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Sample records for regulates neurotrophin 3-dependent

  1. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates energy balance in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Sachs, Benjamin D.; Li, Pingping; Christian, Frank; Vagena, Eirini; Davalos, Dimitrios; Le Moan, Natacha; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Sikorski, Shoana L.; Chan, Justin P.; Scadeng, Miriam; Taylor, Susan S.; Houslay, Miles D.; Baillie, George S.; Saltiel, Alan R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Obesity and metabolic syndrome reflect the dysregulation of molecular pathways that control energy homeostasis. Here we show that upon high-fat diet (HFD), the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) controls energy expenditure in obese mice. Despite no changes in food intake, p75NTR-null mice were protected from HFD-induced obesity and remained lean due to increased energy expenditure, without developing insulin resistance or liver steatosis. p75NTR directly interacts with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) and regulates cAMP signaling in adipocytes, leading to decreased lipolysis and thermogenesis. Adipocyte-specific depletion of p75NTR or transplantation of p75NTR-null white adipose tissue (WAT) into wild-type mice fed a HFD protected against weight gain and insulin resistance. Our results reveal that signaling from p75NTR to cAMP/PKA regulates energy balance and suggest that non-neuronal functions of neurotrophin receptor signaling could be a new target for treating obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26748707

  2. Neurotrophins and the regulation of energy balance and body weight.

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    Rios, M

    2014-01-01

    Complex interactions between the brain and peripheral tissues mediate the effective control of energy balance and body weight. Hypothalamic and hindbrain neural circuits integrate peripheral signals informing the nutritional status of the animal and in response regulate nutrient intake and energy utilization. Obesity and its many medical complications emerge from the dysregulation of energy homeostasis. Excessive weight gain might also arise from alterations in reward systems of the brain that drive consumption of calorie dense, palatable foods in the absence of an energy requirement. Several neurotrophins, most notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, have been implicated in the molecular and cellular processes underlying body weight regulation. Here, we review investigations interrogating their roles in energy balance and reward centers of the brain impacting feeding behavior and energy expenditure.

  3. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

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    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytochemicals That Regulate Neurodegenerative Disease by Targeting Neurotrophins: A Comprehensive Review

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    Ramu Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, characterized by progressive dementia and deterioration of cognitive function, is an unsolved social and medical problem. Age, nutrition, and toxins are the most common causes of AD. However, currently no credible treatment is available for AD. Traditional herbs and phytochemicals may delay its onset and slow its progression and also allow recovery by targeting multiple pathological causes by antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiamyloidogenic properties. They also regulate mitochondrial stress, apoptotic factors, free radical scavenging system, and neurotrophic factors. Neurotrophins such as BDNF, NGF, NT3, and NT4/5 play a vital role in neuronal and nonneuronal responses to AD. Neurotrophins depletion accelerates the progression of AD and therefore, replacing such neurotrophins may be a potential treatment for neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review the phytochemicals that mediate the signaling pathways involved in neuroprotection specifically neurotrophin-mediated activation of Trk receptors and members of p75NTR superfamily. We focus on representative phenolic derivatives, iridoid glycosides, terpenoids, alkaloids, and steroidal saponins as regulators of neurotrophin-mediated neuroprotection. Although these phytochemicals have attracted attention owing to their in vitro neurotrophin potentiating activity, their in vivo and clinical efficacy trials has yet to be established. Therefore, further research is necessary to prove the neuroprotective effects in preclinical models and in humans.

  5. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

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    Joanna Bandoła

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders.

  6. The p75 neurotrophin receptor is a central regulator of glioma invasion.

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    Angela L M Johnston

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The invasive nature of cancers in general, and malignant gliomas in particular, is a major clinical problem rendering tumors incurable by conventional therapies. Using a novel invasive glioma mouse model established by serial in vivo selection, we identified the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR as a critical regulator of glioma invasion. Through a series of functional, biochemical, and clinical studies, we found that p75(NTR dramatically enhanced migration and invasion of genetically distinct glioma and frequently exhibited robust expression in highly invasive glioblastoma patient specimens. Moreover, we found that p75(NTR-mediated invasion was neurotrophin dependent, resulting in the activation of downstream pathways and producing striking cytoskeletal changes of the invading cells. These results provide the first evidence for p75(NTR as a major contributor to the highly invasive nature of malignant gliomas and identify a novel therapeutic target.

  7. Differential up-regulation of neurotrophin receptors and functional activity of neurotrophins on peripheral blood eosinophils of patients with allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and nonatopic subjects.

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    Raap, U; Deneka, N; Bruder, M; Kapp, A; Wedi, B

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that neurotrophins have a pivotal role in neuroimmune interactions. Indeed, in contrast to nonatopic subjects (NA), neurotrophins have been shown to be increased in atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR) and atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of the study was to assess the functional role of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin (NT)-3 and -4 and the expression of pan-neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and tyrosine kinase (trk)A, -B and -C on peripheral blood eosinophils in AR, AD and NA. Peripheral blood eosinophils of patients with AR, AD and NA were purified by CD16 negative selection (purity>98%). Neurotrophin receptor expression was analysed by FACS analysis. Apoptosis test (FACS analysis) and chemotactic index (modified Boyden chamber assay) were assessed after stimulation with BDNF, NT-3/-4 and NGF. The expression of trkA-C and p75(NTR) was significantly higher in AD>AR>NA (PNeurotrophin receptor expression and neurotrophin functional activity was greatest in AD>AR>NA. AD eosinophils are pre-activated and may therefore better respond to neurotrophins. With this study, we provide new pathophysiologic insights into atopic diseases with a functional role of neurotrophins in peripheral blood eosinophils in AD and AR.

  8. Kek-6: A truncated-Trk-like receptor for Drosophila neurotrophin 2 regulates structural synaptic plasticity.

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    Ulian-Benitez, Suzana; Bishop, Simon; Foldi, Istvan; Wentzell, Jill; Okenwa, Chinenye; Forero, Manuel G; Zhu, Bangfu; Moreira, Marta; Phizacklea, Mark; McIlroy, Graham; Li, Guiyi; Gay, Nicholas J; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-08-01

    Neurotrophism, structural plasticity, learning and long-term memory in mammals critically depend on neurotrophins binding Trk receptors to activate tyrosine kinase (TyrK) signaling, but Drosophila lacks full-length Trks, raising the question of how these processes occur in the fly. Paradoxically, truncated Trk isoforms lacking the TyrK predominate in the adult human brain, but whether they have neuronal functions independently of full-length Trks is unknown. Drosophila has TyrK-less Trk-family receptors, encoded by the kekkon (kek) genes, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved functions for this receptor class may exist. Here, we asked whether Keks function together with Drosophila neurotrophins (DNTs) at the larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We tested the eleven LRR and Ig-containing (LIG) proteins encoded in the Drosophila genome for expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and potential interaction with DNTs. Kek-6 is expressed in the CNS, interacts genetically with DNTs and can bind DNT2 in signaling assays and co-immunoprecipitations. Ligand binding is promiscuous, as Kek-6 can also bind DNT1, and Kek-2 and Kek-5 can also bind DNT2. In vivo, Kek-6 is found presynaptically in motoneurons, and DNT2 is produced by the muscle to function as a retrograde factor at the NMJ. Kek-6 and DNT2 regulate NMJ growth and synaptic structure. Evidence indicates that Kek-6 does not antagonise the alternative DNT2 receptor Toll-6. Instead, Kek-6 and Toll-6 interact physically, and together regulate structural synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. Using pull-down assays, we identified and validated CaMKII and VAP33A as intracellular partners of Kek-6, and show that they regulate NMJ growth and active zone formation downstream of DNT2 and Kek-6. The synaptic functions of Kek-6 could be evolutionarily conserved. This raises the intriguing possibility that a novel mechanism of structural synaptic plasticity involving truncated Trk-family receptors

  9. Kek-6: A truncated-Trk-like receptor for Drosophila neurotrophin 2 regulates structural synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Ulian-Benitez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophism, structural plasticity, learning and long-term memory in mammals critically depend on neurotrophins binding Trk receptors to activate tyrosine kinase (TyrK signaling, but Drosophila lacks full-length Trks, raising the question of how these processes occur in the fly. Paradoxically, truncated Trk isoforms lacking the TyrK predominate in the adult human brain, but whether they have neuronal functions independently of full-length Trks is unknown. Drosophila has TyrK-less Trk-family receptors, encoded by the kekkon (kek genes, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved functions for this receptor class may exist. Here, we asked whether Keks function together with Drosophila neurotrophins (DNTs at the larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We tested the eleven LRR and Ig-containing (LIG proteins encoded in the Drosophila genome for expression in the central nervous system (CNS and potential interaction with DNTs. Kek-6 is expressed in the CNS, interacts genetically with DNTs and can bind DNT2 in signaling assays and co-immunoprecipitations. Ligand binding is promiscuous, as Kek-6 can also bind DNT1, and Kek-2 and Kek-5 can also bind DNT2. In vivo, Kek-6 is found presynaptically in motoneurons, and DNT2 is produced by the muscle to function as a retrograde factor at the NMJ. Kek-6 and DNT2 regulate NMJ growth and synaptic structure. Evidence indicates that Kek-6 does not antagonise the alternative DNT2 receptor Toll-6. Instead, Kek-6 and Toll-6 interact physically, and together regulate structural synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. Using pull-down assays, we identified and validated CaMKII and VAP33A as intracellular partners of Kek-6, and show that they regulate NMJ growth and active zone formation downstream of DNT2 and Kek-6. The synaptic functions of Kek-6 could be evolutionarily conserved. This raises the intriguing possibility that a novel mechanism of structural synaptic plasticity involving truncated Trk

  10. Neurotrophin Propeptides: Biological Functions and Molecular Mechanisms.

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    Rafieva, Lola M; Gasanov, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins constitute a family of growth factors that play a key role in the regulation of the development and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems. A common feature of all the neurotrophins is their synthesis in cells as long precursors (pre-pro-neurotrophins) that contain an N-terminal signal peptide, a following propeptide and the mature neurotrophin. Although the signal peptide functions have been well studied, the role of neurotrophin propeptides is not so clear. Here, we briefly summarize the biochemistry of neurotrophin propeptides, including their role as folding-assistants for the mature factor and their role in processing and in secretion of neurotrophins. In the main part of the review we summarize our current state of knowledge of the biological activity of neurotrophin propeptides, their possible mechanisms of action, and their potential influence on the activity of the mature neurotrophins.

  11. Three-tier regulation of cell number plasticity by neurotrophins and Tolls inDrosophila.

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    Foldi, Istvan; Anthoney, Niki; Harrison, Neale; Gangloff, Monique; Verstak, Brett; Nallasivan, Mohanakarthik Ponnadai; AlAhmed, Samaher; Zhu, Bangfu; Phizacklea, Mark; Losada-Perez, Maria; Moreira, Marta; Gay, Nicholas J; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    Cell number plasticity is coupled to circuitry in the nervous system, adjusting cell mass to functional requirements. In mammals, this is achieved by neurotrophin (NT) ligands, which promote cell survival via their Trk and p75 NTR receptors and cell death via p75 NTR and Sortilin. Drosophila NTs (DNTs) bind Toll receptors instead to promote neuronal survival, but whether they can also regulate cell death is unknown. In this study, we show that DNTs and Tolls can switch from promoting cell survival to death in the central nervous system (CNS) via a three-tier mechanism. First, DNT cleavage patterns result in alternative signaling outcomes. Second, different Tolls can preferentially promote cell survival or death. Third, distinct adaptors downstream of Tolls can drive either apoptosis or cell survival. Toll-6 promotes cell survival via MyD88-NF-κB and cell death via Wek-Sarm-JNK. The distribution of adaptors changes in space and time and may segregate to distinct neural circuits. This novel mechanism for CNS cell plasticity may operate in wider contexts. © 2017 Foldi et al.

  12. Regulation of neurotrophin receptors during the maturation of the mammalian visual system.

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    Allendoerfer, K L; Cabelli, R J; Escandón, E; Kaplan, D R; Nikolics, K; Shatz, C J

    1994-03-01

    Cell division, cell death, and remodeling of connections are major features of the construction of the mammalian CNS. We have begun to address the role of neurotrophins in these events through characterization of the expression of their receptors in the developing ferret visual system. By use of chemical cross-linking of iodinated neurotrophins, proteins corresponding to trkB, trkC, and p75 were identified as receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) throughout development. BDNF was also cross-linked to a truncated form of trkB that lacks the tyrosine kinase domain (trkB. T1) in retinal target tissues and in cortex. At the earliest developmental age examined (E24), the ratio of full-length to truncated trkB is > > 1 in the retinal target tissues, LGN and superior colliculus. During the ensuing period of retinal ganglion cell death and segregation into eye-specific layers, the amount of truncated trkB increases markedly relative to full-length trkB. By P27, truncated trkB is the predominant receptor for BDNF in the retinal target tissues and this pattern is maintained into adulthood. Within all subdivisions of visual cortex including the ventricular zone (VZ), intermediate zone (IZ), and cortical plate (CP), similar profiles of bands are observed. The developmental increase in abundance of truncated trkB relative to full-length occurs earliest in the VZ, with a major increase between E30 and P3. In the IZ, this shift to a predominance of truncated trkB occurs between P15 and P30, while in the CP the shift is even further delayed, not occurring until after P30. Within each subdivision of cortex, the shift to a predominance of truncated trkB occurs at times that correlate with the onset of cell death and maturation of axonal connections. This study demonstrates that members of the trk family, previously identified in the CNS on the basis of mRNA transcripts, are present as receptors with specific binding affinities for BDNF and

  13. Up-regulation of neurotrophin-related gene expression in mouse hippocampus following low-level toluene exposure.

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    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Tsukahara, Shinji; Yamamoto, Shoji; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kunugita, Naoki; Arashidani, Keiichi; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role of strain differences in sensitivity to low-level toluene exposure on neurotrophins and their receptor levels in the mouse hippocampus, 8-week-old male C3H/HeN, BALB/c and C57BL/10 mice were exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm toluene for 6h per day, 5 days per week for 6 weeks in an inhalation chamber. We examined the expressions of neurotrophin-related genes and receptors in the mouse hippocampus using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase (Trk) A, and TrkB mRNAs in the C3H/HeN mice hippocampus was significantly higher in the mice exposed to 500 ppm toluene. Among the three strains of mice, the C3H/HeN mice seemed to be sensitive to toluene exposure. To examine the combined effect of toluene exposure and allergic challenge, the C3H/HeN mice stimulated with ovalbumin were exposed to toluene. The allergy group of C3H/HeN mice showed significantly elevated level of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus following exposure to 50 ppm toluene. Then, we also examined the expression of transcription factor, dopamine markers and oxidative stress marker in the hippocampus of sensitive strain C3H/HeN mice and found that the expression of CREB1 mRNA was significantly increased at 50 ppm toluene. In immunohistochemical analysis, the density of the NGF-immunoreactive signal was significantly stronger in the hippocampal CA3 region of the C3H/HeN mice exposed to 500 ppm toluene in non-allergy group and 50 ppm in allergy group. Our results indicate that low-level toluene exposure may induce up-regulation of neurotrophin-related gene expression in the mouse hippocampus depending on the mouse strain and an allergic stimulation in sensitive strain may decrease the threshold for sensitivity at lower exposure level. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The neurotrophin receptor p75 regulates gustatory axon branching and promotes innervation of the tongue during development.

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    Fei, Da; Huang, Tao; Krimm, Robin F

    2014-06-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-4 (NT4) regulate the survival of gustatory neurons, axon growth and branching, and innervation of taste buds during development. These actions are largely, but not completely, mediated through the tyrosine kinase receptor, TrkB. Here, we investigated the role of p75, the other major receptor for BDNF and NT4, in the development of the taste system. We found that p75-/-mice showed delayed axon outgrowth and reduced branching of gustatory axons at embryonic day (E)13.5. From E14.5 to E18.5, gustatory neurons innervated fewer papillae and completely failed to innervate the mid-region of the tongue in p75-/-mice. These early effects of the p75 mutation on gustatory axons preceded the loss of geniculate ganglion neurons starting at E14.5 and also contributed to a loss of taste buds at and after birth. Because knockouts for the TrkB receptor (TrkB-/-) do not lose as many taste buds as hybrid knockouts for its two ligands (BDNF and NT4), we asked if p75 maintains those additional taste buds in the absence of TrkB. It does not; hybrid TrkB-/-/p75-/-mice had more taste buds than TrkB-/-mice; these additional taste buds were not due to an increase in neurons or innervation. p75 regulates gustatory neuron axon branching and tongue innervation patterns during taste system development. This function is likely accomplished independently of BDNF, NT4, and TrkB. In addition, p75 does not support the remaining neurons or taste buds in TrkB-/-mice.

  15. SIGNR3-dependent immune regulation by Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein A in colitis

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    Lightfoot, Yaíma L; Selle, Kurt; Yang, Tao; Goh, Yong Jun; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Owen, Jennifer L; Colliou, Natacha; Li, Eric; Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal immune regulatory signals govern gut homeostasis. Breakdown of such regulatory mechanisms may result in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Lactobacillus acidophilus contains unique surface layer proteins (Slps), including SlpA, SlpB, SlpX, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which interact with pattern recognition receptors to mobilize immune responses. Here, to elucidate the role of SlpA in protective immune regulation, the NCK2187 strain, which solely expresses SlpA, was generated. NCK2187 and its purified SlpA bind to the C-type lectin SIGNR3 to exert regulatory signals that result in mitigation of colitis, maintenance of healthy gastrointestinal microbiota, and protected gut mucosal barrier function. However, such protection was not observed in Signr3−/− mice, suggesting that the SlpA/SIGNR3 interaction plays a key regulatory role in colitis. Our work presents critical insights into SlpA/SIGNR3-induced responses that are integral to the potential development of novel biological therapies for autoinflammatory diseases, including IBD. PMID:25666591

  16. Barhl1 regulates migration and survival of cerebellar granule cells by controlling expression of the neurotrophin-3 gene.

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    Li, Shengguo; Qiu, Feng; Xu, Anlong; Price, Sandy M; Xiang, Mengqing

    2004-03-24

    The neurons generated at the germinal rhombic lip undergo long distance migration along divergent pathways to settle in widely dispersed locations within the hindbrain, giving rise to cerebellar granule cells and precerebellar nuclei. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) signaling has been shown to be required for proper migration and survival of cerebellar granule cells. The molecular bases that govern NT-3 expression within the cerebellum, however, remain unknown at present. Here we report that, during early mouse neurogenesis, the Barhl1 homeobox gene is highly expressed by the rhombic lip and rhombic lip-derived migratory neurons. Its expression is later restricted to cerebellar granule cells and precerebellar neurons extending mossy fibers, two groups of neurons that synaptically connect in the adult cerebellar system. Loss of Barhl1 function causes cerebellar phenotypes with a striking similarity to those of NT-3 conditional null mice, which include attenuated cerebellar foliation as well as defective radial migration and increased apoptotic death of granule cells. Correlating with these defects, we find that NT-3 expression is dramatically downregulated in granule cells of the posterior lobe of Barhl1(-)/- cerebella. Moreover, in the precerebellar system of Barhl1(-/-) mice, all five nuclei that project mossy fibers fail to form correctly because of aberrant neuronal migration and elevated apoptosis. These results suggest that Barhl1 plays an essential role in the migration and survival of cerebellar granule cells and precerebellar neurons and functionally link Barhl1 to the NT-3 signaling pathway during cerebellar development.

  17. Infralimbic Neurotrophin-3 Infusion Rescues Fear Extinction Impairment in a Mouse Model of Pathological Fear.

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    D'Amico, Davide; Gener, Thomas; de Lagrán, Maria Martínez; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Santos, Mónica; Dierssen, Mara

    2017-01-01

    The inability to properly extinguish fear memories constitutes the foundation of several anxiety disorders, including panic disorder. Recent findings show that boosting prefrontal cortex synaptic plasticity potentiates fear extinction, suggesting that therapies that augment synaptic plasticity could prove useful in rescue of fear extinction impairments in this group of disorders. Previously, we reported that mice with selective deregulation of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 expression (TgNTRK3) exhibit increased fear memories accompanied by impaired extinction, congruent with an altered activation pattern of the amygdala-hippocampus-medial prefrontal cortex fear circuit. Here we explore the specific role of neurotrophin 3 and its cognate receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex, and its involvement in fear extinction in a pathological context. In this study we combined molecular, behavioral, in vivo pharmacology and ex vivo electrophysiological recordings in TgNTRK3 animals during contextual fear extinction processes. We show that neurotrophin 3 protein levels are increased upon contextual fear extinction in wild-type animals but not in TgNTRK3 mice, which present deficits in infralimbic long-term potentiation. Importantly, infusion of neurotrophin 3 to the medial prefrontal cortex of TgNTRK3 mice rescues contextual fear extinction and ex vivo local application improves medial prefrontal cortex synaptic plasticity. This effect is blocked by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation through peripheral administration of SL327, suggesting that rescue occurs via this pathway. Our results suggest that stimulating neurotrophin 3-dependent medial prefrontal cortex plasticity could restore contextual fear extinction deficit in pathological fear and could constitute an effective treatment for fear-related disorders.

  18. Receptors of glutamate and neurotrophin in vestibular neuronal functions.

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    Chan, Y S; Chen, L W; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Yung, K K L; Zhang, F X

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed advances in understanding the roles of receptors of neurotrophin and glutamate in the vestibular system. In the first section of this review, the biological actions of neurotrophins and their receptors in the peripheral and central vestibular systems are summarized. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of neurotrophins in developmental plasticity and in the maintenance of vestibular function in the adult animal. This is reviewed in relation to the developmental expression pattern of neurotrophins and their receptors within the vestibular nuclei. The second part is focused on the functional role of different glutamate receptors on central vestibular neurons. The developmental expression pattern of glutamate receptor subunits within the vestibular nuclei is reviewed in relation to the potential role of glutamate receptors in regulating the development of vestibular function. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Neurotrophins in bronchial asthma

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    Renz Harald

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergic bronchial asthma (BA is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, development of airway hyperreactivity and recurrent reversible airway obstruction. T-helper 2 cells and their products have been shown to play an important role in this process. In contrast, the mechanisms by which immune cells interact with the cells residing in lung and airways, such as neurons, epithelial or smooth muscle cells, still remains uncertain. Sensory and motor neurons innervating the lung exhibit a great degree of functional plasticity in BA defined as 'neuronal plasticity'. These neurons control development of airway hyperresponsiveness and acute inflammatory responses, resulting in the concept of 'neurogenic inflammation'. Such quantitative and/or qualitative changes in neuronal functions are mediated to a great extent by a family of cytokines, the neurotrophins, which in turn are produced by activated immune cells, among others in BA. We have therefore developed the concept that neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor link pathogenic events in BA to dysfunctions of the immune and nervous system.

  20. Functional Diversity of Neurotrophin Actions on the Oculomotor System

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    Beatriz Benítez-Temiño

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins play a principal role in neuronal survival and differentiation during development, but also in the maintenance of appropriate adult neuronal circuits and phenotypes. In the oculomotor system, we have demonstrated that neurotrophins are key regulators of developing and adult neuronal properties, but with peculiarities depending on each neurotrophin. For instance, the administration of NGF (nerve growth factor, BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor or NT-3 (neurotrophin-3 protects neonatal extraocular motoneurons from cell death after axotomy, but only NGF and BDNF prevent the downregulation in ChAT (choline acetyltransferase. In the adult, in vivo recordings of axotomized extraocular motoneurons have demonstrated that the delivery of NGF, BDNF or NT-3 recovers different components of the firing discharge activity of these cells, with some particularities in the case of NGF. All neurotrophins have also synaptotrophic activity, although to different degrees. Accordingly, neurotrophins can restore the axotomy-induced alterations acting selectively on different properties of the motoneuron. In this review, we summarize these evidences and discuss them in the context of other motor systems.

  1. RAC1 in keratinocytes regulates crosstalk to immune cells by Arp2/3-dependent control of STAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng; Stanley, Alanna

    2012-01-01

    Crosstalk between keratinocytes and immune cells is crucial for the immunological barrier function of the skin, and aberrant crosstalk contributes to inflammatory skin diseases. Using mice with a keratinocyte-restricted deletion of the RAC1 gene we found that RAC1 in keratinocytes plays an import......Crosstalk between keratinocytes and immune cells is crucial for the immunological barrier function of the skin, and aberrant crosstalk contributes to inflammatory skin diseases. Using mice with a keratinocyte-restricted deletion of the RAC1 gene we found that RAC1 in keratinocytes plays...... an important role in modulating the interferon (IFN) response in skin. These RAC1 mutant mice showed increased sensitivity in an irritant contact dermatitis model, abnormal keratinocyte differentiation, and increased expression of immune response genes including the IFN signal transducer STAT1. Loss of RAC1...... hypersensitive to inflammatory stimuli both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a major role for RAC1 in regulating the crosstalk between the epidermis and the immune system....

  2. Neurotrophins and Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L B; Teixeira, A L; Domingues, R B

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have been implicated in generation and modulation of nociceptive pathways. Change in NTs levels is associated with painful conditions and neurological diseases such as migraine. Currently, it is generally recognized that migraine headaches result from the activation and sensitization of trigeminal sensory afferent fibers leading to neuropeptides release such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). This triggers an inflammatory cascade causing a neurogenic inflammation. The agents responsible for trigeminal activation and release of neuropeptides are still unclear. It is known that the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) is an important mediator of CGRP and SP release. TRPV1 is closely associated with tyrosine receptors kinases (Trk), which are NTs receptors. NTs can act on TRPV1 increasing its sensitivity to painful stimuli, therefore predisposing to hyperalgesia. Upregulation of ion channels and pain receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons may be alternative mechanisms by which NTs contribute to pain development. Only a few studies have been performed to investigate the role of NTs in migraine. These studies have reported changes in NTs levels in migraine patients either during the migraine attack or in free-headache periods. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Single Aplysia Neurotrophin Mediates Synaptic Facilitation via Differentially Processed Isoforms

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    Stefan R. Kassabov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins control the development and adult plasticity of the vertebrate nervous system. Failure to identify invertebrate neurotrophin orthologs, however, has precluded studies in invertebrate models, limiting our understanding of fundamental aspects of neurotrophin biology and function. We identified a neurotrophin (ApNT and Trk receptor (ApTrk in the mollusk Aplysia and found that they play a central role in learning-related synaptic plasticity. Blocking ApTrk signaling impairs long-term facilitation, whereas augmenting ApNT expression enhances it and induces the growth of new synaptic varicosities at the monosynaptic connection between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. Unlike vertebrate neurotrophins, ApNT has multiple coding exons and exerts distinct synaptic effects through differentially processed and secreted splice isoforms. Our findings demonstrate the existence of bona fide neurotrophin signaling in invertebrates and reveal a posttranscriptional mechanism that regulates neurotrophin processing and the release of proneurotrophins and mature neurotrophins that differentially modulate synaptic plasticity.

  4. Regulation of Neurotrophin-3 and Interleukin-1β and Inhibition of Spinal Glial Activation Contribute to the Analgesic Effect of Electroacupuncture in Chronic Neuropathic Pain States of Rats

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    Wenzhan Tu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that neurotrophin-3, interleukin-1β, and spinal glia are involved in neuropathic pain derived from dorsal root ganglia to spinal cord. Electroacupuncture is widely accepted to treat chronic pain, but the precise mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of EA has not been fully demonstrated. In this study, the mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were recorded. We used immunofluorescence and western blots methods to investigate the effect of EA on the expression of NT-3 and IL-1β in DRG and spinal cord of CCI rats; we also examined the expression of spinal GFAP and OX-42 in spinal cord. In present study, the MWT and TWL of CCI group rats were lower than those in the Sham CCI group rats, but EA treatment increased the pain thresholds. Furtherly, we found that EA upregulates the expression of NT-3 in DRG and spinal cord of CCI rats, while EA downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Additionally, immunofluorescence exhibited that CCI-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes was inhibited significantly by EA treatment. These results demonstrated that the analgesic effect of EA may be achieved through promoting the neural protection of NT-3 as well as the inhibition of IL-1β production and spinal glial activity.

  5. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

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    Cecilia Bucci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways.

  6. Lyn- and PLC-beta3-dependent regulation of SHP-1 phosphorylation controls Stat5 activity and myelomonocytic leukemia-like disease.

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    Xiao, Wenbin; Ando, Tomoaki; Wang, Huan-You; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2010-12-23

    Hyperactivation of the transcription factor Stat5 leads to various leukemias. Stat5 activity is regulated by the protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a phospholipase C (PLC)-β3-dependent manner. Thus, PLC-β3-deficient mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, like Lyn (Src family kinase)- deficient mice. Here we show that Lyn/PLC-β3 doubly deficient lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice develop a Stat5-dependent, fatal myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, similar to human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). In hematopoietic stem cells of lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice that cause the CMML-like disease, phosphorylation of SHP-1 at Tyr(536) and Tyr(564) is abrogated, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity and constitutive activation of Stat5. Furthermore, SHP-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(564) by Lyn is indispensable for maximal phosphatase activity and for suppression of the CMML-like disease in these mice. On the other hand, Tyr(536) in SHP-1 can be phosphorylated by Lyn and another kinase(s) and is necessary for efficient interaction with Stat5. Therefore, we identify a novel Lyn/PLC-β3-mediated regulatory mechanism of SHP-1 and Stat5 activities.

  7. A Single Aplysia Neurotrophin Mediates Synaptic Facilitation via Differentially Processed Isoforms Secreted as Mature or Precursor Forms

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    Kassabov, Stefan R.; Choi, Yun-Beom; Karl, Kevin A.; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Bailey, Craig H.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurotrophins control the development and adult plasticity of the vertebrate nervous system. Failure to identify invertebrate neurotrophin orthologs, however, has precluded studies in invertebrate models, limiting understanding of fundamental aspects of neurotrophin biology and function. We identified a neurotrophin (ApNT) and Trk receptor (ApTrk) in the mollusk Aplysia and find they play a central role in learning related synaptic plasticity. ApNT increases the magnitude and lowers the threshold for induction of long-term facilitation and initiates the growth of new synaptic varicosities at the monosynaptic connection between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. Unlike vertebrate neurotrophins, ApNT has multiple coding exons and exerts distinct synaptic effects through differentially processed and secreted splice isoforms. Our findings demonstrate the existence of bona-fide neurotrophin signaling in invertebrates and reveal a novel, post-transcriptional mechanism, regulating neurotrophin processing and the release of pro- and mature neurotrophins which differentially modulate synaptic plasticity. PMID:23562154

  8. Neurotrophins in allergic diseases: from neuronal growth factors to intercellular signaling molecules.

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    Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Renz, Harald

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the complex pathophysiology of allergic diseases has been a main challenge of clinical and experimental research for many years. It is well known that the allergic inflammation triggers neuronal dysfunction and structural changes in the diseased tissues such as the airways or the skin. Recent evidence has emerged that the inflammatory response is also controlled by resident tissue cells such as neurons and structural cells. Therefore, signaling molecules that mediate inflammatory interactions among immune, neuronal, and structural cells are becoming a focus of allergy research. Neurotrophins, a family of homologous growth factors initially discovered in the nervous system, display such bidirectional signaling. The expression of neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is highly upregulated during allergic inflammation. Neurons, structural cells, and invading immune cells were now identified not only as sources but also as targets of neurotrophins within the inflamed tissue. In this review, we provide an actual overview of the role of neurotrophins in the pathobiology of allergic diseases. We discuss recent findings in human and animal studies such as the regulation of neurotrophin expression during allergic inflammation and the effect of neurotrophins on the development and magnitude of allergic reactions.

  9. Neurotrophin effects on eosinophils in allergic inflammation.

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    Nassenstein, Christina; Braun, Armin; Nockher, W Andreas; Renz, Harald

    2005-05-01

    Elevated neurotrophin concentrations have been shown in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids as well as in the sera of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. Concentration of nerve growth factor correlated with disease severity, bronchial hyperreactivity, and levels of mediators released from eosinophils. Due to the release of cationic proteins, oxygen species, and cytokines after degranulation, eosinophils contribute to tissue damage and can influence airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. It has been hypothesized that neurotrophins may be involved in the development of eosinophilia and in activation of these cells. The aim of this review is to elucidate the direct and indirect mechanisms of neurotrophins contributing to eosinophilia in allergic diseases.

  10. The Role of Neurotrophins in Inflammation and Allergy.

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    Manti, S; Brown, P; Perez, M K; Piedimonte, G

    2017-01-01

    Allergic inflammation is the result of a specific pattern of cellular and humoral responses leading to the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system, which, in turn, results in physiological and structural changes affecting target tissues such as the airways and the skin. Eosinophil activation and the production of soluble mediators such as IgE antibodies are pivotal features in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases. In the past few years, however, convincing evidence has shown that neurons and other neurosensory structures are not only a target of the inflammatory process but also participate in the regulation of immune responses by actively releasing soluble mediators. The main products of these activated sensory neurons are a family of protein growth factors called neurotrophins. They were first isolated in the central nervous system and identified as important factors for the survival and differentiation of neurons during fetal and postnatal development as well as neuronal maintenance later in life. Four members of this family have been identified and well defined: nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin 3, and neurotrophin 4/5. Neurotrophins play a critical role in the bidirectional signaling mechanisms between immune cells and the neurosensory network structures in the airways and the skin. Pruritus and airway hyperresponsiveness, two major features of atopic dermatitis and asthma, respectively, are associated with the disruption of the neurosensory network activities. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive description of the neuroimmune interactions underlying the pathophysiological mechanisms of allergic and inflammatory diseases. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuronal survival induced by neurotrophins requires calmodulin

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    Egea, Joaquim; Espinet, Carme; Soler, Rosa M.; Dolcet, Xavier; Yuste, Víctor J.; Encinas, Mario; Iglesias, Montserrat; Rocamora, Nativitat; Comella, Joan X.

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and its downstream target, protein kinase B (PKB), play a central role in the signaling of cell survival triggered by neurotrophins (NTs). In this report, we have analyzed the involvement of Ca2+ and calmodulin (CaM) in the activation of the PKB induced by NTs. We have found that reduction of intracellular Ca2+ concentration or functional blockade of CaM abolished NGF-induced activation of PKB in PC12 cells. Similar results were obtained in cultures of chicken spinal cord motoneurons treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Moreover, CaM inhibition prevented the cell survival triggered by NGF or BDNF. This effect was counteracted by the transient expression of constitutive active forms of the PKB, indicating that CaM regulates NT-induced cell survival through the activation of the PKB. We have investigated the mechanisms whereby CaM regulates the activation of the PKB, and we have found that CaM was necessary for the proper generation and/or accumulation of the products of the PI 3-kinase in intact cells. PMID:11489918

  12. Role of neurotrophin in the taste system following gustatory nerve injury.

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    Meng, Lingbin; Jiang, Xin; Ji, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Taste system is a perfect system to study degeneration and regeneration after nerve injury because the taste system is highly plastic and the regeneration is robust. Besides, degeneration and regeneration can be easily measured since taste buds arise in discrete locations, and nerves that innervate them can be accurately quantified. Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that regulate neural survival, function, and plasticity after nerve injury. Recent studies have shown that neurotrophins play an important role in the developmental and mature taste system, indicating neurtrophin might also regulate taste system following gustatory nerve injury. This review will summarize how taste system degenerates and regenerates after gustatory nerve cut and conclude potential roles of neurotrophin in regulating the process.

  13. Role of Neurotrophins on Postnatal Neurogenesis in the Thalamus: Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol

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    Mooney, Sandra M.; Miller, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    A second wave of neuronal generation occurs in the ventrobasal nucleus of the rat thalamus (VB) during the first three postnatal weeks. The present study tested the hypotheses (1) that postnatal neurogenesis in the VB is neurotrophin-regulated and (2) that ethanol-induced changes in this proliferation are mediated by neurotrophins. The first studies examined the effects of neurotrophins on the numbers of cycling cells in ex vivo preparations of the VB from three-day-old rats. The proportion of cycling (Ki-67-positive) VB cells was higher in cultured thalamic slices treated with neurotrophins than in controls. Interestingly, this increase occurred with nerve growth factor (NGF) alone or with a combination of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but not with BDNF alone. Based on these data, the VBs from young offspring of pregnant rats fed an ethanol-containing or an isocaloric non-alcoholic liquid diet were examined between postnatal day (P) 1 and P31. Studies used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblots to explore the effects of ethanol on the expression of neurotrophins, their receptors, and representative signaling proteins. Ethanol altered the expression of neurotrophins and receptors throughout the first postnatal month. Expression of NGF increased, but there was no change in the expression of BDNF. The high affinity receptors (TrkA and TrkB) were unchanged but ethanol decreased expression of the low affinity receptor, p75. One downstream signaling protein, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased but Akt expression was unchanged. Thus, postnatal cell proliferation in the VB of young rat pups is neurotrophin-responsive and is affected by ethanol. PMID:21277941

  14. Monocytes of allergics and non-allergics produce, store and release the neurotrophins NGF, BDNF and NT-3.

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    Rost, Bettina; Hanf, Gerald; Ohnemus, Ulrich; Otto-Knapp, Ralf; Groneberg, David A; Kunkel, Gert; Noga, Oliver

    2005-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that neurotrophins (NTs) are involved in inflammatory processes. Elevated plasma levels of NTs were found allergic diseases with the highest levels in allergic asthma. However, the exact cellular sources involved in the regulation and release of neurotrophins in allergic inflammation are still not well defined. The aim of this study was to assess whether monocytes of allergic and non-allergic subjects produce, store and release the neurotrophins NGF, BDNF and NT-3. Monocytes of allergic and non-allergic donors were purified by immunomagnetic selection. APAAP-staining for the presence of NTs and their receptors was performed. RT-PCR and Western blot evaluated the production and storage of NTs. Monocytes were incubated and supernatants were collected for measurement of neurotrophic factors after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as inflammatory stimulus. The neurotrophin content in lysates and cell culture supernatants was determined by ELISA. Human monocytes express the neurotrophins NGF, BDNF and NT-3 but also their specific receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. RT-PCR amplification of isolated mRNA demonstrated expression of the examined neurotrophins. Proteins were detectable by Western blot. NTs were found in the monocyte lysates and supernatants at different levels in allergic and non-allergic donors. Cell stimulation with LPS leads to release of NGF and NT3. Monocytes, produce, store and release NGF, BDNF and NT-3. They are a possible source of elevated neurotrophin levels found in allergy and asthma.

  15. The 5' leader of the mRNA encoding the mouse neurotrophin receptor TrkB contains two internal ribosomal entry sites that are differentially regulated.

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    Stephanie L Timmerman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A single internal ribosomal entry site (IRES in conjunction with IRES transactivating factors (ITAFs is sufficient to recruit the translational machinery to a eukaryotic mRNA independent of the cap structure. However, we demonstrate that the mouse TrkB mRNA contains two independent IRESes. The mouse TrkB mRNA consists of one of two 5' leaders (1428 nt and 448 nt, both of which include the common 3' exon (Ex2, 344 nt. Dicistronic RNA transfections and in vitro translation of monocistronic RNA demonstrated that both full-length 5' leaders, as well as Ex2, exhibit IRES activity indicating the IRES is located within Ex2. Additional analysis of the upstream sequences demonstrated that the first 260 nt of exon 1 (Ex1a also contains an IRES. Dicistronic RNA transfections into SH-SY5Y cells showed the Ex1a IRES is constitutively active. However, the Ex2 IRES is only active in response to retinoic acid induced neural differentiation, a state which correlates with the synthesis of the ITAF polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB1. Correspondingly, addition or knock-down of PTB1 altered Ex2, but not Ex1a IRES activity in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. These results demonstrate that the two functionally independent IRESes within the mouse TrkB 5' leader are differentially regulated, in part by PTB1.

  16. SNX3-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) trafficking and degradation by aspirin in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells.

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    Chiow, Kher Hsin; Tan, Yingrou; Chua, Rong Yuan; Huang, Dachuan; Ng, Mah Lee Mary; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; Wong, Siew Heng

    2012-05-01

    Since being introduced globally as aspirin in 1899, acetylsalicylic acid has been widely used as an analgesic, anti-inflammation, anti-pyretic, and anti-thrombotic drug for years. Aspirin had been reported to down-regulate surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHCII in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), which played essential roles in regulating the immune system. We hypothesized that the down-regulation of these surface membrane proteins is partly due to the ability of aspirin in regulating trafficking/sorting of endocytosed surface membrane proteins. By using an established epidermoid carcinoma cell line (A-431), which overexpresses the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfnR), we show that aspirin (1) reduces cell surface expression of EGFR and (2) accumulates endocytosed-EGFR and -TfnR in the early/sorting endosome (ESE). Further elucidation of the mechanism suggests that aspirin enhances recruitment of SNX3 and SNX5 to membranes and consistently, both SNX3 and SNX5 play essential roles in the aspirin-mediated accumulation of endocytosed-TfnR at the ESE. This study sheds light on how aspirin may down-regulate surface expression of EGFR by inhibiting/delaying the exit of endocytosed-EGFR from the ESE and recycling of endocytosed-EGFR back to the cell surface.

  17. Factoring neurotrophins into a neurite-based pathophysiological model of schizophrenia.

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    Bellon, Alfredo; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Jay, Thérèse M

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophins are growth factors that, through variations in concentration and changes in receptor expression, regulate the formation of axons and dendrites during development and throughout adult life. Here we review these growth factors, particularly in the context of schizophrenia, a psychiatric disorder characterized by neurodevelopmental abnormalities. We first discuss emerging information derived from physiologically relevant organotypic cultures and in vivo studies regarding the effects of neurotrophins on the neuronal structure including pruning and GABAergic neurons. We then review postmortem studies of neurotrophin levels and their receptors in brains of individuals with schizophrenia, and compare them with what is known about neurotrophin effects on neuronal structure. This comparison indicates that only some neuropathological defects encountered in patients with schizophrenia can be explained by the single action of neurotrophins on dendrites and axons. However, we propose that a number of inconsistent findings and apparently unrelated results in the schizophrenia field can be reconciled if neurons are considered structurally plastic cells capable of extending and retracting dendrites and axons throughout life. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Recent Understanding of the Neurotrophin's Role in Skeletal Muscle Adaptation

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    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the various effects of neurotrophins in skeletal muscle and how these proteins act as potential regulators of the maintenance, function, and regeneration of skeletal muscle fibers. Increasing evidence suggests that this family of neurotrophic factors influence not only the survival and function of innervating motoneurons but also the development and differentiation of myoblasts and muscle fibers. Muscle contractions (e.g., exercise produce BDNF mRNA and protein in skeletal muscle, and the BDNF seems to play a role in enhancing glucose metabolism and may act for myokine to improve various brain disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and major depression. In adults with neuromuscular disorders, variations in neurotrophin expression are found, and the role of neurotrophins under such conditions is beginning to be elucidated. This paper provides a basis for a better understanding of the role of these factors under such pathological conditions and for treatment of human neuromuscular disease.

  19. Neurotrophins as regulators of urinary bladder function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochodnicky, Peter; Cruz, Célia D.; Yoshimura, Naoki; Cruz, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Increased voiding frequency and urgency are among the most prevalent storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), often diagnosed as part of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). It has been suggested that these symptoms are caused by excessive sensory activation of the neural micturition circuit. It

  20. Genetic Dissection of Neurotrophin Signaling through the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor

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    Ioannis Charalampopoulos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural determinants underlying signaling specificity in the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF are poorly characterized, and it is unclear whether different signaling outputs can be genetically dissociated. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR, also known as TNFRSF16, is a key regulator of trophic and injury responses in the nervous system. Here, we describe a genetic approach for dissecting p75NTR signaling and deciphering its underlying logic. Structural determinants important for regulation of cell death, NF-κB, and RhoA pathways were identified in the p75NTR death domain (DD. Proapoptotic and prosurvival pathways mapped onto nonoverlapping epitopes, demonstrating that different signaling outputs can be genetically separated in p75NTR. Dissociation of c-Jun kinase (JNK and caspase-3 activities indicated that JNK is necessary but not sufficient for p75NTR-mediated cell death. RIP2 recruitment and RhoGDI release were mechanistically linked, indicating that competition for DD binding underlies crosstalk between NF-κB and RhoA pathways in p75NTR signaling. These results provide insights into the logic of p75NTR signaling and pave the way for a genetic dissection of p75NTR function and physiology.

  1. Neurotrophins in the ear: their roles in sensory neuron survival and fiber guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Tessarollo, Lino; Coppola, Enzo; Reichardt, Louis F

    2004-01-01

    We review the history of neurotrophins in the ear and the current understanding of the function of neurotrophins in ear innervation, development and maintenance. Only two neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and their receptors, tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) and TrkC, appear to provide trophic support for inner ear sensory neuron afferents. Mice lacking either both receptors or both ligands lose essentially all sensory innervation of targets in the vestibular and auditory systems of the ear. Analyzes of single mutants show less complete and differential effects on innervation of the different sensory organs within the ear. BDNF and TrkB are most important for survival of vestibular sensory neurons whereas NT-3 and TrkC are most important for survival of cochlear sensory neurons. The largely complementary roles of BDNF to TrkB and NT-3 to TrkC signaling do not reflect specific requirements for innervation of different classes of hair cells. Most neurons express both receptors. Instead, the losses observed in single mutants are related to the spatio-temporal expression pattern of the two neurotrophins. In an area where only one neurotrophin is expressed at a particular time in development, the other neurotrophin is not present to compensate for this absence, resulting in death of neurons innervating that region. Decisive evidence for this suggestion is provided by transgenic mice in which the BDNF coding region has been inserted into the NT-3 gene, resulting in expression of BDNF instead of NT-3. The expression of BDNF in the spatio-temporal pattern of NT-3 results in survival of almost all neurons that are normally lost in the NT-3 mutant. Thus, BDNF and NT-3 have a high level of functional equivalence for inner ear sensory neuron survival. Further analysis of the patterns of afferent fiber losses in mutations that do not develop differentiated hair cells shows that the expression of neurotrophins is remarkably strong and can

  2. Neurotrophins in chronic allergic airway inflammation and remodeling.

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    Renz, Harald; Kiliç, Ayşe

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies, TH2 inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. Airway remodeling represents the disease-limiting stage during disease progression, and the underlying cellular molecular network resulting in airway remodeling are still poorly defined. In addition to the well-established TH2-dependent inflammatory response, several lines of investigation reveal that this regulation in the peripheral central nervous system contributes to disease development, exacerbation and progression. Several members of the neurotrophin family (e.g. nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor) are important transmitters of signals between the immune and the nervous system. Recent data indicate that NGF contributes to the development of airway remodeling in an inflammation and TGF-independent manner. These and other data open the opportunity to therapeutically interfere also on this level of regulation as a novel approach. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Neurotrophins in allergic airway dysfunction: what the mouse model is teaching us.

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    Lommatzsch, Marek; Braun, Armin; Renz, Harald

    2003-05-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are potent mediators of neuronal plasticity in the adult. There is increasing evidence that they regulate a variety of immune functions as well. Thus, neurotrophins are candidate molecules for neuroimmune interactions in allergic bronchial asthma, where elevated neurotrophin levels have been reported. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation we have identified macrophages and lymphocytes as additional cellular sources of NGF and BDNF in the inflamed lung. There was an unusual time course of BDNF in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. BDNF levels peaked 1 week after the last allergen challenge, and did not correlate with the time course of the inflammatory response. In a series of experiments using blocking anti-NGF and anti-BDNF antibodies, we have shown that NGF specifically enhances inflammation and the allergic early-phase response. In contrast, BDNF influenced chronic airway obstruction and local neuronal hyperreactivity without affecting inflammation. Using transgenic mice overexpressing NGF in the airway epithelium, we have confirmed the data obtained from anti-NGF experiments. Allergen-challenged NGF overexpressors displayed a markedly augmented airway inflammation, early-phase response, and sensory irritation compared to wild-type mice. Studies with p75-NTR (-/-) knockout mice showed that these NGF effects are at least in part mediated by the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor. Thus, our experiments suggest that NGF and BDNF have a profound, but differential impact on allergic airway dysfunction.

  4. Neurotrophins in the ventral tegmental area: Role in social stress, mood disorders and drug abuse.

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    Nikulina, E M; Johnston, C E; Wang, J; Hammer, R P

    2014-12-12

    This review discusses the impact of neurotrophins and other trophic factors, including fibroblast growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, on mood disorders, weight regulation and drug abuse, with an emphasis on stress- and drug-induced changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Neurotrophins, comprising nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophins 3 and 4/5 play important roles in neuronal plasticity and the development of different psychopathologies. In the VTA, most research has focused on the role of BDNF, because other neurotrophins are not found there in significant quantities. BDNF originating in the VTA provides trophic support to dopamine neurons. The diverse intracellular signaling pathways activated by BDNF may underlie precise physiological functions specific to the VTA. In general, VTA BDNF expression increases after psychostimulant exposures, and enhanced BDNF level in the VTA facilitates psychostimulant effects. The impact of VTA BDNF on the behavioral effects of psychostimulants relies primarily on its action within the mesocorticolimbic circuit. In the case of opiates, VTA BDNF expression and effects seem to be dependent on whether an animal is drug-naïve or has a history of drug use, only the latter of which is related to dopamine mechanisms. Social defeat stress that is continuous in mice or intermittent in rats increases VTA BDNF expression, and is associated with depressive and social avoidance behaviors. Intermittent social defeat stress induces persistent VTA BDNF expression that triggers psychostimulant cross-sensitization. Understanding the cellular and molecular substrates of neurotrophin effects may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of substance use and mood disorders. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurotrophin receptors expression and JNK pathway activation in human astrocytomas

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    Maraziotis Theodore

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are growth factors that regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis in the nervous system. Their diverse actions are mediated through two different transmembrane – receptor signaling systems: Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75NTR neurotrophin receptor. Trk receptors promote cell survival and differentiation while p75NTR induces, in most cases, the activity of JNK-p53-Bax apoptosis pathway or suppresses intracellular survival signaling cascades. Robust Trk activation blocks p75NTR -induced apoptosis by suppressing the JNK-p53-Bax pathway. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the expression levels of neurotrophin receptors, Trks and p75NTR, and the activation of JNK pathway in human astrocytomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded serial sections from 33 supratentorial astrocytomas (5 diffuse fibrillary astrocytomas, WHO grade II; 6 anaplastic astrocytomas, WHO grade III; 22 glioblastomas multiforme, WHO grade IV were immunostained following microwave pretreatment. Polyclonal antibodies against TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and monoclonal antibodies against p75NTR and phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were used. The labeling index (LI, defined as the percentage of positive (labeled cells out of the total number of tumor cells counted, was determined. Results Moderate to strong, granular cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for TrkA, TrkB and TrkC receptors was detected in greater than or equal to 10% of tumor cells in the majority of tumors independently of grade; on the contrary, p75NTR receptor expression was found in a small percentage of tumor cells (~1% in some tumors. The endothelium of tumor capillaries showed conspicuous immunoreactivity for TrkB receptor. Trk immunoreactivity seemed to be localized in some neurons and astrocytes in non-neoplastic tissue. Phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were

  6. Neurotrophins and asthma: novel insight into neuroimmune interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Renz, Harald

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction and dysregulation contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Many functional aspects of peripheral neurons strongly depend on the activity of neurotrophins, a family of mediators originally defined by their neuronal growth activity. More recently, it has been discovered that neurotrophins (eg, nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophin factor, and neurotrophin 3) have profound activities on various immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Furthermore, immune cells themselves can produce neurotrophins under certain conditions, and the levels of neurotrophins, as well as neurotrophic activities, are strongly upregulated in allergic conditions. Animal data demonstrate that a number of pathomechanisms controlling allergic diseases are directly related to neurotrophin function, including the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. These findings now lead to a much better understanding concerning the regulatory loop between immunologic and neurogenic dysregulation. In this review we will provide an overview of how neurotrophins connect the pathobiology of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, which are the hallmarks of allergic asthma.

  7. Targeting Neurotrophins to Specific Populations of Neurons: NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 and Their Relevance for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M. Keefe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that regulate neuronal survival, synaptic function, and neurotransmitter release, and elicit the plasticity and growth of axons within the adult central and peripheral nervous system. Since the 1950s, these factors have been extensively studied in traumatic injury models. Here we review several members of the classical family of neurotrophins, the receptors they bind to, and their contribution to axonal regeneration and sprouting of sensory and motor pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI. We focus on nerve growth factor (NGF, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, and their effects on populations of neurons within diverse spinal tracts. Understanding the cellular targets of neurotrophins and the responsiveness of specific neuronal populations will allow for the most efficient treatment strategies in the injured spinal cord.

  8. Pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR expression is strongly induced in lesional atopic mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T C; Lauenstein, H-D; Serowka, F; Pilzner, C; Groneberg, D A; Welker, P

    2008-07-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor influence neuronal proliferation and differentiation via the low-affinity pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR that may play a pivotal role in linking the immune with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of p75NTR gene transcription in mast cells under states of allergic inflammation has not been investigated in detail so far, the present studies assessed the gene regulation and expression of this receptor. Transcriptional expression of p75NTR in human skin was studied in isolated cutaneous cells by means of RT-PCR. In situ lesional mast cell p75NTR expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. The p75NTR mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin mast cells and keratinocytes. Lower mRNA levels were present in fibroblasts and melanocytes but no transcripts were found in endothelial cells. The p75NTR protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional mast cells. A significantly increased expression of p75NTR protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional mast cells when compared with control mast cell expression (Pneurotrophin receptor sensitivity of mast cells under states of allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds may act as anti-inflammatory mediators in cutaneous allergic inflammation.

  9. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The role of neurotrophins in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Ulrike; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan

    2010-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and a hyperresponsiveness to nonspecific stimuli which is partly neuronally controlled. In this regard, neurotrophins are prime candidates as mediators of neuronal and immunological plasticity and they will be the focus of the current review. Neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are expressed in the nasal mucosa. The majority of NGF expression has been found in eosinophil granulocytes, the glandular apparatus and peripheral nerves. As shown recently, nasal allergen provocation upregulates BDNF expression in nasal mucosa and NGF expression on peripheral nerves and nasal lavage in patients with allergic rhinitis. In this regard, increased BDNF expression positively correlates with the maximum increase in total nasal symptom score. The neurotrophin receptors including pan-neurotrophin receptor p75, tyrosine kinase A (trkA) and trkB are expressed in nasal tissue. TrkA is expressed on endothelial, p75 on peripheral nerves and trkB on nasal mucosa mast cells that decreases after allergen provocation. The expression of these neurotrophin receptors is increased on peripheral blood eosinophils in allergic rhinitis compared with nonatopic controls. Further, BDNF and NGF exert immunomodulatory functions on eosinophils of patients with allergic rhinitis. Finally, eosinophils of patients with allergic rhinitis are capable of BDNF and NGF production. Neurotrophins represent prime candidates in upper airway pathophysiology in allergic rhinitis. Research on neurotrophins in allergic rhinitis is thus becoming a progressively more exciting field and may reveal new and promising therapeutic options for the future.

  11. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Interleukin 17 regulates SHP-2 and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF expression and RANKL mediated osteoclastogenesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2017-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 predominately produced by the Th17 cells, plays a crucial role in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) mediated disease process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-17 exerts its pathogenic effects in RA-FLS by IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling. Recent studies have shown that RA-FLS produces SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL which results in worsening of the disease. However, whether IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling regulates SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL expressions in RA-FLS remains unknown. In this study, IL-17 treatment dramatically induced the production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF in FLS isolated from adjuvant induced arthritis (AA) rats. Conversely, IL-17 mediated production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF was abrogated by knockdown of IL-17RA using a small interfering RNA or blockade of STAT-3 activation with S3I-201 in AA-FLS. Interestingly, IL-17 treatment noticeably increased the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. However, silencing of IL-17RA reversed the effect of IL-17 on the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. In addition, an increased number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells were observed in a coculture system consisting of IL-17 treated AA-FLS and rat bone marrow derived monocytes/macrophages. Further, mechanistically we found that IL-17 upregulated RANKL expression in AA-FLS that was dependent on the IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling cascade. Knockdown of IL-17RA or inhibition of STAT-3 activation decreased the IL- 17 induced RANKL expression by AA-FLS and their osteoclastogenic potential. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IL-17 regulates SHP-2 expression and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent production of Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL in AA-FLS and may reveal a new insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neurotrophin receptors play a crucial role in neuronal survival, differentiation and regeneration. Nerve growthfactor receptor (NGFR) or P75NTR is a neurotrophin receptor that is involved in many pathological conditionsincluding cancers. Genetic factors that are involved in regulation of neurotrophin receptors are under ...

  14. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2011-05-11

    The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR.

  15. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Results Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. Conclusions The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR. PMID:21569322

  16. Neurotrophins: are they meaningful in chronic spontaneous urticaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozseker, Ferhan; Büyüköztürk, Suna; Gelincik, Asli; Depboylu, Bilge; Genç, Sema; Giriş, Murat; Eroğlu, Hacer; Erden, Sacide; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Dal, Murat; Akkor, Aytuğ

    2008-01-01

    Plasma neurotrophin levels are elevated in patients with allergic and autoimmune diseases. The present study was designed to investigate the serum neurotrophin levels in 42 patients displaying chronic spontaneous urticaria, as well as 22 healthy control subjects. Blood samples were obtained from subjects during their first visit to the clinic, and then again after one month of desloratadine therapy. No significant difference was found between patient and control groups in terms of basal serum neurotrophin levels. However, basal nerve growth factor levels in patients whose symptoms persisted despite treatment were significantly lower than those of the drug-responsive patients and the control group. In treatment-responsive patients, nerve growth factor increased after suppression of the symptoms. Our study suggests that chronic spontaneous urticaria is linked with changes serum nerve growth factor levels, and that the deregulation of neurotrophins may contribute to urticaria pathophysiology.

  17. The Transcriptional Response of Neurotrophins and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors in Lumbar Sensorimotor Circuits to Spinal Cord Contusion is Affected by Injury Severity and Survival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougland, M. Tyler; Harrison, Benjamin J.; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in changes to the anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of cells in the central and peripheral nervous system. Neurotrophins, acting by binding to their cognate Trk receptors on target cell membranes, contribute to modulation of anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of neurons in sensorimotor circuits in both the intact and injured spinal cord. Neurotrophin signaling is associated with many post-SCI changes including maladaptive plasticity leading to pain and autonomic dysreflexia, but also therapeutic approaches such as training-induced locomotor improvement. Here we characterize expression of mRNA for neurotrophins and Trk receptors in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord after two different severities of mid-thoracic injury and at 6 and 12 weeks post-SCI. There was complex regulation that differed with tissue, injury severity, and survival time, including reversals of regulation between 6 and 12 weeks, and the data suggest that natural regulation of neurotrophins in the spinal cord may continue for months after birth. Our assessments determined that a coordination of gene expression emerged at the 12-week post-SCI time point and bioinformatic analyses address possible mechanisms. These data can inform studies meant to determine the role of the neurotrophin signaling system in post-SCI function and plasticity, and studies using this signaling system as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23316162

  18. Cough reflex hypersensitivity: A role for neurotrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Jaffal, Sahar M

    2017-03-01

    Cough is one of the most common complaints for which sufferers seek medical assistance. However, currently available drugs are not very effective in treating cough, particularly that which follows an upper respiratory tract infection. Nonetheless, there has been a significant increase in our understanding of the mechanisms and pathways of the defensive cough as well as the hypersensitive/pathophysiological cough, both at airway and central nervous system (CNS) levels. Numerous molecules and signaling pathways have been identified as potential targets for antitussive drugs, including neurotrophins (NTs). NTs belong to a family of trophic factors and are critical for the development and maintenance of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system including sympathetic efferents, sensory neuron afferents, and immune cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was the first member of the NT family to be discovered, with wide ranging actions associated with synapse formation, survival, proliferation, apoptosis, axonal and dendritic outgrowth, expression and activity of functionally important proteins such as ion channels, receptors, and neurotransmitters. In addition, NGF has been implicated in several disease states particularly neuropathic pain and most recently in the sensitization of the cough reflex. This review will briefly address the peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms of airway neurons and will then focus on NGF signaling and its role in cough hypersensitivity.

  19. Chronic Stress Induces Neurotrophin-3 in Rat Submandibular Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Juri; Iida, Michitaro; Kondo, Yusuke; To, Masahiro; Hayashi, Takashi; Hori, Mayumi; Sato, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Plasma neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) levels are associated with several neural disorders. We previously reported that neurotrophins were released from salivary glands following acute immobilization stress. While the salivary glands were the source of plasma neurotrophins in that situation, the association between the expression of neurotrophins and the salivary gland under chronic stress conditions is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated whether NT-3 levels in the salivary gland and plasma were influenced by chronic stress. Materials and Methods Expressions of NT-3 mRNA and protein were characterized, using real-time polymerase chain reactions, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry, in the submandibular glands of male rats exposed to chronic stress (12 h daily for 22 days). Results Plasma NT-3 levels were significantly increased by chronic stress (p<0.05), and remained elevated in bilaterally sialoadenectomized rats under the same condition. Since chronic stress increases plasma NT-3 levels in the sialoadenectomized rat model, plasma NT-3 levels were not exclusively dependent on salivary glands. Conclusion While the salivary gland was identified in our previous study as the source of plasma neurotrophins during acute stress, the exposure to long-term stress likely affects a variety of organs capable of releasing NT-3 into the bloodstream. In addition, the elevation of plasma NT-3 levels may play important roles in homeostasis under stress conditions. PMID:23074106

  20. Neurotrophin mRNA expression in the developing tooth suggests multiple roles in innervation and organogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luukko, K; Arumäe, U; Karavanov, A; Moshnyakov, M; Sainio, K; Sariola, H; Saarma, M; Thesleff, I

    1997-01-01

    To analyze the roles of neurotrophins during early development of rat teeth, we studied the expression of neurotrophin mRNAs from the initiation of first molar formation to the completion of crown morphogenesis...

  1. Gamma-secretase represents a therapeutic target for the treatment of invasive glioma mediated by the p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiMei Wang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional signaling protein p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR is a central regulator and major contributor to the highly invasive nature of malignant gliomas. Here, we show that neurotrophin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP of p75(NTR is required for p75(NTR-mediated glioma invasion, and identify a previously unnamed process for targeted glioma therapy. Expression of cleavage-resistant chimeras of p75(NTR or treatment of animals bearing p75(NTR-positive intracranial tumors with clinically applicable gamma-secretase inhibitors resulted in dramatically decreased glioma invasion and prolonged survival. Importantly, proteolytic processing of p75(NTR was observed in p75(NTR-positive patient tumor specimens and brain tumor initiating cells. This work highlights the importance of p75(NTR as a therapeutic target, suggesting that gamma-secretase inhibitors may have direct clinical application for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  2. Modulation of neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor expression in nasal mucosa after nasal allergen provocation in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, U; Fokkens, W; Bruder, M; Hoogsteden, H; Kapp, A; Braunstahl, G-J

    2008-04-01

    Patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) feature both allergic airway inflammation and a hyperresponsiveness to nonspecific stimuli which is partly neuronally controlled. Still, it is unclear whether or not neurotrophins are involved in airway pathophysiology of AR and in nasobronchial interaction. Nine AR patients with mono-allergy to grass pollen and nine healthy controls underwent nasal allergen provocation (NP). Serum samples, nasal and bronchial biopsies were taken before (T(0)) and 24 h after (T(24)) NP. Pan-neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR), tyrosine kinase A (trkA), trkB, nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed with immunohistochemistry, and NGF and BDNF levels with ELISA. At T(24), BDNF and NGF were upregulated in nasal mucosa (P neurotrophins and receptors in bronchial mucosa. This study shows that neurotrophins and their receptors are expressed in human airways. Allergic rhinitis was characterized by a modulation of BDNF, NGF, and trkB in nasal mucosa after NP and a correlation of nasal BDNF with the maximal increase of total nasal symptom score. Therefore, our data suggest that neurotrophins participate in upper-airway pathophysiology in AR, whereas their role in nasobronchial interaction remains unclear.

  3. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Amniotic Fluid MMP-9 and Neurotrophins in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Pearce, Brad D; Larsen, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that some developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), are caused by errors in brain plasticity. Given the important role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and neurotrophins (NTs) in neuroplasticity, amniotic fluid samples for 331 ASD cases and 698...

  5. Egr3 dependent sympathetic target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a target tissue derived neurotrophin required for normal sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. NGF signaling regulates gene expression in sympathetic neurons, which in turn mediates critical aspects of neuron survival, axon extension and terminal axon branching during sympathetic nervous system (SNS development. Egr3 is a transcription factor regulated by NGF signaling in sympathetic neurons that is essential for normal SNS development. Germline Egr3-deficient mice have physiologic dysautonomia characterized by apoptotic sympathetic neuron death and abnormal innervation to many target tissues. The extent to which sympathetic innervation abnormalities in the absence of Egr3 is caused by altered innervation or by neuron death during development is unknown. Using Bax-deficient mice to abrogate apoptotic sympathetic neuron death in vivo, we show that Egr3 has an essential role in target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death. Sympathetic target tissue innervation is abnormal in many target tissues in the absence of neuron death, and like NGF, Egr3 also appears to effect target tissue innervation heterogeneously. In some tissues, such as heart, spleen, bowel, kidney, pineal gland and the eye, Egr3 is essential for normal innervation, whereas in other tissues such as lung, stomach, pancreas and liver, Egr3 appears to have little role in innervation. Moreover, in salivary glands and heart, two tissues where Egr3 has an essential role in sympathetic innervation, NGF and NT-3 are expressed normally in the absence of Egr3 indicating that abnormal target tissue innervation is not due to deregulation of these neurotrophins in target tissues. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate a role for Egr3 in mediating sympathetic target tissue innervation that is independent of neuron survival or neurotrophin deregulation.

  6. Neurotrophin-mediated dendrite-to-nucleus signaling revealed by microfluidic compartmentalization of dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael S; Bas Orth, Carlos; Kim, Hyung Joon; Jeon, Noo Li; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2011-07-05

    Signaling from dendritic synapses to the nucleus regulates important aspects of neuronal function, including synaptic plasticity. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can induce long-lasting strengthening of synapses in vivo and this effect is dependent on transcription. However, the mechanism of signaling to the nucleus is not well understood. Here we describe a microfluidic culture device to investigate dendrite-to-nucleus signaling. Using these microfluidic devices, we demonstrate that BDNF can act directly on dendrites to elicit an anterograde signal that induces transcription of the immediate early genes, Arc and c-Fos. Induction of Arc is dependent on dendrite- and cell body-derived calcium, whereas induction of c-Fos is calcium-independent. In contrast to retrograde neurotrophin-mediated axon-to-nucleus signaling, which is MEK5-dependent, BDNF-mediated anterograde dendrite-to-nucleus signaling is dependent on MEK1/2. Intriguingly, the activity of TrkB, the BDNF receptor, is required in the cell body for the induction of Arc and c-Fos mediated by dendritically applied BDNF. These results are consistent with the involvement of a signaling endosome-like pathway that conveys BDNF signals from the dendrite to the nucleus.

  7. Activation of the specific neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC influences the function of eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Englmann, C; Hanf, G; Grützkau, A; Guhl, S; Kunkel, G

    2002-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) can act on several immune cells as well as residential cells. But little is known about their role in modulating eosinophil function via activation of high-affinity receptors. The aim of this study was to assess whether eosinophils express functional receptors and if their function is influenced by NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). Eosinophils were purified by negative immunoselection (purity > 96%). High-affinity neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and flow-cytometry analysis. Functionality of receptors was demonstrated by receptor phosphorylation after ligand binding. Eosinophils were incubated with NGF, BDNF and NT-3, and cells and supernatants were collected for measurement of the mediators IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX) as well as eosinophil viability. Eosinophils expressed mRNA for neurotrophin receptors. Proteins were detectable by western blot and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis. The receptors were phosphorylated after stimulation with neurotrophins. After NGF stimulation, a significant increase in IL-4 was detectable. BDNF and NT-3 stimulation led to a significant increase in EPX. Eosinophil viability was not influenced. Eosinophils express the functionally active receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Receptor activation stimulates eosinophils. This might be an additional pathway regulating inflammatory responses in allergic reactions.

  8. Kissing reduces allergic skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-11-01

    The effect of kissing on allergen-induced skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels were studied in 30 normal subjects, 30 patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and 30 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). All of the patients with AR or AD are allergic to house dust mite (HDM) and Japanese cedar pollen (JCP). They are all Japanese and they do not kiss habitually. The subject kissed freely during 30 min with their lover or spouse alone in a room with closed doors while listening to soft music. Before and after kissing, skin prick tests were performed using commercial HDM allergen, JCP allergen, as well as histamine and control solution, and wheal responses were measured. Simultaneously, plasma levels of neurotrophin, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and -4 (NT-4) were measured. Kissing significantly reduced wheal responses induced by HDM and JCP, but not by histamine, and decreased plasma levels of NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 in patients with AR or AD, while it failed to do so in normal subjects. These finding indicate that kissing have some implication in the study of neuroimmunology in allergic patients.

  9. Neurotrophin-evoked depolarization requires the sodium channel Na(V)1.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert; Kafitz, Karl W; Konnerth, Arthur

    2002-10-17

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are essential for normal brain function. Many types of neurons in the central nervous system are excited by BDNF or neurotrophin-4/5, an action that has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity. The mechanisms involved in this transmitter-like action of neurotrophins remains unclear. Here, by screening candidate genes with an antisense messenger RNA expression approach and by co-expressing the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB and various sodium channels, we demonstrate that the tetrodotoxin-insensitive sodium channel Na(V)1.9 underlies the neurotrophin-evoked excitation. These results establish the molecular basis of neurotrophin-evoked depolarization and reveal a mechanism of ligand-mediated sodium channel activation.

  10. Neurotrophin-3 is increased in skin in human diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A; Wellmer, A; Facer, P; Saldanha, G; Kopelman, P; Lindsay, R; Anand, P

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), a member of the neurotrophin family, has been shown to be necessary for the development of muscle spindle and Merkel cell afferent nerve fibres in animal models.The presence of NT-3 in the suprabasal epidermis, where many unmyelinated sensory fibres terminate, has been shown for the first time. As these fibres are affected in early diabetic neuropathy and a clinical trial of recombinant human NT-3 in diabetic neuropathy is in progress, the concentrations of endogenous NT-3 in skin of 24 patients at different stages of diabetic polyneuropathy have been investigated. NT-3 concentrations, measured with a specific immunoassay, were significantly higher in affected skin biopsies from patients with diabetic neuropathy than matched control skin (diabetic skin 6.32(1.18) pg/mg v control skin 1.28 (0.05) (mean (SEM)); p<0.004, Mann-Whitney U test), particularly in the later stages. The optical density of NT-3-immunostaining was also significantly greater in the epidermis in diabetic patients (diabetic epidermis 0.30(0.06) v controls 0.24 (0.01); p<0.02). No correlation was found between individual quantitative sensory tests and the increase of NT-3 concentration. The increase of NT-3 seems to reflect the degree of skin denervation in diabetic neuropathy, and may represent a compensatory mechanism. The concentrations of NT-3 in other peripheral targets deserve study in diabetic neuropathy.

 PMID:9728960

  11. Visual lateralization in birds: from neurotrophins to cognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntürkün, O

    1997-10-01

    Birds which are tested monocularly in visual discrimination tasks generally show higher performance levels with the right eye seeing. Due to the virtual complete decussation of the optic nerves, a right eye superiority is probably related to a left hemisphere dominance. If visual processes between the hemispheres differ, each half-brain might be differently prone to be deceived by visual illusions. Indeed pigeons tested with the herringbone illusions are deceived to a stronger extent with the right eye. These functional asymmetries are accompanied by anatomical left-right differences in the ascending thalamo- and tectofugal visual pathways in chicks and pigeons, respectively. The neuroanatomical and behavioral assymmetries result from an asymmetrical posture before hatching in which the embryo keeps his head turned to the right, such that the right eye is stimulated by light shining through the shell. The lateralization of adult animals are induced by this prehatching asymmetric photic stimulation since dark incubation abolishes behavioral and anatomical asymmetries. It is conceivable that the asymmetrical embryonal light stimulation increases the release of neurotrophins in the developing avian visual system in an activity dependent matter. Neurotrophins play an important role in neuronal survival and morphology and thus might represent a molecular switch bridging the gap from embryonal light stimulation to asymmetries of visual cognition in adults.

  12. The transmembrane domain of the p75 neurotrophin receptor stimulates phosphorylation of the TrkB tyrosine kinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadipour, Khalil; MacLean, Michael; Pirkle, Sean; Ali, Solav; Lopez-Redondo, Maria-Luisa; Stokes, David L; Chao, Moses V

    2017-10-06

    The function of protein products generated from intramembraneous cleavage by the γ-secretase complex is not well defined. The γ-secretase complex is responsible for the cleavage of several transmembrane proteins, most notably the amyloid precursor protein that results in Aβ, a transmembrane (TM) peptide. Another protein that undergoes very similar γ-secretase cleavage is the p75 neurotrophin receptor. However, the fate of the cleaved p75 TM domain is unknown. p75 neurotrophin receptor is highly expressed during early neuronal development and regulates survival and process formation of neurons. Here, we report that the p75 TM can stimulate the phosphorylation of TrkB (tyrosine kinase receptor B). In vitro phosphorylation experiments indicated that a peptide representing p75 TM increases TrkB phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, mutagenesis analyses revealed that a valine residue at position 264 in the rat p75 neurotrophin receptor is necessary for the ability of p75 TM to induce TrkB phosphorylation. Because this residue is just before the γ-secretase cleavage site, we then investigated whether the p75(αγ) peptide, which is a product of both α- and γ-cleavage events, could also induce TrkB phosphorylation. Experiments using TM domains from other receptors, EGFR and FGFR1, failed to stimulate TrkB phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation and biochemical fractionation data suggested that p75 TM stimulates TrkB phosphorylation at the cell membrane. Altogether, our results suggest that TrkB activation by p75(αγ) peptide may be enhanced in situations where the levels of the p75 receptor are increased, such as during brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Airway epithelial cells produce neurotrophins and promote the survival of eosinophils during allergic airway inflammation.

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    Hahn, Christian; Islamian, Ariyan Pirayesh; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2006-04-01

    Eosinophil-epithelial cell interactions make a major contribution to asthmatic airway inflammation. Nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and other members of the neurotrophin family, originally defined as a class of neuronal growth factors, are now recognized to support the survival and activation of immune cells. Neurotrophin levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during allergic asthma. We sought to investigate the role of neurotrophins as inflammatory mediators in eosinophil-epithelial cell interactions during the allergic immune response. Neurotrophin expression in the lung was investigated by means of immunohistochemistry and ELISA in a mouse model of chronic experimental asthma. Coculture experiments were performed with airway epithelial cells and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophils. Neurotrophin levels increased continuously during chronic allergic airway inflammation, and airway epithelial cells were the major source of NGF and BDNF within the inflamed lung. Epithelial neurotrophin production was upregulated by IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and T(H)2 cytokines. Lung eosinophils expressed the BDNF and NGF receptors tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, and coculture with airway epithelial cells resulted in enhanced epithelial neurotrophin production, as well as in prolonged survival of eosinophils. Eosinophil survival was completely abolished in the presence of the neurotrophin receptor Trk antagonist K252a. During allergic inflammation, airway epithelial cells express increased amounts of NGF and BDNF that promote the survival of tissue eosinophils. Controlling epithelial neurotrophin production might be an important therapeutic target to prevent allergic airway eosinophilia. Attenuating the release of inflammatory mediators from the activated airway epithelium will become an important strategy to disrupt the pathogenesis of chronic allergic asthma.

  14. Does Endurance Training Compensate for Neurotrophin Deficiency Following Diabetic Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Rasoul; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Kazemi, Abdolreza; Dakhili, Amir Bahador; Sorkhkamanzadeh, Ghazaleh; Sheikhy, Ayob

    2016-10-01

    A lack of neurotrophic support is believed to contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. On the other hand, neurotrophins have consistently been shown to increase in the central and peripheral nervous system following exercise, but the effects of exercise intervention on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic neuropathy are not understood. This experimental study was designed and carried out at the Tarbiat Modares university (TMU) in Tehran, Iran, to investigate the hypothesis that increased activity as endurance training can help to increase the endogenous expression of neurotrophins in diabetic rats. This was an experimental study with 2 × 2 factorial plans performed at TMU in Iran. Sampling was accidental and 28 adult male Wistar rats in the body mass range of 326.3 ± 8.4 g comprised the sample, with each rat randomly assigned to four groups: diabetic control (DC), diabetic training (DT), healthy control (HC), and healthy training (HT). To induce diabetic neuropathy, after 12 hours of food deprivation, an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) solution (45 mg/Kg) method was used. Two weeks after STZ injection, the endurance training protocol was performed for 6 weeks; 24 hours after the last training session, the rats were sacrificed. Real-time PCR was used for BDNF and NGF expression. The data indicate that diabetes decreases BDNF and NGF expression in sensory (92%, P = 0.01; 90%, P = 0.038, respectively) and motor (93%, P = 0.05; 60%, P = 0.029, respectively) roots. However, NGF mRNA levels in the DT group were significantly higher than in the HC group ((7.1-fold), P = 0.01; (2.2-fold), P = 0.001, respectively, for sensory and motor roots), but this was not shown for BDNF. In addition, endurance training can increase NGF expression in healthy rats ((7.4-fold), P = 0.01; (3.8-fold), P = 0.001, respectively, for sensory and motor roots). This study shows that BDNF and NGF expression decreases in

  15. Site-Specific Direct Labeling of Neurotrophins and Their Receptors: From Biochemistry to Advanced Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Francesco; Bonsignore, Fulvio; Amodeo, Rosy; Cattaneo, Antonino; Marchetti, Laura

    2018-01-01

    We describe here a versatile methodological platform to achieve site-directed and stoichiometry-controlled labeling of neurotrophins and their receptors with various probes, ranging from biotin to small organic dyes. This labeling method works in vitro on purified neurotrophins as well as in a living cell context, where it achieves selective labeling of surface-exposed neurotrophin receptors. Here, we list all experimental details of our labeling protocols, along with examples of the wide range of applications in which these can be used.

  16. Serum and sputum neurotrophin levels in chronic persistent cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, R; McMahon, A D; McSharry, C P; Macleod, K J; Fraser, I; Livingston, E; Thomson, N C

    2005-07-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) are a family of growth factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin3 (NT-3) that are involved in inflammation. Serum and induced sputum NT levels are increased in asthma and in cough because of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, respectively. Neurogenic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic cough in individuals with normal chest radiography, but the role of NTs in this condition is unknown. To assess if NT levels are elevated in the serum and airways in subjects with chronic persistent cough. Eighty-one subjects with chronic cough persistent for over 1 year; with normal chest radiography and spirometry were included. Thirty healthy subjects were controls. Serum NGF, BDNF and NT-3 were measured by enzyme immunoassay. In a subset, NGF was measured in induced sputum. Sputum cell counts and allergen-specific serum IgE were measured and all patients received specific sequential treatment trials to achieve a final diagnosis for the cough. There was no significant difference either in the levels of serum or sputum NTs in chronic cough subjects compared with controls or between the most common causes of cough: post-nasal drip syndrome, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, asthma and bronchiectasis. The median (inter-quartile range) for sputum NGF (pg/mL) was 516 (296-772) in healthy controls and 580 (312-880) in subjects with chronic cough (P=0.284). There was no correlation between NT levels and sputum cell counts. Sputum NGF levels correlated with duration of cough (r=0.34, P=0.002). NTs are not elevated in induced sputum or serum of subjects with chronic persistent cough. This implies that NTs do not have a central role in perpetuating airway inflammation in chronic persistent cough.

  17. The role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin system genes on body weight in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Kaplan, Allan S; Tiwari, Arun K; Levitan, Robert D; Piran, Sara; Bergen, Andrew W; Kaye, Walter H; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wang, Kai; Berrettini, Wade H; Brandt, Harry A; Bulik, Cynthia M; Crawford, Steven; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M; Halmi, Katherine A; Johnson, Craig L; Keel, Pamela K; Klump, Kelly L; Magistretti, Pierre; Mitchell, James E; Strober, Michael; Thornton, Laura M; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D Blake; Knight, Joanne; Kennedy, James L

    2014-08-01

    Although low weight is a key factor contributing to the high mortality in anorexia nervosa (AN), it is unclear how AN patients sustain low weight compared with bulimia nervosa (BN) patients with similar psychopathology. Studies of genes involved in appetite and weight regulation in eating disorders have yielded variable findings, in part due to small sample size and clinical heterogeneity. This study: (1) assessed the role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin genetic variants in conferring risk for AN and BN; and (2) explored the involvement of these genes in body mass index (BMI) variations within AN and BN. Our sample consisted of 745 individuals with AN without a history of BN, 245 individuals with BN without a history of AN, and 321 controls. We genotyped 20 markers with known or putative function among genes selected from leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin systems. There were no significant differences in allele frequencies among individuals with AN, BN, and controls. AGRP rs13338499 polymorphism was associated with lowest illness-related BMI in those with AN (p = 0.0013), and NTRK2 rs1042571 was associated with highest BMI in those with BN (p = 0.0018). To our knowledge, this is the first study to address the issue of clinical heterogeneity in eating disorder genetic research and to explore the role of known or putatively functional markers in genes regulating appetite and weight in individuals with AN and BN. If replicated, our results may serve as an important first step toward gaining a better understanding of weight regulation in eating disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of training and detraining on memory, neurotrophins and oxidative stress markers in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Zsolt; Toldy, Anna; Szabo, Zsofia; Siamilis, Savvas; Nyakas, Csaba; Silye, Gabriella; Jakus, Judit; Goto, Sataro

    2006-09-01

    In the current investigation we tested how swimming training (T) (8 week, 5 times/week, 2 h/day), and detraining (DT) affects brain functions and oxidative stress markers in rat brain. The free radical concentration, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance, decreased in brain of T and DT rats compared to controls (C). The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increased as a result of training, but decreased below the control level after 6 weeks of detraining. In addition, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) also declined with DT. The passive avoidance test was used to assess the memory of rats, and training-induced improvement was observed but the enhancement disappeared with detraining. When the content of mitochondrial electron transport complexes, as a potent free radical generator, was evaluated by the blue native gel method, no significant alterations were observed. The repair of nuclear and mitochondrial 8-oxodeoxyguanosine, as measured by the activity of OGG1, showed no significant difference. Therefore, the results suggest that regular exercise training improves memory, decreases the level of reactive oxygen species, and increase the production of BDNF and NGF. On the other hand, it appears that the beneficial effects of training are reversible in the brain, since detraining down-regulates the neurotrophin level, and memory. It is suggested that exercise training is more likely to beneficially effect the production of reactive oxygen species and the related oxidative damage.

  19. Neurotrophin receptor p75NTR mediates Huntington’s disease–associated synaptic and memory dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Verónica; Giralt, Albert; Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Puigdellívol, Mar; Suelves, Nuria; Zamora-Moratalla, Alfonsa; Ballesteros, Jesús J.; Martín, Eduardo D.; Dominguez-Iturza, Nuria; Morales, Miguel; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Sílvia

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory deficits are early clinical manifestations of Huntington’s disease (HD). These cognitive impairments have been mainly associated with frontostriatal HD pathology; however, compelling evidence provided by several HD murine models suggests that the hippocampus may contribute to synaptic deficits and memory dysfunction in HD. The neurotrophin receptor p75NTR negatively regulates spine density, which is associated with learning and memory; therefore, we explored whether disturbed p75NTR function in the hippocampus could contribute to synaptic dysfunction and memory deficits in HD. Here, we determined that levels of p75NTR are markedly increased in the hippocampus of 2 distinct mouse models of HD and in HD patients. Normalization of p75NTR levels in HD mutant mice heterozygous for p75NTR prevented memory and synaptic plasticity deficits and ameliorated dendritic spine abnormalities, likely through normalization of the activity of the GTPase RhoA. Moreover, viral-mediated overexpression of p75NTR in the hippocampus of WT mice reproduced HD learning and memory deficits, while knockdown of p75NTR in the hippocampus of HD mice prevented cognitive decline. Together, these findings provide evidence of hippocampus-associated memory deficits in HD and demonstrate that p75NTR mediates synaptic, learning, and memory dysfunction in HD. PMID:25180603

  20. Either brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 only neurotrophin-producing grafts promote locomotor recovery in untrained spinalized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Fischer, Itzhak; Tom, Veronica; Houlé, John D; Lemay, Michel A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Transplants of cellular grafts expressing a combination of 2 neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) have been shown to promote and enhance locomotor recovery in untrained spinalized cats. Based on the time course of recovery and the absence of axonal growth through the transplants, we hypothesized that recovery was due to neurotrophin-mediated plasticity within the existing locomotor circuitry of the lumbar cord. Since BDNF and NT-3 have different effects on axonal sprouting and synaptic connectivity/strengthening, it becomes important to ascertain the contribution of each individual neurotrophins to recovery. Objective. We studied whether BDNF or NT-3 only producing cellular grafts would be equally effective at restoring locomotion in untrained spinal cats. Methods. Rat fibroblasts secreting one of the 2 neurotrophins were grafted into the T12 spinal transection site of adult cats. Four cats in each group (BDNF alone or NT-3 alone) were evaluated. Locomotor recovery was tested on a treadmill at 3 and 5 weeks post-transection/grafting. Results. Animals in both groups were capable of plantar weight-bearing stepping at speed up to 0.8 m/s as early as 3 weeks and locomotor capabilities were similar at 3 and 5 weeks for both types of graft. Conclusions. Even without locomotor training, either BDNF or NT-3 only producing grafts promote locomotor recovery in complete spinal animals. More clinically applicable delivery methods need to be developed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. High-affinity neurotrophin receptors and ligands promote leukemogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Gernot; Rhein, Mathias; Meyer, Johann; Koenecke, Christian; Neumann, Thomas; Yang, Min; Krauter, Jürgen; von Neuhoff, Nils; Heuser, Michael; Diedrich, Helmut; Göhring, Gudrun; Wilkens, Ludwig; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Ganser, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) and their receptors play a key role in neurogenesis and survival. The TRK (tropomyosin-related kinase) receptor protein tyrosine kinases (TRKA, TRKB, TRKC) are high-affinity NT receptors that are expressed in a variety of human tissues. Their role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis is poorly understood. In a prospective study involving 94 adult patients we demonstrate for the first time cell-surface expression of the 3 TRKs and constitutive activation in blasts from patients with de novo or secondary acute leukemia. At least one TRK was expressed in 55% of the analyzed cases. We establish a clear correlation between the TRK expression pattern and FAB classification. Although only few point mutations were found in TRK sequences by reverse-transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we observed coexpression of BDNF (ligand for TRKB) in more than 50% of TRKB+ cases (16/30). Activation of TRKA or TRKB by NGF and BDNF, respectively, efficiently rescued murine myeloid cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. Coexpression of TRKB/BDNF or TRKA/NGF in murine hematopoietic cells induced leukemia. Moreover, activation of TRKs was important for survival of both human and murine leukemic cells. Our findings suggest that TRKs play an important role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a new drug target. PMID:19059881

  2. RCAN1 links impaired neurotrophin trafficking to aberrant development of the sympathetic nervous system in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami; Yamashita, Naoya; Ascaño, Maria; Bodmer, Daniel; Boehm, Erica; Bodkin-Clarke, Chantal; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2015-12-14

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder affecting the nervous system in humans. To date, investigations of neural anomalies in Down syndrome have focused on the central nervous system, although dysfunction of the peripheral nervous system is a common manifestation. The molecular and cellular bases underlying peripheral abnormalities have remained undefined. Here, we report the developmental loss of sympathetic innervation in human Down syndrome organs and in a mouse model. We show that excess regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous inhibitor of the calcineurin phosphatase that is triplicated in Down syndrome, impairs neurotrophic support of sympathetic neurons by inhibiting endocytosis of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor, TrkA. Genetically correcting RCAN1 levels in Down syndrome mice markedly improves NGF-dependent receptor trafficking, neuronal survival and innervation. These results uncover a critical link between calcineurin signalling, impaired neurotrophin trafficking and neurodevelopmental deficits in the peripheral nervous system in Down syndrome.

  3. Neurotrophin-induced migration and neuronal differentiation of multipotent astrocytic stem cells in vitro.

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    Martha Douglas-Escobar

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE affects 2-3 per 1000 full-term neonates. Up to 75% of newborns with severe HIE die or have severe neurological handicaps. Stem cell therapy offers the potential to replace HIE-damaged cells and enhances the autoregeneration process. Our laboratory implanted Multipotent Astrocytic Stem Cells (MASCs into a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI and demonstrated that MASCs move to areas of injury in the cortex and hippocampus. However, only a small proportion of the implanted MASCs differentiated into neurons. MASCs injected into control pups did not move into the cortex or differentiate into neurons. We do not know the mechanism by which the MASCs moved from the site of injection to the injured cortex. We found neurotrophins present after the hypoxic-ischemic milieu and hypothesized that neurotrophins could enhance the migration and differentiation of MASCs. Using a Boyden chamber device, we demonstrated that neurotrophins potentiate the in vitro migration of stem cells. NGF, GDNF, BDNF and NT-3 increased stem cell migration when compared to a chemokinesis control. Also, MASCs had increased differentiation toward neuronal phenotypes when these neurotrophins were added to MASC culture tissue. Due to this finding, we believed neurotrophins could guide migration and differentiation of stem cell transplants after brain injury.

  4. Neurotrauma: The Crosstalk between Neurotrophins and Inflammation in the Acutely Injured Brain

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    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals worldwide. Understanding the pathophysiology of neurotrauma is crucial for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. After the trauma occurs, immediate neurologic damage is produced by the traumatic forces; this primary injury triggers a secondary wave of biochemical cascades together with metabolic and cellular changes, called secondary neural injury. In the scenario of the acutely injured brain, the ongoing secondary injury results in ischemia and edema culminating in an uncontrollable increase in intracranial pressure. These areas of secondary injury progression, or areas of “traumatic penumbra”, represent crucial targets for therapeutic interventions. Neurotrophins are a class of signaling molecules that promote survival and/or maintenance of neurons. They also stimulate axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, and neurotransmitter synthesis and release. Therefore, this review focuses on the role of neurotrophins in the acute post-injury response. Here, we discuss possible endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms of neurotrophins in the prevailing environment surrounding the injured areas, and highlight the crosstalk between neurotrophins and inflammation with focus on neurovascular unit cells, particularly pericytes. The perspective is that neurotrophins may represent promising targets for research on neuroprotective and neurorestorative processes in the short-term following TBI.

  5. NF-kappaB regulates B-cell-derived nerve growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, Klaus; Inoue, Noriko; Sawada, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    In the mammalian brain, four neurotrophins have been identified: nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). NGF exerts an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several types of immune cells, such as mast cells, lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils, produce, store and release NGF. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data indicate that dysfunctions of NGF and the other neurotrophins may contribute to impaired immune responses and concentration of NGF frequently correlates with disease severity. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the potential signaling mechanisms of cytokine- neurotrophins interactions contributing to increased NGF levels. Our data show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a pivotal role in regulating B-cell-derived NGF expression.

  6. The genome sequence of the protostome Daphnia pulex encodes respective orthologues of a neurotrophin, a Trk and a p75NTR: Evolution of neurotrophin signaling components and related proteins in the bilateria

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    Wilson Karen HS

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins and their Trk and p75NTR receptors play an important role in the nervous system. To date, neurotrophins, Trk and p75NTR have only been found concomitantly in deuterostomes. In protostomes, homologues to either neurotrophin, Trk or p75NTR are reported but their phylogenetic relationship to deuterostome neurotrophin signaling components is unclear. Drosophila has neurotrophin homologues called Spätzles (Spz, some of which were recently renamed neurotrophins, but direct proof that these are deuterostome neurotrophin orthologues is lacking. Trks belong to the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and among RTKs, Trks and RORs are closest related. Flies lack Trks but have ROR and ROR-related proteins called NRKs playing a neurotrophic role. Mollusks have so far the most similar proteins to Trks (Lymnaea Trk and Aplysia Trkl but the exact phylogenetic relationship of mollusk Trks to each other and to vertebrate Trks is unknown. p75NTR belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR superfamily. The divergence of the TNFR families in vertebrates has been suggested to parallel the emergence of the adaptive immune system. Only one TNFR representative, the Drosophila Wengen, has been found in protostomes. To clarify the evolution of neurotrophin signaling components in bilateria, this work analyzes the genome of the crustacean Daphnia pulex as well as new genetic data from protostomes. Results The Daphnia genome encodes a neurotrophin, p75NTR and Trk orthologue together with Trkl, ROR, and NRK-RTKs. Drosophila Spz1, 2, 3, 5, 6 orthologues as well as two new groups of Spz proteins (Spz7 and 8 are also found in the Daphnia genome. Searching genbank and the genomes of Capitella, Helobdella and Lottia reveals neurotrophin signaling components in other protostomes. Conclusion It appears that a neurotrophin, Trk and p75NTR existed at the protostome/deuterostome split. In protostomes, a "neurotrophin superfamily" includes

  7. Evidence-based modeling of mode-of-action for functional ingredients influencing Alzheimer’s disease through neurotrophin pathway

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    Erfan Younesi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is the most widely expressed member of the neurotrophin family in the human brain and is crucially involved in the development of neural circuits, modulation of synaptic plasticity, and regulation of cognitive functions, including learning and memory. Many studies have shown the association of altered BDNF levels with neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, BDNF is not able to cross the blood-brain barrier and, thus, its delivery to the nervous system is a challenge. Therefore, functional diets with the ability to induce production of BDNF in the brain may offer an alternative route. The objective of this study was three-fold: first, to find out diets that are causally linked to the agonistic activity of BDNF in the neurotrophin signaling pathway; second and mainly, to investigate mode-of-action of these functional diets through systems-based mechanistic modeling in the context of Alzheimer’s disease; and third, to demonstrate the proof-of-concept application of systems biology methods, that are well established in the pharmaceutical sector, to the emerging field of functional food. Methods: In the first step, two cause-and-effect models of BDNF signaling in two states, i.e. normal state and Alzheimer’s disease state, were constructed using published knowledge in scientific literature and pathway databases. A “differential model analysis” between the two states was performed by which mechanistic mode-of-action of BDNF in neurotrophin signaling pathway could be explained with a high molecular resolution in both normal and disease states. The BDNF mode-of-action model was further validated using the “biomarkerguided validation” approach. In the second step, scientific evidence on the effect of various functional diets on BDNF levels and BDNF-related biological processes or outcomes was harvested from biomedical literature using a disease-specific semantic search

  8. Suckling reduces allergic skin responses and plasma levels of neuropeptide and neurotrophin in lactating women with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Lactation is associated with an inhibited hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to physical and psychological stress in women and female rats. However, suckling also improved mood and calmness in nonatopic lactating women. Relaxation by humor reduced allergen-induced skin wheal responses, while various forms of stress enhanced those responses in allergic patients. Moreover, enhancement and reduction in allergen-induced skin wheal responses are associated with up- and down-regulation of plasma levels of substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), respectively. In addition, plasma levels of SP, VIP and nerve growth factor (NGF), but not neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are elevated in allergic patients. Therefore, the effects of suckling on allergic responses and plasma levels of neuropeptides and neurotrophins were studied in lactating women with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS). Before and after suckling, allergic skin responses to allergens were studied by skin prick test; simultaneously plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 were measured in lactating women with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome. Suckling reduces allergen-induced, but not histamine-induced, skin wheal responses, while holding infants without suckling failed to do so. Suckling also reduced plasma levels of SP, VIP and NGF, but not NT-3 in these patients, while holding infants without suckling failed to do so. These results indicate that suckling reduces allergic responses with a concomitant reduction in plasma levels of SP, VIP and NGF. Collectively, suckling may have some implication in the study of maternal allergy in atopic patients. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Development of fusimotor innervation correlates with group Ia afferents but is independent of neurotrophin-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringstedt, T; Copray, S; Walro, J; Kucera, J

    1998-01-01

    Fusimotor neurons, group Ia afferents and muscle spindles are absent in mutant mice lacking the gene for neurotrophin-3 (NT3). To partition the effect of Ia afferent or spindle absence from that of NT3 deprivation on fusimotor neuron development, we examined the fusimotor system in a mutant mouse

  10. Roles for the pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin in neuronal development, aging and brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Pernille; Giehl, Klaus; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    apoptosis of sympathetic neurons, it did prevent their age-dependent degeneration. Furthermore, in an injury protocol, lesioned corticospinal neurons in Sort1(-/-) mice were protected from death. Thus, the sortilin pathway has distinct roles in pro-neurotrophin-induced apoptotic signaling in pathological...... conditions, but also in specific stages of neuronal development and aging. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  11. Expression of the neurotrophin receptors Trk A and Trk B in adult ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neurotrophins and their receptors of the Trk family play a critical role in proliferation, differentiation and survival of the developing neurons. There are reports on their expression in neoplasms too, namely, the primitive neuroectodermal tumours of childhood, and in adult astrocytic gliomas. The involvement of Trk receptors in ...

  12. Neurotrophin and GDNF family ligand receptor expression in vagal sensory nerve subtypes innervating the adult guinea pig respiratory tract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TinaMarie Lieu; Marian Kollarik; Allen C. Myers; Bradley J. Undem

    2011-01-01

    .... With respect to the neurotrophin receptors, the TRPV1-expressing jugular C-fiber neurons innervating both the trachea and lung compartments preferentially expressed tropomyosin-receptor kinase A (TrkA...

  13. Laughter counteracts enhancement of plasma neurotrophin levels and allergic skin wheal responses by mobile phone-mediated stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Laughter caused by viewing a comic video (Rowan Atkinson's The Best Bits of Mr. Bean) reduced the plasma nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 levels, and allergic skin wheal responses in patients with atopic dermatitis, whereas viewing a nonhumorous video (weather information) failed to do so. In contrast, stress induced by writing mail on a mobile phone enhanced the plasma nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 levels, and allergic skin wheal responses. However, previewing the comic video counteracted mobile phone-mediated enhancement of plasma neurotrophins or allergic skin wheal responses, whereas previewing the weather information failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that, in patients with atopic dermatitis, writing mail on a mobile phone causes stress and enhances allergic responses with a concomitant increase in plasma neurotrophins that are counteracted by laughter. These results may be useful in the study of pathophysiology and treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  14. The production, storage and release of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 by human peripheral eosinophils in allergics and non-allergics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Englmann, C; Hanf, G; Grützkau, A; Seybold, J; Kunkel, G

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that neurotrophins are produced by and can act on several immune-inflammatory cells. The origin of circulating as well as local neurotrophins is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether eosinophils of allergic and non-allergic donors produce, store and release the neurotrophic factors NGF, BDNF and NT-3. Eosinophils were purified by negative immunoselection (purity > 96%) from allergic asthmatics and non-allergic donors (25 to 53 years). The presence of mRNA for neurotrophic factors was evaluated by reverse transcription PCR. Specificity was demonstrated by cloning products and sequencing. Stored NGF, BDNF and NT-3 was demonstrated by Western-blotting and flow cytometry. Eosinophils were incubated and supernatants were collected for measurement of neurotrophic factors after cell stimulation with PAF. Neurotrophin content in eosinophil lysates was determined by ELISA. Eosinophils demonstrate mRNA for neurotrophins. Proteins were detectable by Western blot and FACS analysis. Neurotrophins were found in the eosinophil lysates at different amounts comparing allergic and non-allergic donors. Cell stimulation with PAF (10-8-10-5 M) after priming with GM-CSF leads to a dose-dependant release of NGF and BDNF. Eosinophils store, produce and release NGF, BDNF and NT-3. They are a possible source of elevated neurotrophin levels found in allergy and asthma.

  15. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Vanessa S.; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H.; Mendell, Lorne M.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV–BDNF was significantly more effectiv...

  16. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  17. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Campagnolo, Luisa, E-mail: campagno@med.uniroma2.it [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  18. Presence of Functional Neurotrophin TrkB Receptors in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Valle-Leija

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons express the neurotrophin receptors TrkA, p75NTR, and a non-functional truncated TrkB isoform (TrkB-Tc, but are not thought to express a functional full-length TrkB receptor (TrkB-Fl. We, and others, have demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF modulate synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG of the rat. To clarify whether TrkB is expressed in sympathetic ganglia and contributes to the effects of BDNF upon sympathetic function, we characterized the presence and activity of the neurotrophin receptors expressed in the adult SCG compared with their presence in neonatal and cultured sympathetic neurons. Here, we expand our previous study regarding the immunodetection of neurotrophin receptors. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 19% of adult ganglionic neurons expressed TrkB-Fl immunoreactivity (IR, 82% expressed TrkA-IR, and 51% expressed p75NTR-IR; TrkB-Tc would be expressed in 36% of neurons. In addition, using Western-blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analyses, we confirmed the expression of TrkB-Fl and TrkB-Tc protein and mRNA transcripts in adult SCG. Neonatal neurons expressed significantly more TrkA-IR and TrkB-Fl-IR than p75NTR-IR. Finally, the application of neurotrophin, and high frequency stimulation, induced the activation of Trk receptors and the downstream PI3-kinase (phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase signaling pathway, thus evoking the phosphorylation of Trk and Akt. These results demonstrate that SCG neurons express functional TrkA and TrkB-Fl receptors, which may contribute to the differential modulation of synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity.

  19. Development of primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal nervous system; dependency on neurotrophins and other substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ichikawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents information about the development of primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal nervous system. The deficiency of high affinity receptors for nerve growth factor (trkA and neurotrophin-3 (trk-C causesa reduction of primary nociceptors in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. The disruption of trkB, a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4, causes a loss of Meissner endings in the palate and Ruffini endings in the periodontal ligament. The number of Merkel cells in palatal rugae is also severely reduced by the absence of trkA, trkB or trkC. In the mesencephalic trigeminal tract nucleus (Mes5, primary proprioceptors are decreased by 50% in trkC null mutant mice. On the other hand, the deficiency of Brn-3a, a member of the POU family of transcription factors, decreases primary nociceptors and low-threshold mechanoreceptors in the TG. In the Mes5 of Brn-3a knockout mice, primary proprioceptors are completely lost. In addition, the disruption of dystonin which is a member of the plakin family of high molecular weight cytoskeletal linker proteins causes a reduction of nociceptors in the TG but not proprioceptors in the Mes5. The dependency of primary nociceptors, low-threshold mechanoreceptors and proprioceptors on neurotrophins, Brn-3a and dystonin in the trigeminal nervous system is discussed.

  20. Neurotrophins play differential roles in short and long-term recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Charlotte K; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-09-01

    The neurotrophin family of proteins are believed to mediate various forms of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Here we have assessed the roles of these proteins in object recognition memory in the rat, using icv infusions of function-blocking antibodies or the tyrosine kinase antagonist, tyrphostin AG879, to block Trk receptors. We report that tyrphostin AG879 impairs both short-term and long-term recognition memory, indicating a requirement for Trk receptor activation in both processes. The effect of inhibition of each of the neurotrophins with activity-blocking neutralising antibodies was also tested. Treatment with anti-BDNF, anti-NGF or anti-NT4 had no effect on short-term memory, but blocked long-term recognition memory. Treatment with anti-NT3 had no effect on either process. We also assessed changes in expression of neurotrophins and their respective receptors in the hippocampus, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex over a 24 h period following training in the object recognition task. We observed time-dependent changes in expression of the Trk receptors and their ligands in the dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex. The data are consistent with a pivotal role for neurotrophic factors in the expression of recognition memory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroprotective mechanism of BNG-1 against focal cerebral ischemia: a neuroimaging and neurotrophin study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Fang Chi

    Full Text Available BNG-1 is a herb complex used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat stroke. In this study, we attempted to identify the neuroprotective mechanism of BNG-1 by using neuroimaging and neurotrophin analyses of a stroke animal model. Rats were treated with either saline or BNG-1 for 7 d after 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion by filament model. The temporal change of magnetic resonance (MR imaging of brain was studied using a 7 Tesla MR imaging (MRI system and the temporal expressions of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and nerve growth factor (NGF in brain were analyzed before operation and at 4 h, 2 d, and 7 d after operation. Compared with the saline group, the BNG-1 group exhibited a smaller infarction volume in the cerebral cortex in T2 image from as early as 4 h to 7 d, less edema in the cortex in diffusion weighted image from 2 to 7 d, earlier reduction of postischemic hyperperfusion in both the cortex and striatum in perfusion image at 4 h, and earlier normalization of the ischemic pattern in the striatum in susceptibility weighted image at 2 d. NT-3 and BDNF levels were higher in the BNG-1 group than the saline group at 7 d. We concluded that the protective effect of BNG-1 against cerebral ischemic injury might act through improving cerebral hemodynamics and recovering neurotrophin generation.

  2. A neural model of normal and abnormal learning and memory consolidation: adaptively timed conditioning, hippocampus, amnesia, neurotrophins, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Daniel J; Grossberg, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    How do the hippocampus and amygdala interact with thalamocortical systems to regulate cognitive and cognitive-emotional learning? Why do lesions of thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and cortex have differential effects depending on the phase of learning when they occur? In particular, why is the hippocampus typically needed for trace conditioning, but not delay conditioning, and what do the exceptions reveal? Why do amygdala lesions made before or immediately after training decelerate conditioning while those made later do not? Why do thalamic or sensory cortical lesions degrade trace conditioning more than delay conditioning? Why do hippocampal lesions during trace conditioning experiments degrade recent but not temporally remote learning? Why do orbitofrontal cortical lesions degrade temporally remote but not recent or post-lesion learning? How is temporally graded amnesia caused by ablation of prefrontal cortex after memory consolidation? How are attention and consciousness linked during conditioning? How do neurotrophins, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), influence memory formation and consolidation? Is there a common output path for learned performance? A neural model proposes a unified answer to these questions that overcome problems of alternative memory models.

  3. Impaired JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport promotes amyloid plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2017-10-02

    Lysosomes robustly accumulate within axonal swellings at Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid plaques. However, the underlying mechanisms and disease relevance of such lysosome accumulations are not well understood. Motivated by these problems, we identified JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3) as an important regulator of axonal lysosome transport and maturation. JIP3 knockout mouse neuron primary cultures accumulate lysosomes within focal axonal swellings that resemble the dystrophic axons at amyloid plaques. These swellings contain high levels of amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes (BACE1 and presenilin 2) and are accompanied by elevated Aβ peptide levels. The in vivo importance of the JIP3-dependent regulation of axonal lysosomes was revealed by the worsening of the amyloid plaque pathology arising from JIP3 haploinsufficiency in a mouse model of AD. These results establish the critical role of JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport in regulating amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing and support a model wherein Aβ production is amplified by plaque-induced axonal lysosome transport defects. © 2017 Gowrishankar et al.

  4. Neurotrophin receptor TrkB promotes lung adenocarcinoma metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkevicius, Kerstin W.; Kriegel, Christina; Bellaria, Kelly J.; Lee, Jaewon; Lau, Allison N.; Leeman, Kristen T.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Beede, Alexander M.; Fillmore, Christine M.; Caswell, Deborah; Barrios, Juliana; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sholl, Lynette M.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Chirieac, Lucian R.; Winslow, Monte M.; Haigis, Marcia C.; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is notorious for its ability to metastasize, but the pathways regulating lung cancer metastasis are largely unknown. An in vitro system designed to discover factors critical for lung cancer cell migration identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which stimulates cell migration through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2). Knockdown of TrkB in human lung cancer cell lines significantly decreased their migratory and metastatic ability in vitro and in vivo. In an autochthonous lung adenocarcinoma model driven by activated oncogenic Kras and p53 loss, TrkB deficiency significantly reduced metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 directly regulated TrkB expression, and, in turn, TrkB activated Akt signaling in metastatic lung cancer cells. Finally, TrkB expression was correlated with metastasis in patient samples, and TrkB was detected more often in tumors that did not have Kras or epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. These studies demonstrate that TrkB is an important therapeutic target in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:24982195

  5. Neuroimmune crosstalk in asthma: dual role of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassenstein, Christina; Kammertoens, Thomas; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Uckert, Wolfgang; Spies, Emma; Fuchs, Barbara; Krug, Norbert; Braun, Armin

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma because of their ability to induce airway inflammation and to promote hyperreactivity of sensory neurons, which reflects an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of airway hyperreactivity. Neurotrophins use a dual-receptor system consisting of Trk-receptor tyrosine kinases and the structurally unrelated p75NTR. Previous studies revealed an important role of p75NTR in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. The aim of the study was to investigate the precise mechanisms of neurotrophins in neuroimmune interaction, which can lead to both airway inflammation and sensory nerve hyperreactivity in vivo. Mice selectively expressing p75NTR in immune cells or nerves, respectively, were generated. After sensitization and allergen provocation, hyperreactivity of sensory nerves was tested in response to capsaicin. Airway inflammation was analyzed on the basis of differential cell counts and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Allergic mice selectively expressing p75NTR in immune cells showed normal inflammation but no sensory nerve hyperreactivity, whereas mice selectively expressing p75NTR in nerve cells had a diminished inflammation and a distinct sensory nerve hyperreactivity. Our data indicate that p75NTR plays a dual role by promoting hyperreactivity of sensory nerves and airway inflammation. Additionally, our study provides experimental evidence that development of sensory nerve hyperreactivity depends on an established airway inflammation in asthma. In contrast, development of airway inflammation seems to be independent from sensory nerve hyperreactivity. Because of its dual function, antagonization of p75NTR-mediated signals might be a novel approach in asthma therapy.

  6. Tailor-made purified human platelet lysate concentrated in neurotrophins for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Li; Wu, Joe-Wei; Gouel, Flore; Jonneaux, Aurélie; Timmerman, Kelly; Renn, Ting-Yi; Laloux, Charlotte; Chang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Devos, David; Burnouf, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    Human platelet lysates (PLs), which contain multiple neurotrophins, have been proposed for treating neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). However, current PLs suspended in plasma have high protein content and contain fibrinogen/fibrin and, following activation, also proteolytic and thrombogenic enzymes. Upon brain administration, such PLs may saturate the cerebrospinal fluid and exert neurotoxicity. We assessed whether purified PLs, concentrated in neurotrophins, protected dopaminergic neurons in PD models. Platelet concentrates were collected by apheresis and centrifuged to eliminate plasma and recover the platelets. Platelets were lysed by freeze-thaw cycles, and the 10-fold concentrated platelet pellet lysates (PPLs) were heat-treated (at 56 °C for 30 min). The heat-treated PPLs were low in total proteins, depleted in both plasma and platelet fibrinogen, and devoid of thrombogenic and proteolytic activities. They exerted very high neuroprotective activity when non-oncogenic, Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) cells that had differentiated into dopaminergic neurons were exposed to the MPP(+) neurotoxin. Heat treatment improved the neuroprotection and inactivated the neurotoxic blood-borne hepatitis C virus. PPL did not induce inflammation in BV2 microglial cells and inhibited COX-2 expression upon lipopolysaccharide exposure. Intranasal administration in mice revealed (a) diffusion of neurotrophins in the striatum and cortex, and (b) MPTP intoxication neuroprotection in the substantia nigra and striatum and the absence of neuroinflammation. These dedicated heat-treated PPLs can be a safe and valuable candidate for a therapeutic strategy for PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurotrophins expression is decreased in lungs of human infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon LD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lynn D O'Hanlon, Sherry M Mabry, Ikechukwu I EkekezieChildren's Mercy Hospitals/University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USAObjectives: To evaluate neurotrophin (NT (nerve growth factor [NGF], NT-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] expression in autopsy lung tissues of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH infants versus that of infants that expired with: 1 "normal" lungs (controls; 2 chronic lung disease (CLD; and 3 pulmonary hypertension (PPHN.Hypothesis: NT expression will be significantly altered in CDH lung tissue compared with normal lung tissue and other neonatal lung diseases.Study design: Immunohistochemical studies for NT proteins NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 were applied to human autopsy neonatal lung tissue samples.Subject selection: The samples included a control group of 18 samples ranging from 23-week gestational age to term, a CDH group of 15 samples, a PPHN group of six samples, and a CLD group of 12 samples.Methodology: The tissue samples were studied, and four representative slide fields of alveoli/saccules and four of bronchioles were recorded from each sample. These slide fields were then graded (from 0 to 3 by three blinded observers for intensity of staining.Results: BDNF, NGF, and NT-3 immunostaining intensity scores were significantly decreased in the CDH lung tissue (n=15 compared with normal neonatal lung tissue (n=18 (P<0.001. The other neonatal pulmonary diseases that were studied, CLD and PPHN, were much less likely to be affected and were much more variable in their neurotrophin expression.Conclusion: NT expression is decreased in CDH lungs. The decreased expression of NT in CDH lung tissue may suggest they contribute to the abnormality in this condition.Keywords: nerve growth factor, NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, neurotrophin-3, NT-3, chronic lung disease, persistent pulmonary hypertension, lung

  8. The role of neurotrophins related to stress in saliva and salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Juri; Sato, Sadao; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2010-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well-studied neurotrophins involved in neurogenesis, differentiation, growth, and maintenance of selected peripheral and central populations of neuronal cells during development and adulthood. Neurotrophins, in concert with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, play key roles in modulating brain plasticity and behavioral coping, especially during ontogenetic critical periods, when the developing brain is particularly sensitive to external stimuli. Early life events, such as psychophysical stress, affect NGF and BDNF levels and induce dysregulation of the HPA axis, thereby affecting brain development and contributing to inter-individual differences in vulnerability to stress or psychiatric disorders. Immobilization stress modifies BDNF mRNA expression in some organs. We studied the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF and its receptor tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) in rat submandibular glands, and found increased BDNF expression in duct cells under immobilization stress. Upon further investigation on the influence of salivary glands on plasma BDNF using an acute immobilization stress model, we found that acute immobilization stress lasting 60 min significantly increases the plasma BDNF level. However, plasma BDNF elevation is markedly suppressed in bilaterally sialoadenectomized rats. This suggests that salivary glands may be the primary source of plasma BDNF under acute immobilization stress. This report reviews the structure of salivary glands, the role of neurotrophins in salivary glands, and the significance of BDNF in saliva and salivary glands, followed by a summary of the evidence that indicates the relationship between immobilization stress and BDNF expression within salivary glands.

  9. Evaluating the Role of Neurotrophins in the Psoriasis and Metabolic Syndrome Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Bulur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluate the role of neurotrophins in relation to metabolic syndrome (MetS and psoriasis by determining brain derived neurotrophic hormon (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF and interleukin-6 (IL levels in serum and skin samples of psoriasis patients and healthy controls. Methods: The BDNF, NGF, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were assessed using commercially available ELISA kits. The level of expression BDNF, NGF, TNF-α and IL-6 antibodies was determined by BDNF, NGF, TNF-α and IL-6 Antibodies. Results: Thirty nine psoriasis vulgaris patients without MetS risk factors, 21 patients with psoriasis vulgaris accompanied by MetS and 15 healthy controls were included in the study. The serum BDNF levels, epidermal and the dermal infiltration levels of BDNF were significantly higher in the control group than in the psoriasis patients (p=0.017, p=0.019, p=0.002. There was no difference between the groups in terms of serum NGF, TNF-α and IL-6 levels (p˃0.05, but the infiltration level of NGF in the epidermis was higher in the psoriasis patients than the control group and statistically significant difference was found (p=0.003. Serum BDNF levels, epidermal and dermal BDNF infiltration level and the epidermal NGF staining intensity were similar among psoriasis patient groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The results of our study support the role of neurotrophins in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, serum and tissue BDNF and NGF levels remained unchanged among the psoriasis groups, suggesting that neurotrophins in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis are related to the inflammatory process independently of the metabolic status.

  10. Polypyrrole-Coated Electrodes for the Delivery of Charge and Neurotrophins to Cochlear Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew; Thompson, Brianna; Flynn, Brianna; Atkinson, Patrick; Fretwell, Nicole; Fallon, James; Wallace, Gordon; Shepherd, Rob; Clark, Graeme; O’Leary, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is associated with gradual degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), compromising hearing outcomes with cochlear implant use. Combination of neurotrophin delivery to the cochlea and electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant protects SGNs, prompting research into neurotrophin-eluting polymer electrode coatings. The electrically conducting polypyrrole/para-toluene sulfonate containing neurotrophin-3 (Ppy/pTS/NT3) was applied to 1.7 mm2 cochlear implant electrodes. Ppy/pTS/NT3-coated electrode arrays stored 2 ng NT3 and released 0.1 ng/day with electrical stimulation. Guinea pigs were implanted with Ppy/pTS or Ppy/pTS/NT3 electrode arrays two weeks after deafening via aminoglycosides. The electrodes of a subgroup of these guinea pigs were electrically stimulated for 8 hr/day for 2 weeks. There was a loss of SGNs in the implanted cochleae of guinea pigs with Ppy/pTS-coated electrodes indicative of electrode insertion damage. However, guinea pigs implanted with electrically stimulated Ppy/pTS/NT3-coated electrodes had lower electrically-evoked auditory brainstem response thresholds and greater SGN densities in implanted cochleae compared to non-implanted cochleae and compared to animals implanted with Ppy/pTS-coated electrodes (p<0.05). Ppy/pTS/NT3 did not exacerbate fibrous tissue formation and did not affect electrode impedance. Drug-eluting conducting polymer coatings on cochlear implant electrodes present a clinically viable method to promote preservation of SGNs without adversely affecting the function of the cochlear implant. PMID:19178943

  11. From Molecular to Nanotechnology Strategies for Delivery of Neurotrophins: Emphasis on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géral, Claire; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health problem, but beneficial clinical treatment with neurotrophic factors has not been established yet. The therapeutic use of neurotrophins has been restrained by their instability and rapid degradation in biological medium. A variety of strategies has been proposed for the administration of these leading therapeutic candidates, which are essential for the development, survival and function of human neurons. In this review, we describe the existing approaches for delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is the most abundant neurotrophin in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Biomimetic peptides of BDNF have emerged as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders. Polymer-based carriers have provided sustained neurotrophin delivery, whereas lipid-based particles have contributed also to potentiation of the BDNF action. Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for the design of vehicles for neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Recent developments in nanoscale carriers for encapsulation and transport of BDNF are highlighted. PMID:24300402

  12. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury.

  13. Characterization of p75 neurotrophin receptor expression in human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenru; Kremer, Karlea L; Kaidonis, Xenia; Ludlow, Victoria E; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Xie, Jianling; Proud, Christopher G; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are a heterogeneous stem cell population, which are able to differentiate down neural, chondrocyte, osteocyte and adipocyte lineages. We studied the expression pattern of p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), a marker of neural stem cells, within human DPSC populations from eight donors. p75NTR are expressed at low levels (cell marker), SOX2 (cell pluripotency marker) and nestin (neural stem cell marker) in comparison to p75(-) DPSC. Our results suggest that p75(+) hDPSC may denote a subpopulation with greater neurogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential expression of the neurotrophin receptors p75NTR, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassenstein, Christina; Möhring, Ute Hanna; Luttmann, Werner; Virchow, Johann Christian; Braun, Armin

    2006-06-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. In addition to their influence on afferent sensory nerves within the lung, it has been shown in the last years that these factors modulate allergic airway inflammation. The knowledge about their immunomodulatory roles on diverse subsets of immune cells is still fragmentary and incomplete. Since neurotrophin receptor surface expression is essential for neurotrophin action, the aim of our study was to systematically investigate the expression pattern of the low affinity pan neurotrophin receptor p75NTR as well as the high-affinity receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our results show that each of the receptors has an individual expression pattern in diverse immune cell subtypes. However, there were no differences in neurotrophin receptor expression in healthy controls and patients with allergies.

  15. Genetic Association between Neurotrophin-3 Polymorphisms and Alzheimer's Disease in Japanese Patients

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    Tomoyuki Nagata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some polymorphisms of the neurotrophin family have previously been investigated as candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the present study, we examined whether neurotrophin-3 (NTF-3 polymorphisms are genetic risk factors in patients with AD. Methods: From a sample of 507 subjects, we recruited 248 age-matched subjects divided into 2 groups: AD patients (n = 143 and normal controls (NCs (n = 105. We identified 3 representative NTF-3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: rs6332, rs6489630, and rs4930767. Next, we statistically compared the allele frequencies of each SNP between the AD and NC groups in the early-onset (Results: We found a significant association between rs6332 and the total group of AD patients (p = 0.013 and significant associations between both rs6332 (p = 0.033 and rs6489630 (p = 0.035 and early-onset AD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that NTF-3 SNPs may not only be associated with AD itself, but also with early-onset AD in Japanese patients, assuming that the NTF-3 gene may have age-related effects on neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Neurotrophin blood-based gene expression and social cognition analysis in patients with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Mònica; Pedreño, Carla; Obiols, Jordi; Taurines, Regina; Pàmias, Montserrat; Grünblatt, Edna; Gella, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise neurodevelopmental disorders with clinical onset during the first years of life. The identification of peripheral biomarkers could significantly impact diagnosis and an individualized, early treatment. Although the aetiology of ASD remains poorly understood, there is increasing evidence that neurotrophins and their receptors represent a group of candidate genes for ASD pathophysiology and biomarker research. Total messenger RNA (mRNA) from whole blood was obtained from adolescents and adults diagnosed as ASD (n = 21) according to DSM-IV criteria and confirmed by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithms, as well as healthy controls (n = 10). The mRNA expression of neurotrophins (BDNF, NT3 and NT4) and their receptors (TrkA, TrkB and p75 (NTR) ) was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, social cognition abilities of ASD patients and controls were determined according to three Theory of Mind (ToM) tests (Reading the Mind in the Eyes, Faux pas, and Happé stories). The NT3 and NT4 mRNA expression in the whole blood was significantly lower in ASD compared to healthy controls, while p75(NTR) was higher (P diagnostics and therapy in ASD. Further investigations with larger numbers of samples are needed to verify these results.

  17. [Clinical Applications of Peripheral Markers of Response in Antidepressant Treatment: Neurotrophins and Cytokines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Constanza Mendoza

    2012-03-01

    Explanatory theories of depression have advanced in recent decades from the monoaminergic hypothesis to neurogenesis alterations to the neurohormonal hypothesis that includes the dysfunction of the inflammatory response. Currently there is a growing interest in the development of biomarkers that can contribute to diagnosis and proper treatment. To describe the role of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cytokines in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder in addition to reviewing and analyzing evidence about their clinical application as biomarkers of antidepressant therapy. Relevant data research in several databases. In recent years evidence of alterations in neurogenesis mediated by the expression of BDNF in the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of depression has increased and there is ample evidence that BDNF is a marker of the diagnosis of depressive disorder and also of treatment effectiveness. There is little information about other neurotrophins. There has also been increased interest in relation to depression as an "inflammatory disease" and the link with cytokines in its pathogenesis. Evidence has been found for the usefulness of some cytokines especially IL-1 (interleukin 1), IL-6 (interleukin 6), and TNF (tumor necrosis factor) as biomarkers of antidepressant drug response in humans. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis

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    Meng, Lingjun, E-mail: menglingjun@nibs.ac.cn [College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China); Jin, Wei [Institute for Immunology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Yuhui [Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Health Science Center, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai [National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE −/− mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come. - Highlights: • RIP3 regulate the Nr4a3 to control cytokine production. • Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1a production. • Injection anti-IL-1a antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis. • RIP3 controls macrophage necrotic dead caused inflammation.

  19. Immunohistochemical profile of some neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated by lonidamine

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    M Artico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Lonidamine (LND or [1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl-1H-indazole-3- carboxylic acid] is an anticancer and antispermatogenic drug that exerts a large number of effects on tumor cells and germ cells. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed at 22°C on a 12-h light/12-h dark cycle 1 week before the experiments, with free access to food and water. LND was suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose at a concentration of 10 mg/mL and administered orally at the dose of 10 mL/kg (b.w. as a single dose. Control rats received an equal amount of vehicle. Testes were removed, fixed for 24 h in 2% glutaraldehyde and 2% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M sodium phosphate (pH 7.2 at 22°C, rinsed with the same buffer, and stored at room temperature. From each sample, a block of tissue was removed by sectioning through the organ. After dehydration in ethanol at increasing concentrations (70-100%, each block was embedded in paraffin and serial 5 mm thick sections were cut using a rotatory microtome. The immunoreactivity for NTs has been observed in spermatogonia of untreated rats, while the rats treated with LND showed an immunohistochemical localization in all the stages of germinal cells. The generally well-expressed immunoreactivity for the neurotrophins receptors in treated rats observed in our study is presumably attributable to alterations of the receptors’ structure and/or expression leading to changes of the activity, affinity, localization or protein interactions that may depend on sensitization of ion channels (induced by LND. Neurotrophins (NTs appear to be interesting proteins for the modulation of sperm maturation and motility with a prominent role for the nerve growth factor (NGF, that may exert an autocrine or paracrine role.We therefore investigated the location and distribution of immunoreactivity for some neurotransmitters (SP, VIP, CGRP, nNOS, Chat, neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and their own receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC, p75 in the seminiferous tubules of

  20. Neurotrophins, NMDA receptors, and nitric oxide in development and protection of the auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerman, K; Canlon, B; Duan, M; Ernfors, P

    1999-11-28

    Neurotrophic factors are secreted peptides that when interacting with specific classes of membrane receptors activate intracellular signaling cascades that prevents neuronal death during embryonic development. The establishment of gene-targeted null mutant mice for the neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) has led to the discovery that they are crucial trophic factors for the survival of auditory and vestibular neurons during development. BDNF is the major survival factor for vestibular ganglion neurons, while NT-3 only support a small number of these neurons. In the cochlea, auditory type I neurons require NT3 for their survival, whereas type II neurons depend on BDNF. With this information at hand recent progress has been made regarding the prevention of aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in the adult guinea pig. These results and the mechanisms leading to hair cell damage are discussed in this paper.

  1. Neurotrophin receptor-mediated death of misspecified neurons generated from embryonic stem cells lacking Pax6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Plachta, Nicolas; Allen, Nicolas D; Pinto, Luisa; Götz, Magdalena; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2007-11-01

    Pax6-positive radial glial (RG) cells are the progenitors of most glutamatergic neurons in the cortex, a lineage that can be recapitulated in vitro using embryonic stem (ES) cells. We show here that ES cells lacking Pax6, a transcription factor long known to be essential for cortical development, generate Mash1-positive RG cells that differentiate in GABAergic neurons. These neurons express high levels of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR causing their rapid death. Pax6 function was also investigated following transplantation of ES cells in the developing chick telencephalon and in mice lacking both Pax6 and p75NTR. Taken together, our results indicate that reliable predictions can be made with cultured ES cells when used to explore the role of genes impacting early aspects of mammalian neurogenesis. They also provide a novel opportunity to compare the molecular constituents of glutamatergic with those of GABA-ergic neurons and to explore the mechanisms of their generation.

  2. Neuronal and non-neuronal Trk neurotrophin receptor-like proteins in Eisenia foetida (Annelida Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, C; Castaldo, L; Lamanna, C; Maruccio, L; Vega, J A; Gargiulo, G

    1999-02-19

    The occurrence and distribution of Trk proteins, which are the high-affinity signal-transducing receptors for neurotrophins, have been investigated in earthworms (Eisenia foetida) using polyclonal antibodies which map within their catalytic domain. Western-blot analysis identified major protein bands whose estimated molecular masses were consistent with those of the full-length Trk proteins in vertebrates. Specific immunoreactivity for TrkA-, TrkB-, and TrkC-like was observed in neuronal populations of the dorsal cerebral, subpharyngeal and ventral cord ganglia. Furthermore, TrkA-like immunoreactivity was observed in subcutaneous neurons and nerve fibers between muscle layers in the peripheral nervous system. TrkB- and TrkC-like immunoreactivity was observed in the gut innervation. Non-neuronal expression of TrkB and TrkC proteins was found in epidermal cells, and TrkC-like immunoreactivity was detected in the gut epithelium.

  3. Tryptamine-derived alkaloids from Annonaceae exerting neurotrophin-like properties on primary dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fanny; Le Douaron, Gael; Champy, Pierre; Amar, Majid; Séon-Méniel, Blandine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Figadère, Bruno

    2010-07-15

    N-fatty acyl tryptamines constitute a scarce group of natural compounds mainly encountered in Annonaceous plants. No biological activity was reported so far for these rare molecules. This study investigated the neurotrophic properties of these natural tryptaminic derivatives on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. A structure-activity relationships study led us to precise the role of a nitrogen atom into the aliphatic chain conferring to the compounds a combined neuroprotective and neuritogenic activity in the nanomolar range. The potent antioxidant activity of these natural products seems to be involved in part of their mechanism of action. This study provides the first description of natural neurotrophin mimetics present in Annonaceae extracts, and led to the biological characterization of compounds, which present a potential interest in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Stucky, Cheryl L; McComb, Geoffrey W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2008-10-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3.

  5. Increase in cerebellar neurotrophin-3 and oxidative stress markers in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, Elizabeth M; Xu, Ming; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2009-09-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and language deficits, ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and disturbance in motor functions. Data of imaging, head circumference studies, and Purkinje cell analysis suggest impaired brain growth and development. Both genetic predisposition and environmental triggers have been implicated in the etiology of autism, but the underlying cause remains unknown. Recently, we have reported an increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), a marker of oxidative stress damage to proteins in autistic cerebella. In the present study, we further explored oxidative damage in the autistic cerebellum by measuring 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a marker of DNA modification, in a subset of cases analyzed for 3-NT. We also explored the hypothesis that oxidative damage in autism is associated with altered expression of brain neurotrophins critical for normal brain growth and differentiation. The content of 8-OH-dG in cerebellar DNA isolated by the proteinase K method was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) levels in cerebellar homogenates were measured using NT-3 ELISA. Cerebellar 8-OH-dG showed trend towards higher levels with the increase of 63.4% observed in autism. Analysis of cerebellar NT-3 showed a significant (p = 0.034) increase (40.3%) in autism. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between cerebellar NT-3 and 3-NT (r = 0.83; p = 0.0408). These data provide the first quantitative measure of brain NT-3 and show its increase in the autistic brain. Altered levels of brain NT-3 are likely to contribute to autistic pathology not only by affecting brain axonal targeting and synapse formation but also by further exacerbating oxidative stress and possibly contributing to Purkinje cell abnormalities.

  6. Impaired cerebellar development and function in mice lacking CAPS2, a protein involved in neurotrophin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Kakegawa, Wataru; Mizoguchi, Akira; Washida, Miwa; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Takehito; Nakashima, Hisako; Kimura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Mika; Sekine, Yukiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Nagao, Soichi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2007-03-07

    Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2/CADPS2) is a secretory granule-associated protein that is abundant at the parallel fiber terminals of granule cells in the mouse cerebellum and is involved in the release of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), both of which are required for cerebellar development. The human homolog gene on chromosome 7 is located within susceptibility locus 1 of autism, a disease characterized by several cerebellar morphological abnormalities. Here we report that CAPS2 knock-out mice are deficient in the release of NT-3 and BDNF, and they consequently exhibit suppressed phosphorylation of Trk receptors in the cerebellum; these mice exhibit pronounced impairments in cerebellar development and functions, including neuronal survival, differentiation and migration of postmitotic granule cells, dendritogenesis of Purkinje cells, lobulation between lobules VI and VII, structure and vesicular distribution of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, paired-pulse facilitation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, rotarod motor coordination, and eye movement plasticity in optokinetic training. Increased granule cell death of the external granular layer was noted in lobules VI-VII and IX, in which high BDNF and NT-3 levels are specifically localized during cerebellar development. Therefore, the deficiency of CAPS2 indicates that CAPS2-mediated neurotrophin release is indispensable for normal cerebellar development and functions, including neuronal differentiation and survival, morphogenesis, synaptic function, and motor learning/control. The possible involvement of the CAPS2 gene in the cerebellar deficits of autistic patients is discussed.

  7. Structural Characterization of the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor: A Stranger in the TNFR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, M

    2017-01-01

    Although p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was the founding member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), it is an atypical TNFRSF protein. p75NTR like TNF-R1 and Fas-R contain an extracellular domain with four cysteine-rich domains (CRD) and a death domain (DD) in the intracellular region. While TNFRSF proteins are activated by trimeric TNFSF ligands, p75NTR forms dimers activated by dimeric neurotrophins that are structurally unrelated to TNFSF proteins. In addition, although p75NTR shares with other members the interaction with the TNF receptor-associated factors to activate the NF-κB and cell death pathways, p75NTR does not interact with the DD-containing proteins FADD, TRADD, or MyD88. By contrast, the DD of p75NTR is able to recruit several protein interactors via a full catalog of DD interactions not described before in the TNFRSF. p75-DD forms homotypic symmetrical DD-DD complexes with itself and with the related p45-DD; forms heterotypic DD-CARD interactions with the RIP2-CARD domain, and forms a new interaction between a DD and RhoGDI. All these features, in addition to its promiscuous interactions with several ligands and coreceptors, its processing by α- and γ-secretases, the dimeric nature of its transmembrane domain and its "special" juxtamembrane region, make p75NTR a truly stranger in the TNFR superfamily. In this chapter, I will summarize the known structural aspects of p75NTR and I will analyze from a structural point of view, the similitudes and differences between p75NTR and the other members of the TNFRSF. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Cortical Neurotrophin and Cytogenetic Adaptation after Voluntary Exercise in Normal and Amnestic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary exercise (VEx) has profound effects on neural and behavioral plasticity, including recovery of CNS trauma and disease. However, the unique regional cortical adaption to VEx has not been elucidated. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VEx would restore and retain neurotrophin levels in several cortical regions (frontal cortex [FC], retrosplenial cortex [RSC], occipital cortex [OC]) in an animal model (pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency [PTD]) of the amnestic disorder Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In addition, we assessed the time-dependent effect of VEx to rescue performance on a spontaneous alternation task. Following 2-weeks of VEx or stationary housing conditions (Stat), rats were behaviorally tested and brains were harvested either the day after VEx (24-h) or after an additional two-week period (2-wk). In both control pair-fed (PF) rats and PTD rats, all neurotrophin levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) increased at the 24-h period after VEx in the FC and RSC, but not OC. Two-weeks following VEx, BDNF remained elevated in both FC and RSC, whereas NGF remained elevated in only the FC. Interestingly, VEx only recovered cognitive performance in amnestic rats when there was an additional 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. Given this unique temporal profile, Experiment 2 examined the cortical cytogenetic responses in all three cortical regions following a 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. In healthy (PF) rats, VEx increased the survival of progenitor cells in both the FC and RSC, but only increased oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the FC. Furthermore, VEx had a selective effect of only recovering oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the FC in PTD rats. These data reveal the therapeutic potential of exercise to restore cortical plasticity in the amnestic brain, and that the FC is one of the most responsive cortical regions to VEx. PMID:24215977

  9. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; McComb, Geoffrey W.; Verge, Valerie M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3. PMID:18601922

  10. Reticulon 3-dependent ER-PM contact sites control EGFR nonclathrin endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieri, Giusi; Barbieri, Elisa; Nappo, Gilda; Raimondi, Andrea; Bonora, Massimo; Conte, Alexia; Verhoef, Lisette G G C; Confalonieri, Stefano; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Martini, Emanuele; Mazza, Davide; Pinton, Paolo; Tacchetti, Carlo; Polo, Simona; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Sigismund, Sara

    2017-05-12

    The integration of endocytic routes is critical to regulate receptor signaling. A nonclathrin endocytic (NCE) pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated at high ligand concentrations and targets receptors to degradation, attenuating signaling. Here we performed an unbiased molecular characterization of EGFR-NCE. We identified NCE-specific regulators, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein reticulon 3 (RTN3) and a specific cargo, CD147. RTN3 was critical for EGFR/CD147-NCE, promoting the creation of plasma membrane (PM)-ER contact sites that were required for the formation and/or maturation of NCE invaginations. Ca2+ release at these sites, triggered by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent activation of ER Ca2+ channels, was needed for the completion of EGFR internalization. Thus, we identified a mechanism of EGFR endocytosis that relies on ER-PM contact sites and local Ca2+ signaling. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Sex Differences in Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Related to Neurotrophin Gene Polymorphisms: The Cache County Memory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyi, Joshua; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Rattinger, Gail B; Sanders, Chelsea; Vernon, Elizabeth K; Corcoran, Chris; Kauwe, John S K; Buhusi, Mona

    2017-11-09

    Neurotrophins, including nerve-growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Associations between AD and neurotrophin signaling genes have been inconsistent, with few studies examining sex differences in risk. We examined four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in neurotrophin signaling (rs6265, rs56164415, rs2289656, rs2072446) and risk for AD by sex in a population-based sample of older adults. Three thousand four hundred and ninety-nine individuals without dementia at baseline [mean (standard deviation) age = 74.64 (6.84), 58% female] underwent dementia screening and assessment over four triennial waves. Cox regression was used to examine time to AD or right censoring for each SNP. Female carriers of the minor T allele for rs2072446 and rs56164415 had a 60% (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-2.51) and 93% (HR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.30-2.84) higher hazard for AD, respectively, than male noncarriers of the T allele. Furthermore, male carriers of the T allele of rs2072446 had a 61% lower hazard (HR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.14-1.06) than male noncarriers at trend-level significance (p = .07). The association between certain neurotrophin gene polymorphisms and AD differs by sex and may explain inconsistent findings in the literature. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Improved axonal regeneration of transected spinal cord mediated by multichannel collagen conduits functionalized with neurotrophin-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, L; Daly, W; Newland, B; Yao, S; Wang, W; Chen, B K K; Madigan, N; Windebank, A; Pandit, A

    2013-12-01

    Functionalized biomaterial scaffolds targeted at improving axonal regeneration by enhancing guided axonal growth provide a promising approach for the repair of spinal cord injury. Collagen neural conduits provide structural guidance for neural tissue regeneration, and in this study it is shown that these conduits can also act as a reservoir for sustained gene delivery. Either a G-luciferase marker gene or a neurotrophin-3-encoding gene, complexed to a non-viral, cyclized, PEGylated transfection vector, was loaded within a multichannel collagen conduit. The complexed genes were then released in a controlled fashion using a dual release system both in vitro and in vivo. For evaluation of their biological performance, the loaded conduits were implanted into the completely transected rat thoracic spinal cord (T8-T10). Aligned axon regeneration through the channels of conduits was observed one month post-surgery. The conduits delivering neurotrophin-3 polyplexes resulted in significantly increased neurotrophin-3 levels in the surrounding tissue and a statistically higher number of regenerated axons versus the control conduits (Pspinal cord.

  13. Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao injection protects against cerebral ischemia by activating neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Alesheikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao, containing the active components Panax notoginseng and Gardenia jasminoides, has recently been patented and is in use clinically. It is known to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia, but the underlying pathway remains poorly understood. In the present study, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and administered Tongluo Jiunao, a positive control (Xuesai Tong, containing Panax notoginseng or saline intraperitoneally to investigate the pathway involved in the action of Tongluo Jiunao injection. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining showed that the cerebral infarct area was significantly smaller in model rats that received Tongluo Jiunao than in those that received saline. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed significantly greater expression of neurotrophin 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in ischemic cerebral tissue, and serum levels of neurotrophin 3, in the Tongluo Jiunao group than in the saline group. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining showed that after treatment with Tongluo Jiunao or Xuesai Tong, tropomyosin-related kinase C gene expression and immunoreactivity were significantly elevated compared with saline, with the greatest expression observed after Tongluo Jiunao treatment. These findings suggest that Tongluo Jiunao injection exerts a neuroprotective effect in rats with cerebral ischemia by activating the neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway.

  14. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duricki, Denise A; Hutson, Thomas H; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Shine, H David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C R; Gage, Fred H; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Pre-reproductive maternal enrichment influences offspring developmental trajectories: motor behavior and neurotrophin expression

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    Paola eCaporali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment is usually applied immediately after weaning or in adulthood, with strong effects on CNS anatomy and behavior. To examine the hypothesis that a pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of females could affect the motor development of their offspring, female rats were reared in an enriched environment from weaning to sexual maturity, while other female rats used as controls were reared under standard conditions. Following mating with standard-reared males, all females were housed individually. To evaluate the eventual transgenerational influence of positive pre-reproductive maternal experiences, postural and motor development of male pups was analyzed from birth to weaning. Moreover, expression of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Nerve Growth Factor in different brain regions was evaluated at birth and weaning.Pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of females affected the offspring motor development, as indicated by the earlier acquisition of complex motor abilities displayed by the pups of enriched females. The earlier acquisition of motor abilities was associated with enhanced neurotrophin levels in striatum and cerebellum. In conclusion, maternal positive experiences were transgenerationally transmitted, and influenced offspring phenotype at both behavioral and biochemical levels.

  16. Pre-reproductive maternal enrichment influences offspring developmental trajectories: motor behavior and neurotrophin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Gelfo, Francesca; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Mancini, Laura; Angelucci, Francesco; Petrosini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is usually applied immediately after weaning or in adulthood, with strong effects on CNS anatomy and behavior. To examine the hypothesis that a pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of females could affect the motor development of their offspring, female rats were reared in an enriched environment from weaning to sexual maturity, while other female rats used as controls were reared under standard conditions. Following mating with standard-reared males, all females were housed individually. To evaluate the eventual transgenerational influence of positive pre-reproductive maternal experiences, postural and motor development of male pups was analyzed from birth to weaning. Moreover, expression of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Nerve Growth Factor in different brain regions was evaluated at birth and weaning. Pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of females affected the offspring motor development, as indicated by the earlier acquisition of complex motor abilities displayed by the pups of enriched females. The earlier acquisition of motor abilities was associated with enhanced neurotrophin levels in striatum and cerebellum. In conclusion, maternal positive experiences were transgenerationally transmitted, and influenced offspring phenotype at both behavioral and biochemical levels.

  17. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duricki, Denise A.; Hutson, Thomas H.; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Shine, H. David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C.; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C. R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. PMID:26614754

  18. Neurotrophin-3 restores synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pineda, Victor G; Torres-Cruz, Francisco M; Vivar-Cortés, César I; Hernández-Echeagaray, Elizabeth

    2018-02-17

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is expressed in the mouse striatum; however, it is not clear the NT-3 role in striatal physiology. The expression levels of mRNAs and immune localization of the NT-3 protein and its receptor TrkC are altered in the striatum following damage induced by an in vivo treatment with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial toxin used to mimic the histopathological hallmarks of Huntington's disease (HD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of NT-3 on corticostriatal synaptic transmission and its plasticity in both the control and damaged striatum. Corticostriatal population spikes were electrophysiologically recorded and striatal synaptic plasticity was induced by high-frequency stimulation. Further, the phosphorylation status of Trk receptors was tested under conditions that imitated electrophysiological experiments. NT-3 modulates both synaptic transmission and plasticity in the striatum; nonetheless, synaptic plasticity was modified by the 3-NP treatment, where instead of producing striatal long-term depression (LTD), long-term potentiation (LTP) was obtained. Moreover, the administration of NT-3 in the recording bath restored the plasticity observed under control conditions (LTD) in this model of striatal degeneration. NT-3 modulates corticostriatal transmission through TrkB stimulation and restores striatal LTD by signaling through its TrkC receptor. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Jiao, Xiaodan; Ashtari, Niloufar; Afsharinezhad, Pegah; Ghavami, Saeid; Marzban, Hassan

    2016-01-15

    Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) mouse (nax--naked-ataxia mutant mouse) correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc) degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR) plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5). In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  20. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

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    Maryam Rahimi Balaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2 mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5. In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  1. Effects of omega-3 supplementation on interleukin and neurotrophin levels in an animal model of schizophrenia

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    ALEXANDRA I. ZUGNO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNew studies suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as omega-3, may reduce the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study evaluated the preventive effect of omega-3 on interleukines (IL and neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in the brains of young rats subjected to a model of schizophrenia. Treatment was performed over 21 days, starting on the 30th day of rat's life. After 14 days of treatment with omega-3 or vehicle, a concomitant treatment with saline or ketamine (25 mg/kg was started and maintained until the last day of the experiment. BDNF levels in the rat's prefrontal cortex were decreased at 1 h and 24 h after the last administration of ketamine, whereas the group administered with ketamine and omega-3 showed a decrease in BDNF levels only after 24 h. In contrast, both interventions induced similar responses in levels of IL-1β and IL6. These findings suggest that the similarity of IL-1β and IL6 levels in our experimental groups is due to the mechanism of action of ketamine on the immune system. More studies have to be carried out to explain this pathology. In conclusion, according to previous studies and considering the current study, we could suggest a prophylactic role of omega-3 against the outcome of symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  2. Coseeded Schwann cells myelinate neurites from differentiated neural stem cells in neurotrophin-3-loaded PLGA carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Cheng-Guang; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Guo-Long; Li, Man-Hui; Zhang, Wei; Quan, Da-Ping; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials and neurotrophic factors represent promising guidance for neural repair. In this study, we combined poly-(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to generate NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers in vitro. Bioactive NT-3 was released stably and constantly from PLGA conduits for up to 4 weeks. Neural stem cells (NSCs) and Schwann cells (SCs) were coseeded into an NT-releasing scaffold system and cultured for 14 days. Immunoreactivity against Map2 showed that most of the grafted cells (>80%) were differentiated toward neurons. Double-immunostaining for synaptogenesis and myelination revealed the formation of synaptic structures and myelin sheaths in the coculture, which was also observed under electron microscope. Furthermore, under depolarizing conditions, these synapses were excitable and capable of releasing synaptic vesicles labeled with FM1-43 or FM4-64. Taken together, coseeding NSCs and SCs into NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, developed synaptic connections, exhibited synaptic activities, and myelination of neurites by the accompanying SCs. These results provide an experimental basis that supports transplantation of functional neural construction in spinal cord injury. PMID:22619535

  3. Increased expression of neurotrophin 4 following focal cerebral ischemia in adult rat brain with treadmill exercise.

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    Jin-Young Chung

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin 4 (NT-4 belongs to the family of neurotrophic factors, and it interacts with the tyrosine kinase B (trkB receptor. NT-4 has neuroprotective effects following cerebral ischemia. Its role might be similar to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, because both interact with trkB. Exercise also improves neural function by increasing neurotrophic factors. However, expression profiles of NT-4 in the brain during exercise are unknown. Here, we assessed the expressions of NT-4 and its receptor, trkB, following cerebral ischemia and hypothesized that exercise changes the expressions of NT-4 and trkB. Results showed that in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion rat model, ischemia decreased NT-4 and trkB expression. Immunohistochemistry showed their immunoreactivities around the region of the ischemic area. Treadmill exercise changed the expression of NT-4, which increased in the contralateral hemisphere in rats with ischemic injury. TrkB also showed similar patterns to its neurotophins. The change in NT-4 suggested that exercise might have primed NT4 production so that further injury causes slightly greater increases in NT4 compared with non-exercise controls.

  4. C3-dependent mechanism of microglial priming relevant to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Hughes, Timothy R; Donev, Rossen M; Ruseva, Marieta M; Wu, Xiaobo; Huitinga, Inge; Baas, Frank; Neal, James W; Morgan, B Paul

    2012-01-17

    Microglial priming predisposes the brain to neurodegeneration and affects disease progression. The signal to switch from the quiescent to the primed state is unknown. We show that deleting the C3 convertase regulator complement receptor 1-related protein y (Crry) induces microglial priming. Mice that were double-knockout for Crry and either C3 or factor B did not show priming, demonstrating dependence on alternative pathway activation. Colocalization of C3b/iC3b and CR3 implicated the CR3/iC3b interaction in priming. Systemic lipopolysaccharide challenge overactivated primed microglia with florid expression of proinflammatory molecules, which were blocked by complement inhibition. Relevance for neurodegenerative disease is exemplified by human multiple sclerosis (MS) and by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. In human MS, microglial priming was evident in perilesional white matter, in close proximity to C3b/iC3b deposits. EAE was accelerated and exacerbated in Crry-deficient mice, and was dependent on C activation. In summary, C3-dependent microglial priming confers susceptibility to other challenges. Our observations are relevant to progression in MS and other neurological diseases exacerbated by acute insults.

  5. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophin-3 levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Toker, Aysun; Işık, Ümit; Kılınç, İbrahim

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurotrophins are involved in the etiopathogenesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and neurotrophin-3 (NTF3) levels between children with ADHD and healthy controls. A total of 110 treatment-naive children with the combined presentation of ADHD and 44 healthy controls aged 8-18 years were enrolled in this study. The severity of ADHD symptoms was determined by scores on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised Short and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised Short. The severity of depression and anxiety symptoms of the children were evaluated by the self-report inventories. Serum levels of neurotrophins were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed a significant main effect of groups in the levels of serum neurotrophins, an effect that was independent of age, sex, and the severity of the depression and anxiety. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that the mean serum GDNF and NTF3 levels of ADHD patients were significantly higher than that of controls. However, serum BDNF and NGF levels did not show any significant differences between groups. No correlations between the levels of serum neurotrophins and the severity of ADHD were observed. These results suggest that elevated serum GDNF and NTF3 levels may be related to ADHD in children.

  6. Excessive astrocyte-derived neurotrophin-3 contributes to the abnormal neuronal dendritic development in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

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    Qi Yang

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation in humans that results from expansion of a CGG repeat in the Fmr1 gene. Recent studies suggest a role of astrocytes in neuronal development. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation process of astrocytes from FXS remain unclear. In this study, we found that astrocytes derived from a Fragile X model, the Fmr1 knockout (KO mouse which lacks FMRP expression, inhibited the proper elaboration of dendritic processes of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM from KO astrocytes inhibited proper dendritic growth of both wild-type (WT and KO neurons. Inducing expression of FMRP by transfection of FMRP vectors in KO astrocytes restored dendritic morphology and levels of synaptic proteins. Further experiments revealed elevated levels of the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 in KO ACM and the prefrontal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice. However, the levels of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF were normal. FMRP has multiple RNA-binding motifs and is involved in translational regulation. RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP showed the NT-3 mRNA interacted with FMRP in WT astrocytes. Addition of high concentrations of exogenous NT-3 to culture medium reduced the dendrites of neurons and synaptic protein levels, whereas these measures were ameliorated by neutralizing antibody to NT-3 or knockdown of NT-3 expression in KO astrocytes through short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs. Prefrontal cortex microinjection of WT astrocytes or NT-3 shRNA infected KO astrocytes rescued the deficit of trace fear memory in KO mice, concomitantly decreased the NT-3 levels in the prefrontal cortex. This study indicates that excessive NT-3 from astrocytes contributes to the abnormal neuronal dendritic development and that astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target for FXS.

  7. Nimodipine activates TrkB neurotrophin receptors and induces neuroplastic and neuroprotective signaling events in the mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimäki, Janne; Matsui, Nobuaki; Umemori, Juzoh; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2015-03-01

    The L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine improves clinical outcome produced by delayed cortical ischemia or vasospasm associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. While vasoactive mechanisms are strongly implicated in these therapeutic actions of nimodipine, we sought to test whether nimodipine might also regulate neurotrophic and neuroplastic signaling events associated with TrkB neurotrophin receptor activation. Adult male mice were acutely treated with vehicle or nimodipine (10 mg/kg, s.c., 1.5 h) after which the phosphorylation states of TrkB, cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) and p70S6 kinase (p70S6k) from prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed. Nimodipine increased the phosphorylation of the TrkB catalytic domain and the phosphoslipase-Cγ1 (PLCγ1) domain, whereas phosphorylation of the TrkB Shc binding site remained unaltered. Nimodipine-induced TrkB phosphorylation was associated with increased phosphorylation levels of Akt and CREB in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus whereas phosphorylation of ERK, mTor and p70S6k remained unaltered. Nimodipine-induced TrkB signaling was not associated with changes in BDNF mRNA or protein levels. These nimodipine-induced changes on TrkB signaling mimic those produced by antidepressant drugs and thus propose common mechanisms and long-term functional consequences for the effects of these medications. This work provides a strong basis for investigating the role of TrkB-associated signaling underlying the neuroprotective and neuroplastic effects of nimodipine in translationally relevant animal models of brain trauma or compromised synaptic plasticity.

  8. Effects of palatable cafeteria diet on cognitive and noncognitive behaviors and brain neurotrophins' levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Daniela D; Valvassori, Samira S; Varela, Roger B; Lopes-Borges, Jésica; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza M; Dajori, Ana Luiza F; Quevedo, João; Andrade, Vanessa M

    2015-08-01

    The consumption of palatable high-fat and high-sugar foods have increased dramatically over the past years. Overconsumption of calorically dense food contributes to increasing rates of overweight and obesity that are associated with psychiatry disorders, in particular mood and anxiety disorders. This study evaluated the impact of palatable cafeteria diet (CAF) intake on cognitive and noncognitive behaviors, as well as identified factors related to these behaviors through an evaluation of brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF, NGF, and GDNF) levels in hippocampus of mice. Male Swiss mice received two different diets during 13 weeks: standard chow (STA) and highly CAF. Posteriorly, forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), plus-maze test (PMT), open-field tests (OFT), and object recognition task (ORT) were utilized as behavioral tests. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) neurotrophins' levels were evaluated in hippocampus of mice. The results demonstrated that mice from the CAF group showed a decrease in the immobility time in the FST and TST. Besides, mice in the CAF group spent more time in the open arms of the PMT. No significant differences were observed in the cognitive behaviors, which were evaluated in the OFT and ORT. In addition, the CAF group showed that BDNF and NGF protein levels increased in the hippocampus of mice. In conclusion, our data suggest that the consumption of palatable high-fat and high-sugar foods induces antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like behaviors, which can be related with BDNF and NGF expression increases in hippocampus of mice in the CAF group.

  9. Functional hallmarks of GABAergic synapse maturation and the diverse roles of neurotrophins

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    Rosemarie eGrantyn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the adult brain can result from deficits in the ontogeny of GABAergic synaptic transmission. Gene defects underlying autism spectrum disorders, Rett’s syndrome or some forms of epilepsy, but also a diverse set of syndromes accompanying perinatal trauma, hormonal imbalances, intake of sleep-inducing or mood-improving drugs or, quite common, alcohol intake during pregnancy can alter GABA signaling early in life. The search for therapeutically relevant endogenous molecules or exogenous compounds able to alleviate the consequences of dysfunction of GABAergic transmission in the embryonic or postnatal brain requires a clear understanding of its site- and state-dependent development. At the level of single synapses, it is necessary to discriminate between presynaptic and postsynaptic alterations, and to define parameters that can be regarded as both suitable and accessible for the quantification of developmental changes. Here we focus on the performance of GABAergic synapses in two brain structures, the hippocampus and the superior colliculus, describe some novel aspects of neurotrophin effects during the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission and examine the applicability of the following rules: 1 Synaptic transmission starts with GABA, 2 Nascent/immature GABAergic synapses operate in a ballistic mode (multivesicular release, 3 Immature synaptic terminals release vesicles with higher probability than mature synapses, 4 Immature GABAergic synapses are prone to paired pulse and tetanic depression, 5 Synapse maturation is characterized by an increasing dominance of synchronous over asynchronous release, 6 In immature neurons GABA acts as a depolarizing transmitter, 7 Synapse maturation implies IPSC shortening due to an increase in alpha1 subunit expression, 8 Extrasynaptic (tonic conductances can inhibit the development of synaptic (phasic GABA actions.

  10. Dysregulated brain immunity and neurotrophin signaling in Rett syndrome and autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Athanassiou, Marianna; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Doyle, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder, which occurs in about 1:15,000 females and presents with neurologic and communication defects. It is transmitted as an X-linked dominant linked to mutations of the methyl-CpG-binding protein (MeCP2), a gene transcription suppressor, but its definitive pathogenesis is unknown thus hindering development of effective treatments. Almost half of children with Rett syndrome also have behavioral symptoms consistent with those of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). PubMed was searched (2005-2014) using the terms: allergy, atopy, brain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cytokines, gene mutations, inflammation, mast cells (MCs), microglia, mitochondria, neurotensin (NT), neurotrophins, seizures, stress, and treatment. There are a number of intriguing differences and similarities between Rett syndrome and ASDs. Rett syndrome occurs in females, while ASDs more often in males, and the former has neurologic disabilities unlike ASDs. There is evidence of dysregulated immune system early in life in both conditions. Lack of microglial phagocytosis and decreased levels of BDNF appear to distinguish Rett syndrome from ASDs, in which there is instead microglia activation and/or proliferation and possibly defective BDNF signaling. Moreover, brain mast cell (MC) activation and focal inflammation may be more prominent in ASDs than Rett syndrome. The flavonoid luteolin blocks microglia and MC activation, provides BDNF-like activity, reverses Rett phenotype in mouse models, and has a significant benefit in children with ASDs. Appropriate formulations of luteolin or other natural molecules may be useful in the treatment of Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are neurotrophins-proteins that induce the survival, development, and function of neurons. Their role in the development of schizophrenia and mood disorders is widely studied. This study was aimed to determine whether depression affects levels of BDNF and NT-3 in patients with schizophrenia. Data for 53 Caucasian adult hospitalized patients with chronic paranoid schizophrenia was compared with 27 healthy subjects. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and positive, negative and general sub-scores, the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). Patients were defined as depressed (SHZ-DEP) with scores CDSS > 6 and HDRS > 7, otherwise they were included into the non-depressed group (SHZ-nonDEP). In total, 17 patients (32.1%) with schizophrenia met criteria for depression. SHZ-DEP patients had higher scores in HDRS, CDSS, PANSS total, PANSS negative, PANSS general and CGI (p BDNF or NT-3 levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. BDNF levels were lower in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 18.82 ± 5.95 versus 22.10 ± 5.31 ng/mL, p = 0.045. NT-3 levels were higher in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 133.31 ± 222.19 versus 56.04 ± 201.28 pg/mL, p = 0.033. There were no differences in neurotrophin levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. We found lower BDNF and higher NT-3 serum levels in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

  12. Intervention effects of ganoderma lucidum spores on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of neurotrophin-4 and N-cadherin.

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    Shu-Qiu Wang

    Full Text Available Epilepsy can cause cerebral transient dysfunctions. Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has shown some antiepileptic effects in our previous studies. This was the first study of the effects of GLS on cultured primary hippocampal neurons, treated with Mg(2+ free medium. This in vitro model of epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons allowed us to investigate the anti-epileptic effects and mechanism of GLS activity. Primary hippocampal neurons from <1 day old rats were cultured and their morphologies observed under fluorescence microscope. Neurons were confirmed by immunofluorescent staining of neuron specific enolase (NSE. Sterile method for GLS generation was investigated and serial dilutions of GLS were used to test the maximum non-toxic concentration of GLS on hippocampal neurons. The optimized concentration of GLS of 0.122 mg/ml was identified and used for subsequent analysis. Using the in vitro model, hippocampal neurons were divided into 4 groups for subsequent treatment i control, ii model (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours, iii GLS group I (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium containing GLS for 3 hours and replaced with normal medium and incubated for 6 hours and iv GLS group II (neurons incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours then replaced with a normal medium containing GLS for 6 hours. Neurotrophin-4 and N-Cadherin protein expression were detected using Western blot. The results showed that the number of normal hippocampal neurons increased and the morphologies of hippocampal neurons were well preserved after GLS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of neurotrophin-4 was significantly increased while the expression of N-Cadherin was decreased in the GLS treated group compared with the model group. This data indicates that GLS may protect hippocampal neurons by promoting neurotrophin-4 expression and inhibiting N-Cadherin expression.

  13. Naturally occurring tyrosine kinase inserts block high affinity binding of phospholipase C gamma and Shc to TrkC and neurotrophin-3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, M; Gunn-Moore, F J; Glass, D J; Geis, D R; Yancopoulos, G D; Tavaré, J M

    1995-09-01

    Neurotrophin-3 binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkC. Several naturally occurring splice variants of TrkC exist including those with 14- and 39-amino acid inserts within the tyrosine kinase homology region. When expressed in fibroblasts, full-length TrkC, but not the kinase insert variants, mediated neurotrophin-3-stimulated cell proliferation. We investigated the molecular basis of this signaling defect. The kinase inserts blocked the ability of TrkC to mediate neurotrophin-3 stimulated c-myc and c-fos transcription and activation of the AP-1 transcriptional complex. In cells expressing full-length TrkC, neurotrophin-3 promoted a sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase; TrkC containing kinase inserts only mediated transient activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. The kinase inserts specifically blocked neurotrophin-3-stimulated autophosphorylation of the phospholipase C gamma binding site on TrkC (tyrosine 789) resulting in a severe reduction in phospholipase C gamma association with TrkC and its tyrosine phosphorylation. Neurotrophin-3-stimulated phosphorylation of the Shc binding site (tyrosine 485) on TrkC, and tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc itself, was unaffected by the kinase inserts; however, the kinase inserts blocked high affinity Shc association with TrkC. It is proposed that the lack of high affinity binding of Shc and/or phospholipase C gamma to the TrkC kinase insert variants may be responsible for the inability of these variants to bring about a full biological response in fibroblasts.

  14. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  15. Extinction-induced "despair" in aged and adult rats: links to neurotrophins in frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Bianca; Huston, Joseph P; Namestkova, Katerina; Zhu, Shun-Wei; Mohammed, Abdul H; Schulz, Daniela

    2008-10-01

    In the search for animal models of human geriatric depression, we found that operant extinction of escape from water results in the expression of immobility in different age groups, indicative of behavioral "despair", which was also associated with the resistance-to-extinction (RTE) expressed by these animals. With respect to the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression, nerve-growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) protein levels in frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus (HP) were examined and related to behavioral immobility and RTE in the water maze in aged and adult Wistar rats. Age-related increases in levels of NGF were found in HP and of NT-3 in FC. Indices of immobility showed relationships in the aged with NGF and, in adults, with BDNF, pointing to a dissociation of neurotrophic involvement in extinction trial-induced "despair" in aged and adult rats. The present results support the hypothesis, that extinction-induced immobility in the water maze reflects a state akin to behavioral despair and point to age-related differences of neurotrophic involvement in depressive-like symptoms. The concept of extinction-induced behavioral "despair" in the aged subsumes several aspects of human geriatric depression, such as co-morbidity of learning impairment and anxiety, and, thus could represent a useful paradigm to examine the neuronal mechanisms underlying depression, especially in aged rodents.

  16. Effects of Hura crepitans and its active ingredient, daphne factor F3, on dihydrotestosterone-induced neurotrophin-4 activation and hair retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Chiyoko; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Takuya; Naito, Atsushi; Kurita, Kei; Hanihara, Hiroyuki; Serizawa, Tetsushi; Fujiwara, Masami; Ohdera, Motoyasu

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophin (NT)-4 is known to be an inducer of catagen in the hair cycle, but little is known of its role in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). We previously studied the gene expression of dermal papilla cells from AGA patients and controls and found that NT-4 was up-regulated in the AGA patients. In the present study, the etiological relationship between NT-4 and androgen, which is one of the causes of AGA, and the effect of an NT-4 inhibitor on hair growth were investigated. We established a NT-4 luciferase reporter assay system using a roughly 2-kb region upstream of the NT-4 transcriptional start site and investigated an accelerating effect of androgen on NT-4 transcription. We also screened for a NT-4 inhibitor by using the NT-4 reporter assay and evaluated the effects of NT-4 inhibitors on hair growth by using dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-implanted mice. The results show that transcriptional activity of NT-4 was accelerated by androgen, and extract of Hura crepitans L. inhibited the DHT-induced NT-4 transcriptional activation and ameliorated the retardation of hair regrowth by DHT-implanted mice. We also isolated the active ingredient in H. crepitans and found its structure to be that of 6,7-epoxy-5-hydroxyresiniferonol-14-(2,4-tetradecadienoate), i.e., daphne factor F3. These findings demonstrated that NT-4 activity accelerated by androgen might contribute to the pathogenesis of AGA and indicated that NT-4 inhibitors such as H. crepitans and daphne factor F3 might have a salutary effect on AGA.

  17. Emergence and evolution of the glycoprotein hormone and neurotrophin gene families in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Sandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three vertebrate pituitary glycoprotein hormones (GPH are heterodimers of a common α and a specific β subunit. In human, they are located on different chromosomes but in a similar genomic environment. We took advantage of the availability of genomic and EST data from two cartilaginous fish species as well as from two lamprey species to identify their repertoire of neurotrophin, lin7 and KCNA gene family members which are in the close environment of gphβ. Gphα and gphβ are absent outside vertebrates but are related to two genes present in both protostomes and deuterostomes that were named gpa2 and gpb5. Genomic organization and functional characteristics of their protein products suggested that gphα and gphβ might have been generated concomitantly by a duplication of gpa2 and gpb5 just prior to the radiation of vertebrates. To have a better insight into this process we used new genomic resources and tools to characterize the ancestral environment before the duplication occurred. Results An almost similar repertoire of genes was characterized in cartilaginous fishes as in tetrapods. Data in lampreys are either incomplete or the result of specific duplications and/or deletions but a scenario for the evolution of this genomic environment in vertebrates could be proposed. A number of genes were identified in the amphioxus genome that helped in reconstructing the ancestral environment of gpa2 and gpb5 and in describing the evolution of this environment in vertebrates. Conclusion Our model suggests that vertebrate gphα and gphβ were generated by a specific local duplication of the ancestral forms of gpa2 and gpb5, followed by a translocation of gphβ to a new environment whereas gphα was retained in the gpa2-gpb5 locus. The two rounds of whole genome duplication that occurred early in the evolution of vertebrates generated four paralogues of each gene but secondary gene losses or lineage specific duplications together

  18. Neurotrophin p75 receptor (p75NTR) promotes endothelial cell apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis: implications for diabetes-induced impaired neovascularization in ischemic limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caporali, Andrea; Pani, Elisabetta; Horrevoets, Anton J. G.; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Meloni, Marco; Cristofaro, Brunella; Graiani, Gallia; Leroyer, Aurelie S.; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Spinetti, Gaia; Yoon, Sung Ok; Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes impairs endothelial function and reparative neovascularization. The p75 receptor of neurotrophins (p75(NTR)), which is scarcely present in healthy endothelial cells (ECs), becomes strongly expressed by capillary ECs after induction of peripheral ischemia in type-1 diabetic mice. Here, we

  19. Interaction networks of lithium and valproate molecular targets reveal a striking enrichment of apoptosis functional clusters and neurotrophin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Schulze, T G; Nagarajan, V; Akula, N; Corona, W; Jiang, X-y; Hunter, N; McMahon, F J; Detera-Wadleigh, S D

    2012-08-01

    The overall neurobiological mechanisms by which lithium and valproate stabilize mood in bipolar disorder patients have yet to be fully defined. The therapeutic efficacy and dissimilar chemical structures of these medications suggest that they perturb both shared and disparate cellular processes. To investigate key pathways and functional clusters involved in the global action of lithium and valproate, we generated interaction networks formed by well-supported drug targets. Striking functional similarities emerged. Intersecting nodes in lithium and valproate networks highlighted a strong enrichment of apoptosis clusters and neurotrophin signaling. Other enriched pathways included MAPK, ErbB, insulin, VEGF, Wnt and long-term potentiation indicating a widespread effect of both drugs on diverse signaling systems. MAPK1/3 and AKT1/2 were the most preponderant nodes across pathways suggesting a central role in mediating pathway interactions. The convergence of biological responses unveils a functional signature for lithium and valproate that could be key modulators of their therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Study of the profile of the neurotrophin BDNF in new leprosy cases before, during and after multidrug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin involved in the survival of neurons and growth and differentiation of dendrites and axons. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate plasma levels of BDNF of leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug therapy (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals. Plasma levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at diagnosis, during and after MDT. Plasma levels of BDNF tended to be higher in control subjects in comparison with leprosy patients, but this difference does not reach statistical significance. Interestingly, BDNF levels changed following MDT, achieving statistical difference only at the 2nd dose of MDT. These results indicate that BDNF may not be a surrogate marker of leprosy infection and/or related neuropathy. Further research is needed to investigate the meaning of BDNF level changes following leprosy treatment.

  1. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Vanessa S; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H; Mendell, Lorne M

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV-BDNF was significantly more effective than AAV-NT-3 in eliciting locomotion. In fact, AAV-BDNF-treated rats displayed plantar, weight-supported hindlimb stepping on a stationary platform, that is, without the assistance of a moving treadmill and without step training. Rats receiving AAV-NT-3 or AAV-GFP were incapable of hindlimb stepping during this task, despite provision of balance support. AAV-NT-3 treatment did promote the recovery of treadmill-assisted stepping, but this required continuous perineal stimulation. In addition, AAV-BDNF-treated rats were sensitized to noxious heat, whereas AAV-NT-3-treated and AAV-GFP-treated rats were not. Notably, AAV-BDNF-treated rats also developed hindlimb spasticity, detracting from its potential clinical applicability via the current viral delivery method. Intracellular recording from triceps surae motoneurons revealed that AAV-BDNF significantly reduced motoneuron rheobase, suggesting that AAV-BDNF promoted the recovery of over-ground stepping by enhancing neuronal excitability. Elevated nuclear c-Fos expression in interneurons located in the L2 intermediate zone after AAV-BDNF treatment indicated increased activation of interneurons in the vicinity of the locomotor central pattern generator. AAV-NT-3 treatment reduced motoneuron excitability, with little change in c-Fos expression. These results support the potential for BDNF delivery at the lesion site to reorganize locomotor circuits. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of

  2. A Role for the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor in Axonal Degeneration and Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Bradley R.; Snow, John P.; Vollbrecht, Peter; Pathak, Amrita; Valentine, William M.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Carter, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) mediates the death of specific populations of neurons during the development of the nervous system or after cellular injury. The receptor has also been implicated as a contributor to neurodegeneration caused by numerous pathological conditions. Because many of these conditions are associated with increases in reactive oxygen species, we investigated whether p75NTR has a role in neurodegeneration in response to oxidative stress. Here we demonstrate that p75NTR signaling is activated by 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a lipid peroxidation product generated naturally during oxidative stress. Exposure of sympathetic neurons to HNE resulted in neurite degeneration and apoptosis. However, these effects were reduced markedly in neurons from p75NTR−/− mice. The neurodegenerative effects of HNE were not associated with production of neurotrophins and were unaffected by pretreatment with a receptor-blocking antibody, suggesting that oxidative stress activates p75NTR via a ligand-independent mechanism. Previous studies have established that proteolysis of p75NTR by the metalloprotease TNFα-converting enzyme and γ-secretase is necessary for p75NTR-mediated apoptotic signaling. Exposure of sympathetic neurons to HNE resulted in metalloprotease- and γ-secretase-dependent cleavage of p75NTR. Pharmacological blockade of p75NTR proteolysis protected sympathetic neurons from HNE-induced neurite degeneration and apoptosis, suggesting that cleavage of p75NTR is necessary for oxidant-induced neurodegeneration. In vivo, p75NTR−/− mice exhibited resistance to axonal degeneration associated with oxidative injury following administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. Together, these data suggest a novel mechanism linking oxidative stress to ligand-independent cleavage of p75NTR, resulting in axonal fragmentation and neuronal death. PMID:24939843

  3. Exposure to road traffic enhances allergic skin wheal responses and increases plasma neuropeptides and neurotrophins in patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    The effect of exposure to road traffic was studied by sitting on chairs for 30 min beside a road with heavy wheeled traffic. Exposure to road traffic enhanced allergen-induced, but not histamine-induced, skin wheal responses in 26 patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome, while it had no effect on skin wheal responses in 26 normal subjects. Exposure to road traffic also increased plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophin-3 in patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome, while it had no effect on these plasma parameters in normal subjects. Collectively, exposure to road traffic may aggravate allergic diseases by enhancing allergic responses with concomitant increase in plasma levels of neuropeptides and neurotrophins.

  4. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Kolarow, Richard; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Munsch, Thomas; Zehendner, Christoph; Brigadski, Tanja; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin-induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthas...

  5. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Richard eKolarow; Richard eKolarow; Christoph eKuhlmann; Thomas eMunsch; Christoph eZehendner; Tanja eBrigadski; Tanja eBrigadski; Heiko J Luhmann; Volkmar eLessmann; Volkmar eLessmann

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthase...

  6. Neil3-dependent base excision repair regulates lipid metabolism and prevents atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; Holm, Sverre; Scheffler, Katja

    2016-01-01

    an atherogenic lipid profile, increased hepatic triglyceride levels and attenuated macrophage cholesterol efflux capacity. Apoe-/- Neil3-/- mice showed marked alterations in several pathways affecting hepatic lipid metabolism, but no genotypic alterations in genome integrity or genome-wide accumulation...... of oxidative DNA damage. These results suggest a novel role for the DNA glycosylase Neil3 in atherogenesis in balancing lipid metabolism and macrophage function, potentially independently of genome-wide canonical base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage....

  7. Brucella Dysregulates Monocytes and Inhibits Macrophage Polarization through LC3-Dependent Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is caused by infection with Brucella species and exhibits diverse clinical manifestations in infected humans. Monocytes and macrophages are not only the first line of defense against Brucella infection but also a main reservoir for Brucella. In the present study, we examined the effects of Brucella infection on human peripheral monocytes and monocyte-derived polarized macrophages. We showed that Brucella infection led to an increase in the proportion of CD14++CD16− monocytes and the expression of the autophagy-related protein LC3B, and the effects of Brucella-induced monocytes are inhibited after 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment. Additionally, the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α from monocytes in patients with brucellosis was suppressed through the LC3-dependent autophagy pathway during Brucella infection. Moreover, Brucella infection inhibited macrophage polarization. Consistently, the addition of 3-MA, an inhibitor of LC3-related autophagy, partially restored macrophage polarization. Intriguingly, we also found that the upregulation of LC3B expression by rapamycin and heat-killed Brucella in vitro inhibits M2 macrophage polarization, which can be reversed partially by 3-MA. Taken together, these findings reveal that Brucella dysregulates monocyte and macrophage polarization through LC3-dependent autophagy. Thus, targeting this pathway may lead to the development of new therapeutics against Brucellosis.

  8. Neurotrophin receptors TrkA and TrkC cause neuronal death whereas TrkB does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Lickert, Heiko; Frade, José Maria; Rencurel, Chantal; Giallonardo, Patrizia; Zhang, Lixin; Bibel, Miriam; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2010-09-02

    Neurons of the peripheral nervous system have long been known to require survival factors to prevent their death during development. But why they selectively become dependent on secretory molecules has remained a mystery, as is the observation that in the central nervous system, most neurons do not show this dependency. Using engineered embryonic stem cells, we show here that the neurotrophin receptors TrkA and TrkC (tropomyosin receptor kinase A and C, also known as Ntrk1 and Ntrk3, respectively) instruct developing neurons to die, both in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, TrkB (also known as Ntrk2), a closely related receptor primarily expressed in the central nervous system, does not. These results indicate that TrkA and TrkC behave as dependence receptors, explaining why developing sympathetic and sensory neurons become trophic-factor-dependent for survival. We suggest that the expansion of the Trk gene family that accompanied the segregation of the peripheral from the central nervous system generated a novel mechanism of cell number control.

  9. Neurotrophin-3 Is a Novel Angiogenic Factor Capable of Therapeutic Neovascularization in a Mouse Model of Limb Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, Brunella; Stone, Oliver A.; Caporali, Andrea; Dawbarn, David; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Reyes, Morayma; Madeddu, Paolo; Bates, David O.; Emanueli, Costanza

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the novel hypothesis that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), an established neurotrophic factor that participates in embryonic heart development, promotes blood vessel growth. Methods and Results We evaluated the proangiogenic capacity of recombinant NT-3 in vitro and of NT-3 gene transfer in vivo (rat mesenteric angiogenesis assay and mouse normoperfused adductor muscle). Then, we studied whether either transgenic or endogenous NT-3 mediates postischemic neovascularization in a mouse model of limb ischemia. In vitro, NT-3 stimulated endothelial cell survival, proliferation, migration, and network formation on the basement membrane matrix Matrigel. In the mesenteric assay, NT-3 increased the number and size of functional vessels, including vessels covered with mural cells. Consistently, NT-3 overexpression increased muscular capillary and arteriolar densities in either the absence or the presence of ischemia and improved postischemic blood flow recovery in mouse hind limbs. NT-3–induced microvascular responses were accompanied by tropomyosin receptor kinase C (an NT-3 high-affinity receptor) phosphorylation and involved the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt kinase–endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway. Finally, endogenous NT-3 was shown to be essential in native postischemic neovascularization, as demonstrated by using a soluble tropomyosin receptor kinase C receptor domain that neutralizes NT-3. Conclusion Our results provide the first insight into the proangiogenic capacity of NT-3 and propose NT-3 as a novel potential agent for the treatment of ischemic disease. PMID:20360537

  10. Neurotrophin, p75, and Trk Signaling Module in the Developing Nervous System of the Marine Annelid Platynereis dumerilii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, neurotrophic signaling plays an important role in neuronal development, neural circuit formation, and neuronal plasticity, but its evolutionary origin remains obscure. We found and validated nucleotide sequences encoding putative neurotrophic ligands (neurotrophin, NT and receptors (Trk and p75 in two annelids, Platynereis dumerilii (Errantia and Capitella teleta (Sedentaria, for which some sequences were found recently by Wilson, 2009. Predicted protein sequences and structures of Platynereis neurotrophic molecules reveal a high degree of conservation with the vertebrate counterparts; some amino acids signatures present in the annelid Trk sequences are absent in the basal chordate amphioxus, reflecting secondary loss in the cephalochordate lineage. In addition, expression analysis of NT, Trk, and p75 during Platynereis development by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization supports a role of these molecules in nervous system and circuit development. These annelid data corroborate the hypothesis that the neurotrophic signaling and its involvement in shaping neural networks predate the protostome-deuterostome split and were present in bilaterian ancestors.

  11. Effects of Electroacupuncture at Governor Vessel Acupoints on Neurotrophin-3 in Rats with Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-ping Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to explore new, noninvasive treatment options for spinal cord injuries (SCI, this study investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA for SCI rat models. SCI was induced by a modified Allen’s weight-drop method. We investigated the response of EA at Dazhui (GV 14 and Mingmen (GV 4 acupoints to understand the effects and mechanisms of EA in neuroprotection and neuronal function recovery after SCI. BBB testing was used to detect motor function of rats’ hind limbs among groups, and EA was shown to promote the recovery of SCI rats’ motor function. Nissl staining showed a restored neural morphology and an increase in the quantity of neurons after EA. Also, the antiapoptosis role was exposed by TUNEL staining. Western blotting analysis was used to determine the protein expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 in spinal cord tissue. Compared to the sham group, the expression levels of NT-3 were significantly decreased and EA was shown to upregulate the expression of NT-3. The present study suggests that the role of EA in neuroprotection and dorsal neuronal function recovery after SCI in rats, especially EA stimulation at GV 14 and GV 4, can greatly promote neuronal function recovery, which may result from upregulating the expression of NT-3.

  12. Expression of Neurotrophin-3 and trkC following Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Adult Rat Brain with Treadmill Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 is a neurotrophic factor that mainly binds to the tyrosine kinase C (trkC receptor. NT-3 has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in focal cerebral ischemia. Exercise also has ability to induce functional recovery in focal cerebral ischemia. However, the relationship between NT-3, its receptor trkC, and exercise has not been revealed. In this study, we assessed the expressions of NT-3 and trkC in focal cerebral ischemia. We also assessed the expression of NT-3 and trkC with treadmill exercise in focal cerebral ischemia. The results showed that, in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion rat model, exercise increased NT-3 and trkC expression. However, the patterns of expression of NT-3 and trkC at different time points varied. These results suggest that exercise-induced functional recovery in focal cerebral ischemia was related to NT-3 and trkC, but the role on times of NT-3 and trkC differed, although trkC is the receptor kinase for NT-3.

  13. Imaging galectin-3 dependent endocytosis with lattice light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jongho; Lou, Jieqiong; Coelho, Simao; Lim, Yean Jin; Seidlitz, Silvia; Nicovich, Philip R.; Wunder, Christian; Johannes, Ludger; Gaus, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    Lattice light-sheet (LLS) microscopy provides ultrathin light sheets of a two-dimensional optical lattice that allows us imaging three-dimensional (3D) objects for hundreds of time points at sub-second intervals and at or below the diffraction limit. Galectin-3 (Gal3), a carbohydrate-binding protein, triggers glycosphingolipid (GSL)-dependent biogenesis of morphologically distinct endocytic vesicles that are cargo specific and clathrin independent. In this study, we apply LLS microscopy to study the dynamics of Gal3 dependent endocytosis in live T cells. This will allow us to observe Gal3-mediated endocytosis at high temporal and excellent 3D spatial resolution, which may shed light on our understanding of the mechanism and physiological function of Gal3-induced endocytosis.

  14. Nerve growth factor regulates the firing patterns and synaptic composition of motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-López de Carrizosa, María A; Morado-Díaz, Camilo J; Morcuende, Sara; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Pastor, Angel M

    2010-06-16

    Target-derived neurotrophins exert powerful synaptotrophic actions in the adult brain and are involved in the regulation of different forms of synaptic plasticity. Target disconnection produces a profound synaptic stripping due to the lack of trophic support. Consequently, target reinnervation leads to synaptic remodeling and restoration of cellular functions. Extraocular motoneurons are unique in that they normally express the TrkA neurotrophin receptor in the adult, a feature not seen in other cranial or spinal motoneurons, except after lesions such as axotomy or in neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We investigated the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) by retrogradely delivering this neurotrophin to abducens motoneurons of adult cats. Axotomy reduced the density of somatic boutons and the overall tonic and phasic firing modulation. Treatment with NGF restored synaptic inputs and firing modulation in axotomized motoneurons. When K252a, a selective inhibitor of tyrosine kinase activity, was applied to specifically test TrkA effects, the NGF-mediated restoration of synapses and firing-related parameters was abolished. Discharge variability and recruitment threshold were, however, increased by NGF compared with control or axotomized motoneurons. Interestingly, these parameters returned to normal following application of REX, an antibody raised against neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)). In conclusion, NGF, acting retrogradely through TrkA receptors, supports afferent boutons and regulates the burst and tonic signals correlated with eye movements. On the other hand, p75(NTR) activation regulates recruitment threshold, which impacts on firing regularity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing powerful synaptotrophic effects of NGF on motoneurons in vivo.

  15. Neurotrophins and cognitive functions in T1D compared with healthy controls: effects of a high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoli, Cajsa; Heyman, Elsa; Buyse, Luk; Roelands, Bart; Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Bailey, Stephen; Pattyn, Nathalie; Berthoin, Serge; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is known to have beneficial effects on cognitive function. This effect is greatly favored by an exercise-induced increase in neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), especially with high-intensity exercises (HIE). As a complication of type 1 diabetes (T1D), a cognitive decline may occur, mostly ascribed to hypoglycaemia and chronic hyperglycaemia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute HIE on cognitive function and neurotrophins in T1D and matched controls. Ten trained T1D (8 males, 2 females) participants and their matched (by age, sex, fitness level) controls were evaluated on 2 occasions after familiarization: a maximal test to exhaustion and an HIE bout (10 intervals of 60 s at 90% of their maximal wattage followed by 60 s at 50 W). Cognitive tests and analyses of serum BDNF, IGF-1, and free insulin were performed before and after HIE and following 30 min of recovery. At baseline, cognitive performance was better in the controls compared with the T1D participants (p < 0.05). After exercise, no significant differences in cognitive performance were detected. BDNF levels were significantly higher and IGF-1 levels were significantly lower in T1D compared with the control group (p < 0.05) at all time points. Exercise increased BDNF and IGF-1 levels in a comparable percentage in both groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, although resting levels of serum BDNF and IGF-1 were altered by T1D, comparable increasing effects on BDNF and IGF-1 in T1D and healthy participants were found. Therefore, regularly repeating acute HIE could be a promising strategy for brain health in T1D.

  16. Immunohistochemical location of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosue, Takahiro; Kawano, Shintaro; Matsubara, Ryota; Goto, Yuichi; Hirano, Mitsuhiro; Jinno, Teppei; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Kitamura, Ryoji; Oobu, Kazunari; Nakamura, Seiji

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a useful marker of keratinocyte stem cells. Although the stem cell markers of original normal tissue have been used to identify cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, the expression and function of p75NTR have been poorly understood in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The objective of this study is, thus, to examine p75NTR expression immunohistochemically in oral leukoplakia (OL), the most frequent precancerous lesion, and OSCC, and to reveal the usefulness of p75NTR as a marker for undifferentiated cancer cells and a novel prognostic factor for OSCC patients. In this study immunohistochemical expression of p75NTR, Ki-67, cytokeratin (CK) 5, and CK14 was examined in 112 cases of OL and 81 of OSCC. The labeling indices (LIs) of p75NTR and Ki-67 were calculated, and the association of these LIs with histopathologic characteristics was then evaluated. In the normal oral epithelium and OL, p75NTR was expressed only in the basal layer, and its LI was invariant, irrespective of the extent of epithelial dysplasia. In OSCC, however, p75NTR-LI was significantly increased in association with upgrading of histologic grade and mode of tumor invasion. Furthermore, the prognosis of the high p75NTR-LI group (LI ≥ 53.1%) was poorer than that of the low p75NTR-LI group (LI < 53.1%). These results suggest that p75NTR is expressed in undifferentiated cell populations in OL and OSCC. Furthermore, p75NTR is possibly involved in invasion and poor prognosis in OSCC.

  17. Riluzole protects Huntington disease patients from brain glucose hypometabolism and grey matter volume loss and increases production of neurotrophins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squitieri, Ferdinando; Orobello, Sara; Cannella, Milena; Martino, Tiziana [IRCCS Neuromed, Neurogenetics Unit and Centre for Rare Disease, Pozzilli (Italy); Romanelli, Pantaleo [IRCCS Neuromed, Department of Neurosurgery, Pozzilli (Italy); Giovacchini, Giampiero; Ciarmiello, Andrea [S. Andrea Hospital, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, La Spezia (Italy); Frati, Luigi [University ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Mansi, Luigi [Second University of Naples, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    Huntington disease (HD) mutation increases gain-of-toxic functions contributing to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. Riluzole interferes with glutamatergic neurotransmission, thereby reducing excitotoxicity, enhancing neurite formation in damaged motoneurons and increasing serum concentrations of BDNF, a brain cortex neurotrophin protecting striatal neurons from degeneration. We investigated metabolic and volumetric differences in distinct brain areas between 11 riluzole-treated and 12 placebo-treated patients by MRI and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) PET scanning, according to fully automated protocols. We also investigated the influence of riluzole on peripheral growth factor blood levels. Placebo-treated patients showed significantly greater proportional volume loss of grey matter and decrease in metabolic FDG uptake than patients treated with riluzole in all cortical areas (p<0.05). The decreased rate of metabolic FDG uptake correlated with worsening clinical scores in placebo-treated patients, compared to those who were treated with riluzole. The progressive decrease in metabolic FDG uptake observed in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex correlated linearly with the severity of motor scores calculated by Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS-I) in placebo-treated patients. Similarly, the rate of metabolic changes in the frontal and temporal areas of the brain cortex correlated linearly with worsening behavioural scores calculated by UHDRS-III in the placebo-treated patients. Finally, BDNF and transforming growth factor beta-1 serum levels were significantly higher in patients treated with riluzole. The linear correlation between decreased metabolic FDG uptake and worsening clinical scores in the placebo-treated patients suggests that FDG-PET may be a valuable procedure to assess brain markers of HD. (orig.)

  18. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Yin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9, a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11 with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection enhances apoptosis in vivo through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun; de Brito Bezerra, Beatriz; Pacios, Sandra; Andriankaja, Oelisoa; Li, Yu; Tsiagbe, Vincent; Schreiner, Helen; Fine, Daniel H; Graves, Dana T

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that diabetes aggravates periodontal destruction induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection. Thirty-eight diabetic and 33 normal rats were inoculated with A. actinomycetemcomitans and euthanized at baseline and at 4, 5, and 6 weeks after inoculation. Bone loss and the infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in gingival epithelium were measured in hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections. The induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and of apoptotic cells by a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) assay. After A. actinomycetemcomitans infection, the bone loss in diabetic rats was 1.7-fold and the PMN infiltration 1.6-fold higher than in normoglycemic rats (P infection in gingival epithelium and connective tissue (P periodontal destruction in rats by significantly increasing the inflammatory response, leading to increased bone loss and enhancing apoptosis of gingival epithelial and connective tissue cells through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism. Antibiotics had a more pronounced effect on many of these parameters in diabetic than in normoglycemic rats, suggesting a deficiency in the capacity of diabetic animals to resist infection.

  1. Identification of novel small molecules that inhibit STAT3-dependent transcription and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Kolosenko

    Full Text Available Activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 has been linked to several processes that are critical for oncogenic transformation, cancer progression, cancer cell proliferation, survival, drug resistance and metastasis. Inhibition of STAT3 signaling has shown a striking ability to inhibit cancer cell growth and therefore, STAT3 has become a promising target for anti-cancer drug development. The aim of this study was to identify novel inhibitors of STAT-dependent gene transcription. A cellular reporter-based system for monitoring STAT3 transcriptional activity was developed which was suitable for high-throughput screening (Z' = 0,8. This system was used to screen a library of 28,000 compounds (the ENAMINE Drug-Like Diversity Set. Following counter-screenings and toxicity studies, we identified four hit compounds that were subjected to detailed biological characterization. Of the four hits, KI16 stood out as the most promising compound, inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity in response to IL6 stimulation. In silico docking studies showed that KI16 had favorable interactions with the STAT3 SH2 domain, however, no inhibitory activity could be observed in the STAT3 fluorescence polarization assay. KI16 inhibited cell viability preferentially in STAT3-dependent cell lines. Taken together, using a targeted, cell-based approach, novel inhibitors of STAT-driven transcriptional activity were discovered which are interesting leads to pursue further for the development of anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  2. The sea urchin animal pole domain is a Six3-dependent neurogenic patterning center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Yaguchi, Junko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Angerer, Robert C; Angerer, Lynne M

    2009-04-01

    Two major signaling centers have been shown to control patterning of sea urchin embryos. Canonical Wnt signaling in vegetal blastomeres and Nodal signaling in presumptive oral ectoderm are necessary and sufficient to initiate patterning along the primary and secondary axes, respectively. Here we define and characterize a third patterning center, the animal pole domain (APD), which contains neurogenic ectoderm, and can oppose Wnt and Nodal signaling. The regulatory influence of the APD is normally restricted to the animal pole region, but can operate in most cells of the embryo because, in the absence of Wnt and Nodal, the APD expands throughout the embryo. We have identified many constituent APD regulatory genes expressed in the early blastula and have shown that expression of most of them requires Six3 function. Furthermore, Six3 is necessary for the differentiation of diverse cell types in the APD, including the neurogenic animal plate and immediately flanking ectoderm, indicating that it functions at or near the top of several APD gene regulatory networks. Remarkably, it is also sufficient to respecify the fates of cells in the rest of the embryo, generating an embryo consisting of a greatly expanded, but correctly patterned, APD. A fraction of the large group of Six3-dependent regulatory proteins are orthologous to those expressed in the vertebrate forebrain, suggesting that they controlled formation of the early neurogenic domain in the common deuterostome ancestor of echinoderms and vertebrates.

  3. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA induces caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma ASTC-a-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Lei

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydroartemisinin (DHA, a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, is recommended as the first-line anti-malarial drug with low toxicity. DHA has been shown to possess promising anticancer activities and induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways, although the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Methods In this study, cell counting kit (CCK-8 assay was employed to evaluate the survival of DHA-treated ASTC-a-1 cells. The induction of apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33258 and PI staining as well as flow cytometry analysis. Collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm was measured by dynamic detection under a laser scanning confocal microscope and flow cytometry analysis using Rhodamine123. Caspase-3 activities measured with or without Z-VAD-fmk (a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor pretreatment by FRET techniques, caspase-3 activity measurement, and western blotting analysis. Results Our results indicated that DHA induced apoptotic cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was accompanied by mitochondrial morphology changes, the loss of ΔΨm and the activation of caspase-3. Conclusion These results show for the first time that DHA can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via caspase-3-dependent mitochondrial death pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells. Our work may provide evidence for further studies of DHA as a possible anticancer drug in the clinical treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) levels in post-mortem brain tissue from patients with depression compared to healthy individuals 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheldrick, A; Camara, S; Ilieva, M

    2017-01-01

    suggests that antidepressant treatment may improve or normalise cerebral concentrations of neurotrophic factors. Therefore, we examined the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) in different brain regions (cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, hippocampus, putamen...... treatment and overall age 84.3±5 years versus 14 unaffected subjects at age 70.3±13.8. We detected significant elevation of BDNF (parietal cortex) and NT3 (parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, putamen and nucleus caudatus regions) in MDD patients who received antidepressant...

  5. Ginsenoside Rg1 promotes proliferation and neurotrophin expression of olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Feng; Shen, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Peng; Xu, You-Jia; Fan, Zhi-Hai; Cheng, Mao-Hua; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2010-04-01

    Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) is currently considered to be one of the most promising repair strategies for human spinal cord injury. However, the factors that regulate OECs are still poorly understood. Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), the phytosterol from Panax ginseng, is a potent neuroprotective agent that promotes axonal regeneration. The aim of this study is to determine whether Rg1 would influence the biological activity of OECs. Primary cultured OECs from the olfactory bulb of neonatal rats were treated with Rg1 of various concentrations and durations. Using MTT and bromodeoxyuridine assays, we found that Rg1 significantly promoted cell proliferation, with an optimal concentration of 40 mug/ml of Rg1 at 72 h. In addition, RT-PCR and ELISA assays showed that Rg1 could upregulate the mRNA expression and secretion of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and nerve growth factor. These results suggest that Rg1 may have a great potential in OEC therapy.

  6. Transcriptome and phenotypic analysis reveals Gata3-dependent signalling pathways in murine hair follicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Kurek (Dorota); G.A. Garinis (George); J.H. van Doorninck (Hikke); J. van der Wees (Jacqueline); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The transcription factor Gata3 is crucially involved in epidermis and hair follicle differentiation. Yet, little is known about how Gata3 co-ordinates stem cell lineage determination in skin, what pathways are involved and how Gata3 differentially regulates distinct cell

  7. C3-dependent mechanism of microglial priming relevant to multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Hughes, Timothy R.; Donev, Rossen M.; Ruseva, Marieta M.; Wu, Xiaobo; Huitinga, Inge; Baas, Frank; Neal, James W.; Morgan, B. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Microglial priming predisposes the brain to neurodegeneration and affects disease progression. The signal to switch from the quiescent to the primed state is unknown. We show that deleting the C3 convertase regulator complement receptor 1-related protein y (Crry) induces microglial priming. Mice

  8. The influence of inhalative corticosteroids on circulating Nerve Growth Factor, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-3 in allergic asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Hanf, G; Schäper, C; O'Connor, A; Kunkel, G

    2001-12-01

    The neurotrophins Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin (NT)-3 are produced, stored and released by various immunological cells. The influence of NTs upon the function of these cells is described. Elevated plasma levels were found in inflammatory, autoimmune and allergic diseases with the highest levels in allergic asthma. A connection between bronchial hyper-responsiveness and serum levels has been reported. Little is known about the influence of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on serum NT levels and their influence on the asthmatic state. Eighty-seven volunteers were studied. Thirty-eight were stable allergic asthmatics with constant ICS doses, 29 were asthmatics not receiving anti-asthmatic treatment and 20 were age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Demographic and lung function data were evaluated. NT serum levels were determined by ELISA. NGF and BDNF levels were significantly increased in untreated asthmatics compared to the control and the treated group, while NT-3 demonstrated significantly higher levels in treated asthmatics compared to healthy controls. After stabilization of untreated subjects with ICS, the NT levels decreased significantly. These results suggest that NTs participate in allergic inflammation and asthma. Effective treatment leads to a decrease of circulating neurotrophic factors.

  9. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated neurotrophin gene transfer in the injured adult rat spinal cord improves hind-limb function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blits, B; Oudega, M; Boer, G J; Bartlett Bunge, M; Verhaagen, J

    2003-01-01

    To foster axonal growth from a Schwann cell bridge into the caudal spinal cord, spinal cells caudal to the implant were transduced with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (AAV-NT-3). Control rats received AAV vectors encoding for green fluorescent protein or saline. AAV-BDNF- and AAV-NT-3-transduced 293 human kidney cells produced and secreted BDNF or NT-3, respectively, in vitro. The secreted neurotrophins were biologically active; they both promoted outgrowth of sensory neurites in vitro. In vivo, transgene expression was observed predominantly in neurons for at least 16 weeks after injection. Compared with controls, a modest though significant improvement in hind-limb function was found in rats that received AAV-BDNF and AAV-NT-3. Retrograde tracing demonstrated that twice as many neurons with processes extending toward the Schwann cell graft were present in the second lumbar cord segment of AAV-BDNF- and AAV-NT-3-injected animals compared with controls. We found no evidence, however, for growth of regenerated axons from the Schwann cell implant into the caudal cord. Our results suggest that AAV vector-mediated overexpression of BDNF and NT-3 in the cord caudal to a Schwann cell bridge modified the local lumbar axonal circuitry, which was beneficial for locomotor function.

  10. Amitriptyline improves motor function via enhanced neurotrophin signaling and mitochondrial functions in the murine N171-82Q Huntington disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wei-Na; Chadwick, Wayne; Wang, Rui; Daimon, Caitlin M; Cai, Huan; Amma, Jennifer; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin G; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Hereditary HD is primarily caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin (Htt) gene, which results in the production of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with an expanded amino-terminal polyglutamine (poly(Q)) stretch. Besides pathological mHTT aggregation, reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, impaired neurotrophin signaling, and compromised mitochondrial functions also contribute to the deleterious progressive etiology of HD. As a well tolerated Food and Drug Administration-approved antidepressant, amitriptyline (AMI) has shown efficacy in treating neurodegenerative murine models via potentiation of BDNF levels and amelioration of alterations in neurotrophin signaling pathways. In this study, we observed profound improvements in the motor coordination of AMI-treated N171-82Q HD model mice. The beneficial effects of AMI treatment were associated with its ability to reduce mHTT aggregation, potentiation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling system, and support of mitochondrial integrity and functionality. Our study not only provides preclinical evidence for the therapeutic potency of AMI in treating HD, but it also represents an important example of the usefulness of additional pharmacogenomic profiling of pre-existing drugs for novel therapeutic effects with often intractable pathological scenarios. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Effect of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in rats: A multigeneration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Richa S; Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids are important nutrients required for neuronal functioning. We have demonstrated the beneficial effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in the first and second generation offspring. However, there is a need to examine if the effects are sustained in the third generation offspring. This study reports the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across three consecutive generations on brain neurotrophins like brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); nerve growth factor (NGF) and cognitive performance in the third generation male offspring. Three successive generations of Wistar rats were assigned the following groups throughout pregnancy, lactation and adulthood: i) Control, ii) vitamin B12 deficient (BD), iii) vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid (BDO), iv) vitamin B12 supplemented (BS) and v) vitamin B12 supplemented + omega-3 fatty acid (BSO). The BD group demonstrated lower (p Vitamin B12 supplementation showed comparable BDNF levels in the hippocampus while their levels were lower in the cortex as compared to the control (p vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid showed higher (p vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids in improving brain development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. A HaloTag® method for assessing the retrograde axonal transport of the p75 neurotrophin receptor and other proteins in compartmented cultures of rat sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Sue-Ann; Lund, Karen; Lapointe, Paul; Campenot, Robert B

    2013-03-30

    We have adapted HaloTag® (HT) technology for use in compartmented cultures of rat sympathetic neurons in order to provide a technique that can be broadly applied to studies of the retrograde transport of molecules that play roles in neurotrophin signaling. Transfected neurons expressing HT protein alone, HT protein fused to the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) or HT protein fused to tubulin α-1B were maintained in compartmented cultures in which cell bodies and proximal axons of rat sympathetic neurons reside in proximal compartments and their distal axons extend into distal compartments. HT ligand containing a fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) label was applied either in the distal compartments or the proximal compartments, and the transport of labeled proteins was assayed by gel fluorescence imaging and TMR immunoblot. HT protein expressed alone displayed little or no retrograde transport. HT protein fused to either the intracellular C-terminus or the extracellular N-terminus of p75NTR was retrogradely transported. The retrograde transport of p75NTR was augmented when the distal axons were provided with nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or antibodies to BDNF. The anterograde transport of HT protein fused to the N-terminus of tubulin α-1B was also demonstrated. We conclude that retrograde transport of HT fusion proteins provides a powerful and novel approach in studies of axonal transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Leptin Protects Host Cells from Entamoeba histolytica Cytotoxicity by a STAT3-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans P.; Paul, Shom N.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Petri, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The adipocytokine leptin links nutritional status to immune function. Leptin signaling protects from amebiasis, but the molecular mechanism is not understood. We developed an in vitro model of ameba-host cell interaction to test the hypothesis that leptin prevents ameba-induced apoptosis in host epithelial cells. We demonstrated that activation of mammalian leptin signaling increased cellular resistance to amebic cytotoxicity, including caspase-3 activation. Exogenous expression of the leptin receptor conferred resistance in susceptible cells, and leptin stimulation enhanced protection. A series of leptin receptor signaling mutants showed that resistance to amebic cytotoxicity was dependent on activation of STAT3 but not the Src homology-2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) or STAT5. A common polymorphism in the leptin receptor (Q223R) that increases susceptibility to amebiasis in humans and mice was found to increase susceptibility to amebic cytotoxicity in single cells. The Q223R polymorphism also decreased leptin-dependent STAT3 activation by 21% relative to that of the wild-type (WT) receptor (P = 0.035), consistent with a central role of STAT3 signaling in protection. A subset of genes uniquely regulated by STAT3 in response to leptin was identified. Most notable were the TRIB1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) genes, which have opposing roles in the regulation of apoptosis. Overall apoptotic genes were highly enriched in this gene set (P leptin regulation of host apoptotic genes via STAT3 is responsible for protection. This is the first demonstration of a mammalian signaling pathway that restricts amebic pathogenesis and represents an important advance in our mechanistic understanding of how leptin links nutrition and susceptibility to infection. PMID:22331430

  14. Dynamic interplay between O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hart, Gerald W

    2007-08-01

    O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine side chains of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins is dynamically regulated in response to various environmental and biological stimuli. O-GlcNAcylation is remarkably similar to O-phosphorylation and appears to have a dynamic interplay with O-phosphate in cellular regulation. A systematic glycoproteomics analysis of the affects of inhibiting specific kinases on O-GlcNAcylation should help reveal both the global and specific dynamic relationships between these two abundant post-translational modifications. Here we report the O-GlcNAc perturbations in response to inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a pivotal kinase involved in many signaling pathways. By combining immunoaffinity chromatography and SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture)-based quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified 45 potentially O-GlcNAcylated proteins. Quantitative measurements indicated that at least 10 proteins had an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition by lithium, whereas surprisingly 19 other proteins showed decreases. O-GlcNAcylation changes on a subset of the proteins were confirmed by follow-up experiments. By combining a new O-GlcNAc peptide enrichment method and beta-elimination followed by Michael addition with DTT, we also mapped the O-GlcNAc site (Ser-55) of vimentin, which showed an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition. Based on the MS data, we further investigated potential roles of O-GlcNAc on host cell factor-1, a transcription co-activator, and showed that dynamic regulation of O-GlcNAcylation on host cell factor-1 influenced its subcellular distribution. Taken together, these data indicated the complex interplay between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation that occurs within signaling networks.

  15. Lineage Specification from Prostate Progenitor Cells Requires Gata3-Dependent Mitotic Spindle Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Maxwell E R; Nguyen, Alana H T; Tremblay, Mathieu; Viala, Sophie; Béland, Mélanie; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Bouchard, Maxime

    2017-04-11

    During prostate development, basal and luminal cell lineages are generated through symmetric and asymmetric divisions of bipotent basal cells. However, the extent to which spindle orientation controls division symmetry or cell fate, and the upstream factors regulating this process, are still elusive. We report that GATA3 is expressed in both prostate basal progenitor and luminal cells and that loss of GATA3 leads to a mislocalization of PRKCZ, resulting in mitotic spindle randomization during progenitor cell division. Inherently proliferative intermediate progenitor cells accumulate, leading to an expansion of the luminal compartment. These defects ultimately result in a loss of tissue polarity and defective branching morphogenesis. We further show that disrupting the interaction between PRKCZ and PARD6B is sufficient to recapitulate the spindle and cell lineage phenotypes. Collectively, these results identify a critical role for GATA3 in prostate lineage specification, and further highlight the importance of regulating spindle orientation for hierarchical cell lineage organization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroid bud morphogenesis requires CDC42- and SHROOM3-dependent apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebel, David A F; Plageman, Timothy F; Tang, Theresa L; Jones, Vanessa J; Muccioli, Maria; Tam, Patrick P L

    2016-01-15

    Early development of the gut endoderm and its subsequent remodeling for the formation of organ buds are accompanied by changes to epithelial cell shape and polarity. Members of the Rho-related family of small GTPases and their interacting proteins play multiple roles in regulating epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we examined the role of Cdc42 in foregut development and organ bud formation. Ablation of Cdc42 in post-gastrulation mouse embryos resulted in a loss of apical-basal cell polarity and columnar epithelial morphology in the ventral pharyngeal endoderm, in conjunction with a loss of apical localization of the known CDC42 effector protein PARD6B. Cell viability but not proliferation in the foregut endoderm was impaired. Outgrowth of the liver, lung and thyroid buds was severely curtailed in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In particular, the thyroid bud epithelium did not display the apical constriction that normally occurs concurrently with the outgrowth of the bud into the underlying mesenchyme. SHROOM3, a protein that interacts with Rho GTPases and promotes apical constriction, was strongly expressed in the thyroid bud and its sub-cellular localization was disrupted in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In Shroom3 gene trap mutant embryos, the thyroid bud epithelium showed no apical constriction, while the bud continued to grow and protruded into the foregut lumen. Our findings indicate that Cdc42 is required for epithelial polarity and organization in the endoderm and for apical constriction in the thyroid bud. It is possible that the function of CDC42 is partly mediated by SHROOM3. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Thyroid bud morphogenesis requires CDC42- and SHROOM3-dependent apical constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. F. Loebel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Early development of the gut endoderm and its subsequent remodeling for the formation of organ buds are accompanied by changes to epithelial cell shape and polarity. Members of the Rho-related family of small GTPases and their interacting proteins play multiple roles in regulating epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we examined the role of Cdc42 in foregut development and organ bud formation. Ablation of Cdc42 in post-gastrulation mouse embryos resulted in a loss of apical-basal cell polarity and columnar epithelial morphology in the ventral pharyngeal endoderm, in conjunction with a loss of apical localization of the known CDC42 effector protein PARD6B. Cell viability but not proliferation in the foregut endoderm was impaired. Outgrowth of the liver, lung and thyroid buds was severely curtailed in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In particular, the thyroid bud epithelium did not display the apical constriction that normally occurs concurrently with the outgrowth of the bud into the underlying mesenchyme. SHROOM3, a protein that interacts with Rho GTPases and promotes apical constriction, was strongly expressed in the thyroid bud and its sub-cellular localization was disrupted in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In Shroom3 gene trap mutant embryos, the thyroid bud epithelium showed no apical constriction, while the bud continued to grow and protruded into the foregut lumen. Our findings indicate that Cdc42 is required for epithelial polarity and organization in the endoderm and for apical constriction in the thyroid bud. It is possible that the function of CDC42 is partly mediated by SHROOM3.

  18. Aging Promotes SIRT3-dependent Cartilage SOD2 Acetylation and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao; Kinter, Michael; Hudson, Joanna; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Lane, Rachel S.; White, Jeremy R.; Hakim, Michael; Pan, Yong; Verdin, Eric; Griffin, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To quantify functional age-related changes in the cartilage antioxidant network to discover novel mediators of cartilage oxidative stress and osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology. Methods We evaluated knee OA histopathology in 10, 20, and 30-month old male F344BN rats and analyzed cartilage oxidation by the ratio of reduced:oxidized glutathione. Antioxidant gene expression and protein abundance were analyzed by qRT-PCR and selected reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry, respectively. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) activity and acetylation were analyzed by colorimetric enzyme assays and Western blotting, respectively. We examined human OA cartilage to evaluate the clinical relevance of SOD2 acetylation, and we tested age-related changes in the mitochondrial deacetylase, sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), in rats and mice. Results Cartilage oxidation and OA severity increased with age and were associated with an increase in SOD2 expression and protein abundance. However, SOD2 specific activity decreased with age due to elevated post-translational lysine acetylation. Consistent with these findings, SIRT3 decreased substantially with age, and treatment with SIRT3 increased SOD2 activity in an age-dependent manner. SOD2 was also acetylated in human OA cartilage, and activity was increased with SIRT3 treatment. Moreover, in C57BL6 mice, cartilage SIRT3 expression decreased with age and whole-body deletion of SIRT3 accelerated the development of knee OA. Conclusion Our results show that SIRT3 mediates age-related changes in cartilage redox regulation and protects against early-stage OA. These findings suggest that mitochondrial acetylation promotes OA and that restoration of SIRT3 in aging cartilage may improve cartilage resistance to oxidative stress by rescuing acetylation-dependent inhibition of SOD2 activity. PMID:26866626

  19. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay...... to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making...... use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75(NTR) can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death....

  20. Molecular Evolution of Vertebrate Neurotrophins: Co-Option of the Highly Conserved Nerve Growth Factor Gene into the Advanced Snake Venom Arsenalf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A.; King, Glenn F.; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation. PMID:24312363

  1. Molecular evolution of vertebrate neurotrophins: co-option of the highly conserved nerve growth factor gene into the advanced snake venom arsenalf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Sunagar

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74% and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%, while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation.

  2. Effective treatment of allergic airway inflammation with Helicobacter pylori immunomodulators requires BATF3-dependent dendritic cells and IL-10

    OpenAIRE

    Engler, Daniela B.; Reuter, Sebastian; van Wijck, Yolanda; Urban, Sabine; Kyburz, Andreas; Maxeiner, Joachim; Martin, Helen; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Gerhard, Markus; Cover, Timothy L.; Taube,Christian; Müller, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma represents an increasingly common public health problem. Here, we provide preclinical evidence for the efficacy of active tolerization using Helicobacter pylori components as a viable strategy for asthma prevention. We use a mouse model of allergic asthma to show that regular treatment with H. pylori extract effectively alleviates all hallmarks of the disease. Successful treatment depends on the regulatory cytokine IL-10 and on basic leucine zipper ATF-like 3 (BATF3)-dependent...

  3. Assessment of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activity-dependent neurotrophin protein (ADNP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) concentrations in treatment-naïve humans with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowski, Jan; Uchman, Dorota; Litwiniuk, Anna; Kalisz, Malgorzata; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Martynska, Lidia; Baranowska, Boguslawa; Bik, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by coexisting processes of inflammation, demyelination, axonal neurodegeneration and gliosis. Autoimmune processes play a pivotal role in the disease. The immune system may be modulated by neurotrophins and neurotrophin factors. Aim of the study was to assess plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activity-dependent neurotrophin protein (ADNP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in treatment-naïve humans with newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis. We also elucidated the potential influence of selected inflammatory agents on peripheral concentration of BDNF and ADNP. The study population comprised of 31 untreated patients with MS and 36 controls from a single hospital centre. Assessment of BDNF and ADNP was performed with use of ELISA methods. VIP was measured with RIA. Selected cytokine levels (IL 6, IL 10, and TNF α) were evaluated with ELISA tests. Statistical analyses were performed. We failed to find any significant differences between ADNP, BDNF, VIP, CRP levels and concentration of cytokines between individuals with MS and the controls. No correlation was observed between ADNP, BDNF and VIP as the first parameter and CRP, IL 6, IL 10, TNFα levels and the Expanded Disability Status Scale score in MS. Newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve patients with MS have comparable levels of plasma BDNF, ADNP and VIP to those of healthy controls.

  4. A catalytic role of XoxF1 as La3+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In the methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1, MxaF, a Ca(2+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH, is the main enzyme catalyzing methanol oxidation during growth on methanol. The genome of strain AM1 contains another MDH gene homologue, xoxF1, whose function in methanol metabolism has remained unclear. In this work, we show that XoxF1 also functions as an MDH and is La(3+-dependent. Despite the absence of Ca(2+ in the medium strain AM1 was able to grow on methanol in the presence of La(3+. Addition of La(3+ increased MDH activity but the addition had no effect on mxaF or xoxF1 expression level. We purified MDH from strain AM1 grown on methanol in the presence of La(3+, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence corresponded to that of XoxF1. The enzyme contained La(3+ as a cofactor. The ΔmxaF mutant strain could not grow on methanol in the presence of Ca(2+, but was able to grow after supplementation with La(3+. Taken together, these results show that XoxF1 participates in methanol metabolism as a La(3+-dependent MDH in strain AM1.

  5. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liu, Gan Chen, Fanling Li, Changfa Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neutrophin-3 (NT-3 in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8 and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8. We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01, while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01. In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05. Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01, with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01. In the rat soleus muscle, (1 CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2

  6. TIMP-1 mediates the inhibitory effect of interleukin-6 on the proliferation of a hepatocarcinoma cell line in a STAT3-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-Y. Guo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 is a multifunctional protein which is not only an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs but also to have a possible "cytokine-like" action. Here, we first compared mRNA expression of TIMP-1 and MMP-9 in BEL-7402 (a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, L-02 (a normal liver cell line and QSG-7701 (a cell line derived from peripheral tissue of liver carcinoma using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. By evaluating the variation of the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio as an index of reciprocal changes of the expression of the two genes, we observed that the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was about 13- and 5-fold higher in BEL-7402 than in L-02 and QSG-7701, respectively. Significantly, overexpression of TIMP-1 decreased the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in BEL-7402 and then inhibited the cell growth to 60% and reduced the migration to about 30%. Meanwhile, our data showed that interleukin-6 (IL-6 (100 ng/mL could also inhibited the cell growth of BEL-7402. Further studies indicated that TIMP-1 mediated the inhibitory effect of IL-6 on BEL-7402 cell proliferation in a STAT3-dependent manner, which could further accelerate the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. A dominant negative STAT3 mutant totally abolished IL-6-induced TIMP-1 expression and its biological functions. The present results demonstrate that TIMP-1 may be one of the mediators that regulate the inhibitory effect of IL-6 on BEL-7402 proliferation in which STAT3 signal transduction and p21 up-regulation also play important roles.

  7. Early activation of rat skeletal muscle IL-6/STAT1/STAT3 dependent gene expression in resistance exercise linked to hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwénaëlle Begue

    Full Text Available Cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 is an essential regulator of satellite cell-mediated hypertrophic muscle growth through the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3. The importance of this pathway linked to the modulation of myogenic regulatory factors expression in rat skeletal muscle undergoing hypertrophy following resistance exercise, has not been investigated. In this study, the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of STAT3, together with IL-6/STAT3-responsive gene expression, were measured after both a single bout of resistance exercise and 10 weeks of training. Flexor Digitorum Profundus muscle samples from Wistar rats were obtained 2 and 6 hours after a single bout of resistance exercise and 72 h after the last bout of either 2, 4, or 10 weeks of resistance training. We observed an increase in IL-6 and SOCS3 mRNAs concomitant with phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 after 2 and 6 hours of a single bout of exercise (p<0.05. STAT3-dependent early responsive genes such as CyclinD1 and cMyc were also upregulated whereas MyoD and Myf5 mRNAs were downregulated (p<0.05. BrdU-positive satellite cells increased at 2 and 6 hours after exercise (p<0.05. Muscle fiber hypertrophy reached up to 100% after 10 weeks of training and the mRNA expression of Myf5, c-Myc and Cyclin-D1 decreased, whereas IL-6 mRNA remained upregulated. We conclude that the IL-6/STAT1/STAT3 signaling pathway and its responsive genes after a single bout of resistance exercise are an important event regulating the SC pool and behavior involved in muscle hypertrophy after ten weeks of training in rat skeletal muscle.

  8. The relationship of Chlamydophila pneumoniae with schizophrenia: The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in this relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayci, Fatma; Ozdemir, Armagan; Saribas, Suat; Yuksel, Pelin; Ergin, Sevgi; Kuskucu, Ali Mert; Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Balcioglu, Ibrahim; Alpay, Nihat; Kurt, Aykut; Sezgin, Zeynep; Kocak, Banu Tufan; Icel, Rana Sucu; Can, Gunay; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; Kocazeybek, Bekir

    Several pathogens have been suspected of playing a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Chronic inflammation has been proposed to occur as a result of persistent infection caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae cells that reside in brain endothelial cells for many years. It was recently hypothesized that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) may play prominent roles in the development of schizophrenia. NT-3 and BDNF levels have been suggested to change in response to various manifestations of infection. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the roles of BDNF and NT3 in the schizophrenia-C. pneumoniae infection relationship. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and ELISA methods were used. Fifty patients suffering from schizophrenia and 35 healthy individuals were included as the patient group (PG) and the healthy control group (HCG), respectively. We detected persistent infection in 14 of the 50 individuals in the PG and in 1 of the 35 individuals in the HCG. A significant difference was found between the two groups (p0.05). C. pneumoniae DNA was not detected in any group. A significant difference in NT-3 levels was observed between the groups, with very low levels in the PG (p0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that NT-3 levels during persistent C. pneumoniae infection may play a role in this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurotrophin 3 genotype and emotional adverse effects of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Kim, Jae-Won; Shin, Min-Sup; Cho, Soo-Churl; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Son, Jung-Woo; Shin, Yun-Mi; Chung, Un-Sun; Han, Doug-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Neurotrophin 3 (NTF3) has been studied in relation to the pathophysiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and mood disorders as well as psychostimulant action. We hypothesized that the risk of an emotional side effect to methylphenidate (MPH) treatment may be associated with NTF3 genotypes. Ninety-six medication-naïve children with ADHD (mean age 8.70, standard deviation 1.41 years, 79 males) were genotyped and treated with MPH. At baseline, which was prior to MPH treatment, and after two weeks of medication, investigators asked children and their parents or caregivers about adverse events using a symptom rating scale. ADHD subjects with the A/A genotype at the NTF3 rs6332 polymorphism showed the highest 'Emotionality' and 'Over-focus/euphoria' factor scores, followed by those with the G/A genotype and those with the G/G genotype (p=0.042 and p=0.045, respectively). ADHD subjects with the A/A genotype at the NTF3 rs6332 polymorphism showed the highest 'Proneness to crying' and 'Nail biting' item scores, followed by those with the G/A genotype and those with the G/G genotype (p=0.047 and p=0.017, respectively). These data provide preliminary evidence that genetic variation in the NTF3 gene is related to susceptibility to emotional side effects in response to MPH treatment in Korean children with ADHD.

  10. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russe, Otto Quintus, E-mail: quintus@russe.eu; Möser, Christine V., E-mail: chmoeser@hotmail.com; Kynast, Katharina L., E-mail: katharina.kynast@googlemail.com; King, Tanya S., E-mail: tanya.sarah.king@googlemail.com; Olbrich, Katrin, E-mail: Katrin.olbrich@gmx.net; Grösch, Sabine, E-mail: groesch@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Geisslinger, Gerd, E-mail: geisslinger@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  11. Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis Is Maintained by Neil3-Dependent Repair of Oxidative DNA Lesions in Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elisabeth Regnell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3−/− mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3−/− mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3−/− mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance.

  12. Effective treatment of allergic airway inflammation with Helicobacter pylori immunomodulators requires BATF3-dependent dendritic cells and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Daniela B; Reuter, Sebastian; van Wijck, Yolanda; Urban, Sabine; Kyburz, Andreas; Maxeiner, Joachim; Martin, Helen; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Gerhard, Markus; Cover, Timothy L; Taube, Christian; Müller, Anne

    2014-08-12

    The prevalence of allergic asthma and other atopic diseases has reached epidemic proportions in large parts of the developed world. The gradual loss of the human indigenous microbiota has been held responsible for this trend. The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a constituent of the normal gastric microbiota whose presence has been inversely linked to allergy and asthma in humans and experimental models. Here we show that oral or i.p. tolerization with H. pylori extract prevents the airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar eosinophilia, pulmonary inflammation, and Th2 cytokine production that are hallmarks of allergen-induced asthma in mice. Asthma protection is not conferred by extracts from other enteropathogens and requires a heat-sensitive H. pylori component and the DC-intrinsic production of IL-10. The basic leucine zipper ATF-like 3 (BATF3)-dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) dendritic cell lineage is enriched in the lungs of protected mice and strictly required for protection. Two H. pylori persistence determinants, the γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, are required and sufficient for asthma protection and can be administered in purified form to prevent asthma. In conclusion, we provide preclinical evidence for the concept that the immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori can be exploited for tolerization strategies aiming to prevent allergen-induced asthma.

  13. Experimental evidence of the B2 and B3 dependent circular birefringence of chiral molecules in high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surma, M.

    The rotation of the plane of polarization of light passing through chiral media in the Faraday geometry of a magnetic field B and light propagation vector k have been measured in high magnetic fields of induction up to 30 T and a laser beam wavelength = 488 nm. The optically active enantiomers of neat alpha-methylbenzylamine and solutions in water of tartaric, malic and lactic acids, leucine and threonine exhibit dependence of the induced rotation of the light polarization plane on B 2 and B 3. The effect is reported of the magnetic field B 2 induced circular birefringence of laevorotatory and dextrorotatory enantiomers. Also differences are found in the effective rotation of the plane of polarization in the parallel (alpha ) and antiparallel (alpha ) configurations of B and k acting on a chiral medium. The first quantitative determination is made of the nonlinear ( B 3) Faraday effect in chiral media. The linear in B circular birefringence makes the largest contribution to the B 2 and B 3 dependent rotation.

  14. Exposure to 1950-MHz TD-SCDMA electromagnetic fields affects the apoptosis of astrocytes via caspase-3-dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xiao Liu

    Full Text Available The usage of mobile phone increases globally. However, there is still a paucity of data about the impact of electromagnetic fields (EMF on human health. This study investigated whether EMF radiation would alter the biology of glial cells and act as a tumor-promoting agent. We exposed rat astrocytes and C6 glioma cells to 1950-MHz TD-SCDMA for 12, 24 and 48 h respectively, and found that EMF exposure had differential effects on rat astroctyes and C6 glioma cells. A 48 h of exposure damaged the mitochondria and induced significant apoptosis of astrocytes. Moreover, caspase-3, a hallmark of apoptosis, was highlighted in astrocytes after 48 h of EMF exposure, accompanied by a significantly increased expression of bax and reduced level of bcl-2. The tumorigenicity assays demonstrated that astrocytes did not form tumors in both control and exposure groups. In contrast, the unexposed and exposed C6 glioma cells show no significant differences in both biological feature and tumor formation ability. Therefore, our results implied that exposure to the EMF of 1950-MHz TD-SCDMA may not promote the tumor formation, but continuous exposure damaged the mitochondria of astrocytes and induce apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway with the involvement of bax and bcl-2.

  15. Glial Scar Borders Are Formed by Newly Proliferated, Elongated Astrocytes That Interact to Corral Inflammatory and Fibrotic Cells via STAT3-Dependent Mechanisms after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A.; Song, Bingbing; Levine, Jaclynn; Fernandez, Ana; Gray-Thompson, Zachary; Ao, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Astroglial scars surround damaged tissue after trauma, stroke, infection, or autoimmune inflammation in the CNS. They are essential for wound repair, but also interfere with axonal regrowth. A better understanding of the cellular mechanisms, regulation, and functions of astroglial scar formation is fundamental to developing safe interventions for many CNS disorders. We used wild-type and transgenic mice to quantify and dissect these parameters. Adjacent to crush spinal cord injury (SCI), reactive astrocytes exhibited heterogeneous phenotypes as regards proliferation, morphology, and chemistry, which all varied with distance from lesions. Mature scar borders at 14 d after SCI consisted primarily of newly proliferated astroglia with elongated cell processes that surrounded large and small clusters of inflammatory, fibrotic, and other cells. During scar formation from 5 to 14 d after SCI, cell processes deriving from different astroglia associated into overlapping bundles that quantifiably reoriented and organized into dense mesh-like arrangements. Selective deletion of STAT3 from astroglia quantifiably disrupted the organization of elongated astroglia into scar borders, and caused a failure of astroglia to surround inflammatory cells, resulting in increased spread of these cells and neuronal loss. In cocultures, wild-type astroglia spontaneously corralled inflammatory or fibromeningeal cells into segregated clusters, whereas STAT3-deficient astroglia failed to do so. These findings demonstrate heterogeneity of reactive astroglia and show that scar borders are formed by newly proliferated, elongated astroglia, which organize via STAT3-dependent mechanisms to corral inflammatory and fibrotic cells into discrete areas separated from adjacent tissue that contains viable neurons. PMID:23904622

  16. A novel function of RIP1 in postnatal development and immune homeostasis by protecting against RIP3-dependent necroptosis and FADD-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, John P; Nair, Anirudh; Zhang, Jianke

    2015-01-01

    RIP1 is an adaptor kinase originally identified as being able to associate with TNFR1 and Fas, and is later shown to be involved in signaling induced by TLRs. Major signaling pathways regulated by RIP1 include necroptosis, apoptosis, and pro-survival/inflammation NF-κB activation. Previous studies show that RIP1 deficiency has no effect on mouse embryogenesis, but blocks postnatal development. This phenotype could not readily be explained, since mice lacking TNFR1, Fas, or TLRs show no apparent developmental defect. Certain types of RIP1-deficient cells are hypersensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis. However, in our previous study, deletion of the apoptotic adaptor protein, FADD, provides marginal improvement of postnatal development of rip1 (-/-) mice. Remarkably, the current data shows that haploid insufficiency of RIP3, a known mediator of necroptosis, allowed survival of rip1 (-/-) fadd (-/-) mice beyond weaning age, although the resulting rip1(-/-)fadd(-/-) rip3(+/-) mice were significant smaller in size and weight. Moreover, complete absence of RIP3 further improved postnatal development of the resulting rip1 (-/-) fadd (-/-) rip3 (-/-) mice, which display normal size and weight. In such triple knockout (TKO) mice, lymphocytes underwent normal development, but progressively accumulated as mice age. This lymphoproliferative (lpr) disease in TKO mice is, however, less severe than that of fadd(-/-)rip3 (-/-) double knockout mice. In total, the data show that the postnatal developmental defect in rip1 (-/-) mice is due in part to FADD-mediated apoptosis as well as RIP3-dependent necroptosis. Moreover, the function of RIP1 contributes to development of lpr diseases.

  17. Upregulation of NLRP3 via STAT3-dependent histone acetylation contributes to painful neuropathy induced by bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui-Cui; Huang, Zhu-Xi; Li, Xiao; Shen, Kai-Feng; Liu, Meng; Ouyang, Han-Dong; Zhang, Su-Bo; Ruan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Wu, Shao-Ling; Xin, Wen-Jun; Ma, Chao

    2018-01-12

    Painful neuropathy, as a severe side effect of chemotherapeutic bortezomib, is the most common reason for treatment discontinuation. However, the mechanism by which administration of bortezomib leads to painful neuropathy remains unclear. In the present study, we found that application of bortezomib significantly increased the expression of NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Intrathecal injection of NLRP3 siRNA significantly prevented the mechanical allodynia induced by bortezomib treatment, and intrathecal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector encoding NLRP3 markedly decreased paw withdrawal threshold of naive rats. Furthermore, the expressions of p-STAT3 were colocalized with NLRP3-positive cells in DRG neurons, and inhibition of STAT3 by intrathecal injection of AAV-Cre-GFP into STAT3 flox/flox mice or inhibitor S3I-201 suppressed the upregulation of NLRP3 and mechanical allodynia induced by bortezomib treatment. Chromatin immunoprecipitation further found that bortezomib increased the recruitment of STAT3, as well as the acetylation of histone H3 and H4, in the NLRP3 promoter region in DRG neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the STAT3 activity by using S3I-201 or DRG local deficiency of STAT3 also significantly prevented the upregulated H3 and H4 acetylation in the NLRP3 promoter region following bortezomib treatment. Altogether, our results suggest that the upregulation of NLRP3 in DRG via STAT3-dependent histone acetylation is critically involved in bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Malaria-induced NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation mediates inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial superinfection.

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    Marco A Ataide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14(+CD16(-Caspase-1(+ and CD14(dimCD16(+Caspase-1(+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria.

  19. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  20. Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain

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    Michalina Respondek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC, which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  1. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  2. Alterations of p75 neurotrophin receptor and Myelin transcription factor 1 in the hippocampus of perinatal phencyclidine treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Matosin, Natalie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-12-03

    Postnatal administration of phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents causes major disturbances to neurological processes resulting in severe modifications to normal behavioral traits into adulthood. It is routinely used to model psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, producing many of the dysfunctional processes in the brain that are present in this devastating disorder, including elevated levels of apoptosis during neurodevelopment and disruptions to myelin and plasticity processes. Lingo-1 (or Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein) is responsible for negatively regulating neurite outgrowth and the myelination of axons. Recent findings using a postmortem human brain cohort showed that Lingo-1 signaling partners in the Nogo receptor (NgR)/p75/TNF receptor orphan Y (TROY) signaling complex, and downstream signaling partners With No Lysine (K) (WNK1) and Myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), play a significant part in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here we have examined the implication of Lingo-1 and its signaling partners in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia using PCP to determine if these pathways are altered in the hippocampus throughout different stages of neurodevelopment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with PCP (10mg/kg) or saline solution on postnatal days (PN) 7, 9, and 11. Rats (n=6/group) were sacrificed at PN12, 5weeks, or 14weeks. Relative expression levels of Lingo-1 signaling proteins were examined in the hippocampus of the treated rats. p75 and Myt1 were decreased (0.001≤p≤0.011) in the PCP treated rats at PN12. There were no significant changes in any of the tested proteins at 5weeks (p>0.05). At 14weeks, p75, TROY, and Myt1 were increased in the PCP treated rats (0.014≤p≤0.022). This is the first report of an alteration in Lingo-1 signaling proteins in the rat hippocampus, both directly after PCP treatment in early development and in adulthood. Based on our results, we propose that

  3. Factors that regulate embryonic gustatory development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krimm Robin F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous molecular factors orchestrate the development of the peripheral taste system. The unique anatomy/function of the taste system makes this system ideal for understanding the mechanisms by which these factors function; yet the taste system is underutilized for this role. This review focuses on some of the many factors that are known to regulate gustatory development, and discusses a few topics where more work is needed. Some attention is given to factors that regulate epibranchial placode formation, since gustatory neurons are thought to be primarily derived from this region. Epibranchial placodes appear to arise from a pan-placodal region and a number of regulatory factors control the differentiation of individual placodes. Gustatory neuron differentiation is regulated by a series of transcription factors and perhaps bone morphongenic proteins (BMP. As neurons differentiate, they also proliferate such that their numbers exceed those in the adult, and this is followed by developmental death. Some of these cell-cycling events are regulated by neurotrophins. After gustatory neurons become post-mitotic, axon outgrowth occurs. Axons are guided by multiple chemoattractive and chemorepulsive factors, including semaphorins, to the tongue epithelium. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, functions as a targeting factor in the final stages of axon guidance and is required for gustatory axons to find and innervate taste epithelium. Numerous factors are involved in the development of gustatory papillae including Sox-2, Sonic hedge hog and Wnt-β-catenin signaling. It is likely that just as many factors regulate taste bud differentiation; however, these factors have not yet been identified. Studies examining the molecular factors that regulate terminal field formation in the nucleus of the solitary tract are also lacking. However, it is possible that some of the factors that regulate geniculate ganglion development, outgrowth, guidance and

  4. Factors that regulate embryonic gustatory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Robin F

    2007-09-18

    Numerous molecular factors orchestrate the development of the peripheral taste system. The unique anatomy/function of the taste system makes this system ideal for understanding the mechanisms by which these factors function; yet the taste system is underutilized for this role. This review focuses on some of the many factors that are known to regulate gustatory development, and discusses a few topics where more work is needed. Some attention is given to factors that regulate epibranchial placode formation, since gustatory neurons are thought to be primarily derived from this region. Epibranchial placodes appear to arise from a pan-placodal region and a number of regulatory factors control the differentiation of individual placodes. Gustatory neuron differentiation is regulated by a series of transcription factors and perhaps bone morphongenic proteins (BMP). As neurons differentiate, they also proliferate such that their numbers exceed those in the adult, and this is followed by developmental death. Some of these cell-cycling events are regulated by neurotrophins. After gustatory neurons become post-mitotic, axon outgrowth occurs. Axons are guided by multiple chemoattractive and chemorepulsive factors, including semaphorins, to the tongue epithelium. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), functions as a targeting factor in the final stages of axon guidance and is required for gustatory axons to find and innervate taste epithelium. Numerous factors are involved in the development of gustatory papillae including Sox-2, Sonic hedge hog and Wnt-beta-catenin signaling. It is likely that just as many factors regulate taste bud differentiation; however, these factors have not yet been identified. Studies examining the molecular factors that regulate terminal field formation in the nucleus of the solitary tract are also lacking. However, it is possible that some of the factors that regulate geniculate ganglion development, outgrowth, guidance and targeting of peripheral

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 regulates cleavage of pro-nerve growth factor and is neuroprotective following kainic acid-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Audrey P; Friedman, Wilma J

    2012-01-11

    The neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates neuronal growth, differentiation, and survival during development. However, the precursor of NGF, proNGF, is a potent apoptotic ligand for the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR))-sortilin complex. The mechanisms that regulate cleavage of proNGF, therefore, are critical determinants of whether this factor promotes neuronal survival or death. In this study, we demonstrate that, following kainic acid-induced seizures, the proNGF processing enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) and its inhibitor TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1) are regulated in a manner that prevents proneurotrophin cleavage and leads to increased proNGF in the extracellular milieu. Furthermore, we demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that exogenous MMP-7 enhances proNGF cleavage and provides neuroprotection following kainic acid treatment. These data demonstrate that increased extracellular proNGF levels following seizures are stabilized by altered MMP-7 enzymatic activity, leading to increased neuronal death via activation of p75(NTR).

  6. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3, and induced nitric oxide synthase expressions after low-level laser therapy in an axonotmesis experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lessandra Esper Abdala; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott; André, Edison Sanfelice

    2012-11-01

    A robust body of evidence has shown that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) improves peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the biochemical background triggered in this process is not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mRNA expression of neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and neurotrophin-3, [NT-3]) and also an inflammatory marker (induced nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) in an axonotmesis experimental model after low-level laser therapy. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats (250-350 g) were subjected to right sciatic nerve crush injury, and 24 h later, the animals in the three different experimental groups (n=18) were irradiated on a daily basis with helium-neon laser (collimated HeNe laser, continuous emission, wavelength: 632.8 nm, power density: 0.5 mW/cm(2), irradiation time: 20 sec, energy density: 10 J/cm(2)) during 7, 14, and 21 consecutive days, respectively. The control group (n=18) underwent the same procedures, but with the equipment turned off. At the end of the experiments, animals were killed with an overdose of anesthesia to remove samples from the sciatic nerve lesion epicenter to determine the mRNA expression of BDNF, NGF, NT-3 and iNOS enzyme. Comparisons between groups showed that HeNe laser increased the mRNA expression of both BDNF and NGF factors after 14 days of LLLT, with peak expression at the 21st day. Increase in NT-3 mRNA expression was not observed. In addition, HeNe laser produced iNOS expression reduction, which played an important role in the inflammatory process. The reported data could have a relevant practical value because LLLT is a noninvasive procedure, and have revealed significant increase in neurotrophic factor expressions and inflammatory process reduction, opening the possibility of using LLLT as an important aid to nerve regeneration process.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of epithelial sodium channel through a PTEN/PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

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    Jianing Zhang

    Full Text Available Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal segment of the kidney plays an important role in salt-sensitive hypertension. We reported previously that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stimulates ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells via elevation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical membrane. Here we report that H2S can antagonize H2O2-induced activation of ENaC in A6 cells. Our cell-attached patch-clamp data show that ENaC open probability (PO was significantly increased by exogenous H2O2, which is consistent with our previous finding. The aberrant activation of ENaC induced by exogenous H2O2 was completely abolished by H2S (0.1 mM NaHS. Pre-treatment of A6 cells with H2S slightly decreased ENaC P(O; however, in these cells H2O2 failed to elevate ENaC PO . Confocal microscopy data show that application of exogenous H2O2 to A6 cells significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level and induced accumulation of PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical compartment of the cell membrane. These effects of exogenous H2O2 on intracellular ROS levels and on apical PI(3,4,5P3 levels were almost completely abolished by treatment of A6 cells with H2S. In addition, H2S significantly inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN which is a negative regulator of PI(3,4,5P3. Moreover, BPV(pic, a specific inhibitor of PTEN, elevated PI(3,4,5P3 and ENaC activity in a manner similar to that of H2O2 in A6 cells. Our data show, for the first time, that H2S prevents H2O2-induced activation of ENaC through a PTEN-PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

  8. Dynamics of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent chromatin accessibility of early vitamin D receptor target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuter, Sabine; Pehkonen, Petri; Heikkinen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    The signaling cascade of the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR) is triggered by its specific ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3). In this study we demonstrate that in THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells 87.4% of the 1034 most prominent genome-wide VDR binding sites co-localize with loci of open chromatin. At 165 of them 1α,25(OH)2D3 strongly increases chromatin accessibility and has at further 217 sites weaker effects. Interestingly, VDR binding sites in 1α,25(OH)2D3-responsive chromatin regions are far more often composed of direct repeats with 3 intervening nucleotides (DR3s) than those in ligand insensitive regions. DR3-containing VDR sites are enriched in the neighborhood of genes that are involved in controling cellular growth, while non-DR3 VDR binding is often found close to genes related to immunity. At the example of six early VDR target genes we show that the slope of their 1α,25(OH)2D3-induced transcription correlates with the basal chromatin accessibility of their major VDR binding regions. However, the chromatin loci controlling these genes are indistinguishable in their VDR association kinetics. Taken together, ligand responsive chromatin loci represent dynamically regulated contact points of VDR with the genome, from where it controls early 1α,25(OH)2D3 target genes. © 2013.

  9. Somatic inactivation of ATM in hematopoietic cells predisposes mice to cyclin D3 dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lori A; Yang-Iott, Katherine; DeMicco, Amy; Bassing, Craig H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a cancer of immature T cells that exhibits heterogeneity of oncogenic lesions, providing an obstacle for development of more effective and less toxic therapies. Inherited deficiency of ATM, a regulator of the cellular DNA damage response, predisposes young humans and mice to T-ALLs with clonal chromosome translocations. While acquired ATM mutation or deletion occurs in pediatric T-ALLs, the role of somatic ATM alterations in T-ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. We demonstrate here that somatic Atm inactivation in haematopoietic cells starting as these cells differentiate in utero predisposes mice to T-ALL at similar young ages and harboring analogous translocations as germline Atm-deficient mice. However, some T-ALLs from haematopoietic cell specific deletion of Atm were of more mature thymocytes, revealing that the developmental timing and celluar origin of Atm inactivation influences the phenotype of ATM-deficient T-ALLs. Although it has been hypothesized that ATM suppresses cancer by preventing deletion and inactivation of TP53, we find that Atm inhibits T-ALL independent of Tp53 deletion. Finally, we demonstrate that the Cyclin D3 protein that drives immature T cell proliferation is essential for transformation of Atm-deficient thymocytes. Our study establishes a pre-clinical model for pediatric T-ALLs with acquired ATM inactivation and identifies the cell cycle machinery as a therapeutic target for this aggressive childhood T-ALL subtype.

  10. Transcriptional regulation by Barhl1 and Brn-3c in organ-of-Corti-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Richa; Jones, Chris M; Banfi, Sandro; Dawson, Sally J

    2005-11-30

    Barhl1 and Brn-3c have been identified as transcription factors that are essential for survival and maintenance of hair cells of the inner ear. Little is known about the mechanism of how Brn-3c or Barhl1 may regulate transcription in the inner ear. In this study, the transcriptional function of both Brn-3c and Barhl1 was investigated in the organ-of-Corti-derived cell lines, OC-1 and OC-2. We examined regulatory domains in these transcription factors by linking regions of Barhl1 and Brn-3c to the DNA binding domain of the heterologous transcription factor GAL4 and assayed their effect on a heterologous promoter containing GAL4 DNA binding sites by co-transfection into OC-1 and OC-2 cell lines. Brn-3c was found to contain an independent N-terminal activation domain that is sufficient to activate gene transcription in the organ of corti derived cell lines. Barhl1 on the other hand was found to act as a transcriptional repressor with repressive activity not restricted to a particular domain of Barhl1. In addition, we analyzed the effect of Barhl1 on the promoters of the neurotrophin genes NT-3 and BDNF in OC-1 and OC-2 cell lines. However, Barhl1 was not found to directly regulate neurotrophin promoter constructs in these cells.

  11. Minocycline up-regulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Ma, Lili; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Shaoqiong; Zhu, Cansheng; Liu, Mei; Ma, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Dongliang; Liu, Yingying; Peng, Fuhua; Wang, Qing; Pi, Rongbiao

    2012-07-05

    Previous evidence demonstrated that minocycline could ameliorate clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and exhibit several anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. However, few studies have been carried out to assess its effects on the expression of neurotrophins in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or multiple sclerosis. Here we investigated the alteration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the sera, cerebral cortex, and lumbar spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis C57 BL/6 mice in vivo as well as the splenocytes culture supernatants in vitro after minocycline administration. Our results demonstrated that minocycline could up-regulate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor both in peripheral (sera and splenocytes culture supernatants) and target organs (cerebral cortex and lumber spinal cord) of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that up-regulation of neurotrophins in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis may be a novel neuroprotective mechanism of minocycline. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulating the regulators : accountability of Australian regulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bird, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Accountability of Australian regulators - Australian Securities and Investments Commission - Australian Prudential Regulation Authority - concept of 'accountability' - mechanisms for accountability...

  13. EphrinB3 blocks EphB3 dependence receptor functions to prevent cell death following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theus, M H; Ricard, J; Glass, S J; Travieso, L G; Liebl, D J

    2014-05-08

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, have a variety of roles in the developing and adult central nervous system that require direct cell-cell interactions; including regulating axon path finding, cell proliferation, migration and synaptic plasticity. Recently, we identified a novel pro-survival role for ephrins in the adult subventricular zone, where ephrinB3 blocks Eph-mediated cell death during adult neurogenesis. Here, we examined whether EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult forebrain following traumatic brain injury and whether ephrinB3 infusion could limit this effect. We show that EphB3 co-labels with microtubule-associated protein 2-positive neurons in the adult cortex and is closely associated with ephrinB3 ligand, which is reduced following controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In the complete absence of EphB3 (EphB3(-/-)), we observed reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and functional improvements in motor deficits after CCI injury as compared with wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice. We also demonstrated that EphB3 exhibits dependence receptor characteristics as it is cleaved by caspases and induces cell death, which is not observed in the presence of ephrinB3. Following trauma, infusion of pre-clustered ephrinB3-Fc molecules (eB3-Fc) into the contralateral ventricle reduced cortical infarct volume and TUNEL staining in the cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampus of wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice, but not EphB3(-/-) mice. Similarly, application of eB3-Fc improved motor functions after CCI injury. We conclude that EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult cortex through a novel dependence receptor-mediated cell death mechanism in the injured adult cortex and is attenuated following ephrinB3 stimulation.

  14. Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in neurons via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Su; Shutov, Leonid P; Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Lin, Zhihong; Rysted, Jacob E; Ulrich, Jason D; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2014-11-07

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays an important role in regulating many neuronal functions, including excitability, axonal growth, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. NFAT can be activated by action potential firing or depolarization that leads to Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of NFAT and its translocation to the nucleus. Recent data suggest that NFAT and NFAT-dependent functions in neurons can also be potently regulated by NGF and other neurotrophins. However, the mechanisms of NFAT regulation by neurotrophins are not well understood. Here, we show that in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, NGF markedly facilitates NFAT-mediated gene expression induced by mild depolarization. The effects of NGF were not associated with changes in [Ca(2+)]i and were independent of phospholipase C activity. Instead, the facilitatory effect of NGF depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway downstream of the TrkA receptor and on inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a protein kinase known to phosphorylate NFAT and promote its nuclear export. Knockdown or knockout of NFATc3 eliminated this facilitatory effect. Simultaneous monitoring of EGFP-NFATc3 nuclear translocation and [Ca(2+)]i changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons indicated that NGF slowed the rate of NFATc3 nuclear export but did not affect its nuclear import rate. Collectively, our data suggest that NGF facilitates depolarization-induced NFAT activation by stimulating PI3K/Akt signaling, inactivating GSK3β, and thereby slowing NFATc3 export from the nucleus. We propose that NFAT serves as an integrator of neurotrophin action and depolarization-driven calcium signaling to regulate neuronal gene expression. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Induction of PLSCR1 in a STING/IRF3-dependent manner upon vector transfection in ovarian epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik M Kodigepalli

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the primary sensors of the innate immune system that recognize pathogenic nucleic acids including double-stranded plasmid DNA (dsDNA. TLR signaling activates multiple pathways including IRF3 which is involved in transcriptional induction of inflammatory cytokines (i.e. interferons (IFNs. Phospholipid scramblase 1, PLSCR1, is a highly inducible IFN-regulated gene mediating anti-viral properties of IFNs. Herein, we report a novel finding that dsDNA transfection in T80 immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line leads to a marked increase in PLSCR1 mRNA and protein. We also noted a comparable response in primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs. Similar to IFN-2α treated cells, de novo synthesized PLSCR1 was localized predominantly to the plasma membrane. dsDNA transfection, in T80 and HMEC cells, led to activation of MAPK and IRF3. Although inhibition of MAPK (using U0126 did not modulate PLSCR1 mRNA and protein, IRF3 knockdown (using siRNA significantly ablated the PLSCR1 induction. In prior studies, the activation of IRF3 was shown to be mediated by cGAS-STING pathway. To investigate the contribution of STING to PLSCR1 induction, we utilized siRNA to reduce STING expression and observed that PLSCR1 protein was markedly reduced. In contrast to normal T80/HMECs, the phosphorylation of IRF3 as well as induction of STING and PLSCR1 were absent in ovarian cancer cells (serous, clear cell, and endometrioid suggesting that the STING/IRF3 pathway may be dysregulated in these cancer cells. However, we also noted induction of different TLR and IFN mRNAs between the T80 and HEY (serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines upon dsDNA transfection. Collectively, these results indicate that the STING/IRF3 pathway, activated following dsDNA transfection, contributes to upregulation of PLSCR1 in ovarian epithelial cells.

  16. Induction of PLSCR1 in a STING/IRF3-Dependent Manner upon Vector Transfection in Ovarian Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodigepalli, Karthik M.; Nanjundan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the primary sensors of the innate immune system that recognize pathogenic nucleic acids including double-stranded plasmid DNA (dsDNA). TLR signaling activates multiple pathways including IRF3 which is involved in transcriptional induction of inflammatory cytokines (i.e. interferons (IFNs)). Phospholipid scramblase 1, PLSCR1, is a highly inducible IFN-regulated gene mediating anti-viral properties of IFNs. Herein, we report a novel finding that dsDNA transfection in T80 immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line leads to a marked increase in PLSCR1 mRNA and protein. We also noted a comparable response in primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Similar to IFN-2α treated cells, de novo synthesized PLSCR1 was localized predominantly to the plasma membrane. dsDNA transfection, in T80 and HMEC cells, led to activation of MAPK and IRF3. Although inhibition of MAPK (using U0126) did not modulate PLSCR1 mRNA and protein, IRF3 knockdown (using siRNA) significantly ablated the PLSCR1 induction. In prior studies, the activation of IRF3 was shown to be mediated by cGAS-STING pathway. To investigate the contribution of STING to PLSCR1 induction, we utilized siRNA to reduce STING expression and observed that PLSCR1 protein was markedly reduced. In contrast to normal T80/HMECs, the phosphorylation of IRF3 as well as induction of STING and PLSCR1 were absent in ovarian cancer cells (serous, clear cell, and endometrioid) suggesting that the STING/IRF3 pathway may be dysregulated in these cancer cells. However, we also noted induction of different TLR and IFN mRNAs between the T80 and HEY (serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma) cell lines upon dsDNA transfection. Collectively, these results indicate that the STING/IRF3 pathway, activated following dsDNA transfection, contributes to upregulation of PLSCR1 in ovarian epithelial cells. PMID:25658875

  17. SUMO: regulating the regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossis Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifiers of the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier family have emerged as key regulators of protein function and fate. While the past few years have seen an enormous increase in knowledge on SUMO enzymes, substrates, and consequences of modification, regulation of SUMO conjugation is far from being understood. This brief review will provide an overview on recent advances concerning (i the interplay between sumoylation and other post-translational modifications at the level of individual targets and (ii global regulation of SUMO conjugation and deconjugation.

  18. A Loss-of-Function Screen for Phosphatases that Regulate Neurite Outgrowth Identifies PTPN12 as a Negative Regulator of TrkB Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Dubreuil, Véronique; Miozzo, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely...... that phosphatases belong to multiple independently evolved families, which are rarely studied together. We undertook a loss-of-function RNA-interference-based screen of virtually all known (254) human phosphatases to understand their function in BDNF/TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells....... This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) accounted for 13...

  19. NGF and Its Receptors in the Regulation of Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnone, Gaetana; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in the complex relationship between the nervous and immune systems and how its alteration can affect homeostasis and result in the development of inflammatory diseases. A key mediator in cross-talk between the two systems is nerve growth factor (NGF), which can influence both neuronal cell function and immune cell activity. The up-regulation of NGF described in inflamed tissues of many diseases can regulate innervation and neuronal activity of peripheral neurons, inducing the release of immune-active neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, but can also directly influence innate and adaptive immune responses. Expression of the NGF receptors tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is dynamically regulated in immune cells, suggesting a varying requirement for NGF depending on their state of differentiation and functional activity. NGF has a variety of effects that can be either pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. This apparent contradiction can be explained by considering NGF as part of an endogenous mechanism that, while activating immune responses, also activates pathways necessary to dampen the inflammatory response and limit tissue damage. Decreases in TrkA expression, such as that recently demonstrated in immune cells of arthritis patients, might prevent the activation by NGF of regulatory feed-back mechanisms, thus contributing to the development and maintenance of chronic inflammation. PMID:28492466

  20. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

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    Fumiaki Imamura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells.With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells.In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  1. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  2. Batf3-dependent CD103+ dendritic cells are major producers of IL-12 that drive local Th1 immunity against Leishmania major infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, María; Iborra, Salvador; Conde-Garrosa, Ruth; Sancho, David

    2015-01-01

    The role of different DC subsets in priming and maintenance of immunity against Leishmania major (L. major) infection is debated. The transcription factor basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like 3 (Batf3) is essential for the development of mouse CD103(+) DCs and some functions of CD8α(+) DCs. We found that CD103(+) DCs were significantly reduced in the dermis of Batf3-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Batf3(-/-) mice developed exacerbated and unresolved cutaneous pathology following a low dose of intradermal L. major infection in the ear pinnae. Parasite load was increased 1000-fold locally and expanded systemically. Batf3 deficiency did not affect L. major antigen presentation to T cells, which was directly exerted by CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the skin draining LN. However, CD4(+) T-cell differentiation in the LN and skin was skewed to nonprotective Treg- and Th2-cell subtypes. CD103(+) DCs are major IL-12 producers during L. major infection. Local Th1 immunity was severely hindered, correlating with impaired IL-12 production and reduction in CD103(+) DC numbers. Adoptive transfer of WT but not IL-12p40(-/-) Batf3-dependent DCs significantly improved anti-L. major response in infected Batf3(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that IL-12 production by Batf3-dependent CD103(+) DCs is crucial for maintenance of local Th1 immunity against L. major infection. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Axonal localization of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 is critical for subcellular locality of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 release affecting proper development of postnatal mouse cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Sadakata

    Full Text Available Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2 is a protein that is essential for enhanced release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 from cerebellar granule cells. We previously identified dex3, a rare alternative splice variant of CAPS2, which is overrepresented in patients with autism and is missing an exon 3 critical for axonal localization. We recently reported that a mouse model CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 expressing dex3 showed autistic-like behavioral phenotypes including impaired social interaction and cognition and increased anxiety in an unfamiliar environment. Here, we verified impairment in axonal, but not somato-dendritic, localization of dex3 protein in cerebellar granule cells and demonstrated cellular and physiological phenotypes in postnatal cerebellum of CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 mice. Interestingly, both BDNF and NT-3 were markedly reduced in axons of cerebellar granule cells, resulting in a significant decrease in their release. As a result, dex3 mice showed developmental deficits in dendritic arborization of Purkinje cells, vermian lobulation and fissurization, and granule cell precursor proliferation. Paired-pulse facilitation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses was also impaired. Together, our results indicate that CAPS2 plays an important role in subcellular locality (axonal vs. somato-dendritic of enhanced BDNF and NT-3 release, which is indispensable for proper development of postnatal cerebellum.

  4. Rapid activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway by electroconvulsive shock in the rat prefrontal cortex is not associated with TrkB neurotrophin receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Rantamäki, Tomi P J; Larsen, Marianne Hald

    2007-01-01

    , are important pathways triggered by TrkB autophosphorylation. 2. We have previously observed that chemical antidepressants induce a rapid activation of TrkB signaling in the rodent prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is likely a consequence of the stimulatory effect of antidepressants on BDNF synthesis. However...

  5. MicroNeurotrophins Improve Survival in Motor Neuron-Astrocyte Co-Cultures but Do Not Improve Disease Phenotypes in a Mutant SOD1 Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

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    Kelly E Glajch

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease caused by loss of motor neurons. ALS patients experience rapid deterioration in muscle function with an average lifespan of 3-5 years after diagnosis. Currently, the most effective therapeutic only extends lifespan by a few months, thus highlighting the need for new and improved therapies. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs are important for neuronal development, maintenance, and survival. NTF treatment has previously shown efficacy in pre-clinical ALS models. However, clinical trials using NTFs produced no major improvements in ALS patients, due in part to the limited blood brain barrier (BBB penetration. In this study we assessed the potential neuroprotective effects of a novel class of compounds known as MicroNeurotrophins (MNTs. MNTs are derivatives of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, an endogenous neurosteroid that can cross the BBB and bind to tyrosine kinase receptors mimicking the pro-survival effects of NTFs. Here we sought to determine whether MNTs were neuroprotective in two different models of ALS. Our results demonstrate that BNN27 (10 μM attenuated loss of motor neurons co-cultured with astrocytes derived from human ALS patients with SOD1 mutations via the reduction of oxidative stress. Additionally, in the G93A SOD1 mouse, BNN27 (10 mg/kg treatment attenuated motor behavioral impairment in the paw grip endurance and rotarod tasks at postnatal day 95 in female but not male mice. In contrast, BNN27 (10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg treatment did not alter any other behavioral outcome or neuropathological marker in male or female mice. Lastly, BNN27 was not detected in post-mortem brain or spinal cord tissue of treated mice due to the rapid metabolism of BNN27 by mouse hepatocytes relative to human hepatocytes. Together, these findings demonstrate that BNN27 treatment failed to yield significant neuroprotective effects in the G93A SOD1 model likely due to its rapid rate of metabolism in

  6. RUNX3 is involved in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis induced by a combination of 5-aza-CdR and TSA in leukaemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Feng-Xian; Liu, Xiang-Fu; Fan, Rui-Fang; Long, Zi-Jie; Fang, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Ying; Zheng, Yong-Jiang; Lin, Dong-Jun

    2012-03-01

    Epigenetic therapy has had a significant impact on the management of haematologic malignancies. The aim of this study was to assess whether 5-aza-CdR and TSA inhibit the growth of leukaemia cells and induce caspase-3-dependent apoptosis by upregulating RUNX3 expression. K562 and Reh cells were treated with 5-aza-CdR, TSA or both compounds. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to examine the expression of RUNX3 at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to detect the cellular location of RUNX3. Additionally, after K562 cells were transfected with RUNX3, apoptosis and proliferation were studied using Annexin V staining and MTT assays. The expression of RUNX3 in leukaemia cell lines was markedly less than that in the controls. Demethylating drug 5-aza-CdR could induce RUNX3 expression, but the combination of TSA and 5-aza-CdR had a greater effect than did treatment with a single compound. The combination of 5-aza-CdR and TSA induced the translocation of RUNX3 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. TSA enhanced apoptosis induced by 5-aza-CdR, and Annexin V and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that the combination induced apoptosis but not necrosis. Furthermore, apoptosis was dependent on the caspase-3 pathway. RUNX3 overexpression in K562 cells led to growth inhibition and apoptosis and potentiated the effects of 5-aza-CdR induction. RUNX3 plays an important role in leukaemia cellular functions, and the induction of RUNX3-mediated effects may contribute to the therapeutic value of combination TSA and 5-aza-CdR treatment.

  7. P2X7 receptor mediates NLRP3-dependent IL-1β secretion and parasite proliferation in Toxoplasma gondii-infected human small intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Huang, Rui; Wang, Zhuang; Huang, Shuai; Choi, In-Wook; Zhou, Yu; Lee, Young-Ha; Chu, Jia-Qi

    2018-01-02

    Toxoplasma gondii can invade and replicate in all nucleated cells in a wide range of host species, and infection induces IL-1β production. IL-1β plays central roles in the stimulation of the innate immune system and inflammation. However, little is known of the innate immune responses in human fetal small intestinal epithelial cells (FHs 74 Int cells) after T. gondii infection. FHs 74 Int cells were infected with the T. gondii GFP-RH strain. Then, IL-1β production and its mechanisms of action were evaluated using ELISA, MTT cell viability assays, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. Infection of FHs 74 Int cells by T. gondii triggered significant time- and dose-dependent IL-1β production. Although T. gondii activated NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 inflammasomes in FHs 74 Int cells, NLRP3 levels were consistently and significantly time-dependently increased, while the other inflammasomes were not. Transfection with siRNA targeting NLRP3, cleaved caspase-1 (Casp-1) or ASC significantly reduced T. gondii-induced IL-1β production, whereas T. gondii proliferation was markedly increased. Toxoplasma gondii infection activated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) levels in FHs 74 Int cells in a time-dependent manner; however, transfection with siRNA targeting P2X7R significantly reduced T. gondii-induced IL-1β secretion and substantially increased T. gondii proliferation, which is mediated by decreased protein expression levels of NLRP3, cleaved Casp-1 and ASC. Collectively, NLRP3-dependent IL-1β secretion is mediated by P2X7R in small intestinal epithelial cells in response to T. gondii infection, thereby controlling parasite proliferation. This study revealed that the P2X7R/NLRP3 pathway plays important roles in IL-1β secretion and inhibition of T. gondii proliferation in small intestinal epithelial cells. These results not only contribute to our

  8. H3K9me3-binding proteins are dispensable for SETDB1/H3K9me3-dependent retroviral silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksakova Irina A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs are parasitic sequences whose derepression is associated with cancer and genomic instability. Many ERV families are silenced in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs via SETDB1-deposited trimethylated lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9me3, but the mechanism of H3K9me3-dependent repression remains unknown. Multiple proteins, including members of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 family, bind H3K9me2/3 and are involved in transcriptional silencing in model organisms. In this work, we address the role of such H3K9me2/3 "readers" in the silencing of ERVs in mESCs. Results We demonstrate that despite the reported function of HP1 proteins in H3K9me-dependent gene repression and the critical role of H3K9me3 in transcriptional silencing of class I and class II ERVs, the depletion of HP1α, HP1β and HP1γ, alone or in combination, is not sufficient for derepression of these elements in mESCs. While loss of HP1α or HP1β leads to modest defects in DNA methylation of ERVs or spreading of H4K20me3 into flanking genomic sequence, respectively, neither protein affects H3K9me3 or H4K20me3 in ERV bodies. Furthermore, using novel ERV reporter constructs targeted to a specific genomic site, we demonstrate that, relative to Setdb1, knockdown of the remaining known H3K9me3 readers expressed in mESCs, including Cdyl, Cdyl2, Cbx2, Cbx7, Mpp8, Uhrf1 and Jarid1a-c, leads to only modest proviral reactivation. Conclusion Taken together, these results reveal that each of the known H3K9me3-binding proteins is dispensable for SETDB1-mediated ERV silencing. We speculate that H3K9me3 might maintain ERVs in a silent state in mESCs by directly inhibiting deposition of active covalent histone marks.

  9. IL-10 induces a STAT3-dependent autoregulatory loop in TH2 cells that promotes Blimp-1 restriction of cell expansion via antagonism of STAT5 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poholek, Amanda C; Jankovic, Dragana; Villarino, Alejandro V; Petermann, Franziska; Hettinga, Angela; Shouval, Dror S; Snapper, Scott B; Kaech, Susan M; Brooks, Stephen R; Vahedi, Golnaz; Sher, Alan; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-10-01

    Blimp-1 expression in T cells extinguishes the fate of T follicular helper cells, drives terminal differentiation, and limits autoimmunity. Although various factors have been described to control Blimp-1 expression in T cells, little is known about what regulates Blimp-1 expression in T helper 2 (TH2) cells and the molecular basis of its actions. We report that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) unexpectedly played a critical role in regulating Blimp-1 in TH2 cells. Furthermore, we found that the cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) acted directly on TH2 cells and was necessary and sufficient to induce optimal Blimp-1 expression through STAT3. Together, Blimp-1 and STAT3 amplified IL-10 production in TH2 cells, creating a strong autoregulatory loop that enhanced Blimp-1 expression. Increased Blimp-1 in T cells antagonized STAT5-regulated cell cycle and antiapoptotic genes to limit cell expansion. These data elucidate the signals required for Blimp-1 expression in TH2 cells and reveal an unexpected mechanism of action of IL-10 in T cells, providing insights into the molecular underpinning by which Blimp-1 constrains T cell expansion to limit autoimmunity.

  10. Hesperidin reverses cognitive and depressive disturbances induced by olfactory bulbectomy in mice by modulating hippocampal neurotrophins and cytokine levels and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Michelle S; Jesse, Cristiano R; Ruff, Jossana Rodrigues; de Oliveira Espinosa, Dieniffer; Gomes, Nathalie Savedra; Altvater, Elza Eliza Tenório; Donato, Franciele; Giacomeli, Renata; Boeira, Silvana Peterini

    2016-10-15

    Depression is a serious mental disorder that is becoming more common. To better treat patients suffering from this illness, elucidation of the underlying psychopathological and neurobiological mechanisms of depression is needed. Based on the evidence, we sought to investigate the effects of hesperidin in a model of depression induced by olfactory bulbectomy (OB). C57BL/6 mice were treated with hesperidin (50mg/kg) and imipramine (10mg/kg, positive control) after OB induction. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels and acetylcholinesterase activity were analyzed in the hippocampus of the mice. The behavioral parameters were also verified in the model of depression induced by OB. This study demonstrated that OB increased the pro-inflammatory cytokines levels and acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus, exploratory activity in the open field test and immobility in the forced swimming test in mice. In addition, OB decreased the BDNF and NGF levels in the hippocampus, grooming time in the splash test and memory consolidation in the Morris water maze task. Treatment with hesperidin, similar to imipramine, was effective in preventing these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. We suggest that the main targets of hesperidin are pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation, helping to maintain brain plasticity and acetylcholinesterase activity regulation, which are closely linked with antidepressant-like action, as shown by behavior tests. This study demonstrated that there is a pharmacological effect of hesperidin in alterations induced by OB in mice, indicating that hesperidin could be useful as a treatment for depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression profile of IGF-I-calcineurin-NFATc3-dependent pathway genes in skeletal muscle during early development between duck breeds differing in growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jingting; Li, Huifang; Shan, Yanju; Xu, Wenjuan; Chen, Wenfeng; Song, Chi; Song, Weitao

    2015-06-01

    The insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)-calcineurin (CaN)-NFATc signaling pathways have been implicated in the regulation of myocyte hypertrophy and fiber-type specificity. In the present study, the expression of the CnAα, NFATc3, and IGF-I genes was quantified by RT-PCR for the first time in the breast muscle (BM) and leg muscle (LM) on days 13, 17, 21, 25, and 27 of embryonic development, as well as at 7 days posthatching (PH), in Gaoyou and Jinding ducks, which differ in their muscle growth rates. Consistent expression patterns of CnAα, NFATc3, and IGF-I were found in the same anatomical location at different development stages in both duck breeds, showing significant differences in an age-specific fashion. However, the three genes were differentially expressed in the two different anatomical locations (BM and LM). CnAα, NFATc3, and IGF-I messenger RNA (mRNA) could be detected as early as embryonic day 13 (ED13), and the highest level appeared at this stage in both BM and LM. Significant positive relationships were observed in the expression of the studied genes in the BM and LM of both duck breeds. Also, the expression of these three genes showed a positive relationship with the percentage of type IIb fibers and a negative relationship with the percentage of type I fibers and type IIa fibers. Our data indicate differential expression and coordinated developmental regulation of the selected genes involved in the IGF-I-calcineurin-NFATc3 pathway in duck skeletal muscle during embryonic and early PH growth and development; these data also indicate that this signaling pathway might play a role in the regulation of myofiber type transition.

  12. Cell type-specific regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in states of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, D A; Fischer, T C; Peckenschneider, N; Noga, O; Dinh, Q T; Welte, T; Welker, P

    2007-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a molecule influencing neuronal proliferation and differentiation. In states of allergy, it may orchestrate inflammatory changes by linking the immune system with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of gene transcription in mast cells MCs is not clear, the present studies assessed the gene regulation of BDNF in this inflammatory cell type. Transcriptional expression of BDNF in human skin was studied in isolated cells using RT-PCR. In situ lesional MC BDNF protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and related to the differential staining of MCs and functional effects of BDNF on HaCaT keratinocytes. BDNF mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin MCs, keratinocytes, and fibroblasts. Also, low levels were found in endothelial cells and melanocytes. BDNF protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional MCs. A significantly decreased expression of BDNF protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional MCs when compared with control MC expression. Functional in vitro experiments demonstrated that a decrease in BDNF stimulation led to increased secretion rates for stem cell factor and IL-8 in HaCaT keratinocytes. The demonstration of a decreased level of BDNF gene transcription in lesional MCs points to a differential regulation of MC-released neutrotrophins in cutaneous allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds should be receptor target specific and not universally acting in diseases such as atopic dermatitis or allergic asthma.

  13. Exploring epigenetic regulation of fear memory and biomarkers associated with Post-traumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Maddox

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review examines recent work on epigenetic mechanisms underlying animal models of fear learning as well as its translational implications in disorders of fear regulation, such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Specifically, we will examine work outlining roles of differential histone acetylation and DNA methylation associated with consolidation, reconsolidation and extinction in Pavlovian fear paradigms. We then focus on the numerous studies examining the epigenetic modifications of the Brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF pathway and the extension of these findings from animal models to recent work in human clinical populations. We will also review recently published data on FKBP5 regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function, and how this is modulated in animal models of PTSD and in human clinical populations via epigenetic mechanisms. As glucocorticoid regulation of memory consolidation is well established in fear models, we examine how these recent data contribute to our broader understanding of fear memory formation. The combined recent progress in epigenetic modulation of memory with the advances in fear neurobiology suggest that this area may be critical to progress in our understanding of fear-related disorders with implications for new approaches to treatment and prevention.

  14. Bidirectional remodeling of β1-integrin adhesions during chemotropic regulation of nerve growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlstrom Lucas P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotropic factors in the extracellular microenvironment guide nerve growth by acting on the growth cone located at the tip of extending axons. Growth cone extension requires the coordination of cytoskeleton-dependent membrane protrusion and dynamic adhesion to the extracellular matrix, yet how chemotropic factors regulate these events remains an outstanding question. We demonstrated previously that the inhibitory factor myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG triggers endocytic removal of the adhesion receptor β1-integrin from the growth cone surface membrane to negatively remodel substrate adhesions during chemorepulsion. Here, we tested how a neurotrophin might affect integrin adhesions. Results We report that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF positively regulates the formation of substrate adhesions in axonal growth cones during stimulated outgrowth and prevents removal of β1-integrin adhesions by MAG. Treatment of Xenopus spinal neurons with BDNF rapidly triggered β1-integrin clustering and induced the dynamic formation of nascent vinculin-containing adhesion complexes in the growth cone periphery. Both the formation of nascent β1-integrin adhesions and the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF required cytoplasmic calcium ion signaling and integrin activation at the cell surface. Exposure to MAG decreased the number of β1-integrin adhesions in the growth cone during inhibition of axon extension. In contrast, the BDNF-induced adhesions were resistant to negative remodeling by MAG, correlating with the ability of BDNF pretreatment to counteract MAG-inhibition of axon extension. Pre-exposure to MAG prevented the BDNF-induced formation of β1-integrin adhesions and blocked the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate the neurotrophin-dependent formation of integrin-based adhesions in the growth cone and reveal how a positive regulator of substrate adhesions can block

  15. Bidirectional remodeling of β1-integrin adhesions during chemotropic regulation of nerve growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, Lucas P; Hines, Jacob H; Henle, Steven J; Henley, John R

    2011-11-30

    Chemotropic factors in the extracellular microenvironment guide nerve growth by acting on the growth cone located at the tip of extending axons. Growth cone extension requires the coordination of cytoskeleton-dependent membrane protrusion and dynamic adhesion to the extracellular matrix, yet how chemotropic factors regulate these events remains an outstanding question. We demonstrated previously that the inhibitory factor myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) triggers endocytic removal of the adhesion receptor β1-integrin from the growth cone surface membrane to negatively remodel substrate adhesions during chemorepulsion. Here, we tested how a neurotrophin might affect integrin adhesions. We report that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) positively regulates the formation of substrate adhesions in axonal growth cones during stimulated outgrowth and prevents removal of β1-integrin adhesions by MAG. Treatment of Xenopus spinal neurons with BDNF rapidly triggered β1-integrin clustering and induced the dynamic formation of nascent vinculin-containing adhesion complexes in the growth cone periphery. Both the formation of nascent β1-integrin adhesions and the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF required cytoplasmic calcium ion signaling and integrin activation at the cell surface. Exposure to MAG decreased the number of β1-integrin adhesions in the growth cone during inhibition of axon extension. In contrast, the BDNF-induced adhesions were resistant to negative remodeling by MAG, correlating with the ability of BDNF pretreatment to counteract MAG-inhibition of axon extension. Pre-exposure to MAG prevented the BDNF-induced formation of β1-integrin adhesions and blocked the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the neurotrophin-dependent formation of integrin-based adhesions in the growth cone and reveal how a positive regulator of substrate adhesions can block the negative remodeling and growth inhibitory effects of

  16. Truncation of CXCL12 by CD26 reduces its CXC chemokine receptor 4- and atypical chemokine receptor 3-dependent activity on endothelial cells and lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Rik; Mortier, Anneleen; Boff, Daiane

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 or stromal cell-derived factor 1/SDF-1 attracts hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature leukocytes through the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). In addition, it interacts with atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3 or CXCR7) and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12...... characterization. Compared to unmodified CXCL12, CXCL12(3-68) was no longer able to signal through CXCR4 via inositol trisphosphate (IP3), Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Interestingly, the recruitment of β-arrestin 2 to the cell membrane via CXCR4 by CXCL12(3-68) was abolished......, whereas a weakened but significant β-arrestin recruitment remained via ACKR3. CXCL12-induced endothelial cell migration and signal transduction was completely abrogated by CD26. Intact CXCL12 hardly induced lymphocyte migration upon intra-articular injection in mice. In contrast, oral treatment of mice...

  17. Systems Genetic Analyses Highlight a TGFβ-FOXO3 Dependent Striatal Astrocyte Network Conserved across Species and Associated with Stress, Sleep, and Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Scarpa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent systems-based analyses have demonstrated that sleep and stress traits emerge from shared genetic and transcriptional networks, and clinical work has elucidated the emergence of sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility as early symptoms of Huntington's disease. Understanding the biological bases of these early non-motor symptoms may reveal therapeutic targets that prevent disease onset or slow disease progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex clinical presentation remain largely unknown. In the present work, we specifically examine the relationship between these psychiatric traits and Huntington's disease (HD by identifying striatal transcriptional networks shared by HD, stress, and sleep phenotypes. First, we utilize a systems-based approach to examine a large publicly available human transcriptomic dataset for HD (GSE3790 from GEO in a novel way. We use weighted gene coexpression network analysis and differential connectivity analyses to identify transcriptional networks dysregulated in HD, and we use an unbiased ranking scheme that leverages both gene- and network-level information to identify a novel astrocyte-specific network as most relevant to HD caudate. We validate this result in an independent HD cohort. Next, we computationally predict FOXO3 as a regulator of this network, and use multiple publicly available in vitro and in vivo experimental datasets to validate that this astrocyte HD network is downstream of a signaling pathway important in adult neurogenesis (TGFβ-FOXO3. We also map this HD-relevant caudate subnetwork to striatal transcriptional networks in a large (n = 100 chronically stressed (B6xA/JF2 mouse population that has been extensively phenotyped (328 stress- and sleep-related measurements, and we show that this striatal astrocyte network is correlated to sleep and stress traits, many of which are known to be altered in HD cohorts. We identify causal regulators of this network through

  18. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yotsui, Izumi, E-mail: izumi.yotsui@riken.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Serada, Satoshi, E-mail: serada@nibiohn.go.jp [Laboratory of Immune Signal, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0085 (Japan); Naka, Tetsuji, E-mail: tnaka@nibiohn.go.jp [Laboratory of Immune Signal, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0085 (Japan); Saruhashi, Masashi, E-mail: s13db001@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Taji, Teruaki, E-mail: t3teruak@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Hayashi, Takahisa, E-mail: t4hayash@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Quatrano, Ralph S., E-mail: rsq@wustl.edu [Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130-4899 (United States); Sakata, Yoichi, E-mail: sakata@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan)

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  19. IP{sub 3}-dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenting; Tingare, Asmita; Ng, David Chi-Heng [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johnson, Hong W.; Schell, Michael J. [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda (United States); Lord, Rebecca L. [Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom); Chawla, Sangeeta, E-mail: sangeeta.chawla@york.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons requires a submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool derives from intracellular ER stores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes inhibits cAMP-induced c-fos expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRE-mediated and CRE-mediated gene expression is sensitive to IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of TORC1. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP are widely used in concert by neurons to relay signals from the synapse to the nucleus, where synaptic activity modulates gene expression required for synaptic plasticity. Neurons utilize different transcriptional regulators to integrate information encoded in the spatiotemporal dynamics and magnitude of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals, including some that are Ca{sup 2+}-responsive, some that are cAMP-responsive and some that detect coincident Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals. Because Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP can influence each other's amplitude and spatiotemporal characteristics, we investigated how cAMP acts to regulate gene expression when increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} are buffered. We show here that cAMP-mobilizing stimuli are unable to induce expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in hippocampal neurons in the presence of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} buffer BAPTA-AM. Expression of enzymes that attenuate intracellular IP{sub 3} levels also inhibited cAMP-dependent c-fos induction. Synaptic activity induces c-fos transcription through two cis regulatory DNA elements - the CRE and the SRE. We show here that in response to cAMP both CRE-mediated and SRE-mediated induction of a luciferase reporter gene is attenuated by IP{sub 3} metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 was inhibited

  20. [6]-Gingerol induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells: drug-DNA interaction and expression of certain signal genes in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debrup; Bishayee, Kausik; Ghosh, Samrat; Biswas, Raktim; Mandal, Sushil Kumar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-11-05

    [6]-Gingerol, a pharmacologically important bioactive component of ginger, has been reported to have anti-hyperglycemic, anti-cancer and anti-oxidative properties, but mechanisms through which these are achieved are largely unclear. The present study focuses on apoptosis and autophagy, two key events of anti-cancer activity, in HeLa cells treated with [6]-gingerol. The treated cells showed several morphological changes, including externalization of phosphatidyl serine, degradation of DNA and increase in TUNEL positivity. Furthermore, there was depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential, providing evidence of mitochondria mediated apoptosis. The expression of caspase 3 and PARP was increased in cells exposed to [6]-gingerol. Circular dichroism study for testing drug-DNA interaction with both calf thymus and nuclear DNA as target revealed that the drug had potential to bind with the nuclear DNA and induce conformational changes of DNA. The over-expression of NFkβ, AKT and Bcl2 genes in cancer cells was down-regulated by [6]-gingerol treatment. On the other hand the expression levels of TNFα, Bax and cytochrome c were enhanced in [6]-gingerol treated cells. Thus, overall results suggest that [6]-gingerol has potential to bind with DNA and induce cell death by autophagy and caspase 3 mediated apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune-induced fever is mediated by IL-6 receptors on brain endothelial cells coupled to STAT3-dependent induction of brain endothelial prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskilsson, Anna; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Dufour, Sylvie; Schwaninger, Markus; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2014-11-26

    The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Here we generated mice with deletion of the membrane bound IL-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα) on neural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6Rα on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6Rα in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415957-05$15.00/0.

  2. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ signaling mediates delayed myogenesis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy fetal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassinelli, Letizia; Colleoni, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Giovanella, Umberto; Maciotta, Simona; Colombo, Augusto; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle wasting and premature death. The defective gene is dystrophin, a structural protein, absence of which causes membrane fragility and myofiber necrosis. Several lines of evidence showed that in adult DMD patients dystrophin is involved in signaling pathways that regulate calcium homeostasis and differentiation programs. However, secondary aspects of the disease, such as inflammation and fibrosis development, might represent a bias in the analysis. Because fetal muscle is not influenced by gravity and does not suffer from mechanical load and/or inflammation, we investigated 12-week-old fetal DMD skeletal muscles, highlighting for the first time early alterations in signaling pathways mediated by the absence of dystrophin itself. We found that PLC/IP3/IP3R/Ryr1/Ca(2+) signaling is widely active in fetal DMD skeletal muscles and, through the calcium-dependent PKCα protein, exerts a fundamental regulatory role in delaying myogenesis and in myofiber commitment. These data provide new insights into the origin of DMD pathology during muscle development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. NORM regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  4. Xiaochaihutang attenuates depressive/anxiety-like behaviors of social isolation-reared mice by regulating monoaminergic system, neurogenesis and BDNF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Fang; Yang, Jingyu; Dong, Yingxu; Su, Guangyue; Zhang, Kuo; Pan, Xing; Ma, Ping; Zhou, Tingshuo; Wu, Chunfu

    2017-08-17

    degradation enzyme (MAO A ) expression in the hippocampus of SI-reared mice for the first time. Moreover, XCHT significantly augmented hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF expression in hippocampus of SI-reared mice. Our results showed for the first time that XCHT improved depressive/anxiety-like behaviors of SI-reared mice by regulating the monoaminergic system, neurogenesis and neurotrophin expression. The findings indicate that XCHT may have a therapeutic application for early-life stress model of depression and in turn provide further evidence supporting XCHT a novel potential antidepressant from a distinct perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The cardiac maladaptive ATF3-dependent cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and macrophages is mediated by the IFNγ-CXCL10-CXCR3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, L; Barash, U; Zohar, Y; Karin, N; Aronheim, A

    2017-02-01

    Pressure overload induces adaptive and maladaptive cardiac remodeling processes in the heart. Part of the maladaptive process is the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and macrophages which is dependent on the function of the Activating Transcription Factor 3, ATF3. Yet, the molecular mechanism involved in cardiomyocytes-macrophages communication leading to macrophages recruitment to the heart and cardiac maladaptive remodeling is currently unknown. Isolated peritoneal macrophages from either wild type or ATF3-KO mice were cultured in serum free medium to collect conditioned medium (CM). CM was used to probe an antibody cytokine/chemokine array. The interferon γ induced protein 10kDa, CXCL10, was found to be enriched in wild type macrophages CM. Wild type cardiomyocytes treated with CXCL10 in vitro, resulted in significant increase in cell volume as compared to ATF3-KO cardiomyocytes. In vivo, pressure overload was induced by phenylephrine (PE) infusion using micro-osmotic pumps. Consistently, CXCL11 (CXCL10 competitive agonist) and CXCL10 receptor antagonist (AMG487) attenuated PE-dependent maladaptive cardiac remodeling. Significantly, we show that the expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, is suppressed in cardiomyocytes and macrophages derived from ATF3-KO mice. CXCR3 is positively regulated by ATF3 through an ATF3 transcription response element found in its proximal promoter. Finally, mice lacking CXCR3 display a significant reduction of cardiac remodeling processes following PE infusion. Chronic PE infusion results in a unique cardiomyocytes-macrophages cross-talk that is mediated by IFNγ. Subsequently, macrophages that are recruited to the heart secrete CXCL10 resulting in maladaptive cardiac remodeling mediated by the CXCR3 receptor. ATF3-KO mice escape from PE-dependent maladaptive cardiac remodeling by suppressing the IFNγ-CXCL10-CXCR3 axis at multiple levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parental...... affect mirroring may be understood as a specification of these concepts. It is argued that despite similarities at a descriptive level the concepts are embedded in theories with different ideas of subjectivity. Hence an understanding of the concept of affect regulation as a concretizisation...... and specification of the classical concepts dilutes the complexity of both the concept of affect regulation and of the classical concepts....

  7. Easy to remember, difficult to forget: The development of fear regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Johnson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fear extinction learning is a highly adaptive process that involves the integrity of frontolimbic circuitry. Its disruption has been associated with emotional dysregulation in stress and anxiety disorders. In this article we consider how age, genetics and experiences shape our capacity to regulate fear in cross-species studies. Evidence for adolescent-specific diminished fear extinction learning is presented in the context of immature frontolimbic circuitry. We also present evidence for less neural plasticity in fear regulation as a function of early-life stress and by genotype, focusing on the common brain derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Finally, we discuss this work in the context of exposure-based behavioral therapies for the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders that are based on principles of fear extinction. We conclude by speculating on how such therapies may be optimized for the individual based on the patient's age, genetic profile and personal history to move from standard treatment of care to personalized and precision medicine.

  8. Regulation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bouvet, F.

    2015-06-15

    This paper reviews the design of regulation loops for power converters. Power converter control being a vast domain, it does not aim to be exhaustive. The objective is to give a rapid overview of the main synthesis methods in both continuous- and discrete-time domains.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induces sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation through the up-regulation of surface transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels in rodent microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Kato, Takahiro A; Seki, Yoshihiro; Ohgidani, Masahiro; Sagata, Noriaki; Horikawa, Hideki; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Sato-Kasai, Mina; Hayakawa, Kohei; Inoue, Ryuji; Kanba, Shigenobu; Monji, Akira

    2014-06-27

    Microglia are immune cells that release factors, including proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), and neurotrophins, following activation after disturbance in the brain. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) is important for microglial functions such as the release of cytokines and NO from activated microglia. There is increasing evidence suggesting that pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders is related to the inflammatory responses mediated by microglia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin well known for its roles in the activation of microglia as well as in pathophysiology and/or treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we sought to examine the underlying mechanism of BDNF-induced sustained increase in [Ca(2+)]i in rodent microglial cells. We observed that canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels contribute to the maintenance of BDNF-induced sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation. Immunocytochemical technique and flow cytometry also revealed that BDNF rapidly up-regulated the surface expression of TRPC3 channels in rodent microglial cells. In addition, pretreatment with BDNF suppressed the production of NO induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which was prevented by co-adiministration of a selective TRPC3 inhibitor. These suggest that BDNF induces sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation through the up-regulation of surface TRPC3 channels and TRPC3 channels could be important for the BDNF-induced suppression of the NO production in activated microglia. We show that TRPC3 channels could also play important roles in microglial functions, which might be important for the regulation of inflammatory responses and may also be involved in the pathophysiology and/or the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. RegulatING chromatin regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The five human ING genes encode at least 15 splicing isoforms, most of which affect cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis through their ability to alter gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. Since their discovery in 1996, ING proteins have been classified as type II tumour suppressors...... on the basis of reports describing their down-regulation and mislocalization in a variety of cancer types. In addition to their regulation by transcriptional mechanisms, understanding the range of PTMs (post-translational modifications) of INGs is important in understanding how ING functions are fine...

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Matthew R; Johnson, William M; Pilat, Jennifer M; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y

    2015-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Regulation of neuronal excitability by release of proteins from glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igelhorst, Birte A.; Niederkinkhaus, Vanessa; Karus, Claudia; Lange, Maren D.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of glial cells on electrical isolation and shaping of synaptic transmission between neurons have been extensively studied. Here we present evidence that the release of proteins from astrocytes as well as microglia may regulate voltage-activated Na+ currents in neurons, thereby increasing excitability and speed of transmission in neurons kept at distance from each other by specialized glial cells. As a first example, we show that basic fibroblast growth factor and neurotrophin-3, which are released from astrocytes by exposure to thyroid hormone, influence each other to enhance Na+ current density in cultured hippocampal neurons. As a second example, we show that the presence of microglia in hippocampal cultures can upregulate Na+ current density. The effect can be boosted by lipopolysaccharides, bacterial membrane-derived stimulators of microglial activation. Comparable effects are induced by the exposure of neuron-enriched hippocampal cultures to tumour necrosis factor-α, which is released from stimulated microglia. Taken together, our findings suggest that release of proteins from various types of glial cells can alter neuronal excitability over a time course of several days. This explains changes in neuronal excitability occurring in states of thyroid hormone imbalance and possibly also in seizures triggered by infectious diseases. PMID:26009773

  13. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAHI eCHAVARRIA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve and the other resident cells (neurons and glia. These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5 and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  14. BARHL1 Is Downregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and May Regulate Cognitive Functions through ESR1 and Multiple Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Debmalya; García-Solano, María E; Tiwari, Sandeep; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Jain, Neha; Torres-Moreno, Daniel; Ferri, Belén; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco; Ghosh, Preetam; Blum, Kenneth; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Perry, George

    2017-09-28

    The Transcription factor BarH like homeobox 1 (BARHL1) is overexpressed in medulloblastoma and plays a role in neurogenesis. However, much about the BARHL1 regulatory networks and their functions in neurodegenerative and neoplastic disorders is not yet known. In this study, using a tissue microarray (TMA), we report for the first time that BARHL1 is downregulated in hormone-negative breast cancers and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, using an integrative bioinformatics approach and mining knockout mouse data, we show that: (i) BARHL1 and Estrogen Receptor 1 (ESR1) may constitute a network that regulates Neurotrophin 3 (NTF3)- and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-mediated neurogenesis and neural survival; (ii) this is probably linked to AD pathways affecting aberrant post-translational modifications including SUMOylation and ubiquitination; (iii) the BARHL1-ESR1 network possibly regulates β-amyloid metabolism and memory; and (iv) hsa-mir-18a, having common key targets in the BARHL1-ESR1 network and AD pathway, may modulate neuron death, reduce β-amyloid processing and might also be involved in hearing and cognitive decline associated with AD. We have also hypothesized why estrogen replacement therapy improves AD condition. In addition, we have provided a feasible new mechanism to explain the abnormal function of mossy fibers and cerebellar granule cells related to memory and cognitive decline in AD apart from the Tau and amyloid pathogenesis through our BARHL1-ESR1 axis.

  15. BARHL1 Is Downregulated in Alzheimer’s Disease and May Regulate Cognitive Functions through ESR1 and Multiple Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Debmalya; García-Solano, María E.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Jain, Neha; Torres-Moreno, Daniel; Ferri, Belén; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco; Ghosh, Preetam; Blum, Kenneth; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Perry, George

    2017-01-01

    The Transcription factor BarH like homeobox 1 (BARHL1) is overexpressed in medulloblastoma and plays a role in neurogenesis. However, much about the BARHL1 regulatory networks and their functions in neurodegenerative and neoplastic disorders is not yet known. In this study, using a tissue microarray (TMA), we report for the first time that BARHL1 is downregulated in hormone-negative breast cancers and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Furthermore, using an integrative bioinformatics approach and mining knockout mouse data, we show that: (i) BARHL1 and Estrogen Receptor 1 (ESR1) may constitute a network that regulates Neurotrophin 3 (NTF3)- and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-mediated neurogenesis and neural survival; (ii) this is probably linked to AD pathways affecting aberrant post-translational modifications including SUMOylation and ubiquitination; (iii) the BARHL1-ESR1 network possibly regulates β-amyloid metabolism and memory; and (iv) hsa-mir-18a, having common key targets in the BARHL1-ESR1 network and AD pathway, may modulate neuron death, reduce β-amyloid processing and might also be involved in hearing and cognitive decline associated with AD. We have also hypothesized why estrogen replacement therapy improves AD condition. In addition, we have provided a feasible new mechanism to explain the abnormal function of mossy fibers and cerebellar granule cells related to memory and cognitive decline in AD apart from the Tau and amyloid pathogenesis through our BARHL1-ESR1 axis. PMID:28956815

  16. Sex differences and estrogen regulation of BDNF gene expression, but not propeptide content, in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kight, Katherine E; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2017-01-02

    Sex differences in adult brain function are frequently determined developmentally through the actions of steroid hormones during sensitive periods of prenatal and early postnatal life. In rodents, various cellular end points of the developing brain are affected by estradiol that is derived from the aromatization of circulating testosterone and/or synthesized within the brain. We have previously described a sex difference in neurogenesis in the hippocampus of neonatal rats that is modulated by estradiol. In this report, we examined a potential downstream regulator of the effects of estradiol on hippocampal cell proliferation by measuring gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophin (BDNF) in male and female neonatal rats in response to estradiol. Males had higher baseline BDNF gene expression in dentate gyrus and CA1 regions of the hippocampus compared with females. Neonatal administration of exogenous estradiol resulted in opposite effects on BDNF expression in these areas of the neonatal hippocampus, such that BDNF transcripts increased in CA1 but decreased in dentate. Blocking endogenous estradiol signaling by antagonizing estrogen receptors decreased BDNF expression in the dentate of males, but not females, and had no effect in CA1. Interestingly, this sex difference and response to estradiol was not mirrored by translational output, as no differences in BDNF precursor peptide were observed. The sex- and region-specific effects of estradiol on BDNF expression in the neonatal hippocampus suggest a complex functional relationship between these pleiotropic factors in regulating developmental neurogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. BARHL1 Is Downregulated in Alzheimer’s Disease and May Regulate Cognitive Functions through ESR1 and Multiple Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debmalya Barh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Transcription factor BarH like homeobox 1 (BARHL1 is overexpressed in medulloblastoma and plays a role in neurogenesis. However, much about the BARHL1 regulatory networks and their functions in neurodegenerative and neoplastic disorders is not yet known. In this study, using a tissue microarray (TMA, we report for the first time that BARHL1 is downregulated in hormone-negative breast cancers and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Furthermore, using an integrative bioinformatics approach and mining knockout mouse data, we show that: (i BARHL1 and Estrogen Receptor 1 (ESR1 may constitute a network that regulates Neurotrophin 3 (NTF3- and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF-mediated neurogenesis and neural survival; (ii this is probably linked to AD pathways affecting aberrant post-translational modifications including SUMOylation and ubiquitination; (iii the BARHL1-ESR1 network possibly regulates β-amyloid metabolism and memory; and (iv hsa-mir-18a, having common key targets in the BARHL1-ESR1 network and AD pathway, may modulate neuron death, reduce β-amyloid processing and might also be involved in hearing and cognitive decline associated with AD. We have also hypothesized why estrogen replacement therapy improves AD condition. In addition, we have provided a feasible new mechanism to explain the abnormal function of mossy fibers and cerebellar granule cells related to memory and cognitive decline in AD apart from the Tau and amyloid pathogenesis through our BARHL1-ESR1 axis.

  18. Neurotrophin and Trk neurotrophin receptors in the inner ear of Salmo salar and Salmo trutta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Catania, S; Germanà, A; Cabo, R; Ochoa‐Erena, F. J; Guerrera, M. C; Hannestad, J; Represa, J; Vega, J. A

    2007-01-01

    .... Thus, in the present study, we used Western‐blot analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate the expression and cell localization of both NTs and Trk receptors in the inner ear of alevins of Salmo salar and Salmo trutta . Western...

  19. Meta-analysis of microarray-derived data from PACAP-deficient adrenal gland in vivo and PACAP-treated chromaffin cells identifies distinct classes of PACAP-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Babru; Gerdin, Matthew J; Huddleston, David; Hsu, Chang-Mei; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Stroth, Nikolas; Hamelink, Carol; Eiden, Lee E

    2007-09-01

    Initial PACAP-regulated transcriptomes of PACAP-treated cultured chromaffin cells, and the adrenal gland of wild-type versus PACAP-deficient mice, have been assembled using microarray analysis. These were compared to previously acquired PACAP-regulated transcriptome sets from PC12 cells and mouse central nervous system, using the same microarray platform. The Ingenuity Pathways Knowledge Base was then employed to group regulated transcripts into common first and second messenger regulatory clusters. The purpose of our meta-analysis was to identify sets of genes regulated distinctly or in common by the neurotransmitter/neurotrophin PACAP in specific physiological contexts. Results suggest that PACAP participates in both the basal differentiated expression, and the induction upon physiological stimulation, of distinct sets of transcripts in neuronal and endocrine cells. PACAP in both developmental and acute regulatory paradigms acts on target genes also regulated by either TNFalpha or TGFbeta, two first messengers acting on transcription mainly through NFkappaB and Smads, respectively.

  20. A Pro-Nerve Growth Factor (proNGF) and NGF Binding Protein, α2-Macroglobulin, Differentially Regulates p75 and TrkA Receptors and Is Relevant to Neurodegeneration Ex Vivo and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelona, Pablo F; Saragovi, H Uri

    2015-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is generated from a precursor, proNGF, that is proteolytically processed. NGF preferentially binds a trophic tyrosine kinase receptor, TrkA, while proNGF binds a neurotrophin receptor (NTR), p75(NTR), that can have neurotoxic activity. Previously, we along with others showed that the soluble protein α2-macroglobulin (α2M) is neurotoxic. Toxicity is due in part to α2M binding to NGF and inhibiting trophic activity, presumably by preventing NGF binding to TrkA. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Here, we show ex vivo and in vivo three mechanisms for α2M neurotoxicity. First, unexpectedly the α2M-NGF complexes do bind TrkA receptors but do not induce TrkA dimerization or activation, resulting in deficient trophic support. Second, α2M makes stable complexes with proNGF, conveying resistance to proteolysis that results in more proNGF and less NGF. Third, α2M-proNGF complexes bind p75(NTR) and are more potent agonists than free proNGF, inducing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production. Hence, α2M regulates proNGF/p75(NTR) positively and mature NGF/TrkA negatively, causing neuronal death ex vivo. These three mechanisms are operative in vivo, and α2M causes neurodegeneration in a p75(NTR)- and proNGF-dependent manner. α2M could be exploited as a therapeutic target, or as a modifier of neurotrophin signals. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Muscle Contraction Regulates BDNF/TrkB Signaling to Modulate Synaptic Function through Presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hurtado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF acts via tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB to regulate synapse maintenance and function in the neuromuscular system. The potentiation of acetylcholine (ACh release by BDNF requires TrkB phosphorylation and Protein Kinase C (PKC activation. BDNF is secreted in an activity-dependent manner but it is not known if pre- and/or postsynaptic activities enhance BDNF expression in vivo at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Here, we investigated whether nerve and muscle cell activities regulate presynaptic conventional PKC (cPKCα and βI via BDNF/TrkB signaling to modulate synaptic strength at the NMJ. To differentiate the effects of presynaptic activity from that of muscle contraction, we stimulated the phrenic nerve of rat diaphragms (1 Hz, 30 min with or without contraction (abolished by μ-conotoxin GIIIB. Then, we performed ELISA, Western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological techniques. We found that nerve-induced muscle contraction: (1 increases the levels of mature BDNF protein without affecting pro-BDNF protein or BDNF mRNA levels; (2 downregulates TrkB.T1 without affecting TrkB.FL or p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 levels; (3 increases presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI protein level through TrkB signaling; and (4 enhances phosphorylation of cPKCα and cPKCβI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cPKCβI, which is exclusively located in the motor nerve terminals, increases activity-induced acetylcholine release. Together, these results show that nerve-induced muscle contraction is a key regulator of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, retrogradely activating presynaptic cPKC isoforms (in particular cPKCβI to modulate synaptic function. These results indicate that a decrease in neuromuscular activity, as occurs in several neuromuscular disorders, could affect the BDNF/TrkB/PKC pathway that links pre- and postsynaptic activity to maintain neuromuscular function.

  2. Nerve Growth Factor Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway Is Modulated by Ca2+ and Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Joaquim; Espinet, Carme; Soler, Rosa M.; Peiró, Sandra; Rocamora, Nativitat; Comella, Joan X.

    2000-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a member of the neurotrophin family of trophic factors that have been reported to be essential for the survival and development of sympathetic neurons and a subset of sensory neurons. Nerve growth factor exerts its effects mainly by interaction with the specific receptor TrkA, which leads to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways. Once activated, TrkA also allows for a rapid and moderate increase in intracellular calcium levels, which would contribute to the effects triggered by nerve growth factor in neurons. In this report, we analyzed the relationship of calcium to the activation of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway in PC12 cells. We observed that calcium and calmodulin are both necessary for the acute activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases after TrkA stimulation. We analyzed the elements of the pathway that lead to this activation, and we observed that calmodulin antagonists completely block the initial Raf-1 activation without affecting the function of upstream elements, such as Ras, Grb2, Shc, and Trk. We have broadened our study to other stimuli that activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases through tyrosine kinase receptors, and we have observed that calmodulin also modulates the activation of such kinases after epidermal growth factor receptor stimulation in PC12 cells and after TrkB stimulation in cultured chicken embryo motoneurons. Calmodulin seems to regulate the full activation of Raf-1 after Ras activation, since functional Ras is necessary for Raf-1 activation after nerve growth factor stimulation and calmodulin-Sepharose is able to precipitate Raf-1 in a calcium-dependent manner. PMID:10688641

  3. BDNF expression in cat striate cortex is regulated by binocular pattern deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowska-Macios, Karolina; Arckens, Lutgarde; Kossut, Małgorzata; Burnat, Kalina

    2017-01-01

    Deprivation of patterned visual information, as in early onset congenital cataract patients, results in a severe impairment in global motion perception. Previously we reported a delayed maturation of the peripheral visual field representation in primary visual area 17, based on a 2-D DIGE screen for protein expression changes and in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene ZIF268. To corroborate these findings we here explore the binocular pattern deprivation (BD)-regulated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-described neurotrophin precipitously regulated by early visual experience. To assess the timing of maturation-related BDNF expression we compared the central and the peripheral visual field representations of area 17 of 1, 2, 4 and 6-month-old and adult cats reared under normal visual conditions. To scrutinize the outcome of BD, four different deprivation strategies were compared, including early onset BD from birth and lasting for 2, 4 or 6 months (2BD, 4BD, 6BD), and late onset BD for 2 months upon 2 months of normal vision (2N2BD), as animal models of congenital and delayed onset cataract. During normal cortical development the BDNF transcript levels, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, remained stable. Higher BDNF mRNA levels were found in central area 17 of 2BD and 6BD animals compared to age-matched controls. In central area 17, the high BDNF mRNA levels at the end of the BD period may activate a mechanism by which plastic processes, halted by deprivation, may begin. We here confirm that the peripheral visual field representation of area 17 matures slower than its central counterpart. Only in central area 17 normal visual input upon BD could upregulate BDNF mRNA which may lead to a fast activation of local plastic adaptations.

  4. Cdc42 participates in the regulation of ADF/cofilin and retinal growth cone filopodia by brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsan-Ju; Gehler, Scott; Shaw, Alisa E; Bamburg, James R; Letourneau, Paul C

    2006-02-05

    Rho family GTPases have important roles in mediating the effects of guidance cues and growth factors on the motility of neuronal growth cones. We previously showed that the neurotrophin BDNF regulates filopodial dynamics on growth cones of retinal ganglion cell axons through activation of the actin regulatory proteins ADF and cofilin by inhibiting a RhoA-dependent pathway that phosphorylates (inactivates) ADF/cofilin. The GTPase Cdc42 has also been implicated in mediating the effects of positive guidance cues. In this article we investigated whether Cdc42 is involved in the effects of BDNF on filopodial dynamics. BDNF treatment increases Cdc42 activity in retinal neurons, and neuronal incorporation of constitutively active Cdc42 mimics the increases in filopodial number and length. Furthermore, constitutively active and dominant negative Cdc42 decreased and increased, respectively, the activity of RhoA in retinal growth cones, indicating crosstalk between these GTPases in retinal growth cones. Constitutively active Cdc42 mimicked the activation of ADF/cofilin that resulted from BDNF treatment, while dominant negative Cdc42 blocked the effects of BDNF on filopodia and ADF/cofilin. The inability of dominant negative Cdc42 to block ADF/cofilin activation and stimulation of filopodial dynamics by the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 indicate interaction between Cdc42 and RhoA occurs upstream of ROCK. Our results demonstrate crosstalk occurs between GTPases in mediating the effects of BDNF on growth cone motility, and Cdc42 activity can promote actin dynamics via activation of ADF/cofilin.

  5. β5 Integrin Up-Regulation in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes Cell Motility in Human Chondrosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Liu, Shan-Chi; Chen, Po-Chun; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:23874483

  6. β5 integrin up-regulation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes cell motility in human chondrosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Lin

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis.

  7. Retinoic X receptor subtypes exert differential effects on the regulation of Trh transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Becker, Nathalie; Demeneix, Barbara A; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie

    2013-12-05

    How Retinoid X receptors (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR) interact on negative TREs and whether RXR subtype specificity is determinant in such regulations is unknown. In a set of functional studies, we analyzed RXR subtype effects in T3-dependent repression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Trh). Two-hybrid screening of a hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus cDNA bank revealed specific, T3-dependent interaction of TRs with RXRβ. In vivo chromatin immuno-precipitation showed recruitment of RXRs to the TRE-site 4 region of the Trh promoter in the absence of T3. In vivo overexpression of RXRα in the mouse hypothalamus heightened T3-independent Trh transcription, whereas RXRβ overexpression abrogated this activity. Loss of function of RXRα and β by shRNAs induced inverse regulations. Thus, RXRα and RXRβ display specific roles in modulating T3-dependent regulation of Trh. These results provide insight into the actions of these different TR heterodimerization partners within the context of a negatively regulated gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligases β-TrCP and FBXW7 cooperatively mediates GSK3-dependent Mcl-1 degradation induced by the Akt inhibitor API-1, resulting in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Koo, Junghui; Guan, Baoxiang; Yue, Ping; Deng, Xingming; Chen, Mingwei; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2013-11-22

    The novel Akt inhibitor, API-1, induces apoptosis through undefined mechanisms. The current study focuses on revealing the mechanisms by which API-1 induces apoptosis. API-1 rapidly and potently reduced the levels of Mcl-1 primarily in API-1-senstive lung cancer cell lines. Ectopic expression of Mcl-1 protected cells from induction of apoptosis by API-1. API-1 treatment decreased the half-life of Mcl-1, whereas inhibition of the proteasome with MG132 rescued Mcl-1 reduction induced by API-1. API-1 decreased Mcl-1 levels accompanied with a rapid increase in Mcl-1 phosphorylation (S159/T163). Moreover, inhibition of GSK3 inhibited Mcl-1 phosphorylation and reduction induced by API-1 and antagonized the effect of API-1 on induction of apoptosis. Knockdown of either FBXW7 or β-TrCP alone, both of which are E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in Mcl-1 degradation, only partially rescued Mcl-1 reduction induced by API-1. However, double knockdown of both E3 ubiquitin ligases enhanced the rescue of API-1-induced Mcl-1 reduction. API-1 induces GSK3-dependent, β-TrCP- and FBXW7-mediated Mcl-1 degradation, resulting in induction of apoptosis.

  9. Regulating through leverage: Civil regulation in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fürst, K.

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this study is to examine the efforts of Chinese NGOs to prevent and/or control industrial pollution risks and then use the findings of this research to study the nature of civil regulation in, and beyond, China’s authoritarian setting. It first argues that 'regulation through

  10. Combinatorial Gene Regulation Using Auto-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Rutger; Ursem, Bas; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    As many as 59% of the transcription factors in Escherichia coli regulate the transcription rate of their own genes. This suggests that auto-regulation has one or more important functions. Here, one possible function is studied. Often the transcription rate of an auto-regulator is also controlled by additional transcription factors. In these cases, the way the expression of the auto-regulator responds to changes in the concentrations of the “input” regulators (the response function) is obviously affected by the auto-regulation. We suggest that, conversely, auto-regulation may be used to optimize this response function. To test this hypothesis, we use an evolutionary algorithm and a chemical–physical model of transcription regulation to design model cis-regulatory constructs with predefined response functions. In these simulations, auto-regulation can evolve if this provides a functional benefit. When selecting for a series of elementary response functions—Boolean logic gates and linear responses—the cis-regulatory regions resulting from the simulations indeed often exploit auto-regulation. Surprisingly, the resulting constructs use auto-activation rather than auto-repression. Several design principles show up repeatedly in the simulation results. They demonstrate how auto-activation can be used to generate sharp, switch-like activation and repression circuits and how linearly decreasing response functions can be obtained. Auto-repression, on the other hand, resulted only when a high response speed or a suppression of intrinsic noise was also selected for. The results suggest that, while auto-repression may primarily be valuable to improve the dynamical properties of regulatory circuits, auto-activation is likely to evolve even when selection acts on the shape of response function only. PMID:20548950

  11. Regulating fisheries under uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Gårn; Jensen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Regulator uncertainty is decisive for whether price or quantity regulation maximizes welfare in fisheries. In this paper, we develop a model of fisheries regulation that includes ecological uncertainly, variable economic uncertainty as well as structural economic uncertainty. We aggregate...... qualification of the pro-price regulation message dominating the fisheries economics literature. We also believe that the model of a fishery developed in this paper could be applied to the regulation of other renewable resources where regulators are subject to uncertainty either directly or with some...

  12. Reciprocal regulation of axonal Filopodia and outgrowth during neuromuscular junction development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan P Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assembly of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ is initiated when nerve and muscle first contact each other by filopodial processes which are thought to enable close interactions between the synaptic partners and facilitate synaptogenesis. We recently reported that embryonic Xenopus spinal neurons preferentially extended filopodia towards cocultured muscle cells and that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF produced by muscle activated neuronal FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1 to induce filopodia and favor synaptogenesis. Intriguingly, in an earlier study we found that neurotrophins (NTs, a different set of target-derived factors that act through Trk receptor tyrosine kinases, promoted neuronal growth but hindered presynaptic differentiation and NMJ formation. Thus, here we investigated how bFGF- and NT-signals in neurons jointly elicit presynaptic changes during the earliest stages of NMJ development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whereas forced expression of wild-type TrkB in neurons reduced filopodial extension and triggered axonal outgrowth, expression of a mutant TrkB lacking the intracellular kinase domain enhanced filopodial growth and slowed axonal advance. Neurons overexpressing wild-type FGFR1 also displayed more filopodia than control neurons, in accord with our previous findings, and, notably, this elevation in filopodial density was suppressed when neurons were chronically treated from the beginning of the culture period with BDNF, the NT that specifically activates TrkB. Conversely, inhibition by BDNF of NMJ formation in nerve-muscle cocultures was partly reversed by the overexpression of bFGF in muscle. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the balance between neuronal FGFR1- and TrkB-dependent filopodial assembly and axonal outgrowth regulates the establishment of incipient NMJs.

  13. Regulation of actions and habits by ventral hippocampal trkB and adolescent corticosteroid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Elizabeth T; Gerber, Kyle J; Zimmermann, Kelsey S; Ressler, Kerry J; Parsons, Ryan G; Gourley, Shannon L

    2017-11-01

    In humans and rodents, stress promotes habit-based behaviors that can interfere with action-outcome decision-making. Further, developmental stressor exposure confers long-term habit biases across rodent-primate species. Despite these homologies, mechanisms remain unclear. We first report that exposure to the primary glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) in adolescent mice recapitulates multiple neurobehavioral consequences of stressor exposure, including long-lasting biases towards habit-based responding in a food-reinforced operant conditioning task. In both adolescents and adults, CORT also caused a shift in the balance between full-length tyrosine kinase receptor B (trkB) and a truncated form of this neurotrophin receptor, favoring the inactive form throughout multiple corticolimbic brain regions. In adolescents, phosphorylation of the trkB substrate extracellular signal-regulated kinase 42/44 (ERK42/44) in the ventral hippocampus was also diminished, a long-term effect that persisted for at least 12 wk. Administration of the trkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) during adolescence at doses that stimulated ERK42/44 corrected long-lasting corticosterone-induced behavioral abnormalities. Meanwhile, viral-mediated overexpression of truncated trkB in the ventral hippocampus reduced local ERK42/44 phosphorylation and was sufficient to induce habit-based and depression-like behaviors. Together, our findings indicate that ventral hippocampal trkB is essential to goal-directed action selection, countering habit-based behavior otherwise facilitated by developmental stress hormone exposure. They also reveal an early-life sensitive period during which trkB-ERK42/44 tone determines long-term behavioral outcomes.

  14. HCN1 and HCN2 in Rat DRG neurons: levels in nociceptors and non-nociceptors, NT3-dependence and influence of CFA-induced skin inflammation on HCN2 and NT3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Cristian; McMullan, Simon; Djouhri, Laiche; Gao, Linlin; Watkins, Roger; Berry, Carol; Dempsey, Katherine; Lawson, Sally N

    2012-01-01

    I(h), which influences neuronal excitability, has recently been measured in vivo in sensory neuron subtypes in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). However, expression levels of HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) channel proteins that underlie I(h) were unknown. We therefore examined immunostaining of the most abundant isoforms in DRGs, HCN1 and HCN2 in these neuron subtypes. This immunostaining was cytoplasmic and membrane-associated (ring). Ring-staining for both isoforms was in neurofilament-rich A-fiber neurons, but not in small neurofilament-poor C-fiber neurons, although some C-neurons showed cytoplasmic HCN2 staining. We recorded intracellularly from DRG neurons in vivo, determined their sensory properties (nociceptive or low-threshold-mechanoreceptive, LTM) and conduction velocities (CVs). We then injected fluorescent dye enabling subsequent immunostaining. For each dye-injected neuron, ring- and cytoplasmic-immunointensities were determined relative to maximum ring-immunointensity. Both HCN1- and HCN2-ring-immunointensities were positively correlated with CV in both nociceptors and LTMs; they were high in Aβ-nociceptors and Aα/β-LTMs. High HCN1 and HCN2 levels in Aα/β-neurons may, via I(h), influence normal non-painful (e.g. touch and proprioceptive) sensations as well as nociception and pain. HCN2-, not HCN1-, ring-intensities were higher in muscle spindle afferents (MSAs) than in all other neurons. The previously reported very high I(h) in MSAs may relate to their very high HCN2. In normal C-nociceptors, low HCN1 and HCN2 were consistent with their low/undetectable I(h.) In some C-LTMs HCN2-intensities were higher than in C-nociceptors. Together, HCN1 and HCN2 expressions reflect previously reported I(h) magnitudes and properties in neuronal subgroups, suggesting these isoforms underlie I(h) in DRG neurons. Expression of both isoforms was NT3-dependent in cultured DRG neurons. HCN2-immunostaining in small neurons increased 1 day after

  15. Interpersonal instrumental emotion regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netzer, L.; Van Kleef, G.A.; Tamir, M.

    2015-01-01

    What motivates people to regulate the emotions of others? Prior research has shown that people are motivated to regulate the emotions of others to make others feel better. This investigation, however, was designed to test whether people are also motivated to regulate the emotions of others to

  16. General Theories of Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertog, J.A. den

    1999-01-01

    This chapter makes a distinction between three types of theories of regulation: public interest theories, the Chicago theory of regulation and the public choice theories. The Chicago theory is mainly directed at the explanation of economic regulation; public interest theories and public choice

  17. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression is regulated by microRNAs miR-26a and miR-26b allele-specific binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Caputo

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin that plays an essential role in neuronal development and plasticity. MicroRNA (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs of about 22-nucleotides in length regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. In this study we explore the role of miRNAs as post-transcriptional inhibitors of BDNF and the effect of 3'UTR sequence variations on miRNAs binding capacity. Using an in silico approach we identified a group of miRNAs putatively regulating BDNF expression and binding to BDNF 3'UTR polymorphic sequences. Luciferase assays demonstrated that these miRNAs (miR-26a1/2 and miR-26b downregulates BDNF expression and that the presence of the variant alleles of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs11030100 and rs11030099 mapping in BDNF 3'UTR specifically abrogates miRNAs targeting. Furthermore we found a high linkage disequilibrium rate between rs11030100, rs11030099 and the non-synonymous coding variant rs6265 (Val66Met, which modulates BDNF mRNA localization and protein intracellular trafficking. Such observation led to hypothesize that miR-26s mediated regulation could extend to rs6265 leading to an allelic imbalance with potentially functional effects, such as peptide's localization and activity-dependent secretion. Since rs6265 has been previously implicated in various neuropsychiatric disorders, we evaluated the distribution of rs11030100, rs11030099 and rs6265 both in a control and schizophrenic group, but no significant difference in allele frequencies emerged. In conclusion, in the present study we identified two novel miRNAs regulating BDNF expression and the first BDNF 3'UTR functional variants altering miRNAs-BDNF binding.

  18. Cytokine and chemokine inter-regulation in the inflamed or injured CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia A; Millward, Jason M

    2005-01-01

    The distinction between immune-regulatory and effector cytokines and chemokines, and neural growth and survival factors (neurotrophins) becomes increasingly blurred. We discuss here the role of immune cytokines and chemokines as mediators of innate glial responses in the central nervous system. G...

  19. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Is Involved in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-Enhanced Cell Motility and Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 Expression in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the primary malignancy of bone that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis, and is therefore associated with poor prognoses. Chondrosarcoma further shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small molecule in the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcome of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on cell motility in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma cell lines had significantly higher cell motility and BDNF expression compared to normal chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased cell motility and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in human chondrosarcoma cells. BDNF-mediated cell motility and MMP-1 up-regulation were attenuated by Trk inhibitor (K252a), ASK1 inhibitor (thioredoxin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and p38 inhibitor (SB203580). Furthermore, BDNF also promoted Sp1 activation. Our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration and invasion activity of chondrosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-1 expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, ASK1, JNK/p38, and Sp1. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:23892595

  20. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  1. Aviation Flight Regulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... This regulation covers aircraft operations, crew requirements and flight rules. It also covers Army aviation general provisions, training, standardization, and management of aviation resources...

  2. Regulating household financial advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F. Cummings

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews economic theory related to investment advice. This theory explains 1 why financial advisors need to be carefully regulated for the benefit of both the investment advice industry and for consumers, 2 why principles-based regulation (e.g., a fiduciary standard is more efficient than rules-based regulation, 3 why dual regulation of financial professionals providing investment or insurance advice is inefficient and inequitable policy, and 4 why the application of a universal and uniform fiduciary standard will be difficult to implement.

  3. Nerve growth factor in the hippocamposeptal system: Evidence for activity-dependent anterograde delivery and modulation of synaptic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Lan; Yeh, Mason L.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Yeh, Hermes H.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been implicated in regulating neuronal differentiation, promoting neuronal survival, and modulating synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Depending on the target and mode of action, the prevailing view is that most neurotrophins can be trafficked and released either anterogradely or retrogradely in an activity-dependent manner. However, the prototypic neurotrophin, nerve growth factor (NGF), is not thought to be anterogradely delivered. Here we provide the neuroanatomical subst...

  4. Emotion-regulation choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheppes, Gal; Scheibe, Susanne; Suri, Gaurav; Gross, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite centuries of speculation about how to manage negative emotions, little is actually known about which emotion-regulation strategies people choose to use when confronted with negative situations of varying intensity. On the basis of a new process conception of emotion regulation, we

  5. Mortgage market regulation: Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, M.B.; Smith, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite several European Union (EU) initiatives, there is only limited pan-European mortgage market regulation. The EU strategy can be characterised as one of parallel liberalisation and consolidation. This article highlights the key differences in regulation among European mortgage markets.

  6. Practicing reflexive regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Rutz (Suzanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractReflexive regulation has been developed to provide inspectors with strategies to deal with uncertain situations in which rules and roles are unclear, and inspecting involves multiple actors and learning how to deal with the situation is crucial. Reflexive regulation offers an alternative

  7. Plant Growth Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  8. Regulation of SUMO Modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Knipscheer (Puck Maria)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe small ubiquitin related modifier SUMO is a posttranslational modifier that functions in a wide range of cellular processes like intracellular transport, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and regulation of transcription. SUMO is an 11 kDa protein and is ligated to its target proteins

  9. The regulation of hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Frank

    Within hunting, wildlife populations are estimated to be too high in many countries which is assumed to be due to the market failure, that each hunter harvests too little compared to what the regulator wants. This may be due to the existing regulation which, among other things, requires knowledge...

  10. Reconceptualizing Civil Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galang, Roberto Martin; Castello, Itziar

    2011-01-01

    This article re-conceptualizes the notion of civil regulation, through an analysis of 775 projects by firms located in 21 Asian countries, wherein we map the state of civil regulation initiatives in the region. We challenge two established assumptions in the Corporate Social Responsibility...... and environmental standards; but also that local, small and medium companies play a key role in the development of Asian civil regulation. We call this second finding the “CSR importation trap”. Our findings are supported by evidence on the limitations in the interchangeable properties of business and governments...... literature. First, contrary to what is commonly argued, we claim that strong states in Asia promote civil regulation in what we call the “paradox of the weak state”. Second, we not only argue that civil regulation is mainly enforced by multinational enterprises willing to promote international social...

  11. Hypothalamus integrity and appetite regulation in low birth weight rats reared artificially on a high-protein milk formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, Bérengère; Delamaire, Eloïse; Hoebler, Christine; Grit, Isabelle; Even, Patrick; Fromentin, Gilles; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    High-protein (HP) milk formulas are routinely used in infants born with a low birth weight (LBW) to enhance growth and ensure a better verbal IQ development. Indirect evidence points to a link between an HP intake during early life and the prevalence of obesity in later life. We hypothesized that HP milk supplementation to LBW pups during early postnatal life would impact hypothalamic appetite neuronal pathways development with consequences, at adulthood, on energy homeostasis regulation. Rat pups born with a LBW were equipped with gastrostomy tubes on the fifth day of life. They received a milk formula with either normal protein (NP, 8.7 g protein/dl) or high protein content (HP; 13.0 g protein/dl) and were subsequently weaned to a standard, solid diet at postnatal day 21. Rats that had been fed HP content milk gained more weight at adulthood associated with an increase of plasma insulin, leptin and triglycerides concentrations compared to NP rats. Screening performed on hypothalamus in development from the two groups of rats identified higher gene expression for cell proliferation and neurotrophin markers in HP rats. Despite these molecular differences, appetite neuronal projections emanating from the arcuate nucleus did not differ between the groups. Concerning feeding behavior at adulthood, rats that had been fed HP or NP milk exhibited differences in the satiety period, resting postprandial duration and nocturnal meal pattern. The consequences of HP milk supplementation after LBW will be discussed in regard to neural development and metabolic anomalies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sema3A chemorepellant regulates the timing and patterning of dental nerves during development of incisor tooth germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anjana; Moe, Kyaw; Luukko, Keijo; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Kettunen, Paivi

    2014-07-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) axon repellant serves multiple developmental functions. Sema3A mRNAs are expressed in epithelial and mesenchymal components of the developing incisor in a dynamic manner. Here, we investigate the functions of Sema3A during development of incisors using Sema3A-deficient mice. We analyze histomorphogenesis and innervation of mandibular incisors using immunohistochemistry as well as computed tomography and thick tissue confocal imaging. Whereas no apparent disturbances in histomorphogenesis or hard tissue formation of Sema3A (-/-) incisors were observed, nerve fibers were prematurely seen in the presumptive dental mesenchyme of the bud stage Sema3A (-/-) tooth germ. Later, nerves were ectopically present in the Sema3A (-/-) dental papilla mesenchyme during the cap and bell stages, whereas in the Sema3A (+/+) mice the first nerve fibers were seen in the pulp after the onset of dental hard tissue formation. However, no apparent topographic differences in innervation pattern or nerve fasciculation were seen inside the pulp between postnatal and adult Sema3A (+/+) or Sema3A (-/-) incisors. In contrast, an abnormally large number of nerves and arborizations were observed in the Sema3A (-/-) developing dental follicle target field and periodontium and, unlike in the wild-type mice, nerve fibers were abundant in the labial periodontium. Of note, the observed defects appeared to be mostly corrected in the adult incisors. The expressions of Ngf and Gdnf neurotrophins and their receptors were not altered in the Sema3A (-/-) postnatal incisor or trigeminal ganglion, respectively. Thus, Sema3A is an essential, locally produced chemorepellant, which by creating mesenchymal exclusion areas, regulates the timing and patterning of the dental nerves during the development of incisor tooth germ.

  13. Murine K2P5.1 Deficiency Has No Impact on Autoimmune Neuroinflammation due to Compensatory K2P3.1- and KV1.3-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bittner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes express potassium channels that regulate physiological cell functions, such as activation, proliferation and migration. Expression levels of K2P5.1 (TASK2; KCNK5 channels belonging to the family of two-pore domain potassium channels have previously been correlated to the activity of autoreactive T lymphocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. In humans, K2P5.1 channels are upregulated upon T cell stimulation and influence T cell effector functions. However, a further clinical translation of targeting K2P5.1 is currently hampered by a lack of highly selective inhibitors, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of KCNK5 in established preclinical animal disease models. We here demonstrate that K2P5.1 knockout (K2P5.1−/− mice display no significant alterations concerning T cell cytokine production, proliferation rates, surface marker molecules or signaling pathways. In an experimental model of autoimmune neuroinflammation, K2P5.1−/− mice show a comparable disease course to wild-type animals and no major changes in the peripheral immune system or CNS compartment. A compensatory upregulation of the potassium channels K2P3.1 and KV1.3 seems to counterbalance the deletion of K2P5.1. As an alternative model mimicking autoimmune neuroinflammation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the common marmoset has been proposed, especially for testing the efficacy of new potential drugs. Initial experiments show that K2P5.1 is functionally expressed on marmoset T lymphocytes, opening up the possibility for assessing future K2P5.1-targeting drugs.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tho X. Pham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue expansion in obesity leads to changes in the expression of adipokines, adipocyte-specific hormones that can regulate whole body energy metabolism. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a mechanism by which cells can alter gene expression through the modifications of DNA and histones. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, are intimately tied to energy metabolism due to their dependence on metabolic intermediates such as S-adenosylmethionine and acetyl-CoA. Altered expression of adipokines in obesity may be due to epigenetic changes. The goal of this review is to highlight current knowledge of epigenetic regulation of adipokines.

  15. Electrical installations and regulations

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J F

    1966-01-01

    Electrical Installations and Regulations focuses on the regulations that apply to electrical installations and the reasons for them. Topics covered range from electrical science to alternating and direct current supplies, as well as equipment for providing protection against excess current. Cables, wiring systems, and final subcircuits are also considered, along with earthing, discharge lighting, and testing and inspection.Comprised of 12 chapters, this book begins with an overview of electrical installation work, traits of a good electrician, and the regulations governing installations. The r

  16. BDNF activates mTOR to regulate GluR1 expression required for memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Slipczuk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR kinase plays a key role in translational control of a subset of mRNAs through regulation of its initiation step. In neurons, mTOR is present at the synaptic region, where it modulates the activity-dependent expression of locally-translated proteins independently of mRNA synthesis. Indeed, mTOR is necessary for different forms of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM formation. However, little is known about the time course of mTOR activation and the extracellular signals governing this process or the identity of the proteins whose translation is regulated by this kinase, during mnemonic processing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that consolidation of inhibitory avoidance (IA LTM entails mTOR activation in the dorsal hippocampus at the moment of and 3 h after training and is associated with a rapid and rapamycin-sensitive increase in AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit expression, which was also blocked by intra-hippocampal delivery of GluR1 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO. In addition, we found that pre- or post-training administration of function-blocking anti-BDNF antibodies into dorsal CA1 hampered IA LTM retention, abolished the learning-induced biphasic activation of mTOR and its readout, p70S6K and blocked GluR1 expression, indicating that BDNF is an upstream factor controlling mTOR signaling during fear-memory consolidation. Interestingly, BDNF ASO hindered LTM retention only when given into dorsal CA1 1 h after but not 2 h before training, suggesting that BDNF controls the biphasic requirement of mTOR during LTM consolidation through different mechanisms: an early one involving BDNF already available at the moment of training, and a late one, happening around 3 h post-training that needs de novo synthesis of this neurotrophin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IN CONCLUSION, OUR FINDINGS DEMONSTRATE THAT: 1 mTOR-mediated mRNA translation is required for memory consolidation during

  17. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and

  18. Sport Fishing Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The regulations for sport fishing on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are outlined in this document. Fishing is only permitted from sunrise to sunset, and only...

  19. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article shows a new form of regulation within a tax administration where tax administrators abate tax evasion by nudging and motivating consumers to only purchase services from tax compliant businesses. This indirectly closes or forces tax evading businesses to change their practices, because...... their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... stakeholders, i.e. the consumers, in the regulatory craft. The study is based on a qualitative methodology and draws on a unique case of regulation in the cleaning sector. This sector is at high risk of tax evasion and human exploitation of vulnerable workers operating in the informal economy. The article has...

  20. Focus on PTEN regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eBermudez-Brito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of PTEN as a tumour suppressor has been for a long time attributed to its lipid phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5P3, the phospholipid product of the class I PI3Ks. Besides its traditional role as a lipid phosphatase at the plasma membrane, a wealth of data has shown that PTEN can function independently of its phosphatase activity and that PTEN also exists and plays a role in the nucleus, in cytoplasmic organelles and extracellularly. Accumulating evidence has shed light on diverse physiological functions of PTEN which are accompanied by a complex regulation of its expression and activity. PTEN levels and function are regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally and post-translationally. PTEN is also sensitive to regulation by its interacting proteins and its localization. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms that regulate the expression and enzymatic activity of PTEN and its role in human diseases.

  1. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Regulation of Genetic Tests Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions ...

  2. Legislation and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the nuclear and environmental licensing, and emergency preparedness legislation.

  3. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  4. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generati...

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Tho X.; Ji-Young Lee

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue expansion in obesity leads to changes in the expression of adipokines, adipocyte-specific hormones that can regulate whole body energy metabolism. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a mechanism by which cells can alter gene expression through the modifications of DNA and histones. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, are intimately tied to energy metabolism due to their dependence on metabolic intermediates such as S-adenosylmethion...

  6. Turning regulation into value

    OpenAIRE

    Laamanen, Tomi; Reuter, Emmanuelle; Steiger, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    As an export-based industry, the survival of Swiss private banking depends on its access to an international client base in relevant markets. Adoption of transnational regulation is especially critical as the foreign onshore business gains importance while the offshore business declines. Transnational regulation should therefore not be seen as an option. Rather, it is central to a sustainable and successful Swiss private banking model.

  7. In regulation we trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Siri; Tharaldsen, Jorunn Elise

    2012-01-01

    The role of trust has been argued to play an increasingly important role in modern, complex, and ambivalent risk societies. Trust within organizational research is anticipated to have a general strategic impact on aspects such as organizational performance, communication and knowledge exchange, and learning from accidents. Trust is also an important aspect related to regulation of risk. Diverse regulatory regimes, their contexts and risks influence regulators use of trust and distrust in regulatory practice. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between risk regulation and trust across diverse risk regulation regimes. By drawing from studies of risk regulation, risk perception, and trust the purpose is to discuss how regulation and trust are linked and used in practice to control risk across system levels in socio-technical systems in high risk industries. This paper provides new knowledge on 1) how functional and dysfunctional trust and distrust are grounded in the empirical realities of high risk industries, 2) how different perspectives on trust and distrust act together and bring new knowledge on how society control risk.

  8. Interpersonal emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Jamil; Williams, W Craig

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary emotion regulation research emphasizes intrapersonal processes such as cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, but people experiencing affect commonly choose not to go it alone. Instead, individuals often turn to others for help in shaping their affective lives. How and under what circumstances does such interpersonal regulation modulate emotional experience? Although scientists have examined allied phenomena such as social sharing, empathy, social support, and prosocial behavior for decades, there have been surprisingly few attempts to integrate these data into a single conceptual framework of interpersonal regulation. Here we propose such a framework. We first map a "space" differentiating classes of interpersonal regulation according to whether an individual uses an interpersonal regulatory episode to alter their own or another person's emotion. We then identify 2 types of processes--response-dependent and response-independent--that could support interpersonal regulation. This framework classifies an array of processes through which interpersonal contact fulfills regulatory goals. More broadly, it organizes diffuse, heretofore independent data on "pieces" of interpersonal regulation, and identifies growth points for this young and exciting research domain.

  9. Miniaturized system of neurotrophin patterning for guided regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Laura M Y; Wosnick, Jordan H; Shoichet, Molly S

    2008-06-30

    Understanding the fundamentals of cell behaviour is imperative for designing and improving engineering strategies for regenerative medicine. By combining the precision of confocal microscopy with photochemistry, nerve growth factor (NGF) was chemically immobilized on chitosan films either in distinct areas or as concentration gradients. Using rhodamine as a proxy for NGF, a series of immobilized concentration gradients were created, using the number of rastering scans within a defined area and the distance between each area as a way to control the resulting gradient. The same photochemistry was applied to create NGF patterns on chitosan films which were visualized by immunostaining, and the immobilized NGF remained bioactive as demonstrated with a neuron survival assay. Neuron survival was 73.2+/-1.3% after 3 days of culture on chitosan films with 30 ng/cm(2) of homogenously immobilized NGF, which was comparable to 74.8+/-3.4% neuron survival on chitosan with 50 ng/ml of soluble NGF present. Interestingly, when neurons were plated on a chitosan film that had distinct immobilized NGF-patterned areas surrounded by unmodified chitosan, the neurons remained predominantly as single cells in the NGF-patterned regions, but formed aggregates outside of these patterns on the plain chitosan film. Thus, the immobilized NGF pattern influenced neuron behaviour and can be used to further probe mechanisms of other neuron behaviour such as axon guidance. Importantly, the versatility of the confocal laser patterning technique reported here can be extended to other factors to elucidate fundamental cell functions, and hence design strategies in regenerative medicine.

  10. Neurotrophin Therapy of Neurodegenerative Disorders with Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Table of Contents 1 Narrative...neurodegenerative disorders including Wernicke -Korsakoff syndrome (reviewed in Martin et al., 2005). 2. Results At E15.5, Ts16 brains are slightly

  11. Worldwide regulations for mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Hans P

    2002-01-01

    Since the discovery of the aflatoxins in the 1960s, regulations have been established in many countries to protect the consumer from the harmful effects of mycotoxins that may contaminate foodstuffs. Various factors play a role in the decision-making process of setting limits for mycotoxins. These include scientific factors such as the availability of toxicological data, survey data, knowledge about the distribution of mycotoxins in commodities, and analytical methodology. Economical and political factors such as commercial interests and sufficiency of food supply have their impact as well. International enquiry's on existing mycotoxin legislation in foodstuffs and animal feedstuffs have been carried out several times in the 1980s and 1990s and details about tolerances, legal basis, responsible authorities, official protocols of analysis and sampling have been published. Recently a comprehensive update on worldwide regulations was published as FAO Food and Nutrition Paper 64. It appeared that at least 77 countries now have specific regulations for mycotoxins, 13 countries are known to have no specific regulations, whereas no data are available for about 50 countries, many of them in Africa. Over the years, a large diversity in tolerance levels for mycotoxins has remained. Some free trade zones (EU, MERCOSUR) are in the process of harmonizing the limits and regulations for mycotoxins in their respective member states, but it is not likely that worldwide harmonized limits for mycotoxins will soon be within reach.

  12. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  13. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle....... Understanding the structure/function relationship of TRPV4 is essential for future development of specific TRPV4 agonist for treatment of diseases causes by dysfunctional TRPV4. E.g. two inherited bone dysplasias have recently been demonstrated in humans to originate from TRPV4 mutations....

  14. Volume regulation in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    We review studies on regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and regulatory volume increase (RVI) of major ion and water transporting vertebrate epithelia. The rate of RVD and RVI is faster in cells of high osmotic permeability like amphibian gallbladder and mammalian proximal tubule as compared...... function of iso-osmotic fluid transport that depends on Na+ recirculation. The causative relationship is discussed for a fluid-absorbing and a fluid-secreting epithelium of which the Na+ recirculation mechanisms have been identified. A large number of transporters and ion channels involved in cell volume...... regulation are cloned. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) exhibiting specific electrophysiological characteristics seems exclusive to serve cell volume regulation. This is contrary to K+ channels as well as cotransporters and exchange mechanisms that may serve both transepithelial transport and cell...

  15. Quantitative analysis of flux regulation through hierarchical regulation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eunen, K. van; Rossell, S.; Bouwman, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation analysis is a methodology that quantifies to what extent a change in the flux through a metabolic pathway is regulated by either gene expression or metabolism. Two extensions to regulation analysis were developed over the past years: (i) the regulation of Vmax can be dissected into the

  16. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF FLUX REGULATION THROUGH HIERARCHICAL REGULATION ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Rossell, Sergio; Bouwman, Jildau; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Jameson, D; Verma, M; Westerhoff, HV

    2011-01-01

    Regulation analysis is a methodology that quantifies to what extent a change in the flux through a metabolic pathway is regulated by either gene expression or metabolism. Two extensions to regulation analysis were developed over the past years: (i) the regulation of V(max) can be dissected into the

  17. Quantitative analysis of flux regulation through hierarchical regulation analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eunen, K. van; Rossell, S.L.; Bouwman, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation analysis is a methodology that quantifies to what extent a change in the flux through a metabolic pathway is regulated by either gene expression or metabolism. Two extensions to regulation analysis were developed over the past years: (i) the regulation of V(max) can be dissected into the

  18. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  19. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response p...

  20. Nuclear regulation and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

  1. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism. Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism? before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidades (organic law on universities, LOU is studied, as is the disciplinary handling of cyberplagiarism with the limited regulations currently in place at universities.

  2. Regulation as Rhetoric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen; Györy, Csaba

    environment, these two agencies apply strategies that appear to be strikingly similar, and these similarities are worth investigating not despite, but exactly because of the differing political and social environment. We track recent shifts in organizational practice at these two agencies and argue that both...... engage reflectively in image promotion which serves two purposes: establishing and maintaining legitimacy in a particular social and political environment and producing compliance. Further, we argue that this regulation is a form of ‘post-bureaucratic’ regulation in which compliance is achieved...

  3. Regulating the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  4. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  5. Emotion regulation during isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Šolcová, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Suppl. 1 (2012) ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP407/11/2226 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : emotion regulation * isolation * Mars 500 Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  6. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 1. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques. General Article Volume 22 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 37-50 ...

  7. Federal Gasoline Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to regulate fuels and fuel additives for use in mobile sources if such fuel, fuel additive or any emission products causes or contributes to air or water pollution that may endanger the public health or welfare.

  8. Understanding medical device regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgon, Richard E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a structural and functional understanding of the systems used for the regulation of medical devices in the USA and European Union (EU). Safe and effective anesthesia care depends heavily on medical devices, including simple, low risk devices to complex life-supporting and life-sustaining devices. In the USA and EU, the Food and Drug Administration and European Commission, respectively, provide regulatory oversight to ensure medical devices are reasonably safe and effective when used for their intended purposes. Unfortunately, practicing anesthesiologists generally have little or no understanding of how medical devices are regulated, nor do they have sufficient knowledge of available adverse event reporting systems. The US and EU medical device regulatory systems are similar in many ways, but differ in important ways too, which impacts the afforded level of safety and effectiveness assurance. In both systems, medical devices are classified and regulated on a risk basis, which fundamentally differs from drug regulation, where uniform requirements are imposed. Anesthesia providers must gain knowledge of these systems and be active players in both premarket and postmarket activities, particularly with regard to vigilance and adverse event/device failure reporting.

  9. Sink regulation of photosynthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew J. Paul; Christine H. Foyer

    2001-01-01

    ... in the effects of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is one of the most highly integrated and regulated metabolic processes to maximize the use of available light, to minimize the damaging effects of excess light and to optimize the use...

  10. Situated bio-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prainsack, Barbara; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2013-01-01

    Several years ago, both authors engaged in research into bioscience and biomedical regulation in Asian countries. One of us (BP) explored why the regulatory and discursive embedding of human embryonic stem cell in Israel was much more permissive than elsewhere. The other author (AW) sought to und...

  11. Regulating groundwater use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogesteger van Dijk, Jaime; Wester, Flip

    2017-01-01

    Around the world it has proven very difficult to develop policies and interventions that ensure socio-environmentally sustainable groundwater use and exploitation. In the state of Guanajuato, Central Mexico, both the national government and the decentralized state government have pursued to regulate

  12. Regulation and deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Market regulation has been induced by market failures such as natural monopoly and a-symmetric information. It has also been motivated by considerations to provide universal access and services to remote regions and to sustain farmers’ incomes. The wave of deregulations that characterized the 1980s

  13. Legislation and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the legislative and regulatory framework, regulatory body and responsibility of the license holder.

  14. Vehicle recycling regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smink, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The number of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) in the EU is increasing continously. Around 75 percent of an ELV are recyclable metals. The forecast growth in the number of ELVs calls for regulation that aims to minimise the environmental impact of a car. Using Denmark as an example, this article...

  15. Optimal Regulation of Lumpy Investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, G.; Broer, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    When a monopolist has discretion over the timing of infrastructure investments, regulation of post-investment prices interferes with incentivizing socially optimal investment timing. In a model of regulated lumpy investment under uncertainty, we study regulation when the regulator can condition

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Neurotrophins represent candidate molecules regulating and controlling this cross-talk between the immune and nervous system3. Neurotrophins are a family of peptides that promote survival, growth and differentiation of neurons. They include; nerve growth factor (NGF), brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and.

  17. Meat and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Ursula Nana

    source (animal vs. vegetable protein patties). In a controlled cross-over design, 40 healthy men consumed four meals with similar weight, energy and macronutrient composition (13 g fiber in the three fiber meals) that consisted of meatballs/vegetable patties, bread with butter, a dipping sauce...... by the viscous properties of the fiber ingredients. Moreover, our results suggest that animal and vegetable protein-based, fiber-matched meals had similar effects on appetite regulation. Paper III compared the physico-chemical, orosensory, and microstructural properties of meatballs and sausages containing......Obesity is a significant risk factor for lifestyle related diseases. Foods capable of suppressing hunger and decreasing energy intake could be an efficient tool in obesity prevention. Numerous randomized controlled trials report a beneficial effect of diets high in protein on appetite regulation...

  18. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  19. Probiotics and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig

    resistance and blood lipid profile among others. Probiotics which are health promoting bacteria can potentially be used to affect the GM and thereby change metabolic outcomes of the host. Animal studies have shown associations between intake of probiotics and appetite regulation, but currently no human...... studies have investigated this effect. Supplementation with different probiotic strains have been shown to have an effect on blood lipid profiles in both animals and humans and the mechanisms behind have been studied in vitro and in rodents. The aim of the present thesis was to examine in an ex vivo...... intestine, in an animal study and in two human studies the effect of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8 (W8) on appetite regulation, blood lipids and blood fatty acids. In addition, it was investigated if W8 had an effect on the fecal microbiota of the human...

  20. Markets, religion, regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    of regulation, certification and standardization on a global scale. Building on research on global kosher (a Hebrew term meaning “fit” or “proper”), halal (an Arabic word that literally means “permissible” or “lawful”) and Hindu vegetarianism this paper argues that these economies or markets to a large extent...... and consumers. Epistemologically, comparison is used as a powerful conceptual mechanism that fixes attention on kosher, halal and Hindu vegetarian similarities and differences....

  1. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work) and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism). Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism?) before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidad...

  2. Telecommunications Competition Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Productivity Commission

    2002-01-01

    On 21 June 2000 the Commission received a reference from the Treasurer on telecommunications-specific competition regulation for inquiry and report within 12 months of receipt of the reference. In conducting the review, the Commission was to have regard to the state of competition in the telecommunications market, and the impact of new technologies and delivery platforms. In making its recommendations, the Commission would aim to improve the overall economic performance of the Australian econ...

  3. Regulation of Organelle Acidity

    OpenAIRE

    Grabe, Michael; Oster, George

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular organelles have characteristic pH ranges that are set and maintained by a balance between ion pumps, leaks, and internal ionic equilibria. Previously, a thermodynamic study by Rybak et al. (Rybak, S., F. Lanni, and R. Murphy. 1997. Biophys. J. 73:674–687) identified the key elements involved in pH regulation; however, recent experiments show that cellular compartments are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. We present here a nonequilibrium model of lumenal acidification based on t...

  4. The discovery of GluA3-dependent synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are responsible for fast excitatory synaptic transmission. GluA1-containing AMPARs have been extensively studied and play a key role in several forms of synaptic plasticity and memory. In contrast, GluA3-containing AMPARs have historically been ignored because they have

  5. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  6. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  7. Improving CS regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  8. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation of the Hippocampal Network by VGLUT3-Positive CCK- GABAergic Basket Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fasano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal interneurons release the inhibitory transmitter GABA to regulate excitation, rhythm generation and synaptic plasticity. A subpopulation of GABAergic basket cells co-expresses the GABA/glycine vesicular transporters (VIAAT and the atypical type III vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT3; therefore, these cells have the ability to signal with both GABA and glutamate. GABAergic transmission by basket cells has been extensively characterized but nothing is known about the functional implications of VGLUT3-dependent glutamate released by these cells. Here, using VGLUT3-null mice we observed that the loss of VGLUT3 results in a metaplastic shift in synaptic plasticity at Shaeffer’s collaterals – CA1 synapses and an altered theta oscillation. These changes were paralleled by the loss of a VGLUT3-dependent inhibition of GABAergic current in CA1 pyramidal layer. Therefore presynaptic type III metabotropic could be activated by glutamate released from VGLUT3-positive interneurons. This putative presynaptic heterologous feedback mechanism inhibits local GABAergic tone and regulates the hippocampal neuronal network.

  10. Regulation of the Hippocampal Network by VGLUT3-Positive CCK- GABAergic Basket Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Caroline; Rocchetti, Jill; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Manseau, Frédéric; Sakae, Diana Y; Marcus-Sells, Maya; Ramet, Lauriane; Morel, Lydie J; Carrel, Damien; Dumas, Sylvie; Bolte, Susanne; Bernard, Véronique; Vigneault, Erika; Goutagny, Romain; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Giros, Bruno; Daumas, Stéphanie; Williams, Sylvain; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal interneurons release the inhibitory transmitter GABA to regulate excitation, rhythm generation and synaptic plasticity. A subpopulation of GABAergic basket cells co-expresses the GABA/glycine vesicular transporters (VIAAT) and the atypical type III vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT3); therefore, these cells have the ability to signal with both GABA and glutamate. GABAergic transmission by basket cells has been extensively characterized but nothing is known about the functional implications of VGLUT3-dependent glutamate released by these cells. Here, using VGLUT3-null mice we observed that the loss of VGLUT3 results in a metaplastic shift in synaptic plasticity at Shaeffer's collaterals - CA1 synapses and an altered theta oscillation. These changes were paralleled by the loss of a VGLUT3-dependent inhibition of GABAergic current in CA1 pyramidal layer. Therefore presynaptic type III metabotropic could be activated by glutamate released from VGLUT3-positive interneurons. This putative presynaptic heterologous feedback mechanism inhibits local GABAergic tone and regulates the hippocampal neuronal network.

  11. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... and highly important field. What biological products does FDA regulate? The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research ( ...

  12. [Sleep: regulation and phenomenology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchierini, M-F

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the two-process model of sleep regulation. The 24-hour sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a homeostatic process and an endogenous, 2 oscillators, circadian process, under the influence of external synchronisers. These two processes are partially independent but influence each other, as shown in the two-sleep-process auto-regulation model. A reciprocal inhibition model of two interconnected neuronal groups, "SP on" and "SP off", explains the regular recurrence of paradoxical sleep. Sleep studies have primarily depended on observation of the subject and have determined the optimal conditions for sleep (position, external conditions, sleep duration and need) and have studied the consequences of sleep deprivation or modifications of sleep schedules. Then, electrophysiological recordings permitted the classification of sleep stages according to the observed EEG patterns. The course of a night's sleep is reported on a "hypnogram". The adult subject falls asleep in non-REM sleep (N1), then sleep deepens progressively to stages N2 and N3 with the appearance of spindles and slow waves (N2). Slow waves become more numerous in stage N3. Every 90minutes REM sleep recurs, with muscle atonia and rapid eye movements. These adult sleep patterns develop progressively during the 2 first years of life as total sleep duration decreases, with the reduction of diurnal sleep and of REM sleep. Around 2 to 4 months, spindles and K complexes appear on the EEG, with the differentiation of light and deep sleep with, however, a predominance of slow wave sleep. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Wiring regulations in brief

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Tired of trawling through the Wiring Regs?Perplexed by Part P?Confused by cables, conductors and circuits?Then look no further! This handy guide provides an on-the-job reference source for Electricians, Designers, Service Engineers, Inspectors, Builders, Students, DIY enthusiastsTopic-based chapters link areas of working practice - such as cables, installations, testing and inspection, special locations - with the specifics of the Regulations themselves. This allows quick and easy identification of the official requirements relating to the situati

  14. Regulations, 30 January 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Regulations adopted by the All-Union Women's Committee give recently established women's councils greater scope to initiate legislation and provide that laws and statutory instruments affecting women's interests cannot be discussed without their participation. The Councils are also to play an active role in representing the interests of the female workforce at the enterprise level through participation in formulating and monitoring collective agreements, planning the allocation of resources on the social and day-to-day needs of the staff, and supervising the work of medical, pre-school and educational institutions, commercial and public catering enterprises, and day-to-day services. full text

  15. Epigenetic regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaard, Craig S; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2014-12-01

    The study of epigenetics in plants has a long and rich history, from initial descriptions of non-Mendelian gene behaviors to seminal discoveries of chromatin-modifying proteins and RNAs that mediate gene silencing in most eukaryotes, including humans. Genetic screens in the model plant Arabidopsis have been particularly rewarding, identifying more than 130 epigenetic regulators thus far. The diversity of epigenetic pathways in plants is remarkable, presumably contributing to the phenotypic plasticity of plant postembryonic development and the ability to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  17. Epigenetic Regulation in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaard, Craig S.; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2014-01-01

    The study of epigenetics in plants has a long and rich history, from initial descriptions of non-Mendelian gene behaviors to seminal discoveries of chromatin-modifying proteins and RNAs that mediate gene silencing in most eukaryotes, including humans. Genetic screens in the model plant Arabidopsis have been particularly rewarding, identifying more than 130 epigenetic regulators thus far. The diversity of epigenetic pathways in plants is remarkable, presumably contributing to the phenotypic plasticity of plant postembryonic development and the ability to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. PMID:25452385

  18. VGF and Its C-Terminal Peptide TLQP-62 Regulate Memory Formation in Hippocampus via a BDNF-TrkB-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Jye; Jiang, Cheng; Sadahiro, Masato; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Vulchanova, Lucy; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated expression and secretion of BDNF, which activates TrkB receptor signaling, is known to play a critical role in cognition. Identification of additional modulators of cognitive behavior that regulate activity-dependent BDNF secretion and/or potentiate TrkB receptor signaling would therefore be of considerable interest. In this study, we show in the adult mouse hippocampus that expression of the granin family gene Vgf and secretion of its C-terminal VGF-derived peptide TLQP-62 are required for fear memory formation. We found that hippocampal VGF expression and TLQP-62 levels were transiently induced after fear memory training and that sequestering secreted TLQP-62 peptide in the hippocampus immediately after training impaired memory formation. Reduced VGF expression was found to impair learning-evoked Rac1 induction and phosphorylation of the synaptic plasticity markers cofilin and synapsin in the adult mouse hippocampus. Moreover, TLQP-62 induced acute, transient activation of the TrkB receptor and subsequent CREB phosphorylation in hippocampal slice preparations and its administration immediately after training enhanced long-term memory formation. A critical role of BDNF-TrkB signaling as a downstream effector in VGF/TLQP-62-mediated memory consolidation was further revealed by posttraining activation of BDNF-TrkB signaling, which rescued impaired fear memory resulting from hippocampal administration of anti-VGF antibodies or germline VGF ablation in mice. We propose that VGF is a critical component of a positive BDNF-TrkB regulatory loop and, upon its induced expression by memory training, the TLQP-62 peptide rapidly reinforces BDNF-TrkB signaling, regulating hippocampal memory consolidation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate long-term memory formation and storage may provide alternative treatment modalities for degenerative and neuropsychiatric memory disorders. The neurotrophin BDNF plays a

  19. The Regulation of Street Foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forkour, John Boulard; Samuelsen, Helle; Yeboah, Eric Henry

    2017-01-01

    the challenges and negotiating strategies of regulators of street-vended foods in Ghana and analyses the implication for their relationship with street food vendors. The paper reveals that regulators operate in a context of limited resources, leading to a general feeling of neglect. In coping, regulators adopt...

  20. Orphan drug regulations. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing final regulations amending the 1992 Orphan Drug Regulations issued to implement the Orphan Drug Act. These amendments are intended to clarify regulatory provisions and make minor improvements to address issues that have arisen since those regulations were issued.

  1. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Lydia J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-07-25

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide LBNL personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Laboratory) policies and regulations by outlining normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory organizations. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in LBNL procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. RPM sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the LBNL organization responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which organization is responsible for a policy, please contact Requirements Manager Lydia Young or the RPM Editor.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvergne, Béatrice; Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter

    2006-04-01

    Our understanding of metabolism is undergoing a dramatic shift. Indeed, the efforts made towards elucidating the mechanisms controlling the major regulatory pathways are now being rewarded. At the molecular level, the crucial role of transcription factors is particularly well-illustrated by the link between alterations of their functions and the occurrence of major metabolic diseases. In addition, the possibility of manipulating the ligand-dependent activity of some of these transcription factors makes them attractive as therapeutic targets. The aim of this review is to summarize recent knowledge on the transcriptional control of metabolic homeostasis. We first review data on the transcriptional regulation of the intermediary metabolism, i.e., glucose, amino acid, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. Then, we analyze how transcription factors integrate signals from various pathways to ensure homeostasis. One example of this coordination is the daily adaptation to the circadian fasting and feeding rhythm. This section also discusses the dysregulations causing the metabolic syndrome, which reveals the intricate nature of glucose and lipid metabolism and the role of the transcription factor PPARgamma in orchestrating this association. Finally, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic regulations, which provide new opportunities for treating complex metabolic disorders.

  3. Hormonal Regulation of Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Jeong

    2017-09-12

    Adipose tissue includes multiple anatomical depots that serve as an energy reserve that can expand or contract to maintain metabolic homeostasis. During normal growth and in response to overnutrition, adipose tissue expands by increasing the volume of preexisting adipocytes (hypertrophy) and/or by generating new adipocytes (hyperplasia) via recruitment and differentiation of adipose progenitors. This so-called healthy expansion through hyperplasia is thought to be beneficial in that it protects against obesity associated metabolic disorders by allowing for the "safe" storage of excess energy. Remodeling adipose tissue to replace dysfunctional adipocytes that accumulate with obesity and age also requires new fat cell formation and is necessary to maintain metabolic health. Adipogenesis is the process by which adipose progenitors become committed to an adipogenic lineage and differentiate into mature adipocytes. This transition is regulated by complex array of transcriptional factors and numerous autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine signals. We will focus on hormonal factors that regulate adipocyte differentiation and their molecular mechanisms of actions on adipogenesis as studied in vitro and in vivo. Accumulating evidence indicates that adipose progenitors isolated from different adipose tissues exhibit intrinsic differences in adipogenic potential that may contribute to the depot and sex differences in adipose expansion and remodeling capacity. We will put special emphasis on the hormonal factors that are known to depot-dependently affect body fat accumulation and adipocyte development. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:1151-1195, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Lydia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide Laboratory personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory policies and regulations by outlining the normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory departments. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in Laboratory procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. The sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the department responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which department should be called, please contact the Associate Laboratory Director of Operations.

  5. Strategisk compliance og regulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Denne artikel introducerer strategisk compliance og påpeger dens samspil med klassiske og nyere former for reguleringer i digital værdiskabelse. Konteksten er den digitale økonomi, som vokser frem imellem den materielle økonomis bærepiller: Virksomheder og markeder, men består af en helt ny...... materialitet, som er det digitale univers og dets modsvarighed i nye krav til compliance. Den nye materialitet stiller nye krav, hvad angår digitale processer og transaktioner. Klassisk regulering, som aktører ikke selv kan ændre, støder på egenregulering, hvor aktørerne selv opsætter regler for at skabe...... digital værdi. Dette kalder på strategisk compliance. Med digitalisering er strategisk compliance sat på dagsordnen i reguleringsdebatten. Vi hævder, at regulering og egenregulering kan komme til at virke komplementært i det post-industrielle, digitaliserede samfund....

  6. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  7. Translational regulation in nutrigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health.

  8. Regulation of osteoclast polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoyuki; Ejiri, Sadakazu; Yanagisawa, Shigeru; Ozawa, Hidehiro

    2007-07-01

    Osteoclast function consists of several processes: recognition of mineralized tissues, development of ruffled borders and sealing zones, secretion of acids and proteolytic enzymes into the space beneath the ruffled border, and incorporation and secretion of bone degradation products using the transcytosis system. One of the most important questions concerning osteoclast function is how osteoclasts recognize bone and polarize. During the past decade, new approaches have been taken to investigate the regulation of osteoclast polarization. Attachment of osteoclasts to some proteins containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence motif through vitronectin receptors is the first step in inducing the polarization of osteoclasts. Physical properties of bone such as hardness or roughness are also required to induce osteoclast polarity. Osteoclasts cultured even on plastic dishes secrete protons toward the dish surface, suggesting that osteoclasts recognize plastic as a mineralized matrix and secrete protons. This notion was supported by the recent findings that bisphosphonates and reveromycin A were specifically incorporated into polarized osteoclasts cultured even on plastic dishes. On the other hand, a sealing zone, defined as a thick band of actin, is induced in osteoclasts adherent only on an apatite-containing mineralized matrix. These results suggest that osteoclasts recognize physical properties of the mineralized tissue to secrete protons, and also sense apatite itself or components of apatite to form the sealing zone. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of osteoclast polarization. We also discuss how osteoclasts recognize mineralized tissues to form the sealing zone.

  9. Environmental regulations on chlorofluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Wells, J. B.

    1989-05-01

    In August 1988, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations that implement the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regulations require a 50% reduction in consumption of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) within 10 years and a freeze on consumption of halons within 4 years. The Montreal Protocol provisions were designed in September 1987 based on the results of a 2-year international series of scientific, technical, and economic workshops. As would be expected, scientific investigations continued during this period. While these investigations suggested that significant global depletion had already occurred, these preliminary findings were not taken into account during negotiations or rulemaking. In March 1988, however, the international Ozone Trends Panel confirmed the findings. Depletion greater than that projected under the Montreal Protocol has already occurred. An early reassessment of the Protocol provisions appears to be inevitable. Restrictions on CFCs will affect the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries. Emerging alternatives to CFCs include newly developed refrigerants, innovative designs, and engineering controls. Key issues in evaluating these alternatives include energy efficiency, capital costs, service to consumers, and compatibility with existing designs.

  10. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  11. Trust-based environmental regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Bettina; Gouldson, Andy

    2010-10-15

    Within this paper, we examine the contribution that trust-based relationships can make to achieving better-and particularly more effective, efficient and equitable-environmental regulation. While levels of trust in regulators, regulatory processes and outcomes are often discussed, the influence of trust on different actors and on different measures of regulatory performance is poorly understood. Within this paper, we define trust-based environmental regulation as a specific regulatory style that involves openness and cooperation in interaction between regulated, regulators and third-party stakeholders in order to achieve environmental protection objectives. We then discuss the pros and cons of trust relationships between regulators, regulated businesses and citizens for achieving behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. To illustrate the significance of these issues, we then examine three forms of contractual regulatory style where trust relationships are critically important: responsive regulation, self-regulation and environmental agreements. Based on this analysis, we highlight the importance of trust-based relationships, and we argue that one of the greatest contributions of trust-based environmental regulation is to challenge how we think about regulation. Trust is often understood as enabling existing regulatory relationships or in the case of self-regulation as a complement to regulation. However, we argue that the real potential of trust is to open up new ways for participants in regulatory regimes to engage in collective action, to go beyond a perception of regulation as driven by the competing interests of individual actors, and thus, to open up new channels of influence for behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. Our analysis therefore has great relevance for future research and for on-going debates on the future of regulation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studzinski Diane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M. Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter

  13. Regulation as delegation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Bar-Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to consider the conception of reverse delegation when the government acts a principal and an individual ndash an agent from the point of view of behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory. Methods statistical method sociological polling. Results In diverse areas ndash from retirement savings to consumer credit to prescription drug use to fuel economy and energy efficiency rules to tobacco consumption to food and beverage consumption ndash government makes decisions for us or endeavors to help us make better decisions thus serving as our agent. From the point of view of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory a great deal of modern regulation can be helpfully evaluated as a hypothetical delegation. Shifting from personal decisions to public goods problems the authors view the idea of reverse delegation with the government as principal and the individuals as agents. They show that the essence of delegation changes depending on the context. The article describes conditions under which various approaches will make sense. Scientific novelty the paper is devoted to the foreign experience of regulation through delegation by the example of a country with developed market economy the USA. It shows the prospects of such approach in solving both the public and the private tasks. Application of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory is viewed to distinguish between such types of hypothetical delegation as information default rules incentives precommitments mandates and prohibitions. The article considers the benefits and costs of delegation and circumstances in which one or another approach makes sense. Practical significance PrincipalAgent Theory is widely used in economics and political science and can serve as a convenient tool to consider the optimal scale and essence of the assistance rendered to us by the government as our agent. The paper is of interest for the Russian legal science as the institution of

  14. Higher regulators, algebraic

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Spencer J

    2000-01-01

    This book is the long-awaited publication of the famous Irvine lectures. Delivered in 1978 at the University of California at Irvine, these lectures turned out to be an entry point to several intimately-connected new branches of arithmetic algebraic geometry, such as regulators and special values of L-functions of algebraic varieties, explicit formulas for them in terms of polylogarithms, the theory of algebraic cycles, and eventually the general theory of mixed motives which unifies and underlies all of the above (and much more). In the 20 years since, the importance of Bloch's lectures has not diminished. A lucky group of people working in the above areas had the good fortune to possess a copy of old typewritten notes of these lectures. Now everyone can have their own copy of this classic work.

  15. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  16. Mitosis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Vázquez Sara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell division by mitosis is essential for the development of organisms and their reproduction; it is also neces- sary that each new cell is genetically identical to that from which it comes. In eukaryotes this is achieved by the presence of complex mechanisms that ensure the integrity of genomic material and their proper segregation during mitosis. The traditional view of mitosis has been divided into different stages that were characterized by morphological studies in dividing cells; advances in molecular biology have led beyond this characterization, so that we now know a range of participant molecules. This article will discuss the process of mitosis, both at the cellular and molecular level and a brief summary of the molecular players that regulate this process.

  17. Meniscus regulator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marshall K.

    1995-06-01

    A method and system is provided for regulating the meniscus of a water droplet in a high velocity water droplet apparatus in which a large pulse of energy are applied to the water droplet to propel the water droplet at high velocity. In this method the shape of the meniscus of the water droplet is observed and adjusted in accordance with the observation. The energy is applied to the water droplet substantially simultaneously with the observing of the shape of the meniscus. The shape of the meniscus is determined by observing a magnified image of the water droplet so that the adjustment may be made in accordance with the magnified image. The high energy is applied to the water droplet by means of a projectile and an energy transfer body which transfers energy from the projectile to the water droplet. A pressure adjustment device is provided for adjusting the pressure applied to the water droplet in order to adjust the meniscus.

  18. Robust regulering af destillationskolonner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim

    1987-01-01

    Sharke og Dixons metode benyttes til minimalrealisering af Laplace-overføringsmatricer. Ud fra denne metode til minimalrealisering opnåes en tilstandsbeskrivelse med første ordens Pade'-approximation af tidsforsinkelsen i Laplace-overføringsfunktionsmatricerne. Ud fra A.N Hansens frekvensanalyser...... bør denne regulator dog undersøges med eksakt beskrivelse af tidsforsinkelsen, hvilket ikke er nået indenfor denne opgave, væsenligst på grund af problemer med MIMOFAD Konklusion. Med Sharked og Dixons metode er der opnået kendskab til en simpel metode til minimalrealisering af Laplace......-overføringsmatricer. Metoden munder ud i et simpelt program der foretager minimalrealisering af Laplace-overføringsfunktionsmatricer med reelle adskildte poler. Anvendelsen af programmet resulterer i en tilstandsbeskrivelse af Laplace-overføringsfunktioner for velbeskrevne kolonner i litteraturen. Den opnåede...

  19. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  20. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment...... to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  1. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  2. Regulation of organelle acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, M; Oster, G

    2001-04-01

    Intracellular organelles have characteristic pH ranges that are set and maintained by a balance between ion pumps, leaks, and internal ionic equilibria. Previously, a thermodynamic study by Rybak et al. (Rybak, S., F. Lanni, and R. Murphy. 1997. Biophys. J. 73:674-687) identified the key elements involved in pH regulation; however, recent experiments show that cellular compartments are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. We present here a nonequilibrium model of lumenal acidification based on the interplay of ion pumps and channels, the physical properties of the lumenal matrix, and the organelle geometry. The model successfully predicts experimentally measured steady-state and transient pH values and membrane potentials. We conclude that morphological differences among organelles are insufficient to explain the wide range of pHs present in the cell. Using sensitivity analysis, we quantified the influence of pH regulatory elements on the dynamics of acidification. We found that V-ATPase proton pump and proton leak densities are the two parameters that most strongly influence resting pH. Additionally, we modeled the pH response of the Golgi complex to varying external solutions, and our findings suggest that the membrane is permeable to more than one dominant counter ion. From this data, we determined a Golgi complex proton permeability of 8.1 x 10(-6) cm/s. Furthermore, we analyzed the early-to-late transition in the endosomal pathway where Na,K-ATPases have been shown to limit acidification by an entire pH unit. Our model supports the role of the Na,K-ATPase in regulating endosomal pH by affecting the membrane potential. However, experimental data can only be reproduced by (1) positing the existence of a hypothetical voltage-gated chloride channel or (2) that newly formed vesicles have especially high potassium concentrations and small chloride conductance.

  3. Standard types of regulation loops; Chaines de regulation types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M. [ENSAM, Centre d`Enseignement et de Recherche de Lille, 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give help in the analysis of industrial regulation problems using different types of real installations. The increasing complexity of industrial systems requires the use of a decomposition-recomposition procedure using a scheme with different blocs. Examples are given to help the non-specialist users in the mastery of essential choices and in the distinction between operational and material separations. The examples concern: the heating loop of a central heating installation, the sensors and actuators of industrial systems (the temperature regulation of a tubular furnace, the electro-hydraulic positioning systems used in machine tools, forming, aeronautics etc.., the regulation of a mixing system for hot and cold fluids, and the regulation of a fluidizing system. The usual types of regulation loops are presented with the different steps of the resolution of a regulation problem. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  4. Branded prescription drug fee. Final regulations, temporary regulations, and removal of temporary regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered entities engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs. This fee was enacted by section 9008 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by section 1404 of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. This document also withdraws the Branded Prescription Drug Fee temporary regulations and contains new temporary regulations regarding the definition of controlled group that apply beginning on January 1, 2015. The final regulations and the new temporary regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing certain branded prescription drugs. The text of the temporary regulations in this document also serves as the text of proposed regulations set forth in a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-123286-14) on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.

  5. Sustainable regulation of construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    The seminar examined the role building codes and regulations can have in promoting a more sustainable approach to construction, particularly through their application to non-industrial building materials. A range of building materials such as straw, bamboo, rammed earth, adobe, and cob (a mixture of clay and chopped straw) were described and illustrated by slides to show their building potential. The current codes have a prime concern to protect the health and safety of people from the built environment. They have been developed almost exclusively for mainstream industrial materials and methods of construction, which makes them difficult to use with alternative, indigenous, or non-industrial building materials, even though those materials may be considered more sustainable. The argument was put forward that with only one-third of the world population living in modern industrial buildings today, it is not sustainable to re-house the remaining rapidly expanding population in high technology dwellings. Many of the low technology building materials and methods now used by the majority of people in the world need only incremental improvement to be equal or superior to many of their industrial replacements. Since these can be more sustainable methods of building, there needs to be an acceptance of the use of alternative materials, particularly in the developing parts of the world, where they are being rejected for less sustainable industrial methods. However, many codes make it difficult to use non-industrial materials; indeed, many of the industrial materials would not meet the demands that must be now met if they were now being introduced as new materials. Consequently, there is a need to develop codes to facilitate the use of a wider range of materials than in current use, and research is needed to assist this development. Sustainable regulation should take into account the full range of real impacts that materials and systems have in areas such as resource use and

  6. Regulation of the power sector

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of the Power Sector is a unified, consistent and comprehensive treatment of the theories and practicalities of regulation in modern power-supply systems. The need for generation to occur at the time of use occasioned by the impracticality of large-scale electricity storage coupled with constant and often unpredictable changes in demand make electricity-supply systems large, dynamic and complex and their regulation a daunting task. Conceptually arranged in four parts, this book addresses both traditional regulatory frameworks and also liberalized and re-regulated environments. First, an introduction gives a full characterization of power supply including engineering, economic and regulatory viewpoints. The second part presents the fundamentals of regulation and the third looks at the regulation of particular components of the power sector in detail. Advanced topics and subjects still open or subject to dispute form the content of the fourth part. In a sector where regulatory design is the key driver...

  7. Epigenetic regulation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Elaine M; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-07-01

    Research suggests that 65% of variation in obesity is genetic. However, much of the known genetic associations have little known function and their effect size small, thus the gene-environment interaction, including epigenetic influences on gene expression, is suggested to be an important factor in the susceptibilty to obesity. This review will explore the potential of epigenetic markers to influence expression of genes associated with obesity. Epigenetic changes in utero are known to have direct implications on the phenotype of the offspring. More recently work has focused on how such epigenetic changes continue to regulate risk of obesity from infancy through to adulthood. Work has shown that, for example, hypomethylation of the MC4 gene causes an increase in expression, and has a direct impact on appetite and intake, and thus influences risk of obesity. Similar influences are also seen in other aspects of obesity including inflammation and adiposity. Maternal diet during foetal development has many epigenetic implications, which affect the offspring's risk factors for obesity during childhood and adulthood, and even in subsequent generations. Genes associated with risk of obesity, are susceptible to epigenetic mutations, which have subsequent effects on disease mechanisms, such as appetite and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance.

  8. Regulating the sharing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Erickson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this introductory essay, we explore definitions of the ‘sharing economy’, a concept indicating both social (relational, communitarian and economic (allocative, profit-seeking aspects which appear to be in tension. We suggest combining the social and economic logics of the sharing economy to focus on the central features of network enabled, aggregated membership in a pool of offers and demands (for goods, services, creative expressions. This definition of the sharing economy distinguishes it from other related peer-to-peer and collaborative forms of production. Understanding the social and economic motivations for and implications of participating in the sharing economy is important to its regulation. Each of the papers in this special issue contributes to knowledge by linking the social and economic aspects of sharing economy practices to regulatory norms and mechanisms. We conclude this essay by suggesting future research to further clarify and render intelligible the sharing economy, not as a contradiction in terms but as an empirically observable realm of socio-economic activity.

  9. Personality and Emotion Regulation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Hayu Purnamaningsih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emotions has many important functions in our life such as in relation of interpersonal communication, and health. In interpersonal communicative function aimed to signal to other information about internal state. Emotions manifests in specific cognitive, behavioural, and physiological reactions, thus closely related to health. There is wide variety of ways for individuals to regulate their emotion. In this regard, there are two kinds of emotion regulation strategy; first Antecedent-focused emotion regulation consisting of situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change and second, Response-focused emotion regulation consisting of suppression. The purpose of this research is to investigate personality factors relate with emotion regulation strategies. 339 students from Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Gadjah Mada were participating in this study and given The Big Five Personality Factors (Ramdhani, 2012, adaptation, and the modified version of the Emotion Regulation Scale was used, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (John & Gross, 2004 which measure personality and emotion regulation respectively. Using multiple regression analysis, the study indicated that personality predicts emotion regulation strategies.

  10. Power-MOSFET Voltage Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. N.; Gray, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-six parallel MOSFET devices with two-stage feedback circuit form a high-current dc voltage regulator that also acts as fully-on solid-state switch when fuel-cell out-put falls below regulated voltage. Ripple voltage is less than 20 mV, transient recovery time is less than 50 ms. Parallel MOSFET's act as high-current dc regulator and switch. Regulator can be used wherever large direct currents must be controlled. Can be applied to inverters, industrial furnaces photovoltaic solar generators, dc motors, and electric autos.

  11. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  12. Algorithms for optimal price regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoriev, Alexander; van Loon, Joyce; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Papadimitriou, C.; Zhang, S.

    2008-01-01

    Since summer 2007, mobile phone users in the European Union (EU) are protected by a ceiling on the roaming tariff when calling or receiving a call abroad. We analyze the effects of this price regulative policy, and compare it to alternative implementations of price regulations. The problem is a

  13. Regulating Pornography: A Public Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Margaret E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward sex and pornography by means of a telephone survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, adults. Describes survey questions about sexual attitudes, perceived effects of pornography, and pornography regulation. Concludes that adults who feel more strongly that pornography has negative effects are more opposed to its regulation. (SG)

  14. Teachers' Regulation of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, William K., Jr.

    The nature of teachers' control in classrooms is explored in order: to understand the tension created when noneducators superimpose their rules on the regime of teachers at work and to learn something of a general nature about the antagonism between regulators and those they regulate. Teachers' regulatory powers are based on coercion, exchange, or…

  15. Designing Next Generation Telecom Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Samarajiva, Rohan

    – ICT convergence regulation and multisector utility regulation. Whatever structure of next generation telecom regulation is adopted, all countries will need to pay much greater attention to the need for increased coordination of policy directions and regulatory activities both across the industries......Continuously expanding applications of information and communication technologies (ICT) are transforming local, national, regional and international economies into network economies, the foundation for information societies. They are being built upon expanded and upgraded national telecom networks...... to creating an environment to foster a massive expansion in the coverage and capabilities of the information infrastructure networks, with national telecom regulators as the key implementers of the policies of reform. The first phase of reform has focused on industry specific telecom policy and regulation...

  16. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  17. Regulation of GMOs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinliang

    2008-12-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are created by biotechnology to serve people with much benefit while may impose risks to ecological environment and human health and therefore need careful regulation. During the past two decades, GMOs have been well developed in China and so has their corresponding regulation. This paper reviews and comments the multiple aspects of mainly the agricultural GMOs, including their safety assessment, control measures, trade activities, import, labels, and GM food, which have been prescribed by the corresponding laws, regulations and administrative measures. It is held that till present a framework for regulation of agricultural GMOs and GM food has been established basically in China, while a more comprehensive system for regulation of all kinds of GMOs and all kinds of related activities is still needed at present and in the future.

  18. PPARγ regulates exocrine pancreas lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danino, Hila; Naor, Ronny Peri-; Fogel, Chen; Ben-Harosh, Yael; Kadir, Rotem; Salem, Hagit; Birk, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic lipase (triacylglycerol lipase EC 3.1.1.3) is an essential enzyme in hydrolysis of dietary fat. Dietary fat, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), regulate pancreatic lipase (PNLIP); however, the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation is mostly unknown. As PUFA are known to regulate expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and as we identified in-silico putative PPARγ binding sites within the putative PNLIP promoter sequence, we hypothesized that PUFA regulation of PNLIP might be mediated by PPARγ. We used in silico bioinformatics tools, reporter luciferase assay, PPARγ agonists and antagonists, PPARγ overexpression in exocrine pancreas AR42J and primary cells to study PPARγ regulation of PNLIP. Using in silico bioinformatics tools we mapped PPARγ binding sites (PPRE) to the putative promoter region of PNLIP. Reporter luciferase assay in AR42J rat exocrine pancreas acinar cells transfected with various constructs of the putative PNLIP promoter showed that PNLIP transcription is significantly enhanced by PPARγ dose-dependently, reaching maximal levels with multi PPRE sites. This effect was significantly augmented in the presence of PPARγ agonists and reduced by PPARγ antagonists or mutagenesis abrogating PPRE sites. Over-expression of PPARγ significantly elevated PNLIP transcript and protein levels in AR42J cells and in primary pancreas cells. Moreover, PNLIP expression was up-regulated by PPARγ agonists (pioglitazone and 15dPGJ2) and significantly down-regulated by PPARγ antagonists in non-transfected rat exocrine pancreas AR42J cell line cells. PPARγ transcriptionally regulates PNLIP gene expression. This transcript regulation resolves part of the missing link between dietary PUFA direct regulation of PNLIP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dnase1L3 Regulates Inflammasome-Dependent Cytokine Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilan Shi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus arises in humans and mice lacking the endonuclease Dnase1L3. When Dnase1L3 is absent, DNA from circulating apoptotic bodies is not cleared, leading to anti-DNA antibody production. Compared to early anti-DNA and anti-chromatin responses, other autoantibody responses and general immune activation in Dnase1L3−/− mice are greatly delayed. We investigated the possibility that immune activation, specifically inflammasome activation, is regulated by Dnase1L3. Here, we report that Dnase1L3 inhibition blocked both NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome-mediated release of high-mobility group box 1 protein and IL-1β. In contrast to IL-1β release, Dnase1L3 inhibition only mildly impaired NLRP3-dependent pyroptosis, as measured by propidium iodide uptake or LDH release. Mechanistically, we found that Dnase1L3 was needed to promote apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC nuclear export and speck formation. Our results demonstrate that Dnase1L3 inhibition separates cytokine secretion from pyroptosis by targeting ASC. These findings suggest that Dnase1L3 is necessary for cytokine secretion following inflammasome activation.

  20. The oncogenic microRNA miR-21 promotes regulated necrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Conklin, Daniel J; Li, Fenge; Dai, Zhongping; Hua, Xiang; Li, Yan; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Young, Ken H; Xiong, Wei; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Li, Yong

    2015-05-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate apoptosis, yet their role in regulated necrosis remains unknown. miR-21 is overexpressed in nearly all human cancer types and its role as an oncogene is suggested to largely depend on its anti-apoptotic action. Here we show that miR-21 is overexpressed in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, a pathologic condition involving RIP3-dependent regulated necrosis (necroptosis). Therefore, we investigate the role of miR-21 in acute pancreatitis injury and necroptosis. miR-21 deficiency protects against caerulein- or L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. miR-21 inhibition using locked-nucleic-acid-modified oligonucleotide effectively reduces pancreatitis severity. miR-21 deletion is also protective in tumour necrosis factor-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These data suggest that miRNAs are critical participants in necroptosis and miR-21 enhances cellular necrosis by negatively regulating tumour suppressor genes associated with the death-receptor-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway, and could be a therapeutic target for preventing pathologic necrosis.

  1. Load regulates bone formation and Sclerostin expression through a TGFβ-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Nguyen

    Full Text Available Bone continually adapts to meet changing physical and biological demands. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes cooperate to integrate these physical and biochemical cues to maintain bone homeostasis. Although TGFβ acts on all three of these cell types to maintain bone homeostasis, the extent to which it participates in the adaptation of bone to mechanical load is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the TGFβ pathway in load-induced bone formation and the regulation of Sclerostin, a mechanosensitive antagonist of bone anabolism. We found that mechanical load rapidly represses the net activity of the TGFβ pathway in osteocytes, resulting in reduced phosphorylation and activity of key downstream effectors, Smad2 and Smad3. Loss of TGFβ sensitivity compromises the anabolic response of bone to mechanical load, demonstrating that the mechanosensitive regulation of TGFβ signaling is essential for load-induced bone formation. Furthermore, sensitivity to TGFβ is required for the mechanosensitive regulation of Sclerostin, which is induced by TGFβ in a Smad3-dependent manner. Together, our results show that physical cues maintain bone homeostasis through the TGFβ pathway to regulate Sclerostin expression and the deposition of new bone.

  2. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Emotion Regulation in Alcohol Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Géraldine; Luminet, Olivier; Maurage, François; Tecco, Juan; Lechantre, Stéphane; Ferauge, Marc; Gross, James J; de Timary, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate, in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients, the use of the 5 emotion regulation strategies specified in Gross's (1998, Rev Gen Psychol, 2, 271) process model of emotion regulation with the use of a semi-structured interview allowing a detailed and high-quality assessment of emotion regulation strategies. A secondary aim was to examine the possible influence of protracted abstinence and detoxification on emotion dysregulation. Finally, the association between the level of craving and the types of regulation strategies was investigated. Forty-four treatment-seeking AD patients with varying time spent in rehabilitation, and 26 healthy controls were interviewed using a version of the Emotion Regulation Interview (Werner et al., 2011, J Psychopathol Behav Assess, 33, 346) adapted to alcohol dependence. Compared to controls, AD patients reported significantly greater use of response modulation and attentional deployment, but lesser use of cognitive change. Among patients, (1) rehabilitation duration was positively correlated with the use of cognitive change and (2) the use of response modulation was positively associated with the level of craving. These findings clarify the specific pattern of emotion dysregulation associated with alcohol dependence. They also suggest that (1) abstinence is associated with a shift toward more adaptive emotion regulation patterns and that (2) inefficient regulation strategies may lead to craving and the maintenance of alcohol use. If these findings are confirmed through longitudinal and mediation designs, they will have important clinical implications. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Regulation of Drosophila metamorphosis by xenobiotic response regulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deng, Huai; Kerppola, Tom K

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Nrf2-Keap1 and the homologous Drosophila CncC-dKeap1 protein complexes regulate both transcriptional responses to xenobiotic compounds as well as native cellular and developmental processes...

  5. Designing Next Generation Telecom Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Samarajiva, Rohan; Melody, William H.

    2003-01-01

    This article critically examines the multiple rationales for telecom, IT, media convergence regulation, on the one hand, and multisector utility regulation, on the other, and the practical questions of implementation they pose, with a view to contributing to informed policy and regulatory decisions...... to the regulatory process such as scarcity of regulatory resources and safeguards for regulatory independence, are examined. It is concluded that ICT and media convergence issues are primarily about improving the efficiency of market economies, and how changes in regulation can facilitate this process. Multi...

  6. Nanometrology - challenges for health regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailton Carreteiro Damasceno

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between metrology, nanotechnology and nanoscience and sanitary regulation is discussed from the point of view of its importance and the interrelationship between the themes for the development of products and services involving nanotech-nology. The discussion involves the main techniques for measuring dimensional, chemical and biological properties of materials, and presents some of the challenges for the future. Issues such as processes of standardization and regulation in Europe, U.S. and Brazil are also addressed, providing an overview of how these processes are related to sanitary regulation.

  7. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive...

  8. Network Regulation and Support Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    -in tariffs to market-based quota systems, and network regulation approaches, comprising rate-of-return and incentive regulation. National regulation and the vertical structure of the electricity sector shape the incentives of market agents, notably of distributed generators and network operators....... This article seeks to investigate the interactions between the policy dimensions of support schemes and network regulation and how they affect the deployment of distributed generation. Firstly, a conceptual analysis examines how the incentives of the different market agents are affected. In particular......At present, there exists no explicit European policy framework on distributed generation. Various Directives encompass distributed generation; inherently, their implementation is to the discretion of the Member States. The latter have adopted different kinds of support schemes, ranging from feed...

  9. PDH regulation in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian

    regulation in human skeletal muscle. 2: Effect of muscle glycogen on PDH regulation in human skeletal muscle at rest and during exercise. 3: The impact of physical inactivity on PDH regulation in human skeletal muscle at rest and during exercise. 4: Elucidating the importance of PGC-1? in PDH regulation...... in mouse skeletal muscle at rest and in response to fasting and during recovery from exercise. The studies indicate that the content of PDH-E1? in human muscle follows the metabolic profile of the muscle, rather than the myosin heavy chain fiber distribution of the muscle. The larger lactate accumulation...... in human skeletal muscle. It may be noted that the increased PDK4 protein associated with elevated plasma FFA occurs already 2 hours after different dietary intake. A week of physical inactivity (bed rest), leading to whole body glucose intolerance, does not affect muscle PDH-E1? content, or the exercise...

  10. Comparison of some European regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyriadis, K. [Germanisher Lloyd, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    Fatigue calculations are an essential part in certification of a wind turbine. Manufacturers have to fulfill recommendations of several different regulations throughout Europe with the result that the design has often to be altered to satisfy them. In general three national (D/GL, NL, DK), and two international (GL, IEC) regulations are in use, with the IEC standard getting more importance with wind energy deploying to more in regions with no yet clearly defined national standards (India, Spain). The Germanischer Lloyd made calculations for wind turbines they are certifying and in one case we compared the resulting damages for different regulations and classes on a 600 kW, three bladed, stall regulated wind turbine. (EG) 18 refs.

  11. Firms' Compliance with Complex Regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendoza Rodriguez, J.P.; Dekker, H.C.; Wielhouwer, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the question of what explains compliance with complex regulations, which are technical, extensive, and often subject to modifications. Based on official (anonymized) data of financial intermediaries in the Netherlands (N = 602), we examined the association between compliance

  12. Microbial regulation in gorgonian corals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, Laura R; Smith, Stephanie M; Downum, Kelsey R; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2012-01-01

    .... Since many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) signals to facilitate colonization of host organisms, regulation of prokaryotic cell-to-cell communication may represent an important bacterial control mechanism...

  13. How should Bitcoin be regulated ?

    OpenAIRE

    SHCHERBAK, Sergii

    2014-01-01

    The lack of clarity about Bitcoin’s legal framework has meant that none of the regulators across the EU have yet achieved sufficient clarity in the legal treatment of Bitcoin and its stakeholders. This uncertainty poses a number of substantial risks to Bitcoin stakeholders and creates challenges for regulatory authorities. Therefore, there is a need for a clear strategy for Bitcoin’s regulation aiming to ensure the maximum possible balance between the interests of Bitcoin stakeholders longing...

  14. Money Laundering and its Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto E. Chong; Florencio López-de-Silanes

    2007-01-01

    The recent wave of terrorist attacks has increased the attention paid to money laundering activities. Using several methodologies, this paper investigates empirically the determinants of money laundering and its regulation in over 80 countries by assembling a cross-country dataset on proxies for money laundering and the prevalence of feeding activities. The paper additionally constructs specific money laundering regulation indices based on available information on laws and their mechanisms of...

  15. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  16. Liquidity regulation and bank behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, C.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the 2007-08 financial crisis, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision proposed two liquidity standards to reinforce banks’ resilience to liquidity risks. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the impact of liquidity regulation on bank behavior. The first of four main chapters analyzes the development of global liquidity standards, their objectives as well as their interaction with capital standards. The analysis suggests that regulating capital is associated with declinin...

  17. Civilsamfundets ABC: R for Regulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Lund, Anker Brink

    2016-01-01

    Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til R for Regulering.......Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til R for Regulering....

  18. Regulating Power from Supermarket Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Madsen, Henrik; Pinson, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the demand response capabilities of a supermarket refrigeration system, with a particular focus on the suitability for participation in the regulating power market. An ARMAX model of a supermarket refrigeration system is identified using experimental data from...... be represented in a manner that is sufficiently simple to communicate to a market operator in the form of a bid for the provision of regulating power....

  19. Splicing-Dependent Trans-synaptic SALM3–LAR-RPTP Interactions Regulate Excitatory Synapse Development and Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of synapse development and plasticity. SALM3 is a PSD-95-interacting synaptic adhesion molecule known to induce presynaptic differentiation in contacting axons, but little is known about its presynaptic receptors and in vivo functions. Here, we identify an interaction between SALM3 and LAR family receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (LAR-RPTPs that requires the mini-exon B splice insert in LAR-RPTPs. In addition, SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation requires all three types of LAR-RPTPs. SALM3 mutant (Salm3−/− mice display markedly reduced excitatory synapse number but normal synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region. Salm3−/− mice exhibit hypoactivity in both novel and familiar environments but perform normally in learning and memory tests administered. These results suggest that SALM3 regulates excitatory synapse development and locomotion behavior.

  20. Emotion regulation and sport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-08-01

    This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested.

  1. Pheromone-sensing neurons regulate peripheral lipid metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind Hussey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is now established that the central nervous system plays an important role in regulating whole body metabolism and energy balance. However, the extent to which sensory systems relay environmental information to modulate metabolic events in peripheral tissues has remained poorly understood. In addition, it has been challenging to map the molecular mechanisms underlying discrete sensory modalities with respect to their role in lipid metabolism. In previous work our lab has identified instructive roles for serotonin signaling as a surrogate for food availability, as well as oxygen sensing, in the control of whole body metabolism. In this study, we now identify a role for a pair of pheromone-sensing neurons in regulating fat metabolism in C. elegans, which has emerged as a tractable and highly informative model to study the neurobiology of metabolism. A genetic screen revealed that GPA-3, a member of the Gα family of G proteins, regulates body fat content in the intestine, the major metabolic organ for C. elegans. Genetic and reconstitution studies revealed that the potent body fat phenotype of gpa-3 null mutants is controlled from a pair of neurons called ADL(L/R. We show that cAMP functions as the second messenger in the ADL neurons, and regulates body fat stores via the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, from downstream neurons. We find that the pheromone ascr#3, which is detected by the ADL neurons, regulates body fat stores in a GPA-3-dependent manner. We define here a third sensory modality, pheromone sensing, as a major regulator of body fat metabolism. The pheromone ascr#3 is an indicator of population density, thus we hypothesize that pheromone sensing provides a salient 'denominator' to evaluate the amount of food available within a population and to accordingly adjust metabolic rate and body fat levels.

  2. Pheromone-sensing neurons regulate peripheral lipid metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Rosalind; Stieglitz, Jon; Mesgarzadeh, Jaleh; Locke, Tiffany T; Zhang, Ying K; Schroeder, Frank C; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2017-05-01

    It is now established that the central nervous system plays an important role in regulating whole body metabolism and energy balance. However, the extent to which sensory systems relay environmental information to modulate metabolic events in peripheral tissues has remained poorly understood. In addition, it has been challenging to map the molecular mechanisms underlying discrete sensory modalities with respect to their role in lipid metabolism. In previous work our lab has identified instructive roles for serotonin signaling as a surrogate for food availability, as well as oxygen sensing, in the control of whole body metabolism. In this study, we now identify a role for a pair of pheromone-sensing neurons in regulating fat metabolism in C. elegans, which has emerged as a tractable and highly informative model to study the neurobiology of metabolism. A genetic screen revealed that GPA-3, a member of the Gα family of G proteins, regulates body fat content in the intestine, the major metabolic organ for C. elegans. Genetic and reconstitution studies revealed that the potent body fat phenotype of gpa-3 null mutants is controlled from a pair of neurons called ADL(L/R). We show that cAMP functions as the second messenger in the ADL neurons, and regulates body fat stores via the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, from downstream neurons. We find that the pheromone ascr#3, which is detected by the ADL neurons, regulates body fat stores in a GPA-3-dependent manner. We define here a third sensory modality, pheromone sensing, as a major regulator of body fat metabolism. The pheromone ascr#3 is an indicator of population density, thus we hypothesize that pheromone sensing provides a salient 'denominator' to evaluate the amount of food available within a population and to accordingly adjust metabolic rate and body fat levels.

  3. Thyroid hormone receptor regulates most genes independently of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aijun; Sieglaff, Douglas H; York, Jean Philippe; Suh, Ji Ho; Ayers, Stephen D; Winnier, Glenn E; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Pin, Christopher; Zhang, Pumin; Webb, Paul; Xia, Xuefeng

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) acts through specific receptors (TRs), which are conditional transcription factors, to induce fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a peptide hormone that is usually induced by fasting and that influences lipid and carbohydrate metabolism via local hepatic and systemic endocrine effects. While TH and FGF21 display overlapping actions when administered, including reductions in serum lipids, according to the current models these hormones act independently in vivo. In this study, we examined mechanisms of regulation of FGF21 expression by TH and tested the possibility that FGF21 is required for induction of hepatic TH-responsive genes. We confirm that active TH (triiodothyronine (T3)) and the TRβ-selective thyromimetic GC1 increase FGF21 transcript and peptide levels in mouse liver and that this effect requires TRβ. T3 also induces FGF21 in cultured hepatocytes and this effect involves direct actions of TRβ1, which binds a TRE within intron 2 of FGF21. Gene expression profiles of WT and Fgf21-knockout mice are very similar, indicating that FGF21 is dispensable for the majority of hepatic T3 gene responses. A small subset of genes displays diminished T3 response in the absence of FGF21. However, most of these are not obviously directly involved in T3-dependent hepatic metabolic processes. Consistent with these results, T3-dependent effects on serum cholesterol are maintained in the Fgf21(-/-) background and we observe no effect of the Fgf21-knockout background on serum triglycerides and glucose. Our findings indicate that T3 regulates the genes involved in classical hepatic metabolic responses independently of FGF21. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  5. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S L; Bigman, Cabral A; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public.

  6. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Sanders-Jackson

    Full Text Available Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition.Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies.A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%. The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support.This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue.Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public.

  7. Balancing Public and Private Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Scheltema

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS might develop into a viable alternative to public regulation. However, it turns on the (regulatory circumstances whether that holds true in practice. If public regulation on CSR topics is lacking, governments are unable to agree upon certain topics on a global level or diverging public regulation exists, VSS can be helpful to set global standards. Obviously, private standards will especially be helpful if they are commensurate with local public legislation (and e.g. treaties and/or are accepted by local governments. If one neglects this, numerous domestic structures might exist that frustrate VSS. Furthermore, governments have to remain vigilant as to whether these private regimes do not result in market disruption, consumer detriment or hamper trade. VSS might also compete with public arrangements which might limit the uptake of VSS. However, if public regulation exists VSS might be a viable alternative if compliance with not too compelling public norms by market participants is rather poor and the public policymaker is aiming to incentivize the better performing part of the market to embark on higher standards and thus only desires to regulate the less performing part of the market. However, of paramount importance is the effectiveness of VSS in order to be a viable alternative to public regulation. The effectiveness of VSS should be assessed using an integrated multi-disciplinary (comparative approach entailing legal, impact-assessment, legitimacy, governance and behavioural aspects. Only effective VSS in the aforementioned sense are a true alternative to public regulation.Beyond that, the legal perspective in connection with (the effectiveness of VSS is discussed, featuring FSC and UTZ Certified as an example. It is important from this perspective that VSS have a clear and sufficiently selective objective and sufficiently specific norms, are regularly evaluated, entail ‘conflict of law rules’ and

  8. 77 FR 43082 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. Public...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of...

  9. Molecular basis of osmotic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, M B

    1995-06-01

    Cells almost universally respond to the stress of long-term hyperosmolality by accumulating compatible organic osmolytes. This allows them to maintain normal cell volume without a deleterious increase in intracellular inorganic ion concentration. Cells in the renal inner medulla are exposed to variable concentrations of salt and urea that may reach molal levels. The organic osmolytes that they accumulate include sorbitol, betaine, inositol, taurine, and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). This review considers recent advances in understanding osmotic regulation of these substances. Sorbitol is synthesized from glucose catalyzed by aldose reductase. Hypertonicity elevates the abundance of this enzyme by increasing transcription of its gene. Betaine is taken up via a specialized transporter. Hypertonicity raises the number of transporters by increasing their transcription. Current studies demonstrate that the 5' regions flanking the aldose reductase and betaine transporter genes contain osmotic response elements that increase transcription in response to hypertonicity. Osmotic regulation of inositol and taurine uptake also involves increased expression of specific transporter genes. GPC is unique in that its level rises in response to high urea, as well as hypertonicity. GPC accumulation is mainly regulated by changes in its degradation to choline, catalyzed by GPC:choline phosphodiesterase. Numerous other genes, including those for heat shock proteins, are also induced by hypertonicity. Their regulation and their role in osmotic regulation are the subject of considerable ongoing research.

  10. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  11. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  12. Re-Framing Biotechnology Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Alison

    Biotechnology is about to spill the banks of federal regulation. New genetic engineering techniques like CRISPR-Cas9 promise revolutionary breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture, and public health—but those techniques would not be regulated under the terms of the Coordinated Framework for Regulation of Biotechnology. This revolutionary moment in biotechnology offers an opportunity to correct the flaws in the framework, which was hastily patched together at the advent of the technology. The framework has never captured all relevant technologies, has never satisfied the public that risk is being effectively managed, and has never been accessible to small companies and publicly-funded labs that increasingly are positioned to make radical, life-saving innovations. This Article offers a proposal for new legislation that would reshape biotechnology regulation to better meet these goals. Key reforms include tying regulation to risk rather than technology category; consolidating agency review; capturing distinct regulatory expertise through inter-agency consultations; creating a clearinghouse to help guide applicants and disseminate information; setting up more comprehensive monitoring of environmental effects; and providing federal leadership to fill key data gaps and address socio-economic impacts.

  13. Regulation of class V myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Yao, Lin-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-01-01

    Class V myosin (myosin-5) is a molecular motor that functions as an organelle transporter. The activation of myosin-5's motor function has long been known to be associated with a transition from the folded conformation in the off-state to the extended conformation in the on-state, but only recently have we begun to understand the underlying mechanism. The globular tail domain (GTD) of myosin-5 has been identified as the inhibitory domain and has recently been shown to function as a dimer in regulating the motor function. The folded off-state of myosin-5 is stabilized by multiple intramolecular interactions, including head-GTD interactions, GTD-GTD interactions, and interactions between the GTD and the C-terminus of the first coiled-coil segment. Any cellular factor that affects these intramolecular interactions and thus the stability of the folded conformation of myosin-5 would be expected to regulate myosin-5 motor function. Both the adaptor proteins of myosin-5 and Ca2+ are potential regulators of myosin-5 motor function, because they can destabilize its folded conformation. A combination of these regulators provides a versatile scheme in regulating myosin-5 motor function in the cell.

  14. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations.

  15. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye Kim

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212-2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes.

  16. Guidelines on Building Regulations 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thse guidelines clarify and intepret the provisions of the Building Regulations of 2008 (BR08). The Guidelines, which match BR08 in terms of organisation into Parts, are accompanied by the full text of the regulations and the explanatory notes issued by the Danish Enterprise and Construction...... Authority. The Guidelines refer the reader to sources such as relevant standards, instructions and other background material which provides more detailed information. The Guidelines cover the same ground as BR08, including building control regulations, layout, fitting out, structures, fire safety, indoor...... climate, energy consumotion and services. The Guidelines are aimed at all professionals involved in building projects, particularly building design consultants, contractors and municipal application officers....

  17. Digital Convergence and Content Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Starks

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Broadcasting, Press and Internet journalism systems of distribution are converging: the same infrastructure can deliver all three historically separate services. Reception devices mirror this: the Connected TV, the tablet and the smart phone overlap in their functionality. Service overlaps are evident too, with broadcasters providing online and on-demand services and newspapers developing electronic versions. Does this mean that media regulation policies must converge too?My argument is that they should, though only where historically different communications are now fulfilling a similar function, e.g. broadcaster online services and electronic versions of newspapers. Convergence requires a degree of harmonisation and, to this end, I advocate a review of UK broadcasting's 'due impartiality' requirement and of the UK's application of the public service concept. I also argue for independent self-regulation (rather than state-based regulation of non-public-service broadcasting journalism.

  18. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  19. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-07-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain.

  20. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Minsky and dynamic macroprudential regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kregel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of current debates about the proper form of prudential regulation and proposals for the imposition of liquidity and capital ratios, the paper examines Hyman Minsky’s work as a consultant to government agencies exploring financial regulatory reform in the 1960s. As the author explains, this often-overlooked early work, a precursor to Minsky’s “financial instability hypothesis”, serves as yet another useful guide to explaining why regulation and supervision in the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis were flawed, and why the approach to reregulation after the crisis has been incomplete.

  2. Wave Dragon Buoyancy Regulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter, which was deployed offshore at Nissum Bredning in Denmark in 2003. The experience gained from operating Wave Dragon during 2003 and 2004 has shown that the buoyancy regulation system can be improved in a number of ways. This study describes the current...... situation, and proposes a number of activities in order to improve the buoyancy regulation system. This work was performed under EU ENERGIE contract no. ENK5-CT-2002-00603, and is a contribution to WP 2.3/2.4 and D40/D41....

  3. Capsaicinoids regulate airway anion transporters through Rho kinase- and cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yoshitaka; Morise, Masahiro; Ito, Yasushi; Mizutani, Takefumi; Matsuno, Tadakatsu; Ito, Satoru; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Sato, Mitsuo; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicinoids on airway anion transporters, we recorded and analyzed transepithelial currents in human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells. Application of capsaicin (100 μM) attenuated vectorial anion transport, estimated as short-circuit currents (I(SC)), before and after stimulation by forskolin (10 μM) with concomitant reduction of cytosolic cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was also observed in the response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM, a cell-permeable cAMP analog) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1 mM, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases). The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was attributed to suppression of bumetanide (an inhibitor of the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1)- and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (an inhibitor of basolateral HCO(3)(-)-dependent anion transporters)-sensitive components, which reflect anion uptake via basolateral cAMP-dependent anion transporters. In contrast, capsaicin potentiated apical Cl(-) conductance, which reflects conductivity through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel. All these paradoxical effects of capsaicin were mimicked by capsazepine. Forskolin application also increased phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, and the phosphorylation was prevented by capsaicin and capsazepine, suggesting that these capsaicinoids assume aspects of Rho kinase inhibitors. We also found that the increments in apical Cl(-) conductance were caused by conventional Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 (20 μM) and HA-1077 (20 μM), with selective inhibition of basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1. Collectively, capsaicinoids inhibit cAMP-mediated anion transport through down-regulation of basolateral anion uptake, paradoxically accompanied by up-regulation of apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion conductance. The latter is mediated by inhibition of Rho

  4. The Organization of Regulated Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jos; Jeon, Doh-Shin; Menicucci, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    and weak positive (respectively, strong positive) correlation. Second, if the firms can collude under VS and know all costs, then VS is equivalent to VI. However, if firms collude under asymmetric information, then collusion does not affect the choice between VS and VI, since the regulator takes advantage...... of the transaction costs created by asymmetric information....

  5. Liquidity regulation and bank behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonner, C.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the 2007-08 financial crisis, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision proposed two liquidity standards to reinforce banks’ resilience to liquidity risks. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the impact of liquidity regulation on bank behavior. The first of four main chapters

  6. Capital regulation and tail risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.; Ratnovski, L.; Vlahu, R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies risk mitigation associated with capital regulation, in a context where banks may choose tail risk assets. We show that this undermines the traditional result that higher capital reduces excess risk taking driven by limited liability. Moreover, higher capital may have an unintended

  7. Capital regulation and tail risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.; Ratnovski, L.; Vlahu, R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies risk mitigation associated with capital regulation, in a context when banks may choose tail risk assets. We show that this undermines the traditional result that higher capital reduces excess risk-taking driven by limited liability. When capital raising is costly, poorly

  8. Histaminergic regulation of prolactin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U P

    1990-01-01

    Histamine (HA), which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, participates in the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin (PRL) secretion. HA has a predominant stimulatory effect which is mediated via H2-receptors following central administration and via H1-receptors following...

  9. Spatial regulation of Rap signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gloerich, M.

    2011-01-01

    By cycling between an inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound state, small G-proteins of the Rap family act as molecular switches that relay upstream signals to diverse cellular processes. This GDP/GTP-cycle and consequently downstream signaling by Rap is under tight regulation by its GEFs and GAPs.

  10. Incentives and regulation in banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martynova, N.

    2015-01-01

    The financial crisis of 2007-2008 has unveiled the hidden flaws in the regulatory framework of the financial sector. The rules of the game established by regulators were not stringent enough and provided bankers with wrong incentives to gamble with depositors’ money. There are two major challenges

  11. The Regulation of Carcinogenic Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Gio Batta

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a system of relative standards be formulated which would compare utility of substances to their relative risk as carcinogens. This would define a range of use restrictions. Substances intended for specific uses would then be regulated according to these standards. (Author/RE)

  12. Lasp-1 regulates podosome function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Stölting

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells form a variety of adhesive structures to connect with their environment and to regulate cell motility. In contrast to classical focal adhesions, podosomes, highly dynamic structures of different cell types, are actively engaged in matrix remodelling and degradation. Podosomes are composed of an actin-rich core region surrounded by a ring-like structure containing signalling molecules, motor proteins as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Lasp-1 is a ubiquitously expressed, actin-binding protein that is known to regulate cytoskeleton architecture and cell migration. This multidomain protein is predominantely present at focal adhesions, however, a second pool of Lasp-1 molecules is also found at lamellipodia and vesicle-like microdomains in the cytosol.In this report, we show that Lasp-1 is a novel component and regulator of podosomes. Immunofluorescence studies reveal a localization of Lasp-1 in the podosome ring structure, where it colocalizes with zyxin and vinculin. Life cell imaging experiments demonstrate that Lasp-1 is recruited in early steps of podosome assembly. A siRNA-mediated Lasp-1 knockdown in human macrophages affects podosome dynamics as well as their matrix degradation capacity. In summary, our data indicate that Lasp-1 is a novel component of podosomes and is involved in the regulation of podosomal function.

  13. Peripheral chemoreceptors and cardiovascular regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, J M

    1994-01-01

    ... I. INTRODUCTION Peripheral chemoreceptors are located in the carotid and aortic bodies and in clumps along the route of the abdominal vagus, although aortic and abdominal chemoreceptors are not present in all species. Their role in the regulation of the cardiovascular system cannot be understood without knowledge of the various factors that can chan...

  14. Light regulates ascorbate in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ntagkas, Nikolaos; Woltering, Ernst J.; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2017-01-01

    l-ascorbate (vitamin. C, ASC) is an antioxidant that is essential for the proper function not only of plants but also animals. Light is a major regulatory factor for ASC levels in plants. In this paper, we review the regulation of ASC by light and the involved biochemical and physiological

  15. Regulating collaboration in teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobber, M.; Akkerman, S.F.; Verloop, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members

  16. 75 FR 67912 - North Korea Sanctions Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... 31 CFR Part 510 North Korea Sanctions Regulations AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury...'') is issuing regulations with respect to North Korea to implement Executive Order 13466 of June 26... issuing the North Korea Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 510 (the ``Regulations''), to implement E.O...

  17. The Legal Regulation of Cybersecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Štitilis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cybercrime has become a global phenomenon, which is causing more harm to individual citizens, organizations, society and the state. Most countries in the world compare cybercrime with offences such as terrorism and drug trafficking due to its risks and profitability. Cybersecurity is the central category to fight cybercrime in cyberspace. Therefore, the strategic legal regulation of cybersecurity is one of the most relevant problems in EU, including Lithuania. So far cybersecurity legal regulation analysis in scientific literature has been rather limited. The European Commission, together with the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, has published a cybersecurity strategy alongside a Commission proposed directive on network and information security (NIS. The cybersecurity strategy – “An Open, Safe and Secure Cyberspace” - represents the EU’s comprehensive vision on how best to prevent and respond to cyber disruptions and attacks. The purpose of its is to further European values of freedom and democracy and ensure the digital economy can safely grow. Specific actions are aimed at enhancing cyber resilience of information systems, reducing cybercrime and strengthening EU international cyber-security policy and cyber defence. The main goal of the paper is to analyze and compare the EU cybersecurity strategy and experience of several foreign countries with the strategic legal regulation of cybersecurity in Lithuania. The article consists of four parts. The first part dealt with the EU cybersecurity strategy. The second part of the article examines the comparative aspect of foreign cybersecurity strategic legal regulation. The third part deals with attempts in Lithuania to draft cybersecurity law and the holistic approach of cybersecurity legal regulation. The fourth part examines Lithuanian cybersecurity strategy and comments on the main probleas related with the strategy. Several different approaches

  18. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  19. miRNA regulation of cytokine genes

    OpenAIRE

    Asirvatham, Ananthi J.; Magner, William J.; Tomasi, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss specific examples of regulation of cytokine genes and focus on a new mechanism involving post-transcriptional regulation via miRNAs. The post-transcriptional regulation of cytokine genes via the destabilizing activity of AU-rich elements [AREs] and miRNAs is a pre-requisite for regulating the half-life of many cytokines and achieving the temporal and spatial distributions required for regulation of these genes.

  20. Modeling Stratospheric Constituents: Reactive Species That Regulate Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawitch, Ross J.

    2000-01-01

    Photochemical loss of stratospheric ozone occurs primarily by catalytic cycles whose rates are limited by the concentration of OH, HO2, NO2, ClO, and/or BrO as well as the concentration of either atomic oxygen or of ozone itself. Once the concentrations of these gases are established, the photochemical loss rate of O3 depends on the rate coefficient of only a handful of key reactions. We have developed a method for testing our understanding of stratospheric ozone photochemistry by comparing measured and modeled concentrations of reactive hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine and bromine radicals using a photochemical steady state model constrained by observed concentrations of long-lived precursors (e.g., NO(y), Cl(y), Br(y), O3, H2O, CH4) and environmental parameters such as ozone column, reflectivity, and aerosol surface area. We will show based on analyses of observations obtained by aircraft, balloon, and satellite platforms during the POLARIS campaign that our overall understanding of the processes that regulate these radical species is very good. The most notable current discrepancies are the tendency to underestimate observed NO2 by 15 to 30% for air masses that experience near continuous solar illumination over a 24 hour period and the tendency to underestimate observed OH and H02 by about 10 to 20% during midday and by much larger amounts at high solar zenith angle (SZA > 85). Possible resolutions to these discrepancies will be discussed. This study was carried out in close collaboration with many members of the POLARIS science team.

  1. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  2. Regulation of Drosophila metamorphosis by xenobiotic response regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huai; Kerppola, Tom K

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Nrf2-Keap1 and the homologous Drosophila CncC-dKeap1 protein complexes regulate both transcriptional responses to xenobiotic compounds as well as native cellular and developmental processes. The relationships between the functions of these proteins in xenobiotic responses and in development were unknown. We investigated the genes regulated by CncC and dKeap1 during development and the signal transduction pathways that modulate their functions. CncC and dKeap1 were enriched within the nuclei in many tissues, in contrast to the reported cytoplasmic localization of Keap1 and Nrf2 in cultured mammalian cells. CncC and dKeap1 occupied ecdysone-regulated early puffs on polytene chromosomes. Depletion of either CncC or dKeap1 in salivary glands selectively reduced early puff gene transcription. CncC and dKeap1 depletion in the prothoracic gland as well as cncC(K6/K6) and dKeap1(EY5/EY5) loss of function mutations in embryos reduced ecdysone-biosynthetic gene transcription. In contrast, dKeap1 depletion and the dKeap1(EY5/EY5) loss of function mutation enhanced xenobiotic response gene transcription in larvae and embryos, respectively. Depletion of CncC or dKeap1 in the prothoracic gland delayed pupation by decreasing larval ecdysteroid levels. CncC depletion suppressed the premature pupation and developmental arrest caused by constitutive Ras signaling in the prothoracic gland; conversely, constitutive Ras signaling altered the loci occupied by CncC on polytene chromosomes and activated transcription of genes at these loci. The effects of CncC and dKeap1 on both ecdysone-biosynthetic and ecdysone-regulated gene transcription, and the roles of CncC in Ras signaling in the prothoracic gland, establish the functions of these proteins in the neuroendocrine axis that coordinates insect metamorphosis.

  3. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  4. 76 FR 35739 - Foreign Assets Control Regulations; Transaction Control Regulations (Regulations Prohibiting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... authorities with respect to North Korea, which were implemented by the Foreign Assets Control Regulations, 31... and procedure, Banking, Banks, Blocking of assets, Credit, Foreign trade, Imports, North Korea... practice and procedure, Banking, Banks, Blocking of assets, Credit, Foreign trade, North Korea, Penalties...

  5. 78 FR 31551 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. A notice... Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov : http...

  6. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Appetite Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hee Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity has been rapidly increasing worldwide over the last several decades and has become a major health problem in developed countries. The brain, especially the hypothalamus, plays a key role in the control of food intake by sensing metabolic signals from peripheral organs and modulating feeding behaviors. To accomplish these important roles, the hypothalamus communicates with other brain areas such as the brainstem and reward-related limbic pathways. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and pancreatic β-cell-derived insulin inform adiposity to the hypothalamus. Gut hormones such as cholecystokinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and oxyntomodulin transfer satiety signals to the brain and ghrelin relays hunger signals. The endocannabinoid system and nutrients are also involved in the physiological regulation of food intake. In this article, we briefly review physiological mechanisms of appetite regulation.

  8. Information, Interests, and Environmental Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; May, Peter J.

    2002-01-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of informational approaches to bringing about compliance with environmental regulations with particular attention to differences in the influence of information provided by different information sources. Based on theorizing from a combination of informa......This study contributes to the understanding of informational approaches to bringing about compliance with environmental regulations with particular attention to differences in the influence of information provided by different information sources. Based on theorizing from a combination...... of information processing and interest group literatures, we develop hypotheses about regulatees' reliance upon and the influence of different sources of information. We test these hypotheses for Danish farmers’ compliance with agro-environmental rules. Our findings show that information plays a role in bringing...

  9. Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport during gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoichi; Boag, Peter R; Hime, Gary R; Loveland, Kate L

    2012-06-01

    Gametogenesis is the process by which sperm or ova are produced in the gonads. It is governed by a tightly controlled series of gene expression events, with some common and others distinct for males and females. Nucleocytoplasmic transport is of central importance to the fidelity of gene regulation that is required to achieve the precisely regulated germ cell differentiation essential for fertility. In this review we discuss the physiological importance for gamete formation of the molecules involved in classical nucleocytoplasmic protein transport, including importins/karyopherins, Ran and nucleoporins. To address what functions/factors are conserved or specialized for these developmental processes between species, we compare knowledge from mice, flies and worms. The present analysis provides evidence of the necessity for and specificity of each nuclear transport factor and for nucleoporins during germ cell differentiation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Transport and RNA Processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis.

  11. Regulators of Tfh cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendra Motiram Jogdand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The follicular helper T (Tfh cells help is critical for activation of B cells, antibody class switching and germinal center formation. The Tfh cells are characterized by the expression of CXCR5, ICOS, PD-1, Bcl-6, and IL-21. They are involved in clearing infections and are adversely linked with autoimmune diseases and also have a role in viral replication as well as clearance. Tfh cells are generated from naïve CD4 T cells with sequential steps involving cytokine signaling (IL-21, IL-6, IL-12, activin A, migration and positioning in the germinal center by CXCR5, surface receptors (ICOS/ICOSL, SAP/SLAM as well as transcription factor (Bcl-6, c-Maf, STAT3 signaling and repressor miR155. On the other hand Tfh generation is negatively regulated at specific steps of Tfh generation by specific cytokine (IL-2, IL-7, surface receptor (PD-1, CTLA-4, transcription factors Blimp-1, STAT5, T-bet, KLF-2 signaling and repressor miR 146a. Interestingly, miR 17-92 and FOXO1 acts as a positive as well as a negative regulator of Tfh differentiation depending on the time of expression and disease specificity. Tfh cells are also generated from the conversion of other effector T cells as exemplified by Th1 cells converting into Tfh during viral infection. The mechanistic details of effector T cells conversion into Tfh are yet to be clear. To manipulate Tfh cells for therapeutic implication and or for effective vaccination strategies, it is important to know positive and negative regulators of Tfh generation. Hence, in this review we have highlighted and interlinked molecular signaling from cytokines, surface receptors, transcription factors, ubiquitin Ligase and miRNA as positive and negative regulators for Tfh differentiation.

  12. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  13. VOLTAGE REGULATORS OF SYNCHRONOUS GENERATORS

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorash O. V.; Korzenkov P. G.; Popuchieva M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous generators are the primary source of electrical power autonomous electrosupply systems, including backup systems. They are also used in a structure of rotating electricity converters and are widely used in renewable energy as part of wind power plants of small, mini and micro hydroelectric plants. Increasing the speed and the accuracy of the system of the voltage regulation of synchronous generators is possible due to the development of combined systems containing more stabilizers...

  14. Environmental regulations and labor markets

    OpenAIRE

    Deschenes, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Environmental regulations such as air quality standards can lead to notable improvements in ambient air quality and to related health benefits. 
But they impose additional production costs on firms and may reduce productivity, earnings, and employment, especially in sectors exposed to trade and intensive in labor. The limited empirical evidence suggests that the benefits are likely to outweigh 
the costs.

  15. Regulation of Information and Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Deception is the manipulation of information to gain some advantage. This paper considers commercial deception through advertising. The paper first discusses the economics of information. The literature has derived four major policy conclusions. First, truthful information regarding price should not be restricted by regulatory authorities. Second, deception is most likely and most harmful for credence goods, and regulation is most useful (if it is useful at all) for these goods. Third, truthf...

  16. Energy saving statutes and regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, L.

    1981-11-01

    The West German Federal government and the state governments are endeavouring to introduce energy saving measures with the aid of statutes, regulations, and ordinances. In his introductory remarks, the author briefly refers to the various activities since 1974 and on the basis of a 1976 report subjects the present status of statutes and ordinances on energy saving measures to a critical analysis. Special emphasis is placed on the interest of the gas supply industry.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of neuroblastoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinck, Kaat; Speleman, Frank

    2018-01-19

    In recent years, technological advances have enabled a detailed landscaping of the epigenome and the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that drive normal cell function, development and cancer. Rather than merely a structural entity to support genome compaction, we now look at chromatin as a very dynamic and essential constellation that is actively participating in the tight orchestration of transcriptional regulation as well as DNA replication and repair. The unique feature of chromatin flexibility enabling fast switches towards more or less restricted epigenetic cellular states is, not surprisingly, intimately connected to cancer development and treatment resistance, and the central role of epigenetic alterations in cancer is illustrated by the finding that up to 50% of all mutations across cancer entities affect proteins controlling the chromatin status. We summarize recent insights into epigenetic rewiring underlying neuroblastoma (NB) tumor formation ranging from changes in DNA methylation patterns and mutations in epigenetic regulators to global effects on transcriptional regulatory circuits that involve key players in NB oncogenesis. Insights into the disruption of the homeostatic epigenetic balance contributing to developmental arrest of sympathetic progenitor cells and subsequent NB oncogenesis are rapidly growing and will be exploited towards the development of novel therapeutic strategies to increase current survival rates of patients with high-risk NB.

  18. Nongenomic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Monk, David

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent advances in epigenetic regulation and chromatin biology for a better understanding of gene regulation related to human disease. Alterations to chromatin influence genomic function, including gene transcription. At its most simple level, this involves DNA methylation and posttranscriptional histone modifications. However, recent developments in biochemical and molecular techniques have revealed that transcriptional regulation is far more complex, involving combinations of histone modifications and discriminating transcription factor binding, and long-range chromatin loops with enhancers, to generate a multifaceted code. Here, we describe the most recent advances, culminating in the example of genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin monoallelic expression that utilizes the majority of these mechanisms to attain one active and one repressed allele. It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms work in unison to maintain tight control of gene expression and genome function. With the wealth of knowledge gained from recent molecular studies, future goals should focus on the application of this information in deciphering their role in developmental diseases.

  19. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  20. Musical affect regulation in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Ghazban, Niusha; Corbeil, Mariève

    2015-03-01

    Adolescents and adults commonly use music for various forms of affect regulation, including relaxation, revitalization, distraction, and elicitation of pleasant memories. Mothers throughout the world also sing to their infants, with affect regulation as the principal goal. To date, the study of maternal singing has focused largely on its acoustic features and its consequences for infant attention. We describe recent laboratory research that explores the consequences of singing for infant affect regulation. Such work reveals that listening to recordings of play songs can maintain 6- to 9-month-old infants in a relatively contented or neutral state considerably longer than recordings of infant-directed or adult-directed speech. When 10-month-old infants fuss or cry and are highly aroused, mothers' multimodal singing is more effective than maternal speech at inducing recovery from such distress. Moreover, play songs are more effective than lullabies at reducing arousal in Western infants. We explore the implications of these findings along with possible practical applications. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.