David; Cole-Hunter, Tom; de Nazelle, Audrey; Dons, Evi; Gerike, Regine; Götschi, Thomas; Int Panis, Luc; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Walking and cycling for transportation (i.e. active transportation, AT), provide substantial health benefits from increased physical activity (PA). However, risks of injury from exposure to motorized traffic and their emissions (i.e. air pollution) exist. The objective was to systematically review studies conducting health impact assessment (HIA) of a mode shift to AT on grounds of associated health benefits and risks. Systematic database searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Transportation Research International Documentation were performed by two independent researchers, augmented by bibliographic review, internet searches and expert consultation to identify peer-reviewed studies from inception to December 2014. Thirty studies were included, originating predominantly from Europe, but also the United States, Australia and New Zealand. They compromised of mostly HIA approaches of comparative risk assessment and cost-benefit analysis. Estimated health benefit-risk or benefit-cost ratios of a mode shift to AT ranged between -2 and 360 (median=9). Effects of increased PA contributed the most to estimated health benefits, which strongly outweighed detrimental effects of traffic incidents and air pollution exposure on health. Despite different HIA methodologies being applied with distinctive assumptions on key parameters, AT can provide substantial net health benefits, irrespective of geographical context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ecdysteroids in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.): biosynthesis, transport and regulation of levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrim, Ahmed; Maria, Annick; Sayah, Fouad; Lafont, René; Takvorian, Najat

    2008-10-01

    Many plant species produce phytoecdysteroids (PEs: i.e. analogues of insect steroid hormones). There is increasing evidence that PEs are used as a chemical defence by plants against non-adapted insects and nematodes. PEs are good candidates for the development of an environmentally safe approach to crop protection. Most crop species do not accumulate PEs. However, many arguments support the idea that most, if not all, plant species have the genetic ability to produce PEs, but the biosynthetic pathway is not active. A better understanding of the PE biosynthetic pathway and its regulation is consequently necessary. Spinach is one of the very few crop plants which produce large amounts of PEs, of which 20-hydroxyecdysone is the major component. Labeling experiments with radiolabeled precursor (mevalonic acid), putative ecdysteroid intermediates and 20-hydroxyecdysone itself have allowed investigation of PE biosynthesis and transport during spinach development. Biosynthesis takes place in older leaf sets ("sources"), but not in the young developing ones, which in contrast accumulate (acting as "sinks") the PEs produced by the older leaves. PEs are thus continuously redistributed within the developing plant, as its leaf set number increases. The biosynthetic pathway has been analyzed using excised leaves and various labeled precursors, and a preferential sequence of the last steps has been established. Although they do not produce PEs, apical leaf sets are nevertheless able to perform several putative terminal steps of PE biosynthesis. The regulatory mechanisms of PE synthesis appear to involve a direct negative feedback of 20-hydroxyecdysone (the major PE in spinach) on its own synthesis; thus, a sustained synthesis in older leaves requires that they can export the PE they produce.

  1. Fatty acid transport protein 1 regulates retinoid metabolism and photoreceptor development in mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubizolle, Aurélie; Guillou, Laurent; Mollereau, Bertrand; Hamel, Christian P.

    2017-01-01

    In retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), RPE65 catalyzes the isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol in the visual cycle and controls the rhodopsin regeneration rate. However, the mechanisms by which these processes are regulated are still unclear. Fatty Acid Transport Protein 1 (FATP1) is involved in fatty acid uptake and lipid metabolism in a variety of cell types. FATP1 co-localizes with RPE65 in RPE and inhibits its isomerase activity in vitro. Here, we further investigated the role of FATP1 in the visual cycle using transgenic mice that overexpress human FATP1 specifically in the RPE (hFATP1TG mice). The mice displayed no delay in the kinetics of regeneration of the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal after photobleaching and had no defects in light sensitivity. However, the total retinoid content was higher in the hFATP1TG mice than in wild type mice, and the transgenic mice also displayed an age-related accumulation (up to 40%) of all-trans-retinal and retinyl esters that was not observed in control mice. Consistent with these results, hFATP1TG mice were more susceptible to light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. hFATP1 overexpression also induced an ~3.5-fold increase in retinosome autofluorescence, as measured by two-photon microscopy. Interestingly, hFATP1TG retina contained ~25% more photoreceptor cells and ~35% longer outer segments than wild type mice, revealing a non-cell-autonomous effect of hFATP1 expressed in the RPE. These data are the first to show that FATP1-mediated fatty acid uptake in the RPE controls both retinoid metabolism in the outer retina and photoreceptor development. PMID:28672005

  2. A role for glutamate transporters in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runhild Gammelsaeter

    Full Text Available In the brain, glutamate is an extracellular transmitter that mediates cell-to-cell communication. Prior to synaptic release it is pumped into vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs. To inactivate glutamate receptor responses after release, glutamate is taken up into glial cells or neurons by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs. In the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, glutamate is proposed to act as an intracellular messenger, regulating insulin secretion from β-cells, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. By immunogold cytochemistry we show that insulin containing secretory granules express VGLUT3. Despite the fact that they have a VGLUT, the levels of glutamate in these granules are low, indicating the presence of a protein that can transport glutamate out of the granules. Surprisingly, in β-cells the glutamate transporter EAAT2 is located, not in the plasma membrane as it is in brain cells, but exclusively in insulin-containing secretory granules, together with VGLUT3. In EAAT2 knock out mice, the content of glutamate in secretory granules is higher than in wild type mice. These data imply a glutamate cycle in which glutamate is carried into the granules by VGLUT3 and carried out by EAAT2. Perturbing this cycle by knocking down EAAT2 expression with a small interfering RNA, or by over-expressing EAAT2 or a VGLUT in insulin granules, significantly reduced the rate of granule exocytosis. Simulations of granule energetics suggest that VGLUT3 and EAAT2 may regulate the pH and membrane potential of the granules and thereby regulate insulin secretion. These data suggest that insulin secretion from β-cells is modulated by the flux of glutamate through the secretory granules.

  3. The role of renal proximal tubule transport in the regulation of blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Horita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1 on the basolateral side of the renal proximal tubule plays a pivotal role in systemic acid-base homeostasis. Mutations in the gene encoding NBCe1 cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis accompanied by other extrarenal symptoms. The proximal tubule reabsorbs most of the sodium filtered in the glomerulus, contributing to the regulation of plasma volume and blood pressure. NBCe1 and other sodium transporters in the proximal tubule are regulated by hormones, such as angiotensin II and insulin. Angiotensin II is probably the most important stimulator of sodium reabsorption. Proximal tubule AT1A receptor is crucial for the systemic pressor effect of angiotensin II. In rodents and rabbits, the effect on proximal tubule NBCe1 is biphasic; at low concentration, angiotensin II stimulates NBCe1 via PKC/cAMP/ERK, whereas at high concentration, it inhibits NBCe1 via NO/cGMP/cGKII. In contrast, in human proximal tubule, angiotensin II has a dose-dependent monophasic stimulatory effect via NO/cGMP/ERK. Insulin stimulates the proximal tubule sodium transport, which is IRS2-dependent. We found that in insulin resistance and overt diabetic nephropathy, stimulatory effect of insulin on proximal tubule transport was preserved. Our results suggest that the preserved stimulation of the proximal tubule enhances sodium reabsorption, contributing to the pathogenesis of hypertension with metabolic syndrome. We describe recent findings regarding the role of proximal tubule transport in the regulation of blood pressure, focusing on the effects of angiotensin II and insulin.

  4. Regulation of polar auxin transport in grapevine fruitlets (Vitis vinifera L.) and the proposed role of auxin homeostasis during fruit abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Nathalie; Serrano, Alejandra; Abello, Carlos; Arce, Aníbal; Espinoza, Carmen; Gouthu, Satyanarayana; Deluc, Laurent; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-10-28

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most abundant auxin, is a growth promoter hormone involved in several developmental processes. Auxin homeostasis is very important to its function and this is achieved through the regulation of IAA biosynthesis, conjugation, degradation and transport. In grapevine, IAA plays an essential role during initial stages of berry development, since it delays fruitlet abscission by reducing the ethylene sensitivity in the abscission zone. For this reason, Continuous polar IAA transport to the pedicel is required. This kind of transport is controlled by IAA, which regulates its own movement by modifying the expression and localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators that localize asymmetrically within the cell. On the other hand, the hormone gibberellin (GA) also activates the polar auxin transport by increasing PIN stability. In Vitis vinifera, fruitlet abscission occurs during the first two to three weeks after flowering. During this time, IAA and GA are present, however the role of these hormones in the control of polar auxin transport is unknown. In this work, the use of radiolabeled IAA showed that auxin is basipetally transported during grapevine fruitlet abscission. This observation was further supported by immunolocalization of putative VvPIN proteins that display a basipetal distribution in pericarp cells. Polar auxin transport and transcripts of four putative VvPIN genes decreased in conjunction with increased abscission, and the inhibition of polar auxin transport resulted in fruit drop. GA3 and IAA treatments reduced polar auxin transport, but only GA3 treatment decreased VvPIN transcript abundance. When GA biosynthesis was blocked, IAA was capable to increase polar auxin transport, suggesting that its effect depends on GA content. Finally, we observed significant changes in the content of several IAA-related compounds during the abscission period. These results provide evidence that auxin homeostasis plays a central

  5. Histidine Residues in the Na+-coupled Ascorbic Acid Transporter-2 (SVCT2) Are Central Regulators of SVCT2 Function, Modulating pH Sensitivity, Transporter Kinetics, Na+ Cooperativity, Conformational Stability, and Subcellular Localization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormazabal, Valeska; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Escobar, Elizabeth; Aylwin, Carlos; Salas-Burgos, Alexis; Godoy, Alejandro; Reyes, Alejandro M.; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I.

    2010-01-01

    Na+-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) activity is impaired at acid pH, but little is known about the molecular determinants that define the transporter pH sensitivity. SVCT2 contains six histidine residues in its primary sequence, three of which are exofacial in the transporter secondary structure model. We used site-directed mutagenesis and treatment with diethylpyrocarbonate to identify histidine residues responsible for SVCT2 pH sensitivity. We conclude that five histidine residues, His109, His203, His206, His269, and His413, are central regulators of SVCT2 function, participating to different degrees in modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na+ cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization. Our results are compatible with a model in which (i) a single exofacial histidine residue, His413, localized in the exofacial loop IV that connects transmembrane helices VII-VIII defines the pH sensitivity of SVCT2 through a mechanism involving a marked attenuation of the activation by Na+ and loss of Na+ cooperativity, which leads to a decreased Vmax without altering the transport Km; (ii) exofacial histidine residues His203, His206, and His413 may be involved in maintaining a functional interaction between exofacial loops II and IV and influence the general folding of the transporter; (iii) histidines 203, 206, 269, and 413 affect the transporter kinetics by modulating the apparent transport Km; and (iv) histidine 109, localized at the center of transmembrane helix I, might be fundamental for the interaction of SVCT2 with the transported substrate ascorbic acid. Thus, histidine residues are central regulators of SVCT2 function. PMID:20843809

  6. Proline accumulation in leaves of Periploca sepium via both biosynthesis up-regulation and transport during recovery from severe drought.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan An

    Full Text Available Drought resistance and recovery ability are two important requisites for plant adaptation to drought environments. Proline (Pro metabolism has been a major concern in plant drought tolerance. However, roles of Pro metabolism in plant recovery ability from severe drought stress are largely unexplored. Periploca sepium Bunge has gained increasing attention for its adaptation to dry environments. Here, we investigated Pro metabolism in different tissues of P. sepium seedlings in the course of drought stress and recovery. We found that leaf Pro metabolism response during post-drought recovery was dependant on drought severity. Pro biosynthesis was down-regulated during recovery from -0.4 MPa but increased continually and notably during recovery from -1.0 MPa. Significant correlation between Pro concentration and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase activity indicates that Glutamate pathway is the predominant synthesis route during both drought and re-watering periods. Ornithine δ-aminotransferase activity was up-regulated significantly only during recovery from -1.0 MPa, suggesting positive contribution of ornithine pathway to improving plant recovery capacity from severe drought. In addition to up-regulation of biosynthesis, Pro transport from stems and roots also contributed to high Pro accumulation in leaves and new buds during recovery from -1.0 MPa, as indicated by the combined analysis of Pro concentration and its biosynthesis in stems, roots and new buds. Except its known roles as energy, carbon and nitrogen sources for plant rapid recovery, significant positive correlation between Pro concentration and total antioxidant activity indicates that Pro accumulation can also promote plant damage repair ability by up-regulating antioxidant activity during recovery from severe drought stress.

  7. MicroRNAs overexpressed in growth-restricted rat skeletal muscles regulate the glucose transport in cell culture targeting central TGF-β factor SMAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    The micro-array profiling of micro-RNA has been performed in rat skeletal muscle tissues, isolated from male adult offspring of intrauterine plus postnatal growth restricted model (IPGR). Apparently, the GLUT4 mRNA expression in male sk. muscle was found to be unaltered in contrast to females. The over-expression of miR-29a and miR-23a in the experimental group of SMSP (Starved Mother Starved Pups) have been found to regulate the glucose transport activity with respect to their control counterparts CMCP (Control Mother Control Pups) as confirmed in rat L6 myoblast-myocyte cell culture system. The ex-vivo experimentation demonstrates an aberration in insulin signaling pathway in male sk. muscle that leads to the localization of the membrane-bound Glut4 protein. We have identified through a series of experiments one important protein factor SMAD4, a co-SMAD critical to the TGF-beta signaling pathway. This factor is targeted by miR-29a, as identified in an in vitro reporter-assay system in cell-culture experiment. The other micro-RNA, miR-23a, targets SMAD4 indirectly that seems to be critical in regulating insulin-dependent glucose transport activity. MicroRNA mimics, inhibitors and siRNA studies indicate the role of SMAD4 as inhibitory for glucose transport activities in normal physiological condition. The data demonstrate for the first time a critical function of microRNAs in fine-tuning the regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Chronic starved conditions (IPGR) in sk. muscle up-regulates microRNA changing the target protein expression patterns, such as SMAD4, to alter the glucose transport pathways for the survival. The innovative outcome of this paper identifies a critical pathway (TGF-beta) that may act negatively for the mammalian glucose transport machinery.

  8. Evaluation of the Physical Activity Biography: Sport and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogen, Sandra; Hofmann, Peter; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Beside the genetic disposition, physical activity (PA) is one of the major health factors and can play a large role in the prevention and therapy of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity-related diseases etc.). In contrast to the genetic disposition, PA can be deliberately influenced by lifestyle. Therefore, it is of high importance to assess PA patterns. In order to assess PA reliably and validly, a new questionnaire (Physical Activity Biography, PAB) was created. The PAB assesses recreational PA (sport and transport) and enables to distinguish between endurance intensity levels and considers strength and high speed activity patterns throughout life. This study aims to evaluate the PAB by means of item analysis, retest-reliability and validity (criteria were physical fitness assessed by the questionnaire FFB-mot and by exercise tests). 141 participants answered the PAB. For deriving retest-reliability, 81 participants completed the PAB after a retest-interval of one month again. 55 participated in exercise tests and answered the FFB-mot to determine construct validity. Retest-reliability (ICC) above 0.7 was found for most items. For the items assessing recent PA, the criteria of convergent and discriminant validity were given. Despite the complexity of the question under study, the results fulfilled the expectations concerning reliability and validity. The PAB enables to assess the amount of sport and locomotion a person has accomplished during different life time frames and, because of the protective effects of PA on various diseases, may become an important tool for risk assessment. Key points The risk of chronic diseases depends largely on physical activity biography. A new questionnaire (PAB) assessing recent and lifetime physical activity was created. The PAB assesses physical activity during sports and transport. The results of the evaluation of the PAB fulfilled the expectations. The PAB enables to determine a person’s amount of

  9. MARK4 regulates NLRP3 positioning and inflammasome activation through a microtubule-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Thome, Sarah; Ma, Xiaodan; Amrute-Nayak, Mamta; Finigan, Alison; Kitt, Lauren; Masters, Leanne; James, John R.; Shi, Yuguang; Meng, Guoyu; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    Excessive activation of the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is involved in many chronic inflammatory diseases, including cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s disease. Here we show that microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) binds to NLRP3 and drives it to the microtubule-organizing centre, enabling the formation of one large inflammasome speck complex within a single cell. MARK4 knockdown or knockout, or disruption of MARK4-NLRP3 interaction, impairs NLRP3 spatial arrangement and limits inflammasome activation. Our results demonstrate how an evolutionarily conserved protein involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics orchestrates NLRP3 inflammasome activation by controlling its transport to optimal activation sites, and identify a targetable function for MARK4 in the control of innate immunity. PMID:28656979

  10. Protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylates the system N glutamine transporter SN1 (slc38a3 and regulates its membrane trafficking and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Sofie H. Nissen-Meyer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The system N transporter SN1 (also known as SNAT3 is enriched on perisynaptic astroglial cell membranes. SN1 mediates electroneutral and bidirectional glutamine transport, and regulates the intracellular as well as the extracellular concentrations of glutamine. We hypothesize that SN1 participates in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle and regulates the amount of glutamine supplied to the nerve terminals for replenishment of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA. We also hypothesize that its activity on the plasma membrane is regulated by PKC-mediated phosphorylation and that SN1 activity has an impact on synaptic plasticity. This review discusses inconcistencies reported in the regulation of SN1 by PKC and presents a consolidated model for regulation and degradation of SN1 and the subsequent functional implications. As SN1 function is likely also regulated by PKC-mediated phosphorylation in peripheral organs, the same mechanisms may, thus, have impact on e.g. pH regulation in the kidney, urea formation in the liver and insulin secretion in the pancreas.

  11. Gravity-regulated differential auxin transport from columella to lateral root cap cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenschlager, Iris; Wolff, Patricia; Wolverton, Chris; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Sandberg, Goran; Ishikawa, Hideo; Evans, Mike; Palme, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Gravity-induced root curvature has long been considered to be regulated by differential distribution of the plant hormone auxin. However, the cells establishing these gradients, and the transport mechanisms involved, remain to be identified. Here, we describe a GFP-based auxin biosensor to monitor auxin during Arabidopsis root gravitropism at cellular resolution. We identify elevated auxin levels at the root apex in columella cells, the site of gravity perception, and an asymmetric auxin flux from these cells to the lateral root cap (LRC) and toward the elongation zone after gravistimulation. We differentiate between an efflux-dependent lateral auxin transport from columella to LRC cells, and an efflux- and influx-dependent basipetal transport from the LRC to the elongation zone. We further demonstrate that endogenous gravitropic auxin gradients develop even in the presence of an exogenous source of auxin. Live-cell auxin imaging provides unprecedented insights into gravity-regulated auxin flux at cellular resolution, and strongly suggests that this flux is a prerequisite for root gravitropism.

  12. Active urea transport by the skin of Bufo viridis: Amiloride- and phloretin-sensitive transport sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapoport, J.; Abuful, A.; Chaimovitz, C.; Noeh, Z.; Hays, R.M. (Soroka Medical Center, Beersheva (Israel) Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Urea is actively transported inwardly (J{sub i}) across the skin of the green toad Bufo viridis. J{sub i} is markedly enhanced in toads adapted to hypertonic saline. The authors studied urea transport across the skin of Bufo viridis under a variety of experimental conditions, including treatment with amiloride and phloretin, agents that inhibit urea permeability in the bladder of Bufo marinus. Amiloride (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in both adapted and unadapted animals and was unaffected by removal of sodium from the external medium. Phloretin (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in adapted animals by 23-46%; there was also a reduction in J{sub i} in unadapted toads at 10{sup {minus}4} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M phloretin. A dose-response study revealed that the concentration of phloretin causing half-maximal inhibition (K{sub {1/2}}) was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M for adapted animals. J{sub i} was unaffected by the substitution of sucrose for Ringer solution or by ouabain. They conclude (1) the process of adaptation appears to involve an increase in the number of amiloride- and phloretin-inhibitable urea transport sites in the skin, with a possible increase in the affinity of the sites for phloretin; (2) the adapted skin resembles the Bufo marinus urinary bladder with respect to amiloride and phloretin-inhibitable sites; (3) they confirm earlier observations that J{sub i} is independent of sodium transport.

  13. Active transportation and cardiovascular disease risk factors in U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furie, Gregg L; Desai, Mayur M

    2012-12-01

    Evidence of associations between active transportation (walking and bicycling for transportation) and health outcomes is limited. Better understanding of this relationship would inform efforts to increase physical activity by promoting active transportation. This study examined associations between active transportation and cardiovascular disease risk factors in U.S. adults. Using the 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), adults (N=9933) were classified by level of active transportation. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses controlled for sociodemographic characteristics, smoking status, and minutes/week of non-active transportation physical activity. Analyses were conducted in 2011. Overall, 76% reported no active transportation. Compared with no active transportation, mean BMI was lower among individuals with low (-0.9, 95% CI= -1.4, -0.5) and high (-1.2, 95% CI= -1.7, -0.8) levels of active transportation. Mean waist circumference was lower in the low (-2.2 cm, 95% CI= -3.2, -1.2) and high (-3.1 cm, 95% CI= -4.3, -1.9) active transportation groups. The odds of hypertension were 24% lower (AOR=0.76, 95% CI=0.61, 0.94) and 31% lower (AOR=0.69, 95% CI=0.58, 0.83) among individuals with low and high levels of active transportation, respectively, compared with no active transportation. High active transportation was associated with 31% lower odds of diabetes (AOR=0.69, 95% CI=0.54, 0.88). Active transportation was not associated with high-density lipoprotein level. Active transportation was associated with more-favorable cardiovascular risk factor profiles, providing additional justification for infrastructure and policies that permit and encourage active transportation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  15. Promoting physical activity and reducing climate change : Opportunities to replace short car trips with active transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maibach, E.; Steg, L.; Anable, J.

    2009-01-01

    Automobile use is a significant contributor to climate change, local air pollution, pedestrian injuries and deaths, declines in physical activity and obesity. A significant proportion of car use is for short trips that can relatively easily be taken with active transportation options - walking or

  16. Regulation of mitochondria-dynactin interaction and mitochondrial retrograde transport in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drerup, Catherine M; Herbert, Amy L; Monk, Kelly R; Nechiporuk, Alex V

    2017-04-17

    Mitochondrial transport in axons is critical for neural circuit health and function. While several proteins have been found that modulate bidirectional mitochondrial motility, factors that regulate unidirectional mitochondrial transport have been harder to identify. In a genetic screen, we found a zebrafish strain in which mitochondria fail to attach to the dynein retrograde motor. This strain carries a loss-of-function mutation in actr10 , a member of the dynein-associated complex dynactin. The abnormal axon morphology and mitochondrial retrograde transport defects observed in actr10 mutants are distinct from dynein and dynactin mutant axonal phenotypes. In addition, Actr10 lacking the dynactin binding domain maintains its ability to bind mitochondria, arguing for a role for Actr10 in dynactin-mitochondria interaction. Finally, genetic interaction studies implicated Drp1 as a partner in Actr10-dependent mitochondrial retrograde transport. Together, this work identifies Actr10 as a factor necessary for dynactin-mitochondria interaction, enhancing our understanding of how mitochondria properly localize in axons.

  17. Estriol blunts postprandial blood glucose rise in male rats through regulating intestinal glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Woojung; Kim, Su-Nam; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2015-03-01

    Despite increased total food intake in healthy, late-stage pregnant women, their peak postprandial blood sugar levels are normally much lower than the levels seen in healthy nonpregnant women. In this study, we sought to determine whether estriol (E3), an endogenous estrogen predominantly produced during human pregnancy, contributes to the regulation of the postprandial blood glucose level in healthy normal rats. In vivo studies using rats showed that E3 blunted the speed and magnitude of the blood glucose rise following oral glucose administration, but it did not appear to affect the total amount of glucose absorbed. E3 also did not affect insulin secretion, but it significantly reduced the rate of intestinal glucose transport compared with vehicle-treated animals. Consistent with this finding, expression of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and 2 was significantly downregulated by E3 treatment in the brush-border membrane and basolateral membrane, respectively, of enterocytes. Most of the observed in vivo effects were noticeably stronger with E3 than with 17β-estradiol. Using differentiated human Caco-2 enterocyte monolayer culture as an in vitro model, we confirmed that E3 at physiologically relevant concentrations could directly inhibit glucose uptake via suppression of glucose transporter 2 expression, whereas 17β-estradiol did not have a similar effect. Collectively, these data showed that E3 can blunt the postprandial glycemic surge in rats through modulating the level of intestinal glucose transporters. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  19. Inhibition of dopamine transporter activity by G protein βγ subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Garcia-Olivares

    Full Text Available Uptake through the Dopamine Transporter (DAT is the primary mechanism of terminating dopamine signaling within the brain, thus playing an essential role in neuronal homeostasis. Deregulation of DAT function has been linked to several neurological and psychiatric disorders including ADHD, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and drug addiction. Over the last 15 years, several studies have revealed a plethora of mechanisms influencing the activity and cellular distribution of DAT; suggesting that fine-tuning of dopamine homeostasis occurs via an elaborate interplay of multiple pathways. Here, we show for the first time that the βγ subunits of G proteins regulate DAT activity. In heterologous cells and brain tissue, a physical association between Gβγ subunits and DAT was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, in vitro pull-down assays using purified proteins established that this association occurs via a direct interaction between the intracellular carboxy-terminus of DAT and Gβγ. Functional assays performed in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog GTP-γ-S, Gβγ subunit overexpression, or the Gβγ activator mSIRK all resulted in rapid inhibition of DAT activity in heterologous systems. Gβγ activation by mSIRK also inhibited dopamine uptake in brain synaptosomes and dopamine clearance from mouse striatum as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry in vivo. Gβγ subunits are intracellular signaling molecules that regulate a multitude of physiological processes through interactions with enzymes and ion channels. Our findings add neurotransmitter transporters to the growing list of molecules regulated by G-proteins and suggest a novel role for Gβγ signaling in the control of dopamine homeostasis.

  20. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  1. Gastrointestinal Hormone Cholecystokinin Increases P-Glycoprotein Membrane Localization and Transport Activity in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kentaro; Shimizu, Saori; Tomono, Takumi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2017-09-01

    It was reported that stimulation of taste receptor type 2 member 38 by a bitter substance, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mRNA level and transport activity via release of the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at 9 h. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCK-8 and PTC might also regulate P-gp activity more rapidly via a different mechanism. As a result, we found that the pretreatment of human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells with 10-mM PTC significantly decreased the intracellular accumulation of P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) compared with the control after 90-min incubation. Moreover, CCK-8 treatments significantly reduced the accumulation of Rho123 within 30 min, compared with the control. On the other hand, when Caco-2 cells were pretreated with PTC, the efflux ratio of Rho123 was significantly increased compared with control. The efflux ratio of Rho123 in CCK-8 treatment cells was also significantly increased compared with control. Furthermore, CCK-8 increased the phosphorylation of the scaffold proteins ezrin, radixin, and moesin, which regulate translocation of P-gp to the plasma membrane. Therefore, our results indicate that PTC induced release of CCK-8, which in turn induced the phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins, leading to upregulation of P-gp transport activity via increased membrane localization of P-gp. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Influence of Active Transport Systems on Morphine -6-Glucuronide Transport in MDCKII and MDCK-PGP Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SO. Mashayekhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G is a potent metabolite of morphine which has high penetration into the brain despite its high polarity, which could be the result of an active transport system involved in M6G transport through blood brain barrier. Examples of such transporters are p-glycoprotein (PGP, probenecid-sensitive transport mechanism, multidrug resistance related protein 1-3, the organic anion transporter family, and the organic anion transporter polypeptide family. The aim of present study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in transporting morphine's potent metabolite, M6G.Methods: M6G permeability via two cell lines; MDCKII and MDCK-PGP, was compared with that of sucrose. M6G transport was examined in different concentrations and in the presence of inhibitors of different transport systems such as cyclosporine, digoxin and probenecid. M6G concentration was measured using ELISA assay. The method was sensitive, reliable and reproducible.Results: The results confirmed that M6G could cross a layer of MDCK II or MDR-PGP cells more than sucrose could. It was also observed that M6G is a PGP transporter substrate. Its permeability was increased by the use of a PGP expressed cell line, and also in the presence of a strong PGP inhibitor. Digoxin related transporters such as Oatp2 may also involved in transport of M6G. M6G seemed to be a glucose transporter 1 substrate, but was not a substrate to probenecid sensitive transporters.Major conclusion: It is concluded that different transporters are responsible for M6G transports via different membrane, which could have effects on its pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics.

  3. The Regulation and Expression of the Creatine Transporter: A Brief Review of Creatine Supplementation in Humans and Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Mike

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Creatine monohydrate has become one of the most popular ergogenic sport supplements used today. It is a nonessential dietary compound that is both endogenously synthesized and naturally ingested through diet. Creatine ingested through supplementation has been observed to be absorbed into the muscle exclusively by means of a creatine transporter, CreaT1. The major rationale of creatine supplementation is to maximize the increase within the intracellular pool of total creatine (creatine + phosphocreatine. There is much evidence indicating that creatine supplementation can improve athletic performance and cellular bioenergetics, although variability does exist. It is hypothesized that this variability is due to the process that controls both the influx and efflux of creatine across the cell membrane, and is likely due to a decrease in activity of the creatine transporter from various compounding factors. Furthermore, additional data suggests that an individual's initial biological profile may partially determine the efficacy of a creatine supplementation protocol. This brief review will examine both animal and human research in relation to the regulation and expression of the creatine transporter (CreaT. The current literature is very preliminary in regards to examining how creatine supplementation affects CreaT expression while concomitantly following a resistance training regimen. In conclusion, it is prudent that future research begin to examine CreaT expression due to creatine supplementation in humans in much the same way as in animal models.

  4. Regulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegood, R C; Walker, D A

    1982-12-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) activity increased markedly (greater than 10-fold) upon illumination of wheat leaves. Darkening caused a relatively slow but complete reversal of light activation. The effects of O2 and CO2 concentration and light intensity on fructose-bisphosphatase activation were measured. In ratelimiting light, 2% O2 stimulated enzyme activity, whereas varying the CO2 concentration had little effect. In saturating light, lowering the oxygen tension had no effect, but CO2 at near-saturating concentrations for photosynthesis inhibited enzyme activity. Dark inactivation of the enzyme was completely prevented by incubation of leaves in N2, but was facilitated by O2, indicating that O2 is the major oxidant in darkened leaves. It is argued that while fructose bisphosphatase is redox-regulated in leaves, modulation of enzyme activity by this mechanism is unlikely to contribute to the regulation of CO2 fixation in leaves.

  5. Releasable activity and maximum permissible leakage rate within a transport cask of Tehran Research Reactor fuel samples

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaeian Mahdi; Kamali Jamshid; Roshanzamir Manoochehr; Moosakhani Alireza; Noori Elghar

    2015-01-01

    Containment of a transport cask during both normal and accident conditions is important to the health and safety of the public and of the operators. Based on IAEA regulations, releasable activity and maximum permissible volumetric leakage rate within the cask containing fuel samples of Tehran Research Reactor enclosed in an irradiated capsule are calculated. The contributions to the total activity from the four sources of gas, volatile, fines, and corrosion...

  6. Regulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Homann, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1985-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium resulted in a reduction of CTP:phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase (CDP-diacylglycerol synthase; EC 2.7.7.41) activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reduction of activity did not occur in the absence of inositol. CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity was not regulated in a S. cerevisiae mutant strain (opi1; an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant) by the addition of phospholipid precursors to the growth medium.

  7. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  8. Online kinematic regulation by visual feedback for grasp versus transport during reach-to-pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Pasluosta, Cristian; Li, Zong-Ming

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated novel kinematic performance parameters to understand regulation by visual feedback (VF) of the reaching hand on the grasp and transport components during the reach-to-pinch maneuver. Conventional metrics often signify discrete movement features to postulate sensory-based control effects (e.g., time for maximum velocity to signify feedback delay). The presented metrics of this study were devised to characterize relative vision-based control of the sub-movements across the entire maneuver. Movement performance was assessed according to reduced variability and increased efficiency of kinematic trajectories. Variability was calculated as the standard deviation about the observed mean trajectory for a given subject and VF condition across kinematic derivatives for sub-movements of inter-pad grasp (distance between thumb and index finger-pads; relative orientation of finger-pads) and transport (distance traversed by wrist). A Markov analysis then examined the probabilistic effect of VF on which movement component exhibited higher variability over phases of the complete maneuver. Jerk-based metrics of smoothness (minimal jerk) and energy (integrated jerk-squared) were applied to indicate total movement efficiency with VF. The reductions in grasp variability metrics with VF were significantly greater (pjerk, suggesting separate control pathways for each component. The Markov analysis indicated that VF preferentially regulates grasp over transport when continuous control is modeled probabilistically during the movement. Efficiency measures demonstrated VF to be more integral for early motor planning of grasp than transport in producing greater increases in smoothness and trajectory adjustments (i.e., jerk-energy) early compared to late in the movement cycle. These findings demonstrate the greater regulation by VF on kinematic performance of grasp compared to transport and how particular features of this relativistic control occur continually over the

  9. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Scofield, Patricia A [ORNL; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low

  10. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Regulating Ion Transport in Peptide Nanotubes by Tailoring the Nanotube Lumen Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Luis; Benjamin, Ari; Sullivan, Matthew; Keten, Sinan

    2015-05-07

    We use atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate how specific ionic flux in peptide nanotubes can be regulated by tailoring the lumen chemistry through single amino acid substitutions. By varying the size and polarity of the functional group inserted into the nanotube interior, we are able to adjust the Na(+) flux by over an order of magnitude. Cl(-) is consistently denied passage. Bulky, nonpolar groups encourage interactions between the Na(+) and the peptide backbone carbonyl groups, disrupting the Na(+) solvation shell and slowing the transport of Na(+). Small groups have the opposite effect and accelerate flow. These results suggest that relative ion flux and selectivity can be precisely regulated in subnanometer pores by molecularly defining the lumen according to biological principles.

  12. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Hérick de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey, we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making

  13. Regulation of xylanase activity in cellulomonas Sp. IIbc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, H.; Alea, F. (Cuban Research Inst. for Sugar Cane By-Products (ICIDCA), La Habana (Cuba))

    1992-01-01

    The regulation mechanism governing the xylanolytic activity in the strain Cellulomonas sp. IIbc was studied. High levels of activity were detected during the cultivation on cellulose as the only carbon source. No activity was produced with glucose, xylose or cellobiose cultures, but in the last one, the synthesis was de-repressed when the sugar concentration dropped to 0.2%. The activity was not inhibited by glucose, cellobiose and xylose up to 1% concentration. A basal constitutive synthesis was detected in nutrient broth cultures. At the same time, xylose and cellobiose acted as inducers of the xylanase activity. (orig.).

  14. Associations between built environment and active transport in Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Lars

    adolescents (11-13 years) attending 5th or 6th grade in 14 different schools in Region Southern Denmark. Measures: - 5-day commuting diary. Mode of transport was reported from home to school and return (walk, bike, car, bus, train and other). - Web based questionnaire to asses perceived safety of bike route......Introduction: Active commuting to school in Denmark is common but differentiates between schools. What is the association between the surrounding school environment assessed with a three component index and active commuting in adolescents? Methods: Materials: The study material consists of 1348...... to and from school (very safe to very unsafe). - Area median household income (statistic records). GIS measures: -Individual network distance from home to school. -Index consisting of summed rank-score of the following three components (1-14 each; summed 3-42): Pedshed: ‘Area of 2 km school service area’ / ‘2...

  15. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: an analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Elliot; Böcker, Lars; Helbich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 - 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics. The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel. The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of environments and cultures that support healthy

  16. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: an analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Fishman

    Full Text Available Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling.Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 - 2012, this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics.The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel.The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of environments and cultures that

  17. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  18. Activities of the European Commission on safe transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerwen, I. van [Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General of Energy, Brussels (Commission of the European Communities (CEC))

    1997-12-31

    The current situation relating to the transport of radioactive material within the European Community is described with emphasis on the effect of the European Single Market. The topics covered include: recent developments in Community legislation with respect to radiation protection basic safety standards, shipment of waste and radioactive substances, and the transport of dangerous goods; the contribution of the European Commission to the continuous revision process of the IAEA transport regulations; the public perception of the transport of radioactive materials. (UK).

  19. Effect of plasma membrane cholesterol depletion on glucose transport regulation in leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Caliceti

    Full Text Available GLUT1 is the predominant glucose transporter in leukemia cells, and the modulation of glucose transport activity by cytokines, oncogenes or metabolic stresses is essential for their survival and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms allowing to control GLUT1 trafficking and degradation are still under debate. In this study we investigated whether plasma membrane cholesterol depletion plays a role in glucose transport activity in M07e cells, a human megakaryocytic leukemia line. To this purpose, the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD on both GLUT1 activity and trafficking was compared to that of the cytokine Stem Cell Factor (SCF. Results show that, like SCF, MBCD led to an increased glucose transport rate and caused a subcellular redistribution of GLUT1, recruiting intracellular transporter molecules to the plasma membrane. Due to the role of caveolae/lipid rafts in GLUT1 stimulation in response to many stimuli, we have also investigated the GLUT1 distribution along the fractions obtained after non ionic detergent treatment and density gradient centrifugation, which was only slightly changed upon MBCD treatment. The data suggest that MBCD exerts its action via a cholesterol-dependent mechanism that ultimately results in augmented GLUT1 translocation. Moreover, cholesterol depletion triggers GLUT1 translocation without the involvement of c-kit signalling pathway, in fact MBCD effect does not involve Akt and PLCγ phosphorylation. These data, together with the observation that the combined MBCD/SCF cell treatment caused an additive effect on glucose uptake, suggest that the action of SCF and MBCD may proceed through two distinct mechanisms, the former following a signalling pathway, and the latter possibly involving a novel cholesterol dependent mechanism.

  20. The regulation of transportation contracts for natural gas: the issue of contractual dirigisme; A regulacao dos contratos de transporte de gas natural: a questao do dirigismo contratual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Lizziane Souza; Siqueira, Mariana; Vasconcellos, Mariana Vannucci [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The old principals that that rules the liberal idea of contract are replaced for a new Theory that allows the State to interfere in the private sector to please the public interest. The Gas Transport Contract has the influence of open access and its public regulation is necessary to provide the most important needs of Brazilian market. After this word about the problem, we realize the meaning of the public intervention on the Transport Contracts to protect the nation's interests and to limit the private power. This paper try to clear the meaning of the contracts regulation to the gas natural market and its influence in a Brazilian interests. (author)

  1. AMPK negatively regulates tensin-dependent integrin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Maria; Lilja, Johanna; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Guzmán, Camilo; Rafaeva, Maria; Alibert, Charlotte; Yan, Yan; Sahgal, Pranshu; Lerche, Martina; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Mäkelä, Tomi P; Ivaska, Johanna

    2017-04-03

    Tight regulation of integrin activity is paramount for dynamic cellular functions such as cell matrix adhesion and mechanotransduction. Integrin activation is achieved through intracellular interactions at the integrin cytoplasmic tails and through integrin-ligand binding. In this study, we identify the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a β1-integrin inhibitor in fibroblasts. Loss of AMPK promotes β1-integrin activity, the formation of centrally located active β1-integrin- and tensin-rich mature fibrillar adhesions, and cell spreading. Moreover, in the absence of AMPK, cells generate more mechanical stress and increase fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Mechanistically, we show that AMPK negatively regulates the expression of the integrin-binding proteins tensin1 and tensin3. Transient expression of tensins increases β1-integrin activity, whereas tensin silencing reduces integrin activity in fibroblasts lacking AMPK. Accordingly, tensin silencing in AMPK-depleted fibroblasts impedes enhanced cell spreading, traction stress, and fibronectin fiber formation. Collectively, we show that the loss of AMPK up-regulates tensins, which bind β1-integrins, supporting their activity and promoting fibrillar adhesion formation and integrin-dependent processes. © 2017 Georgiadou et al.

  2. Insulin resistance vs. hyperinsulinemia in hypertension: insulin regulation of Ca2+ transport and Ca(2+)-regulation of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, M B

    1995-06-01

    Hypertension in obesity and insulin resistance has been attributed to insulin stimulation of sympathetic neural output and renal sodium retention. However, recent data demonstrates a significant vasodilatory effect of insulin and suggests that vascular smooth muscle resistance to this action may instead be the cause of hypertension in insulin resistance. This concept is supported by the observation that pharmacological amplification of peripheral insulin sensitivity results in reduced arterial pressure. Insulin attenuates vasoconstrictor responses to pressor agonists and accelerates vascular smooth muscle relaxation, while these effects are blunted in obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin regulation of vasoconstriction and vascular relaxation appears to be secondary to regulation of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), as insulin attenuates both voltage- and receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and stimulates both the transcription and activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase in vascular smooth muscle cells. Further, these effects are also blunted in insulin resistance. Although [Ca2+]i plays a poorly understood role in insulin signalling, increases beyond an optimal range results in impaired insulin sensitivity, possibly by Ca(2+)-inhibition of insulin-induced dephosphorylation of insulin-sensitive substrates. Consistent with this concept, ectopic overexpression of the agouti gene in the viable yellow (Avy) mouse results in increased skeletal myocyte [Ca2+]i. Accordingly, increased [Ca2+]i in primary insulin target tissues appears to result in peripheral insulin resistance which then results in aberrant regulation of vascular smooth muscle [Ca2+]i and increases in arterial pressure.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum transport of glutathione by Sec61 is regulated by Ero1 and Bip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsero, Alise J.; Igbaria, Aeid; Darch, Maxwell A.

    2017-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Ero1 catalyzes disulfide bond formation and promotes glutathione (GSH) oxidation to GSSG. Since GSSG cannot be reduced in the ER, maintenance of the ER glutathione redox state and levels likely depends on ER glutathione import and GSSG export. We used quantitative...... GSH and GSSG biosensors to monitor glutathione import into the ER of yeast cells. We found that glutathione enters the ER by facilitated diffusion through the Sec61 protein-conducting channel, while oxidized Bip (Kar2) inhibits transport. Increased ER glutathione import triggers H2O2-dependent Bip...... oxidation through Ero1 reductive activation, which inhibits glutathione import in a negative regulatory loop. During ER stress, transport is activated by UPR-dependent Ero1 induction, and cytosolic glutathione levels increase. Thus, the ER redox poise is tuned by reciprocal control of glutathione import...

  4. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); He, Chao [Department of Cardiology, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 433000 (China); Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Kejian [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Shihezi University (China); Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Guo, Xiaomei, E-mail: xmguo@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  6. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmei Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1 is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca2+ uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b, the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1, and the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1 for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx.

  7. Sulfate transporters in the plant’s response to drought and salinity: regulation and possible functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine eGallardo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought and salinity are two frequently combined abiotic stresses that affect plant growth, development, and crop productivity. Sulfate, and molecules derived from this anion such as glutathione, play important roles in the intrinsic responses of plants to such abiotic stresses. Therefore, understanding how plants facing environmental constraints re-equilibrate the flux of sulfate between and within different tissues might uncover perspectives for improving tolerance against abiotic stresses. In this review, we took advantage of genomics and post-genomics resources available in Arabidopsis thaliana and in the model legume species Medicago truncatula to highlight and compare the regulation of sulfate transporter genes under drought and salt stress. We also discuss their possible function in the plant’s response and adaptation to abiotic stresses and present prospects about the potential benefits of mycorrhizal associations, which by facilitating sulfate uptake may assist plants to cope with abiotic stresses. Several transporters are highlighted in this review that appear promising targets for improving sulfate transport capacities of crops under fluctuating environmental conditions.

  8. Unraveling the Complex Epigenetic Mechanisms that Regulate Gene Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression has been largely increased in recent years by the development and refinement of different techniques. This has revealed that gene transcription is highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e., those that do not involve changes in the genome sequence, but rather in nuclear architecture, chromosome conformation and histone and DNA modifications. Our understanding of how these different levels of epigenetic regulation interact with each other and with classical transcription-factor based gene regulation to influence gene transcription has just started to emerge. This review discusses the latest advances in unraveling the complex interactions between different types of epigenetic regulation and transcription factor activity, with special attention to the approaches that can be used to study these interactions.

  9. Urban sprawl and its relationship with active transportation, physical activity and obesity in Canadian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliske, Laura; Pickett, William; Janssen, Ian

    2012-06-01

    Urban sprawl is a potential environmental influence on youth overweight/obesity. However, little is known about the association between urban sprawl and behaviours that influence obesity such as active transportation and physical activity. The study population consisted of 7,017 respondents aged 12 to 19 to the 2007/2008 Canadian Community Health Survey, living in Canada's 33 census metropolitan areas (CMAs). Factor analysis was used to obtain an urban sprawl score for each CMA, incorporating dwelling density, percentage of single or detached dwelling units, and percentage of the population living in the urban core. Multi-level logistic regression examined whether urban sprawl was associated with frequent active transportation (30 or more minutes a day), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (60 or more minutes a day), and overweight/obesity. Urban sprawl was associated with active transportation among 12- to 15-year-olds, with the relative odds of engaging in at least 30 minutes of active transportation per day increasing by 24% (95% CI: 10-39%) for each standard deviation (SD) increase in the urban sprawl score. For the entire sample aged 12 to 19, higher urban sprawl was associated with MVPA (odds ratio per SD increase = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.20), but not with overweight/obesity (odds ratio per SD increase = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94-1.18). Urban sprawl was associated with active transportation and MVPA in Canadian youth, although in the opposite direction to what has been reported in the literature for adults.

  10. Agp2, a member of the yeast amino acid permease family, positively regulates polyamine transport at the transcriptional level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Aouida

    Full Text Available Agp2 is a plasma membrane protein of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transporter family, involved in high-affinity uptake of various substrates including L-carnitine and polyamines. The discovery of two high affinity polyamine permeases, Dur3 and Sam3, prompted us to investigate whether Agp2 directly transports polyamines or acts instead as a regulator. Herein, we show that neither dur3Δ nor sam3Δ single mutant is defective in polyamine transport, while the dur3Δ sam3Δ double mutant exhibits a sharp decrease in polyamine uptake and an increased resistance to polyamine toxicity similar to the agp2Δ mutant. Studies of Agp2 localization indicate that in the double mutant dur3Δ sam3Δ, Agp2-GFP remains plasma membrane-localized, even though transport of polyamines is strongly reduced. We further demonstrate that Agp2 controls the expression of several transporter genes including DUR3 and SAM3, the carnitine transporter HNM1 and several hexose, nucleoside and vitamin permease genes, in addition to SKY1 encoding a SR kinase that positively regulates low-affinity polyamine uptake. Furthermore, gene expression analysis clearly suggests that Agp2 is a strong positive regulator of additional biological processes. Collectively, our data suggest that Agp2 might respond to environmental cues and thus regulate the expression of several genes including those involved in polyamine transport.

  11. Agp2, a Member of the Yeast Amino Acid Permease Family, Positively Regulates Polyamine Transport at the Transcriptional Level

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-03

    Agp2 is a plasma membrane protein of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transporter family, involved in high-affinity uptake of various substrates including L-carnitine and polyamines. The discovery of two high affinity polyamine permeases, Dur3 and Sam3, prompted us to investigate whether Agp2 directly transports polyamines or acts instead as a regulator. Herein, we show that neither dur3? nor sam3? single mutant is defective in polyamine transport, while the dur3? sam3? double mutant exhibits a sharp decrease in polyamine uptake and an increased resistance to polyamine toxicity similar to the agp2? mutant. Studies of Agp2 localization indicate that in the double mutant dur3? sam3?, Agp2-GFP remains plasma membrane-localized, even though transport of polyamines is strongly reduced. We further demonstrate that Agp2 controls the expression of several transporter genes including DUR3 and SAM3, the carnitine transporter HNM1 and several hexose, nucleoside and vitamin permease genes, in addition to SKY1 encoding a SR kinase that positively regulates low-affinity polyamine uptake. Furthermore, gene expression analysis clearly suggests that Agp2 is a strong positive regulator of additional biological processes. Collectively, our data suggest that Agp2 might respond to environmental cues and thus regulate the expression of several genes including those involved in polyamine transport. © 2013 Aouida et al.

  12. Variability and seasonality of active transportation in USA: evidence from the 2001 NHTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Diez Roux, Ana V; Bingham, C Raymond

    2011-09-14

    Active transportation including walking and bicycling is an important source of physical activity. Promoting active transportation is a challenge for the fields of public health and transportation. Descriptive data on the predictors of active transportation, including seasonal patterns in active transportation in the US as a whole, is needed to inform interventions and policies. This study analyzed monthly variation in active transportation for the US using National Household Travel Survey 2001 data. For each age group of children, adolescents, adults and elderly, logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of the odds of active transportation including gender, race/ethnicity, household income level, geographical region, urbanization level, and month. The probability of engaging in active transportation was generally higher for children and adolescents than for adults and the elderly. Active transportation was greater in the lower income groups (except in the elderly), was lower in the South than in other regions of the US, and was greater in areas with higher urbanization. The percentage of people using active transportation exhibited clear seasonal patterns: high during summer months and low during winter months. Children and adolescents were more sensitive to seasonality than other age groups. Women, non-Caucasians, persons with lower household income, who resided in the Midwest or Northeast, and who lived in more urbanized areas had greater seasonal variation. These descriptive results suggest that interventions and policies that target the promotion of active transportation need to consider socio-demographic factors and seasonality.

  13. Parental Active Transportation Routines (PATRns) as a Moderator of the Association Between Neighborhood Characteristics and Parental Influences and Active School Transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kann, D.H.H. van; Kremers, S.P.J.; Vries, S.I. de; Vries, N.K. de; Jansen, M.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of interventions to stimulate active school transportation (AST) requires better understanding of this behavior. This study explored the associations between Parental Active Transportation Routines (PATRns) and children’s AST use, as well as the role of PATRns as a

  14. Intracerebroventricular injection of adiponectin regulates locomotor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Yumiko; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Ueta, Tomoyo; Taniguchi, Yasuko; Futami, Akari; Sato, Fukiko; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Tsutsumi, Rie; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing exercise motivation is the best way to prevent obesity and diabetes. In this study, we examined whether adiponectin affects locomotion activity in Wister and Spontaneously-Running Tokushima-Shikoku (SPORTS) rats using two types of behavioral assays: home cage and wheel running activity. SPORTS rats were established from an original line from Wister strain that had shown high level of wheel running activity in our laboratory. Injection of adiponectin into the lateral ventricle of Wister rats and SPORTS rats decreased home cage activity, but no change was observed in the food intake and oxygen consumption. This result indicates the possibility that adiponectin can reduce non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity via the central nervous system. In contrast, injection of adiponectin did not change wheel running activity in SPORTS rats. We produced hypothalamus-destructed model rat using monosodium glutamate (MSG) to elucidate the regulation site of adiponectin. Injection of adiponectin into MSG-treated SPORTS rats did not change amount of home cage activity and food intake, suggesting that adiponectin action on home cage activity was in the hypothalamic area. These results suggest that adiponectin regulates locomotion activity through mediobasal hypothalamus.

  15. Activity Dependency and Aging in the Regulation of Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Age and activity might be considered the two antagonistic key regulators of adult neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis decreases with age but remains present, albeit at a very low level, even in the oldest individuals. Activity, be it physical or cognitive, increases adult neurogenesis and thereby seems to counteract age effects. It is, thus, proposed that activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis might contribute to some sort of “neural reserve,” the brain’s ability to compensate functional loss associated with aging or neurodegeneration. Activity can have nonspecific and specific effects on adult neurogenesis. Mechanistically, nonspecific stimuli that largely affect precursor cell stages might be related by the local microenvironment, whereas more specific, survival-promoting effects take place at later stages of neuronal development and require the synaptic integration of the new cell and its particular synaptic plasticity. PMID:26525149

  16. Mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Hara, Hideki; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family and the pyrin and HIN-domain (PYHIN) family can form multiprotein complexes termed “inflammasomes”. The biochemical function of inflammasomes is to activate caspase-1, which leads to the maturation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 and induction of pyroptosis, a form of cell death. Unlike other inflammasomes, the NLRP3 inflammasome can be activated by diverse stimuli. The importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in immunity and human diseases has been well documented, but the mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation remains unclear. In this review we summarize current understanding of the mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, as well as recent advances in the non-canonical and alternative inflammasome pathways. PMID:27669650

  17. International cooperation for the development of consistent and stable transportation regulations to promote and enhance safety and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strosnider, J. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-07-01

    International commerce of radioactive materials crosses national boundaries, linking separate regulatory institutions with a common purpose and making it necessary for these institutions to work together in order to achieve common safety goals in a manner that does not place an undue burden on industry and commerce. Widespread and increasing use of radioactive materials across the world has led to increases in the transport of radioactive materials. The demand for consistency in the oversight of international transport has also increased to prevent unnecessary delays and costs associated with incongruent or redundant regulatory requirements by the various countries through which radioactive material is transported. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the authority for international regulation of transportation of radioactive materials responsible for promulgation of regulations and guidance for the establishment of acceptable methods of transportation for the international community. As such, the IAEA is seen as the focal point for consensus building between its Member States to develop consistency in transportation regulations and reviews and to ensure the safe and secure transport of radioactive material. International cooperation is also needed to ensure stability in our regulatory processes. Changes to transportation regulations should be based on an anticipated safety benefit supported by risk information and insights gained from continuing experience, evaluation, and research studies. If we keep safety as the principle basis for regulatory changes, regulatory stability will be enhanced. Finally, as we endeavour to maintain consistency and stability in our international regulations, we must be mindful of the new security challenges that lay before the international community as a result of a changing terrorist environment. Terrorism is a problem of global concern that also requires international cooperation and support, as we look for ways to

  18. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation

    OpenAIRE

    Babon, Jeffrey J.; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M.; Nicola, Nicos A.; Varghese, Leila N.

    2014-01-01

    The Janus Kinase (JAK) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2, was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human disea...

  19. Electronic Commerce: a battle on regulation, standards transportation media and business integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Andersen

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The drive towards the electronic commerce organisation is both a troublesome and a strifted path for government, enterprises and consumers worldwide. In this article we analyse the evolution of electronic commerce in Denmark during the period 1995-1998 from four perspectives: regulation, standards, transportation media and business integration. The Danish government is stimulating the use of electronic commerce using direct and indirect policy initiatives on central, governmental regulation and establishment of greens enabling self-regulation. Also, the governments own, organisational management is in Denmark seen as a mean to exalt electronic commerce. Onwards, the fist on proprietary standards and the UN/EDIFACT is an ongoing source of delaying, stimulating or reventing electronic commerce depending on the business sector and the size of market actor addressed. In Denmark, the direct access and value added network supporters have so far been the dominating mean to transport the electronic documents in the business transaction. The Internet and XML technology is at the turn of the century challenging the way of doing business within this field. Some view this as the big blue to speed the diffusion of electronic commerce; others are worried that the incentive to investment and pull the partners in the value chain to use EDI might be lost. Finally, our study conclude that the debate on business integration issues is ambiguous and characterised by substantial uncertainty on for example the role of intermediates, direct sale, hyper-shift in business partners and the pull/push of global enterprises at the local markets.

  20. Dynamics of peptidergic secretory granule transport are regulated by neuronal stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Ann E

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons store and secrete the contents of large dense core vesicles (LDCVs from axon terminals and from dendrites. Secretion of peptides requires a highly regulated exocytotic mechanism, plus coordinated synthesis and transport of LDCVs to their sites of release. Although these trafficking events are critical to function, little is known regarding the dynamic behavior of LDCVs and the mechanisms by which their transport is regulated. Sensory neurons also package opiate receptors in peptide-containing LDCVs, which is thought to be important in pain sensation. Since peptide granules cannot be refilled locally after their contents are secreted, it is particularly important to understand how neurons support regulated release of peptides. Results A vector encoding soluble peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase fused to green fluorescent protein was constructed to address these questions in cultured primary peptidergic neurons of the trigeminal ganglion using time lapse confocal microscopy. The time course of release differs with secretagogue; the secretory response to depolarization with K+ is rapid and terminates within 15 minutes, while phorbol ester stimulation of secretion is maintained over a longer period. The data demonstrate fundamental differences between LDCV dynamics in axons and growth cones under basal conditions. Conclusions Under basal conditions, LDCVs move faster away from the soma than toward the soma, but fewer LDCVs travel anterograde than retrograde. Stimulation decreased average anterograde velocity and increases granule pausing. Data from antibody uptake, quantification of enzyme secretion and appearance of pHluorin fluorescence demonstrate distributed release of peptides all along the axon, not just at terminals.

  1. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2004 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the gas and electricity markets for professional customers on 1 July 2004; B - Regulation of the gas market: Gas markets and players (The European environment, The French gas market); Regulation of the gas market (Implementing regulation, Works planned for the coming year; C - Regulation of the electricity market: The electricity markets and players (The European electricity markets, The French electricity market, Monitoring the electricity market); Regulation of the French electricity market (Access to public grid, Cross-border exchanges, Un-bundled accounting principles); The public electricity service in the regulated market (Content of the public service, Public service charges, Electricity production public service financing, Electricity sales tariffs) D - The working of CRE: How CRE exercises its jurisdiction, Tools; E - Appendices: Glossary, Units and conversions, Council of European Energy Regulators, Index of tables and figures.

  2. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    discuss the influence of reactive oxygen species produced within the muscle as well as muscle glycogen and TAK1 in regulating AMPK during exercise. Currently, during intensive contraction, activation of alpha2-AMPK seems mainly to rely on AMP accumulating from ATP-hydrolysis whereas calcium signaling may...

  3. Using Regulation Activities to Improve Undergraduate Collaborative Writing on Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Lim, Seongmi

    2017-01-01

    Although wikis have been widely adopted to support collaborative writing in undergraduate classrooms, educators remain concerned about the level of student participation. Using regulation theories to design interventions in the form of activities, we examined their effects on collaborative writing on wikis. Results demonstrate that with the…

  4. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction... information (a total capital/ startup costs and operations and maintenance costs). The comments that are...

  5. Plasma concentration of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is responsible for trafficking of T helper 2 lymphocytes into sites of allergic inflammation. However, its role in assessing the severity of acute asthma in children is still unclear. Objective: We sought to evaluate plasma TARC as a marker for monitoring asthma ...

  6. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This is a proposed...

  7. Insight into Nek2A activity regulation and its pharmacological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ambuj Kumar

    2012-11-28

    Nov 28, 2012 ... phatase 1 interaction, mitotic degradation, microtubule bind- ing, and centrosome localization [22]. ... congression and causes persistent activation of the spindle checkpoint [24]. Hec1 is shown to be an ... hydrogen bond and salt bridge formations whereas the entropy corresponds to regulating the losses of ...

  8. Why Control Activity? Evolutionary Selection Pressures Affecting the Development of Physical Activity Genetic and Biological Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Timothy Lightfoot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature strongly suggests that daily physical activity is genetically and biologically regulated. Potential identities of the responsible mechanisms are unclear, but little has been written concerning the possible evolutionary selection pressures leading to the development of genetic/biological controls of physical activity. Given the weak relationship between exercise endurance and activity levels and the differential genomic locations associated with the regulation of endurance and activity, it is probable that regulation of endurance and activity evolved separately. This hypothesis paper considers energy expenditures and duration of activity in hunter/gatherers, pretechnology farmers, and modern Western societies and considers the potential of each to selectively influence the development of activity regulation. Food availability is also considered given the known linkage of caloric restriction on physical activity as well as early data relating food oversupply to physical inactivity. Elucidating the selection pressures responsible for the genetic/biological control of activity will allow further consideration of these pressures on activity in today’s society, especially the linkages between food and activity. Further, current food abundance is removing the cues for activity that were present for the first 40,000 years of human evolution, and thus future research should investigate the effects of this abundance upon the mechanisms regulating activity.

  9. Chloride transporting capability of Calu-3 epithelia following persistent knockdown of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVinish, L J; Cope, G; Ropenga, A; Cuthbert, A W

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Calu-3 cells are derived from serous cells of human lung submucosal glands, a prime target for therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF). Calu-3 cells can be cultured to form epithelia capable of transepithelial transport of chloride. A CF Calu-3 cell is not available. Experimental approach: A retroviral vector was used to cause persistent down regulation of CFTR using siRNA methodology, in Calu-3 cells. A Calu-3 cell line with CFTR content less than 5% of the original line has been established. Epithelia grown using the modified cells have been used in comparative studies of transporting capability. Key results: All aspects of cAMP activated chloride secretion were attenuated in the epithelia with reduced CFTR content. However transporting capability was reduced less than the CFTR content. From studies with the CFTR channel inhibitor, GlyH-101, it was concluded that wild type Calu-3 cells have a reserve of CFTR channels not located in the membrane, but available for replacement, while in the modified Calu-3 cell line there was little or no reserve. Lubiprostone, a putative ClC-2 activator, increased transepithelial chloride secretion in both modified and wild type Calu-3 epithelia. Modified Calu-3 epithelia with the residual CFTR currents blocked with GlyH-101 responded equally well to lubiprostone as those without the blocking agent. Conclusions and implications: It appears that lubiprostone is capable of stimulating a non-CFTR dependent transepithelial chloride secretion in Calu-3 monolayers, with obvious implications for CF therapy. Cell lines, however, do not always reflect the behaviour of the native tissue with integrity. PMID:17339840

  10. Reliability and validity of the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ for assessing physical activity behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Adams

    Full Text Available No current validated survey instrument allows a comprehensive assessment of both physical activity and travel behaviours for use in interdisciplinary research on walking and cycling. This study reports on the test-retest reliability and validity of physical activity measures in the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ.The TPAQ assesses time spent in different domains of physical activity and using different modes of transport for five journey purposes. Test-retest reliability of eight physical activity summary variables was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC and Kappa scores for continuous and categorical variables respectively. In a separate study, the validity of three survey-reported physical activity summary variables was assessed by computing Spearman correlation coefficients using accelerometer-derived reference measures. The Bland-Altman technique was used to determine the absolute validity of survey-reported time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA.In the reliability study, ICC for time spent in different domains of physical activity ranged from fair to substantial for walking for transport (ICC = 0.59, cycling for transport (ICC = 0.61, walking for recreation (ICC = 0.48, cycling for recreation (ICC = 0.35, moderate leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.47, vigorous leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.63, and total physical activity (ICC = 0.56. The proportion of participants estimated to meet physical activity guidelines showed acceptable reliability (k = 0.60. In the validity study, comparison of survey-reported and accelerometer-derived time spent in physical activity showed strong agreement for vigorous physical activity (r = 0.72, p<0.001, fair but non-significant agreement for moderate physical activity (r = 0.24, p = 0.09 and fair agreement for MVPA (r = 0.27, p = 0.05. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean

  11. Evidence for organic cation transporter-mediated metformin transport and 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Rieko; Yamada, Mayumi; Kurogi, Eriko; Ogino, Yohei; Serizawa, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Satoshi; Ma, Xiao; Egawa, Tatsuro; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    5'-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key molecule of metabolic enhancement in skeletal muscle. We investigated whether metformin (MET) acts directly on skeletal muscle, is transported into skeletal muscle via organic cation transporters (OCTs), and activates AMPK. Isolated rat epitrochlearis and soleus muscles were incubated in vitro either in the absence or in the presence of MET. The activation status of AMPK, the intracellular energy status, and glucose and MET transport activity were then evaluated. The effect of cimetidine, which is an OCT inhibitor, on AMPK activation was also examined. MET (10 mmol/L, ≥60 min) increased the phosphorylation of Thr¹⁷² at the catalytic α subunit of AMPK in both muscles. AMPK activity assays showed that both AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 activity increased significantly. The AMPK activation was associated with energy deprivation, which was estimated from the ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr), and glycogen content, and with increased rates of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) transport. MET did not change the basal phosphorylation status of insulin receptor signaling molecules. MET was transported into the cytoplasm in a time-dependent manner, and cimetidine suppressed MET-induced AMPK phosphorylation and 3MG transport. These results suggest that MET is acutely transported into skeletal muscle by OCTs, and stimulates AMPKα1 and α2 activity in both fast- and slow-twitch muscle types, at least in part by reducing the energy state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modern requirements of legal regulations for transport in the cities and necessity for making sector strategy in order to harmonize with other modes of transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra VASILJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crucial problem of transport in the cities, as a source of pollution of the environment, are uncontrolled individual motorization, permanently increasing number of motor vehicles on the roads and streets that expels human primary need for walking.Reduced social area is also loaded with vibrations and increased sound pressure which often exceeds recommended 80 dB/A.Accent is on ecological problems caused by: polluted air, which comes from gas emissions (full of aerosol, metals, dust, soot, smoke, cutting and disappearance of green areas in order to provide space for transport, making huge amount of secondary waste (e. g. tyres, metal, used oil, liquids.To improve present sequences and reduce negative effects in the future it is necessary to take different measures: fiscal, administrative, educational, which will restrict use of individual, particularly car traffic. Same measures should be used to encourage users to use public transportation.Transport in the cities, with all weaknesses and comparative advantages, should be separately analyzed mode of road transport and also be an individual part in strategic documents.The most important questions that such strategy of transport in the cities should include are: regulation, privatization or other more efficient mode of organization in public transport of passengers, as well as urban elements of sustainable development of the urban areas and transport.

  13. Individual, Social, and Environmental Correlates of Active Transportation Patterns in French Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchoux, Camille; Enaux, Christophe; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Menai, Mehdi; Charreire, Hélène; Salze, Paul; Weber, Christiane; Hercberg, Serge; Feuillet, Thierry; Hess, Franck; Roda, Célina; Simon, Chantal; Nazare, Julie-Anne

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were (1) to define physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB) patterns in daily life contexts (work, leisure, and transportation) in French working women from NutriNet-Santé web-cohort and (2) to identify pattern(s) of active transportation and their individual, social, and environmental correlates. 23,432 participants completed two questionnaires to evaluate PA and SB in daily life contexts and individual representations of residential neighborhood and transportation modes. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed which identified 6 distinct movement behavior patterns: (i) active occupation, high sedentary leisure, (ii) sedentary occupation, low leisure, (iii) sedentary transportation, (iv) sedentary occupation and leisure, (v) active transportation, and (vi) active leisure. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to identify correlates of the "active transportation" cluster. The perceived environmental characteristics positively associated with "active transportation" included "high availability of destinations around home," "presence of bicycle paths," and "low traffic." A "positive image of walking/cycling," the "individual feeling of being physically active," and a "high use of active transport modes by relatives/friends" were positively related to "active transportation," identified as a unique pattern regarding individual and environmental correlates. Identification of PA and SB context-specific patterns will help to understand movement behaviors' complexity and to design interventions to promote active transportation in specific subgroups.

  14. Activity-Based Costing Application in an Urban Mass Transport Company

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boris Popesko; Petr Novák

    2011-01-01

      The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic overview of the application of Activity-Based Costing in an urban mass transport company which operates land public transport via buses and trolleys within the city...

  15. Safety and Health Perceptions in Work-related Transport Activities in Ghanaian Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Atombo

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: OSH culture is not fully complied in industries transport activities. This study, therefore, supports the use of safety seminars and training sessions for industry workers responsible for transport operations for better integration of safety standards.

  16. Palmitoylation of caspase-6 by HIP14 regulates its activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, Niels H; Sanders, Shaun S; Singaraja, Roshni R; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Vaid, Kuljeet; Qiu, Xiaofan; Kannan, Srinivasaragavan; Verma, Chandra; Hayden, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    Caspase-6 (CASP6) has an important role in axonal degeneration during neuronal apoptosis and in the neurodegenerative diseases Alzheimer and Huntington disease. Decreasing CASP6 activity may help to restore neuronal function in these and other diseases such as stroke and ischemia, where increased CASP6 activity has been implicated. The key to finding approaches to decrease CASP6 activity is a deeper understanding of the mechanisms regulating CASP6 activation. We show that CASP6 is posttranslationally palmitoylated by the palmitoyl acyltransferase HIP14 and that the palmitoylation of CASP6 inhibits its activation. Palmitoylation of CASP6 is decreased both in Hip14-/- mice, where HIP14 is absent, and in YAC128 mice, a model of Huntington disease, where HIP14 is dysfunctional and where CASP6 activity is increased. Molecular modeling suggests that palmitoylation of CASP6 may inhibit its activation via steric blockage of the substrate-binding groove and inhibition of CASP6 dimerization, both essential for CASP6 function. Our studies identify palmitoylation as a novel CASP6 modification and as a key regulator of CASP6 activity.

  17. Perturbed rhythmic activation of signaling pathways in mice deficient for Sterol Carrier Protein 2-dependent diurnal lipid transport and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffe, Céline; Gobet, Cédric; Martin, Eva; Métairon, Sylviane; Morin-Rivron, Delphine; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gachon, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Through evolution, most of the living species have acquired a time keeping system to anticipate daily changes caused by the rotation of the Earth. In all of the systems this pacemaker is based on a molecular transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop able to generate rhythmic gene expression with a period close to 24 hours. Recent evidences suggest that post-transcriptional regulations activated mostly by systemic cues play a fundamental role in the process, fine tuning the time keeping system and linking it to animal physiology. Among these signals, we consider the role of lipid transport and metabolism regulated by SCP2. Mice harboring a deletion of the Scp2 locus present a modulated diurnal accumulation of lipids in the liver and a perturbed activation of several signaling pathways including PPARα, SREBP, LRH-1, TORC1 and its upstream regulators. This defect in signaling pathways activation feedbacks upon the clock by lengthening the circadian period of animals through post-translational regulation of core clock regulators, showing that rhythmic lipid transport is a major player in the establishment of rhythmic mRNA and protein expression landscape.

  18. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Cohen, Stephen Michael

    2017-01-01

    deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor...

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 Activity Regulates Neutrophil Spontaneous Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeldine, Jon; Krystof, Vladimir; Strnad, Miroslav; Pechan, Paul; M., Janet

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases. PMID:22276149

  1. Expression, regulation, and function of drug transporters in cervicovaginal tissues of a mouse model used for microbicide testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Pearlman, Andrew; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) are three efflux transporters that play key roles in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs used in the pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV sexual transmission. In this study, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of these transporters in cervicovaginal tissues of a mouse model. Expression and regulation were examined using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining, in the mouse tissues harvested at estrus and diestrus stages under natural cycling or after hormone synchronization. The three transporters were expressed at moderate to high levels compared to the liver. Transporter proteins were localized in various cell types in different tissue segments. Estrous cycle and exogenous hormone treatment affected transporter mRNA and protein expression, in a tissue- and transporter-dependent manner. Depo-Provera-synchronized mice were dosed vaginally or intraperitoneally with 3H-TFV, with or without MK571 co-administration, to delineate the function of cervicovaginal Mrp4. Co-administration of MK571 significantly increased the concentration of vaginally-administered TFV in endocervix and vagina. MK571 increased the concentration of intraperitoneally-administered TFV in the cervicovaginal lavage and vagina by several fold. Overall, P-gp, Bcrp, and Mrp4 were positively expressed in mouse cervicovaginal tissues, and their expression can be regulated by the estrous cycle or by exogenous hormones. In this model, the Mrp4 transporter impacted TFV distribution in cervicovaginal tissues. PMID:27453435

  2. Pinoid kinase regulates root gravitropism through modulation of PIN2-dependent basipetal auxin transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, Gloria; Sukumar, Poornima; Edwards, Karin; Delong, Alison; Rahman, Abidur

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism governing polar auxin transport. We tested the hypothesis that PINOID (PID)-mediated phosphorylation and RCN1- regulated dephosphorylation might antagonistically regulate auxin transport and gravity response in seedling roots. Here we show that basipetal IAA transport and gravitropism are reduced in pid mutant seedlings, while acropetal transport and lateral root development are unchanged. Treatment of wild-type seedlings with the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, phenocopied the reduced auxin transport and gravity response of pid-9 and reduced formation of asymmetric DR5-revGFP expression at the root tip after reorientation relative to gravity. Gravitropism and auxin transport in pid are resistant to further inhibition by staurosporine. Gravity response defects of rcn1 and pid-9 are partially rescued by treatment with staurosporine or the phosphatase inhibitor, cantharidin, respectively, and in the pid-9 rcn1 double mutant. Furthermore, the effect of staurosporine is lost in pin2, and a PIN2::GFP fusion protein accumulates in endomembrane compartments after staurosporine treatment. In the pid-9 mutant, immunological techniques find a similar PIN2 localization. These data suggest that staurosporine inhibits gravitropism and basipetal IAA transport by blocking PID action and altering PIN2 localization and support the model that PID and RCN1 reciprocally regulate root gravitropic curvature.

  3. Role of the DHH1 gene in the regulation of monocarboxylic acids transporters expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mota

    Full Text Available Previous experiments revealed that DHH1, a RNA helicase involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation, complemented the phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant affected in the expression of genes coding for monocarboxylic-acids transporters, JEN1 and ADY2 (Paiva S, Althoff S, Casal M, Leao C. FEMS Microbiol Lett, 1999, 170:301-306. In wild type cells, JEN1 expression had been shown to be undetectable in the presence of glucose or formic acid, and induced in the presence of lactate. In this work, we show that JEN1 mRNA accumulates in a dhh1 mutant, when formic acid was used as sole carbon source. Dhh1 interacts with the decapping activator Dcp1 and with the deadenylase complex. This led to the hypothesis that JEN1 expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by Dhh1 in formic acid. Analyses of JEN1 mRNAs decay in wild-type and dhh1 mutant strains confirmed this hypothesis. In these conditions, the stabilized JEN1 mRNA was associated to polysomes but no Jen1 protein could be detected, either by measurable lactate carrier activity, Jen1-GFP fluorescence detection or western blots. These results revealed the complexity of the expression regulation of JEN1 in S. cerevisiae and evidenced the importance of DHH1 in this process. Additionally, microarray analyses of dhh1 mutant indicated that Dhh1 plays a large role in metabolic adaptation, suggesting that carbon source changes triggers a complex interplay between transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects.

  4. Spns2, a transporter of phosphorylated sphingoid bases, regulates their blood and lymph levels, and the lymphatic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Kim, Eugene Y; Yamada, Akimitsu; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Allegood, Jeremy C; Hait, Nitai C; Maceyka, Michael; Milstien, Sheldon; Takabe, Kazuaki; Spiegel, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a ligand for 5 specific receptors, is a potent lipid mediator that plays important roles in lymphocyte trafficking and immune responses. S1P is produced inside cells and therefore must be secreted to exert its effects through these receptors. Spinster 2 (Spns2) is one of the cell surface transporters thought to secrete S1P. We have shown that Spns2 can export endogenous S1P from cells and also dihydro-S1P, which is active at all cell surface S1P receptors. Moreover, Spns2 mice have decreased levels of both of these phosphorylated sphingoid bases in blood, accompanied by increases in very long chain ceramide species, and have defective lymphocyte trafficking. Surprisingly, levels of S1P and dihydro-S1P were increased in lymph from Spns2 mice as well as in specific tissues, including lymph nodes, and interstitial fluid. Moreover, lymph nodes from Spns2 mice have aberrant lymphatic sinus that appeared collapsed, with reduced numbers of lymphocytes. Our data suggest that Spns2 is an S1P transporter in vivo that plays a role in regulation not only of blood S1P but also lymph node and lymph S1P levels and consequently influences lymphocyte trafficking and lymphatic vessel network organization.

  5. Active Transport Can Greatly Enhance Cdc20:Mad2 Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To guarantee genomic integrity and viability, the cell must ensure proper distribution of the replicated chromosomes among the two daughter cells in mitosis. The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC is a central regulatory mechanism to achieve this goal. A dysfunction of this checkpoint may lead to aneuploidy and likely contributes to the development of cancer. Kinetochores of unattached or misaligned chromosomes are thought to generate a diffusible “wait-anaphase” signal, which is the basis for downstream events to inhibit the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C. The rate of Cdc20:C-Mad2 complex formation at the kinetochore is a key regulatory factor in the context of APC/C inhibition. Computer simulations of a quantitative SAC model show that the formation of Cdc20:C-Mad2 is too slow for checkpoint maintenance when cytosolic O-Mad2 has to encounter kinetochores by diffusion alone. Here, we show that an active transport of O-Mad2 towards the spindle mid-zone increases the efficiency of Mad2-activation. Our in-silico data indicate that this mechanism can greatly enhance the formation of Cdc20:Mad2 and furthermore gives an explanation on how the “wait-anaphase” signal can dissolve abruptly within a short time. Our results help to understand parts of the SAC mechanism that remain unclear.

  6. Evidence of moderation effects in predicting active transport to school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnham-Lee, Katy P; Falconer, Catherine L; Sherar, Lauren B; Taylor, Ian M

    2017-03-01

    Distance from home to school is an important influence on the decision to use active transport (AT); however, ecological perspectives would suggest this relationship may be moderated by individual, interpersonal and environmental factors. This study investigates whether (i) gender, (ii) biological maturation, (iii) perceived family support for physical activity (PA) and (iv) multiple deprivation moderate the relationship between distance to school and AT. A total of 611 children (11-12 years old, 334 females) were recruited from schools in Leicestershire, UK. Gender, family support for PA, and AT were self-reported. Home and school postcodes were used to determine multiple deprivation and distance to school (km). Predicted age at peak height velocity was used to indicate biological maturation. Logistic regressions revealed the main effects explained 40.2% of the variance in AT; however; distance to school was the only significant predictor. Further analyses revealed that distance to school had a greater negative impact on the use of AT in late-maturing (OR: 3.60, CI: 1.45-8.96), less deprived (OR: 3.54, CI: 1.17-10.72) and children with low family support of PA (OR: 0.26, CI: 0.11-0.61). This study provides evidence that, although distance to school might be the strongest predictor of AT, this relationship is complex.

  7. Intracellular regulation of TNF activity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Vucic, Domagoj

    2018-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα, TNF) is a key mediator and regulator of mammalian immune responses in healthy organisms and in diseased conditions. TNF governs development of the immune system, cell survival signaling pathways, proliferation and regulates metabolic processes. Whereas TNF-induced NF-κB and MAP pro-survival kinase activities constitute its major biochemical functions, TNF can also stimulate cell death in certain pathological situations. TNF-induced signal transduction pathways are tightly regulated through ubiquitination and phosphorylation of molecules partaking in all TNF-dependent membrane-associated and intracellular protein signaling complexes. Deregulated TNF signaling in individuals carrying naturally occurring genetic mutations in proteins that mediate TNF signaling, or in corresponding genetically modified animal models, results in severe pathologies. In this review we will describe the current knowledge of TNF signaling and its relevance for human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trends in CO2 Emissions from China-Oriented International Marine Transportation Activities and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualong Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demand for marine transportation and its associated CO2 emissions are growing rapidly as a result of increasing international trade and economic growth. An activity-based approach is developed for forecasting CO2 emissions from the China-oriented international seaborne trade sector. To accurately estimate the aggregated emissions, CO2 emissions are calculated individually for five categories of vessels: crude oil tanker, product tanker, chemical tanker, bulk carrier, and container. A business-as-usual (BAU scenario was developed to describe the current situation without additional mitigation policies, whilst three alternative scenarios were developed to describe scenarios with various accelerated improvements of the key factors. The aggregated CO2 emissions are predicted to reach 419.97 Mt under the BAU scenario, and 258.47 Mt under the optimal case, AD3. These predictions are 4.5 times and 2.8 times that of the aggregated emissions in 2007. Our analysis suggests that regulations for monitoring, reporting, and verifying the activities of vessels should be proposed, in order to quantify the CO2 emissions of marine transportation activities in Chinese territorial waters. In the long-term future, mitigation policies should be employed to reduce CO2 emissions from the marine trade sector and to address the climatic impact of shipping.

  9. Ethylene regulates root growth through effects on auxin biosynthesis and transport-dependent auxin distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzicka, Kamil; Ljung, Karin; Vanneste, Steffen; Podhorská, Radka; Beeckman, Tom; Friml, Jiri; Benkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    In plants, each developmental process integrates a network of signaling events that are regulated by different phytohormones, and interactions among hormonal pathways are essential to modulate their effect. Continuous growth of roots results from the postembryonic activity of cells within the root meristem that is controlled by the coordinated action of several phytohormones, including auxin and ethylene. Although their interaction has been studied intensively, the molecular and cellular mech...

  10. Gibberellins regulate iron deficiency-response by influencing iron transport and translocation in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baolan; Wei, Haifang; Xue, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2017-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of plant hormones with diverse functions. However, there has been little information on the role of GAs in response to plant nutrient deficiency. To evaluate the roles of GAs in regulation of Fe homeostasis, the effects of GA on Fe accumulation and Fe translocation in rice seedlings were investigated using wild-type, a rice mutant ( eui1 ) displaying enhnaced endogenous GA concentrations due to a defect in GA deactivation, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsEUI . Exposure to Fe-deficient medium significantly reduced biomass of rice plants. Both exogenous application of GA and an endogenous increase of bioactive GA enhanced Fe-deficiency response by exaggerating foliar chlorosis and reducing growth. Iron deficiency significantly suppressed production of GA 1 and GA 4 , the biologically active GAs in rice. Exogenous application of GA significantly decreased leaf Fe concentration regardless of Fe supply. Iron concentration in shoot of eui1 mutants was lower than that of WT plants under both Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions. Paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, alleviated Fe-deficiency responses, and overexpression of EUI significantly increased Fe concentration in shoots and roots. Furthermore, both exogenous application of GA and endogenous increase in GA resulting from EUI mutation inhibited Fe translocation within shoots by suppressing OsYSL2 expression, which is involved in Fe transport and translocation. The novel findings provide compelling evidence to support the involvement of GA in mediation of Fe homeostasis in strategy II rice plants by negatively regulating Fe transport and translocation.

  11. The Influence of Urban Land-Use and Public Transport Facilities on Active Commuting in Wellington, New Zealand: Active Transport Forecasting Using the WILUTE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joreintje Dingena Mackenbach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has numerous physical and mental health benefits, and active commuting (walking or cycling to work can help meet physical activity recommendations. This study investigated socioeconomic differences in active commuting, and assessed the impact of urban land-use and public transport policies on active commuting in the Wellington region in New Zealand. We combined data from the New Zealand Household Travel Survey and GIS data on land-use and public transport facilities with the Wellington Integrated Land-Use, Transportation and Environment (WILUTE model, and forecasted changes in active commuter trips associated with changes in the built environment. Results indicated high income individuals were more likely to commute actively than individuals on low income. Several land-use and transportation factors were associated with active commuting and results from the modelling showed a potential increase in active commuting following an increase in bus frequency and parking fees. In conclusion, regional level policies stimulating environmental factors that directly or indirectly affect active commuting may be a promising strategy to increase population level physical activity. Access to, and frequency of, public transport in the neighbourhood can act as a facilitator for a more active lifestyle among its residents without negatively affecting disadvantaged groups.

  12. Alexithymia influences brain activation during emotion perception but not regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M; Swart, Marte; Wiersma, Durk; de Haan, Lieuwe; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    Alexithymia is a psychological construct that can be divided into a cognitive and affective dimension. The cognitive dimension is characterized by difficulties in identifying, verbalizing and analysing feelings. The affective dimension comprises reduced levels of emotional experience and imagination. Alexithymia is widely regarded to arise from an impairment of emotion regulation. This is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to critically evaluate this by investigating the neural correlates of emotion regulation as a function of alexithymia levels. The aim of the current study was to investigate the neural correlates underlying the two alexithymia dimensions during emotion perception and emotion regulation. Using fMRI, we scanned 51 healthy subjects while viewing, reappraising or suppressing negative emotional pictures. The results support the idea that cognitive alexithymia, but not affective alexithymia, is associated with lower activation in emotional attention and recognition networks during emotion perception. However, in contrast with several theories, no alexithymia-related differences were found during emotion regulation (neither reappraisal nor suppression). These findings suggest that alexithymia may result from an early emotion processing deficit rather than compromised frontal circuits subserving higher-order emotion regulation processes. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Neuronal activity-induced regulation of Lingo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovski, Alexandra; Josephson, Anna; Ringman, Andreas; Brené, Stefan; Spenger, Christian; Olson, Lars

    2004-10-25

    Axonal regeneration after injury can be limited in the adult CNS by the presence of inhibitory proteins such as Nogo. Nogo binds to a receptor complex that consists of Nogo receptor (NgR), p75NTR, and Lingo-1. Nogo binding activates RhoA, which inhibits axonal outgrowth. Here we assessed Lingo-1 and NgR mRNA levels after delivery of BDNF into the rat hippocampal formation, Lingo-1 mRNA levels in rats subjected to kainic acid (KA) and running in running wheels. Lingo-1 mRNA was not changed by running. However, we found that Lingo-1 mRNA was strongly up-regulated while NgR mRNA was down-regulated in the dentate gyrus in both the BDNF and the KA experiments. Our data demonstrate inverse regulation of NgR and Lingo-1 in these situations, suggesting that Lingo-1 up-regulation is one characteristic of activity-induced neural plasticity responses.

  14. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, L V M; Pendurthi, U R

    2012-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of the factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells, but is generally absent on cells that come into contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bonds, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review the key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors' perspective on the subject. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Uterine activity, sperm transport, and the role of boar stimuli around insemination in sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, P.; Soede, N.M.; Kemp, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes changes in spontaneous myometrial activity around estrus, factors that affect myometrial activity, and the possible role of uterine contractions in the process of (artificial) insemination, sperm transport and fertilization. Myometrial activity in the sow increases during

  16. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2007 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Towards a single European energy market: Birth of a single European energy market (Origins of Europe of Energy, Emergence of a European energy policy); Main European Community guiding lines (European governance as regards energy, Guiding principles for the internal energy market); European Community activities (European Commission reports, Electricity and gas Regional Initiatives); Organisation and coordination of European regulators (Joint organisation of European regulators, CRE's relations with European Community institutions); CRE's European activities (Regional integration of gas markets, Regional integration of electricity markets, Operation of the European interconnected electricity grid and security of supply, CRE's other European activities); B - CRE action at national level: Grids/networks and infrastructures (General information, Electricity grids, Regulation of gas networks and infrastructures); Markets (Changes in the regulatory and legislative contexts of electricity and natural gas markets, Electricity markets

  17. Adolescents who engage in active school transport are also more active in other contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Tom; Duncan, Scott; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    and travel behaviours across time- and space-classified domains. METHODS: A total of 196 adolescents wore a Global Positioning System receiver and an accelerometer for 7 days. All data were classified into one of four domains: home, school, transport, or leisure. Generalized linear mixed models were used......BACKGROUND: Although active school travel (AST) is important for increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), it is unclear how AST is related to context-specific physical activity and non-school travel. This study investigated how school travel is related to physical activity...... to compare domain-specific PA and non-school trips between active and passive school travellers. RESULTS: Active travellers accumulated 13 and 14 more min of MVPA on weekdays and weekend days, respectively. They also spent 15min less time in vehicular travel during non-school trips, and accrued an additional...

  18. ABCC4/MRP4: a MYCN-regulated transporter and potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony eHuynh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to cytotoxic drugs is thought to be a major cause of treatment failure in childhood neuroblastoma, and members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily may contribute to this phenomenon by active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from cancer cells. As a member of the C subfamily of ABC transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP4/ABCC4 has the ability to export a variety of endogenous and exogenous substances across the plasma membrane. In light of its capacity for chemotherapeutic drug efflux, MRP4 has been studied in the context of drug resistance in a number of cancer cell types. However, MRP4 also influences cancer cell biology independently of chemotherapeutic drug exposure, which highlights the potential importance of endogenous MRP4 substrates in cancer biology. Furthermore, MRP4 is a direct transcriptional target of Myc family oncoproteins and expression of this transporter is a powerful independent predictor of clinical outcome in neuroblastoma. Together these features suggest that inhibition of MRP4 may be an attractive therapeutic approach for neuroblastoma and other cancers that rely on MRP4. In this respect, existing options for MRP4 inhibition are relatively non-selective and thus development of more specific anti-MRP4 compounds should be a major focus of future work in this area.

  19. KIF5C S176 Phosphorylation Regulates Microtubule Binding and Transport Efficiency in Mammalian Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur ePadzik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased phosphorylation of the KIF5 anterograde motor is associated with impaired axonal transport and neurodegeneration, but paradoxically also with normal transport, though the details are not fully defined. JNK phosphorylates KIF5C on S176 in the motor domain; a site that we show is phosphorylated in brain. Microtubule pelleting assays demonstrate that phosphomimetic KIF5C(1-560S176D associates weakly with microtubules compared to KIF5C(1-560WT. Consistent with this, 50% of KIF5C(1-560S176D shows diffuse movement in neurons. However the remaining 50% remains microtubule bound and displays decreased pausing and increased bidirectional movement. The same directionality switching is observed with KIF5C(1-560WT in the presence of an active JNK chimera, MKK7-JNK. Yet, in cargo trafficking assays where peroxisome cargo is bound, KIF5C(1-560S176D-GFP-FRB transports normally to microtubule plus ends. We also find that JNK increases the ATP hydrolysis of KIF5C in vitro. These data suggest that phosphorylation of KIF5C-S176 primes the motor to either disengage entirely from microtubule tracks as previously observed in response to stress, or to display improved efficiency. The final outcome may depend on cargo load and motor ensembles.

  20. Mechanisms Regulating Acid-Base Transporter Expression in Breast- and Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbatenko, Andrej

    , characteristics of which are a shift towards glycolytic metabolism and increased acid production. HER2 receptor overexpression in breast cancer leads to further increased glycolysis, invasion and metastasis, drug resistance and poor prognosis. Increased tumor glycolysis requires acquisition of mechanisms...... for dealing with excess acid production. In this light, evidence accumulates on the importance of pH regulatory proteins to cancer cell survival and motility. Our group previously demonstrated upregulation of the Na+/HCO3 - co-transporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) by a constitutively active form of HER2 receptor (p95HER...

  1. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally, several reports have demonstrated how defects in DNA sensing, signaling, and regulation are associated with susceptibility to infections or inflammatory diseases in humans and model organisms. In this review, the current literature on DNA-stimulated innate immune activation is discussed, and important new questions facing this field are proposed. PMID:25926682

  2. Centromeric Transcription Regulates Aurora-B Localization and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Blower

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric transcription is widely conserved; however, it is not clear what role centromere transcription plays during mitosis. Here, I find that centromeres are transcribed in Xenopus egg extracts into a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA; cen-RNA that localizes to mitotic centromeres, chromatin, and spindles. cen-RNAs bind to the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC in vitro and in vivo. Blocking transcription or antisense inhibition of cen-RNA leads to a reduction of CPC localization to the inner centromere and misregulation of CPC component Aurora-B activation independently of known centromere recruitment pathways. Additionally, transcription is required for normal bipolar attachment of kinetochores to the mitotic spindle, consistent with a role for cen-RNA in CPC regulation. This work demonstrates that cen-RNAs promote normal kinetochore function through regulation of the localization and activation of the CPC and confirm that lncRNAs are components of the centromere.

  3. Regulation of burstiness by network-driven activation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    We prove that complex networks of interactions have the capacity to regulate and buffer unpredictable fluctuations in production events. We show that non-bursty network-driven activation dynamics can effectively regulate the level of burstiness in the production of nodes, which can be enhanced or reduced. Burstiness can be induced even when the endogenous inter-event time distribution of nodes' production is non-bursty. We found that hubs tend to be less controllable than low degree nodes, which are more susceptible to the networked regulatory effects. Our results have important implications for the analysis and engineering of bursty activity in a range of systems, from telecommunication networks to transcription and translation of genes into proteins in cells.

  4. The POLARIS peptide of Arabidopsis regulates auxin transport and root growth via effects on ethylene signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilley, Paul M; Casson, Stuart A; Tarkowski, Petr; Hawkins, Nathan; Wang, Kevin L-C; Hussey, Patrick J; Beale, Mike; Ecker, Joseph R; Sandberg, Göran K; Lindsey, Keith

    2006-11-01

    The rate and plane of cell division and anisotropic cell growth are critical for plant development and are regulated by diverse mechanisms involving several hormone signaling pathways. Little is known about peptide signaling in plant growth; however, Arabidopsis thaliana POLARIS (PLS), encoding a 36-amino acid peptide, is required for correct root growth and vascular development. Mutational analysis implicates a role for the peptide in hormone responses, but the basis of PLS action is obscure. Using the Arabidopsis root as a model to study PLS action in plant development, we discovered a link between PLS, ethylene signaling, auxin homeostasis, and microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics. Mutation of PLS results in an enhanced ethylene-response phenotype, defective auxin transport and homeostasis, and altered microtubule sensitivity to inhibitors. These defects, along with the short-root phenotype, are suppressed by genetic and pharmacological inhibition of ethylene action. PLS expression is repressed by ethylene and induced by auxin. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby PLS negatively regulates ethylene responses to modulate cell division and expansion via downstream effects on microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics and auxin signaling, thereby influencing root growth and lateral root development. This mechanism involves a regulatory loop of auxin-ethylene interactions.

  5. MicroRNA 224 Regulates Ion Transporter Expression in Ameloblasts To Coordinate Enamel Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Zhou, Yachuan; Zhou, Xuedong; Sun, Feifei; Gao, Bo; Wan, Mian; Zhou, Xin; Sun, Jianxun; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Crane, Janet; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-08-01

    Enamel mineralization is accompanied by the release of protons into the extracellular matrix, which is buffered to regulate the pH value in the local microenvironment. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA 224 (miR-224) as a regulator of SLC4A4 and CFTR, encoding the key buffering ion transporters, in modulating enamel mineralization. miR-224 was significantly downregulated as ameloblasts differentiated, in parallel with upregulation of SLC4A4 and CFTR. Overexpression of miR-224 downregulated SLC4A4 and CFTR expression in cultured human epithelial cells. A microRNA luciferase assay confirmed the specific binding of miR-224 to the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of SLC4A4 and CFTR mRNAs, thereby inhibiting protein translation. miR-224 agomir injection in mouse neonatal incisors resulted in normal enamel length and thickness, but with disturbed organization of the prism structure and deficient crystal growth. Moreover, the enamel Ca/P ratio and microhardness were markedly reduced after miR-224 agomir administration. These results demonstrate that miR-224 plays a pivotal role in fine tuning enamel mineralization by modulating SLC4A4 and CFTR to maintain pH homeostasis and support enamel mineralization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Latorre

    Full Text Available TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system.

  7. The association between access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-12-05

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting.

  8. Bifurcation analysis of the regulation of nociceptive neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, O. E.

    2017-11-01

    A model of the membrane of a nociceptive neuron from a rat dorsal ganglion has been used to address the problem of analyzing the regulation of nociceptive signals by 5-hydroxy-γ-pyrone-2-carboxylic acid, which is the active pharmaceutic ingredient of the analgesic Anoceptin. The study has applied bifurcation analysis to report the relationship between the values of model parameters and the type of problem solution before and after the parameters change in response to analgesic modulation.

  9. The Role of Transport Activities in Logistics Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Chira

    2014-01-01

    The operation of transportation determines the efficiency of moving products. The progress in techniques and management principles improves the moving load, delivery speed, service quality, operation costs, the usage of facilities and energy saving. Transportation takes a crucial part in the manipulation of logistic. Reviewing the current condition, a strong system needs a clear frame of logistics and a proper transport implements and techniques to link the producing procedures. The objective...

  10. Activity-Based Costing Application in an Urban Mass Transport Company

    OpenAIRE

    Popesko Boris; Novák Petr

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic overview of the application of Activity-Based Costing in an urban mass transport company which operates land public transport via buses and trolleys within the city. The case study was conducted using the Activity-Based Methodology in order to calculate the true cost of individual operations and to measure the profitability of particular transport lines. The case study analysis showed the possible effects of the application of the Activity-Based...

  11. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  12. Active Transportation Demand Management (ATDM) Trajectory Level Validation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The ATDM Trajectory Validation project developed a validation framework and a trajectory computational engine to compare and validate simulated and observed vehicle...

  13. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  14. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  15. Molybdenum and tungsten in Campylobacter jejuni: their physiological role and identification of separate transporters regulated by a single ModE-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveirne, Michael E; Sikes, Michael L; Olson, Jonathan W

    2009-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important human pathogen that causes millions of cases of food-borne enteritis each year. The C. jejuni respiratory chain is highly branched and contains at least four enzymes predicted to contain a metal binding pterin (MPT), with the metal being either molybdenum or tungsten. Also predicted are two separate transport systems, one for molybdenum encoded by modABC and a second for tungsten encoded by tupABC. Both transport systems were mutated and the activities of the four predicted MPT-containing enzymes were assayed in the presence of molybdenum and tungsten in wild-type and mod and tup backgrounds. Results indicate that mod is primarily a molybdenum transporter that can also transport tungsten, while tup is a tungsten-specific transporter. The MPT containing enzymes nitrate reductase, sulphite oxidase, and SN oxide reductase are strict molybdoenzymes while formate dehydrogenase prefers tungsten. A ModE-like protein regulates both transporters, repressing mod in the presence of both molybdenum and tungsten and tup only in the presence of tungsten. Like other ModE proteins, the C. jejuni ModE binds DNA through a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain, but unlike other members of the ModE family it does not have a metal binding domain.

  16. Models of long-distance transport: how is carrier-dependent auxin transport regulated in the stem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Michael; Hanan, Jim; Ferguson, Brett J; Beveridge, Christine A

    2012-05-01

    • This paper presents two models of carrier-dependent long-distance auxin transport in stems that represent the process at different scales. • A simple compartment model using a single constant auxin transfer rate produced similar data to those observed in biological experiments. The effects of different underlying biological assumptions were tested in a more detailed model representing cellular and intracellular processes that enabled discussion of different patterns of carrier-dependent auxin transport and signalling. • The output that best fits the biological data is produced by a model where polar auxin transport is not limited by the number of transporters/carriers and hence supports biological data showing that stems have considerable excess capacity to transport auxin. • All results support the conclusion that auxin depletion following apical decapitation in pea (Pisum sativum) occurs too slowly to be the initial cause of bud outgrowth. Consequently, changes in auxin content in the main stem and changes in polar auxin transport/carrier abundance in the main stem are not correlated with axillary bud outgrowth. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Regulating the regulator: factors that control levels and activity of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Patricia A; Riddick, David S; Okey, Allan B

    2006-07-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) participates in a wide range of critical cellular events in response to endogenous signals or xenobiotic chemicals. Hence, it is important that AHR levels and activity themselves be well controlled in target tissues. The AHR is essentially ubiquitous in its distribution in mammalian tissues. However, levels of the receptor vary widely across different tissues and among different cell types. AHR levels and activity are modulated by exposure to the receptor's own ligands and are influenced by other xenobiotic chemicals. Many different factors impinge on AHR levels and AHR activity. These factors may alter responsiveness of downstream pathways, thereby affecting normal physiologic functions as well as responses to toxic environmental chemicals such as dioxins. Our commentary appraises the current literature on factors that regulate AHR levels/activity and attempts to identify fruitful strategies towards discovery of key pathways by which AHR levels are modulated in response to endogenous signals and in response to xenobiotic chemicals. An extraordinarily large number of agents alter the level or activity of the AHR. We have not yet entered an age of enlightenment sufficient to achieve true understanding of the interplay of mechanisms that regulate AHR expression in space and in time.

  18. Ins and outs of ADF/cofilin activity and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Troys, Marleen; Huyck, Lynn; Leyman, Shirley; Dhaese, Stien; Vandekerkhove, Joël; Ampe, Christophe

    2008-09-01

    The actin-binding proteins of the actin-depolymerisation factor (ADF)/cofilin family were first described more than three decades ago, but research on these proteins still occupies a front role in the actin and cell migration field. Moreover, cofilin activity is implicated in the malignant, invasive properties of cancer cells. The effects of ADF/cofilins on actin dynamics are diverse and their regulation is complex. In stimulated cells, multiple signalling pathways can be initiated resulting in different activation/deactivation switches that control ADF/cofilin activity. The output of this entire regulatory system, in combination with spatial and temporal segregation of the activation mechanisms, underlies the contribution of ADF/cofilins to various cell migration/invasion phenotypes. In this framework, we describe current views on how ADF/cofilins function in migrating and invading cells.

  19. Active transport and obesity prevention - A transportation sector obesity impact scoping review and assessment for Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, V; Moodie, M; Mantilla Herrera, A M; Veerman, J L; Carter, R

    2017-03-01

    Given the alarming prevalence of obesity worldwide and the need for interventions to halt the growing epidemic, more evidence on the role and impact of transport interventions for obesity prevention is required. This study conducts a scoping review of the current evidence of association between modes of transport (motor vehicle, walking, cycling and public transport) and obesity-related outcomes. Eleven reviews and thirty-three primary studies exploring associations between transport behaviours and obesity were identified. Cohort simulation Markov modelling was used to estimate the effects of body mass index (BMI) change on health outcomes and health care costs of diseases causally related to obesity in the Melbourne, Australia population. Results suggest that evidence for an obesity effect of transport behaviours is inconclusive (29% of published studies reported expected associations, 33% mixed associations), and any potential BMI effect is likely to be relatively small. Hypothetical scenario analyses suggest that active transport interventions may contribute small but significant obesity-related health benefits across populations (approximately 65 health adjusted life years gained per year). Therefore active transport interventions that are low cost and targeted to those most amenable to modal switch are the most likely to be effective and cost-effective from an obesity prevention perspective. The uncertain but potentially significant opportunity for health benefits warrants the collection of more and better quality evidence to fully understand the potential relationships between transport behaviours and obesity. Such evidence would contribute to the obesity prevention dialogue and inform policy across the transportation, health and environmental sectors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Active transportation and adolescents' health: the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, Richard; Faulkner, Guy E J; Fortier, Michelle; Tremblay, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Active transportation (AT; e.g., walking and cycling) is increasingly promoted to increase youth physical activity (PA). Most previous research focused solely on school trips, and associations among AT and cardiovascular risk factors have seldom been examined in adolescents. To address these important research gaps using data from the nationally representative 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. A total of 1,016 adolescents aged 12-19 years reported their weekly time spent utilitarian walking and cycling, and wore an Actical accelerometer for 7 days. They underwent a series of physical tests (measures of fitness, body composition, blood pressure, and blood sampling) following standardized protocols. In 2013, differences in PA and health-related outcomes across levels of walking and cycling were assessed with ANCOVA analyses adjusted for age, gender, parental education, and usual daily PA. Greater walking and cycling time was associated with higher moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Compared to adolescents reporting walking 1-5 hours/week, those reporting 5 hours/week had better grip strength, lower total cholesterol, and total cholesterol/HDL ratio. Compared to adolescents reporting no cycling, those reporting ≥1 hour/week accumulated more light PA, had greater aerobic fitness, and lower BMI, waist circumference, and total cholesterol/HDL ratio; those who reported cycling <1 hour/week had lower total cholesterol. Utilitarian walking and cycling were associated with higher daily MVPA in youth. Cycling was associated with a more consistent pattern of health benefits than walking. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activity Development for Intersection Operations The National Transportation Curriculum Project : Developing Activity-Based Learning Modules for the Introductory Transportation Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this work was to develop activity-based learning materials for the introductory transportation engineering course : with the purpose of increasing student understanding and concept retention. These materials were to cover intersection : o...

  2. Individual, Social, and Environmental Correlates of Active Transportation Patterns in French Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchoux, Camille; Enaux, Christophe; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Menai, Mehdi; Charreire, Hélène; Salze, Paul; Weber, Christiane; Hercberg, Serge; Feuillet, Thierry; Hess, Franck; Roda, Célina; Simon, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were (1) to define physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB) patterns in daily life contexts (work, leisure, and transportation) in French working women from NutriNet-Santé web-cohort and (2) to identify pattern(s) of active transportation and their individual, social, and environmental correlates. 23,432 participants completed two questionnaires to evaluate PA and SB in daily life contexts and individual representations of residential neighborhood and transportation modes. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed which identified 6 distinct movement behavior patterns: (i) active occupation, high sedentary leisure, (ii) sedentary occupation, low leisure, (iii) sedentary transportation, (iv) sedentary occupation and leisure, (v) active transportation, and (vi) active leisure. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to identify correlates of the “active transportation” cluster. The perceived environmental characteristics positively associated with “active transportation” included “high availability of destinations around home,” “presence of bicycle paths,” and “low traffic.” A “positive image of walking/cycling,” the “individual feeling of being physically active,” and a “high use of active transport modes by relatives/friends” were positively related to “active transportation,” identified as a unique pattern regarding individual and environmental correlates. Identification of PA and SB context-specific patterns will help to understand movement behaviors' complexity and to design interventions to promote active transportation in specific subgroups. PMID:28717653

  3. Individual, Social, and Environmental Correlates of Active Transportation Patterns in French Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Perchoux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives were (1 to define physical activity (PA and sedentary behaviors (SB patterns in daily life contexts (work, leisure, and transportation in French working women from NutriNet-Santé web-cohort and (2 to identify pattern(s of active transportation and their individual, social, and environmental correlates. 23,432 participants completed two questionnaires to evaluate PA and SB in daily life contexts and individual representations of residential neighborhood and transportation modes. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed which identified 6 distinct movement behavior patterns: (i active occupation, high sedentary leisure, (ii sedentary occupation, low leisure, (iii sedentary transportation, (iv sedentary occupation and leisure, (v active transportation, and (vi active leisure. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to identify correlates of the “active transportation” cluster. The perceived environmental characteristics positively associated with “active transportation” included “high availability of destinations around home,” “presence of bicycle paths,” and “low traffic.” A “positive image of walking/cycling,” the “individual feeling of being physically active,” and a “high use of active transport modes by relatives/friends” were positively related to “active transportation,” identified as a unique pattern regarding individual and environmental correlates. Identification of PA and SB context-specific patterns will help to understand movement behaviors’ complexity and to design interventions to promote active transportation in specific subgroups.

  4. Aberrant DR5 transport through disruption of lysosomal function suggests a novel mechanism for receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Birce; Safarikova, Barbora; Laukova, Jarmila; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Vaculova, Alena Hyrslova; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Olsson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    To examine reciprocal or unilateral implications between two cell destruction processes, autophagy and apoptosis, in 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-treated tumor cells, a combination of chemical inhibitors, RNAi and genetic approaches were used. In contrast to cancer cells harboring obstructed apoptosis, either at the DISC or the mitochondrial level, p53-deficiency generated signs of autophagy deregulation upon chemotherapy. On the other, hand disruption of lysosomal function by chloroquine, caused a profound decrease in apoptotic markers appearing in response to 5-FU. DR5, which is essential for 5-FU-induced apoptosis, accumulated in lysosomes and autophagosomes upon chloroquine treatment. Since neither 3-MA, RNAi of critical autophagy regulators or inhibition of cathepsins reversed apoptosis in a similar manner, it is likely that not autophagy per se but rather correct receptor transport is an important factor for 5-FU cytotoxicity. We found that apoptosis generated by TRAIL, the cognate ligand for DR5, remained unchanged upon chloroquine lysosomal interference, indicating that 5-FU activates the receptor by a discrete mechanism. In support, depletion of membrane cholesterol or hampering cholesterol transport drastically reduced 5-FU cytotoxicity. We conclude that targeting of lysosomes by chloroquine deregulates DR5 trafficking and abrogates 5-FU- but not TRAIL-stimulated cell elimination, hence suggesting a novel mechanism for receptor activation. PMID:27506940

  5. Visualization of glutamine transporter activities in living cells using genetically encoded glutamine sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Gruenwald

    Full Text Available Glutamine plays a central role in the metabolism of critical biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, neurotransmitters, and glutathione. Since glutamine metabolism is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters, the cellular glutamine concentration is expected to be temporally dynamic. Moreover, differentiation in glutamine metabolism between cell types in the same tissue (e.g. neuronal and glial cells is often crucial for the proper function of the tissue as a whole, yet assessing cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes in such heterogenic tissue by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting glutamine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, hence addressing this knowledge gap. Here we report the development of Föster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET glutamine sensors based on improved cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins, monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1 and venus. These sensors were found to be specific to glutamine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Using cos7 cells expressing the human glutamine transporter ASCT2 as a model, we demonstrate that the properties of the glutamine transporter can easily be analyzed with these sensors. The range of glutamine concentration change in a given cell can also be estimated using sensors with different affinities. Moreover, the mTFP1-venus FRET pair can be duplexed with another FRET pair, mAmetrine and tdTomato, opening up the possibility for real-time imaging of another molecule. These novel glutamine sensors will be useful tools to analyze specificities of glutamine metabolism at the single-cell level.

  6. The endocannabinoid system in renal cells: regulation of Na(+) transport by CB1 receptors through distinct cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, L S; Taveira Da Silva, R; Lima, D; Sampaio, C L C; Iannotti, F A; Mazzarella, E; Di Marzo, V; Vieyra, A; Reis, R A M; Einicker-Lamas, M

    2015-10-01

    The function of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in renal tissue is not completely understood. Kidney function is closely related to ion reabsorption in the proximal tubule, the nephron segment responsible for the re-absorption of 70-80% of the filtrate. We studied the effect of compounds modulating the activity of cannabinoid (CB) receptors on the active re-absorption of Na(+) in LLC-PK1 cells. Changes in Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity were assessed after treatment with WIN55,212-2 (WIN), a non-selective lipid agonist, and haemopressin (HP), an inverse peptide agonist at CB1 receptors. Pharmacological tools were used to investigate the signalling pathways involved in the modulation of Na(+) transport. In addition to CB1 and CB2 receptors and TRPV1 channels, the mRNAs encoding for enzymes of the ECS were also expressed in LLC-PK1. WIN (10(-7)  M) and HP (10(-6)  M) altered Na(+) re-absorption in LLC-PK1 in a dual manner. They both acutely (after 1 min) increased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity in a TRPV1 antagonist-sensitive way. WIN's stimulating effect persisted for 30 min, and this effect was partially blocked by a CB1 antagonist or a PKC inhibitor. In contrast, HP inhibited Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase after 30 min incubation, and this effect was attenuated by a CB1 antagonist or a PKA inhibitor. The ECS is expressed in LLC-PK1 cells. Both CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels regulate Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity in these cells, and are modulated by lipid and peptide CB1 receptor ligands, which act via different signalling pathways. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Regulation of stretch-activated ANP secretion by chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong Hee; Bai, Guang Yi; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Yuan, Kuichang; Park, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2008-04-01

    This study was aimed to define roles of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs), especially Cl(-) channels, in regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion using isolated perfused beating atria. The volume load was achieved by elevating height of outflow catheter connected to isolated rat atria and the pressure load was achieved by decreasing diameter of outflow catheter. Both methods increased atrial contractility similarly although volume load was different (736microl for volume load vs. 129microl for pressure load). Atrial stretch by volume load markedly increased ECF translocation and ANP secretion but the pressure load slightly increased. The ANP secretion was positively correlated to workload generated by volume or pressure load. Treatment of atria with gadolinium, a blocker for SACs, attenuated the ECF translocation and the ANP secretion induced by volume load. A blocker for Ca2+-activated Cl(-) channel, niflumic acid (NFA), accentuated the ANP secretion induced by volume load whereas a blocker for swelling-activated Cl(-) channel, diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS), attenuated the ANP secretion. The ANP secretion of hypertrophied atria by volume load was markedly reduced and the augmented effect of NFA on volume load-induced ANP secretion was not observed. These results indicate that Cl(-) channels may differently regulate stretch-activated ANP secretion.

  8. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R Hensch

    Full Text Available Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT. Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states.

  9. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors.

  10. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-04

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation.

  11. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  12. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    container. It now permits free transit of shipping containers from their western ports, if transported by rail directly to the U.S. ( Mireles , 2005, p...Transportation Industry Study Seminar. Mireles , Richard, Castillo. (2005, January). A Cure for West Coast Congestion. Logistics Today, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 1

  13. SERCA pump activity is physiologically regulated by presenilin and regulates amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kim N; Demuro, Angelo; Akbari, Yama; Hitt, Brian D; Smith, Ian F; Parker, Ian; LaFerla, Frank M

    2008-06-30

    In addition to disrupting the regulated intramembraneous proteolysis of key substrates, mutations in the presenilins also alter calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism linking presenilins and calcium regulation is unresolved. At rest, cytosolic Ca(2+) is maintained at low levels by pumping Ca(2+) into stores in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the sarco ER Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps. We show that SERCA activity is diminished in fibroblasts lacking both PS1 and PS2 genes, despite elevated SERCA2b steady-state levels, and we show that presenilins and SERCA physically interact. Enhancing presenilin levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes accelerates clearance of cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas higher levels of SERCA2b phenocopy PS1 overexpression, accelerating Ca(2+) clearance and exaggerating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated Ca(2+) liberation. The critical role that SERCA2b plays in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is underscored by our findings that modulating SERCA activity alters amyloid beta production. Our results point to a physiological role for the presenilins in Ca(2+) signaling via regulation of the SERCA pump.

  14. Glycolysis and the regulation of glucose transport in Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis in batch and fed-batch culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiousis George

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that many reports deal with glycolysis in Lactococcus lactis, there is not much information on the regulation of uptake of glucose itself. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of the glucose level on its specific uptake rate. Results Studies on aeration levels in pH controlled L. lactis spp. lactis batch cultures on glucose (55 mM showed that product formation is extremely homolactic and the highest yield of lactate on glucose is obtained under microaerobic conditions (5% dissolved oxygen. Microaerobic conditions were therefore applied in experiments carried out to investigate the regulation of the uptake of glucose. The tool of glucostat fed-batch culture was employed, in which glucose was added at a rate suitable to maintain a stable concentration throughout the runs with glucose concentration ranging from 13.75 to 555 mM. The glucostat experiments showed that the concentration of glucose influences its specific uptake rate and consequently the glycolytic flux, as well as the fermentation pattern. The highest specific activities of the key glycolytic enzymes PFK, PYK and the LDH were obtained at 55 mM glucose, the area of the highest observed glycolytic flux. Reduction of the glycolytic flux by 55% in the 277 mM glucostat corresponded to an almost identical reduction in PFK activity, indicating a certain controlling influence of this enzyme on the flux, through the glucose effect. Conclusion Determination of intracellular metabolites' pools showed that FBP cannot be regarded as a direct regulator of product formation, since almost identical concentrations were obtained at both low (13.75 mM and high (138 mM glucose levels, at which neither the glucose uptake rates and the glycolytic flux, nor the fermentation patterns were similar (mixed acids vs homolactic, respectively. Glucostat data showed instead that the control of the flux through the glycolytic pathway under the examined

  15. Antithrombin regulates matriptase activity involved in plasmin generation, syndecan shedding, and HGF activation in keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wen Chen

    Full Text Available Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1 HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2 AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans.

  16. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report june 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2006 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the electricity and natural gas markets to household consumers on 1 July 2007: CRE at the service of eligible customers (Information for eligible customers, Improved knowledge of non-household customers); Monitoring of the non-discrimination, transparency and independence of system operators (Drafting and distribution of codes of good conduct for system operators, The necessary improvement of system operator independence); Preparing the practical methods of opening: GTE 2007 and GTG 2007 (The necessary simplification of relations between operators and customers, Achieving a greater level of consumer information and protection, The clearly defined stages of the 'customer pathway', Profiling and settlement mechanisms: turning experience feedback from 2004 to good account); Persisting uncertainties and hurdles (The need for a suitable regulatory and legislative platform, Hurdles to the opening of the household market); B - Regulation of the natural gas market: The gas market in the European context (Increasing weight of

  17. Prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Rachael A; Ladyman, Sharon R; Bouwer, Gregory T; Alyousif, Yousif; Sapsford, Tony J; Scott, Victoria; Kokay, Ilona C; Grattan, David R; Brown, Colin H

    2017-06-01

    During lactation, prolactin promotes milk synthesis and oxytocin stimulates milk ejection. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits the activity of oxytocin-secreting neurones. We found that prolactin inhibition of oxytocin neurone activity is lost in lactation, and that some oxytocin neurones were excited by prolactin in lactating rats. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity was not associated with a change in activation of intracellular signalling pathways known to couple to prolactin receptors. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in lactation might allow coordinated activation of both populations of neurones when required for successful lactation. Secretion of prolactin for milk synthesis and oxytocin for milk secretion is required for successful lactation. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits oxytocin neurones but this effect would be counterproductive during lactation when secretion of both hormones is required for synthesis and delivery of milk to the newborn. Hence, we determined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) prolactin on oxytocin neurones in urethane-anaesthetised virgin, pregnant and lactating rats. Prolactin (2 μg) consistently inhibited oxytocin neurones in virgin and pregnant rats (by 1.9 ± 0.4 and 1.8 ± 0.5 spikes s -1 , respectively), but not in lactating rats; indeed, prolactin excited six of 27 oxytocin neurones by >1 spike s -1 in lactating rats but excited none in virgin or pregnant rats (χ 2 2  = 7.2, P = 0.03). Vasopressin neurones were unaffected by prolactin (2 μg) in virgin rats but were inhibited by 1.1 ± 0.2 spikes s -1 in lactating rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that i.c.v. prolactin increased oxytocin expression in virgin and lactating rats and increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 phosphorylation to a similar extent in oxytocin neurones of virgin and lactating rats. Western blotting showed that i.c.v. prolactin did not affect

  18. Hsp90 regulation of fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Wang, Yunguan; Kasam, Rajesh K.; Sinner, Debora; Reddy, Geereddy B.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; McCormack, Francis X.; Jegga, Anil G.; Madala, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe fibrotic lung disease associated with fibroblast activation that includes excessive proliferation, tissue invasiveness, myofibroblast transformation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. To identify inhibitors that can attenuate fibroblast activation, we queried IPF gene signatures against a library of small-molecule-induced gene-expression profiles and identified Hsp90 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents that can suppress fibroblast activation in IPF. Although Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that regulates multiple processes involved in fibroblast activation, it has not been previously proposed as a molecular target in IPF. Here, we found elevated Hsp90 staining in lung biopsies of patients with IPF. Notably, fibroblasts isolated from fibrotic lesions showed heightened Hsp90 ATPase activity compared with normal fibroblasts. 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90 ATPase activity, attenuated fibroblast activation and also TGF-β–driven effects on fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation. The loss of the Hsp90AB, but not the Hsp90AA isoform, resulted in reduced fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast transformation, and ECM production. Finally, in vivo therapy with 17-AAG attenuated progression of established and ongoing fibrosis in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis, suggesting that targeting Hsp90 represents an effective strategy for the treatment of fibrotic lung disease. PMID:28239659

  19. Active pre-filters for dc/dc Boost regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Ramos-Paja

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an active pre-filter to mitigate the current harmonics generated by classical dc/dc Boost regulators, which generate current ripples proportional to the duty cycle. Therefore, high output voltage conditions, i.e., high voltage conversion ratios, produce high current harmonics that must be filtered to avoid damage or source losses. Traditionally, these current components are filtered using electrolytic capacitors, which introduce reliability problems because of their high failure rate. The solution introduced in this paper instead uses a dc/dc converter based on the parallel connection of the Boost canonical cells to filter the current ripples generated by the Boost regulator, improving the system reliability. This solution provides the additional benefits of improving the overall efficiency and the voltage conversion ratio. Finally, the solution is validated with simulations and experimental results.

  20. Evaluation of the Road Transport Management System, a self-regulation initiative in heavy vehicle transport in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available d'Afrique du Sud à l'aide du système de gestion des transports routiers (RTMS) des normes. Les normes RTMS exigent que les entreprises gèrent leurs activités de manière responsable afin d'assurer un risque minimal pour les autres usagers de la... privé avec le soutien actif des organismes de l'industrie et des organismes gouvernementaux .. Les études de cas montrent que des avantages importants se sont accumulés pour les administrations routières et l'industrie du transport depuis la mise en...

  1. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  2. Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 Trafficking by the Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells Requires Cross-talk with Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zejian; Sneve, Mary; Haroldson, Thomas A; Smith, Jeffrey P; Drewes, Lester R

    2016-04-08

    The transport of monocarboxylate fuels such as lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies across brain endothelial cells is mediated by monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1). Although the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for rodent blood-brain barrier development and for the expression of associated nutrient transporters, the role of this pathway in the regulation of brain endothelial MCT1 is unknown. Here we report expression of nine members of the frizzled receptor family by the RBE4 rat brain endothelial cell line. Furthermore, activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RBE4 cells via nuclear β-catenin signaling with LiCl does not alter brain endothelialMct1mRNA but increases the amount of MCT1 transporter protein. Plasma membrane biotinylation studies and confocal microscopic examination of mCherry-tagged MCT1 indicate that increased transporter results from reduced MCT1 trafficking from the plasma membrane via the endosomal/lysosomal pathway and is facilitated by decreased MCT1 ubiquitination following LiCl treatment. Inhibition of the Notch pathway by the γ-secretase inhibitorN-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester negated the up-regulation of MCT1 by LiCl, demonstrating a cross-talk between the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch pathways. Our results are important because they show, for the first time, the regulation of MCT1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by the multifunctional canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Promoting active transport in a workplace setting: evaluation of a pilot study in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li Ming; Orr, Neil; Bindon, Jeni; Rissel, Chris

    2005-06-01

    Promoting active transport is an increasingly important focus of recent health promotion initiatives addressing the major public health concerns of car dependence, decreased levels of physical activity and environmental health. Using active transport that relies less on the use of private cars and more on alternatives such as walking, cycling and public transport has the potential to increase population levels of physical activity and to improve the environment. Over 12 months, a combined social and individualized marketing campaign was delivered to a cohort of randomly selected health service employees (n = 68) working at a health care facility in inner-city Sydney, Australia. Pre- and post-intervention surveys measured changes in mode of transport, awareness of active transport and attitudes towards mode of transport. Following the intervention, we found there was a reduction in the proportion of participants who drove to work 5 days per week and a decrease in trips travelled by car on weekends. In addition, there was high awareness of the intervention amongst participants and their understanding of the concept of active transport improved from 17.6% at baseline to 94.1% at the follow-up survey (p transport. Our findings suggest that a combined social and individualized marketing campaign in the workplace setting can increase the use of active transport for the journey to work and trips on weekends. However, before these findings are widely applied, the intervention needs to be tested in a controlled study with a larger sample size.

  4. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Thiago Hérick de; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-06-27

    To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. By using data from the Health section of 2008's Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil's National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making. Apresentar estimativas nacionais sobre o deslocamento a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho no Brasil e em 10 de suas regiões metropolitanas. Utilizando dados do Suplemento sobre Saúde da Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios de 2008, estimamos a frequência de pessoas empregadas que se deslocam a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho estratificada por sexo, e segundo faixa etária, escolaridade, renda domiciliar per capita, residência em área urbana ou rural, regiões metropolitanas e macrorregiões do país. Adicionalmente, estimamos a distribuição da mesma frequ

  5. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  6. Are characteristics of the school district associated with active transportation to school in Danish adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Christiane; Bloomfield, Kim; Ejstrud, Bo; Vinther-Larsen, Mathilde; Meijer, Mathias; Grønbæk, Morten; Grittner, Ulrike

    2012-06-01

    This study sought to determine the influence of individual factors on active transportation to school among Danish seventh graders and whether school district factors are associated with such behaviour independently of individual factors. Mixed effects logistic regression models determined the effects of individual (gender, family affluence, enjoyment of school and academic performance) and school district factors (educational level, household savings, land use and size) on active transportation to school (by foot, bicycle or other active means) among 10 380 pupils aged 13-15 years nested in 407 school districts. Of all students, 64.4% used active transportation to school daily. Boys, those with perceived higher school performance and those with lower family affluence were more likely to use active transportation to school. After adjustment for all individual factors listed above, high household savings at the school district level was associated with higher odds of active transportation to school. As factors of land use, low level of farming land use and high proportion of single houses were associated with active transportation to school. Policies aiming at reducing social inequalities at the school district level may enhance active transportation to school. School districts with farming land use face barriers for active transportation to school, requiring special policy attention.

  7. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  8. Regulation of ENaC-Mediated Sodium Reabsorption by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengis S. Pavlov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are members of a steroid hormone receptor superfamily that responds to changes in lipid and glucose homeostasis. Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor subtype γ (PPARγ has received much attention as the target for antidiabetic drugs, as well as its role in responding to endogenous compounds such as prostaglandin J2. However, thiazolidinediones (TZDs, the synthetic agonists of the PPARγ are tightly associated with fluid retention and edema, as potentially serious side effects. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC represents the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in the renal collecting duct. Consequently, ENaC is a central effector impacting systemic blood volume and pressure. The role of PPARγ agonists on ENaC activity remains controversial. While PPARγ agonists were shown to stimulate ENaC-mediated renal salt absorption, probably via Serum- and Glucocorticoid-Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1, other studies reported that PPARγ agonist-induced fluid retention is independent of ENaC activity. The current paper provides new insights into the control and function of ENaC and ENaC-mediated sodium transport as well as several other epithelial channels/transporters by PPARs and particularly PPARγ. The potential contribution of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites in PPAR-dependent mechanisms is also discussed.

  9. Regulation of Expression of Renal Organic Anion Transporters OAT1 and OAT3 in a Model of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Preising

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, we gained evidence that impairment of rOat1 and rOat3 expression induced by ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI is mediated by COX metabolites and this suppression might be critically involved in renal damage. Methods: (i Basolateral organic anion uptake into proximal tubular cells after model ischemia and reperfusion (I/R was investigated by fluorescein uptake. The putative promoter sequences from hOAT1 (SLC22A6 and hOAT3 (SCL22A8 were cloned into a reporter plasmid, transfected into HEK cells and (ii transcriptional activity was determined after model ischemia and reperfusion as a SEAP reporter gen assay. Inhibitors or antagonists were applied with the beginning of reperfusion. Results: By using inhibitors of PKA (H89 and PLC (U73122, antagonists of E prostanoid receptor type 2 (AH6809 and type 4 (L161,982, we gained evidence that I/R induced down regulation of organic anion transport is mediated by COX1 metabolites via E prostanoid receptor type 4. The latter signaling was confirmed by application of butaprost (EP2 agonist or TCS2510 (EP4 agonist to control cells. In brief, the latter signaling was verified for the transcriptional activity in the reporter gen assay established. Therein, selective inhibitors for COX1 (SC58125 and COX2 (SC560 were also applied. Conclusion: Our data show (a that COX1 metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal organic anion transport(ers after I/R via the EP4 receptor and (b that this is due to transcriptional regulation of the respective transporters. As the promoter sequences cloned were of human origin and expressed in a human renal epithelial cell line we (c hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms described after I/R is meaningful for humans as well.

  10. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-10-10

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability.

  11. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Xu, Yonghong [Institute of Ophthalmological Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 430060 Wuhan (China); Meng, Xiangning [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  12. Oxygen limitation modulates pH regulation of catabolism and hydrogenases, multidrug transporters, and envelope composition in Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmacher Michael D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli, pH regulates genes for amino-acid and sugar catabolism, electron transport, oxidative stress, periplasmic and envelope proteins. Many pH-dependent genes are co-regulated by anaerobiosis, but the overall intersection of pH stress and oxygen limitation has not been investigated. Results The pH dependence of gene expression was analyzed in oxygen-limited cultures of E. coli K-12 strain W3110. E. coli K-12 strain W3110 was cultured in closed tubes containing LBK broth buffered at pH 5.7, pH 7.0, and pH 8.5. Affymetrix array hybridization revealed pH-dependent expression of 1,384 genes and 610 intergenic regions. A core group of 251 genes showed pH responses similar to those in a previous study of cultures grown with aeration. The highly acid-induced gene yagU was shown to be required for extreme-acid resistance (survival at pH 2. Acid also up-regulated fimbriae (fimAC, periplasmic chaperones (hdeAB, cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (cfa, and the "constitutive" Na+/H+ antiporter (nhaB. Base up-regulated core genes for maltodextrin transport (lamB, mal, ATP synthase (atp, and DNA repair (recA, mutL. Other genes showed opposite pH responses with or without aeration, for example ETS components (cyo,nuo, sdh and hydrogenases (hya, hyb, hyc, hyf, hyp. A hypF strain lacking all hydrogenase activity showed loss of extreme-acid resistance. Under oxygen limitation only, acid down-regulated ribosome synthesis (rpl,rpm, rps. Acid up-regulated the catabolism of sugar derivatives whose fermentation minimized acid production (gnd, gnt, srl, and also a cluster of 13 genes in the gadA region. Acid up-regulated drug transporters (mdtEF, mdtL, but down-regulated penicillin-binding proteins (dacACD, mreBC. Intergenic regions containing regulatory sRNAs were up-regulated by acid (ryeA, csrB, gadY, rybC. Conclusion pH regulates a core set of genes independently of oxygen, including yagU, fimbriae, periplasmic chaperones, and nha

  13. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Evolution of U.S. Transportation Regulations for Radioactive Materials?A Retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafner, R

    2008-04-28

    The discussion in this Chapter is a highly condensed version of the information presented previously in Chapter 52 of the 2nd Edition of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code.[1] The full text of the previous Chapter 52, i.e., Development of U.S. Regulations for the Transportation of Radioactive Materials - A Look Back over the Past 40 Years, could not be reproduced here. Therefore, this Chapter offers a high-level overview of the information presented previously, including all of the appropriate references. For the most part, the material that was not included in this version of Chapter 52 is available in the public domain. Due to the sheer volume of the information, readers interested in the preamble-only versions of the material referenced in this Chapter are redirected to Reference [1]. Readers interested in the full-text versions of the material referenced in this Chapter are redirected to the appropriate Federal Register and/or U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) websites. Because some of the material dates back to pre-website times, readers interested in the full-text versions of some of the references may have to rely on the services of their local libraries.

  15. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Glucose Transporters in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Byrne, Kenneth J.; Baird, Anne-Marie; Kilmartin, Lisa; Leonard, Jennifer; Sacevich, Calen; Gray, Steven G., E-mail: sgray@stjames.ie [Department of Clinical Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Research Group, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-03-25

    Due to their inherently hypoxic environment, cancer cells often resort to glycolysis, or the anaerobic breakdown of glucose to form ATP to provide for their energy needs, known as the Warburg effect. At the same time, overexpression of the insulin receptor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with an increased risk of metastasis and decreased survival. The uptake of glucose into cells is carried out via glucose transporters or GLUTs. Of these, GLUT-4 is essential for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Following treatment with the epigenetic targeting agents histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), GLUT-3 and GLUT-4 expression were found to be induced in NSCLC cell lines, with minimal responses in transformed normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). Similar results for GLUT-4 were observed in cells derived from liver, muscle, kidney and pre-adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoter for GLUT-4 indicates that it may also be regulated by several chromatin binding factors or complexes including CTCF, SP1 and SMYD3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that the promoter for GLUT-4 is dynamically remodeled in response to HDACi. Overall, these results may have value within the clinical setting as (a) it may be possible to use this to enhance fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging sensitivity; (b) it may be possible to target NSCLC through the use of HDACi and insulin mediated uptake of the metabolic targeting drugs such as 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG); or (c) enhance or sensitize NSCLC to chemotherapy.

  17. Active Use of the Natural Environment for Emotion Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein Åge Kjøs Johnsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Two studies on the use of nature for emotion regulation were conducted. Study 1 (N = 35 ran over two weeks and was an experimental investigation. Participants in the experimental condition were asked to use a picture of nature actively as environmental stimuli for emotion regulation in their everyday life, while two control groups simply looked at a picture of nature or a picture of balloons each evening. A significant effect of the manipulation was found on positive mood, but the effect was complex with an initial increase and then a decrease. There were no findings on negative mood. Study 2 (N = 473 explored the motivational tendency to seek out nature when the participants were happy or sad. A novel concept (expectancy construct was introduced to measure the perception of the emotion regulatory potential of different environments. The classical natural environment was rated highest on emotional potential of all environments tested here. Perceiving a higher emotional potential in nature was related to a higher intention to seek out nature when happy or sad. Personality and mood were also related to these concepts. Higher positive mood was related to the intention to seek out nature when happy. Conscientiousness was related to a more positive perception of nature. The studies support the notion that using nature may be an effective strategy for regulating one’s emotions.

  18. Smooth muscle–endothelial cell communication activates Reelin signaling and regulates lymphatic vessel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Sophie; Xie, Sherry; Tatin, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Active lymph transport relies on smooth muscle cell (SMC) contractions around collecting lymphatic vessels, yet regulation of lymphatic vessel wall assembly and lymphatic pumping are poorly understood. Here, we identify Reelin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein previously implicated in central nervous system development, as an important regulator of lymphatic vascular development. Reelin-deficient mice showed abnormal collecting lymphatic vessels, characterized by a reduced number of SMCs, abnormal expression of lymphatic capillary marker lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), and impaired function. Furthermore, we show that SMC recruitment to lymphatic vessels stimulated release and proteolytic processing of endothelium-derived Reelin. Lymphatic endothelial cells in turn responded to Reelin by up-regulating monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) expression, which suggests an autocrine mechanism for Reelin-mediated control of endothelial factor expression upstream of SMC recruitment. These results uncover a mechanism by which Reelin signaling is activated by communication between the two cell types of the collecting lymphatic vessels—smooth muscle and endothelial cells—and highlight a hitherto unrecognized and important function for SMCs in lymphatic vessel morphogenesis and function. PMID:22665518

  19. 78 FR 36723 - Federal Management Regulation (FMR); Restrictions on International Transportation of Freight and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... International Transportation of Freight and Household Goods AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide Policy (OGP..., for information pertaining to status or publication schedules. For clarification of content, contact... readers where to find additional information regarding bilateral or multilateral air transport agreements...

  20. 77 FR 58102 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Transportation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... approved information collection requirement concerning Transportation Requirements. A notice was published... other forms of information technology. DATES: Submit comments on or before October 19, 2012. ADDRESSES: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0061, Transportation Requirements, by any of...

  1. Adenovirus Protein E4-ORF1 Activation of PI3 Kinase Reveals Differential Regulation of Downstream Effector Pathways in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Chaudhary

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K regulates metabolism, including the translocation of the Glut4 glucose transporter to the plasma membrane and inactivation of the FoxO1 transcription factor. Adenoviral protein E4-ORF1 stimulates cellular glucose metabolism by mimicking growth-factor activation of PI3K. We have used E4-ORF1 as a tool to dissect PI3K-mediated signaling in adipocytes. E4-ORF1 activation of PI3K in adipocytes recapitulates insulin regulation of FoxO1 but not regulation of Glut4. This uncoupling of PI3K effects occurs despite E4-ORF1 activating PI3K and downstream signaling to levels achieved by insulin. Although E4-ORF1 does not fully recapitulate insulin’s effects on Glut4, it enhances insulin-stimulated insertion of Glut4-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane independent of Rab10, a key regulator of Glut4 trafficking. E4-ORF1 also stimulates plasma membrane translocation of ubiquitously expressed Glut1 glucose transporter, an effect that is likely essential for E4-ORF1 to promote an anabolic metabolism in a broad range of cell types.

  2. ROMK1 channel activity is regulated by monoubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Wang, Zhijian; Babilonia, Elisa; Yang, Baofeng; Dong, Ke; Hebert, Steven C; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2005-03-22

    The ubiquitination of proteins can signal their degradation, modify their activity or target them to specific membranes or cellular organelles. Here, we show that monoubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane abundance and function of the potassium channel, ROMK. Immunoprecipitation of proteins obtained from renal cortex and outer medulla with ROMK antibody revealed that this channel was monoubiquitinated. To determine the ubiquitin binding site on ROMK1, all intracellular lysine (Lys) residues of ROMK1 were individually mutated to arginine (Arg), and a two-electrode voltage clamp was used to measure the ROMK1 channel activity in Xenopus oocytes. ROMK1 channel activity increased from 8.1 to 27.2 microA only when Lys-22 was mutated to Arg. Furthermore, Western blotting failed to detect the ubiquitinated ROMK1 in oocytes injected with R1K22R. Patch-clamp experiments showed that biophysical properties of R1K22R were identical to those of wild-type ROMK1. Although total protein expression levels of GFP-ROMK1 and GFP-R1K22R in oocytes were similar, confocal microscopy showed that the surface fluorescence intensity in oocytes injected with GFP-R1K22R was higher than that of GFP-ROMK1. In addition, biotin labeling of ROMK1 and R1K22R proteins expressed in HEK293 cells showed increased surface expression of the Lys-22 mutant channel. Finally, expression of R1K22R in COS7 cells significantly stimulated the surface expression of ROMK1. We conclude that ROMK1 can be monoubiquitinated and that Lys-22 is an ubiquitin-binding site. Thus, monoubiquitination of ROMK1 regulates channel activity by reducing the surface expression of channel protein. This finding implicates the linking of a single ubiquitin molecule to channels as an important posttranslational regulatory signal.

  3. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Balaji; Dektar, Katherine N; Gordon, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  4. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide: a potent activator of human intestinal ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M; Adermann, K; Raab, H R; Forssmann, W G; Kuhn, M

    1996-12-26

    To investigate the effects of PACAP-27 on electrolyte transport across the isolated human intestinal mucosa, changes in short-circuit current (Isc) were measured in Ussing chamber experiments. Serosally added PACAP-27 increased Isc in a concentration-dependent manner, eliciting a similar maximal effect in both the jejunal and the colonic mucosa. Bumetanide inhibited Isc responses, indicating stimulation of Cl- secretion. The potency and efficacy of PACAP-27 were comparable to those of VIP, suggesting that both peptides activate intestinal secretion by way of a common receptor located in the basolateral membrane of the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Self regulation initiative in heavy vehicle transport to address road safety, accelerated road deterioration and transport productivity in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available with inadequate vehicle maintenance, driver fatigue and poor driver health, contributes significantly to South Africa’s poor road safety record. The Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (LAP) is an initiative to introduce self-regulation, as opposed to legal...

  7. A Grapevine TTG2-Like WRKY Transcription Factor Is Involved in Regulating Vacuolar Transport and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Alessandra; Cavallini, Erika; Zenoni, Sara; Finezzo, Laura; Begheldo, Maura; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    A small set of TTG2-like homolog proteins from different species belonging to the WRKY family of transcription factors were shown to share a similar mechanism of action and to control partially conserved biochemical/developmental processes in their native species. In particular, by activating P-ATPases residing on the tonoplast, PH3 from Petunia hybrida promotes vacuolar acidification in petal epidermal cells whereas TTG2 from Arabidopsis thaliana enables the accumulation of proanthocyanidins in the seed coat. In this work we functionally characterized VvWRKY26 identified as the closest grapevine homolog of PhPH3 and AtTTG2. When constitutively expressed in petunia ph3 mutant, VvWRKY26 can fulfill the PH3 function in the regulation of vacuolar pH and restores the wild type pigmentation phenotype. By a global correlation analysis of gene expression and by transient over-expression in Vitis vinifera, we showed transcriptomic relationships of VvWRKY26 with many genes related to vacuolar acidification and transport in grapevine. Moreover, our results indicate an involvement in flavonoid pathway possibly restricted to the control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis that is consistent with its expression pattern in grape berry tissues. Overall, the results show that, in addition to regulative mechanisms and biological roles shared with TTG2-like orthologs, VvWRKY26 can play roles in fleshy fruit development that have not been previously reported in studies from dry fruit species. This study paves the way toward the comprehension of the regulatory network controlling vacuolar acidification and flavonoid accumulation mechanisms that contribute to the final berry quality traits in grapevine.

  8. Abscisic acid induction of vacuolar H+-ATPase activity in mesembryanthemum crystallinum is developmentally regulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla; Vera-Estrella; Maldonado-Gama; Pantoja

    1999-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways.

  9. Up-Regulation of the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 by Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abousaab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The excitatory amino-acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 clear glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus terminate neuronal excitation. The carriers are subject to regulation by various kinases. The EAAT3 isoform is regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. The present study thus explored whether mTOR influences transport by EAAT1 and/or EAAT2. Methods: cRNA encoding wild type EAAT1 (SLC1A3 or EAAT2 (SLC1A2 was injected into Xenopus oocytes without or with additional injection of cRNA encoding mTOR. Dual electrode voltage clamp was performed in order to determine electrogenic glutamate transport (IEAAT. EAAT2 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. Results: Appreciable IEAAT was observed in EAAT1 or EAAT2 expressing but not in water injected oocytes. IEAAT was significantly increased by coexpressi