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Sample records for regulates nerve growth

  1. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

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    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  2. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system

  3. Bidirectional remodeling of β1-integrin adhesions during chemotropic regulation of nerve growth

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    Carlstrom Lucas P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotropic factors in the extracellular microenvironment guide nerve growth by acting on the growth cone located at the tip of extending axons. Growth cone extension requires the coordination of cytoskeleton-dependent membrane protrusion and dynamic adhesion to the extracellular matrix, yet how chemotropic factors regulate these events remains an outstanding question. We demonstrated previously that the inhibitory factor myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG triggers endocytic removal of the adhesion receptor β1-integrin from the growth cone surface membrane to negatively remodel substrate adhesions during chemorepulsion. Here, we tested how a neurotrophin might affect integrin adhesions. Results We report that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF positively regulates the formation of substrate adhesions in axonal growth cones during stimulated outgrowth and prevents removal of β1-integrin adhesions by MAG. Treatment of Xenopus spinal neurons with BDNF rapidly triggered β1-integrin clustering and induced the dynamic formation of nascent vinculin-containing adhesion complexes in the growth cone periphery. Both the formation of nascent β1-integrin adhesions and the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF required cytoplasmic calcium ion signaling and integrin activation at the cell surface. Exposure to MAG decreased the number of β1-integrin adhesions in the growth cone during inhibition of axon extension. In contrast, the BDNF-induced adhesions were resistant to negative remodeling by MAG, correlating with the ability of BDNF pretreatment to counteract MAG-inhibition of axon extension. Pre-exposure to MAG prevented the BDNF-induced formation of β1-integrin adhesions and blocked the stimulation of axon extension by BDNF. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate the neurotrophin-dependent formation of integrin-based adhesions in the growth cone and reveal how a positive regulator of substrate adhesions can block

  4. Nerve growth factor regulates neurolymphatic remodeling during corneal inflammation and resolution.

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    Darci M Fink

    Full Text Available The cellular and physiologic mechanisms that regulate the resolution of inflammation remain poorly defined despite their widespread importance in improving inflammatory disease outcomes. We studied the resolution of two cardinal signs of inflammation-pain and swelling-by investigating molecular mechanisms that regulate neural and lymphatic vessel remodeling during the resolution of corneal inflammation. A mouse model of corneal inflammation and wound recovery was developed to study this process in vivo. Administration of nerve growth factor (NGF increased pain sensation and inhibited neural remodeling and lymphatic vessel regression processes during wound recovery. A complementary in vivo approach, the corneal micropocket assay, revealed that NGF-laden pellets stimulated lymphangiogenesis and increased protein levels of VEGF-C. Adult human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells did not express canonical NGF receptors TrkA and p75NTR or activate downstream MAPK- or Akt-pathway effectors in the presence of NGF, although NGF treatment increased their migratory and tubulogenesis capacities in vitro. Blockade of the VEGF-R2/R3 signaling pathway ablated NGF-mediated lymphangiogenesis in vivo. These findings suggest a hierarchical relationship with NGF functioning upstream of the VEGF family members, particularly VEGF-C, to stimulate lymphangiogenesis. Taken together, these studies show that NGF stimulates lymphangiogenesis and that NGF may act as a pathogenic factor that negatively regulates the normal neural and lymphatic vascular remodeling events that accompany wound recovery.

  5. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance.

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    Turney, Stephen G; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B; Goeckeler, Zoe M; Rioux, Robert M; Whitesides, George M; Bridgman, Paul C

    2016-02-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. © 2016 Turney et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. CSK negatively regulates nerve growth factor induced neural differentiation and augments AKT kinase activity

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    Dey, Nandini; Howell, Brian W.; De, Pradip K.; Durden, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Src family kinases are involved in transducing growth factor signals for cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types. The activity of all Src family kinases (SFKs) is controlled by phosphorylation at their C-terminal 527-tyrosine residue by C-terminal SRC kinase, CSK. There is a paucity of information regarding the role of CSK and/or specific Src family kinases in neuronal differentiation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP1, blocked NGF-induced activation of SFKs and obliterated neurite outgrowth. To confirm a role for CSK and specific isoforms of SFKs in neuronal differentiation, we overexpressed active and catalytically dead CSK in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. CSK overexpression caused a profound inhibition of NGF-induced activation of FYN, YES, RAS, and ERK and inhibited neurite outgrowth, NGF-stimulated integrin-directed migration and blocked the NGF-induced conversion of GDP-RAC to its GTP-bound active state. CSK overexpression markedly augmented the activation state of AKT following NGF stimulation. In contrast, kinase-dead CSK augmented the activation of FYN, RAS, and ERK and increased neurite outgrowth. These data suggest a distinct requirement for CSK in the regulation of NGF/TrkA activation of RAS, RAC, ERK, and AKT via the differential control of SFKs in the orchestration of neuronal differentiation

  7. Differential effects of the steaming time and frequency for manufactured red Liriope platyphylla on nerve growth factor secretion ability, nerve growth factor receptor signaling pathway and regulation of calcium concentration.

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    Choi, Sun Il; Goo, Jun Seo; Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, So Hee; Hwang, In Sik; Lee, Hye Ryun; Lee, Young Ju; Son, Hong Joo; Lee, Hee Seob; Lee, Jong Sup; Kim, Hak Jin; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2012-11-01

    The herb Liriope platyphylla (LP) has been considered to have curative properties for diabetes, asthma and neurodegenerative disorders. To examine the effects of steaming time and frequency of manufactured red LP (RLP) on the nerve growth factor (NGF) secretion ability and NGF receptor signaling pathway, the NGF concentration, cell differentiation, NGF signaling pathway and calcium concentration were analyzed in neuronal cells treated with several types of LPs manufactured under different conditions. The maximum NGF secretion was observed in B35 cells treated with 50 µg/ml LP extract steamed for 9 h (9-SLP) and with two repeated steps (3 h steaming and 24 h air-dried) carried out 7 times (7-SALP). No significant changes in viability were detected in any of the cells treated with the various LPs, with the exception of 0-SLP and 0-SALP. In addition, PC12 cell differentiation was induced by treatment with the NGF-containing conditional medium (CM) collected from the RLP-treated cells. The levels of TrkA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the high affinity NGF receptor signaling pathway were significantly higher in the cells treated with 3-SLP or 1-SALP/3-SALP CM compared with those treated with the vehicle CM. In the low affinity NGF receptor pathway, the expression levels of most components were higher in the 9-, 15- and 24-SALP CM-treated cells compared with the vehicle CM-treated cells. However, this level was significantly altered in cells treated with 3-SALP CM. Furthermore, an examination of the RLP function on calcium regulation revealed that only the LP- or RLP-treated cells exhibited changes in intracellular and extracellular calcium levels. RLP induced a significant decrease in the intracellular calcium levels and an increase in the extracellular calcium levels. These results suggest the possibility that steaming-processed LP may aid in the relief of neurodegenerative diseases through the NGF secretion ability and NGF

  8. Nerve growth factor mRNA in brain: localization by in situ hybridization

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    Rennert, P.D.; Heinrich, G.

    1986-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor is a 118 amino acid polypeptide that plays an important role in the differentiation and survival of neurons. The recent discovery that a mRNA that encodes beta Nerve Growth Factor is present in brain suggests that the Nerve Growth Factor gene may not only regulate gene expression of peripheral but also of central neurons. To identify the site(s) of Nerve Growth Factor mRNA production in the brain and to determine which cells express the Nerve Growth Factor gene, the technique of in situ hybridization was employed. A 32P-labeled RNA probe complementary to Nerve Growth Factor mRNA hybridized to cells in the stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus and the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampus. These observations identify for the first time cellular sites of Nerve Growth Factor gene expression in the central nervous system, and suggest that Nerve Growth Factor mRNA is produced by neurons

  9. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

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    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nerve growth factor receptor immunostaining suggests an extrinsic origin for hypertrophic nerves in Hirschsprung's disease.

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    Kobayashi, H; O'Briain, D S; Puri, P

    1994-01-01

    The expression of nerve growth factor receptor in colon from 20 patients with Hirshsprung's disease and 10 controls was studied immunohistochemically. The myenteric and submucous plexuses in the ganglionic bowel and hypertrophic nerve trunks in the aganglionic bowel displayed strong expression of nerve growth factor receptor. The most important finding was the identical localisation of nerve growth factor receptor immunoreactivity on the perineurium of both hypertrophic nerve trunks in Hirshs...

  11. Nerve growth factor reduces apoptotic cell death in rat facial motor neurons after facial nerve injury.

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    Hui, Lian; Yuan, Jing; Ren, Zhong; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on motor neurons after induction of a facial nerve lesion, and to compare the effects of different routes of NGF injection on motor neuron survival. This study was carried out in the Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, China Medical University, Liaoning, China from October 2012 to March 2013. Male Wistar rats (n = 65) were randomly assigned into 4 groups: A) healthy controls; B) facial nerve lesion model + normal saline injection; C) facial nerve lesion model + NGF injection through the stylomastoid foramen; D) facial nerve lesion model + intraperitoneal injection of NGF. Apoptotic cell death was detected using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling assay. Expression of caspase-3 and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) was determined by immunohistochemistry. Injection of NGF significantly reduced cell apoptosis, and also greatly decreased caspase-3 and PUMA expression in injured motor neurons. Group C exhibited better efficacy for preventing cellular apoptosis and decreasing caspase-3 and PUMA expression compared with group D (pfacial nerve injury in rats. The NGF injected through the stylomastoid foramen demonstrated better protective efficacy than when injected intraperitoneally.

  12. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

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    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M., E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie [Apoptosis Research Centre, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2011-02-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75{sup NTR}, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75{sup NTR}. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75{sup NTR}. This latter signaling through p75{sup NTR} promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75{sup NTR} mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer.

  13. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  14. Exposure to nerve growth factor worsens nephrotoxic effect induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 cells.

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    Donatella Vizza

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkA(NTR and p75(NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 (NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75(NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A.

  15. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit with nerve growth factor gradient.

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    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Tae Ho; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with nerve growth factor (NGF) gradient along the longitudinal direction by rolling a porous polycaprolactone membrane with NGF concentration gradient. The NGF immobilized on the membrane was continuously released for up to 35 days, and the released amount of the NGF from the membrane gradually increased from the proximal to distal NGF ends, which may allow a neurotrophic factor gradient in the tubular NGC for a sufficient period. From the in vitro cell culture experiment, it was observed that the PC12 cells sense the NGF concentration gradient on the membrane for the cell proliferation and differentiation. From the in vivo animal experiment using a long gap (20 mm) sciatic nerve defect model of rats, the NGC with NGF concentration gradient allowed more rapid nerve regeneration through the NGC than the NGC itself and NGC immobilized with uniformly distributed NGF. The NGC with NGF concentration gradient seems to be a promising strategy for the peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 52-64, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the regulation of Neuropeptide W in vitro and in vivo.

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    Wang, Rikang; Yan, Fengxia; Liao, Rifang; Wan, Pei; Little, Peter J; Zheng, Wenhua

    2017-05-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are neurotrophic factors involved in the growth, survival and functioning of neurons. In addition, a possible role of neurotrophins, particularly BDNF, in HPA axis hyperactivation has recently been proposed. Neuropeptide W (NPW) is an endogenous peptide ligand for the GPR7 and GPR8 and a stress mediator in the hypothalamus. It activates the HPA axis by working on hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). No information is available about the interrelationships between neurotrophines like NGF/BDNF and NPW. We studied the effect and underlying mechanisms of NGF/BDNF on the production of NPW in PC12 cells and hypothalamus. NGF time- and concentration-dependently stimulated the expression of NPW in PC12 cells. The effect of NGF was blocked by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signal pathway with specific inhibitors for PI3K or AktsiRNA for Akt while inhibition of ERK pathway had no effect. Moreover, BDNF concentration-dependently induced the expression of NPW mRNA and decreased the expression of NPY mRNA in primary cultured hypothalamic neurons which was also blocked by a PI3K kinase inhibitor. Finally, in vivo study showed that exogenous BDNF injected icv increased NPW production in the hypothalamus and this effect was reversed by a PI3 kinase inhibitor. These results and the fact that BDNF was able to stimulate the expression of CRH demonstrated that neurotrophines can modulate the expression of NPW in neuronal cells via the PI3K/Akt pathway and suggest that BDNF might be involved in functions of the HPA axis, at least in part by modulating the expression of NPW/NPY and CRH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation

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    Matsuda, H.; Coughlin, M.D.; Bienenstock, J.; Denburg, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been clones. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. These experiments indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by 125 I-polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. The authors conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, they postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes

  18. Intra-articular nerve growth factor regulates development, but not maintenance, of injury-induced facet joint pain & spinal neuronal hypersensitivity.

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    Kras, J V; Kartha, S; Winkelstein, B A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the current study is to define whether intra-articular nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to osteoarthritic pain, is necessary and sufficient for the development or maintenance of injury-induced facet joint pain and its concomitant spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Male Holtzman rats underwent painful cervical facet joint distraction (FJD) or sham procedures. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed in the forepaws, and NGF expression was quantified in the C6/C7 facet joint. An anti-NGF antibody was administered intra-articularly in additional rats immediately or 1 day following facet distraction or sham procedures to block intra-articular NGF and test its contribution to initiation and/or maintenance of facet joint pain and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. NGF was injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints in separate rats to determine if NGF alone is sufficient to induce these behavioral and neuronal responses. NGF expression increases in the cervical facet joint in association with behavioral sensitivity after that joint's mechanical injury. Intra-articular application of anti-NGF immediately after a joint distraction prevents the development of both injury-induced pain and hyperexcitability of spinal neurons. Yet, intra-articular anti-NGF applied after pain has developed does not attenuate either behavioral or neuronal hyperexcitability. Intra-articular NGF administered to the facet in naïve rats also induces behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Findings demonstrate that NGF in the facet joint contributes to the development of injury-induced joint pain. Localized blocking of NGF signaling in the joint may provide potential treatment for joint pain. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for a systemic regulation of neurotrophin synthesis in response to peripheral nerve injury.

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    Shakhbazau, Antos; Martinez, Jose A; Xu, Qing-Gui; Kawasoe, Jean; van Minnen, Jan; Midha, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    Up-regulation of neurotrophin synthesis is an important mechanism of peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. Neurotrophin expression is regulated by a complex series of events including cell interactions and multiple molecular stimuli. We have studied neurotrophin synthesis at 2 weeks time-point in a transvertebral model of unilateral or bilateral transection of sciatic nerve in rats. We have found that unilateral sciatic nerve transection results in the elevation of nerve growth factor (NGF) and NT-3, but not glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or brain-derived neural factor, in the uninjured nerve on the contralateral side, commonly considered as a control. Bilateral transection further increased NGF but not other neurotrophins in the nerve segment distal to the transection site, as compared to the unilateral injury. To further investigate the distinct role of NGF in regeneration and its potential for peripheral nerve repair, we transduced isogeneic Schwann cells with NGF-encoding lentivirus and transplanted the over-expressing cells into the distal segment of a transected nerve. Axonal regeneration was studied at 2 weeks time-point using pan-neuronal marker NF-200 and found to directly correlate with NGF levels in the regenerating nerve. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. The glucuronyltransferase GlcAT-P is required for stretch growth of peripheral nerves in Drosophila.

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    Rahul Pandey

    Full Text Available During development, the growth of the animal body is accompanied by a concomitant elongation of the peripheral nerves, which requires the elongation of integrated nerve fibers and the axons projecting therein. Although this process is of fundamental importance to almost all organisms of the animal kingdom, very little is known about the mechanisms regulating this process. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of novel mutant alleles of GlcAT-P, the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian glucuronyltransferase b3gat1. GlcAT-P mutants reveal shorter larval peripheral nerves and an elongated ventral nerve cord (VNC. We show that GlcAT-P is expressed in a subset of neurons in the central brain hemispheres, in some motoneurons of the ventral nerve cord as well as in central and peripheral nerve glia. We demonstrate that in GlcAT-P mutants the VNC is under tension of shorter peripheral nerves suggesting that the VNC elongates as a consequence of tension imparted by retarded peripheral nerve growth during larval development. We also provide evidence that for growth of peripheral nerve fibers GlcAT-P is critically required in hemocytes; however, glial cells are also important in this process. The glial specific repo gene acts as a modifier of GlcAT-P and loss or reduction of repo function in a GlcAT-P mutant background enhances VNC elongation. We propose a model in which hemocytes are required for aspects of glial cell biology which in turn affects the elongation of peripheral nerves during larval development. Our data also identifies GlcAT-P as a first candidate gene involved in growth of integrated peripheral nerves and therefore establishes Drosophila as an amenable in-vivo model system to study this process at the cellular and molecular level in more detail.

  1. The glucuronyltransferase GlcAT-P is required for stretch growth of peripheral nerves in Drosophila.

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    Pandey, Rahul; Blanco, Jorge; Udolph, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    During development, the growth of the animal body is accompanied by a concomitant elongation of the peripheral nerves, which requires the elongation of integrated nerve fibers and the axons projecting therein. Although this process is of fundamental importance to almost all organisms of the animal kingdom, very little is known about the mechanisms regulating this process. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of novel mutant alleles of GlcAT-P, the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian glucuronyltransferase b3gat1. GlcAT-P mutants reveal shorter larval peripheral nerves and an elongated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We show that GlcAT-P is expressed in a subset of neurons in the central brain hemispheres, in some motoneurons of the ventral nerve cord as well as in central and peripheral nerve glia. We demonstrate that in GlcAT-P mutants the VNC is under tension of shorter peripheral nerves suggesting that the VNC elongates as a consequence of tension imparted by retarded peripheral nerve growth during larval development. We also provide evidence that for growth of peripheral nerve fibers GlcAT-P is critically required in hemocytes; however, glial cells are also important in this process. The glial specific repo gene acts as a modifier of GlcAT-P and loss or reduction of repo function in a GlcAT-P mutant background enhances VNC elongation. We propose a model in which hemocytes are required for aspects of glial cell biology which in turn affects the elongation of peripheral nerves during larval development. Our data also identifies GlcAT-P as a first candidate gene involved in growth of integrated peripheral nerves and therefore establishes Drosophila as an amenable in-vivo model system to study this process at the cellular and molecular level in more detail.

  2. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with [ 125 I]NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and [ 125 I]NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations

  3. A photon-driven micromotor can direct nerve fibre growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Nieminen, Timo A.; Mohanty, Samarendra; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal path-finding is important in the development of the nervous system, nerve repair and nerve regeneration. The behaviour of the growth cone at the tip of the growing axon determines the direction of axonal growth and migration. We have developed an optical-based system to control the direction of growth of individual axons (nerve fibres) using laser-driven spinning birefringent spheres. One or two optical traps position birefringent beads adjacent to growth cones of cultured goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons. Circularly polarized light with angular momentum causes the trapped bead to spin. This creates a localized microfluidic flow generating an estimated 0.17 pN shear force against the growth cone that turns in response to the shear. The direction of axonal growth can be precisely manipulated by changing the rotation direction and position of this optically driven micromotor. A physical model estimating the shear force density on the axon is described.

  4. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  5. Accelerating axon growth to overcome limitations in functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Chan, K Ming; Sulaiman, Olawale A R; Udina, Esther; Amirjani, Nasim; Brushart, Thomas M

    2009-10-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate at very slow rates. Therefore, proximal injury sites such as the brachial plexus still present major challenges, and the outcomes of conventional treatments remain poor. This is in part attributable to a progressive decline in the Schwann cells' ability to provide a supportive milieu for the growth cone to extend and to find the appropriate target. These challenges are compounded by the often considerable delay of regeneration across the site of nerve laceration. Recently, low-frequency electrical stimulation (as brief as an hour) has shown promise, as it significantly accelerated regeneration in animal models through speeding of axon growth across the injury site. To test whether this might be a useful clinical tool, we carried out a randomized controlled trial in patients who had experienced substantial axonal loss in the median nerve owing to severe compression in the carpal tunnel. To further elucidate the potential mechanisms, we applied rolipram, a cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonist, to rats after axotomy of the femoral nerve. We demonstrated that effects similar to those observed in animal studies could also be attained in humans. The mechanisms of action of electrical stimulation likely operate through up-regulation of neurotrophic factors and cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Indeed, the application of rolipram significantly accelerated nerve regeneration. With new mechanistic insights into the influencing factors of peripheral nerve regeneration, the novel treatments described above could form part of an armament of synergistic therapies that could make a meaningful difference to patients with peripheral nerve injuries.

  6. Pannexin 1 Modulates Axonal Growth in Mouse Peripheral Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Horton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The pannexin family of channels consists of three members—pannexin-1 (Panx1, pannexin-2 (Panx2, and pannexin-3 (Panx3 that enable the exchange of metabolites and signaling molecules between intracellular and extracellular compartments. Pannexin-mediated release of intracellular ATP into the extracellular space has been tied to a number of cellular activities, primarily through the activity of type P2 purinergic receptors. Previous work indicates that the opening of Panx1 channels and activation of purinergic receptors by extracellular ATP may cause inflammation and apoptosis. In the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system, coupled pannexin, and P2 functions have been linked to peripheral sensitization (pain pathways. Purinergic pathways are also essential for other critical processes in the PNS, including myelination and neurite outgrowth. However, whether such pathways are pannexin-dependent remains to be determined. In this study, we use a Panx1 knockout mouse model and pharmacological inhibitors of the Panx1 and the ATP-mediated signaling pathway to fill gaps in our understanding of Panx1 localization in peripheral nerves, roles for Panx1 in axonal outgrowth and myelination, and neurite extension. Our data show that Panx1 is localized to axonal, myelin, and vascular compartments of the peripheral nerves. Knockout of Panx1 gene significantly increased axonal caliber in vivo and axonal growth rate in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons. Furthermore, genetic knockout of Panx1 or inhibition of components of purinergic signaling, by treatment with probenecid and apyrase, resulted in denser axonal outgrowth from cultured DRG explants compared to untreated wild-types. Our findings suggest that Panx1 regulates axonal growth in the peripheral nervous system.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  8. Nerve growth factor loaded heparin/chitosan scaffolds for accelerating peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guicai; Xiao, Qinzhi; Zhang, Luzhong; Zhao, Yahong; Yang, Yumin

    2017-09-01

    Artificial chitosan scaffolds have been widely investigated for peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the effect was not as good as that of autologous grafts and therefore could not meet the clinical requirement. In the present study, the nerve growth factor (NGF) loaded heparin/chitosan scaffolds were fabricated via electrostatic interaction for further improving nerve regeneration. The physicochemical properties including morphology, wettability and composition were measured. The heparin immobilization, NGF loading and release were quantitatively and qualitatively characterized, respectively. The effect of NGF loaded heparin/chitosan scaffolds on nerve regeneration was evaluated by Schwann cells culture for different periods. The results showed that the heparin immobilization and NGF loading did not cause the change of bulk properties of chitosan scaffolds except for morphology and wettability. The pre-immobilization of heparin in chitosan scaffolds could enhance the stability of subsequently loaded NGF. The NGF loaded heparin/chitosan scaffolds could obviously improve the attachment and proliferation of Schwann cells in vitro. More importantly, the NGF loaded heparin/chitosan scaffolds could effectively promote the morphology development of Schwann cells. The study may provide a useful experimental basis to design and develop artificial implants for peripheral nerve regeneration and other tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electricity regulation and economic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, M. Teresa (Maria Teresa), 1951-; Garcia-Quevedo, Jose; Trujillo-Baute, Elisa

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyse the effect of electricity regulation on economic growth. Although the relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth has been extensively analysed in the empirical literature, this framework has not been used to estimate the effect of electricity regulation on economic growth. Understanding this effect is essential for the assessment of regulatory policy. Specifically, we assess the effects of two major areas of regulation, rene...

  10. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Steinle, Jena

    2010-01-01

    Jena J SteinleDepartments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Neurobiology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USAAbstract: Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferati...

  11. Curative effect of surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Luo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage can improve neural nutritional status and reduce nerve injury degree, and it is beneficial to the recovery of neural function.

  12. [Effect of deep electroacupuncture stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB 30) on changes of function and nerve growth factor expression of the injured sciatic nerve in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Li; Li, Ye; Ren, Lu; Dai, Li-Li; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Bai, Ru; Ma, Tie-Ming

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE; To observe the effect of deep electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of "Huantiao"(GB 30) on the functional and pathological changes and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression of the damaged sciatic nerve in rats, so as to study its mechanisms underlying reliving sciatica. Forty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into normal, model, deep EA and shallow EA groups (n = 12 in each group). The sciatic nerve injury model was established by mechanical clamp of the sciatic nerve stem. For deep and shallow EA, the acupuncture needles were inserted into GB 30 about 16 mm and 7 mm, respectively. The EA treatment was given 20 min, once daily for 14 days. The evoked potentials of the injured sciatic nerve stem responding to electrical stimulation were recorded by using a biophysiological experimental system for calculating the motor conduction velocity. Pathological changes of the sciatic nerve were displayed by H. E. stain. The expression of NGF and Fos proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry. In comparison with the normal group, the conduction velocity and the amplitude of the evoked potentials of the sciatic nerve were significantly decreased in the model group (P 0.05), and no significant changes of latencies of the evoked potentials inthe four groups (P > 0.05). In the model group, the disorganized nerve fibers axons, myelin and Schwann cells of the damaged sciatic nerve were found, which became milder in the EA groups particularly in the deep EA group. In regard to the NGF and Fos immunoactivity of the injured sciatic nerve, the expression levels of both NGF and Fos proteins were obviously higher in the model group than in the normal group (P stimulation, NGF expression was further significantly up-regulated in both deep and shallow EA groups (P stimulation of GB 30 can improve the pathological changes and function of the injured sciatic nerve in the rat, which is closely associated with its effects in up-regulating NGF expression and down-regulating Fos

  13. Molecular cloning of a human gene that is a member of the nerve growth factor family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Reichardt, L.F. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Cell death within the developing vertebrate nervous system is regulated in part by interactions between neurons and their innervation targets that are mediated by neurotrophic factors. These factors also appear to have a role in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Two neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, share substantial amino acid sequence identity. The authors have used a screen that combines polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA and low-stringency hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides to isolate human BDNF and a human gene, neurotrophin-3, that is closely related to both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. mRNA products of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 genes were detected in the adult human brain, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Neurotrophin-3 is also expected to function in embryonic neural development.

  14. Nerve growth factor expression by PLG-mediated lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey, Kevin J; Shea, Lonnie D

    2006-04-01

    Biomaterials capable of efficient gene delivery provide a fundamental tool for basic and applied research models, such as promoting neural regeneration. We developed a system for the encapsulation and sustained release of plasmid DNA complexed with a cationic lipid and investigated their efficacy using in vitro models of neurite outgrowth. Sustained lipoplex release was obtained for up to 50 days, with rates controlled by the fabrication conditions. Released lipoplexes retained their activity, transfecting 48.2+/-8.3% of NIH3T3 cells with luciferase activity of 3.97x10(7)RLU/mg. Expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) was employed in two models of neurite outgrowth: PC12 and primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) co-culture. Polymer-mediated lipofection of PC12 produced bioactive NGF, eliciting robust neurite outgrowth. An EGFP/NGF dual-expression vector identified transfected cells (GFP-positive) while neurite outgrowth verified NGF secretion. A co-culture model examined the ability of NGF secretion by an accessory cell population to stimulate DRG neurite outgrowth. Polymer-mediated transfection of HEK293T with an NGF-encoding plasmid induced outgrowth by DRG neurons. This system could be fabricated as implants or nerve guidance conduits to support cellular and tissue regeneration. Combining this physical support with the ability to locally express neurotrophic factors will potentiate regeneration in nerve injury and disease models.

  15. Functionality of the baroreceptor nerves in heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    are a consequence of the memory encapsulated by the models, and the nonlinearity gives rise to sigmoidal response curves. The nonlinear afferent baroreceptor models are coupled with an effector model, and the coupled model has been used to predict baroreceptor feedback regulation of heart rate during postural...... change from sitting to standing and during head-up tilt. The efferent model couples the afferent nerve paths to the sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow, and subsequently predicts the build up of an action potential at the sinus knot of the heart. In this paper, we analyze the nonlinear afferent model...... and show that the coupled model is able to predict heart rate regulation using blood pressure data as an input...

  16. Gene regulation by growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, R.; Gorham, J.; Siegfried, Z.; Leonard, D.; Gizang-Ginsberg, E.; Thompson, M.A.; Lawe, D.; Kouzarides, T.; Vosatka, R.; MacGregor, D.; Jamal, S.; Greenberg, M.E.; Ziff, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    To coordinate the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types, cells of higher eukaryotes communicate through the release of growth factors. These peptides interact with specific transmembrane receptors of other cells and thereby generate intracellular messengers. The many changes in cellular physiology and activity that can be induced by growth factors imply that growth factor-induced signals can reach the nucleus and control gene activity. Moreover, current evidence also suggests that unregulated signaling along such pathways can induce aberrant proliferation and the formation of tumors. This paper reviews investigations of growth factor regulation of gene expression conducted by the authors' laboratory

  17. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  18. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  19. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor β immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent

  20. Molecular analysis of the nerve growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempstead, B.; Patil, N.; Olson, K.; Chao, M.

    1988-01-01

    An essential molecule in the translocation of information by nerve growth factor (NGF) to responsive cells is the cell-surface receptor for NGF. This paper presents information on the genomic structure of the NGF receptor gene, NGF receptor models, and transfection of NGF receptors. Equilibrium binding of [ 125 I]NGF to cells reveals two distinct affinity states for the NGF receptor. The human NGF receptor gene is a single-copy gene, consisting of six exons that span 23 kb. The receptor gene is capable of being transferred to fibroblast cells from human genomic DNA and expressed at high levels. The constitutive nature of the receptor promoter sequence is a partial explanation of why this tissue-specific gene is expressed efficiently in a variety of nonneuronal cells after genomic gene transfer. The two kinetic forms of the NGF receptor appear to be encoded by the same protein, which is the product of a single gene

  1. Regulation of semaphorin III/collapsin-1 gene expression during peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Giger, Roman J; Verhaagen, J

    1998-01-01

    The competence of neurons to regenerate depends on their ability to initiate a program of gene expression supporting growth and on the growth-permissive properties of glial cells in the distal stump of the injured nerve. Most studies on intrinsic molecular mechanisms governing peripheral nerve

  2. Effect of nerve activity on transport of nerve growth factor and dopamine β-hydroxylase antibodies in sympathetic neurones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, G.; Chubb, I.; Freeman, C.; Geffen, L.; Rush, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of nerve activity on the uptake and retrograde transport of nerve growth factor (NGF) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) antibodies was studied by injecting 125 I-labelled NGF and anti-DBH into the anterior eye chamber of guinea-pigs. Decentralization of the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion (SCG) had no significant effect on the retrograde transport of either NGF or anti-DBH. Phenoxybenzamine produced a 50% increase in anti-DBH but not NGF accumulation and this effect was prevented by prior decentralization. This demonstrates that NGF is taken up independently of the retrieval of synaptic vesicle components. (Auth.)

  3. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena J Steinle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jena J SteinleDepartments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Neurobiology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USAAbstract: Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease.Keywords: NGF, β-adrenergic receptor agents, α-adrenergic receptor agents, retina, cornea, glaucoma

  4. Retrograde axonal transport of 125I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered 125 I-nerve growth factor ( 125 I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of 125 I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of 125 I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The 125 I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar 125 I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of 125 I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of 125 I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported 125 I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions

  5. Reciprocal regulation of nuclear factor kappa B and its inhibitor ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiai Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NF-κB binds to the κB motif to regulate transcription of genes involved in growth, immunity and inflammation, and plays a pivotal role in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after nerve injuries. The zinc finger protein ZAS3 also binds to the κB or similar motif. In addition to competition for common DNA sites, in vitro experiments have shown that ZAS3 can inhibit NF-κB via the association with TRAF2 to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. However, the physiological significance of the ZAS3-mediated inhibition of NF-κB has not been demonstrated. The purpose of this study is to characterize ZAS3 proteins in nervous tissues and to use spinal nerve ligation, a neuropathic pain model, to demonstrate a functional relationship between ZAS3 and NF-κB. Results Immunohistochemical experiments show that ZAS3 is expressed in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Abundant ZAS3 expression is found in the trigeminal ganglion, hippocampal formation, dorsal root ganglia, and motoneurons. Low levels of ZAS3 expressions are also found in the cerebral cortex and in the grey matter of the spinal cord. In those nervous tissues, ZAS3 is expressed mainly in the cell bodies of neurons and astrocytes. Together with results of Western blot analyses, the data suggest that ZAS3 protein isoforms with differential cellular distribution are produced in a cell-specific manner. Further, neuropathic pain confirmed by persistent mechanical allodynia was manifested in rats seven days after L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerve ligation. Changes in gene expression, including a decrease in ZAS3 and an increase in the p65 subunit of NF-κB were observed in dorsal root ganglion ipsilateral to the ligation when compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion ZAS3 is expressed in nervous tissues involved in cognitive function and pain modulation. The down-regulation of ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury may lead to activation of

  6. Expression of β-nerve growth factor and homeobox A10 in experimental cryptorchidism treated with exogenous nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hua; Xian, Yun; Liu, Lili; Wang, Yongjun; He, Jianghong; Huang, Jianfei

    2015-04-01

    With the exception of standard inguinal orchidopexy, treatment of cryptorchidism with human chorionic gonadotropin has been performed for several years; however, its side effects have limited its application. The β‑nerve growth factor (NGF) and homeobox A10 (HoxA10) genes are closely associated with the development of the testes. To the best of our knowledge, whether exogenous NGF alters the endogenous levels of NGF and HoxA10 in cryptorchidism in rats remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the gene and protein expression of NGF and HoxA10 in experimental cryptorchidism following treatment with exogenous NGF. A unilateral mechanical cryptorchidism model in Sprague-Dawley rats was established and different concentrations of exogenous NGF were administered to observe the effects of NGF on cryptorchidism. Changes in the gene and protein expression levels of NGF and HoxA10 in the cryptorchid tissues of each group were identified using one step reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization with digoxigenin‑labeled‑β‑NGF RNA probes, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The expression levels of NGF and HoxA10 were markedly higher in the group treated with a high dose of exogenous NGF compared with the group treated with a low dose of exogenous NGF and the group treated with human chorionic gonadotropin. These results confirmed the potential therapeutic effect of exogenous NGF in human cryptorchidism.

  7. Baseline effects of lysophosphatidylcholine and nerve growth factor in a rat model of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan L Wood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells play a major role in helping heal injured nerves. They help clear debris, produce neurotrophins, upregulate neurotrophin receptors, and form bands of Büngner to guide the healing nerve. But nerves do not always produce enough neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors to repair themselves. Nerve growth factor (NGF is an important neurotrophin for promoting nerve healing and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC has been shown to stimulate NGF receptors (NGFR. This study tested the administration of a single intraneural injection of LPC (1 mg/mL for single LPC injection and 10 mg/mL for multiple LPC injections at day 0 and one (day 7, two (days 5 and 7, or three (days 5, 7, and 9 injections of NGF (160 ng/mL for single injections and 80 ng/mL for multiple injections to determine baseline effects on crushed sciatic nerves in rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF. The healing of the nerves was measured weekly by monitoring gait; electrophysiological parameters: compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitudes; and morphological parameters: total fascicle areas, myelinated fiber counts, fiber densities, fiber packing, and mean g-ratio values at weeks 3 and 6. The crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF groups statistically differed from the control group for all six weeks for the electrophysiological parameters but only differed from the control group at week 3 for the morphological parameters. The crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF groups did not differ from each other over the course of the study. Single injections of LPC and NGF one week apart or multiple treatments of NGF at 5, 7 and 9 days post-injury did not alter the healing rate of the sciatic nerves during weeks 1-6 of the study. These findings are important to define the baseline effects of NGF and LPC injections, as part of a larger effort to determine the minimal dose regimen of NGF to regenerate peripheral nerves.

  8. Calcium regulation in frog peripheral nerve by the blood-nerve barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwani, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: (a) to investigate the characteristics of calcium transport across the perineurium and the endoneurial capillaries, and (b) to gain a better understanding of the extent of calcium homeostasis in the endoneurial space. To study the nature of calcium transport across the perineurium, the flux of radiotracer 45 Ca was measured through the perineurial cylinder, isolated from the frog sciatic nerve, and through the perineurium into the nerve in situ. To study the nature of calcium transport across the endoneurial capillaries, the permeability-surface area product (PA) of 45 Ca was determined as a function of the calcium concentration in the blood. To study calcium homeostasis, the calcium content of the frog sciatic nerve was determined as a function of chronic changes in plasma [Ca

  9. Morphology and nanomechanics of sensory neurons growth cones following peripheral nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martin

    Full Text Available A prior peripheral nerve injury in vivo, promotes a rapid elongated mode of sensory neurons neurite regrowth in vitro. This in vitro model of conditioned axotomy allows analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to an improved neurite re-growth. Our differential interference contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry results show that conditioned axotomy, induced by sciatic nerve injury, did not increase somatic size of adult lumbar sensory neurons from mice dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons but promoted the appearance of larger neurites and growth cones. Using atomic force microscopy on live neurons, we investigated whether membrane mechanical properties of growth cones of axotomized neurons were modified following sciatic nerve injury. Our data revealed that neurons having a regenerative growth were characterized by softer growth cones, compared to control neurons. The increase of the growth cone membrane elasticity suggests a modification in the ratio and the inner framework of the main structural proteins.

  10. Expression and localization of nerve growth factor (NGF in the testis of alpaca (llama pacos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During alpaca testis development and spermatogenesis, nerve growth factor (NGF may play an importantrole. The main aim of this study was to determine the expression and localization of NGF in the alpacatestis, and to discuss the important role of NGF in alpaca reproductive characteristics. Immunohistochemicalstaining technique and real-time PCR were used. The expression of NGF in the same cells one-month old(newborn alpacas 12-month, and 24-month old alpacas showed significant differences (p 0.05; NGF at different cell stages showed nosignificant differences (p > 0.05. It suggests that NGF may be involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis,which provides direct evidence for NGF action in the alpaca testis during postnatal development and spermatogenesis.

  11. Balanced levels of nerve growth factor are required for normal pregnancy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Pierre; Barrientos, Gabriela; Tirado-González, Irene; Cohen, Marie; Moschansky, Petra; Peters, Eva M; Klapp, Burghard F; Rose, Matthias; Tometten, Mareike; Blois, Sandra M

    2014-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), the first identified member of the family of neurotrophins, is thought to play a critical role in the initiation of the decidual response in stress-challenged pregnant mice. However, the contribution of this pathway to physiological events during the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy remains largely elusive. Using NGF depletion and supplementation strategies alternatively, in this study, we demonstrated that a successful pregnancy is sensitive to disturbances in NGF levels in mice. Treatment with NGF further boosted fetal loss rates in the high-abortion rate CBA/J x DBA/2J mouse model by amplifying a local inflammatory response through recruitment of NGF-expressing immune cells, increased decidual innervation with substance P(+) nerve fibres and a Th1 cytokine shift. Similarly, treatment with a NGF-neutralising antibody in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice, a normal-pregnancy model, also induced abortions associated with increased infiltration of tropomyosin kinase receptor A-expressing NK cells to the decidua. Importantly, in neither of the models, pregnancy loss was associated with defective ovarian function, angiogenesis or placental development. We further demonstrated that spontaneous abortion in humans is associated with up-regulated synthesis and an aberrant distribution of NGF in placental tissue. Thus, a local threshold of NGF expression seems to be necessary to ensure maternal tolerance in healthy pregnancies, but when surpassed may result in fetal rejection due to exacerbated inflammation. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  12. Mental disorders, functional impairment, and nerve growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salles FHM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fanny Helena Martins Salles,1 Pedro San Martin Soares,1 Carolina David Wiener,1 Thaise Campos Mondin,1 Paula Moraes da Silva,1 Karen Jansen,1–3 Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza,1 Ricardo Azevedo da Silva,1 Jean Pierre Oses1–3 1Translational Science on Brain Disorders, Department of Health and Behavior, Catholic University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; 2Translational Psychiatry Program, 3Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Medical School, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Nerve growth factor (NGF is an important member of the neurotrophin family and its alteration has been associated with psychiatric disorders. Functionality consists of the activities that an individual can perform, as well as their social participation, which is an important factor in analyzing the carrier living conditions of subjects with psychiatric suffering. Several studies have evaluated functionality in bipolar disorder; however, no studies have evaluated the functionality in other mental disorders. There are also few studies investigating the association between functionality and the biological bases of mental disorders. This study aimed to evaluate the serum NGF levels in psychiatric patients and to verify a possible association between the serum neurotrophic levels and functionality. This was a cross-sectional study with a convenient sample obtained from the Public Mental Health Service from the south of Brazil. The final sample was composed of 286 patients enrolled from July 2013 to October 2014. Data was collected using a sociodemographic questionnaire, and the diagnosis was confirmed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I and a Functioning Assessment Short Test. The serum NGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistic

  13. The chemokine CXCL12 mediates the anti-amyloidogenic action of painless human nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capsoni, Simona; Malerba, Francesca; Carucci, Nicola Maria; Rizzi, Caterina; Criscuolo, Chiara; Origlia, Nicola; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Viegi, Alessandro; Meli, Giovanni; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease. Due to its pain-inducing activity, in current clinical trials nerve growth factor is delivered locally into the brain by neurosurgery, but data on the efficacy of local nerve growth factor delivery in decreasing amyloid-β deposition are not available. To reduce the nerve growth factor pain-inducing side effects, thus avoiding the need for local brain injection, we developed human painless nerve growth factor (hNGFp), inspired by the human genetic disease hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V. hNGFp has identical neurotrophic potency as wild-type human nerve growth factor, but a 10-fold lower pain sensitizing activity. In this study we first mimicked, in the 5xFAD mouse model, the intraparenchymal delivery of hNGFp used in clinical trials and found it to be ineffective in decreasing amyloid-β plaque load. On the contrary, the same dose of hNGFp delivered intranasally, which was widely biodistributed in the brain and did not induce pain, showed a potent anti-amyloidogenic action and rescued synaptic plasticity and memory deficits. We found that hNGFp acts on glial cells, modulating inflammatory proteins such as the soluble TNFα receptor II and the chemokine CXCL12. We further established that the rescuing effect by hNGFp is mediated by CXCL12, as pharmacological inhibition of CXCL12 receptor CXCR4 occludes most of hNGFp effects. These findings have significant therapeutic implications: (i) we established that a widespread exposure of the brain is required for nerve growth factor to fully exert its neuroprotective actions; and (ii) we have identified a new anti-neurodegenerative pathway as a broad target for new therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  14. Effects of a synthetic bioactive peptide on neurite growth and nerve growth factor release in chondroitin sulfate hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Conovaloff, Aaron W.; Beier, Brooke L.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has revealed robust dorsal root ganglia neurite growth in hydrogels of chondroitin sulfate. In the current work, it was determined whether addition of a synthetic bioactive peptide could augment neurite growth in these matrices via enhanced binding and sequestering of growth factors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that addition of peptide slowed nerve growth factor diffusivity in chondroitin sulfate gels, but not in control gels of hyaluronic acid. F...

  15. Neonatal hyperthyroidism impairs epinephrine-provoked secretion of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor in mouse saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, J; Landel, C P

    1986-07-01

    We examined long-term effects of neonatal hyperthyroidism on salivary secretions of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor in male and female mice at the age of 31 days. Hyperthyroidism was induced by thyroxine (T4) injections (0.4 microgram/g body weight/day) during days 0-6. Littermate control mice were treated with vehicle. T4 treatment did not alter the amounts of protein secreted into saliva but hormone administration induced alteration in the types of protein secreted. T4 treatment decreased the contents of both nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor secreted into the saliva. A Sephadex G-200 column chromatographic profile revealed the presence of two distinct nerve growth factor immunoreactive peaks, while epidermal growth factor immunoreactivity predominantly eluted as a single low molecular weight form. T4 treatment did not alter the molecular nature of their secretion, but the treatment decreased their contents. These results indicate an impairment in salivary secretion of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor long after T4 treatment has been discontinued.

  16. Afferent nerves regulating the cough reflex: Mechanisms and Mediators of Cough in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Brendan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary C-fibers and acid-sensitive, capsaicin-insensitive mechanoreceptors innervating the larynx, trachea and large bronchi regulate the cough reflex. These vagal afferent nerves may interact centrally with sensory input arising from afferent nerves innervating the intrapulmonary airways or even extrapulmonary afferents such as those innervating the nasal mucosa and esophagus to produce chronic cough or enhanced cough responsiveness. The mechanisms of cough initiation in health and in disease are briefly described. PMID:20172253

  17. Nerve growth factor, clinical applications and production of the recombinant protei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zangi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian neurotrophin family proteins, nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5 are known as neuronal survival factors. NGF, one of the most important cytokines, is composed of 118 amino acids. NGF is involved in the growth and differentiation of neural cells of the vertebrate peripheral sympathetic nerve as well as basal forebrain cholinergic neurons which degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, it is implicated in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis in the central nervous system. NGF is produced by a variety of immune cells, including B cells, T cells, monocytes and mast cells as well as nervous system and binds through two distinct receptors, TrkA and p75NTR which signaling through them leads to the neuronal differentiation and cell death respectively. Considering the importance of this protein as a drug, NGF has been proposed for the treatment of neuron degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis. To produce enough protein for research and clinical applications, genetic engineering techniques are used to produce recombinant forms. To date, there are no reports about the systems for production of the recombinant human NGF in an effective, low cost, with industrial production. Plants as a safe host generally offer major advantages such as free of animal pathogens, low costs, the ability to produce a protein similar to natural protein, and industrial production in large scale. Then they are suitable for the production of recombinant human NGF.

  18. Ocular Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and NGF Eye Drop Application as Paradigms to Investigate NGF Neuroprotective and Reparative Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirassa, Paola; Rosso, Pamela; Iannitelli, Angela

    2018-01-01

    The eye is a central nervous system structure that is uniquely accessible to local treatment. Through the ocular surface, it is possible to access the retina, optic nerve, and brain. Animal models of retina degeneration or optic nerve crush could thus serve as tools to investigate whether and how factors, which are anterogradely or retrogradely transported through the optic nerve, might contribute to activate neuroprotection and eventually regeneration. Among these factors, nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a crucial role during development of the visual system, as well as during the entire life span, and in pathological conditions. The ability of NGF to exert survival and trophic actions on the retina and brain cells when applied intraocularly and topically as eye drops is critically reviewed here, together with the effects of ocular neurotrophins on neuronal pathways influencing body rhythm, cognitions, and behavioral functions. The latest data from animal models and humans are presented, and the mechanism of action of ocularly administered NGF is discussed. NGF eye drops are proposed as an experimental strategy to investigate the role and cellular targets of neurotrophins in the mechanism(s) underlying neurodegeneration/regeneration and their involvement in the regulation of neurological and behavioral dysfunctions.

  19. Regulators of growth plate maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Joyce Adriana Mathilde

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen is known to play an important role in longitudinal bone growth and growth plate maturation, but the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effect is not fully understood. In this thesis this role is further explored. Chapter 1 contains a general introduction to longitudinal bone growth

  20. GSK3 controls axon growth via CLASP-mediated regulation of growth cone microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Saijilafu; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Xu, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) activity in neurons yields pleiotropic outcomes, causing both axon growth promotion and inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that specific GSK3 substrates, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), support axon growth by regulating the stability of axonal microtubules (MTs), but the substrate(s) and mechanisms conveying axon growth inhibition remain elusive. Here we show that CLIP (cytoplasmic linker protein)-associated protein (CLASP), originally identified as a MT plus end-binding protein, displays both plus end-binding and lattice-binding activities in nerve growth cones, and reveal that the two MT-binding activities regulate axon growth in an opposing manner: The lattice-binding activity mediates axon growth inhibition induced by suppression of GSK3 activity via preventing MT protrusion into the growth cone periphery, whereas the plus end-binding property supports axon extension via stabilizing the growing ends of axonal MTs. We propose a model in which CLASP transduces GSK3 activity levels to differentially control axon growth by coordinating the stability and configuration of growth cone MTs. PMID:21937714

  1. Stringency of environmental regulation and aquaculture growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gedefaw Abate, Tenaw; Nielsen, Rasmus; Tveterås, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    remarkable growth in aquaculture while others have stagnated or even declined have not been determined. In this article, we investigate whether environmental regulations have an impact on aquaculture growth. Using a cross-country regression analysis, we show that stringent environmental regulations......During the last three decades, aquaculture has been the fastest growing animal-food-producing sector in the world, accounting for half of the present seafood supply. However, there is a significant growth disparity among aquaculture-producing countries. The reasons why some countries have achieved...... are negatively related to aquaculture growth, whereas GDP growth has a positive effect. Countries often face a difficult balancing act between growth and environmental considerations when devising regulations. Our empirical results suggest that stricter environmental regulations in developed countries have...

  2. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor A, in rooster testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Wang, Chunqiang; Su, Yuhong; Tian, Yumin; Zhu, Hongyan

    2015-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), which is required for the survival and differentiation of the nervous system, is also thought to play an important role in the development of mammalian reproductive tissues. To explore the function of NGF in the male reproductive system of non-mammalian animals, we determined the presence of NGF and its receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), in rooster testes and investigated the regulation of NGF and TrkA expression by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The mRNA and protein levels of NGF and TrkA in 6-week-old rooster testes were lower than those in 12-, 16- or 20-week age groups; levels were highest in the 16-week group. Immunohistochemistry showed that NGF and TrkA were both detected in spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids. NGF immunoreactivity was observed in Leydig cells and strong TrkA signals were present in Sertoli cells. Meanwhile, FSH increased TrkA transcript levels in rooster testes in a dose-dependent manner. We present novel evidence for the developmental and FSH-regulated expression of the NGF/TrkA system, and our findings suggest that the NGF/TrkA system may play a prominent role in chicken spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Influence of trigeminal nerve lesion on facial growth: study of two cases of Goldenhar syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darris, Pierre; Treil, Jacques; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Baron, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    This cases report confirms the hypothesis that embryonic and maxillofacial growth are influenced by the peripheral nervous system, including the trigeminal nerve (V). So, it's interesting to use the stigma of the trigeminal nerve as landmarks to analyze the maxillofacial volume and understand its growth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity of the three-dimensional cephalometric analysis of Treil based on trigeminal landmarks. The first case is a caucasian female child with Goldenhar syndrome. The second case is a caucasian male adult affected by the same syndrome. In both cases, brain MRI showed an unilateral trigeminal nerve lesion, ipsilateral to the facial dysmorphia. The results of this radiological study tend to prove the primary role of the trigeminal nerve in craniofacial growth. These cases demonstrate the validity of the theory of Moss. They are one of anatomo-functional justifications of the three-dimensional cephalometric biometry of Treil based on trigeminal nerve landmarks. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  4. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Jun Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the effect of 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery. Methods: A total of 110 patients with femoral fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between January 2015 and January 2017 were collected and divided into the control group (n=55 and study group (n=55 by random number table. Control group received postoperative nerve growth factor therapy, and study group received postoperative 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy. The differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, the differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups. After treatment, serum bone metabolism indexes BGP and PⅠNP contents of study group were higher than those of control group while CTX-Ⅰ and TRAP contents were lower than those of control group; serum oxidative stress indexes TAC, CAT and SOD contents of study group were higher than those of control group while MDA content was lower than that of control group; limb nerve conduction velocity SCV and MCV levels of study group were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy after femoral fracture surgery can effectively balance osteoblast/ osteoclast activity, reduce oxidative stress and improve limb nerve conduction velocity.

  5. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 regulates endocytosis in nerve terminals via dynamin I phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.C.; Hansra, G.; Calova, V.; Cousin, M.; Robinson, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) in nerve terminals is essential for normal synaptic transmission and for memory retrieval. Dynamin I is a 96kDa nerve terminal phosphoprotein necessary for synaptic vesicle endocytosis in the nerve terminal. Dynamin I is dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated in a cyclical fashion with nerve terminal depolarisation and repolarisation. A number of kinases phosphorylate dynamin I in vitro including PKC, MAP kinase and cdc2. PKC phosphorylates dynamin in the proline rich domain on Ser 795 and is also thought to be the in vivo kinase for dynamin I. Another candidate is the neuron specific kinase cdk5, crucial for CNS development. The aim of this study is to identify the kinase which phosphorylates dynamin I in intact nerve terminals. Here we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) phosphorylates dynamin I in the proline-rich tail on Ser-774 or Ser-778. The phosphorylation of these sites but not Ser-795 also occurred in intact nerve terminals suggesting that cdk5 is the physiologically relevant enzyme for dynamin I. Synaptosomes prepared from rat brains (after cervical dislocations) and labelled with 32 Pi, were incubated with 100 M roscovitine (a selective inhibitor of cdks), 10 M Ro 31-8220 (a selective PKC inhibitor) and 100 M PD 98059 (a MEK kinase inhibitor). Dynamin rephosphorylation during repolarisation was reduced in synaptosomes treated with roscovitine and Ro 38-8220 but not in synaptosomes treated with PD 98059. Fluorimetric experiments on intact synaptosomes utilising FM-210 (a fluorescent dye) indicate that endocytosis was reduced in synaptosomes treated with 100 M roscovitine. Our results suggest that dynamin phosphorylation in intact nerve terminals may not be regulated by PKC or MAP kinase and that dynamin phosphorylation by cdk5 may regulate endocytosis. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  6. Closing the Border on a New Frontier : The Problem With Salivary Nerve Growth Factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, J.E.; Bosch, J.A.

    In 2013, a study appeared in Psychosomatic Medicine showing that salivary levels of nerve growth factor (sNGF) rapidly increase (to +45% of baseline levels) in response to an acute psychosocial stress task that involved discussing an unresolved conflict with a romantic partner (1). NGF, also

  7. Growth Factor and Laminin Effect with Muscular Fiber Sheath on Repairing of the Sciatica Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Torabi

    2014-01-01

    Background & aim: Peripheral nerve injuries which can lead to a physical disability. If the defect is very low, direct suture without tension on both ends of the cut nerve regeneration is considered as a standard procedure. Otherwise, to reconstruct the axons, the gap must be filled by graft material in order to the guidance. Due to the similarity of the matrix tubular skeletal muscle and nerve muscles graft was used to repair in this study. Methods: In the present experimental study, 42 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups and underwent surgery. In the first group a narrow strip of muscle was prepared by freezing – thawing, and later sutured between the distal and proximal sciatic nerve. In the second group, the gap caused by muscle graft was regenerated and the nerve growth factor and laminin was injected into the graft. In the control group, the two ends of the cut nerve were hidden beneath the adjacent muscles. Next, a group of rats with sciatic functional index was investigated for the behavioral. On the other group were examined for histological studies after two months. Results: Sciatic functional index and Mean counts of myelinated fibers in two graft groups compared with the control group was significant p<0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. Conclusion: co-axially aligned muscle grafts were an appropriate alternative substitute for repairing. It seems that the nerve growth factor and laminin have a positive role in axonal regeneration and functional recovery acceleration. Key words: Sciatic Functional Index, muscle graft, NGF, Laminin

  8. Ghrelin ameliorates nerve growth factor Dysmetabolism and inflammation in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuxing; Shen, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Dongling; Luo, Huiqiong; Chen, Jinliang; Sun, Yue; Xiao, Qian

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is characterized by cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation, deficient neurotrophic support, and neuronal and synaptic loss. Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide, is associated with neuromodulation and cognitive improvement, which has been considered as a potential protective agent for several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we sought to investigate the role of ghrelin in preventing diabetic-related neuropathology. We found that ghrelin attenuated astrocytic activation and reduced levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In addition, ghrelin inhibited p38 mitogen-associated protein kinase activation. The upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) precursor and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and downregulation of mature NGF and MMP-7 in the diabetic brain were reversed by ghrelin. Treatment with ghrelin elevated synaptophysin expression and synaptic density in diabetic rats. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ghrelin ameliorates diabetes-related neurodegeneration by preventing NGF dysmetabolism and synaptic degeneration through regulating MMP levels as well as inhibiting neuroinflammation.

  9. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  10. Effects of nerve growth factor on the neurotization of denervated muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menderes, Adnan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Vayvada, Haluk; Ozer, Erdener; Barutçu, Ali

    2002-04-01

    Studies on surgical repair techniques of the peripheral nerve are still trying to improve the outcome. There are many studies on the effects of various neurotrophic factors on the transected peripheral nerve. Muscular neurotization, which is the direct implantation of the nerve to the target denervated skeletal muscle, is one of the techniques used when the primary repair of the peripheral nerves is not possible. The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF), which is one of the primary neurotrophic factors, on the reinnervation of denervated muscles by neurotization is investigated in this experimental study. The denervated soleus muscle was neurotized via peroneal nerve implantation (group 1), and NGF was administered to the neurotized muscle (group 2). All animals were evaluated at weeks 8, 10, and 12 using electromyography. Muscle contractility, muscle weight, and histological morphometric tests were performed at week 12. The experimental groups were compared with each other and normal control values. Electromyographically, group 2 (direct nerve implantation + NGF) demonstrated better reinnervation in all evaluations. The study of muscle weight showed that the muscle mass was 75% of the normal soleus muscle in group 1 and was 85% of the normal side in group 2 at the end of week 12. In group 1, the twitch force was 56% of the normal soleus muscle and was 71% in group 2. Tetanic force was 53% of the normal soleus muscle in group 1 and 68% in group 2. Histological morphometric studies revealed that there was a decrease in the density of the motor end plates in group 1, but there was no statistically significant difference between the normal soleus muscles and the NGF applied to group 2. The positive effects of NGF on the neurotization of denervated muscles seen in this study suggest that it may be useful for treating some difficult reconstructions caused by denervation.

  11. Complementary effects of two growth factors in multifunctionalized silk nanofibers for nerve reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony M Dinis

    Full Text Available With the aim of forming bioactive guides for peripheral nerve regeneration, silk fibroin was electrospun to obtain aligned nanofibers. These fibers were functionalized by incorporating Nerve Growth Factor (NGF and Ciliary NeuroTrophic Factor (CNTF during electrospinning. PC12 cells grown on the fibers confirmed the bioavailability and bioactivity of the NGF, which was not significantly released from the fibers. Primary neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs were grown on the nanofibers and anchored to the fibers and grew in a directional fashion based on the fiber orientation, and as confirmed by growth cone morphology. These biofunctionalized nanofibers led to a 3-fold increase in neurite length at their contact, which was likely due to the NGF. Glial cell growth, alignment and migration were stimulated by the CNTF in the functionalized nanofibers. Organotypic culture of rat fetal DRGs confirmed the complementary effect of both growth factors in multifunctionalized nanofibers, which allowed glial cell migration, alignment and parallel axonal growth in structures resembling the 'bands of Bungner' found in situ. Graftable multi-channel conduits based on biofunctionalized aligned silk nanofibers were developed as an organized 3D scaffold. Our bioactive silk tubes thus represent new options for a biological and biocompatible nerve guidance conduit.

  12. Effect of mouse nerve growth factor combined with mecobalamine on treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Rong Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the clinical effect of mouse nerve growth fact (NGF combined with mecobalamine on treatment of diabetic peripheral n-europathy (DPN. Methods: A total of 84 cases of patients with DPN treated in ourhospital between April 2012 and June 2015 were selected, and divided into study group and control group randomly (n=42; Control group was only given mecobalamine treatment, while study group was given mouse nerve growth factor combined with mecobalamine treatment for 4 weeks. TThe motor nerve conduction velocity median nerve (MNCV, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV, serum high sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP and Toronto clinical scoring system (TCSS changes of median nerve and nervus peroneus communis before and after treatment were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in MNCV, SNCV of mediannerve and nervus peroneus communis before treatment. MNCV and SNCV of both groups after treatment were significantly increased. MNCV, SNCV of mediannerve and nervus peroneus communis in study group was significantly higher than that in control group. hs-CRP and TCSS scoring of both groups before treatment showed no statistic significant difference. hs-CRP scoring of both groups after treatment showed no significant difference. TCSS scoring was significantly lower than that in control group. Adverse reaction total occurrence rate after given drug in study group was 16.67% (7/42, compared with 7.14% (3/42 in control group, difference was significant. Conclusions: Mouse NGF combined with mecobalamine could achieve good curative effect. It is of higher safety in the treatment of patients with DPN, and deserves popularization and application.

  13. NERVE REGENERATION THROUGH A 2-PLY BIODEGRADABLE NERVE GUIDE IN THE RAT AND THE INFLUENCE OF ACTH4-9 NERVE GROWTH-FACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROBINSON, PH; VANDERLEI, B; HOPPEN, HJ; LEENSLAG, JW; PENNINGS, AJ; NIEUWENHUIS, P

    1991-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane-based (PU) nerve guides, instilled with or without ACTH4-9 analog (a melanocortin) were used for bridging an 8 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve and were evaluated for function and histological appearance after 16 weeks of implantation. Autologous nerve grafts functioned as

  14. A meta-analysis of peripheral blood nerve growth factor levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X-Y; Wu, H-T; Cao, C; Loh, Y P; Cheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Neurotrophins particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are crucial modulators in the neurodevelopment and maintenance of central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurotrophin hypothesis of schizophrenia (SCZ) postulated that the changes in the brains of SCZ patients are the result of disturbances of developing processes involving neurotrophic factors. This hypothesis was mainly supported by the abnormal regulation of BDNF in SCZ, especially the decreased peripheral blood BDNF levels in SCZ patients validated by several meta-analyses. However, the regulation of NGF in SCZ remains unclear because of the inconsistent findings from the clinical studies. Therefore, we undertook, to the best of our knowledge, the first systematic review with a meta-analysis to quantitatively summarize the peripheral blood NGF data in SCZ patients compared with healthy control (HC) subjects. A systematic search of Pubmed, PsycINFO and Web of Science identified 13 articles encompassing a sample of 1693 individuals for the meta-analysis. Random-effects meta-analysis showed that patients with SCZ had significantly decreased peripheral blood levels of NGF when compared with the HC subjects (Hedges's g=-0.633, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.948 to -0.318, Pmeta-regression analyses showed that age, gender and sample size had no moderating effects on the outcome of the meta-analysis, whereas disease severity might be a confounding factor for the meta-analysis. These results demonstrated that patients with SCZ are accompanied by the decreased peripheral blood NGF levels, strengthening the clinical evidence of an abnormal neurotrophin profile in the patients with SCZ.

  15. Trauma-Induced Heterotopic Ossification Regulates the Blood-Nerve Barrier

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    Zbigniew Gugala

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available De novo bone formation can occur in soft tissues as a result of traumatic injury. This process, known as heterotopic ossification (HO, has recently been linked to the peripheral nervous system. Studies suggest that HO may resemble neural crest-derived bone formation and is activated through the release of key bone matrix proteins leading to opening of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB. One of the first steps in this process is the activation of a neuro-inflammatory cascade, which results in migration of chondro-osseous progenitors, and other cells from both the endoneurial and perineurial regions of the peripheral nerves. The perineurial cells undergo brown adipogenesis, to form essential support cells, which regulate expression and activation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9 an essential regulatory protein involved in opening the BNB. However, recent studies suggest that, in mice, a key bone matrix protein, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 is able to immediately cross the BNB to activate signaling in specific cells within the endoneurial compartment. BMP signaling correlates with bone formation and appears critical for the induction of HO. Surprisingly, several other bone matrix proteins have also been reported to regulate the BNB, leading us to question whether these matrix proteins are important in regulating the BNB. However, this temporary regulation of the BNB does not appear to result in degeneration of the peripheral nerve, but rather may represent one of the first steps in innervation of the newly forming bone.

  16. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...... implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain....

  17. Expression of growth-associated protein B-50/GAP43 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve during regenerative sprouting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Nielander, H.B.; Vos, J.P.; Lopes da Silva, S.; Verhaagen, J.; Oestreicher, J.; Schrama, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that B-50 is identical to the neuron- specific, growth-associated protein GAP43. The present study reports on the fate of B-50/GAP43 mRNA and B-50/GAP43 protein, determined by radioimmunoassay, in a rat model of peripheral nerve regeneration (sciatic nerve crush) over a

  18. Chondroitinase C Selectively Degrades Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans that Inhibit Axonal Growth within the Endoneurium of Peripheral Nerve.

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    James B Graham

    Full Text Available The success of peripheral nerve regeneration is highly dependent on the regrowth of axons within the endoneurial basal lamina tubes that promote target-oriented pathfinding and appropriate reinnervation. Restoration of nerve continuity at this structural level after nerve transection injury by direct repair and nerve grafting remains a major surgical challenge. Recently, biological approaches that alter the balance of growth inhibitors and promoters in nerve have shown promise to improve appropriate axonal regeneration and recovery of peripheral nerve function. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are known inhibitors of axonal growth. This growth inhibition is mainly associated with a CSPG's glycosaminoglycan chains. Enzymatic degradation of these chains with chondroitinase eliminates this inhibitory activity and, when applied in vivo, can improve the outcome of nerve repair. To date, these encouraging findings were obtained with chondroitinase ABC (a pan-specific chondroitinase. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of CSPG subtypes in rodent, rabbit, and human peripheral nerve and to test more selective biological enzymatic approaches to improve appropriate axonal growth within the endoneurium and minimize aberrant growth. Here we provide evidence that the endoneurium, but not the surrounding epineurium, is rich in CSPGs that have glycosaminoglycan chains readily degraded by chondroitinase C. Biochemical studies indicate that chondroitinase C has degradation specificity for 6-sulfated glycosaminoglycans found in peripheral nerve. We found that chondroitinase C degrades and inactivates inhibitory CSPGs within the endoneurium but not so much in the surrounding nerve compartments. Cryoculture bioassays (neurons grown on tissue sections show that chondroitinase C selectively and significantly enhanced neuritic growth associated with the endoneurial basal laminae without changing growth-inhibiting properties of the surrounding

  19. Chondroitinase C Selectively Degrades Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans that Inhibit Axonal Growth within the Endoneurium of Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James B; Muir, David

    2016-01-01

    The success of peripheral nerve regeneration is highly dependent on the regrowth of axons within the endoneurial basal lamina tubes that promote target-oriented pathfinding and appropriate reinnervation. Restoration of nerve continuity at this structural level after nerve transection injury by direct repair and nerve grafting remains a major surgical challenge. Recently, biological approaches that alter the balance of growth inhibitors and promoters in nerve have shown promise to improve appropriate axonal regeneration and recovery of peripheral nerve function. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are known inhibitors of axonal growth. This growth inhibition is mainly associated with a CSPG's glycosaminoglycan chains. Enzymatic degradation of these chains with chondroitinase eliminates this inhibitory activity and, when applied in vivo, can improve the outcome of nerve repair. To date, these encouraging findings were obtained with chondroitinase ABC (a pan-specific chondroitinase). The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of CSPG subtypes in rodent, rabbit, and human peripheral nerve and to test more selective biological enzymatic approaches to improve appropriate axonal growth within the endoneurium and minimize aberrant growth. Here we provide evidence that the endoneurium, but not the surrounding epineurium, is rich in CSPGs that have glycosaminoglycan chains readily degraded by chondroitinase C. Biochemical studies indicate that chondroitinase C has degradation specificity for 6-sulfated glycosaminoglycans found in peripheral nerve. We found that chondroitinase C degrades and inactivates inhibitory CSPGs within the endoneurium but not so much in the surrounding nerve compartments. Cryoculture bioassays (neurons grown on tissue sections) show that chondroitinase C selectively and significantly enhanced neuritic growth associated with the endoneurial basal laminae without changing growth-inhibiting properties of the surrounding epineurium

  20. A local anesthetic, ropivacaine, suppresses activated microglia via a nerve growth factor-dependent mechanism and astrocytes via a nerve growth factor-independent mechanism in neuropathic pain

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    Sakamoto Atsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthetics alleviate neuropathic pain in some cases in clinical practice, and exhibit longer durations of action than those predicted on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of their blocking effects on voltage-dependent sodium channels. Therefore, local anesthetics may contribute to additional mechanisms for reversal of the sensitization of nociceptive pathways that occurs in the neuropathic pain state. In recent years, spinal glial cells, microglia and astrocytes, have been shown to play critical roles in neuropathic pain, but their participation in the analgesic effects of local anesthetics remains largely unknown. Results Repetitive epidural administration of ropivacaine reduced the hyperalgesia induced by chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve. Concomitantly with this analgesia, ropivacaine suppressed the increases in the immunoreactivities of CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the dorsal spinal cord, as markers of activated microglia and astrocytes, respectively. In addition, epidural administration of a TrkA-IgG fusion protein that blocks the action of nerve growth factor (NGF, which was upregulated by ropivacaine in the dorsal root ganglion, prevented the inhibitory effect of ropivacaine on microglia, but not astrocytes. The blockade of NGF action also abolished the analgesic effect of ropivacaine on neuropathic pain. Conclusions Ropivacaine provides prolonged analgesia possibly by suppressing microglial activation in an NGF-dependent manner and astrocyte activation in an NGF-independent manner in the dorsal spinal cord. Local anesthetics, including ropivacaine, may represent a new approach for glial cell inhibition and, therefore, therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain.

  1. Synthesis and application of labelled growth regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyutte, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    For the investigation of the metabolism both of phytoeffectors like herbicides and plant growth regulators such compounds are needed in radioactive labelled form. The synthesis of radioactive labelled fluorodifen, nitrofen, ethephon, diphenylic acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, abscisic acid, hydroxybenzoic acids and different conjugates are described. Some examples of these compounds metabolism in plants are discussed [ru

  2. Age-Dependent Schwann Cell Phenotype Regulation Following Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wayne A; Luo, T David; Barnwell, Jonathan C; Smith, Thomas L; Li, Zhongyu

    2017-12-01

    Schwann cells are integral to the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, which declines after adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this decline are poorly understood. This study sought to compare the protein expression of Notch, c-Jun, and Krox-20 after nerve crush injury in adolescent and young adult rats. We hypothesized that these Schwann cell myelinating regulatory factors are down-regulated after nerve injury in an age-dependent fashion. Adolescent (2 months old) and young adult (12 months old) rats (n = 48) underwent sciatic nerve crush injury. Protein expression of Notch, c-Jun, and Krox-20 was quantified by Western blot analysis at 1, 3, and 7 days post-injury. Functional recovery was assessed in a separate group of animals (n = 8) by gait analysis (sciatic functional index) and electromyography (compound motor action potential) over an 8-week post-injury period. Young adult rats demonstrated a trend of delayed onset of the dedifferentiating regulatory factors, Notch and c-Jun, corresponding to the delayed functional recovery observed in young adult rats compared to adolescent rats. Compound motor action potential area was significantly greater in adolescent rats relative to young adult rats, while amplitude and velocity trended toward statistical significance. The process of Schwann cell dedifferentiation following peripheral nerve injury shows different trends with age. These trends of delayed onset of key regulatory factors responsible for Schwann cell myelination may be one of many possible factors mediating the significant differences in functional recovery between adolescent and young adult rats following peripheral nerve injury.

  3. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary blood flow via vasa recta pericytes

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    Scott S Wildman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta, and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF. Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesise that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is

  4. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  5. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

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    Chiaki Murayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH, a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control, a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in “itch-scratch” animal models is under investigation.

  6. Expression and localization of nerve growth factor (NGF in the testis of alpaca (llama pacos

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    Changsheng Dong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During alpaca testis development and spermatogenesis, nerve growth factor (NGF may play an important role. The main aim of this study was to determine the expression and localization of NGF in the alpaca testis, and to discuss the important role of NGF in alpaca reproductive characteristics. Immunohistochemical staining technique and real-time PCR were used. The expression of NGF in the same cells one-month old (newborn alpacas 12-month, and 24-month old alpacas showed significant differences (p < 0.05; 12- and 24-month old alpacas showed no significant differences (p > 0.05; NGF at different cell stages showed no significant differences (p > 0.05. It suggests that NGF may be involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, which provides direct evidence for NGF action in the alpaca testis during postnatal development and spermatogenesis. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 55–61

  7. Incorporation of chitosan microspheres into collagen-chitosan scaffolds for the controlled release of nerve growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    Full Text Available Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support.Microsphere-Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF-CMSs into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF-CMSs/CCH. The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF-CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH, CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed.The NGF-CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF-CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF-CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH.Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF-CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  8. The crosstalk between the kidney and the central nervous system: the role of renal nerves in blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Erika E; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? This review describes the role of renal nerves as the key carrier of signals from the kidneys to the CNS and vice versa; the brain and kidneys communicate through this carrier to maintain homeostasis in the body. What advances does it highlight? Whether renal or autonomic dysfunction is the predominant contributor to systemic hypertension is still debated. In this review, we focus on the role of the renal nerves in a model of renovascular hypertension. The sympathetic nervous system influences the renal regulation of arterial pressure and body fluid composition. Anatomical and physiological evidence has shown that sympathetic nerves mediate changes in urinary sodium and water excretion by regulating the renal tubular water and sodium reabsorption throughout the nephron, changes in the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate by regulating the constriction of renal vasculature, and changes in the activity of the renin-angiotensin system by regulating the renin release from juxtaglomerular cells. Additionally, renal sensory afferent fibres project to the autonomic central nuclei that regulate blood pressure. Hence, renal nerves play a key role in the crosstalk between the kidneys and the CNS to maintain homeostasis in the body. Therefore, the increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and the renal afferent nerve activity to the CNS may contribute to the outcome of diseases, such as hypertension. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  9. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

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    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC, even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  10. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75 NTR , TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75 NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75 NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  11. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of axon and dendrite growth

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    Ephraim F Trakhtenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroregenerative therapies for central nervous system (CNS injury, neurodegenerative disease, or stroke require axons of damaged neurons to grow and reinnervate their targets. However, mature mammalian CNS neurons do not regenerate their axons, limiting recovery in these diseases (Yiu and He, 2006. CNS’ regenerative failure may be attributable to the development of an inhibitory CNS environment by glial-associated inhibitory molecules (Yiu and He, 2006, and by various cell-autonomous factors (Sun and He, 2010. Intrinsic axon growth ability also declines developmentally (Li et al., 1995; Goldberg et al., 2002; Bouslama-Oueghlani et al., 2003; Blackmore and Letourneau, 2006 and is dependent on transcription (Moore et al., 2009. Although neurons’ intrinsic capacity for axon growth may depend in part on the panoply of expressed transcription factors (Moore and Goldberg, 2011, epigenetic factors such as the accessibility of DNA and organization of chromatin are required for downstream genes to be transcribed. Thus a potential approach to overcoming regenerative failure focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms regulating regenerative gene expression in the CNS. Here we review molecular mechanisms regulating the epigenetic state of DNA through chromatin modifications, their implications for regulating axon and dendrite growth, and important new directions for this field of study.

  13. Regulation of Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) Limb Blastema Cell Proliferation by Nerves and BMP2 in Organotypic Slice Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrberg, Jeffrey; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    We have modified and optimized the technique of organotypic slice culture in order to study the mechanisms regulating growth and pattern formation in regenerating axolotl limb blastemas. Blastema cells maintain many of the behaviors that are characteristic of blastemas in vivo when cultured as slices in vitro, including rates of proliferation that are comparable to what has been reported in vivo. Because the blastema slices can be cultured in basal medium without fetal bovine serum, it was possible to test the response of blastema cells to signaling molecules present in serum, as well as those produced by nerves. We also were able to investigate the response of blastema cells to experimentally regulated changes in BMP signaling. Blastema cells responded to all of these signals by increasing the rate of proliferation and the level of expression of the blastema marker gene, Prrx-1. The organotypic slice culture model provides the opportunity to identify and characterize the spatial and temporal co-regulation of pathways in order to induce and enhance a regenerative response.

  14. Regulation of Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Limb Blastema Cell Proliferation by Nerves and BMP2 in Organotypic Slice Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Lehrberg

    Full Text Available We have modified and optimized the technique of organotypic slice culture in order to study the mechanisms regulating growth and pattern formation in regenerating axolotl limb blastemas. Blastema cells maintain many of the behaviors that are characteristic of blastemas in vivo when cultured as slices in vitro, including rates of proliferation that are comparable to what has been reported in vivo. Because the blastema slices can be cultured in basal medium without fetal bovine serum, it was possible to test the response of blastema cells to signaling molecules present in serum, as well as those produced by nerves. We also were able to investigate the response of blastema cells to experimentally regulated changes in BMP signaling. Blastema cells responded to all of these signals by increasing the rate of proliferation and the level of expression of the blastema marker gene, Prrx-1. The organotypic slice culture model provides the opportunity to identify and characterize the spatial and temporal co-regulation of pathways in order to induce and enhance a regenerative response.

  15. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Nerve growth factor concentration and implications in photorefractive keratectomy vs laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Keun; Lee, Kyung Sub; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2005-06-01

    To determine whether tear nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration correlates with corneal sensation and ocular surface dryness after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Prospective, nonrandomized comparative clinical trial. Seventy eyes of 35 patients and 76 eyes of 38 patients underwent PRK and LASIK procedures to correct myopia and myopic astigmatism, respectively. Total tear protein level, tear NGF concentration, tear film breakup time (BUT) and Schirmer values were measured before and 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The postoperative mean tear NGF/total tear protein (NGF/tP) ratio increased in both PRK and LASIK patients compared with preoperative levels (P PRK than in LASIK subjects (P LASIK in the ablated zone was lower than the preoperative sensation (P PRK subjects. Mean BUT and Schirmer values were significantly lower in LASIK-treated eyes compared with PRK-treated eyes up to 6 months postoperatively (P PRK-treated and LASIK-treated eyes might be related to the difference in the early postoperative levels of NGF, which is a potent nerve growth stimulator.

  17. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans VEM-1, a novel membrane protein, regulates the guidance of ventral nerve cord-associated axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runko, Erik; Kaprielian, Zaven

    2004-10-13

    In the developing CNS, pathfinding growth cones use intermediate target- and pioneer axon-associated guidance cues to navigate along stereotypical trajectories. We previously showed that the novel membrane-associated protein Vema is localized to the floor plate and the optic chiasm, intermediate targets located at the ventral midline of the spinal cord and diencephalon in the developing rodent CNS, respectively. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of vema, vem-1, is expressed by the AVG pioneer midline neuron and by several neurons that extend longitudinally projecting axons into the ventral nerve cord (VNC). In vem-1 mutants and vem-1 (RNAi) animals, a subset of posteriorly projecting interneuron axons either fail to extend ventrally to the VNC and, instead, assume aberrant lateral positions or are inappropriately located in the left tract of the VNC. In addition, ventral motor neuron axons exhibit pathfinding errors within the VNC and along the dorsoventral body axis. The conserved UNC-40/DCC and SAX-3-/Robo receptors mediate signaling events that regulate axon guidance in a wide variety of systems. Double-mutant analyses reveal that vem-1 genetically interacts with unc-40 and is likely to function in parallel with sax-3 to regulate the guidance of a subset of VNC-associated interneuron and motor neuron axons. Consistent with these genetic data, we also show that VEM-1 is capable of physically interacting with UNC-40 but not SAX-3.

  19. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  20. Intranasal Nerve Growth Factor administration improves cerebral functions in a child with severe traumatic brain injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, Antonio; Conti, Giorgio; Falsini, Benedetto; Buonsenso, Danilo; Crasti, Matteo; Manni, Luigi; Soligo, Marzia; Fantacci, Claudia; Genovese, Orazio; Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Di Giuda, Daniela; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Cocciolillo, Fabrizio; Ferrara, Pietro; Ruggiero, Antonio; Staccioli, Susanna; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes neural recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) supporting neuronal growth, differentiation and survival of brain cells and up-regulating the neurogenesis-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX). Only a few studies reported NGF administration in paediatric patients with severe TBI. A four-year-old boy in a persistent unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) was treated with intranasal murine NGF administration 6 months after severe TBI. The patient received four cycles of intranasal NGF (0.1 mg/kg, twice a day for 10 consecutive days). NGF administration improved functional [Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT); Single photon emission/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)] assessment, electrophysiological [Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)] studies and clinical conditions. He showed improvements in voluntary movements, facial mimicry, phonation, attention and verbal comprehension, ability to cry, cough reflex, oral motility, feeding capacity, and bowel and urinary functions. After NGF administration, raised levels of both NGF and DCX were found in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient. No side effects were reported. Although further studies are needed for better understanding the neuroprotective role of this neurotrophin, intranasal NGF administration appears to be a promising and safe rescuing strategy treatment in children with neurological impairment after TBI.

  1. Trigeminal nerve injury-induced thrombospondin-4 up-regulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K-W; Kim, D-S; Zaucke, F; Luo, Z D

    2014-04-01

    Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause up-regulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve. Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation and orofacial behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 and behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 up-regulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  2. Process for producing vegetative and tuber growth regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W. (Inventor); Yorio, Neil C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process of making a vegetative and tuber growth regulator. The vegetative and tuber growth regulator is made by growing potato plants in a recirculating hydroponic system for a sufficient time to produce the growth regulator. Also, the use of the vegetative and growth regulator on solanaceous plants, tuber forming plants and ornamental seedlings by contacting the roots or shoots of the plant with a sufficient amount of the growth regulator to regulate the growth of the plant and one more of canopy size, plant height, stem length, internode number and presence of tubers in fresh mass. Finally, a method for regulating the growth of potato plants using a recirculating hydroponic system is described.

  3. Identification and quantification of mRNA for nerve growth factor in histological preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P A; Rush, R A; Scott, J; Penschow, J; Coghlan, J

    1986-03-14

    Hybridization histochemistry has been used to detect mRNA for nerve growth factor (NGF) in histological preparations of mouse salivary glands and rat iris using a /sup 32/P-labelled cDNA probe and autoradiography. Label was visible over the tubular cells of the male mouse submaxillary gland but not the sublingual gland. A much lower label density was found over the tubular cells of the female submaxillary gland, whereas sections of liver and pancreas were negative. Quantitative autoradiography allowed the detection of low levels of mRNA for NGF in the rat iris which was elevated by prior culture of the tissue. The results provide direct histological evidence for the presence of specific NGF-mRNA in the mouse submaxillary gland and rat iris, with increased levels following culture. 15 refs.

  4. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6 ' -O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ( 1 H and 13 C NMR, 1 H- 1 H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC 50 values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  5. Enhanced bioavailability of nerve growth factor with phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles in cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Bu,1,2 Jingling Tang,3 Yinghui Wei,4 Yanhui Sun,1 Xinyu Wang,1 Linhua Wu,2 Hongzhuo Liu1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, 3School of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Supplementation of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF into the cochlea of deafened animals rescues spiral ganglion cells from degeneration. However, a safe and potent delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as NGF, to spiral ganglion cells remains one of the greatest challenges. This study presents the development of self-assembled cubic lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to enhance inner ear bioavailability of bioactive NGF via a round window membrane route.Methods: A novel nanocarrier-entrapped NGF was developed based on phytantriol by a liquid precursor dilution, with Pluronic® F127 and propylene glycol as the surfactant and solubilizer, respectively. Upon dilution of the liquid lipid precursors, monodispersed submicron-sized particles with a slight negative charge formed spontaneously.Results: Biological activity of entrapped NGF was assessed using pheochromocytoma cells with NGF-loaded reservoirs to induce significant neuronal outgrowth, similar to that seen in free NGF-treated controls. Finally, a 3.28-fold increase in inner ear bioavailability was observed after administration of phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles as compared to free drug, contributing to an enhanced drug permeability of the round window membrane. Conclusion: Data presented here demonstrate the potential of lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to improve the outcomes of patients bearing cochlear implants. Keywords: nerve growth factor, lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles, PC12 cells, inner ear drug

  6. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases:a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Zhao; Xiao-yan Li; Chun-ying Xu; Li-ping Zou

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efifcacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL:A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION:Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections;patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS:Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.0001,RR: 1.35, 95%CI: 1.30–1.40). The average nerve conduction velocity in the nerve growth factor group was signiifcantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001,MD: 4.59 m/s, 95%CI: 4.12–5.06). The incidence of pain or sclero-ma at the injection site in the nerve growth factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P < 0.00001,RR: 6.30, 95%CI: 3.53–11

  7. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Tornøe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device...

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Vera J M; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Evans, Ronald M; Jonker, Johan W; Downes, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  9. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); Phearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm(2); Pneurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm(2); Pneurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  10. Exploring Serum Levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Nerve Growth Factor Across Glaucoma Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Oddone

    Full Text Available To investigate the serum levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF in patients affected by primary open angle glaucoma with a wide spectrum of disease severity compared to healthy controls and to explore their relationship with morphological and functional glaucoma parameters.45 patients affected by glaucoma at different stages and 15 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent visual field testing, peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurement using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and blood collection for both neurotrophins detection by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Statistical analysis and association between biostrumental and biochemical data were investigated.Serum levels of BDNF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in healthy controls (261.2±75.0 pg/ml vs 313.6±79.6 pg/ml, p = 0.03. Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of BDNF were significantly lower in early (253.8±40.7 pg/ml, p = 0.019 and moderate glaucoma (231.3±54.3 pg/ml, p = 0.04 but not in advanced glaucoma (296.2±103.1 pg/ml, p = 0.06 compared to healthy controls. Serum levels of NGF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in the healthy controls (4.1±1 pg/mL vs 5.5±1.2 pg/mL, p = 0.01. Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of NGF were significantly lower in early (3.5±0.9 pg/mL, p = 0.0008 and moderate glaucoma (3.8±0.7 pg/ml, p<0.0001 but not in advanced glaucoma (5.0±0.7 pg/ml, p = 0.32 compared to healthy controls. BDNF serum levels were not related to age, visual field mean deviation or retinal nerve fibre layer thickness either in glaucoma or in controls while NGF levels were significantly related to visual field mean deviation in the glaucoma group (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.004.BDNF and NGF serum levels are reduced in the early and moderate glaucoma stages, suggesting the possibility that both factors could be further investigated

  11. Vascular and neuronal protection induced by the ocular administration of nerve growth factor in diabetic-induced rat encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirassa, Paola; Maccarone, Mattia; Florenzano, Fulvio; Cartolano, Sara; De Nicolò, Sara

    2013-05-01

    Based on our previous findings on the efficacy of ocular applied nerve growth factor as eye drops (oNGF) to act in brain and counteract neuronal damage, we hypothesized that oNGF treatment might revert neuronal atrophy occurring in diabetic brain also by controlling neurotrophin system changes. The major NGF brain target areas, such as the septum and the hippocampus, were used as an experimental paradigma to test this hypothesis. Bilateral oNGF treatment was performed twice a day for 2 weeks in full-blown streptozotocin-treated adult male rats. The forebrain distribution of cholinergic and endothelial cell markers and NGF receptors were studied by confocal microscopy. The septo-hippocampal content of NGF mature and precursor form and NGF receptors expression were also analyzed by Elisa and Western blot. oNGF treatment recovers the morphological alterations and the neuronal atrophy in septum and normalized the expression of mature and pro-NGF, as well as NGF receptors in the septum and hippocampus of diabetic rats. In addition, oNGF stimulated brain vascularization and up-regulated the TRKA receptor in vessel endothelium. Our findings confirm that reduced availability of mature NGF and NGF signaling impairment favors vascular and neuronal alterations in diabetic septo-hippocampal areas and corroborate the ability of oNGF to act as a neuroprotective agent in brain. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Co-immobilization of semaphorin3A and nerve growth factor to guide and pattern axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Aleesha M; Jarmusik, Natalie A; Leipzig, Nic D

    2015-12-01

    Immobilization of axon guidance cues offers a powerful tissue regenerative strategy to control the presentation and spatial location of these biomolecules. We use our previously developed immobilization strategy to specifically tether recombinant biotinylated nerve growth factor (bNGF) and biotinylated semaphorin3A (bSema3A) to chitosan films as an outgrowth and guidance platform. DRG neurite length and number for a range of single cues of immobilized bNGF or bSema3A were examined to determine a concentration response. Next single and dual cues of bNGF and bSema3A were immobilized and DRG guidance was assessed in response to a step concentration change from zero. Overall, immobilized groups caused axon extension, retraction and turning depending on the ratio of bNGF and bSema3A immobilized in the encountered region. This response indicated the exquisite sensitivity of DRG axons to both attractive and repulsive tethered cues. bSema3A concentrations of 0.10 and 0.49 ng/mm(2), when co-immobilized with bNGF (at 0.86 and 0.43 ng/mm(2) respectively), caused axons to turn away from the co-immobilized region. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that at these bSema3A concentrations, axons inside the co-immobilized region display microtubule degradation and breakdown of actin filaments. At the lowest bSema3A concentration (0.01 ng/mm(2)) co-immobilized with a higher bNGF concentration (2.16 ng/mm(2)), neurite lengths are shorter in the immobilized area, but bNGF dominates the guidance mechanism as neurites are directed toward the immobilized region. Future applications can pattern these cues in various geometries and gradients in order to better modulate axon guidance in terms of polarity, extension and branching. Nervous system formation and regeneration requires key molecules for guiding the growth cone and nervous system patterning. In vivo these molecules work in conjunction with one another to modulate axon guidance, and often they are tethered to limit spatial

  13. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  14. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. 125 I-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin

  15. The role of nerve growth factor in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiaka, Elisavet K; Papanas, Nikolaos; Manolakis, Anastassios C; Maltezos, Efstratios

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are still particularly difficult to heal. Therefore, preventing and therapeutic adjuncts are increasingly being explored. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a promising agent exhibiting beneficial actions on both diabetic peripheral neuropathy, one of the main causes of foot ulcers, and on ulcer healing. Indeed, preclinical research in animal models of diabetes has revealed the trophic effect of NGF on small C-fibres, while phase 2 human trials have provided evidence for a favourable effect on sensory neuropathy. However, the results of a phase 3 trial were moderate and, therefore, not enough to encourage widespread use of NGF in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Available literature on the role of NGF on diabetic wound healing is sparse but encouraging. Exogenous supplementation of NGF or the use of alternative techniques to increase its endogenous expression could emerge as a protective and therapeutic modality for diabetic foot ulcers in addition to standard treatment and other growth factors. The present review provides an outlook on the role of NGF in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22928161

  16. Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and the chronobiology of mood: a new insight into the "neurotrophic hypothesis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirassa P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Paola Tirassa,1 Adele Quartini,2 Angela Iannitelli2–4 1National Research Council (CNR, Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN, 2Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine – "Sapienza" University of Rome, 3Italian Psychoanalytical Society (SPI, Rome, Italy; 4International Psychoanalytical Association (IPA, London, UKAbstract: The light information pathways and their relationship with the body rhythms have generated a new insight into the neurobiology and the neurobehavioral sciences, as well as into the clinical approaches to human diseases associated with disruption of circadian cycles. Light-based strategies and/or drugs acting on the circadian rhythms have widely been used in psychiatric patients characterized by mood-related disorders, but the timing and dosage use of the various treatments, although based on international guidelines, are mainly dependent on the psychiatric experiences. Further, many efforts have been made to identify biomarkers able to disclose the circadian-related aspect of diseases, and therefore serve as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools in clinic to assess the different mood-related symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, loss of interest or pleasure, appetite, psychomotor changes, and cognitive impairments. Among the endogenous factors suggested to be involved in mood regulation, the neurotrophins, nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor show anatomical and functional link with the circadian system and mediate some of light-induced effects in brain. In addition, in humans, both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have showed a daily rhythm, which correlate with the morningness–eveningness dimensions, and are influenced by light, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers for chronotypes and/or chronotherapy. The evidences of the relationship between the diverse mood-related disorders

  17. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  18. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  19. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  20. Effects of age and insulin-like growth factor-1 on rat neurotrophin receptor expression after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, T David; Alton, Timothy B; Apel, Peter J; Cai, Jiaozhong; Barnwell, Jonathan C; Sonntag, William E; Smith, Thomas L; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-10-01

    Neurotrophin receptors, such as p75(NTR) , direct neuronal response to injury. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) mediates the increase in p75(NTR) during aging. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) treatment on recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Young and aged rats underwent tibial nerve transection with either local saline or IGF-1 treatment. Neurotrophin receptor mRNA and protein expression were quantified. Aged rats expressed elevated baseline IGF-1R (34% higher, P = 0.01) and p75(NTR) (68% higher, P < 0.01) compared with young rats. Post-injury, aged animals expressed significantly higher p75(NTR) levels (68.5% above baseline at 4 weeks). IGF-1 treatment suppressed p75(NTR) gene expression at 4 weeks (17.2% above baseline, P = 0.002) post-injury. Local IGF-1 treatment reverses age-related declines in recovery after peripheral nerve injuries by suppressing p75(NTR) upregulation and pro-apoptotic complexes. IGF-1 may be considered a viable adjuvant therapy to current treatment modalities. Muscle Nerve 54: 769-775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy Activates Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszynski, Mark H.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Barba, David; U, H S.; Bakay, Roy; Pay, Mary M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M.; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and lacks effective disease modifying therapies. In 2001 we initiated a clinical trial of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in AD patients. We present post-mortem findings in 10 subjects with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years post-treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 10 patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using either ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all eight patients in the first Phase 1 ex vivo trial and two patients in a subsequent Phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In two cases, NGF protein levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Degenerating neurons in the AD brain respond to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF, in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and non-treated sides of the brain in three patients that underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P>0.05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers were present in two patients that underwent AAV2-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology as well as neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic genes with resulting activation of cell signaling. No adverse pathological effects related to NGF were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings indicate that

  2. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy: Activation of Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Yang, Jennifer H; Barba, David; U, Hoi-Sang; Bakay, Roy A E; Pay, Mary M; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and lacks effective disease-modifying therapies. In 2001, we initiated a clinical trial of nerve growth factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in patients with AD. We present postmortem findings in 10 patients with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years after treatment. To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. Patients in this anatomicopathological study were enrolled in clinical trials from March 2001 to October 2012 at the University of California, San Diego, Medical Center in La Jolla. Ten patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all 8 patients in the first phase 1 ex vivo trial and of 2 patients in a subsequent phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In 2 patients, NGF protein levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among 10 patients, degenerating neurons in the AD brain responded to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and nontreated sides of the brain in 3 patients who underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P < .05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers was present in 2 patients who underwent adeno-associated viral vectors (serotype 2)-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology and neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic

  3. Electrical stimulation of dog pudendal nerve regulates the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-he Ju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pudendal nerve plays an important role in urine storage and voiding. Our hypothesis is that a neuroprosthetic device placed in the pudendal nerve trunk can modulate bladder function after suprasacral spinal cord injury. We had confirmed the inhibitory pudendal-to-bladder reflex by stimulating either the branch or the trunk of the pudendal nerve. This study explored the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex in beagle dogs, with intact or injured spinal cord, by electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk. The optimal stimulation frequency was approximately 15-25 Hz. This excitatory effect was dependent to some extent on the bladder volume. We conclude that stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk is a promising method to modulate bladder function.

  4. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro, E-mail: krlee@skku.edu [Natural Products Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Wook [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Yeou [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6{sup '}-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC{sub 50} values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  5. Nanotechnological strategies for nerve growth factor delivery: Therapeutic implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Célia; Rijo, Patrícia; Reis, Catarina Pinto

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with amyloid-β peptide misfolding and aggregation. Neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), can prevent neuronal damage and rescue the cholinergic neurons that undergo cell death in AD, reverse deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques and improve cognitive deficits. However, NGF administration is hampered by the poor pharmacokinetic profile of the therapeutic protein and its inability to cross the blood-brain barrier, which requires specialised drug delivery systems (DDS) for efficient NGF delivery to the brain. This review covers the main therapeutic approaches that have been developed for NGF delivery targeting the brain, from polymeric implants to gene and cell-based therapies, focusing on the role of nanoparticulate systems for the sustained release of NGF in the brain as a neuroprotective and disease-modifying approach toward AD. Lipid- and polymer-based delivery systems, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots are specifically addressed as promising nanotechnological strategies to overcome the current limitations of NGF-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. From genes to pain: nerve growth factor and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capsoni, Simona

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN V) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the loss of deep pain perception. The anomalous pain and temperature sensations are due to the absence of nociceptive sensory innervation. The neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), by binding to tropomyosin receptor A (TrkA) and p75NTR receptors, is essential for the development and survival of sensory neurons, and for pain perception during adulthood. Recently a homozygous missense mutation (R100W) in the NGF gene has been identified in HSAN V patients. Interestingly, alterations in NGF signalling, due to mutations in the NGF TRKA gene, have also been involved in another congenital insensitivity to pain, HSAN IV, characterized not only by absence of reaction to painful stimuli, but also anhidrosis and mental retardation. These symptoms are absent in HSAN V patients. Unravelling the mechanisms that underlie the differences between HSAN IV and V could assist in better understanding NGF biology. This review highlights the recent key findings in the understanding of HSAN V, including insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease, derived from genetic studies of patients with this disorder. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Serum nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Esra; Ceylan, Mehmet Fatih; Kara, Mehmet; Tekin, Neslihan; Goker, Zeynep; Senses Dinc, Gulser; Ozturk, Onder; Eker, Sevda; Kizilgun, Murat

    2014-02-07

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. The etiopathogeny of ADHD has not been totally defined. Recent reports have suggested a pathophysiological role of neurotrophins in ADHD. In this study, we evaluated serum levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in patients with ADHD. The sample population consisted of 44 child or adolescent patients diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV criteria; 36 healthy subjects were included in the study as controls. Venous blood samples were collected, and NGF levels were measured. The mean serum NGF levels of the ADHD patients were significantly higher than those of the controls. Age and gender of the patients were not correlated with serum NGF levels. There were no significant differences in NGF levels among the combined and predominantly inattentive subtypes of ADHD. Our study suggests that there are higher levels of serum NGF in drug naive ADHD patients, and that increased levels of NGF might have an important role in the pathophysiology of ADHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of nerve growth factor and heme oxygenase-1 predict poor survival of breast carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sang Jae; Chung, Myoung Ja; Moon, Woo Sung; Kang, Myoung Jae; Jang, Kyu Yun; Bae, Jun Sang; Jamiyandorj, Urangoo; Park, Ho Sung; Kwon, Keun Sang; Jung, Sung Hoo; Youn, Hyun Jo; Lee, Ho; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin and has been suggested to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) expression. Although the role of HO1 in tumorigenesis remains controversial, recent evidence suggests NGF and HO1 as tumor-progressing factors. However, the correlative role of NGF and HO1 and their prognostic impact in breast carcinoma is unknown. We investigated the expression and prognostic significance of the expression of NGF and HO1 in 145 cases of breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemical expression of NGF and HO1 was observed in 31% and 49% of breast carcinoma, respectively. The expression of NGF and HO1 significantly associated with each other, and both have a significant association with histologic grade, HER2 expression, and latent distant metastasis. The expression of NGF and HO1 predicted shorter overall survival of breast carcinoma by univariate and multivariate analysis. NGF expression was an independent prognostic indicator for relapse-free survival by multivariate analysis. The combined expression pattern of NGF and HO1 was also an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival and relapse-free survival. The patients with tumors expressing NGF had the shortest survival and the patients with tumor, which did not express NGF or HO1 showed the longest survival time. This study has demonstrated that individual expression of NGF or HO1, and the combined NGF/HO1 expression pattern could be prognostic indicators for breast carcinoma patients

  9. The Multiple Life of Nerve Growth Factor: Tribute to Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Aloe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the 19th century, it was envisaged by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, but not, proven, that life at the neuronal level requires trophic support. The proof was obtained in the early 1950's by work initiated by Rita Levi-Montalcini (RLM discovering the nerve growth factor (NGF. Today, NGF and its relatives, collectively designated neurotrophins, are well recognized as mediators of multiple biological phenomena in health and disease, ranging from the neurotrophic through immunotrophic and epitheliotrophic to metabotrophic effects. Consequently, NGF and other neurotrophins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, from Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases to atherosclerosis and other cardiometabolic diseases. Recent studies demonstrated the therapeutic potentials of NGF in these diseases, including ocular and cutaneous diseases. Furthermore, NGF TrkA receptor antagonists emerged as novel drugs for pain, prostate and breast cancer, melanoma, and urinary bladder syndromes. Altogether, NGF's multiple potential in health and disease is briefly described here.

  10. [Clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor in treatment of occupational hand-arm vibration disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunyue; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Ying; Lang, Li; Deng, Xiaofeng; Cheng, Ying

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF) in treating occupational hand-arm vibration disease (HAVD). Sixty-four patients with HAVD were equally and randomly divided into treatment group and control group. The control group was given Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge and deproteinized extract of calf blood to improve circulation, and also given methylcobalamin tablets and vitamin B6 for neurotrophic treatment. In addition to the above treatments for the control group, the treatment group was also given 30 µg/d mNGF by intramuscular injection for two courses (4 weeks for each course) with a 15-day interval. Both the treatment group and the control group showed significant improvements in clinical symptoms and signs (hand numbness and pain, and reduced senses of touch, pain, and vibration), cold water loading test (CWLT), and electroneuromyography (ENMG) after treatments (P hand numbness and pain, reduced senses of touch, pain, and vibration, CWLT, and ENMG, so it has better clinical effect and safety in treating HAVD. Early diagnosis and treatment can improve the outcome of patients with HAVD.

  11. Targeting of liposomes to cells bearing nerve growth factor receptors mediated by biotinylated NGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies of liposome targeting have concentrated on immunological systems, the use of ligand-receptor interactions has received little attention. The protein hormone beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) was modified by biotinylation via carboxyl group substitution (C-bio-NGF) under reaction conditions that yielded an average of 3 biotin additions per NGF subunit. NGF was also biotinylated through amino group substitution to produce derivatives with ratios of 1, 2 and 4 biotin moieties per NGF subunit (N-bio-NGF). These derivatives were compared with native NGF for their ability to compete with 125 I-NGF for binding to NGF receptors on rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells at 4 0 C. C-bio-NGF was as effective as native NGF in binding to NGF receptors, while N-bio-NGF containing 1 biotin per NGF subunit was only 28% as active in binding as native NGF. C-bio-NGF, but not N-bio-NGF, mediated the specific binding of 125 I-streptavidin to PC12 cells. Biocytin-NGF, a derivative of C-bio-NGF with an extended spacer chain, was also synthesized and retained full biological and receptor binding activities. C-bio-NGF and biocytin-NGF were as effective as native NGF in a bioassay involving induction of neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells

  12. Increased Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Sensory Neurons of Early Diabetic Rats Is Corrected by Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lucia Nori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN, characterized by early hyperalgesia and increased nerve growth factor (NGF, evolves in late irreversible neuropathic symptoms with reduced NGF support to sensory neurons. Electroacupuncture (EA modulates NGF in the peripheral nervous system, being effective for the treatment of DPN symptoms. We hypothesize that NGF plays an important pathogenic role in DPN development, while EA could be useful in the therapy of DPN by modulating NGF expression/activity. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ injection. One week after STZ, EA was started and continued for three weeks. NGF system and hyperalgesia-related mediators were analyzed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and in their spinal cord and skin innervation territories. Our results show that four weeks long diabetes increased NGF and NGF receptors and deregulated intracellular signaling mediators of DRG neurons hypersensitization; EA in diabetic rats decreased NGF and NGF receptors, normalized c-Jun N-terminal and p38 kinases activation, decreased transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel, and possibly activated the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (Nf-κB. In conclusion, NGF signaling deregulation might play an important role in the development of DPN. EA represents a supportive tool to control DPN development by modulating NGF signaling in diabetes-targeted neurons.

  13. The multiple life of nerve growth factor: tribute to rita levi-montalcini (1909-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi; Chaldakov, George N

    2013-03-01

    At the end of the 19(th) century, it was envisaged by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, but not, proven, that life at the neuronal level requires trophic support. The proof was obtained in the early 1950's by work initiated by Rita Levi-Montalcini (RLM) discovering the nerve growth factor (NGF). Today, NGF and its relatives, collectively designated neurotrophins, are well recognized as mediators of multiple biological phenomena in health and disease, ranging from the neurotrophic through immunotrophic and epitheliotrophic to metabotrophic effects. Consequently, NGF and other neurotrophins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, from Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases to atherosclerosis and other cardiometabolic diseases. Recent studies demonstrated the therapeutic potentials of NGF in these diseases, including ocular and cutaneous diseases. Furthermore, NGF TrkA receptor antagonists emerged as novel drugs for pain, prostate and breast cancer, melanoma, and urinary bladder syndromes. Altogether, NGF's multiple potential in health and disease is briefly described here.

  14. Binding and internalization of nerve growth factor by PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasaian, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of nerve growth factor (NGF) with its cell surface receptors has been studied using both fluorescent- and radio-labelled NGF. The fluorescence studies were done by flow cytometry, and gave information about the concentration dependence and time course of NGF binding to rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) and human melanoma cells (A875). 125 I-NGF was used to study the fate of NGF in PC12 cells following its association with cell surface receptors. Variations of the PC12 binding assay were used to distinguish ligand bound to fast and slowly dissociating receptors at the cell surface, internalized ligand, and cytoskeletally-associated NGF. Ligand uptake into each of these pools was followed in untreated cells, as well as in cells exposed to colchicine and/or cytochalasin B to disrupt the cytoskeleton. NGF degradation was also followed in these cells, and chloroquine was used to inhibit this process. In a separate project, NGF activity was assayed in samples of human amniotic fluid and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A range of activities was found in these samples, with the CSF samples containing somewhat more activity than the amniotic fluid samples

  15. Neuroprotective Role of Nerve Growth Factor in Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chiaretti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries (HIBI in childhood are frequently associated with poor clinical and neurological outcome. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective therapy to restore neuronal loss and to determine substantial clinical improvement. Several neurotrophins, such as Nerve Growth Factor (NGF, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, and Glial Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF, play a key role in the development, differentiation, and survival of the neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system. Experimental animal studies demonstrated their neuroprotective role in HIBI, while only a few studies examined the neuroprotective mechanisms in patients with severe HIBI. We report two cases of children with HIBI and prolonged comatose state who showed a significant improvement after intraventricular NGF administration characterized by amelioration of electroencephalogram (EEG and cerebral perfusion at single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The improvement in motor and cognitive functions of these children could be related to the neuroprotective role exerted by NGF in residual viable cholinergic neurons, leading to the restoration of neuronal networks in the damaged brain.

  16. Prolonged controlled delivery of nerve growth factor using porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilony, Neta; Rosenberg, Michal; Holtzman, Liran; Schori, Hadas; Shefi, Orit; Segal, Ester

    2017-07-10

    Although nerve growth factor (NGF) is beneficial for the treatment of numerous neurological and non-neurological diseases, its therapeutic administration represents a significant challenge, due to the difficulty to locally deliver relevant doses in a safe and non-invasive manner. In this work, we employ degradable nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) films as carriers for NGF, allowing its continuous and prolonged release, while retaining its bioactivity. The PSi carriers exhibit high loading efficacy (up to 90%) of NGF and a continuous release, with no burst, over a period of>26days. The released NGF bioactivity is compared to that of free NGF in both PC12 cells and dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We show that the NGF has retained its bioactivity and induces neurite outgrowth and profound differentiation (of >50% for PC12 cells) throughout the period of release within a single administration. Thus, this proof-of-concept study demonstrates the immense therapeutic potential of these tunable carriers as long-term implants of NGF reservoirs and paves the way for new localized treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in patients with major depression disorder and suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Carolina David; de Mello Ferreira, Sharon; Pedrotti Moreira, Fernanda; Bittencourt, Guilherme; de Oliveira, Jacqueline Flores; Lopez Molina, Mariane; Jansen, Karen; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; Rizzato Lara, Diogo; Portela, Luiz Valmor; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Oses, Jean Pierre

    2015-09-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important member of the neurotrophins group and their involvement in the pathophysiology of major depression disorder (MDD) and suicide risk (SR) has been recently suggested. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in NGF serum levels in individuals with MDD and with or without risk of suicide, in subjects from a young population-based sample. This is a paired cross-sectional study nested in a population-based study. Individuals were rated for MDD and SR by a diagnostic interview--Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I). The total population of the sample was comprised of 141 subjects distributed in three groups: 47 healthy controls, 47 subjects with current depressive episode without SR (MDD) and 47 subjects with current depressive episode and with SR (MDD + SR). NGF serum levels were significantly reduced in the MDD and MDD + SR groups when compared with controls (p ≤ 0.001). However, there were no differences in NGF levels between the MDD and MDD + SR groups (p = 1.000). These results suggest that reduced NGF serum levels can be a possible biomarker of MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B.

    1988-01-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating [ 3 H]thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain

  19. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To achieve the best explants and media for spinach tissue culture, the effects of two different plant growth regulators, two explants and cultivars on adventitious shoot regeneration were tested. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) showed that the effects of plant growth regulators on spinach tissue culture were significant; ...

  20. Identification of retrograde transport vesicles containing nerve growth factor in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weible, M.W.; Sandow, S.L.; Ozsarac, N.; Hendry, I.A.; Grimes, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Survival, differentiation, and development of responsive neurons are regulated by neurotrophins secreted from the target cells that they innervate. These responsive neurons must meet the challenge of transporting the neurotrophins chemical message from the target tissue to the soma; the distance of which may be a few millimetres to many meters. One hypothesis involves the formation of a signalling organelle at the neurite tip and subsequent retrograde axonal transport to the soma. This signalling vesicle is derived from the endocytosis of the neurotrophin-receptor complex. By modifying a method developed to isolate signalling endosomes from PC12 cells, we are able to isolate signalling vesicles from rat and mouse sciatic tissue. Approximately, 4 mole of I 125 -labelled neurotrophin was injected into the rodent foot pad and the sciatic nerve ligated under 88 μ/g ketamine and 16 μ/g rompun (i.p.) anaesthetic. All experiments had the approval of the ANU animal ethics committee. We achieved a recovery of 23% and 34% in the mouse and rat respectively of total transported iodinated neurotrophin accumulating on the distal side of the ligation. The homogenized tissue was characterized via differential centrifugation, blotted, and probed using antibodies to the neurotrophin receptors. Electron microscopy confirmed that the membrane pellet containing the transported neurotrophin from this in vivo preparation contained vesicular structures. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  1. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

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    Eugene T. Won

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory growth (CG is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch-up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. Compensatory growth is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin and leptin.

  2. Rescuing apoptotic neurons in Alzheimer’s disease using wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated and cardiolipin-conjugated liposomes with encapsulated nerve growth factor and curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo YC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yung-Chih Kuo, Ching-Chun Lin Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Liposomes with cardiolipin (CL and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA were developed to permeate the blood–brain barrier and treat Alzheimer’s disease. WGA-conjugated and CL-incorporated liposomes (WGA-CL-liposomes were used to transport nerve growth factor (NGF and curcumin (CUR across a monolayer of human brain-microvascular endothelial cells regulated by human astrocytes and to protect SK-N-MC cells against apoptosis induced by ß-amyloid1–42 (Aß1–42 fibrils. An increase in the CL mole percentage in lipids increased the liposomal diameter, absolute zeta potential value, entrapment efficiency of NGF and CUR, release of NGF, biocompatibility, and viability of SK-N-MC cells with Aß1–42, but decreased the atomic ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus and release of CUR. In addition, an increase in the WGA concentration for grafting enhanced the liposomal diameter, atomic ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus, and permeability of NGF and CUR across the blood–brain barrier, but reduced the absolute zeta potential value and biocompatibility. WGA-CL-liposomes carrying NGF and CUR could be promising colloidal delivery carriers for future clinical application in targeting the blood–brain barrier and inhibiting neurotoxicity. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, nerve growth factor, curcumin, wheat germ agglutinin, cardiolipin, liposome

  3. Hypertrophy of Neurons Within Cardiac Ganglia in Human, Canine, and Rat Heart Failure: The Potential Role of Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S.; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S.; Nee, Lisa M.; Wurster, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hyper...

  4. Effects of chronic aluminum exposure on learning and memory and brain-derived nerve growth factor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘宝龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chronic aluminum exposure on the learning and memory abilities and brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) in SpragueDawley (SD) rats.Methods Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into 4 groups:control group and high-,middle-,and low-dose exposure groups.The rats in high-,middle-,and low-dose expo-

  5. Effect of the Nerve Growth Factor Mimetic GK-2 on Brain Structural and Functional State in the Early Postresuscitation Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Avrushchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 used to improve the structural and functional state of the brain in the early postresuscitation period. Material and methods. Cardiac arrest was induced in mature male albino rats for 12 minutes, followed by resuscitation. The neurological state of the resuscitated animals was assessed by a scoring scale. On postresuscitation day 7, the density and composition of neuronal populations of Purkinje cells in the lateral cerebellar region and pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector were determined by a differential morphometric analysis. The results were statistically processed using the ANOVA method. Results. The use of GK-2 was found to accelerate neurological recovery in the resuscitated animals. On day 7 after 12-minute cardiac arrest, the resuscitated animals showed neuronal dystrophic changes and death in the neuronal populations highly susceptible to ischemia. It was shown that the systemic administration of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 contributed to a reduction in the magnitude and depth of postresuscitation changes in the cerebellar Purkinje cells and prevented dystrophic changes in the pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector. The findings suggest that GK-2 has a neuroprotective effect in the recovery period after total body ischemia. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate the efficiency of the systemic administration of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 in improving the brain structural and functional state in the early postresuscitation period. This determines perspectives for the use of GK-2 to prevent and correct posthypoxic encephalopathies. Key words: the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2, postresuscitation period, neuronal dystrophic changes and death, neurological status.

  6. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1.

  7. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  8. Effect of β-nerve growth factor on differentiation of endothelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Ad-EGFP-hβ-NGF) on the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in rats. Methods: The successfully ... may contribute to angiopoiesis or vascular repair. Keywords: β-Nerve ... angiogenesis in damaged tissues [6]. In this study ...

  9. [Nerve Growth Factor in Patients With Arterial Hypertension: Neuropsychical, Hemodynamic, Metabolic Relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, A V; Ivanchenko, V S; Gordienko, A I; Khimich, N V; Gagarina, A A

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the changes of serum nerve growth factor (NGF) level in patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and obesity in dependence on the degree of psycho-emotional stress and physical activity. We examined 76 male patients with stage I and II AH with mean age 46.75±0.56 years (36 patients with and 40 without obesity). Control group consisted of 26 individuals without AH, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. All patients underwent ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Serum concentrations of NGF β-subunit and cortisol were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. For assessment of levels of psycho-emotional stress, reactive and personal anxiety, and physical activity we used Psychological Stress Measure (PSM-25), the Spielberger-Khanin questionnaire, and brief International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), respectively. Level of NGF in patients with AH and obesity (0.94±0.28 ρg/ml) was higher than in non-obese patients with AH (0.21±0.06 ρg/ml; p=0.018) with highest figures in patients with insufficient physical activity and high level of psychoemotional stress. In all groups of patients there was unidirectional reverse correlation between serum NGF and cortisol levels. According to ambulatory BP monitoring, NGF level was inversely proportional to systolic and diastolic BP variability in patients with AH and obesity and in the control group. Reduced serum concentration of NGF was associated with increased levels of reactive and personal anxiety. Obtained data suggests that NGF plays an important role in complex multifactorial interactions between neuropsychic, cardiovascular and metabolic processes.

  10. Urinary Nerve Growth Factor as a Potential Biomarker of Treatment Outcomes in Overactive Bladder Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Seok Suh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate urinary nerve growth factor (NGF as a biomarker of treatment efficacy and recurrence in overactive bladder (OAB patients. Methods We enrolled 189 OAB subjects who visited our outpatient clinic from February 2010 to February 2015. All subjects with OAB received antimuscarinic treatment. A 3-day voiding diary and questionnaire were collected from each patient. Urinary levels of NGF were evaluated at baseline, the beginning of antimuscarinic treatment, and the end of antimuscarinic treatment. Urinary NGF was normalized to urine creatinine (Cr. Between-group comparisons of baseline characteristics were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to predict responses to anticholinergic treatment and recurrence. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test with the Bonferroni correction was used for intragroup comparisons. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to analyze the utility of this biomarker. Results Urinary levels of NGF/Cr tended to decrease in patients who responded to treatment (n=62, but this was not significant (P=0.260. Urinary NGF levels were higher at baseline in patients who did not experience recurrence than in those who did (P=0.047. In those who did not experience recurrence (n=29, urinary NGF/Cr decreased at the end of treatment compared to baseline, and this reduction was maintained at 12 weeks after the end of treatment (P<0.05. Conclusions Urinary NGF is a potential biomarker for predicting the outcome of antimuscarinic treatment in OAB patients. This may provide useful information when deciding to stop antimuscarinic treatment in responders.

  11. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  12. Growth factors regulate glutamine synthetase activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... glutamate and ammonia, which in turn, cells are supplied with ammonia ... out to determine the maximum growth time at which cells will be .... Western blot technique for detection the glutamine synthetase enzyme. Lane 1;.

  13. Independent regulation of skeletal growth by Ihh and IGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Fanxin; Joeng, Kyu-Sang; Xuan, Shouhong; Efstratiadis, Argiris; McMahon, Andrew P

    2006-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a major role in regulating the systemic growth of mammals. However, it is unclear to what extent their systemic and/or local functions act in concert with other local growth factors controlling the sizes of individual organs. We have specifically addressed whether growth control of the skeleton by IGFs interacts genetically with that by Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a locally produced growth signal for the endochondral skeleton. Here, we report that disruption of both IGF and Ihh signaling resulted in additive reduction in the size of the embryonic skeleton. Thus, IGF and Ihh signaling appear to control the growth of the skeleton in parallel pathways.

  14. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, K.T.; Seabright, R.; Logan, A.; Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. → Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. → The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. → The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  15. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, K.T. [Keele University at the RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Seabright, R.; Logan, A. [Neuropharmacology and Neurobiology, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Birmingham University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M. [Biosciences, Birmingham University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Johnson, W.E.B., E-mail: w.e.johnson@aston.ac.uk [Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  16. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    Full Text Available During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group: (1 non-sensitized, (2 anaphylaxis, (3 anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS and (4 anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  17. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E

    1995-01-01

    The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... converge to activate 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Thus, glucose-induced insulin secretion was found to be associated with a small stimulatory effect on 44-kDa MAP kinase, which was synergistically enhanced by increased levels of intracellular cAMP and by the hormonal secretagogues......-1. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase by both Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent pathways. Nerve growth factor, independently of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, efficiently stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase without causing insulin release, indicating that activation...

  18. Effect of plant growth regulators, explants type and efficient plantlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... Plant Pathology, Tissue Culture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Botany,. University of ... variability in response to growth regulators. In vitro rooting ..... an adult tree Wrightia tomentosa through enhanced axillary.

  19. Effects of Plant Growth Regulators and Photoperiod on In

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shahin

    using the combination of two plant growth regulators and same photoperiod. Key words: Tissue culture, ... they can be stored and transplanted directly into the field without an acclimatization ..... SAS user's guide. cary, NC: Statistical Analysis ...

  20. Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated Curcuma longa ... Shoots were inoculated in MS culture medium with the addition of 30 g/L of sucrose ... flow cytometry, utilizing two reference standards, green pea, and tomato.

  1. Exogenous application of plant growth regulators increased the total ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... the exogenous application of flavonoids reports plant growth regulation ... method used for extraction and quantification of endogenous gibberellins was ... 365 nm) while separation was done on a C18 reverse-phase HPLC.

  2. Cerebrolysin modulates pronerve growth factor/nerve growth factor ratio and ameliorates the cholinergic deficit in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubhi, Kiren; Rockenstein, Edward; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben; Mante, Michael; Inglis, Chandra; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Fahnestock, Margaret; Doppler, Edith; Novak, Philip; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by degeneration of neocortex, limbic system, and basal forebrain, accompanied by accumulation of amyloid-β and tangle formation. Cerebrolysin (CBL), a peptide mixture with neurotrophic-like effects, is reported to improve cognition and activities of daily living in patients with AD. Likewise, CBL reduces synaptic and behavioral deficits in transgenic (tg) mice overexpressing the human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). The neuroprotective effects of CBL may involve multiple mechanisms, including signaling regulation, control of APP metabolism, and expression of neurotrophic factors. We investigate the effects of CBL in the hAPP tg model of AD on levels of neurotrophic factors, including pro-nerve growth factor (NGF), NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotropin (NT)-3, NT4, and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that levels of pro-NGF were increased in saline-treated hAPP tg mice. In contrast, CBL-treated hAPP tg mice showed levels of pro-NGF comparable to control and increased levels of mature NGF. Consistently with these results, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated increased NGF immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of CBL-treated hAPP tg mice. Protein levels of other neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, NT3, NT4, and CNTF, were unchanged. mRNA levels of NGF and other neurotrophins were also unchanged. Analysis of neurotrophin receptors showed preservation of the levels of TrKA and p75(NTR) immunoreactivity per cell in the nucleus basalis. Cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis were reduced in the saline-treated hAPP tg mice, and treatment with CBL reduced these cholinergic deficits. These results suggest that the neurotrophic effects of CBL might involve modulation of the pro-NGF/NGF balance and a concomitant protection of cholinergic neurons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Optic nerve size evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in children with optic nerve hypoplasia, multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, isolated growth hormone deficiency, and idiopathic short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkebaek, Niels Holtum; Patel, Leena; Wright, Neville Bryce; Grigg, John Russell; Sinha, Smeeta; Hall, Catherine Margaret; Price, David Anthony; Lloyd, Ian Christopher; Clayton, Peter Ellis

    2004-10-01

    To objectively define criteria for intracranial optic nerve (ON) size in ON hypoplasia (ONH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Intracranial ON sizes from MRI were compared between 46 children with ONH diagnosed by ophthalmoscopy (group 1, isolated ONH, 8 children; and group 2, ONH associated with abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and septum pellucidum, 38 children) and children with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (group 3, multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, 14 children), isolated growth hormone deficiency (group 4, isolated growth hormone deficiency, 15 children), and idiopathic short stature (group 5, idiopathic short stature, 10 children). Intracranial ON size was determined by the cross-sectional area, calculated as [pi x (1/2) height x (1/2) width]. Groups 1 and 2 had lower intracranial ON size than did groups 3, 4, and 5 (P imaging of the ONs with cross-sectional area short child more than 12 months of age, with or without hypothalamic-pituitary axis abnormalities, confirms the clinical diagnosis of ONH.

  4. Growth Conditions Regulate the Requirements for Caulobacter Chromosome Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shebelut, Conrad W.; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Gitai, Zemer

    2009-01-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation...... determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated....

  5. Activation of transglutaminase 2 by nerve growth factor in differentiating neuroblastoma cells: A role in cell survival and neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarni, Alanood S; Hargreaves, Alan J; Dickenson, John M

    2018-02-05

    NGF (nerve growth factor) and tissue transglutaminase (TG2) play important roles in neurite outgrowth and modulation of neuronal cell survival. In this study, we investigated the regulation of TG2 transamidase activity by NGF in retinoic acid-induced differentiating mouse N2a and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. TG2 transamidase activity was determined using an amine incorporation and a peptide cross linking assay. In situ TG2 activity was assessed by visualising the incorporation of biotin-X-cadaverine using confocal microscopy. The role of TG2 in NGF-induced cytoprotection and neurite outgrowth was investigated by monitoring hypoxia-induced cell death and appearance of axonal-like processes, respectively. The amine incorporation and protein crosslinking activity of TG2 increased in a time and concentration-dependent manner following stimulation with NGF in N2a and SH-SY5Y cells. NGF mediated increases in TG2 activity were abolished by the TG2 inhibitors Z-DON (Z-ZON-Val-Pro-Leu-OMe; Benzyloxycarbonyl-(6-Diazo-5-oxonorleucinyl)-l-valinyl-l-prolinyl-l-leucinmethylester) and R283 (1,3,dimethyl-2[2-oxo-propyl]thio)imidazole chloride) and by pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (PKB) and protein kinase C (PKC), and removal of extracellular Ca 2+ . Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated NGF induced in situ TG2 activity. TG2 inhibition blocked NGF-induced attenuation of hypoxia-induced cell death and neurite outgrowth in both cell lines. Together, these results demonstrate that NGF stimulates TG2 transamidase activity via a ERK1/2, PKB and PKC-dependent pathway in differentiating mouse N2a and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, NGF-induced cytoprotection and neurite outgrowth are dependent upon TG2. These results suggest a novel and important role of TG2 in the cellular functions of NGF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  7. Chronic mild stress influences nerve growth factor through a matrix metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Kurek, Anna; Detka, Jan; Slusarczyk, Joanna; Papp, Mariusz; Tota, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Lason, Wladyslaw; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2016-04-01

    Stress is generally a beneficial experience that motivates an organism to action to overcome the stressful challenge. In particular situations, when stress becomes chronic might be harmful and devastating. The hypothalamus is a critical coordinator of stress and the metabolic response; therefore, disruptions in this structure may be a significant cause of the hormonal and metabolic disturbances observed in depression. Chronic stress induces adverse changes in the morphology of neural cells that are often associated with a deficiency of neurotrophic factors (NTFs); additionally, many studies indicate that insufficient NTF synthesis may participate in the pathogenesis of depression. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression of the nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hypothalamus of male rats subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) or to prenatal stress (PS) and to PS in combination with an acute stress event (AS). It has been found that chronic mild stress, but not prenatal stress, acute stress or a combination of PS with AS, decreased the concentration of the mature form of NGF (m-NGF) in the rat hypothalamus. A discrepancy between an increase in the Ngf mRNA and a decrease in the m-NGF levels suggested that chronic mild stress inhibited NGF maturation or enhanced the degradation of this factor. We have shown that NGF degradation in the hypothalamus of rats subjected to chronic mild stress is matrix metalloproteinase-dependent and related to an increase in the active forms of some metalloproteinases (MMP), including MMP2, MMP3, MMP9 and MMP13, while the NGF maturation process does not seem to be changed. We suggested that activated MMP2 and MMP9 potently cleave the mature but not the pro- form of NGF into biologically inactive products, which is the reason for m-NGF decomposition. In turn, the enhanced expression of Ngf in the hypothalamus of these rats is an attempt to overcome the reduced levels of m-NGF. Additionally, the decreased level of m

  8. The role of growth regulators, embryo age and genotypes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... 0.1 mg/l kinetin, MS + 0.1 mg/l IAA and MS + 0.1 mg/l kinetin + 0.1 mg/l IAA were used as growth regulators. ... factor for a high success in zygotic embryo culture is the ... regulators components have proved to influence the.

  9. Nerve signaling regulates basal keratinocyte proliferation in the blastema apical epithelial cap in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akira; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2012-06-15

    The ability of adult vertebrates to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive; however, the ability to regenerate structurally complex organs such as the limb is limited largely to the salamanders. The fact that most of the tissues of the limb can regenerate has led investigators to question and identify the barriers to organ regeneration. From studies in the salamander, it is known that one of the earliest steps required for successful regeneration involves signaling between nerves and the wound epithelium/apical epithelial cap (AEC). In this study we confirm an earlier report that the keratinocytes of the AEC acquire their function coincident with exiting the cell cycle. We have discovered that this unique, coordinated behavior is regulated by nerve signaling and is associated with the presence of gap junctions between the basal keratinocytes of the AEC. Disruption of nerve signaling results in a loss of gap junction protein, the reentry of the cells into the cell cycle, and regenerative failure. Finally, coordinated exit from the cell cycle appears to be a conserved behavior of populations of cells that function as signaling centers during both development and regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jining; Chen Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-01-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration

  11. Noise Stress Induces an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Xeroderma Pigmentosum-A Response in the Auditory Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, O'neil W

    2017-03-01

    In response to toxic stressors, cancer cells defend themselves by mobilizing one or more epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cascades that employ xeroderma pigmentosum-A (XPA) to repair damaged genes. Recent experiments discovered that neurons within the auditory nerve exhibit basal levels of EGFR+XPA co-expression. This finding implied that auditory neurons in particular or neurons in general have the capacity to mobilize an EGFR+XPA defense. Therefore, the current study tested the hypothesis that noise stress would alter the expression pattern of EGFR/XPA within the auditory nerve. Design-based stereology was used to quantify the proportion of neurons that expressed EGFR, XPA, and EGFR+XPA with and without noise stress. The results revealed an intricate neuronal response that is suggestive of alterations to both co-expression and individual expression of EGFR and XPA. In both the apical and middle cochlear coils, the noise stress depleted EGFR+XPA expression. Furthermore, there was a reduction in the proportion of neurons that expressed XPA-alone in the middle coils. However, the noise stress caused a significant increase in the proportion of neurons that expressed EGFR-alone in the middle coils. The basal cochlear coils failed to mobilize a significant response to the noise stress. These results suggest that EGFR and XPA might be part of the molecular defense repertoire of the auditory nerve.

  12. Noise Stress Induces an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Xeroderma Pigmentosum–A Response in the Auditory Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, O’neil W.

    2017-01-01

    In response to toxic stressors, cancer cells defend themselves by mobilizing one or more epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cascades that employ xeroderma pigmentosum–A (XPA) to repair damaged genes. Recent experiments discovered that neurons within the auditory nerve exhibit basal levels of EGFR+XPA co-expression. This finding implied that auditory neurons in particular or neurons in general have the capacity to mobilize an EGFR+XPA defense. Therefore, the current study tested the hypothesis that noise stress would alter the expression pattern of EGFR/XPA within the auditory nerve. Design-based stereology was used to quantify the proportion of neurons that expressed EGFR, XPA, and EGFR+XPA with and without noise stress. The results revealed an intricate neuronal response that is suggestive of alterations to both co-expression and individual expression of EGFR and XPA. In both the apical and middle cochlear coils, the noise stress depleted EGFR+XPA expression. Furthermore, there was a reduction in the proportion of neurons that expressed XPA-alone in the middle coils. However, the noise stress caused a significant increase in the proportion of neurons that expressed EGFR-alone in the middle coils. The basal cochlear coils failed to mobilize a significant response to the noise stress. These results suggest that EGFR and XPA might be part of the molecular defense repertoire of the auditory nerve. PMID:28056182

  13. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  14. Business regulation and economic growth in the Western Balkan countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engjell PERE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Actually economic policies in many countries aimed to stimulate their economic growth, particularly after negative impact of the global economic crisis. In this regards, fiscal regulation are an important aspect of those policies, that can promote or obstacle the economic growth in general. In this point of view this paper aims to analyze the system of administration rules in different Western Balkans Countries, (which includes Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia (FYROM, Montenegro and Serbia. Moreover, a special attention is given investigation of the regulation and administrative facilitation aspects of doing business in the above-mentioned countries, whether this system stimulates, or not, the development of private business and economic growth.The paper is divided into three main sections. The first part provides a retrospective of economic growth in the Western Balkan countries and the dependence of this growth on global economic development. The second part proceeds with the investigations of the impact of administrative regulation on economic growth. The third part, based on an econometric model, will analyze the correlation between economic growth and elaborated indicators which present the level of business administrative regulation system. Furthermore, this last section discusses the results and concludes. In this analysis, the paper is based substantially on the data base of "Doing Business 2013" (World Bank.

  15. Immunohistochemical profile of cytokines and growth factors expressed in vestibular schwannoma and in normal vestibular nerve tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurone, Samanta; Bianchi, Enrica; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Di Gioia, Cira; Ierinó, Rocco; Carubbi, Cecilia; Galli, Daniela; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Giangaspero, Felice; Filipo, Roberto; Zanza, Christian; Artico, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, also known as acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors, which originate from myelin-forming Schwann cells. They develop in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. The clinical progression of the condition involves slow and progressive growth, eventually resulting in brainstem compression. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression level and the localization of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the adhesion molecules, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in order to determine whether these factors are involved in the transformation and development of human vestibular schwannoma. The present study investigated whether changes in inflammation are involved in tumor growth and if so, the mechanisms underlying this process. The results of the current study demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β1, IL-1β and IL-6 exhibited increased expression in human vestibular schwannoma tissue compared with normal vestibular nerve samples. TNF-α was weakly expressed in Schwann cells, confirming that a lower level of this cytokine is involved in the proliferation of Schwann cells. Neoplastic Schwann cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that may act in an autocrine manner, stimulating cellular proliferation. In addition, the increased expression of VEGF in vestibular schwannoma compared with that in normal vestibular nerve tissue, suggests that this factor may induce neoplastic growth via the promotion of angiogenesis. The present findings suggest that inflammation may promote angiogenesis and consequently contribute to tumor progression. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in vestibular

  16. Ultrasound-guided plasma rich in growth factors injections and scaffolds hasten motor nerve functional recovery in an ovine model of nerve crush injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mikel; Anitua, E; Delgado, D; Prado, R; Sánchez, P; Fiz, N; Guadilla, J; Azofra, J; Pompei, O; Orive, G; Ortega, M; Yoshioka, T; Padilla, S

    2017-05-01

    In the present study we evaluated the motor recovery process of peripheral nerve injury (PNI), based on electrophysiological and histomorphometric criteria, after treatment with plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) injections and scaffolds in an ovine model. Three groups of sheep underwent a nerve crush lesion: the first group (n = 3) was left to recover spontaneously (SR); the second group was administered saline injections (SI; n = 5) and a third group (n = 6) received PRGF injections and scaffolds immediately after the crush injury. At post-intervention week 8, 70% of sheep in the PRGF group were CMAP-positive, with no electrophysiological response in the rest of the groups. Histomorphometric analysis 12 weeks after the surgical intervention revealed that the average axonal density of the SR (1184 ± 864 axons/µm 2 ) and SI (3109 ± 2450 axons/µm 2 ) groups was significantly inferior to the control (8427 ± 2433 axons/µm 2 ) and also inferior to the PRGF group (5276 ± 4148 axons/µm 2 ), showing no significant differences between the control and PRGF groups. The axonal size of the SR and SI groups was significantly smaller compared with the control group (18 ± 4 µm 2 ), whereas the axonal size of the PRGF group (6 ± 5 µm 2 ) did not show statistical differences from the control. Morphometry of the target muscles indicated that the PRGF group had the lowest percentage volume reduction 12 weeks after the crush injury. The PRGF group had larger muscle fibre areas than the SI and SR groups, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Overall, these data suggest that the PRGF injections and scaffolds hastened functional axon recovery and dampened atrophy of the target muscles in an ovine model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 112 patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in our hospital between July 2013 and February 2016 were collected, and according to random number table, they were divided into the control group (n=56 who underwent minimally invasive hematoma evacuation therapy and the observation group (n=56 who underwent minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation therapy. Serum contents of inflammatory mediators, nerve injury indexes and neurotransmitters were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, there were no significant differences in serum contents of inflammatory mediators, nerve injury indexes and neurotransmitters between the two groups. After treatment, serum contents of inflammatory mediators such as CRP, PCT, IL-1β and IL-6 in observation group were lower than those in control group; serum contents of nerve injury indexes such as NSE, S100B, GEAP and MBP were lower than those in control group; serum contents of neurotransmitters such as SP, NPY, Glu and Asp were lower than those in control group while GABA and Gly were higher than those in control group. Conclusion: Minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation can effectively reduce neurological function injury, and has positive clinical significance.

  18. Salvianolic Acid A Protects the Peripheral Nerve Function in Diabetic Rats through Regulation of the AMPK-PGC1α-Sirt3 Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid A (SalA is one of the main efficacious, water-soluble constituents of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. This study investigated the protective effects of SalA on peripheral nerve in diabetic rats. Administration of SalA (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg, ig was started from the 5th week after strepotozotocin (STZ60 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection and continued for 8 weeks. Paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV were used to assess peripheral nerve function. The western blot methods were employed to test the expression levels of serine-threonine liver kinase B1 (LKB1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α, silent information regulator protein3 (sirtuin 3/Sirt3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS in sciatic nerve. Results showed that SalA administration could increase PWMT and MNCV in diabetic rats; reduce the deterioration of sciatic nerve pathology; increase AMPK phosphorylation level, up-regulate PGC-1α, Sirt3 and nNOS expression, but had no influence on LKB1. These results suggest that SalA has protective effects against diabetic neuropathy. The beneficial effects of SalA on peripheral nerve function in diabetic rats might be attributed to improvements in glucose metabolism through regulation of the AMPK-PGC1α-Sirt3 axis.

  19. Regulating cough through modulation of sensory nerve function in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, D; Page, C P

    2013-10-01

    Whilst local anaesthetics when applied directly to laryngeal nerves or topically to the lung can suppress cough, their chronic use is constrained because of dose limiting side effects. However, the effectiveness of local anaesthetics suggests that selectivity targeting nerves in the airway may provide novel approaches for the treatment of cough in the future. There is a considerable wealth of evidence showing that there are different afferent nerve subtypes in the airways. Traditionally C-fibres have been the focus of much research in the cough field since the stimulation of these afferents by capsaicin is able to elicit cough in guinea-pigs and in man, and drugs targeting various proteins expressed in these nerves (e.g. mu-opioid, NOP1, TRPV1, sodium channels) have been shown to be anti-tussive in preclinical models of cough. However, interest in Aδ fibres has increased recently in light of the discovery of a specific cough receptor in the guinea-pig that is provoked by citric acid and punctate stimulation, but not capsaicin and which has been anatomically linked to Aδ fibres. There is also some evidence that as a result of inflammation in the airways, Aδ fibres can begin to express neuropeptides and TRPV1 receptors so that they can become responsive to endogenous activators of this ion channel and to irritants like capsaicin. Consequently, there is considerable interest in targeting either one or both afferent nerve types for the treatment of chronic cough. However, to date the translation of preclinical studies into man has largely been disappointing and certainly there is a need for better preclinical models in this field. There also remain many challenges to overcome at a clinical level, such as what patient group(s) should be used to assess anti-tussive drugs and whether the use of irritants that induce cough in healthy volunteers (such as citric acid or capsaicin) is of any value in the assessment of novel anti-tussive drugs. The development of several

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P reason for these effects. The clinical use

  1. Nitroxide radicals formed in situ as polymer chain growth regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolyakina, Elena V; Grishin, Dmitry F

    2009-01-01

    Published data on controlled synthesis of macromolecules using nitroxide radicals, formed in situ during polymerization, as polymer chain growth regulators are systematized and generalized. The attention is focused on the mechanism of polymer chain growth control during reversibly inhibited radical homopolymerization and the effect of structure of precursors and regulating additives on the polymerization kinetics of monomers of different nature and the molecular-mass characteristics of the polymers thus formed. The key methods for generation of nitroxide radicals directly during polymerization are considered. The prospects for development and practical use of these approaches for the synthesis of new polymeric materials are evaluated.

  2. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential req...

  3. Effect of growth regulators on growth, flowering and rhizome yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2001 and 2002, to study the effect of foliar application of growth regulators on growth; flowering and rhizome yield of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.). Treatments consisted of gibberellic acid (GA3) at 0,150 and 300 ppm; ethrel at 0,100 and 200 ppm and cycocel (CCC) at 0,250 ppm ...

  4. Fabrication of bioactive conduits containing the fibroblast growth factor 1 and neural stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15 mm critical gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Hsiao-Chiang; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-hui; Chen, Jeng-Rung; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Nerve conduits are often used in combination with bioactive molecules and stem cells to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the acidic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) was immobilized onto the microporous/micropatterned poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) nerve conduits after open air plasma treatment. PLA substrates grafted with chitosan in the presence of a small amount of gold nanoparticles (nano Au) showed a protective effect on the activity of the immobilized FGF1 in vitro. Different conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm critical gap defect in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Axon regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated by histology, walking track analysis and electrophysiology. Among different conduits, PLA conduits grafted with chitosan–nano Au and the FGF1 after plasma activation had the greatest regeneration capacity and functional recovery in the experimental animals. When the above conduit was seeded with aligned neural stem cells, the efficacy was further enhanced and it approached that of the autograft group. This work suggested that microporous/micropatterned nerve conduits containing bioactive growth factors may be successfully fabricated by micropatterning techniques, open plasma activation, and immobilization, which, combined with aligned stem cells, may synergistically contribute to the regeneration of the severely damaged peripheral nerve. (paper)

  5. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  6. Endogenous versus exogenous growth factor regulation of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-β1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-β1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-β1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-β1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Expression of growth-associated protein 43 in the skin nerve fibers of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursova, Sarka; Dubovy, Petr; Vlckova-Moravcova, Eva; Nemec, Martin; Klusakova, Ilona; Belobradkova, Jana; Bednarik, Josef

    2012-04-15

    The growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) is known as a marker of regenerating nerve fibers and their continuous remodeling in the adult human skin. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a possible role for GAP-43 in the detection of the early stages of small-fiber neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) as compared with a well- established and validated parameter - intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactive intra-epidermal C fibers. In a group of 21 patients with DM2 within three years of diagnosis (13 men, 8 women; mean age 53.9±12.8; range 30-74) and a group of 17 healthy volunteers (8 men, 9 women; mean age 55.8±8.5; range 45-70 years), skin punch biopsies were taken from a distal calf and double immunostained with both PGP 9.5 and GAP-43. In healthy controls, 96.8% of 629 PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers were immunostained with GAP-43; the proportion of PGP 9.5 intra-epidermal nerve fibers immunoreactive for GAP-43 in control subjects ranged from 86.5 to 100%. In DM2 patients, IENFD was significantly lower compared to controls (median, 1.5 vs. 11.2/mm; pDM2 patients compared to healthy controls (73.6% of 337 PGP 9.5 positive fibers; p<0.001); ranged from 0 to 98.1%. In conclusion, these results show that impaired regeneration of intra-epidermal C fibers in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as indicated by GAP-43, might be a marker of incipient diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Upregulated TLR3 Promotes Neuropathic Pain by Regulating Autophagy in Rat With L5 Spinal Nerve Ligation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijia; Lu, Zhijun

    2017-02-01

    Microglia, rapidly activated following peripheral nerve injury (PNI), accumulate within the spinal cord and adopt inflammation that contributes to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Microglia express functional Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play pivotal roles in regulating inflammatory processes. However, little is known about the role of TLR3 in regulating neuropathic pain after PNI. Here TLR3 expression and autophagy activation was assayed in dorsal root ganglions and in microglia following PNI by using realtime PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The role of TLR3/autophagy signaling in regulating tactile allodynia was evaluated by assaying paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and cold allodynia after intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA). We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) induces the expression of TLR3 in dorsal root ganglions and in primary rat microglia at the mRNA and protein level. Meanwhile, L5 SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy, which contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of Poly (I:C), a TLR3 agonist, significantly increases the activation of microglial autophagy, whereas TLR3 knockdown markedly inhibits L5 SNL-induced microglial autophagy. Poly (I:C) treatment promotes the expression of proinflammatory mediators, whereas 3-MA (a specific inhibitor of autophagy) suppresses Poly (I:C)-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy inhibition further inhibits TLR3-mediated mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results suggest that inhibition of TLR3/autophagy signaling contributes to alleviate neurophathic pain triggered by SNL.

  9. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1 Δchon cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone

  10. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, Yoshiki [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Fukui Hospital, 23-3 Matsuokashimoaizuki, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakai, Yasuo [Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Plastic Surgery, Bellland General Hospital, 500-3 Higashiyama Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8247 (Japan); Yahara, Yasuhito [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Akiyama, Haruhiko [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagito, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hosokawa, Ko [Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsumaki, Noriyuki, E-mail: ntsumaki@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  11. The role of growth regulators, embryo age and genotypes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most important problem of tomato breeders is lengthy seed to seed cycle in a breeding program. In vitro techiques provide a lot of advantages for breeders. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of growth regulators and immature embryo age on embryo germination and rapid generation ...

  12. Toxicity of the insect growth regulator lufenuron on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metarhizium anisopliae has been considered a promising alternative with low environmental impacts for the biological control of a variety of insect-pests. Another alternative is the use of biological pesticides such as insect growth regulators, including lufenuron. An assessment of the potential impact of fungicides on M.

  13. Effect of plant growth regulators on regeneration of the endangered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of an efficient in vitro regeneration protocol of Calligonum comosum is important and that has achieved to protect the endangered multipurpose medicinally important desert plant in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Nodal segments were used as explants source and the effect of various plant growth regulators (PGRs) ...

  14. Effect of plant growth regulators on callus induction and plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of different concentrations and combinations of growth regulators on callus induction and plant regeneration of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivar Diamant. The tuber segments were used as explants and cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium ...

  15. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) tissue culture. Taha Roodbar Shojaei1*, Vahid Salari2, Darioush Ramazan3, Mahdi Ehyaei1, Javad. Gharechahi4 and Roya Motallebi Chaleshtori5. 1Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, College of ...

  16. Callus induction via different growth regulators from cotyledon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cicer arietinum L.) cultivars KK-1 and Hassan-2K on MS and B5 media containing different combinations and concentrations of growth regulators. Different MS and B5 callusing media containing varying level of 2, 4-D (2 and 4 mg/l), NAA (0.50 ...

  17. In vitro production of growth regulators and phosphatase activity by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result showed that the population levels of phosphobacteria were higher in the rhizosphere soil of groundnut plant. Further, all the strains of phosphobacteria were able to produce phytohormones and phosphatase enzyme under in vitro conditions. Keywords: In vitro, phosphobacteria, growth regulators ...

  18. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain.

  19. Structure of the gene encoding VGF, a nervous system-specific mRNA that is rapidly and selectively induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salton, S R; Fischberg, D J; Dong, K W

    1991-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the development and survival of neurons in the peripheral nervous system. Following treatment with NGF but not epidermal growth factor, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells undergo neural differentiation. We have cloned a nervous system-specific mRNA, NGF33.1, that is rapidly and relatively selectively induced by treatment of PC12 cells with NGF and basic fibroblast growth factor in comparison with epidermal growth factor. Analysis of the nucleic acid and predicted amino acid sequences of the NGF33.1 cDNA clone suggested that this clone corresponded to the NGF-inducible mRNA called VGF (A. Levi, J. D. Eldridge, and B. M. Paterson, Science 229:393-395, 1985; R. Possenti, J. D. Eldridge, B. M. Paterson, A. Grasso, and A. Levi, EMBO J. 8:2217-2223, 1989). We have used the NGF33.1 cDNA clone to isolate and characterize the VGF gene, and in this paper we report the complete sequence of the VGF gene, including 853 bases of 5' flank revealed TATAA and CCAAT elements, several GC boxes, and a consensus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein binding site. The VGF promoter contains sequences homologous to other NGF-inducible, neuronal promoters. We further show that VGF mRNA is induced in PC12 cells to a greater extent by depolarization and by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment than by 8-bromo-cyclic AMP treatment. By Northern (RNA) and RNase protection analysis, VGF mRNA is detectable in embryonic and postnatal central and peripheral nervous tissues but not in a number of nonneural tissues. In the cascade of events which ultimately leads to the neural differentiation of NGF-treated PC12 cells, the VGF gene encodes the most rapidly and selectively regulated, nervous-system specific mRNA yet identified.

  20. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  2. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates B-50/GAP43 phosphorylation in isolated nerve growth cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Hooff, C.O.M. van; Graan, P.N.E. de; Oestreicher, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    A characteristic feature of neurite formation is high expression of the phosphoprotein B-50/GAP43. Previous studies with growth cone membranes have indicated that this neuron-specific protein kinase C substrate may be involved in transmembrane signal transduction at the growth cone. We monitored the

  3. INCREASED PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM -INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthmatics and in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated pulmona...

  4. DOSE-DEPENDENT INCREASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR, NEUROTROPHIN-3, AND NEUROTROPHIN-4 IN A PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM-INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased levels of neurotrophins (nerve growth factor [NGF], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], neurotrophin [NT]-3, and/or NT-4) have been associated with asthma as well as in animal models of allergic asthma. In our mouse model for fungal allergic asthma, repeated ...

  5. Auxin-BR Interaction Regulates Plant Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huiyu; Lv, Bingsheng; Ding, Tingting; Bai, Mingyi; Ding, Zhaojun

    2018-01-01

    Plants develop a high flexibility to alter growth, development, and metabolism to adapt to the ever-changing environments. Multiple signaling pathways are involved in these processes and the molecular pathways to transduce various developmental signals are not linear but are interconnected by a complex network and even feedback mutually to achieve the final outcome. This review will focus on two important plant hormones, auxin and brassinosteroid (BR), based on the most recent progresses about these two hormone regulated plant growth and development in Arabidopsis, and highlight the cross-talks between these two phytohormones. PMID:29403511

  6. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  7. Disruption of spinal cord white matter and sciatic nerve geometry inhibits axonal growth in vitro in the absence of glial scarring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crutcher Keith A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axons within the mature mammalian central nervous system fail to regenerate following injury, usually resulting in long-lasting motor and sensory deficits. Studies involving transplantation of adult neurons into white matter implicate glial scar-associated factors in regeneration failure. However, these studies cannot distinguish between the effects of these factors and disruption of the spatial organization of cells and molecular factors (disrupted geometry. Since white matter can support or inhibit neurite growth depending on the geometry of the fiber tract, the present study sought to determine whether disrupted geometry is sufficient to inhibit neurite growth. Results Embryonic chick sympathetic neurons were cultured on unfixed longitudinal cryostat sections of mature rat spinal cord or sciatic nerve that had been crushed with forceps ex vivo then immediately frozen to prevent glial scarring. Neurite growth on uncrushed portions of spinal cord white matter or sciatic nerve was extensive and highly parallel with the longitudinal axis of the fiber tract but did not extend onto crushed portions. Moreover, neurite growth from neurons attached directly to crushed white matter or nerve tissue was shorter and less parallel compared with neurite growth on uncrushed tissue. In contrast, neurite growth appeared to be unaffected by crushed spinal cord gray matter. Conclusions These observations suggest that glial scar-associated factors are not necessary to block axonal growth at sites of injury. Disruption of fiber tract geometry, perhaps involving myelin-associated neurite-growth inhibitors, may be sufficient to pose a barrier to regenerating axons in spinal cord white matter and peripheral nerves.

  8. Glia-axon interactions and the regulation of the extracellular K+ in the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirounek, P; Robert, A; Kindler, E; Blazek, T

    1998-01-01

    Changes in membrane potential of both axons and Schwann cells were measured simultaneously during electrical activity and during the period of recovery in the rabbit vagus nerve by the use of the sucrose-gap apparatus. During low-frequency stimulation (0.5-1 Hz) the preparation developed a ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization. This hyperpolarization increased when the inwardly rectifying K+ channels in Schwann cells were blocked with Ba2+, indicating that the hyperpolarization was generated by the electrogenic glial Na(+)-K+ pump. During trains at higher frequencies (15 Hz), the preparation depolarized, but after cessation of the stimulation it developed a posttetanic hyperpolarization (PTH). The PTH was also ouabain-sensitive and was strongly enhanced by Cs+ which is known to block the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) in axons but not in glial cells. These results show that the PTH reflects mainly the axonal electrogenic pump. Our results indicate that during activity the K+ released from the firing axons is removed from the extracellular space by Schwann cells and that after cessation of the stimulation the K+ surplus returns from Schwann cells back to axons. Both the glial and axonal K+ uptake is mediated by successive activation of the glial and axonal Na(+)-K+ pump. The nature of the signalling mechanisms that control the pumping rates of the respective pumps remain unknown.

  9. Functional role of diverse changes in sympathetic nerve activity in regulating arterial pressure during REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Misa; Yoshida, Ikue; Miki, Kenju

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether REM sleep evoked diverse changes in sympathetic outflows and, if so, to elucidate why REM sleep evokes diverse changes in sympathetic outflows. Male Wistar rats were chronically implanted with electrodes to measure renal (RSNA) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), electroencephalogram, electromyogram, and electrocardiogram, and catheters to measure systemic arterial and central venous pressure; these parameters were measured simultaneously and continuously during the sleep-awake cycle in the same rat. REM sleep resulted in a step reduction in RNSA by 36.1% ± 2.7% (P sleep. In contrast to REM sleep, RSNA, LSNA, systemic arterial pressure, and heart rate increased in a unidirectional manner associated with increases in physical activity levels in the order from NREM sleep, quiet awake, moving, and grooming state. Thus, the relationship between RSNA vs. LSNA and systemic arterial pressure vs. heart rate observed during REM sleep was dissociated compared with that obtained during the other behavioral states. It is suggested that the diverse changes in sympathetic outflows during REM sleep may be needed to increase systemic arterial pressure by balancing vascular resistance between muscles and vegetative organs without depending on the heart.

  10. Ihh signaling regulates mandibular symphysis development and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugito, H; Shibukawa, Y; Kinumatsu, T; Yasuda, T; Nagayama, M; Yamada, S; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2011-05-01

    Symphyseal secondary cartilage is important for mandibular development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation remain largely unknown. Here we asked whether Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates symphyseal cartilage development and growth. By embryonic days 16.5 to 18.5, Sox9-expressing chondrocytes formed within condensed Tgfβ-1/Runx2-expressing mesenchymal cells at the prospective symphyseal joint site, and established a growth-plate-like structure with distinct Ihh, collagen X, and osteopontin expression patterns. In post-natal life, mesenchymal cells expressing the Ihh receptor Patched1 were present anterior to the Ihh-expressing secondary cartilage, proliferated, differentiated into chondrocytes, and contributed to anterior growth of alveolar bone. In Ihh-null mice, however, symphyseal development was defective, mainly because of enhanced chondrocyte maturation and reduced proliferation of chondroprogenitor cells. Proliferation was partially restored in dual Ihh;Gli3 mutants, suggesting that Gli3 is normally a negative regulator of symphyseal development. Thus, Ihh signaling is essential for symphyseal cartilage development and anterior mandibular growth.

  11. Productivity growth and price regulation of Slovenian water distribution utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Zorić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse the price regulation method and performance of thewater industry in Slovenia. A stochastic cost frontier model is employed to estimate and decompose the total factor productivity (TFP growth of water distribution utilities in the 1997-2003 period. The main goal is to find out whether the lack of proper incentives to improve performance has resulted in the low TFP growth of Slovenian water distribution utilities. The evidence suggests that cost inefficiencies are present in water utilities, which indicates considerable cost saving potential in the analysed industry. Technical change is found to have positively affected the TFP growth over time, while cost inefficiency levels remained essentially unchanged. Overall, the average annual TFP growth in the analysed period is estimated to be only slightly above zero, which is a relatively poor result. This can largely be contributed to the present institutional and regulatory setting that does not stimulate utilities to improve productivity. Therefore, the introduction of an independent regulatory agency and an incentive-based price regulation scheme should be seriously considered in order to enhance the performance of Slovenian water distribution utilities.

  12. Impairment of the nerve growth factor pathway driving amyloid accumulation in cholinergic neurons: the incipit of the Alzheimer′s disease story?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Triaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current idea behind brain pathology is that disease is initiated by mild disturbances of common physiological processes. Overtime, the disruption of the neuronal homeostasis will determine irreversible degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. This could be also true in the case of nerve growth factor (NGF alterations in sporadic Alzheimer′s disease (AD, an age-related pathology characterized by cholinergic loss, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In fact, the pathway activated by NGF, a key neurotrophin for the metabolism of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN, is one of the first homeostatic systems affected in prodromal AD. NGF signaling dysfunctions have been thought for decades to occur in AD late stages, as a mere consequence of amyloid-driven disruption of the retrograde axonal transport of neurotrophins to BFCN. Nowadays, a wealth of knowledge is potentially opening a new scenario: NGF signaling impairment occurs at the onset of AD and correlates better than amyloid load with cognitive decline. The recent acceleration in the characterization of anatomical, functional and molecular profiles of early AD is aimed at maximizing the efficacy of existing treatments and setting novel therapies. Accordingly, the elucidation of the molecular events underlying APP metabolism regulation by the NGF pathway in the septo-hippocampal system is crucial for the identification of new target molecules to slow and eventually halt mild cognitive impairment (MCI and its progression toward AD.

  13. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF and Its Receptors TrkA and p75 in the Reproductive Organs of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PU Shaoxia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to investigate the expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF and its receptors (TrkA and p75 in prehierarchical follicles and oviducts of hens, five 130-day-old laying hens were examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NGF and its receptors were expressed in theca cells and granulosa cells of prehierarchical follicles, and they were also expressed in the epithelial cells of oviducts. The expression of the genes NGF, TrkA and p75 were significantly different in prehierarchical follicles (p<0.05 or p<0.01, and NGF and TrkA gene expression was significantly different in different parts of oviduct (p<0.05 or p<0.01. The expression of NGF and p75 mRNA levels was highest in large white follicle (LWF, as well as the expression of TrkA in small yellow follicle (SYF. In the oviduct, the expression of NGF was the highest in infundibulum, and lowest in isthmus. These results suggest that NGF may play an important role in the regulation of hen reproduction.

  14. Effects of huperzine A on secretion of nerve growth factor in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and neurite outgrowth in rat PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li-li; Wang, Rui; Tang, Xi-can

    2005-06-01

    To study the effects of huperzine A (HupA) on neuritogenic activity and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF). After being treated with 10 micromol/L HupA, neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells was observed and counted under phase-contrast microscopy. Mitogenic activity was assayed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. AChE activity, mRNA and protein expression were measured by the Ellman method, RT-PCR, and Western blot, respectively. NGF mRNA and protein levels were determined by RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Treatment of PC12 cells with 10 micromol/L HupA for 48 h markedly increased the number of neurite-bearing cells, but caused no significant alteration in cell viability or other signs of cytotoxicity. In addition to inhibiting AChE activity, 10 micromol/L HupA also increased the mRNA and protein levels of this enzyme. In addition, following 2 h exposure of the astrocytes to 10 micromol/L HupA, there was a significant up-regulation of mRNA for NGF and P75 low-affinity NGF receptor. The protein level of NGF was also increased after 24 h treatment with HupA. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that HupA has a direct or indirect neurotrophic activity, which might be beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  15. Nerve growth factor delivery by ultrasound-mediated nanobubble destruction as a treatment for acute spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaojun; Wang, Zhigang; Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Shengxi; Hu, Zhenming

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can cause severe disability or death. Treatment options include surgical intervention, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. However, the efficacy of these methods for functional recovery remains unsatisfactory. Purpose This study was conducted to explore the effect of ultrasound (US)-mediated destruction of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanobubbles (NBs) expressing nerve growth factor (NGF) (NGF/PLGA NBs) on nerve regeneration in rats following SCI. Materials and methods Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups after Allen hit models of SCI were established. The groups were normal saline (NS) group, NGF and NBs group, NGF and US group, and NGF/PLGA NBs and US group. Histological changes after SCI were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Neuron viability was determined by Nissl staining. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining was used to examine cell apoptosis. NGF gene and protein expressions were detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Green fluorescent protein expression in the spinal cord was examined using an inverted fluorescence microscope. The recovery of neural function was determined using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan test. Results NGF therapy using US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction significantly increased NGF expression, attenuated histological injury, decreased neuron loss, inhibited neuronal apoptosis in injured spinal cords, and increased BBB scores in rats with SCI. Conclusion US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction effectively transfects the NGF gene into target tissues and has a significant effect on the injured spinal cord. The combination of US irradiation and gene therapy through NGF/PLGA NBs holds great promise for the future of nanomedicine and the development of noninvasive treatment options for SCI and other diseases. PMID:28280337

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  17. Effects of nerve and fibroblast growth factors on the production of nitric oxide in experimental model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Ivana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nitric oxide (NO in neurological diseases represents one of the most studied, yet controversial subjects in physiology. The aim was to examine the effects of intrastriatal injection neurotrophins (nerve growth factors-NGF, fibroblast growth factors-FGF in order to investigate the possible involvement of NO in quinolinic acid (QA induced striatum toxicity in the rat model of Huntington's disease (HD. QA was administered unilaterally into the striatum of adult Wistar rats in a single dose of 150 nM. The other two groups of animals were pretreated immediately before QA application with NGF and FGF, respectively. Control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. Animals were decapitated 7 days after the treatment. Nitrite levels were significantly decreased both in the ipsi- and contra lateral striatum and forebrain cortex of NGF- and FGF-treated animals compared with QA treatment. These results indicated a temporal and spatial propagation of oxidative stress and spread protective effects of NGF and FGF on the forebrain cortex, the distant structure, but tightly connected with striatum, the place of direct neurotoxin damage. Neurotrophins could be the potential neuroprotective agents in HD.

  18. Role of sodium-calcium exchange in regulation of intracellular calcium in nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Armass, S.; Blaustein, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Ca efflux from rat brain presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) was examined after loading the terminals with 45 Ca during a brief depolarization, usually in media containing 20 μM Ca labeled with 45 Ca, to assure a small (physiological) load. Efflux of 45 Ca was very slow in the absence of external Na and Ca and was greatly accelerated by Na and/or Ca. The dependence of 45 Ca efflux on external Na was sigmoid, with a Hill coefficient of ∼ 4.5; this implies that more than two external Na ions are required to activate the efflux of one Ca ion. The external Na (Na 0 )-dependent Ca efflux was inhibited by 1 mM external La, by low temperature, and by raising external K. With small Ca loads, the mitochondrial uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), had negligible effect on either Ca uptake or efflux; with large loads, however, FCCP reduced the depolarization-stimulated Ca uptake and increased the Na 0 -dependent Ca efflux. These effects may be attributed to reduction of mitochondrial Ca sequestration. Mitochondria do not appear to sequester much Ca when the loads are smaller. Estimations of Ca efflux indicate that ∼ 20% of a small 45 Ca load may be extruded via Na + -Ca 2+ exchange within 1 s; this corresponds to a net Ca efflux of ∼ 110 pmol Ca x mg protein -1 x s -1 . This rate of extrusion is equivalent to the net Ca gain when the terminals fire at a frequency of ∼ 18/s. The data on the Ca efflux into Na- and Ca-free media indicate that the ATP-fueled Ca pump can only extrude ∼ 10-20 pmol Ca x mg protein -1 x s -1 . Thus the results imply that Na + -Ca 2+ exchange plays an important role in helping to extrude the Ca that enters during activity

  19. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  20. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  1. Structural and Functional Substitution of Deleted Primary Sensory Neurons by New Growth from Intrinsic Spinal Cord Nerve Cells: An Alternative Concept in Reconstruction of Spinal Cord Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. James

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In a recent clinical report, return of the tendon stretch reflex was demonstrated after spinal cord surgery in a case of total traumatic brachial plexus avulsion injury. Peripheral nerve grafts had been implanted into the spinal cord to reconnect to the peripheral nerves for motor and sensory function. The dorsal root ganglia (DRG containing the primary sensory nerve cells had been surgically removed in order for secondary or spinal cord sensory neurons to extend into the periphery and replace the deleted DRG neurons. The present experimental study uses a rat injury model first to corroborate the clinical finding of a re-established spinal reflex arch, and second, to elucidate some of the potential mechanisms underlying these findings by means of morphological, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological assessments. Our findings indicate that, after spinal cord surgery, the central nervous system sensory system could replace the traumatically detached original peripheral sensory connections through new neurite growth from dendrites.

  2. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential requirements for exocytosis in the growth and maintenance of different dendritic compartments. Rop promotes dendrite growth together with the exocyst, an octameric protein complex involved in tethering vesicles to the plasma membrane, with Rop–exocyst complexes and exocytosis predominating in primary dendrites over terminal dendrites. By contrast, membrane-associated proteins readily diffuse from primary dendrites into terminals, but not in the reverse direction, suggesting that diffusion, rather than targeted exocytosis, supplies membranous material for terminal dendritic growth, revealing key differences in the distribution of materials to these expanding dendritic compartments. PMID:26483382

  3. Growth of maize coleoptiles in the presence of natural and synthetic growth regulators. Growth correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Raczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of natural (IAA, FC, ABA and synthetic (2,4-D growth substances on the increase of the fresh weight of maize coleoptile segments and change of the pH of the incubation medium, accepted here as criteria of maize coleoptile growth, was studied. The growth of maize coleoptiles depended on the concentration of the growth substances, as well as, on the composition of the incubation medium. The highest stimulation of coleoptile growth was seen with FC at a concentration of 10-4M, whereas ABA at 10-3 M gave the highest inhibition of maize coleoptile fresh weight increase and caused alkalization of the medium. The presence of K+ ions in the incubation medium enhanced the stimulatory effect of IAA and FC on the increase of the coleoptile fresh weight, whereas the presence of these ions and phosphate buffer abolished the growth-promoting effect of IAA and FC. The best correlation of the "fresh weight" and "pH" effects was found in the case of the growth of maize coleoptiles in the presence of FC (rxy = 0.67. The inhibition of maize coleoptile growth in the presence of high concentrations of IAA can be explained by the destructive effect of natural auxin at these concentrations on the integrity of mitochondrial membranes, and therefore on the normal functioning of mitochondria.

  4. Functional role of peripheral opioid receptors in the regulation of cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Thinly myelinated Aδ-fiber and unmyelinated C-fiber cardiac sympathetic (spinal) sensory nerve fibers are activated during myocardial ischemia to transmit the sensation of angina pectoris. Although recent observations showed that myocardial ischemia increases the concentrations of opioid peptides and that the stimulation of peripheral opioid receptors inhibits chemically induced visceral and somatic nociception, the role of opioids in cardiac spinal afferent signaling during myocardial ischemia has not been studied. The present study tested the hypothesis that peripheral opioid receptors modulate cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia by suppressing the responses of cardiac afferent nerve to ischemic mediators like bradykinin and extracellular ATP. The nerve activity of single unit cardiac afferents was recorded from the left sympathetic chain (T2–T5) in anesthetized cats. Forty-three ischemically sensitive afferent nerves (conduction velocity: 0.32–3.90 m/s) with receptive fields in the left and right ventricles were identified. The responses of these afferent nerves to repeat ischemia or ischemic mediators were further studied in the following protocols. First, epicardial administration of naloxone (8 μmol), a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, enhanced the responses of eight cardiac afferent nerves to recurrent myocardial ischemia by 62%, whereas epicardial application of vehicle (PBS) did not alter the responses of seven other cardiac afferent nerves to ischemia. Second, naloxone applied to the epicardial surface facilitated the responses of seven cardiac afferent nerves to epicardial ATP by 76%. Third, administration of naloxone enhanced the responses of seven other afferent nerves to bradykinin by 85%. In contrast, in the absence of naloxone, cardiac afferent nerves consistently responded to repeated application of ATP (n = 7) or bradykinin (n = 7). These data suggest that peripheral opioid peptides suppress the

  5. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  6. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector (Serotype 2)-Nerve Growth Factor for Patients With Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Michael S; Tuszynski, Mark H; Thomas, Ronald G; Barba, David; Brewer, James B; Rissman, Robert A; Siffert, Joao; Aisen, Paul S

    2018-03-26

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an endogenous neurotrophic factor that prevents the death and augments the functional state of cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain, a cell population that undergoes extensive degeneration in Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether stereotactically guided intracerebral injections of adeno-associated viral vector (serotype 2)-nerve growth factor (AAV2-NGF) are well tolerated and exhibit preliminary evidence of impact on cognitive decline in mild to moderate AD-associated dementia. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, 49 participants with mild to moderate AD were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive stereotactically guided intracerebral injections of AAV2-NGF or sham surgery. Participants were enrolled between November 2009 and December 2012. Analyses began in February 2015. The study was conducted at 10 US academic medical centers. Eligibility required a diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia due to AD and individuals aged 55 to 80 years. A total of 39 participants did not pass screening; the most common reason was Mini-Mental State Examination scores below cutoff. Analyses were intention-to-treat. Stereotactically guided intracerebral injections of AAV2-NGF into the nucleus basalis of Meynert of each hemisphere or sham surgery. Change from baseline on the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale at month 24. Among 49 participants, 21 (43%) were women, 42 (86%) self-identified as white, and the mean (SD) age was 68 (6.4) years. AAV2-NGF was safe and well-tolerated through 24 months. No significant difference was noted between the treatment group and placebo on the primary outcome measure, the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (mean [SD] score, 14.52 [4.66] vs 9.11 [4.65], P = .17). This multicenter randomized clinical trial demonstrated the feasibility of sham-surgery-controlled stereotactic gene delivery studies in patients with AD. AAV2-NGF delivery was well-tolerated but did not

  7. Control of Growth Within Drosophila Peripheral Nerves by Ras and Protein Kinase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Genes Dev 17:2006 –2020. Rodriguez-Viciana P, Warne PH, Dhand R, Vanhaesebroeck B, Gout I, Fry MJ, Waterfield MD, Downward J (1994...we hope that these methodologies will enable us ultimately to identify all of the relevant genes that interact with NF1 to control growth, and place...NF1 and these partner genes in as complete a mechanistic context as possible. Then this mechanism could be tested and refined in systems more

  8. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  9. Effects of different plant growth regulators on blueberry fruit quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. N.; Luo, C.; Wang, X.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on blueberry fruit growth, various concentrations of Abscisic acid (ABA), Methyl jasmonate (MJ), Brassinolide (BR), Melatonin (MT) were sprayed on blueberry cv. ‘Brigita’ fruits. The results showed that all the PGRs put into effect on improving the quality of blueberry fruit. Comparing with the control plants no PGR spraying,300 mg/L of MT treatment promoted effectively accumulation of the soluble sugar. ABA 20mg/L treatment in-creased effectively accumulation of anthocyanin, and significantly decreased titratable acid content. The treatment of MJ 10mg/L improved significantly the soluble solid content. The effect of the four PGRs treatments on appearance did not show obvious difference.

  10. Role of Estrogen in Thyroid Function and Growth Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are more prevalent in women, particularly between puberty and menopause. It is wellknown that estrogen (E has indirect effects on the thyroid economy. Direct effects of this steroid hormone on thyroid cells have been described more recently; so, the aim of the present paper was to review the evidences of these effects on thyroid function and growth regulation, and its mechanisms. The expression and ratios of the two E receptors, α and β, that mediate the genomic effects of E on normal and abnormal thyroid tissue were also reviewed, as well as nongenomic, distinct molecular pathways. Several evidences support the hypothesis that E has a direct role in thyroid follicular cells; understanding its influence on the growth and function of the thyroid in normal and abnormal conditions can potentially provide new targets for the treatment of thyroid diseases.

  11. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  12. Metabolic regulation of mycobacterial growth and antibiotic sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hun Baek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic bacterial infections, such as tuberculosis (TB, requires a remarkably long course of therapy, despite the availability of drugs that are rapidly bacteriocidal in vitro. This observation has long been attributed to the presence of bacterial populations in the host that are "drug-tolerant" because of their slow replication and low rate of metabolism. However, both the physiologic state of these hypothetical drug-tolerant populations and the bacterial pathways that regulate growth and metabolism in vivo remain obscure. Here we demonstrate that diverse growth-limiting stresses trigger a common signal transduction pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis that leads to the induction of triglyceride synthesis. This pathway plays a causal role in reducing growth and antibiotic efficacy by redirecting cellular carbon fluxes away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Mutants in which this metabolic switch is disrupted are unable to arrest their growth in response to stress and remain sensitive to antibiotics during infection. Thus, this regulatory pathway contributes to antibiotic tolerance in vivo, and its modulation may represent a novel strategy for accelerating TB treatment.

  13. Cholecystokinin regulates satiation idependently of the abdominal vagal nerve in a pig model of total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, van der N.; Meulen, van der J.; Schuurman, T.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The vagal nerve and gut hormones CCK and GLP-1 play important roles in the control of food intake. However, it is not clear to what extent CCK and GLP-1 increase satiation by stimulating receptors located on abdominal vagal nerve endings or via receptors located elsewhere. This study aimed to

  14. Cholecystokinin regulates satiation independently of the abdominal vagal nerve in a pig model of total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, N. van der; Meulen, J. van der; Schuurman, T.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The vagal nerve and gut hormones CCK and GLP-1 play important roles in the control of food intake. However, it is not clear to what extent CCK and GLP-1 increase satiation by stimulating receptors located on abdominal vagal nerve endings or via receptors located elsewhere. This study aimed to

  15. Epidermal growth factor regulates apoptosis and oxidative stress in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Anil Murat; Sozbilen, Murat Celal; Sevgili, Elvin; Dagci, Taner; Özyalcin, Halit; Armagan, Guliz

    2018-03-22

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to vascular damage and disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier which participates in secondary nerve injury. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an endogenous protein which regulates cell proliferation, growth and differention. Previous studies reported that EGF exerts neuroprotective effect in spinal cord after SCI. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying EGF-mediated protection in different regions of nervous system have not shown yet. In this study, we aimed to examine possible anti-apoptotic and protective roles of EGF not only in spinal cord but also in brain following SCI. Twenty-eight adult rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each as follows: sham, trauma (SCI), SCI + EGF and SCI + methylprednisolone (MP) groups. The functional neurological deficits due to the SCI were assessed by behavioral analysis using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open-field locomotor test. The alterations in pro-/anti-apoptotic protein levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were measured in spinal cord and frontal cortex. In our study, EGF promoted locomotor recovery and motor neuron survival of SCI rats. EGF treatment significantly decreased Bax and increased Bcl-2 protein expressions both in spinal cord and brain when compared to SCI group. Moreover, antioxidant enzyme activities including catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were increased following EGF treatment similar to MP treatment. Our experiment also suggests that alteration of the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax may result from decreased apoptosis following EGF treatment. As a conclusion, these results show, for the first time, that administration of EGF exerts its protection via regulating apoptotic and oxidative pathways in response to spinal cord injury in different regions of central nervous system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Systemic down-regulation of delta-9 desaturase promotes muscle oxidative metabolism and accelerates muscle function recovery following nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Hussain

    Full Text Available The progressive deterioration of the neuromuscular axis is typically observed in degenerative conditions of the lower motor neurons, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Neurodegeneration in this disease is associated with systemic metabolic perturbations, including hypermetabolism and dyslipidemia. Our previous gene profiling studies on ALS muscle revealed down-regulation of delta-9 desaturase, or SCD1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Interestingly, knocking out SCD1 gene is known to induce hypermetabolism and stimulate fatty acid beta-oxidation. Here we investigated whether SCD1 deficiency can affect muscle function and its restoration in response to injury. The genetic ablation of SCD1 was not detrimental per se to muscle function. On the contrary, muscles in SCD1 knockout mice shifted toward a more oxidative metabolism, and enhanced the expression of synaptic genes. Repressing SCD1 expression or reducing SCD-dependent enzymatic activity accelerated the recovery of muscle function after inducing sciatic nerve crush. Overall, these findings provide evidence for a new role of SCD1 in modulating the restorative potential of skeletal muscles.

  17. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  18. Nerve growth factor affects 11C-nicotine binding, blood flow, EEG, and verbal episodic memory in an Alzheimer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.; Nordberg, A.; Holst, H. von

    1992-01-01

    Based on animal research suggesting that nerve growth factor (NGF) can stimulate central cholinergic neurons, the known losses of cholinergic innervation of the cortices in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and our experience of infusing NGF to support adrenal grafts in parkinsonian patients, we have initiated clinical trials of NGF infusions into the brain of patients with AD. Here we report a follow-up of our first case, a 69-year-old woman, with symptoms of dementia since 8 years. Intraventricular infusion of 6.6 mg NGF during three months resulted in a marked transient increase in uptake and binding of 11 C-nicotine in frontal and temporal cortex and a persistent increase in cortical blood flow as measured by PET as well as progressive decreases of slow wave EEG activity. After one month of NGF, tests of verbal episodic memory were improved whereas other cognitive tests were not. No adverse effects could be ascribed to the NGF infusion. Taken together, the results of this case study indicate that NGF may counteract cholinergic deficits in AD, and suggest that further clinical trials of NGF infusion in AD are warranted. (authors)

  19. Strip biosensor for amplified detection of nerve growth factor-beta based on a molecular translator and catalytic DNA circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lai, Ting; Mu, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-10-07

    We have demonstrated a new visual detection approach based on a molecular translator and a catalytic DNA circuit for the detection of nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-β). In this assay, a molecular translator based on the binding-induced DNA strand-displacement reaction was employed to convert the input protein to an output DNA signal. The molecular translator is composed of a target recognition element and a signal output element. Target recognition is achieved by the binding of the anti-NGF-β antibody to the target protein. Polyclonal anti-NGF-β antibody is conjugated to DNA1 and DNA2. The antibody conjugated DNA1 is initially hybridized to DNA3 to form a stable DNA1/DNA3 duplex. In the presence of NGF-β, the binding of the same target protein brings DNA1 and DNA2 into close proximity, resulting in an increase in their local effective concentration. This process triggers the strand-displacement reaction between DNA2 and DNA3 and releases the output DNA3. The released DNA3 is further amplified by a catalytic DNA circuit. The product of the catalytic DNA circuit is detected by a strip biosensor. This proposed assay has high sensitivity and selectivity with a dynamic response ranging from 10 fM to 10 pM, and its detection limit is 10 fM of NGF-β. This work provides a sensitive, enzyme-free, and universal strategy for the detection of other proteins.

  20. Influence of estrogen replacement and aging on the expression of nerve growth factor in the urethra of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchi, Eliana V M; Jármy-Di Bella, Zsuzsanna I K; Castro, Rodrigo A; Takano, Claudia C; Simões, Manuel J; Girão, Manoel J B C; Sartori, Marair G F

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the urethra of adult female rats in different hormonal status using immunohistochemical assay. Forty-eight rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Rodentia, Mammalia) from the CEDEME-UNIFESP laboratory animal facility were used in the study. Rats were divided into four groups: group A, 12 non-neutered rats; group B, 12 oophorectomized rats; group C, 12 castrated rats treated with 17β-estradiol for 30 days; and group D, 12 aging rats. Animals were killed by lethal injection and their urethra was removed. NGF expression was evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry using mouse monoclonal primary IgG antibody anti-NGF diluted 1:600, and read under 400× magnification. Digital analysis of the images was done by Imagelab software. The intensity of the dark brown color was used as a measure of NGF cytoplasmatic expression, and was used to quantify the percentage of epithelial and muscular layer cells showing this neurotrophin. After oophorectomy, rats showed a significant increase in NGF expression in the periurethral muscular layer. Compared with oophorectomized rats, NGF expression increased in the epithelial layer and diminished in the periurethral smooth muscle following estrogen administration. In 18-month-old rats, NGF expression was diminished in both epithelial and muscular layers. Hormonal status led to significant differences in NGF protein expression in urethral epithelium and periurethral smooth muscle. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D.

  2. Corticotrigeminal Projections from the Insular Cortex to the Trigeminal Caudal Subnucleus Regulate Orofacial Pain after Nerve Injury via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation in Insular Cortex Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Zhi-Hua; Feng, Ban; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Han; Li, Hui; Chen, Tao; Cui, Jing; Zang, Wei-Dong; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neuroplasticity alterations are implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic orofacial pain. However, the relationship between critical cortex excitability and orofacial pain maintenance has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated a top-down corticospinal descending pain modulation pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the spinal dorsal horn that could directly regulate nociceptive transmission. Thus, we aimed to investigate possible corticotrigeminal connections that directly influence orofacial nociception in rats. Infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI) induced significant orofacial nociceptive behaviors as well as pain-related negative emotions such as anxiety/depression in rats. By combining retrograde and anterograde tract tracing, we found powerful evidence that the trigeminal caudal subnucleus (Vc), especially the superficial laminae (I/II), received direct descending projections from granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (IC). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important signaling molecule involved in neuroplasticity, was significantly activated in the IC following IoN-CCI. Moreover, in IC slices from IoN-CCI rats, U0126, an inhibitor of ERK activation, decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and reduced the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of Vc-projecting neurons. Additionally, U0126 also reduced the number of action potentials in the Vc-projecting neurons. Finally, intra-IC infusion of U0126 obviously decreased Fos expression in the Vc, accompanied by the alleviation of both nociceptive behavior and negative emotions. Thus, the corticotrigeminal descending pathway from the IC to the Vc could directly regulate orofacial pain, and ERK deactivation in the IC could effectively alleviate neuropathic pain as well as pain-related negative emotions in IoN-CCI rats, probably through this top-down pathway. These findings may help

  3. Economic growth and energy regulation in the environmental Kuznets curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Daniel Balsalobre; Álvarez-Herranz, Agustín

    2016-08-01

    This study establishes the existence of a pattern of behavior, between economic growth and environmental degradation, consistent with the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis for 17 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries between 1990 and 2012. Based on this EKC pattern, it shows that energy regulation measures help reduce per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To validate this hypothesis, we also add the explanatory variables: renewable energy promotion, energy innovation processes, and the suppression effect of income level on the contribution of renewable energy sources to total energy consumption. It aims to be a tool for decision-making regarding energy policy. This paper provides a two-stage econometric analysis of instrumental variables with the aim of correcting the existence of endogeneity in the variable GDP per capita, verifying that the instrumental variables used in this research are appropriate for our aim. To this end, it first makes a methodological contribution before incorporating additional variables associated with environmental air pollution into the EKC hypothesis and showing how they positively affect the explanation of the correction in the GHG emission levels. This study concludes that air pollution will not disappear on its own as economic growth increases. Therefore, it is necessary to promote energy regulation measures to reduce environmental pollution.

  4. Growth regulators and substrates for Oncidium baueri Lindl. micropropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Brandstetter Rodrigues

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An adequate concentration of growth regulators as well as the replacement of agar by an alternative medium may be promising from practical and financial points of view to produce orchid plants by micropropagation. The objective of this work was to evaluate different concentrations of growth regulator and alternative substrates for agar replacement in culture medium for in vitro multiplication and rooting of Oncidium baueri. In the explant multiplication phase, two experimental factors were evaluated- various concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mg L-1 and substrates (agar, vermiculite, and coconut fiber added to MS medium. In the rooting phase, different concentrations of indole butyric acid (IBA (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg L-1 were added to culture medium containing the same substrate. Six months after the experiments were initiated, the survival percentage, number of leaves, shoots, and roots and length of the aerial part and the major root were evaluated. The results suggested that addition of 1.0 mg L-1 BAP is necessary for the O. baueri in vitro multiplication phase, but IBA is not necessary in the rooting phase. For the substrate, vermiculite is not indicated as an agar replacement. In contrast, coconut fiber can be used in both multiplication and rooting phases of Oncidium baueri in vitro culture.

  5. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes long-term survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury: comparison with CNTF and BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Kai; Cheung, Anny Wan-Suen; Yu, Sau-Wai; Sha, Ou; Cho, Eric Yu Pang

    2014-10-01

    Different trophic factors are known to promote retinal ganglion cell survival and regeneration, but each had their own limitations. We report that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers distinct advantages in supporting ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration, when compared to two well-established trophic factors ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Ganglion cells in adult hamster were injured by cutting the optic nerve. HGF, CNTF, or BDNF was injected at different dosages intravitreally after injury. Ganglion cell survival was quantified at 7, 14, or 28 days postinjury. Peripheral nerve (PN) grafting to the cut optic nerve of the growth factor-injected eye was performed either immediately after injury or delayed until 7 days post-injury. Expression of heat-shock protein 27 and changes in microglia numbers were quantified in different growth factor groups. The cellular distribution of c-Met in the retina was examined by anti-c-Met immunostaining. Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) was equally potent as BDNF in promoting short-term survival (up to 14 days post-injury) and also supported survival at 28 days post-injury when ganglion cells treated by CNTF or BDNF failed to be sustained. When grafting was performed without delay, HGF stimulated twice the number of axons to regenerate compared with control but was less potent than CNTF. However, in PN grafting delayed for 7 days after optic nerve injury, HGF maintained a better propensity of ganglion cells to regenerate than CNTF. Unlike CNTF, HGF application did not increase HSP27 expression in ganglion cells. Microglia proliferation was prolonged in HGF-treated retinas compared with CNTF or BDNF. C-Met was localized to both ganglion cells and Muller cells, suggesting HGF could be neuroprotective via interacting with both neurons and glia. Compared with CNTF or BDNF, HGF is advantageous in sustaining long-term ganglion cell survival and their propensity to respond to

  6. Influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Tao; Feng Ai-Ping; Liu Lun-Bo; Huang Qi-Jun; Du Chen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 112 patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in our hospital between July 2013 and February 2016 were collected, and according to random number table, they were divided into the control group (n=56) who underwent minimally invasive he...

  7. Neurofibromin regulates somatic growth through the hypothalamic–pituitary axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Balazs; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Lee, Da Yong; Emnett, Ryan J.; Li, Jia; Gutmann, David H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the role of the neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) gene in mammalian brain development, we recently generated mice in which Nf1 gene inactivation occurs in neuroglial progenitor cells using the brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) promoter. We found that Nf1BLBPCKO mice exhibit significantly reduced body weights and anterior pituitary gland sizes. We further demonstrate that the small anterior pituitary size reflects loss of neurofibromin expression in the hypothalamus, leading to reduced growth hormone releasing hormone, pituitary growth hormone (GH) and liver insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) production. Since neurofibromin both negatively regulates Ras activity and positively modulates cAMP levels, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for these abnormalities. While BLBP-mediated expression of an activated Ras molecule did not recapitulate the body weight and hypothalamic/pituitary defects, treatment of Nf1BLBPCKO mice with rolipram to increase cAMP levels resulted in a partial restoration of the body weight phenotype. Furthermore, conditional expression of the Ras regulatory GAP domain of neurofibromin also did not rescue the body weight or Igf1 mRNA defects in Nf1BLBPCKO mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role for neurofibromin in hypothalamic–pituitary axis function and provide further insights into the short stature and GH deficits seen in children with NF1. PMID:18614544

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

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    Santiago Vernia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a target of the hepatic JNK-signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21 deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. Moreover, the protective effects of hepatic JNK deficiency to suppress metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice were not observed in mice with hepatocyte-specific FGF21 deficiency, including reduced blood glucose concentration and reduced intolerance to glucose and insulin. Furthermore, we show that JNK contributes to the regulation of hepatic FGF21 expression during fasting/feeding cycles. These data demonstrate that the hepatokine FGF21 is a key mediator of JNK-regulated metabolic syndrome.

  9. Effects of perinatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the levels of nerve growth factor and its low-affinity receptor in cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, B C; Otten, U; Strauss, S; Volk, B; Maysinger, D

    1993-04-16

    Deficits or excesses of thyroid hormones during critical periods of mammalian cerebellar development can lead to profound biochemical and morphological abnormalities in this system. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of perinatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the ontogeny of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its low-affinity receptor (p75NGFR) in the rat cerebellum. The concentration of NGF and of p75NGFR immunoreactivity (IR) were measured, several days after birth, in cerebella of rats which had received propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroxine. NGF concentration was markedly enhanced only on postnatal day 2 (P2) in hyperthyroid rats, whereas in hypothyroid (PTU-treated) rats NGF values were similar to age-matched controls. These observations suggest that thyroid hormone affects NGF synthesis during early periods of cerebellar development. In Purkinje cells of control animals, p75NGFR IR peaked at P10. In hypothyroid rats, the expression of p75NGFR was retarded, peaking at P15, whereas in hyperthyroid rats it was advanced, peaking at P8. The increased p75NGFR IR found in Purkinje cell bodies and the delayed disappearance of p75NGFR IR from the external granular layer of hypothyroid rats suggest different roles for thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum. We conclude that p75NGFR and NGF are independently regulated by thyroid hormone during critical periods of cerebellar development. The effect of thyroid hormone deficiency on p75NGFR content in Purkinje cells may involve complex mechanisms such as impaired efficiency of axonal transport.

  10. Swimming: Effects on Stress Urinary Incontinence and the Expression of Nerve Growth Factor in Rats Following Transabdominal Urethrolysis

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    Il Gyu Ko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeStress urinary incontinence (SUI commonly occurs in women, and it has an enormous impact on quality of life. Surgery, drugs, and exercise have been recommended for the treatment of this disease. Among these, exercise is known to be effective for the relief of symptoms of SUI; however, the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of the effect of exercise on SUI are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of swimming the symptom of SUI in relation to the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF in rats.MethodsTransabdominal urethrolysis was used to induce SUI, in Sprague-Dawley rats. The experimental groups were divided into the following three groups: sham-operation group, transabdominal urethrolysis-induced group, and transabdominal urethrolysis-induced and swimming group. The rats in the swimming group were forced to swim for 30 minutes once daily starting 2 weeks after SUI induction and continuing for 4 weeks. For this study, determination of abdominal leak point pressure and immunohistochemistry for NGF in the urethra and in the neuronal voiding centers (medial preoptic nucleus [MPA], ventrolateral periaqueductal gray [vlPAG], pontine micturition center [PMC], and spinal cord [L4-L5] were performed.ResultsTransabdominal urethrolysis significantly reduced the abdominal leak point pressure, thereby contributing to the induction of SUI. Abdominal leak point pressure, however, was significantly improved by swimming. The expression of NGF in the urethra and in the neuronal voiding centers (MPA, vlPAG, PMC, and L4-L5 relating to micturition was enhanced by the induction of SUI. Swimming, however, significantly suppressed SUI-induced NGF expression.ConclusionsSwimming alleviated symptoms of transabdominal urethrolysis-induced SUI, as assessed by an increase in abdominal leak point pressure. The underlying mechanisms of these effects of swimming might be ascribed to the inhibitory effect of swimming on NGF expression.

  11. QTL replication and targeted association highlight the nerve growth factor gene for nonverbal communication deficits in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, A T-H; Yoon, J; Geschwind, D H; Cantor, R M

    2013-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has a heterogeneous etiology that is genetically complex. It is defined by deficits in communication and social skills and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors. Genetic analyses of heritable quantitative traits that correlate with ASD may reduce heterogeneity. With this in mind, deficits in nonverbal communication (NVC) were quantified based on items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised. Our previous analysis of 228 families from the Autism Genetics Research Exchange (AGRE) repository reported 5 potential quantitative trait loci (QTL). Here we report an NVC QTL replication study in an independent sample of 213 AGRE families. One QTL was replicated (Panalysis of 476 haplotype blocks with 708 AGRE families using the Family Based Association Test (FBAT). Blocks in two QTL genes were associated with NVC with a P-value of 0.001. Three associated haplotype blocks were intronic to the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene (P=0.001, 0.001, 0.002), and one was intronic to KCND3 (P=0.001). Individual haplotypes within the associated blocks drove the associations (0.003, 0.0004 and 0.0002) for NGF and 0.0001 for KCND3. Using the same methods, these genes were tested for association with NVC in an independent sample of 1517 families from an Autism Genome Project (AGP). NVC was associated with a haplotype in an adjacent NGF block (P=0.0005) and one 46 kb away from the associated block in KCND3 (0.008). These analyses illustrate the value of QTL and targeted association studies for genetically complex disorders such as ASD. NGF is a promising risk gene for NVC deficits.

  12. Sulfur availability regulates plant growth via glucose-TOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yihan; Silbermann, Marleen; Speiser, Anna; Forieri, Ilaria; Linster, Eric; Poschet, Gernot; Allboje Samami, Arman; Wanatabe, Mutsumi; Sticht, Carsten; Teleman, Aurelio A; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2017-10-27

    Growth of eukaryotic cells is regulated by the target of rapamycin (TOR). The strongest activator of TOR in metazoa is amino acid availability. The established transducers of amino acid sensing to TOR in metazoa are absent in plants. Hence, a fundamental question is how amino acid sensing is achieved in photo-autotrophic organisms. Here we demonstrate that the plant Arabidopsis does not sense the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine itself, but its biosynthetic precursors. We identify the kinase GCN2 as a sensor of the carbon/nitrogen precursor availability, whereas limitation of the sulfur precursor is transduced to TOR by downregulation of glucose metabolism. The downregulated TOR activity caused decreased translation, lowered meristematic activity, and elevated autophagy. Our results uncover a plant-specific adaptation of TOR function. In concert with GCN2, TOR allows photo-autotrophic eukaryotes to coordinate the fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur for efficient cysteine biosynthesis under varying external nutrient supply.

  13. Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; McCann, Thomas E.; Unsworth, Edward; Goldsmith, Paul; Yu, Zu-Xi; Tan, Fei; Santiago, Lizzie; Mills, Edward M.; Wang, Yu; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains endow extracellular matrix proteoglycans with diversity and complexity based upon the length, composition, and charge distribution of the polysaccharide chain. Using cultured primary neurons, we show that specific sulfation in the GAG chains of chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediates neuronal guidance cues and axonal growth inhibition. Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS-A), but not chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS-C), exhibits a strong negative guidance cue to mouse cerebellar granule neurons. Enzymatic and gene-based manipulations of 4-sulfation in the GAG side chains alter their ability to direct growing axons. Furthermore, 4-sulfated CS GAG chains are rapidly and significantly increased in regions that do not support axonal regeneration proximal to spinal cord lesions in mice. Thus, our findings provide the evidence showing that specific sulfation along the carbohydrate backbone carries instructions to regulate neuronal function. PMID:18768934

  14. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  15. Differential responses of onion and garlic against plant growth regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oozunidou, G.; Asif, M.; Giannakuola, A.; Iliass, A.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Gibberellic acid-GA3, Prohexadione-Calcium, and Ethephon pre-harvest application on yield, biomass production, photosynthetic function, lipid peroxidation and quality characteristics of onion (Allium cepa L.) and garlic (Allium sativum L.) plants were investigated. Shoot length and biomass of onion and garlic, expressed either in fresh or dry weight, increased significantly under GA3, while a progressive decrease under Prohex-Ca and Ethephon occurred. Higher MDA (lipid peroxidation) values were recorded after Prohex-Ca and Ethephon supply on onion and garlic plants; it seems that GA3 treatment prevents lipid peroxidation as measured with the help of the TBARS method. Plants treated with Prohex-Ca and Ethephon revealed higher peroxidase activity compared to control and GA3 treated plants. Considering the results of MDA content and peroxidase activities it can be assumed that GA3 treated plants are slightly protected from the natural course of oxidative stress, which occurs during ageing as observed for control samples. The fluctuations of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters represent a general decline in chloroplasts function after plant growth regulators exposure, whereas in combination to the suppressed chlorophyll content, structural malformations of photo systems may also occur. The production of ascorbic acid, glucose and fructose content seems to be enhanced under GA3 in both species, while their values were depressed under Prohex-Ca and Ethephon. Overall, only GA3 supply leads to a vigorous onion and garlic growth and yield. (author)

  16. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Freeman, D. Carl; McArthur, E.D.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. ?? 2009 Landes Bioscience.

  17. Comparison of the Regenerative Effects of Platelet-Rich Fibrin and Plasma Rich in Growth Factors on Injured Peripheral Nerve: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torul, Damla; Bereket, Mehmet Cihan; Onger, Mehmet Emin; Altun, Gamze

    2018-04-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on peripheral nerve injury in the early period of healing. Thirty Wistar albino rats were used in this study. Rats were divided into control (C), damaged (D), PRF, and PRGF groups. The left sciatic nerves of each group were identified as group C. Crush-type injury was performed on the right sciatic nerves of the D, PRF, and PRGF groups. In the PRF and PRGF groups, blood 2 mL was obtained to prepare the PRF and PRGF and the biomaterials were applied to the injured nerve area. After 8 weeks, functional, electrophysiologic, and stereological evaluations were performed. For the electrophysiologic evaluation, the latency and amplitude values in the D, PRF, and PRGF groups were significantly lower than those in the C group (P > .05). According to the sciatic functional index result, there were significant differences between groups D and PRF and between groups D and PRGF (P = .000). For the stereological evaluations, although no significant difference was observed between the PRGF and C groups (P > .05), a significant difference was observed among the D, PRF, and PRGF groups for myelinated axon number. There were significant differences between groups D and PRF and between groups D and PRGF for axon area (P = .021 and .001, respectively). No significant difference was observed among the D, PRF, and PRGF groups for myelin sheath thickness and ratio of axon area to myelin sheath thickness (P > .05). The results of this study suggest that PRGF increases nerve regeneration in the early period of healing and that the limited early action of PRF should be re-evaluated in the late period. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of the central growth regulator BIG BROTHER is regulated by multiple cis-elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breuninger Holger

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the organismal variation we observe in nature is due to differences in organ size. The observation that even closely related species can show large, stably inherited differences in organ size indicates a strong genetic component to the control of organ size. Despite recent progress in identifying factors controlling organ growth in plants, our overall understanding of this process remains limited, partly because the individual factors have not yet been connected into larger regulatory pathways or networks. To begin addressing this aim, we have studied the upstream regulation of expression of BIG BROTHER (BB, a central growth-control gene in Arabidopsis thaliana that prevents overgrowth of organs. Final organ size and BB expression levels are tightly correlated, implying the need for precise control of its expression. BB expression mirrors proliferative activity, yet the gene functions to limit proliferation, suggesting that it acts in an incoherent feedforward loop downstream of growth activators to prevent over-proliferation. Results To investigate the upstream regulation of BB we combined a promoter deletion analysis with a phylogenetic footprinting approach. We were able to narrow down important, highly conserved, cis-regulatory elements within the BB promoter. Promoter sequences of other Brassicaceae species were able to partially complement the A. thaliana bb-1 mutant, suggesting that at least within the Brassicaceae family the regulatory pathways are conserved. Conclusions This work underlines the complexity involved in precise quantitative control of gene expression and lays the foundation for identifying important upstream regulators that determine BB expression levels and thus final organ size.

  19. Expressionof Drosophila FOXO regulates growth and can phenocopy starvation

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    Lockyer Joseph M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Components of theinsulin signaling pathway are important regulators of growth. TheFOXO (forkhead box, sub-group "O" transcriptionfactors regulate cellular processes under conditions of low levelsof insulin signaling. Studies in mammalian cell culture show thatactivation of FOXO transcription factors causes cell death or cellcycle arrest. The Caenorhabiditis elegans homologue ofFOXO, Daf-16, is required for the formation of dauer larvae in responseto nutritional stress. In addition, FOXO factors have been implicatedin stress resistance and longevity. Results We have identifiedthe Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FOXO (dFOXO,which is conserved in amino acid sequence compared with the mammalianFOXO homologues and Daf-16. Expression of dFOXO during early larvaldevelopment causes inhibition of larval growth and alterations infeeding behavior. Inhibition of larval growth is reversible upondiscontinuation of dFOXO expression. Expression of dFOXO duringthe third larval instar or at low levels during development leadsto the generation of adults that are reduced in size. Analysis ofthe wings and eyes of these small flies indicates that the reductionin size is due to decreases in cell size and cell number. Overexpressionof dFOXO in the developing eye leads to a characteristic phenotypewith reductions in cell size and cell number. This phenotype canbe rescued by co-expression of upstream insulin signaling components,dPI3K and dAkt, however, this rescue is not seen when FOXO is mutatedto a constitutively active form. Conclusions dFOXO is conservedin both sequence and regulatory mechanisms when compared with otherFOXO homologues. The establishment of Drosophila as a model forthe study of FOXO transcription factors should prove beneficialto determining the biological role of these signaling molecules.The alterations in larval development seen upon overexpression ofdFOXO closely mimic the phenotypic effects of starvation, suggestinga

  20. The fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO functions in the brain to regulate postnatal growth in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available FTO (fat mass and obesity associated was identified as an obesity-susceptibility gene by several independent large-scale genome association studies. A cluster of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism located in the first intron of FTO was found to be significantly associated with obesity-related traits, such as body mass index, hip circumference, and body weight. FTO encodes a protein with a novel C-terminal α-helical domain and an N-terminal double-strand β-helix domain which is conserved in Fe(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase family. In vitro, FTO protein can demethylate single-stranded DNA or RNA with a preference for 3-methylthymine or 3-methyluracil. Its physiological substrates and function, however, remain to be defined. Here we report the generation and analysis of mice carrying a conditional deletion allele of Fto. Our results demonstrate that Fto plays an essential role in postnatal growth. The mice lacking Fto completely display immediate postnatal growth retardation with shorter body length, lower body weight, and lower bone mineral density than control mice, but their body compositions are relatively normal. Consistent with the growth retardation, the Fto mutant mice have reduced serum levels of IGF-1. Moreover, despite the ubiquitous expression of Fto, its specific deletion in the nervous system results in similar phenotypes as the whole body deletion, indicating that Fto functions in the central nerve system to regulate postnatal growth.

  1. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  2. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines.In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug.These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  3. Matrix Rigidity Regulates Cancer Cell Growth and Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilghman, Robert W.; Cowan, Catharine R.; Mih, Justin D.; Koryakina, Yulia; Gioeli, Daniel; Slack-Davis, Jill K.; Blackman, Brett R.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Parsons, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness) of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: “rigidity dependent” (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased), and “rigidity independent” (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates). Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. Conclusions/Significance These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models. PMID:20886123

  4. Wnt5a regulates midbrain dopaminergic axon growth and guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brette D Blakely

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During development, precise temporal and spatial gradients are responsible for guiding axons to their appropriate targets. Within the developing ventral midbrain (VM the cues that guide dopaminergic (DA axons to their forebrain targets remain to be fully elucidated. Wnts are morphogens that have been identified as axon guidance molecules. Several Wnts are expressed in the VM where they regulate the birth of DA neurons. Here, we describe that a precise temporo-spatial expression of Wnt5a accompanies the development of nigrostriatal projections by VM DA neurons. In mice at E11.5, Wnt5a is expressed in the VM where it was found to promote DA neurite and axonal growth in VM primary cultures. By E14.5, when DA axons are approaching their striatal target, Wnt5a causes DA neurite retraction in primary cultures. Co-culture of VM explants with Wnt5a-overexpressing cell aggregates revealed that Wnt5a is capable of repelling DA neurites. Antagonism experiments revealed that the effects of Wnt5a are mediated by the Frizzled receptors and by the small GTPase, Rac1 (a component of the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity pathway. Moreover, the effects were specific as they could be blocked by Wnt5a antibody, sFRPs and RYK-Fc. The importance of Wnt5a in DA axon morphogenesis was further verified in Wnt5a-/- mice, where fasciculation of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB as well as the density of DA neurites in the MFB and striatal terminals were disrupted. Thus, our results identify a novel role of Wnt5a in DA axon growth and guidance.

  5. Effect of plant growth regulators on production of alpha-linolenic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sujana Kokkiligadda

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... MS received 13 October 2016; revised 22 March 2017; accepted 30 May 2017; ... Plant growth regulators; microalgae; Chlorella pyrenoidosa; alpha-linolenic acid. 1. ... the growth period by flocculation method [9] using alum.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a radioiodine labeled peptidomimetic ligand for high-affinity nerve growth factor receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K. H.; Kim, D. H.; Paik, J. Y.; Koh, B. H.; Bae, J. S.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Some of the obstacles for the clinical application of whole nerve growth factor (NGF) may be overcome by utilizing small molecule mimetics. We thus investigated the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a small cyclic peptide derived from NGF-[C(92-96)] with high receptor binding affinity. I-125 C(92-96) was labeled with the Bolton-Hunter method, and binding to TrkA/IgG chimeric protein was confirmed on a polyacrylamide gel after cross-linking. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in normal ICR mice intravenously injected with 0.5 MBq I-125 C(92-96) containing varying doses of C(92-96). Biodistribution studies were done at 6 h after injection. Cross-linkage analysis confirmed binding of I-125 C(92-96) to the high affinity NGF receptor, TrkA. Intravenously injected I-125 C(92-96) was cleared from the blood in a biexponential manner with an early T1/2{alpha} of 5.2 min and late T1/2{beta} of 121.3 min. Log blood-concentration decreased over time with a k-slope of 0.0025, clearance of 11.8{+-}0.5 ml/min, T1/2 of 4.1{+-}0.4 hr, and volume of distribution of 69.7{+-}4.6 ml. The pattern of elimination from the blood remained essentially unchanged regardless of the dose of added C(92-96), with dose-proportionate increases in AUCs and peak concentrations consistent with linear pharmacokinetics. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high kidney activity suggesting renal excretion of I-125 C(92-96). There were moderate levels of accumulation in the spleen, lungs and liver, followed by the myocardium and skeletal muscle, whereas brain uptake was low (< 0.2 %ID/gm). Intravenously administered C(92-96) follows linear pharmacokinetics, and is cleared from the circulation at a rate comparable to whole NGF despite its substantially smaller size. Although intravenous C(92-96) does not adequately reach brain tissue, clinically relevant doses can achieve major organ accumulation levels that may be sufficient to elicit biologic responses through NGF receptors.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a radioiodine labeled peptidomimetic ligand for high-affinity nerve growth factor receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, K. H.; Kim, D. H.; Paik, J. Y.; Koh, B. H.; Bae, J. S.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T.

    2005-01-01

    Some of the obstacles for the clinical application of whole nerve growth factor (NGF) may be overcome by utilizing small molecule mimetics. We thus investigated the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a small cyclic peptide derived from NGF-[C(92-96)] with high receptor binding affinity. I-125 C(92-96) was labeled with the Bolton-Hunter method, and binding to TrkA/IgG chimeric protein was confirmed on a polyacrylamide gel after cross-linking. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in normal ICR mice intravenously injected with 0.5 MBq I-125 C(92-96) containing varying doses of C(92-96). Biodistribution studies were done at 6 h after injection. Cross-linkage analysis confirmed binding of I-125 C(92-96) to the high affinity NGF receptor, TrkA. Intravenously injected I-125 C(92-96) was cleared from the blood in a biexponential manner with an early T1/2α of 5.2 min and late T1/2β of 121.3 min. Log blood-concentration decreased over time with a k-slope of 0.0025, clearance of 11.8±0.5 ml/min, T1/2 of 4.1±0.4 hr, and volume of distribution of 69.7±4.6 ml. The pattern of elimination from the blood remained essentially unchanged regardless of the dose of added C(92-96), with dose-proportionate increases in AUCs and peak concentrations consistent with linear pharmacokinetics. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high kidney activity suggesting renal excretion of I-125 C(92-96). There were moderate levels of accumulation in the spleen, lungs and liver, followed by the myocardium and skeletal muscle, whereas brain uptake was low (< 0.2 %ID/gm). Intravenously administered C(92-96) follows linear pharmacokinetics, and is cleared from the circulation at a rate comparable to whole NGF despite its substantially smaller size. Although intravenous C(92-96) does not adequately reach brain tissue, clinically relevant doses can achieve major organ accumulation levels that may be sufficient to elicit biologic responses through NGF receptors

  8. Thyroid hormone modulates the development of cholinergic terminal fields in the rat forebrain: relation to nerve growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J D; Butcher, L L; Woolf, N J

    1991-04-24

    Hyperthyroidism, induced in rat pups by the daily intraperitoneal administration of 1 microgram/g body weight triiodothyronine, facilitated the development of ChAT fiber plexuses in brain regions innervated by basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, leading to an earlier and increased expression of cholinergic markers in those fibers in the cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. A similar enhancement was seen in the caudate-putamen complex. This histochemical profile was correlated with an accelerated appearance of ChAT-positive telencephalic puncta, as well as with a larger total number of cholinergic terminals expressed, which persisted throughout the eight postnatal week, the longest time examined in the present study. Hypothyroidism was produced in rat pups by adding 0.5% propylthiouracil to the dams' diet beginning the day after birth. This dietary manipulation resulted in the diminished expression of ChAT in forebrain fibers and terminals. Hypothyroid treatment also reduced the quantity of ChAT puncta present during postnatal weeks 2 and 3, and, from week 4 and continuing through week 6, the number of ChAT-positive terminals in the telencephalic regions examined was actually less than the amount extant during the former developmental epoch. Immunostaining for nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R), which is associated almost exclusively with ChAT-positive somata and fibers in the basal forebrain, demonstrated a different time course of postnatal development. Forebrain fibers and terminals demonstrating NGF-R were maximally visualized 1 week postnatally, a time at which these same neuronal elements evinced minimal ChAT-like immunopositivity. Thereafter and correlated with increased immunoreactivity for ChAT, fine details of NGF-R stained fibers were observed less frequently. Although propylthiouracil administration decreased NGF-R immunodensity, no alteration in the development of that receptor was observed as a function of triiodothyronine treatment. Cholinergic

  9. Nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein: studies of a central and peripheral neuronal marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salton, S R; Richter-Landsberg, C; Greene, L A; Shelanski, M L

    1983-03-01

    The PC12 clone of pheochromocytoma cells undergoes neuronal differentiation in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Concomitant with this is a significant induction in the incorporation of radiolabeled fucose or glucosamine into a 230,000-dalton cell surface glycoprotein named the NGF-Inducible Large External, or NILE, glycoprotein (GP) (McGuire, J. C., L. A. Greene, and A. V. Furano (1978) Cell 15: 357-365). In the current studies NILE GP was purified from PC12 cells using wheat germ agglutinin-agarose affinity chromatography and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Polyclonal antisera were raised against purified NILE GP and were found to selectively immunoprecipitate a single 230,000-dalton protein from detergent extracts of PC12 cells metabolically labeled with either [3H]fucose, [3H]glucosamine, or [35S]methionine. These antisera stained the surfaces of PC12 cells by indirect immunofluorescence and were cytotoxic to PC12 cells in the presence of complement. Limited treatment of PC12 cells with either trypsin or pronase produced a fucosylated 90,000-dalton immunoreactive fragment of NILE GP which remained in the membrane. Using quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, the action of NGF on NILE GP was represent an increase in the amount of protein, rather than a selective increase in carbohydrate incorporation. Immunofluorescent staining of primary cell cultures and tissue whole mounts revealed that immunologically cross-reactive NILE GP appears to be expressed on the cell surfaces (somas and neurites) of most if not all peripheral and central neurons examined. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled cultures showed that the cross-reactive material had an apparent molecular weight by SDS-PAGE of 225,000 to 230,000 in the peripheral nervous system and 200,000 to 210,000 in the central nervous system. NILE-cross-reactive material was also found to a small extent on Schwann cell surfaces, but not at all on a variety of other cell types. These results suggest

  10. Sustained Local Release of NGF from a Chitosan-Sericin Composite Scaffold for Treating Chronic Nerve Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Wen; Tao, Kaixiong; Song, Yu; Xie, Hongjian; Wang, Jian; Li, Xiaolin; Shuai, Xiaoming; Gao, Jinbo; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC), a common form of peripheral nerve injury, always leads to chronic peripheral nerve pain and dysfunction. Current available treatments for CNC are ineffective as they usually aim to alleviate symptoms at the acute phase with limited capability toward restoring injured nerve function. New approaches for effective recovery of CNC injury are highly desired. Here we report for the first time a tissue-engineered approach for the repair of CNC. A genipin cross-linked chitosan-sericin 3D scaffold for delivering nerve growth factor (NGF) was designed and fabricated. This scaffold combines the advantages of both chitosan and sericin, such as high porosity, adjustable mechanical properties and swelling ratios, the ability of supporting Schwann cells growth, and improving nerve regeneration. The degradation products of the composite scaffold upregulate the mRNA levels of the genes important for facilitating nerve function recovery, including glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), early growth response 2 (EGR2), and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in Schwann cells, while down-regulating two inflammatory genes' mRNA levels in macrophages, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Importantly, our tissue-engineered strategy achieves significant nerve functional recovery in a preclinical CNC animal model by decreasing neuralgia, improving nerve conduction velocity (NCV), accelerating microstructure restoration, and attenuating gastrocnemius muscles dystrophy. Together, this work suggests a promising clinical alternative for treating chronic peripheral nerve compression injury.

  11. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins 1/2 localize to dorsal root ganglia and excitatory spinal neurons and are regulated by nerve injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ming Dong; Tortoriello, Giuseppe; Hsueh, Brian

    2014-01-01

    , and nerve injury-induced regulation of NECAB1/NECAB2 in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord. In DRGs, NECAB1/2 are expressed in around 70% of mainly small- and medium-sized neurons. Many colocalize with calcitonin gene-related peptide and isolectin B4, and thus represent nociceptors. NECAB1....../2 neurons are much more abundant in DRGs than the Ca2+-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and secretagogin) studied to date. In the spinal cord, the NECAB1/2 distribution is mainly complementary. NECAB1 labels interneurons and a plexus of processes in superficial layers of the dorsal horn....... In the dorsal horn, most NECAB1/2 neurons are glutamatergic. Both NECAB1/2 are transported into dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerve injury reduces NECAB2, but not NECAB1, expression in DRG neurons. Our study identifies NECAB1/2 as abundant Ca2+-binding proteins in pain-related DRG neurons...

  12. Serum cytokines, T lymphocyte subsets and STAT3 function in patients with herpes zoster as well as the intervention effect of mouse nerve growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the levels of serum cytokines, T lymphocyte subsets and STAT3 in patients with herpes zoster as well as the intervention effect of mouse nerve growth factor. Methods: A total of 102 patients with herpes zoster were selected as observation group and received mouse nerve growth factor intervention, and 100 cases of normal people who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period as the healthy control group. The levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines, IgG subclass and complements and T lymphocyte subsets as well as STAT3 function of observation group before and after treatment and healthy control group were detected. Results: Serum IL-2 and γ-IFN levels of observation group after treatment were higher than those before treatment while IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and TNF-α毩 levels were lower than those before treatment (P<0.05; serum IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, C3 and C4 values of observation group after treatment were higher than those before treatment while IgG2 value was lower than that before treatment (P<0.05; CD3, CD4 and CD4/CD8 levels of observation group after treatment were higher than those before treatment while CD8 level was lower than that before treatment (P<0.05; STAT3, p-STAT3 and JAK2 expression levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those before treatment (P<0.05. Conclusions: There are abnormal immune system and STAT3 signaling pathway function in patients with herpes zoster, and mouse nerve growth factor intervention can restore multisystem balance and accelerate disease rehabilitation, and has positive clinical significance.

  13. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and platelet-rich plasma on sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel, Erhan; Ergün, Selma Sönmez; Kotan, Dilcan; Gürsoy, Esra Başar; Parman, Yeşim; Zengin, Asli; Nurten, Asiye

    2011-02-01

    Local administration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been shown to increase the rate of axon regeneration in crush-injured and freeze-injured rat sciatic nerves. Local administration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been also shown to have a measurable effect on facial nerve regeneration after transection in a rat model. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of locally administered IGF-I and PRP on the parameters of the Sciatic Function Index (SFI), sensory function (SF), axon count, and myelin thickness/axon diameter ratio (G-ratio) in a rat model of crush-injured sciatic nerves. The right sciatic nerve of Wistar albino rats (24 animals) was crushed using a Yasargil-Phynox aneurysm clip for 45 minutes. All animals were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (control group) was treated with saline, Group 2 was treated with IGF-I, and Group 3 was treated with PRP. Injections were performed using the tissue expander's injection port with a connecting tube directed at the crush-injured site. Functional recovery was assessed with improvement in the SFI. Recovery of sensory function was using the pinch test. Histopathological examination was performed 3 months after the injury. The SFI showed an improved functional recovery in the IGF-I-treated animals (Group 2) compared with the saline-treated animals (Group 1) 30 days after the injury. In IGF-I-treated rats, sensory function returned to the baseline level significantly faster than in saline-treated and PRP-treated rats as shown in values between SF-2 and SF-7. The G-ratios were found to be significantly higher in both experimental groups than in the control group. This study suggests that the application of IGF-I to the crush-injured site may expedite the functional recovery of paralyzed muscle by increasing the rate of axon regeneration.

  14. Regulation of chick bone growth by leptin and catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, L J; Wenzel, S J; Sindberg, G M

    2010-04-01

    neurotransmitters may facilitate this by promoting chondrocyte maturation. These studies represent novel evidence suggesting a role of sympathetic tone in the regulation of skeletal growth in avian species.

  15. the role of plant growth regulators in morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mujib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Althaea officinalis L. (marshmallow belonging to the Malvaceae family, is an important plant that contains a variety of important phytocompounds including asparagine, pectin, flavonoids, polyphenolic acid, and scopoletin. The yield of these compounds can be improved using biotechnological methods that allow for a steady and continuous regeneration of plant material. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, the In vitro clonal multiplication of marshmallow has not been attempted on a large scale. Therefore, in this study, we developed callus induction and multiple shoot regeneration protocols from explants. All the explants, i.e., roots, nodes, and leaves, evoked compact white or yellow calli in a medium supplemented with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, which grew vigorously. The callus induction frequency was the highest (62.1% from stem nodes, followed by leaves (39.1% and roots (27.5%. The differential behavior of explants in response to various plant growth regulators (PGRs was studied. The calli from leaves and roots were noted to be non-organogenic/embryogenic in media containing different PGR concentrations and have been described in this communication. The stem nodes used were cultured on MS media amended with different concentrations of benzyl-amino-purine (BAP: 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/l. Multiple shoots were formed at variable numbers, the maximum being in a medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l of BAP. The induced shoots were rooted in IBA-, NAA-, and IAA-amended media, where IBA at 0.5 mg/l induced a maximum number of roots (8.8 roots/shoot. The regenerated plants were transferred to plastic pots, filled with soilrite and soil (1 : 1, and finally, transferred to outdoor conditions.

  16. Vegetative growth response of cotton plants due to growth regulator supply via seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vitor Ferrari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The global cotton industry is distinguished by its numerous industrial uses of the plume as well as by high production costs. Excessive vegetative growth can interfere negatively with productivity, and thus, applying growth regulators is essential for the development of the cotton culture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the development and yield of the cotton cultivar FMT 701 with the application of mepiquat chloride to seeds and leaves. The experimental design used a randomized block design with four replications, arranged in bands.The treatments consisted of mepiquat chloride rates (MC (0, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g a.i. kg-1 of seeds applied directly to the cotton seeds and MC management by foliar spray using a 250 mL ha-1 rates that was administered under the following conditions: divided into four applications (35, 45, 55 and 65 days after emergence; as a single application at 70 days; and without the application of the product. The mepiquat chloride applied to cotton seeds controls the initial plant height and stem diameter, while foliar application reduces the height of the plants. After application to seed, foliar spraying MC promotes increase mass of 20 bolls, however no direct influence amount bolls per plant and yield of cotton seed. Higher cotton seed yield was obtained with a rate of 3.4 g a.i. MC kg-1 seeds.

  17. Effects of growth regulator herbicide on downy brome (Bromus tectorum) seed production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research showed growth regulator herbicides, such as picloram and aminopyralid, have a sterilizing effect on Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Thunb.) that can reduce this invasive annual grass’s seed production nearly 100%. This suggests growth regulators might be used to control invasive ...

  18. Effects of plant growth regulators on callus, shoot and root formation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root and stem explants of fluted pumpkin were cultured in medium containing different types and concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGRs). The explants were observed for callus, root and shoot formation parameters after four months. Differences among explants, plant growth regulators and their interaction were ...

  19. A Comparison Study of Growth Factor Expression following Treatment with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Saline Solution, Povidone-Iodine, and Lavender Oil in Wounds Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Koca Kutlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, saline solution (SS, povidone-iodine (PI, and lavender oil (Lavandula angustifolia through expression of growth factors in a rat model of wound healing. Six experimental groups were established, each containing 8 rats: a healthy group with no incision wounds, an incision-control group, an incision and TENS group, an incision and SS group, an incision and PI group, and an incision and lavender oil group. Experiments continued for 5 days, after which the skin in the excision area was removed. Tissue concentrations of epidermal growth factor (EGF and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-A were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Tissue expressions of EGF, PDGF-A, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 were determined using immunohistochemistry. Wound closure progressed more rapidly in the TENS and lavender oil groups than in the control and other study groups. In particular, PDGF-A expressions in the dermis and EGF expression in the epidermis were significantly intense in the TENS group (P<0.05. In addition, ELISA levels of growth factors such as PDGF-A and EGF were significantly higher in TENS group compared to the control group (P<0.05. These immunohistochemical and ELISA results suggest that TENS may improve wound healing through increasing growth factors in the dermis and epidermis more than other topical applications.

  20. The effect of some growth regulators on enzyme systems in irradiated barley grain using disinfestation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, S.

    1973-01-01

    Disinfestation doses of 20 to 100 krad may cause changes in the biological systems of barley grain and, therefore, may influence undesirably the technological quality of malted grain. The effect of some growth regulators on irradiated grain has been investigated. The experiments have been carried out on brewery barley var. Visa Breuns. Following growth-regulators were used: gibberellic acid (Polish preparation ''Gibrescol''), kinetin (6-furfurylo-aminopurin), CCC (2-chloroethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), and betaine hydrochloride. By treating the irradiated barley with solutions of growth regulators it was possible to diminish the loss of enzyme activity. A ''regenerating'' effect of growth substances, mainly gibberellic acid and betain hydrochloride in 10 -4 M solutions, was observed. Amylolytic activity decreased immediately after irradiation but in samples treated with growth regulators it was higher than in those without regulators. The results may have a practical importance since gibberellic acid has just been introduced into the brewery industry. (F.J.)

  1. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity

  2. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  3. PCP and SAX-3/Robo Pathways Cooperate to Regulate Convergent Extension-Based Nerve Cord Assembly in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pavak K; Tanner, Matthew R; Kovacevic, Ismar; Rankin, Aysha; Marshall, Teagan E; Noblett, Nathaniel; Tran, Nhan Nguyen; Roenspies, Tony; Hung, Jeffrey; Chen, Zheqian; Slatculescu, Cristina; Perkins, Theodore J; Bao, Zhirong; Colavita, Antonio

    2017-04-24

    Formation and resolution of multicellular rosettes can drive convergent extension (CE) type cell rearrangements during tissue morphogenesis. Rosette dynamics are regulated by both planar cell polarity (PCP)-dependent and -independent pathways. Here we show that CE is involved in ventral nerve cord (VNC) assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that a VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle containing PCP pathway and a Slit-independent SAX-3/Robo pathway cooperate to regulate, via rosette intermediaries, the intercalation of post-mitotic neuronal cell bodies during VNC formation. We show that VANG-1 and SAX-3 are localized to contracting edges and rosette foci and act to specify edge contraction during rosette formation and to mediate timely rosette resolution. Simultaneous loss of both pathways severely curtails CE resulting in a shortened, anteriorly displaced distribution of VNC neurons at hatching. Our results establish rosette-based CE as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of nerve cord morphogenesis and reveal a role for SAX-3/Robo in this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  5. Connective tissue growth factor regulates fibrosis-associated renal lymphangiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinashi, Hiroshi; Falke, Lucas L.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Bovenschen, Niels; Aten, Jan; Leask, Andrew; Ito, Yasuhiko; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2017-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is correlated with the degree of renal interstitial fibrosis. Pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta induces VEGF-C production, the main driver of lymphangiogenesis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important determinant of fibrotic tissue remodeling, but its

  6. Connective tissue growth factor regulates fibrosis-associated renal lymphangiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinashi, Hiroshi; Falke, Lucas L.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Bovenschen, Niels; Aten, Jan; Leask, Andrew; Ito, Yasuhiko; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2017-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is correlated with the degree of renal interstitial fibrosis. Pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor β induces VEGF-C production, the main driver of lymphangiogenesis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important determinant of fibrotic tissue remodeling, but its

  7. The kinesin-3 family motor KLP-4 regulates anterograde trafficking of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Michael I; Ahlawat, Shikha; Kowalski, Jennifer R; Malkin, Emily; Koushika, Sandhya P; Juo, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The transport of glutamate receptors from the cell body to synapses is essential during neuronal development and may contribute to the regulation of synaptic strength in the mature nervous system. We previously showed that cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK-5) positively regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we identify a kinesin-3 family motor klp-4/KIF13 in a cdk-5 suppressor screen for genes that regulate GLR-1 trafficking. klp-4 mutants have decreased abundance of GLR-1 in the VNC. Genetic analysis of klp-4 and the clathrin adaptin unc-11/AP180 suggests that klp-4 functions before endocytosis in the ventral cord. Time-lapse microscopy indicates that klp-4 mutants exhibit decreased anterograde flux of GLR-1. Genetic analysis of cdk-5 and klp-4 suggests that they function in the same pathway to regulate GLR-1 in the VNC. Interestingly, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of cdk-5 but not klp-4 mutants. However, GLR-1 does accumulate in klp-4-mutant cell bodies if receptor degradation in the multivesicular body/lysosome pathway is blocked. This study identifies kinesin KLP-4 as a novel regulator of anterograde glutamate receptor trafficking and reveals a cellular control mechanism by which receptor cargo is targeted for degradation in the absence of its motor.

  8. Impaired autonomic regulation of resistance arteries in mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor or upon vascular endothelial growth factor trap delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkebaum, Erik; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Meens, Merlijn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Control of peripheral resistance arteries by autonomic nerves is essential for the regulation of blood flow. The signals responsible for the maintenance of vascular neuroeffector mechanisms in the adult, however, remain largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we report that VEGF( ...

  9. Growth rate regulated genes and their wide involvement in the Lactococcus lactis stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redon Emma

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of transcriptomic tools has allowed exhaustive description of stress responses. These responses always superimpose a general response associated to growth rate decrease and a specific one corresponding to the stress. The exclusive growth rate response can be achieved through chemostat cultivation, enabling all parameters to remain constant except the growth rate. Results We analysed metabolic and transcriptomic responses of Lactococcus lactis in continuous cultures at different growth rates ranging from 0.09 to 0.47 h-1. Growth rate was conditioned by isoleucine supply. Although carbon metabolism was constant and homolactic, a widespread transcriptomic response involving 30% of the genome was observed. The expression of genes encoding physiological functions associated with biogenesis increased with growth rate (transcription, translation, fatty acid and phospholipids metabolism. Many phages, prophages and transposon related genes were down regulated as growth rate increased. The growth rate response was compared to carbon and amino-acid starvation transcriptomic responses, revealing constant and significant involvement of growth rate regulations in these two stressful conditions (overlap 27%. Two regulators potentially involved in the growth rate regulations, llrE and yabB, have been identified. Moreover it was established that genes positively regulated by growth rate are preferentially located in the vicinity of replication origin while those negatively regulated are mainly encountered at the opposite, thus indicating the relationship between genes expression and their location on chromosome. Although stringent response mechanism is considered as the one governing growth deceleration in bacteria, the rigorous comparison of the two transcriptomic responses clearly indicated the mechanisms are distinct. Conclusion This work of integrative biology was performed at the global level using transcriptomic analysis

  10. In vitro and in vivo gene therapy with CMV vector-mediated presumed dog beta-nerve growth factor in pyridoxine-induced neuropathy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Shin, Il Seob; Choi, Eun Wha; Hwang, Cheol Yong; Lee, Sang Koo; Youn, Hwa Young

    2008-12-01

    Due to the therapeutic potential of gene therapy for neuronal injury, many studies of neurotrophic factors, vectors, and animal models have been performed. The presumed dog beta-nerve growth factor (pdbeta-NGF) was generated and cloned and its expression was confirmed in CHO cells. The recombinant pdbeta-NGF protein reacted with a human beta-NGF antibody and showed bioactivity in PC12 cells. The pdbeta-NGF was shown to have similar bioactivity to the dog beta-NGF. The recombinant pdbeta-NGF plasmid was administrated into the intrathecal space in the gene therapy group. Twenty-four hours after the vector inoculation, the gene therapy group and the positive control group were intoxicated with excess pyridoxine for seven days. Each morning throughout the test period, the dogs' body weight was taken and postural reaction assessments were made. Electrophysiological recordings were performed twice, once before the experiment and once after the test period. After the experimental period, histological analysis was performed. Dogs in the gene therapy group had no weight change and were normal in postural reaction assessments. Electrophysiological recordings were also normal for the gene therapy group. Histological analysis showed that neither the axons nor the myelin of the dorsal funiculus of L4 were severely damaged in the gene therapy group. In addition, the dorsal root ganglia of L4 and the peripheral nerves (sciatic nerve) did not experience severe degenerative changes in the gene therapy group. This study is the first to show the protective effect of NGF gene therapy in a dog model.

  11. Warts signaling controls organ and body growth through regulation of ecdysone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Erik; Nagy, Stanislav; Gerlach, Stephan Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of growth between individual organs and the whole body is essential during development to produce adults with appropriate size and proportions [1, 2]. How local organ-intrinsic signals and nutrient-dependent systemic factors are integrated to generate correctly proportioned organisms...... under different environmental conditions is poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hippo/Warts signaling functions intrinsically to regulate tissue growth and organ size [3, 4], whereas systemic growth is controlled via antagonistic interactions of the steroid hormone ecdysone and nutrient-dependent insulin....../insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (insulin) signaling [2, 5]. The interplay between insulin and ecdysone signaling regulates systemic growth and controls organismal size. Here, we show that Warts (Wts; LATS1/2) signaling regulates systemic growth in Drosophila by activating basal ecdysone production, which negatively...

  12. MicroRNA-381 Favors Repair of Nerve Injury Through Regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Pathway via LRRC4 in Acute Cerebral Ischemia after Cerebral Lymphatic Blockage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Min Piao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute cerebral ischemia is a manifestation of cerebral vascular insufficiency and has a high mortality. However, the therapy for acute cerebral ischemia is still limited. This study aimed to investigate the effect of microRNA-381 (miR-381 on the repair of nerve injury in rats with acute cerebral ischemia after cerebral lymphatic blockage (CLB by targeting leucine-rich repeat C4 protein (LRRC4 through the Stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXC chemokine receptor-4 signaling pathway. Methods: Rat models of CLB and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO were established, and 56 Wistar rats were divided into sham, MCAO, CLB + MCAO, CLB + MCAO + miR-381 inhibitor, CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic, CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 and CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic + AMD3100 groups. Modified neurological severity score (mNSS was used to determine nerve injury, TTC staining to measure infarction volume, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL staining and flow cytometry to evaluate cell apoptosis, immunofluorescence to measure BrdU-positive cell number, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to determine contents of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-10 (IL-10, nerve growth factor (NGF and neurite outgrowth inhibitor -A (Nogo-A, Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and Western blotting to evaluate expression of miR-381, LRRC4, SDF-1, CXCR4, pERK, Slit2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Results: LRRC4 was a target gene of miR-381. Compared with the results in the CLB + MCAO group, mNSS, infarction volume, apoptosis rate and TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and Nogo-A contents as well as LRRC4 expression in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 inhibitor and CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 groups were increased (those in the CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 group > those in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic + AMD3100 group, while BrdU-positive cell number, contents of NGF and

  13. Tetracycline-regulated expression of OLIG2 gene in human dental pulp stem cells lead to mouse sciatic nerve regeneration upon transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, N; Yaghoobi, M M; Shamsara, M; Esmaeili-Mahani, S

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) potency to differentiate into several types of cell lineages. Oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) plays an important role in the oligodendrogenic pathway. In this study, a tetracycline (Tet)-inducible system expressing OLIG2 gene was transfected into human DPSCs to direct their differentiation toward oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Following induction, the expression of stage-specific markers was studied by Reverse Transcription quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry and western blotting. In the following, the cells were transplanted into the mouse model of local sciatic demyelination damage by lysolecithin. Recovery of lysolecithin-induced lesions in sciatic nerve was studied by treadmill exercise, von Frey filament test and hind paw withdrawal in response to a thermal stimulus. Improvement of behavioral symptoms was efficiently observed from the second week to the sixth week post-transplantation. Our findings showed that exogenous expression of the OLIG2 gene by a Tet-regulated system could be used as an efficient way to induce the differentiation of DPSCs into functional oligodendrocytes. Meanwhile, the DPSC-derived OPCs have relevant therapeutic potential in the animal model of sciatic nerve injury and therefore might represent a valuable tool for stem cell-based therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the peripheral and central nervous systems (CNSs). Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lysine-doped polypyrrole/spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic) acid containing nerve growth factor composite fibers for neural application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Kefeng; Xing, Yiming; Yu, Qiaozhen

    2015-11-01

    Lysine-doped polypyrrole (PPy)/regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly(l-lactic) acid (PLLA)/nerve growth factor (NGF) (L-PRPN) composite scaffold was fabricated by co-axial electrospraying and electrospinning. This L-PRPN composite scaffold had a structure of microfibers with a core-shell structure as the stems and nanofibers as branches. Assessment in vitro demonstrated that the L-PRPN composite micro/nano-fibrous scaffold could maintain integrated structure for at least 4months and the pH value of PBS at about 7.28. It had good biocompatibility and cell adhesion and relatively stable conductivity. PC 12 cells cultured on this scaffold, anisotropic cell-neurite-cell-neurite or neurite-neurite sheets were formed after being cultured for 6days. Evaluations in vivo also showed that L-PRPN composite fibrous conduit was effective at bridging 2.0cm sciatic nerve gap in adult rat within 10months. This conduit and electrical stimulation (ES) through it promoted Schwann cell migration and axonal regrowth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  16. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  17. Diet-Induced Growth Is Regulated via Acquired Leptin Resistance and Engages a Pomc-Somatostatin-Growth Hormone Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Löhr

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc/alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH neurons of the hypothalamic melanocortin system function as key regulators of energy homeostasis, also controlling somatic growth across different species. However, the mechanisms of melanocortin-dependent growth control still remain ill-defined. Here, we reveal a thus-far-unrecognized structural and functional connection between Pomc neurons and the somatotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Excessive feeding of larval zebrafish causes leptin resistance and reduced levels of the hypothalamic satiety mediator pomca. In turn, this leads to reduced activation of hypophysiotropic somatostatin (Sst-neurons that express the melanocortin receptor Mc4r, elevated growth hormone (GH expression in the pituitary, and enhanced somatic growth. Mc4r expression and αMSH responsiveness are conserved in Sst-expressing hypothalamic neurons of mice. Thus, acquired leptin resistance and attenuation of pomca transcription in response to excessive caloric intake may represent an ancient mechanism to promote somatic growth when food resources are plentiful. : The melanocortin system controls energy homeostasis and somatic growth, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Löhr et al. identify a functional neural circuit in which Pomc neurons stimulate hypothalamic somatostatin neurons, thereby inhibiting hypophyseal growth hormone production. Excessive feeding and acquired leptin resistance attenuate this pathway, allowing faster somatic growth when food resources are rich. Keywords: Pomc neuron, somatostatin neuron, somatic growth, growth hormone, melanocortin system, high-fat diet, obesity, leptin resistance, zebrafish, mouse

  18. Methods for growth regulation of greenhouse produced ornamental pot- and bedding plants – a current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrand Karl-Johan I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical plant growth regulators (PGRs are used in the production of ornamental potted and bedding plants. Growth control is needed for maximizing production per unit area, reducing transportation costs and to obtain a desired visual quality. However, the use of PGRs is associated with toxicity risks to humans and the environment. In many countries the availability of PGRs is restricted as few substances are registered for use. A number of alternative methods have been suggested. The methods include genetic methods (breeding and crop cultivation practices such as fertigation, temperature and light management. A lot of research into “alternative” growth regulation was performed during the 1980-1990s, revealing several possible ways of using different climatic factors to optimize plant growth with respect to plant height. In recent years, the interest in climatic growth regulation has been resurrected, not least due to the coming phase-out of the plant growth regulator chlormequat chloride (CCC. Today, authorities in many countries are aiming towards reducing the use of agrochemicals. At the same time, there is a strong demand from consumers for products produced without chemicals. This article provides a broad overview of available methods for non-chemical growth control. It is concluded that a combination of plant breeding and management of temperature, fertigation and light management has the potential of replacing chemical growth regulators in the commercial production of ornamental pot- and bedding plants.

  19. AMPK regulation of the growth of cultured human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Asish K.; Persons, Kelly; Safer, Joshua D.; Luo Zhijun; Holick, Michael F.; Ruderman, Neil B.

    2006-01-01

    AMP kinase (AMPK) is a fuel sensing enzyme that responds to cellular energy depletion by increasing processes that generate ATP and inhibiting others that require ATP but are not acutely necessary for survival. In the present study, we examined the relationship between AMPK activation and the growth (proliferation) of cultured human keratinocytes and assessed whether the inhibition of keratinocyte growth by vitamin D involves AMPK activation. In addition, we explored whether the inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation as they approach confluence could be AMPK-related. Keratinocytes were incubated for 12 h with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). At concentrations of 10 -4 and 10 -3 M, AICAR inhibited keratinocyte growth by 50% and 95%, respectively, based on measurements of thymidine incorporation into DNA. It also increased AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase phosphorylation (P-AMPK and P-ACC) and decreased the concentration of malonyl CoA confirming that AMPK activation had occurred. Incubation with the thiazolidinedione, troglitazone (10 -6 M) caused similar alterations in P-AMPK, P-ACC, and cell growth. In contrast, the well known inhibition of keratinocyte growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (10 -7 and 10 -6 M) was not associated with changes in P-AMPK or P-ACC. Like most cells, the growth of keratinocytes diminished as they approached confluence. Thus, it was of note that we found a progressive increase in P-AMPK (1.5- to 2-fold, p 3 is AMPK-independent

  20. Information Integration and Communication in Plant Growth Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwanon, Juthamas; Wang, Wenfei; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-03-10

    Plants are equipped with the capacity to respond to a large number of diverse signals, both internal ones and those emanating from the environment, that are critical to their survival and adaption as sessile organisms. These signals need to be integrated through highly structured intracellular networks to ensure coherent cellular responses, and in addition, spatiotemporal actions of hormones and peptides both orchestrate local cell differentiation and coordinate growth and physiology over long distances. Further, signal interactions and signaling outputs vary significantly with developmental context. This review discusses our current understanding of the integrated intracellular and intercellular signaling networks that control plant growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anisotropic cell growth-regulated surface micropatterns in flower petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flower petals have not only diverse macroscopic morphologies but are rich in microscopic surface patterns, which are crucial to their biological functions. Both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the physical mechanisms underlying the formation of minute wrinkles on flower petals. Three representative flowers, daisy, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Eustoma grandiflorum, are investigated as examples. A surface wrinkling model, incorporating the measured mechanical properties and growth ratio, is used to elucidate the difference in their surface morphologies. The mismatch between the anisotropic epidermal cell growth and the isotropic secretion of surficial wax is found to dictate the surface patterns.

  2. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  3. Cellular growth in plants requires regulation of cell wall biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2017-02-01

    Cell and organ morphogenesis in plants are regulated by the chemical structure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, the cell wall. The two primary load bearing components in the plant cell wall, the pectin matrix and the cellulose/xyloglucan network, are constantly remodelled to generate the morphological changes required during plant development. This remodelling is regulated by a plethora of loosening and stiffening agents such as pectin methyl-esterases, calcium ions, expansins, and glucanases. The tight spatio-temporal regulation of the activities of these agents is a sine qua non condition for proper morphogenesis at cell and tissue levels. The pectin matrix and the cellulose-xyloglucan network operate in concert and their behaviour is mutually dependent on their chemical, structural and mechanical modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Yadav

    Full Text Available The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it's evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters-environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope, an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have

  5. Institutions and Regulation for Economic Growth ? : public interests versus public incentives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Realizing institutions and regulations that foster economic growth is an essential asset for contemporary economies. This book investigates practices and options for steering individual and firm behaviour that prevents unacceptable externalities and boosts public interests. These multi-dimensional

  6. HemoHIM improves ovarian morphology and decreases expression of nerve growth factor in rats with steroid-induced polycystic ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Bae, Chun Sik; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    Estradiol valerate (EV)-induced polycystic ovaries (PCOs) in rats cause the anovulation and cystic ovarian morphology. We investigated whether treatment with HemoHIM influences the ovarian morphology and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in an EV-induced PCO rat model. PCO was induced by a single intramuscular injection of EV (4 mg, dissolved in sesame oil) in adult cycling rats. HemoHIM was either administered orally (100 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 35 consecutive days or injected intraperitoneally (50 mg/kg of body weight) every other day after EV injection. Ovarian morphology was almost normalized, and NGF was normalized in the PCO + HemoHIM group. HemoHIM lowered the high numbers of antral follicles and increased the number of corpora lutea in PCOs. The results are consistent with a beneficial effect of HemoHIM in the prevention and treatment of PCO syndrome.

  7. Influence of nerve growth factor on developing dorso-medial and ventro-lateral neurons of chick and mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Lumsden, A

    1983-01-01

    Trigeminal ganglia have been removed from five, six, seven and eight day chick embryos and explants of the dorso-medial (DM) and ventro-lateral (VL) parts of the maxillomandibular lobe were grown in tissue culture. Quantitative methods were used to assess the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) on fiber outgrowth from these explants. At all ages outgrowth from DM explants was significantly greater than from VL explants, the difference being most pronounced between the extreme DM and VL poles of the maxillomandibular lobe. These observations are interpreted as indicating the existence of two distinct populations of neurons in terms of their response to NGF rather than the consequence of the asynchronous differentiation and maturation of the VL and DM neurons. A similar study of 10, 11 and 12 day embryonic mouse trigeminal ganglia revealed no significant difference in neurite outgrowth between DM and VL regions grown in the presence or absence of NGF. Copyright © 1983. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Demonstration of immunochemical identity between the nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the cell adhesion molecule L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, E; Richter-Landsberg, C; Faissner, A

    1985-01-01

    The nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 were shown to be immunochemically identical. Immunoprecipitation with L1 and NILE antibodies of [3H]fucose-labeled material from culture supernatants and detergent extracts of NGF......-treated rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells yielded comigrating bands by SDS-PAGE. NILE antibodies reacted with immunopurified L1 antigen, but not with N-CAM and other L2 epitope-bearing glycoproteins from adult mouse brain. Finally, by sequential immunoprecipitation from detergent extracts of [35S......]methionine-labeled early post-natal cerebellar cell cultures or [3H]fucose-labeled NGF-treated PC12 cells, all immunoreactivity for NILE antibody could be removed by pre-clearing with L1 antibody and vice versa....

  9. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  10. Orchestrated structure evolution: modeling growth-regulated nanomanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Shaghayegh; Boehringer, Karl F [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States); Kitayaporn, Sathana; Schwartz, Daniel T, E-mail: karlb@washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Orchestrated structure evolution (OSE) is a scalable manufacturing method that combines the advantages of top-down (tool-directed) and bottom-up (self-propagating) approaches. The method consists of a seed patterning step that defines where material nucleates, followed by a growth step that merges seeded islands into the final patterned thin film. We develop a model to predict the completed pattern based on a computationally efficient approximate Green's function solution of the diffusion equation plus a Voronoi diagram based approach that defines the final grain boundary structure. Experimental results rely on electron beam lithography to pattern the seeds, followed by the mass transfer limited growth of copper via electrodeposition. The seed growth model is compared with experimental results to quantify nearest neighbor seed-to-seed interactions as well as how seeds interact with the pattern boundary to impact the local growth rate. Seed-to-seed and seed-to-pattern interactions are shown to result in overgrowth of seeds on edges and corners of the shape, where seeds have fewer neighbors. We explore how local changes to the seed location can be used to improve the patterning quality without increasing the manufacturing cost. OSE is shown to enable a unique set of trade-offs between the cost, time, and quality of thin film patterning.

  11. Regulation of the growth and photosynthesis of cherry tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth and photosynthetic characteristics of cherry tomato seedlings were investigated under seven light irradiations such as dysprosium lamps (white light; control, C), red light emitting diodes (LEDs) (R), blue LEDs (B), orange LEDs (O), green LEDs (G), red and blue LEDs (RB) and red, blue and green LEDs (RBG) ...

  12. Effect of temperature, light intensity and growth regulators on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ansellia africana (Orchidaceae) is an important endangered medicinal plant species of South Africa which has been heavily exploited in recent years. Experiments were conducted in growth rooms at different temperatures (16, 26, 36°C) and in a nursery at different light intensities induced by shade cloth densities (200, 400, ...

  13. Influence of plant growth regulators on development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore propagation of the plant material by cell cultures and the extraction of potential pharmaceutical active compounds are of great interest. Calli were established on different media from roots and shoots of seedlings and softness and colour of the tissue were compared. Optimum growth of callus cultures was ...

  14. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  15. Analysis of the Yeast Kinome Reveals a Network of Regulated Protein Localization during Filamentous Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bharucha, Nikë; Ma, Jun; Dobry, Craig J.; Lawson, Sarah K.; Yang, Zhifen; Kumar, Anuj

    2008-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of kinases and other signaling proteins is regulated in response to cellular cues; however, the extent of this regulation has not been investigated for any gene set in any organism. Here, we present a systematic analysis of protein kinases in the budding yeast, screening for differential localization during filamentous growth. Filamentous growth is an important stress response involving mitogen-activated protein kinase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling m...

  16. Foliar fertilizations with boron and growth regulators on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv floresta culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, S.I.; Chueire, F.B.; Teixeira, N.T.

    1989-01-01

    The experiment was realized to verify the possibility of applying Boron as foliar fertilization with growth regulators: indol acetic acid, giberellic acid, ethephon and cycocel. The other objective was to compare the foliar and soil fertilization, with Boron, on the lettuce culture. The results showed that there wasn't difference of production between the treatments. Meanwhile the application of growth regulator modified the Boron grade in the leaves. (author) [pt

  17. Regulation of growth and nutrient uptake under different transpiration regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the extent to which air humidity affects the regulation of nutrient demand, an experiment with tomato plants was carried out under fully controlled climate conditions. Treatments consisted of three levels of relative air humidity (RH): 50%, 70% (control) and 95%, corresponding to 1.32,

  18. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  19. Crop growth, light utilization and yield of relay intercropped cotton as affected by plant density and a plant growth regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, X.; Liu, S.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, S.; Spiertz, J.H.J.; Li, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Modern cotton cultivation requires high plant densities and compact plants. Here we study planting density and growth regulator effects on plant structure and production of cotton when the cotton is grown in a relay intercrop with wheat, a cultivation system that is widespread in China. Field

  20. Activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase by nerve growth factor involves indirect coupling of the trk proto-oncogene with src homology 2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmichi, M; Decker, S J; Saltiel, A R

    1992-10-01

    Growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases can form stable associations with intracellular proteins that contain src homology (SH) 2 domains, including the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase. The activation of this enzyme by growth factors is evaluated in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the pp140c-trk nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (3T3-c-trk). NGF causes the rapid stimulation of PI-3 kinase activity detected in anti-phosphotyrosine, but not in anti-trk, immunoprecipitates. This effect coincides with the tyrosine phosphorylation of two proteins, with molecular masses of of 100 kd and 110 kd, that coimmunoprecipitate with p85. Similar phosphorylation patterns are induced when an immobilized fusion protein containing the amino-terminal SH2 domain of p85 is used to precipitate tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Thus, although NGF produces the rapid activation of PI-3 kinase through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation, there is no evidence for tyrosine phosphorylation of p85, or for its ligand-dependent association with the NGF receptor. Perhaps another phosphoprotein may link the NGF receptor to this enzyme.

  1. Promoting neuroregeneration by applying dynamic magnetic fields to a novel nanomedicine: Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-gold nanoparticles bounded with nerve growth factor (NGF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Muzhaozi; Wang, Ya; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2018-04-05

    Neuroregeneration imposes a significant challenge in neuroscience for treating neurodegenerative diseases. The objective of this study is to evaluate the hypothesis that the nerve growth factor (NGF) functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-gold (Au) nanomedicine can stimulate the neuron growth and differentiation under external magnetic fields (MFs), and dynamic MFs outperform their static counterparts. The SPIO-Au core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) (Diameter: 20.8 nm) possessed advantages such as uniform quasi-spherical shapes, narrow size distribution, excellent stabilities, and low toxicity (viability >96% for 5 days). NGF functionalization has enhanced the cellular uptake. The promotion of neuronal growth and orientation using NGF functionalized SPIO-Au NPs, driven by both the static and dynamic MFs, were revealed experimentally on PC-12 cells and theoretically on a cytoskeletal force model. More importantly, dynamic MFs via rotation performed better than the static ones, i.e., the cellular differentiation ratio increased 58%; the neurite length elongation increased 63%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on Yongquan acupoint reduces CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats via down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Yang, Lianxue; Gao, Xiulai

    2010-07-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and its involvement in regulating gene expression in spinal dorsal horn, cortical and subcortical neurons by peripheral noxious stimulation contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment used in physiotherapy practice to promote analgesia in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. In this study, a total number of 114 rats were used for three experiments. Effects of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity and TENS analgesia on ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Fos protein expression were examined by using behavioral test, Western blot, and immunostaining methods. We found that CFA injection caused an area of localized swelling, erythema, hypersensitivity to thermal stimuli, the decreased response time of hind paw licking (HPL), as well as upregulation of c-Fos protein expression and ERK2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn and the contralateral primary somatosensory area of cortex and the amygdala of rats. TENS on Yongquan acupoint for 20 min produced obvious analgesic effects as demonstrated with increased HPL to thermal stimuli of CFA-treated rats. In addition, TENS application suppressed the CFA-induced ERK2 activation and c-Fos protein expression. These results suggest that down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression were involved in TENS inhibition on CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats.

  3. Replicate high-density rat genome oligonucleotide microarrays reveal hundreds of regulated genes in the dorsal root ganglion after peripheral nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannion James W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat oligonucleotide microarrays were used to detect changes in gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG 3 days following sciatic nerve transection (axotomy. Two comparisons were made using two sets of triplicate microarrays, naïve versus naïve and naïve versus axotomy. Results Microarray variability was assessed using the naïve versus naïve comparison. These results support use of a P 1.5-fold expression change and P 1.5-fold and P in situ hybridization verified the expression of 24 transcripts. These data showed an 83% concordance rate with the arrays; most mismatches represent genes with low expression levels reflecting limits of array sensitivity. A significant correlation was found between actual mRNA differences and relative changes between microarrays (r2 = 0.8567. Temporal patterns of individual genes regulation varied. Conclusions We identify parameters for microarray analysis which reduce error while identifying many putatively regulated genes. Functional classification of these genes suggest reorganization of cell structural components, activation of genes expressed by immune and inflammatory cells and down-regulation of genes involved in neurotransmission.

  4. [Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) blood levels in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning - a preliminary observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Gomółka, Ewa; Gawlikowski, Tomasz; Szpak, Dorota; Potoczek, Anna; Boba, Magdalena

    Neurotrophins are the family of proteins which stimulate and regulate the process of neurogenesis. Several factors belong to the family, mainly nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT 3), and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). Acute poisoning with carbon monoxide (CO), which usually is accompanied by neurologic symptoms, can potentially change the secretion profile of neurotrophins. Aim of the study. The main goal of the study is to assess the changes of NGF and BDNF plasma levels during an acute phase of CO poisoning as well as immediately after recovery. Additionally, the relationship among neurotrophin levels and selected aspects of clinical course of CO poisoning were studied. The study group consisted of 18 patients (mean age: 31.8±10.3 years) hospitalized in Toxicology Department of University Hospital in Cracow because of acute CO poisoning. There were 10 women (mean age: 30.2±6.9 years) and 8 men (mean age 33.9±13.7 years) in the group. The levels of NGF and BDNF were evaluated using immunoenzymatic method (ELISA) in plasma samples taken thrice in each patient. The sample 1. was taken during hospital admission, the sample 2. about 12-36 hours after admission, and the sample 3. just before the hospital discharging (usually, on the 3rd-4th day). The clinical data were collected from patients’ anamnesis, physical examination and neuropsychological evaluation. The statistical analysis were performed using tools comprised in STATISTICA 12.0 PL (StatSoft Polska, Cracow, Poland) software. The majority of NGF plasma levels were less than 14 pg/mL (values below the limit of quantification), contrary to the sole case of 34.3 pg/mL. BDNF plasma levels ranged from 4.8 ng/mL to above 48 ng/mL, i.e. they were higher than the upper limit of measurement range for the plasma dilution which had been used. The comparison of NGF and BDNF plasma levels in the study group with their analogues in healthy volunteers taken from the

  5. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk...

  6. Growth Hormone Receptor Signaling Pathways and its Negative Regulation by SOCS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández Pérez, Leandro; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Guerra, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a critical regulator of linear body growth during childhood but continues to have important metabolic actions throughout life. The GH receptor (GHR) is ubiquitously expressed, and deficiency of GHR signaling causes a dramatic impact on normal physiology during somatic devel...

  7. Effect of plant growth regulators on in vitro germination of coffee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... Germination times of zygotic embryos cultured in MS medium had a mean of 5.1 days, ... growth regulators used, gibberellic acid at 0.1 mg l-1 proved to be the most efficient in .... process, and the biological role of regulators was invest- ... thiamine, 25 mg l-1 cysteine, and 3% sucrose for MS; and 100 mg l-1.

  8. Using natural and synthetic growth regulators of plants in industrial mycology and malting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kuznetcova

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on the expansion of the use the plants growth regulators in different areas are presented. The positive impact of the growth stimulators on the development of the Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium’s on agar nutrient media during surface cultivation is shown. The results for growth regulators stimulating effect on the fungus biosynthetic activity in submerged cultures are obtained. The possibility of using fumar and heteroauxin for malting is considered. The decline of malting time and increase of amylolytic activity of the malt are recorded.

  9. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Lu, Chang-Feng; Peng, Jiang; Hu, Cheng-Dong; Wang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  10. Regulation of Long Bone Growth in Vertebrates; It Is Time to Catch Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló-Díez, Alberto; Joyner, Alexandra L

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of organ size is essential to human health and has fascinated biologists for centuries. Key to the growth process is the ability of most organs to integrate organ-extrinsic cues (eg, nutritional status, inflammatory processes) with organ-intrinsic information (eg, genetic programs, local signals) into a growth response that adapts to changing environmental conditions and ensures that the size of an organ is coordinated with the rest of the body. Paired organs such as the vertebrate limbs and the long bones within them are excellent models for studying this type of regulation because it is possible to manipulate one member of the pair and leave the other as an internal control. During development, growth plates at the end of each long bone produce a transient cartilage model that is progressively replaced by bone. Here, we review how proliferation and differentiation of cells within each growth plate are tightly controlled mainly by growth plate-intrinsic mechanisms that are additionally modulated by extrinsic signals. We also discuss the involvement of several signaling hubs in the integration and modulation of growth-related signals and how they could confer remarkable plasticity to the growth plate. Indeed, long bones have a significant ability for "catch-up growth" to attain normal size after a transient growth delay. We propose that the characterization of catch-up growth, in light of recent advances in physiology and cell biology, will provide long sought clues into the molecular mechanisms that underlie organ growth regulation. Importantly, catch-up growth early in life is commonly associated with metabolic disorders in adulthood, and this association is not completely understood. Further elucidation of the molecules and cellular interactions that influence organ size coordination should allow development of novel therapies for human growth disorders that are noninvasive and have minimal side effects.

  11. Hormonal regulation of the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in Muscari armeniacum Leichtl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chilling of Muscari bulbs is necessary for the growth of the inflorescence stalk and flowering, but not for the growth of leaves. Gibberellic acid (GA accelerated stem growth and flowering in chilled Muscari bulbs. In the present experiment it was shown that in unchilled derooted Muscari bulbs the growth of leaves, but not the growth of the inflorescence stalk, was observed when bulbs were stored in water, GA at a concentration of 50 and 100 mg/L, benzyladenine (BA at a concentration of 25 and 50 mg/L, or a mixture of GA+BA (50+25 mg/L, but abscisic acid (ABA at a concentration of 10 mg/L greatly inhibited the growth of leaves. In chilled derooted Muscari bulbs the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk was observed when bulbs were stored in water or GA, but BA and GA+BA treatments totally inhibited the growth of the inflorescence stalk without an effect on the growth of leaves. These results clearly showed that the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in Muscari bulbs are controlled by plant growth regulators in different ways. ABA totally inhibited the growth of leaves and inflorescence stalk in chilled derooted Muscari bulbs. It was shown that after the excision of the inflorescence bud in cultivated chilled Muscari bulbs, the inflorescence stalk died, but application of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA 0.5% in the place of the removed inflorescence bud induced the growth of the inflorescence stalk. IAA applied under the inflorescence bud inhibited the development of flowers (flower-bud blasting and induced the growth of the inflorescence stalk below the treatment site. These results are discussed with reference to hormonal regulation of stem (stalk growth in tulip, narcissus, hyacinth, and Hippeastrum.

  12. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  13. The regulation of cell growth and survival by aldosterone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is synthesized from cholesterol, mainly in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone exerts its effects in the epithelial tissues of the kidney and colon and in non-epithelial tissues such as the brain and cardiovasculature. The genomic response to aldosterone involves dimerization of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), dissociation of heat shock proteins from MR, translocation of the aldosterone-MR complex to the nucleus and the concomitant regulation of gene expression. Rapid responses to aldosterone occur within seconds to minutes, do not involve transcription or translation and can modulate directly or indirectly the later genomic responses. Aside from the well-known effects of aldosterone on the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, aldosterone can also produce deleterious structural changes in tissues by inducing hypertrophy and the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis, leading to fibrosis and tissue remodelling. Here we discuss the involvement of aldosterone-mediated rapid signalling cascades in the development of disease states such as chronic kidney disease and heart failure, and the antagonists that can inhibit these pathophysiological responses.

  14. The regulation of cell growth and survival by aldosterone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is synthesized from cholesterol, mainly in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone exerts its effects in the epithelial tissues of the kidney and colon and in non-epithelial tissues such as the brain and cardiovasculature. The genomic response to aldosterone involves dimerization of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), dissociation of heat shock proteins from MR, translocation of the aldosterone-MR complex to the nucleus and the concomitant regulation of gene expression. Rapid responses to aldosterone occur within seconds to minutes, do not involve transcription or translation and can modulate directly or indirectly the later genomic responses. Aside from the well-known effects of aldosterone on the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, aldosterone can also produce deleterious structural changes in tissues by inducing hypertrophy and the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis, leading to fibrosis and tissue remodelling. Here we discuss the involvement of aldosterone-mediated rapid signalling cascades in the development of disease states such as chronic kidney disease and heart failure, and the antagonists that can inhibit these pathophysiological responses.

  15. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth through Mechanotransduction-Mediated ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Feng, Yi; Hu, Hong; Shi, Aiwei; Zhang, Lei; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-12-01

    Enhancing the action of nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic approach to neural regeneration. To facilitate neural regeneration, we investigated whether combining low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and NGF could promote neurite outgrowth, an essential process in neural regeneration. In the present study, PC12 cells were subjected to a combination of LIPUS (1 MHz, 30 or 50 mW/cm 2 , 20% duty cycle and 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 10 min every other day) and NGF (50 ng/mL) treatment, and then neurite outgrowth was compared. Our findings indicated that the combined treatment with LIPUS (50 mW/cm 2 ) and NGF (50 ng/mL) promotes neurite outgrowth that is comparable to that achieved by NGF (100 ng/mL) treatment alone. LIPUS significantly increased NGF-induced neurite length, but not neurite branching. These effects were attributed to the enhancing effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB and the expression of thioredoxin (Trx-1). Furthermore, blockage of stretch-activated ion channels with Gd 3+ suppressed the stimulating effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and the downstream signaling activation. Taken together, our findings suggest that LIPUS enhances NGF-induced neurite outgrowth through mechanotransduction-mediated signaling of the ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 pathway. The combination of LIPUS and NGF could potentially be used for the treatment of nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of planar growth by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enugutti, Balaji; Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Oelschner, Maxi; Torres Ruiz, Ramón Angel; Schliebner, Ivo; Leister, Dario; Schneitz, Kay

    2012-09-11

    The spatial coordination of growth is of central importance for the regulation of plant tissue architecture. Individual layers, such as the epidermis, are clonally propagated and structurally maintained by symmetric cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer. The developmental control of this process is poorly understood. The simple cellular basis and sheet-like structure of Arabidopsis integuments make them an attractive model system to address planar growth. Here we report on the characterization of the Arabidopsis UNICORN (UCN) gene. Analysis of ucn integuments reveals localized distortion of planar growth, eventually resulting in an ectopic multicellular protrusion. In addition, ucn mutants exhibit ectopic growth in filaments and petals, as well as aberrant embryogenesis. We further show that UCN encodes an active AGC VIII kinase. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological data suggest that UCN suppresses ectopic growth in integuments by directly repressing the KANADI transcription factor ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE. Our findings indicate that UCN represents a unique plant growth regulator that maintains planar growth of integuments by repressing a developmental regulator involved in the control of early integument growth and polarity.

  17. Growth regulation in X-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgjo, K.; Devik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Extracts of hairless mouse skin were tested for their content of epidermal G 1 inhibitor and G 2 inhibitor at daily intervals after X-irradiation with 4 500 or 2 250 rad. After either dose the skin extracts lacked G 1 inhibitory activity on days 5 and 6 respectively after irradiation. This coincided with the time when the epidermal mitotic rate again became normal and started a period of over-shoot. The time interval of 5 to 6 days corresponds to the turnover time of the differentiating cells in hairless mouse back epidermis. The findings indicate that the proliferating cells in epidermis can respond to changes in local chalone concentration, even after X-irradiation at the tested doses, and that the irradiated epidermal cell population still retains some important properties inherent in a cybernetically regulated system. The local G 2 -inhibitory activity also varied after irradiation, but these variations could not be directly related to the corresponding mitotic rates. (author)

  18. MiR-203 involves in neuropathic pain development and represses Rap1a expression in nerve growth factor differentiated neuronal PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Huang, Yuguang; Ma, Chao; Yu, Xuerong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Shen, Le

    2015-01-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play a role in numerous biological processes, their function in neuropathic pain is not clear. The rat bilateral sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (bCCI) is an established model of neuropathic pain, so we examined miRNA expression and function in the spinal dorsal horn in bCCI rats. Microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the expression of miRNA in nerve system of bCCI rats, and the targets of miRNA were predicted by bioinformatic approaches. The function of specific miRNA was estimated through the methods of gene engineering. This study revealed substantially (∼10-fold) decreased miR-203 expression in the spinal dorsal horns but not the dorsal root ganglions, hippocampus, or anterior cingulate cortexes of bCCI rats. Rap1a protein expression was upregulated in bCCI rat spinal dorsal horns. We further verified that miR-203 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of the rap1a gene, thereby decreasing rap1a protein expression in neuron-like cells. Rap1a has diverse neuronal functions and their perturbation is responsible for several mental disorders. For example, Rap1a/MEK/ERK is involved in peripheral sensitization. These data suggest a potential role for miR-203 in regulating neuropathic pain development, and Rap1a is a validated target gene in vitro. Results from our study and others indicate the possibility that Rap1a may be involved in pain. We hope that these results can provide support for future research into miR-203 in gene therapy for neuropathic pain.

  19. Effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid on the nerve growth factor and the choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tujioka, Kazuyo; Thanapreedawat, Panicha; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Horie, Kenji; Kim, Mujo; Tsutsui, Kazumi; Hayase, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The brain protein synthesis and the plasma concentration of growth hormone (GH) is sensitive to the dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in ovariectomized female rats; however, the role of dietary GABA on biomarkers including nerve growth factor (NGF) and choline acetyltransferase for the function of cholinergic neurons remains unknown in ovariectomized female rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the dietary GABA affects the concentration and mRNA level of NGF, and the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains of ovariectomized female rats. Experiments were done on two groups of 24-wk-old ovariectomized female rats given 0 or 0.5% GABA added to a 20% casein diet. The concentrations of NGF and activities of choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and mRNA level of NGF in the hippocampus increased significantly with the 20% casein+0.5% GABA compared with the 20% casein diet alone. In the hippocampus, the mRNA level of NGF significantly correlated with the NGF concentration (r=0.714, pGABA to ovariectomized female rats is likely to control the mRNA level and concentration of NGF and cause an increase in the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains.

  20. A Multilevel Latent Growth Modelling of the Longitudinal Changes in Motivation Regulations in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Jaakkola

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine individual- and classroom-level differences in the longitudinal change in motivational regulations during physical education students’ transition from elementary (Grade 6 across middle school (Grades 7 to 9. A sample of 757 Finnish adolescents (M = 12.71, SD = 0.23 participated in this study. Participants of the study responded to questionnaires collected six times. A multilevel latent growth modelling approach was used to analyze the data. Results showed that motivational regulations in physical education developed at different rates during middle school. More specifically, students’: (a identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9; (b amotivation increased during middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7; and (c introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. The changes in amotivation and introjected regulation were largely due to individual factors, whereas the changes in identified regulation were due to environmental factors.

  1. Response of pine hypocotyl sections to growth regulators and related substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zakrzewski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth response of Pinus silvestris hypocotyl sections to some synthetic growth regulators and related substances was studied. Elongation of hypocotyl sections was stimulated by naphtaleneacetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, in-dole-3-propionic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, indoleaoetic amide, indoleacetic nitrile and coumarin. Indole-3-acetic acid and naphtaleneacetic acid extended period of growth up to 16 and 24 hours, respectively. Growth was inhibited by kinetin, trans-cinnamic acid and 2,3,5-tri-iodobenzoic acid. No effect of gibberellic acid, tryptophan and biotin was observed.

  2. Impact of Growth Hormone on Regulation of Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troike, Katie M; Henry, Brooke E; Jensen, Elizabeth A; Young, Jonathan A; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2017-06-18

    Increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related conditions worldwide has necessitated a more thorough understanding of adipose tissue (AT) and expanded the scope of research in this field. AT is now understood to be far more complex and dynamic than previously thought, which has also fueled research to reevaluate how hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), alter the tissue. In this review, we will introduce properties of AT important for understanding how GH alters the tissue, such as anatomical location of depots and adipokine output. We will provide an overview of GH structure and function and define several human conditions and cognate mouse lines with extremes in GH action that have helped shape our understanding of GH and AT. A detailed discussion of the GH/AT relationship will be included that addresses adipokine production, immune cell populations, lipid metabolism, senescence, differentiation, and fibrosis, as well as brown AT and beiging of white AT. A brief overview of how GH levels are altered in an obese state, and the efficacy of GH as a therapeutic option to manage obesity will be given. As we will reveal, the effects of GH on AT are numerous, dynamic and depot-dependent. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:819-840, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. An Expandable, Inducible Hemangioblast State Regulated by Fibroblast Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Vereide

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that “trap” murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These “expandable” hemangioblasts (eHBs are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines.

  4. Transcriptome analysis reveals the regulation of brassinosteroids on petal growth in Gerbera hybrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gerbera hybrida is a cut-flower crop of global importance, and an understanding of the mechanisms underlying petal development is vital for the continued commercial development of this plant species. Brassinosteroids (BRs, a class of phytohormones, are known to play a major role in cell expansion, but their effect on petal growth in G. hybrida is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that the brassinolide (BL, the most active BR, promotes petal growth by lengthening cells in the middle and basal regions of petals, and that this effect on petal growth was greater than that of gibberellin (GA. The RNA-seq (high-throughput cDNA sequencing technique was employed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms by which BRs control petal growth. A global transcriptome analysis of the response to BRs in petals was conducted and target genes regulated by BR were identified. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs include various transcription factors (TFs that were activated during the early stage (0.5 h of BL treatment, as well as cell wall proteins whose expression was regulated at a late stage (10 h. BR-responsive DEGs are involved in multiple plant hormone signal pathways, hormone biosynthesis and biotic and abiotic stress responses, showing that the regulation of petal growth by BRs is a complex network of processes. Thus, our study provides new insights at the transcriptional level into the molecular mechanisms of BR regulation of petal growth in G. hybrida.

  5. Desert hedgehog promotes ischemia-induced angiogenesis by ensuring peripheral nerve survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Marie-Ange; Chapouly, Candice; Yao, Qinyu; Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Vandierdonck, Soizic; Reynaud, Annabel; Petit, Myriam; Jaspard-Vinassa, Béatrice; Belloc, Isabelle; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Ruat, Martial; Duplàa, Cécile; Couffinhal, Thierry; Desgranges, Claude; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Blood vessel growth and patterning have been shown to be regulated by nerve-derived signals. Desert hedgehog (Dhh), one of the Hedgehog family members, is expressed by Schwann cells of peripheral nerves. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of Dhh to angiogenesis in the setting of ischemia. We induced hindlimb ischemia in wild-type and Dhh(-/-) mice. First, we found that limb perfusion is significantly impaired in the absence of Dhh. This effect is associated with a significant decrease in capillary and artery density in Dhh(-/-). By using mice in which the Hedgehog signaling pathway effector Smoothened was specifically invalidated in endothelial cells, we demonstrated that Dhh does not promote angiogenesis by a direct activation of endothelial cells. On the contrary, we found that Dhh promotes peripheral nerve survival in the ischemic muscle and, by doing so, maintains the pool of nerve-derived proangiogenic factors. Consistently, we found that denervation of the leg, immediately after the onset of ischemia, severely impairs ischemia-induced angiogenesis and decreases expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A, angiopoietin 1, and neurotrophin 3 in the ischemic muscle. This study demonstrates the crucial roles of nerves and factors regulating nerve physiology in the setting of ischemia-induced angiogenesis.

  6. Inhibition of KLF7-Targeting MicroRNA 146b Promotes Sciatic Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Ting; Cheng, Yong-Xia; Liu, Yan-Cui; Zhai, Feng-Guo; Sun, Ping; Li, Hui-Ting; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Ying

    2018-06-01

    A previous study has indicated that Krüppel-like factor 7 (KLF7), a transcription factor that stimulates Schwann cell (SC) proliferation and axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, is a promising therapeutic transcription factor in nerve injury. We aimed to identify whether inhibition of microRNA-146b (miR-146b) affected SC proliferation, migration, and myelinated axon regeneration following sciatic nerve injury by regulating its direct target KLF7. SCs were transfected with miRNA lentivirus, miRNA inhibitor lentivirus, or KLF7 siRNA lentivirus in vitro. The expression of miR146b and KLF7, as well as SC proliferation and migration, were subsequently evaluated. In vivo, an acellular nerve allograft (ANA) followed by injection of GFP control vector or a lentiviral vector encoding an miR-146b inhibitor was used to assess the repair potential in a model of sciatic nerve gap. miR-146b directly targeted KLF7 by binding to the 3'-UTR, suppressing KLF7. Up-regulation of miR-146b and KLF7 knockdown significantly reduced the proliferation and migration of SCs, whereas silencing miR-146b resulted in increased proliferation and migration. KLF7 protein was localized in SCs in which miR-146b was expressed in vivo. Similarly, 4 weeks after the ANA, anti-miR-146b increased KLF7 and its target gene nerve growth factor cascade, promoting axonal outgrowth. Closer analysis revealed improved nerve conduction and sciatic function index score, and enhanced expression of neurofilaments, P0 (anti-peripheral myelin), and myelinated axon regeneration. Our findings provide new insight into the regulation of KLF7 by miR-146b during peripheral nerve regeneration and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for peripheral nerve injury.

  7. Integrin β1 regulates leiomyoma cytoskeletal integrity and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Minnie; Segars, James; Catherino, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are characterized by an excessive extracellular matrix, increased mechanical stress, and increased active RhoA. Previously, we observed that mechanical signaling was attenuated in leiomyoma, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Integrins, especially integrin β1, are transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple extracellular matrix stresses to the intracellular cytoskeleton to influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we characterized integrin and laminin to signaling in leiomyoma cells. We observed a 2.25 ± 0.32 fold increased expression of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. Antibody-mediated inhibition of integrin β1 led to significant growth inhibition in leiomyoma cells and a loss of cytoskeletal integrity. Specifically, polymerization of actin filaments and formation of focal adhesions were reduced by inhibition of integrin p1. Inhibition of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells led to 0.81 ± 0.02 fold decrease in active RhoA, and resembled levels found in serum-starved cells. Likewise, inhibition of integrin β1 was accompanied by a decrease in phospho-ERK. Compared to myometrial cells, leiomyoma cells demonstrated increased expression of integrin α6 subunit to laminin receptor (1.91 ± 0.11 fold), and increased expression of laminin 5α (1.52±0.02), laminin 5β (3.06±0.92), and laminin 5γ (1.66 ± 0.06). Of note, leiomyoma cells grown on laminin matrix appear to realign themselves. Taken together, the findings reveal that the attenuated mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells is accompanied by an increased expression and a dependence on integrin β1 signaling in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. PMID:23023061

  8. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  9. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells by growth factors and phorbol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, J J; Ku, L; Delafontaine, P

    1993-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) is an important mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells. To characterize regulation of vascular IGF I receptors, we performed radioligand displacement experiments using rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMs). Serum deprivation for 48 hours caused a 40% decrease in IGF I receptor number. Exposure of quiescent RASMs to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), or angiotensin II (Ang II) caused a 1.5-2.0-fold increase in IGF I receptors per cell. After FGF exposure, there was a marked increase in the mitogenic response to IGF I. IGF I downregulated its receptors in the presence of platelet-poor plasma. Stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) by exposure of quiescent RASMs to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate caused a biphasic response in IGF I binding; there was a 42% decrease in receptor number at 45 minutes and a 238% increase at 24 hours. To determine the role of PKC in growth factor-induced regulation of IGF I receptors, we downregulated PKC by exposing RASMs to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) for 48 hours. PDGF- and FGF- but not Ang II-mediated upregulation of IGF I receptors was completely inhibited in PDBu-treated cells. Thus, acute PKC activation by phorbol esters inhibits IGF I binding, whereas chronic PKC activation increases IGF I binding. PDGF and FGF but not Ang II regulate vascular IGF I receptors through a PKC-dependent pathway. These data provide new insights into the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell IGF I receptors in vitro and are of potential importance in characterizing vascular proliferative responses in vivo.

  10. EFFECTS OF SOME PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS ON JASMONIC ACID INDUCED INHIBITION OF SEED GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH OF BARLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat ÇAVUŞOĞLU

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The effects of gibberellic acid, kinetin, benzyladenine, ethylene, 24-epibrassinolide and polyamines (spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine on jasmonic acid inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth of barley were studied. All of the plant growth regulators studied were determined to have a succesful performance in reversing of the inhibitory effects of jasmonic acid on the seed germination and seedling growth. Moreover, the above mentioned growth regulators overcame the inhibitory effect of JA on the percentages of germination and coleoptile emergence in the same ratio, while GA3 was the most successful hormone on the fresh weight and radicle and coleoptile elongation in comparison with the other growth regulators. Key words: Barley, jasmonic acid, plant growth regulator, seed germination, seedling growth ARPANIN TOHUM ÇİMLENMESİ VE FİDE BÜYÜMESİNİN JASMONİK ASİT TEŞVİKLİ İNHİBİSYONU ÜZERİNE BAZI BİTKİ BÜYÜME DÜZENLEYİCİLERİNİN ETKİLERİ Özet: Arpanın tohum çimlenmesi ve fide büyümesinin jasmonik asit inhibisyonu üzerine gibberellik asit, kinetin, benziladenin, etilen, 24-epibrassinolit ve poliaminlerin (spermin, spermidin, putressin, kadaverin etkileri araştırılmıştır. Çalışılan bitki büyüme düzenleyicilerinin tümünün tohum çimlenmesi ve fide büyümesi üzerinde jasmonik asitin engelleyici etkisini tersine çevirmede başarılı bir performansa sahip oldukları belirlenmiştir. Dahası, yukarıda sözü edilen büyüme düzenleyicileri çimlenme ve koleoptil çıkış yüzdeleri üzerinde aynı oranda etkili olurken, taze ağırlık ve radikula ve koleoptil uzaması üzerinde diğer büyüme düzenleyicileri ile karşılaştırıldığında en başarılı hormon GA3 olmuştur. Anahtar kelimeler: Arpa, jasmonik asit, bitki büyüme düzenleyicisi, tohum çimlenmesi, fide büyümesi

  11. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Objectives: Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass Brachypodium distachyon also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation. Description: The project is divided in three main parts: 1) Performing time-lapse imaging and growth measurement in B. distachyon and S. bicolor to determine growth rate dynamic during the day/night cycle. Identifying growth-associated genes whose expression patterns follow the observed growth dynamics using deep sequencing technology, 2) identifying regulators of these genes by screening for DNA-binding proteins interacting with the growth-associated gene promoters identified in Aim 1. Screens will be performed using a validated yeast-one hybrid strategy paired with a specifically designed B. distachyon and S. bicolor transcription factor libraries (1000 clones each), and 3) Selecting 50 potential growth regulators from the screen for downstream characterization. The selection will be made by using a sytems biology approach by calculating the connectivity between growth rate, rhythmic gene expression profiles and TF expression profile and determine which TF is likely part of a hub

  12. Linking gene regulation to cell behaviors in the posterior growth zone of sequentially segmenting arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terri A; Nagy, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    Virtually all arthropods all arthropods add their body segments sequentially, one by one in an anterior to posterior progression. That process requires not only segment specification but typically growth and elongation. Here we review the functions of some of the key genes that regulate segmentation: Wnt, caudal, Notch pathway, and pair-rule genes, and discuss what can be inferred about their evolution. We focus on how these regulatory factors are integrated with growth and elongation and discuss the importance and challenges of baseline measures of growth and elongation. We emphasize a perspective that integrates the genetic regulation of segment patterning with the cellular mechanisms of growth and elongation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Regulates Growth in Response to Nutritional Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Ronit

    2016-10-01

    All organisms can respond to the availability of nutrients by regulating their metabolism, growth, and cell division. Central to the regulation of growth in response to nutrient availability is the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling that is composed of two structurally distinct complexes: TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). The TOR genes were first identified in yeast as target of rapamycin, a natural product of a soil bacterium, which proved beneficial as an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug and is currently being tested for a handful of other pathological conditions including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and age-related diseases. Studies of the TOR pathway unraveled a complex growth-regulating network. TOR regulates nutrient uptake, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation, as well as metabolic pathways, in a coordinated manner that ensures that cells grow or cease growth in response to nutrient availability. The identification of specific signals and mechanisms that stimulate TOR signaling is an active and exciting field of research that has already identified nitrogen and amino acids as key regulators of TORC1 activity. The signals, as well as the cellular functions of TORC2, are far less well understood. Additional open questions in the field concern the relationships between TORC1 and TORC2, as well as the links with other nutrient-responsive pathways. Here I review the main features of TORC1 and TORC2, with a particular focus on yeasts as model organisms.

  14. elPBN neurons regulate rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections during activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu

    2016-08-01

    The external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN) within the pons and rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) contributes to central processing of excitatory cardiovascular reflexes during stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves (CSAN). However, the importance of elPBN cardiovascular neurons in regulation of rVLM activity during CSAN activation remains unclear. We hypothesized that CSAN stimulation excites the elPBN cardiovascular neurons and, in turn, increases rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections. Compared with controls, in rats subjected to microinjection of retrograde tracer into the rVLM, the numbers of elPBN neurons double-labeled with c-Fos (an immediate early gene) and the tracer were increased after CSAN stimulation (P neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In cats, epicardial bradykinin and electrical stimulation of CSAN increased the activity of elPBN cardiovascular neurons, which was attenuated (n = 6, P neurons in the elPBN and rVLM sequentially through a monosynaptic (glutamatergic) excitatory elPBN-rVLM pathway. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The effects of different combinations of perceptual-motor exercises, music, and vitamin D supplementation on the nerve growth factor in children with high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Hadi; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Taheri, Hamidreza; Khodashenas, Ezzat; Movahedi, Ahmadreza

    2018-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of different combinations of perceptual-motor exercises, music, and Vitamin D consumption on the nerve growth factor (NGF) in children with high-functioning autism. 48 children with autism, aged between six and nine years, were divided into four groups: Group A- perceptual-motor activities along with music (n = 12); Group B-Vitamin D supplementation (n = 12); Group C-perceptual-motor activities along with music and Vitamin D (n = 12); and Group D-control (n = 12). Participants' blood NGF level was measured before and after the intervention. The results showed a significant improvement in the NGF levels in Groups B and C due to the interventions. Also, in Group A, the NGF levels increased compared to Group D, although this increase was not significant. In addition, the intake of Vitamin D along with perceptual-motor exercises resulted in a significant increase in the levels of NGF compared to Groups A, B and D. These findings suggest that perceptual-motor exercises along with music as well as taking Vitamin D may provide two appropriate interventions for improving NGF in children with autism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Potentiation of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by ifenprodil: the role of sigma-1 and IP3 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Ishima

    Full Text Available In addition to both the α1 adrenergic receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists, ifenprodil binds to the sigma receptor subtypes 1 and 2. In this study, we examined the effects of ifenprodil on nerve growth factor (NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Ifenprodil significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the α1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, prazosin and the NMDA receptor NR2B antagonist, Ro 25-6981 did not alter NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth mediated by ifenprodil was significantly antagonized by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, NE-100, but not the sigma-2 receptor antagonist, SM-21. Similarly, ifenprodil enhanced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth was again significantly reduced by the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3 receptor antagonists, xestospongin C and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB treatment. Furthermore, BAPTA-AM, a chelator of intracellular Ca(2+, blocked the effects of ifenprodil on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, indicating the role of intracellular Ca(2+ in the neurite outgrowth. These findings suggest that activation at sigma-1 receptors and subsequent interaction with IP(3 receptors may mediate the pharmacological effects of ifenprodil on neurite outgrowth.

  17. Asarone from Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma Potentiates the Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neuronal Differentiation in Cultured PC12 Cells: A Signaling Mediated by Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Y C Lam

    Full Text Available Acori Tatarinowii Rhizoma (ATR, the rhizome of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, is being used clinically to treat neurological disorders. The volatile oil of ATR is being considered as an active ingredient. Here, α-asarone and β-asarone, accounting about 95% of ATR oil, were evaluated for its function in stimulating neurogenesis. In cultured PC12 cells, application of ATR volatile oil, α-asarone or β-asarone, stimulated the expression of neurofilaments, a bio-marker for neurite outgrowth, in a concentration-dependent manner. The co-treatment of ATR volatile oil, α-asarone or β-asarone, with low concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF potentiated the NGF-induced neuronal differentiation in cultured PC12 cells. In addition, application of protein kinase A inhibitors, H89 and KT5720, in cultures blocked the ATR-induced neurofilament expression, as well as the phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB. In the potentiation of NGF-induced signaling in cultured PC12 cells, α-asarone and β-asarone showed synergistic effects. These results proposed the neurite-promoting asarone, or ATR volatile oil, could be useful in finding potential drugs for treating various neurodegenerative diseases, in which neurotrophin deficiency is normally involved.

  18. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophin-3 levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Toker, Aysun; Işık, Ümit; Kılınç, İbrahim

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurotrophins are involved in the etiopathogenesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and neurotrophin-3 (NTF3) levels between children with ADHD and healthy controls. A total of 110 treatment-naive children with the combined presentation of ADHD and 44 healthy controls aged 8-18 years were enrolled in this study. The severity of ADHD symptoms was determined by scores on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised Short and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised Short. The severity of depression and anxiety symptoms of the children were evaluated by the self-report inventories. Serum levels of neurotrophins were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed a significant main effect of groups in the levels of serum neurotrophins, an effect that was independent of age, sex, and the severity of the depression and anxiety. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that the mean serum GDNF and NTF3 levels of ADHD patients were significantly higher than that of controls. However, serum BDNF and NGF levels did not show any significant differences between groups. No correlations between the levels of serum neurotrophins and the severity of ADHD were observed. These results suggest that elevated serum GDNF and NTF3 levels may be related to ADHD in children.

  19. Nerve growth factor affects [sup 11]C-nicotine binding, blood flow, EEG, and verbal episodic memory in an Alzheimer patient; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L [Dept. of Histology and Neurobiology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, A [Dept. of Pharmacology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Holst, H von [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    1992-01-01

    Based on animal research suggesting that nerve growth factor (NGF) can stimulate central cholinergic neurons, the known losses of cholinergic innervation of the cortices in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and our experience of infusing NGF to support adrenal grafts in parkinsonian patients, we have initiated clinical trials of NGF infusions into the brain of patients with AD. Here we report a follow-up of our first case, a 69-year-old woman, with symptoms of dementia since 8 years. Intraventricular infusion of 6.6 mg NGF during three months resulted in a marked transient increase in uptake and binding of [sup 11]C-nicotine in frontal and temporal cortex and a persistent increase in cortical blood flow as measured by PET as well as progressive decreases of slow wave EEG activity. After one month of NGF, tests of verbal episodic memory were improved whereas other cognitive tests were not. No adverse effects could be ascribed to the NGF infusion. Taken together, the results of this case study indicate that NGF may counteract cholinergic deficits in AD, and suggest that further clinical trials of NGF infusion in AD are warranted. (authors).

  20. Combined intranasal nerve growth factor and ventricle neural stem cell grafts prolong survival and improve disease outcome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shi-Jiang; Gong, Yan-Hua; Lin, Yan-Chen

    2017-08-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease that selectively involves motor neurons. Neurotrophic factor supplementation and neural stem cell (NSC) alternative therapy have been used to treat ALS. The two approaches can affect each other in their pathways of action, and there is a possibility for synergism. However, to date, there have been no studies demonstrating the effects of combined therapy in the treatment of ALS. In this study, for the first time, we adopted a method involving the intranasal administration of nerve growth factor combined with lateral ventricle NSC transplantation using G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice as experimental subjects to explore the treatment effect of this combined therapy in ALS. We discover that the combined therapy increase the quantity of TrkA receptors, broaden the migration of exogenous NSCs, further promote active proliferation in neurogenic regions of the brain and enhance the preservation of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Regarding physical activity, the combined therapy improved motor functions, further postponed ALS onset and extended the survival time of the mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen and nerve growth factor on the long-term neural behavior of neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lixia; Ren, Qing; Zhang, Yongjun; Wang, Jiwen

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of HBO (Hyperbaric oxygen) and NGF (Nerve growth factor) on the long-term neural behavior of neonatal rats with HIBD (Neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain damage). The HIBD model was produced by ligating the right common carotid artery of 7 days old SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats followed by 8% O2 + 92% N2 for 2h. Totally 40 rats were randomly divided into 5 groups including sham-operated group, HIBD control group, HBO treated group, NGF treated group and NGF + HBO treated group. The learning and memory ability of these rats was evaluated by Morris water maze at 30 days after birth, and sensory motor function was assessed by experiments of foot error and limb placement at 42 days after birth. The escape latency of HBO treated group, NGF treated group and NGF + HBO treated group was shorter than that of HIBD control group (pmemory ability and sensory motor function in neonatal rats after hypoxic ischemic brain damage.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor regulates insulin-like growth factor-binding protein production by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, J; Ku, L; Delafontaine, P

    1994-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I is an important mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells, and its effects are regulated by several binding proteins. Western ligand blotting of conditioned medium from rat aortic smooth muscle cells detected a 24 kDa binding protein and a 28 kDa glycosylated variant of this protein, consistent with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 by size. Low amounts of a glycosylated 38 to 42 kDa doublet (consistent with binding protein-3) and a 31 kDa non-glycosylated protein also were present. Basic fibroblast growth factor markedly increased secretion of the 24 kDa binding protein and its 28 kDa glycosylated variant. This effect was dose- and time-dependent and was inhibited by co-incubation with cycloheximide. Crosslinking of [125I]-insulin-like growth factor I to cell monolayers revealed no surface-associated binding proteins, either basally or after agonist treatment. Induction of binding protein production by fibroblast growth factor at sites of vascular injury may be important in vascular proliferative responses in vivo.

  3. A multilevel latent growth modelling of the longitudinal changes in motivation regulations in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Timo; Wang, John; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine individual- and classroom-level differences in the longitudinal change in motivational regulations during physical education students' transition from elementary (Grade 6) across middle school (Grades 7 to 9). A sample of 757 Finnish adolescents (M = 12.71, SD = 0.23) participated in this study. Participants of the study responded to questionnaires collected six times. A multilevel latent growth modelling approach was used to analyze the data. Results showed that motivational regulations in physical education developed at different rates during middle school. More specifically, students': (a) identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9; (b) amotivation increased during middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7; and (c) introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. The changes in amotivation and introjected regulation were largely due to individual factors, whereas the changes in identified regulation were due to environmental factors. Key pointsStudents' identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9.Students' amotivation increased across middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7.Students' introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9.Other motivational regulations remained stable across time.

  4. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Hazen, Samuel [Scripps Research Inst., San Diego, CA (United States); Mullet, John [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-11-22

    Critical to the development of renewable energy sources from biofuels is the improvement of biomass from energy feedstocks, such as sorghum and maize. The specific goals of this project include 1) characterize the growth and gene expression patterns under diurnal and circadian conditions, 2) select transcription factors associated with growth and build a cis-regulatory network in yeast, and 3) perturb these transcription factors in planta using transgenic Brachypodium and sorghum, and characterize the phenotypic outcomes as they relate to biomass accumulation. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield.

  5. Interleukin 1 is an autocrine regulator of human endothelial cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzolino, F.; Torcia, M.; Aldinucci, D.; Ziche, M.; Bani, D.; Almerigogna, F.; Stern, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Proliferation of endothelial cells is regulated through the autocrine production of growth factors and the expression of cognate surface receptors. In this study, the authors demonstrate that interleukin 1 (IL-1) is an inhibitor of endothelial growth in vitro and in vivo. IL-1 arrested growing, cultured endothelial cells in G 1 phase; inhibition of proliferation was dose dependent and occurred in parallel with occupancy of endothelial surface IL-1 receptors. In an angiogenesis model, IL-1 could inhibit fibroblast growth factor-induced vessel formation. The autocrine nature of the IL-1 effect on endothelial proliferation was demonstrated by the observation that occupancy of cell-surface receptors by endogenous IL-1 depressed cell growth. The potential significance of this finding was emphasized by the detection of IL-1 in the native endothelium of human umbilical veins. A mechanism by which IL-1 may exert its inhibitory effect on endothelial cell growth was suggested by studies showing that IL-1 decreased the expression of high-affinity fibroblast growth factor binding sites on endothelium. These results point to a potentially important role of IL-1 in regulating blood vessel growth the suggest that autocrine production of inhibitory factors may be a mechanism controlling proliferation of normal cells

  6. The AP2 clathrin adaptor protein complex regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garafalo, Steven D; Luth, Eric S; Moss, Benjamin J; Monteiro, Michael I; Malkin, Emily; Juo, Peter

    2015-05-15

    Regulation of glutamate receptor (GluR) abundance at synapses by clathrin-mediated endocytosis can control synaptic strength and plasticity. We take advantage of viable, null mutations in subunits of the clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex in Caenorhabditis elegans to characterize the in vivo role of AP2 in GluR trafficking. In contrast to our predictions for an endocytic adaptor, we found that levels of the GluR GLR-1 are decreased at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of animals with mutations in the AP2 subunits APM-2/μ2, APA-2/α, or APS-2/σ2. Rescue experiments indicate that APM-2/μ2 functions in glr-1-expressing interneurons and the mature nervous system to promote GLR-1 levels in the VNC. Genetic analyses suggest that APM-2/μ2 acts upstream of GLR-1 endocytosis in the VNC. Consistent with this, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of apm-2 mutants. However, GLR-1 does not appear to accumulate at the plasma membrane of the cell body as expected, but instead accumulates in intracellular compartments including Syntaxin-13- and RAB-14-labeled endosomes. This study reveals a novel role for the AP2 clathrin adaptor in promoting the abundance of GluRs at synapses in vivo, and implicates AP2 in the regulation of GluR trafficking at an early step in the secretory pathway. © 2015 Garafalo et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Nerve growth factor alters microtubule targeting agent-induced neurotransmitter release but not MTA-induced neurite retraction in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Sherry K; Gracias, Neilia G; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of anticancer treatment with the microtubule-targeted agents (MTAs), paclitaxel and epothilone B (EpoB); however, the mechanisms by which the MTAs alter neuronal function and morphology are unknown. We previously demonstrated that paclitaxel alters neuronal sensitivity, in vitro, in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Evidence in the literature suggests that NGF may modulate the neurotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Here, we examine whether NGF modulates changes in neuronal sensitivity and morphology induced by paclitaxel and EpoB. Neuronal sensitivity was assessed using the stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), whereas morphology of established neurites was evaluated using a high content screening system. Dorsal root ganglion cultures, maintained in the absence or presence of NGF, were treated from day 7 to day 12 in culture with paclitaxel (300nM) or EpoB (30nM). Following treatment, the release of CGRP was stimulated using capsaicin or high extracellular potassium. In the presence of NGF, EpoB mimicked the effects of paclitaxel: capsaicin-stimulated release was attenuated, potassium-stimulated release was slightly enhanced and the total peptide content was unchanged. In the absence of NGF, both paclitaxel and EpoB decreased capsaicin- and potassium-stimulated release and the total peptide content, suggesting that NGF may reverse MTA-induced hyposensitivity. Paclitaxel and EpoB both decreased neurite length and branching, and this attenuation was unaffected by NGF in the growth media. These differential effects of NGF on neuronal sensitivity and morphology suggest that neurite retraction is not a causative factor to alter neuronal sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation and biological activity of a new plant growth regulator of Vicia faba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembdner, G.; Dathe, W.; Bergner, C.; Roensch, H.

    1983-01-01

    Jasmonic acid was identified as a plant growth inhibitor of the pericarp of Vicia faba by means of gas-liquid chromatography, high resolution mass spectrometry as well as 1 H and 13 C NMR. The highest level of jasmonic acid was reached during intensive pericarp growth. Jasmonic acid is a plant growth inhibitor possessing a relative activity in the wheat seedling bioassay of 1-2.5 % compared to ABA (=100%). Contrary to ABA, jasmonic acid does not cause retardation of leaf emergence. In the dwarf rice gibberellin bioassay relative low concentrations of jasmonic acid inhibit both autonomous and GA 3 -stimulated growth. Jasmonic acid does not influence seed germination of Amaranthus caudatus. The possible physiological role of jasmonic acid in the Vicia pericarp and the distribution in plants of this new plant growth regulator type are discussed. (author)

  9. Isolation and biological activity of a new plant growth regulator of Vicia faba L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembdner, G.; Dathe, W.; Bergner, C.; Roensch, H. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Halle/Saale. Inst. fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen)

    1983-01-01

    Jasmonic acid was identified as a plant growth inhibitor of the pericarp of Vicia faba by means of gas-liquid chromatography, high resolution mass spectrometry as well as /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR. The highest level of jasmonic acid was reached during intensive pericarp growth. Jasmonic acid is a plant growth inhibitor possessing a relative activity in the wheat seedling bioassay of 1-2.5 % compared to ABA (=100%). Contrary to ABA, jasmonic acid does not cause retardation of leaf emergence. In the dwarf rice gibberellin bioassay relative low concentrations of jasmonic acid inhibit both autonomous and GA/sub 3/-stimulated growth. Jasmonic acid does not influence seed germination of Amaranthus caudatus. The possible physiological role of jasmonic acid in the Vicia pericarp and the distribution in plants of this new plant growth regulator type are discussed.

  10. Neural stem cells enhance nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zhou, Shuai; Feng, Guo-Ying; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi; Liu, Qian; Huang, Fei

    2012-10-01

    With the development of tissue engineering and the shortage of autologous nerve grafts in nerve reconstruction, cell transplantation in a conduit is an alternative strategy to improve nerve regeneration. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) on sciatic nerve injury in rats. At the transection of the sciatic nerve, a 10-mm gap between the nerve stumps was bridged with a silicon conduit filled with 5 × 10(5) NSCs. In control experiments, the conduit was filled with nerve growth factor (NGF) or normal saline (NS). The functional and morphological properties of regenerated nerves were investigated, and expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and NGF was measured. One week later, there was no connection through the conduit. Four or eight weeks later, fibrous connections were evident between the proximal and distal segments. Motor function was revealed by measurement of the sciatic functional index (SFI) and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). Functional recovery in the NSC and NGF groups was significantly more advanced than that in the NS group. NSCs showed significant improvement in axon myelination of the regenerated nerves. Expression of NGF and HGF in the injured sciatic nerve was significantly lower in the NS group than in the NSCs and NGF groups. These results and other advantages of NSCs, such as ease of harvest and relative abundance, suggest that NSCs could be used clinically to enhance peripheral nerve repair.

  11. Somatostatin is required for masculinization of growth hormone–regulated hepatic gene expression but not of somatic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Malcolm J.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Parlow, Albert F.; Ramirez, Jose L.; Kumar, Ujendra; Patel, Yogesh C.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    Pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion differs between males and females and regulates the sex-specific expression of cytochrome P450s in liver. Sex steroids influence the secretory dynamics of GH, but the neuroendocrine mechanisms have not been conclusively established. Because periventricular hypothalamic somatostatin (SST) expression is greater in males than in females, we generated knockout (Smst–/–) mice to investigate whether SST peptides are necessary for sexually differentiated GH secretion and action. Despite marked increases in nadir and median plasma GH levels in both sexes of Smst–/– compared with Smst+/+ mice, the mutant mice had growth curves identical to their sibling controls and retained a normal sexual dimorphism in weight and length. In contrast, the liver of male Smst–/– mice was feminized, resulting in an identical profile of GH-regulated hepatic mRNAs between male and female mutants. Male Smst-/- mice show higher expression of two SST receptors in the hypothalamus and pituitary than do females. These data indicate that SST is required to masculinize the ultradian GH rhythm by suppressing interpulse GH levels. In the absence of SST, male and female mice exhibit similarly altered plasma GH profiles that eliminate sexually dimorphic liver function but do not affect dimorphic growth. PMID:11413165

  12. Daily changes in temperature, not the circadian clock, regulate growth rate in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick A Matos

    Full Text Available Plant growth is commonly regulated by external cues such as light, temperature, water availability, and internal cues generated by the circadian clock. Changes in the rate of growth within the course of a day have been observed in the leaves, stems, and roots of numerous species. However, the relative impact of the circadian clock on the growth of grasses has not been thoroughly characterized. We examined the influence of diurnal temperature and light changes, and that of the circadian clock on leaf length growth patterns in Brachypodium distachyon using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Pronounced changes in growth rate were observed under combined photocyles and thermocycles or with thermocycles alone. A considerably more rapid growth rate was observed at 28°C than 12°C, irrespective of the presence or absence of light. In spite of clear circadian clock regulated gene expression, plants exhibited no change in growth rate under conditions of constant light and temperature, and little or no effect under photocycles alone. Therefore, temperature appears to be the primary cue influencing observed oscillations in growth rate and not the circadian clock or photoreceptor activity. Furthermore, the size of the leaf meristem and final cell length did not change in response to changes in temperature. Therefore, the nearly five-fold difference in growth rate observed across thermocycles can be attributed to proportionate changes in the rate of cell division and expansion. A better understanding of the growth cues in B. distachyon will further our ability to model metabolism and biomass accumulation in grasses.

  13. Methodology for evaluating the insect growth regulator (IGR) methoprene incorporated into packaging films

    Science.gov (United States)

    The insect growth regulator methoprene has been impregnated onto various packaging materials to control stored product insects, and is labeled for use in this manner in the United States. Different methodologies were utilized to evaluate efficacy towards Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour b...

  14. A progesterone-brown fat axis is involved in regulating fetal growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIlvride, Saraid; Mushtaq, Aleena; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Hurling, Chloe; Steel, Jennifer; Jansen, Eugène; Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Williamson, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with profound maternal metabolic changes, necessary for the growth and development of the fetus, mediated by reproductive signals acting on metabolic organs. However, the role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in regulating gestational metabolism is unknown. We show that BAT

  15. delta-EF1 is a negative regulator of Ihh in the developing growth plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Ellen; Luyten, Frank P; Tylzanowski, Przemko

    2009-11-30

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in the growth plate. Although the biology of Ihh is currently well documented, its transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. delta-EF1 is a two-handed zinc finger/homeodomain transcriptional repressor. Targeted inactivation of mouse delta-EF1 leads to skeletal abnormalities including disorganized growth plates, shortening of long bones, and joint fusions, which are reminiscent of defects associated with deregulation of Ihh signaling. Here, we show that the absence of delta-EF1 results in delayed hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and increased cell proliferation in the growth plate. Further, we demonstrate that delta-EF1 binds to the putative regulatory elements in intron 1 of Ihh in vitro and in vivo, resulting in down-regulation of Ihh expression. Finally, we show that delta-EF1 haploinsufficiency leads to a postnatal increase in trabecular bone mass associated with enhanced Ihh expression. In summary, we have identified delta-EF1 as an in vivo negative regulator of Ihh expression in the growth plate.

  16. Cytokinins as key regulators in plant–microbe–insect interactions: connecting plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giron, D.; Frago, E.; Glevarec, G.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Plant hormones play important roles in regulating plant growth and defence by mediating developmental processes and signalling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of parasitic and mutualistic biotic interactions. 2. Plants are known to rapidly respond to pathogen and herbivore

  17. Effect of gamma radiation and some growth regulators on ripening and senescence in mango fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kady, S.M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken during the seasons of 1979 and 1980 to study the effect of gamma irradiation, some growth regulators, benlate and 'vaporgard' on ripening and senescence of 'Hindi Be - Sinnara' mango fruits during storage under room conditions and also to determine the optimum treatment for maximum extension in shelf - life

  18. The effect of plant growth regulators on optimization of tissue culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mature seeds of four upland rice cultivars namely Kusan, Lamsan, Selasi and Siam were assessed for callus induction and plant regeneration on different concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators, incorporated into MS (Murashige and Skoog) basal medium. Callus induction frequency was significantly ...

  19. The effect of plant growth regulators on callus initiation in wormwood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out in the Biotechnology laboratory of Plant Science Department of Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria to study the effect of some plant growth regulators on the in vitro initiation of callus using the leaves of Chiyong variety of Artemisia annua. The explants were sterilized and incubated on Murashige ...

  20. The effect of plant growth regulators and their interaction with electric current on winter wheat development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biesaga-Koscielniak, J.; Koscielniak, J.; Filek, M.; Marcinska, I.; Krekule, Jan; Macháčková, Ivana; Kubon, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2010), s. 987-995 ISSN 0137-5881 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : In vitro culture * Plant growth regulators * Electric current Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2010

  1. Genetic activity of plant growth regulators, cartolin and benzilandenin, under ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilenskij, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Protective effects of a new cytokinin-type growth regulator cartolin (CRT) are established on a genetic test system of waxy-changes in pollen barley grains under acute irradiation of growing plants. It is shown that the CRT effect is similar to that of synthetic cytokinin benziladenin

  2. [THE REGULATING EFFECT OF DIPEPTIDES ON CELL PROLIFERATION IN NERVE TISSUE CULTURE IN MAMMALS AND ON ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN INSECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisova, N I; Zachepilo, T G; Kamyshev, N G; Lopatina, N G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dipeptides AspPro and AspSer and of their composing amino acids (asparagine acid--Asp, proline--Pro, serin--Ser) on the proliferative activity in the explants of cortex and subcortical structures of the rat brain and on the functional activity of CNS of the honeybee was studied. The square index defined as a proportion of the whole explant square to the square of its central zone was determined. The number of bees responded with the conditional reaction (proboscis extension in the direction to aromatized solution) after 1 min (short-term memory) and 180 min (long-term memory) was detected after single learning procedure. Both dipeptides, as well as the asparagine acid, stimulated an increase of the growth zone of the subcortical structure explants in rats and of the number of honeybees with retention of conditional reaction in the short-term/long-term memory independently of the effect of the second member of the dipeptide. The unidirectionality of the effect suggests the existence of common mechanisms of reception and signal transduction established during evolution that require the further study.

  3. Growth-Rate Dependent Regulation of tRNA Level and Charging in Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Iolanda; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-10-13

    Cellular growth crucially depends on protein synthesis and the abundance of translational components. Among them, aminoacyl-tRNAs play a central role in biosynthesis and shape the kinetics of mRNA translation, thus influencing protein production. Here, we used microarray-based approaches to determine the charging levels and tRNA abundance of Bacillus licheniformis. We observed an interesting cross-talk among tRNA expression, charging pattern, and growth rate. For a large subset of tRNAs, we found a co-regulated and augmented expression at high growth rate. Their tRNA aminoacylation level is kept relatively constant through riboswitch-regulated expression of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase (AARS). We show that AARSs with putative riboswitch-controlled expression are those charging tRNAs with amino acids which disfavor cell growth when individually added to the nutrient medium. Our results suggest that the riboswitch-regulated AARS expression in B. licheniformis is a powerful mechanism not only to maintain a constant ratio of aminoacyl-tRNA independent of the growth rate but concomitantly to control the intracellular level of free amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Focal adhesion kinase regulates neuronal growth, synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Pollak, Daniela D; Cabatic, Maureen; Li, Lin; Baston, Arthur; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain and highly enriched in neuronal growth cones. Inhibitory and facilitatory activities of FAK on neuronal growth have been reported and its role in neuritic outgrowth remains controversial. Unlike other tyrosine kinases, such as the neurotrophin receptors regulating neuronal growth and plasticity, the relevance of FAK for learning and memory in vivo has not been clearly defined yet. A comprehensive study aimed at determining the role of FAK in neuronal growth, neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons and in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory was therefore undertaken using the mouse model. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments indicated that FAK is a critical regulator of hippocampal cell morphology. FAK mediated neurotrophin-induced neuritic outgrowth and FAK inhibition affected both miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials and activity-dependent hippocampal long-term potentiation prompting us to explore the possible role of FAK in spatial learning and memory in vivo. Our data indicate that FAK has a growth-promoting effect, is importantly involved in the regulation of the synaptic function and mediates in vivo hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Synthesis Of 2- (1- Naphthyl) Ethanoic Acid ( Plant Growth Regulator ) From Coal Tar And Its Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin Mooh Theint; Tin Myint Htwe

    2011-12-01

    Plant growth regulators, which are commonly called as plant hormones, naturally produced non-nutrient chemical compounds involved in growth and development. Among the various kinds of plant growth regulators, 2- (1- Naphthyl ) ethanoic acid especially encourages the root development of the plant. In this work, NAA was successfuly synthesized from naphthalene which was extracted from coal tar. The purity of naphthalene, -Chloromethyl naphthalene, -Naphthyl acetonitrile, - Naphthyl acetic acid or 2 - ( 1-Naphthyl ) ethanoic acid were also confirmed by Thin Layer Chromatography, and by spectroscopy methods. The yield percent of NAA based on naphthalene was found to be 2.1%. The yield percent of naphthaleneFrom coal tar is found to be 4.09%. The effect of NAA on root development was also studied in different concentrations of soy bean (Glycine max)and cow pea (Vigna catjang walp).

  6. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis.

  7. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kaihola

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a child during pregnancy. In addition, serotonin (5-HT exerts neurotrophic actions with thus far not fully known effects in the offspring. The neurotrophic growth factor (NGF is involved in neuronal cell survival and differentiation, and altered placenta levels have been found to increase the risk for pregnancy complications, similar to those found in women treated with SSRIs. We therefore investigated whether the NGF signaling pathway was altered in the placenta from women treated with SSRIs (n = 12 and compared them with placenta from depressed (n = 12 and healthy mothers (n = 12. Results from immunohistochemical stainings revealed that placental NGF protein levels of SSRI-treated women were increased in both trophoblasts and endothelial cells compared with depressed and control women. In addition, downstream of the NGF receptor TrkA, increased levels of the signaling proteins ROCK2 and phosphorylated Raf-1 were found in stromal cells and a tendency towards increased levels of ROCK2 in trophoblasts and endothelial cells in SSRI-treated women when compared to healthy controls. SSRI-treated women also displayed increased levels of phosphorylated ROCK2 in all placental cell types studied in comparison with depressed and control women. Interestingly, in placental endothelial cells from depressed women, NGF levels were significantly lower compared to control women, but ROCK2 levels were increased compared with control and SSRI-treated women. Taken together, these results show that the NGF signaling and downstream pathways in the placenta are affected by SSRI treatment and/or antenatal depression. This might lead to an altered placental function, although the

  8. Emergence of robust growth laws from optimal regulation of ribosome synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Matthew; Klumpp, Stefan; Mateescu, Eduard M; Hwa, Terence

    2014-08-22

    Bacteria must constantly adapt their growth to changes in nutrient availability; yet despite large-scale changes in protein expression associated with sensing, adaptation, and processing different environmental nutrients, simple growth laws connect the ribosome abundance and the growth rate. Here, we investigate the origin of these growth laws by analyzing the features of ribosomal regulation that coordinate proteome-wide expression changes with cell growth in a variety of nutrient conditions in the model organism Escherichia coli. We identify supply-driven feedforward activation of ribosomal protein synthesis as the key regulatory motif maximizing amino acid flux, and autonomously guiding a cell to achieve optimal growth in different environments. The growth laws emerge naturally from the robust regulatory strategy underlying growth rate control, irrespective of the details of the molecular implementation. The study highlights the interplay between phenomenological modeling and molecular mechanisms in uncovering fundamental operating constraints, with implications for endogenous and synthetic design of microorganisms. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranga, Carla C.; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D.; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-01-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. - Highlights: • Lasiodiplodia theobromae produces a wide variety of fatty acid esters in natural substrates. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate inhibit tobacco germination at 0.2 mg/mL. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate induce tobacco germination at 98 ng/mL. • Tobacco growth increase in ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate parallels gibberellic acid. • A role as plant growth regulators is proposed for fatty acid esters.

  10. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga, Carla C., E-mail: curanga@cicese.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Beld, Joris, E-mail: joris.beld@drexelmed.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Mrse, Anthony, E-mail: amrse@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Córdova-Guerrero, Iván, E-mail: icordova@uabc.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC), Calzada Universidad 14418 Parque Industrial Internacional Tijuana, Tijuana, B.C. 22390 (Mexico); Burkart, Michael D., E-mail: mburkart@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Hernández-Martínez, Rufina, E-mail: ruhernan@cicese.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. - Highlights: • Lasiodiplodia theobromae produces a wide variety of fatty acid esters in natural substrates. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate inhibit tobacco germination at 0.2 mg/mL. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate induce tobacco germination at 98 ng/mL. • Tobacco growth increase in ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate parallels gibberellic acid. • A role as plant growth regulators is proposed for fatty acid esters.

  11. Hedgehog signaling contributes to basic fibroblast growth factor-regulated fibroblast migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhong Xin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Sun, Cong Cong [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Ting Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Wang, Tao; Chi, Li Sha; Cai, Wan Hui [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zheng, Jia Yong [Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhou, Xuan [Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Cong, Wei Tao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Xiao Kun, E-mail: proflxk@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Jin, Li Tai, E-mail: jin_litai@126.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2017-06-15

    Fibroblast migration is a central process in skin wound healing, which requires the coordination of several types of growth factors. bFGF, a well-known fibroblast growth factor (FGF), is able to accelerate fibroblast migration; however, the underlying mechanism of bFGF regulation fibroblast migration remains unclear. Through the RNA-seq analysis, we had identified that the hedgehog (Hh) canonical pathway genes including Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1, were regulated by bFGF. Further analysis revealed that activation of the Hh pathway via up-regulation of Smo promoted fibroblast migration, invasion, and skin wound healing, but which significantly reduced by GANT61, a selective antagonist of Gli1/Gli2. Western blot analyses and siRNA transfection assays demonstrated that Smo acted upstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-β-catenin to promote cell migration. Moreover, RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that Hh pathway genes including Smo and Gli1 were under control of β-catenin, suggesting that β-catenin turn feedback activates Hh signaling. Taken together, our analyses identified a new bFGF-regulating mechanism by which Hh signaling regulates human fibroblast migration, and the data presented here opens a new avenue for the wound healing therapy. - Highlights: • bFGF regulates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in fibroblasts. • The Smo and Gli two master regulators of Hh signaling positively regulate fibroblast migration. • Smo facilitates β-catenin nuclear translocation via activation PI3K/JNK/GSK3β. • β-catenin positively regulates fibroblast cell migration and the expression of Hh signaling genes including Smo and Gli.

  12. Hedgehog signaling contributes to basic fibroblast growth factor-regulated fibroblast migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhong Xin; Sun, Cong Cong; Ting Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Wang, Tao; Chi, Li Sha; Cai, Wan Hui; Zheng, Jia Yong; Zhou, Xuan; Cong, Wei Tao; Li, Xiao Kun; Jin, Li Tai

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is a central process in skin wound healing, which requires the coordination of several types of growth factors. bFGF, a well-known fibroblast growth factor (FGF), is able to accelerate fibroblast migration; however, the underlying mechanism of bFGF regulation fibroblast migration remains unclear. Through the RNA-seq analysis, we had identified that the hedgehog (Hh) canonical pathway genes including Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1, were regulated by bFGF. Further analysis revealed that activation of the Hh pathway via up-regulation of Smo promoted fibroblast migration, invasion, and skin wound healing, but which significantly reduced by GANT61, a selective antagonist of Gli1/Gli2. Western blot analyses and siRNA transfection assays demonstrated that Smo acted upstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-β-catenin to promote cell migration. Moreover, RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that Hh pathway genes including Smo and Gli1 were under control of β-catenin, suggesting that β-catenin turn feedback activates Hh signaling. Taken together, our analyses identified a new bFGF-regulating mechanism by which Hh signaling regulates human fibroblast migration, and the data presented here opens a new avenue for the wound healing therapy. - Highlights: • bFGF regulates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in fibroblasts. • The Smo and Gli two master regulators of Hh signaling positively regulate fibroblast migration. • Smo facilitates β-catenin nuclear translocation via activation PI3K/JNK/GSK3β. • β-catenin positively regulates fibroblast cell migration and the expression of Hh signaling genes including Smo and Gli.

  13. Stiff mutant genes of Phycomyces target turgor pressure and wall mechanical properties to regulate elongation growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph K. E. Ortega

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell growth is paramount to all living organisms. In plants, algae and fungi, regulation of expansive growth of cells is required for development and morphogenesis. Also, many sensory responses of stage IVb sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus are produced by regulating elongation growth rate (growth responses and differential elongation growth rate (tropic responses. Stiff mutant sporangiophores exhibit diminished tropic responses and are found to be defective in at least four genes; madD, madE, madF and madG. Prior experimental research suggests that the defective genes affect growth regulation, but this was not verified. All the growth of the single-celled stalk of the stage IVb sporangiophore occurs in a short region termed the growth zone. Prior experimental and theoretical research indicates that elongation growth rate of the stage IVb sporangiophore can be regulated by controlling the cell wall mechanical properties within the growth zone and the magnitude of the turgor pressure. A quantitative biophysical model for elongation growth rate is required to elucidate the relationship between wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure during growth regulation. In this study, it is hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the wall within the growth zone of stiff mutant sporangiophores are different compared to wild type. A biophysical equation for elongation growth rate is derived for fungal and plant cells with a growth zone. Two strains of stiff mutants are studied, C149 madD120 (- and C216 geo- (-. Experimental results demonstrate that turgor pressure is larger but irreversible deformation rates of the wall within the growth zone and growth zone length are smaller for stiff mutant sporangiophores compared to wild type. These findings explain the diminished tropic responses of the stiff mutant sporangiophores and suggest that the defective genes affect the amount of wall-building material delivered to the inner

  14. Effectiveness of growth regulators, based on the heterylcarbon acid, on forcing of Tulips (Tulips HD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derevianko Natalia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main factor in growing flowers for forcing is their rate of growth, on account of the fact that in short period of time it is necessary to grow quickly a large number of flowers and to cut them simultaneously. The influence of growth regulators (GR based on heterylcarbon acid on the forcing of tulips in greenhouse conditions (winter period was studied. It was determined that the application of GR1 of the basic within tulip’s forcing period reduces in average to 5 days (from all period of forcing. In case of application GR2 the tulip’s forcing period also reduces to 3 days (from all period of forcing compared with a control group of tulips. The ability of the plant growth regulators under research to accelerate growing properties of flowers is associated with the presence of heterylcarbon acid and potassium ions in their structure of substances. These growth regulators relate to non-toxic compounds and possess antioxidant properties.

  15. Prioritizing plant defence over growth through WRKY regulation facilitates infestation by non-target herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Jin; Li, Jiancai; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Bian, Wenbo; Erb, Matthias; Lou, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Plants generally respond to herbivore attack by increasing resistance and decreasing growth. This prioritization is achieved through the regulation of phytohormonal signaling networks. However, it remains unknown how this prioritization affects resistance against non-target herbivores. In this study, we identify WRKY70 as a specific herbivore-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated rice transcription factor that physically interacts with W-box motifs and prioritizes defence over growth by positively regulating jasmonic acid (JA) and negatively regulating gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis upon attack by the chewing herbivore Chilo suppressalis. WRKY70-dependent JA biosynthesis is required for proteinase inhibitor activation and resistance against C. suppressalis. In contrast, WRKY70 induction increases plant susceptibility against the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Experiments with GA-deficient rice lines identify WRKY70-dependent GA signaling as the causal factor in N. lugens susceptibility. Our study shows that prioritizing defence over growth leads to a significant resistance trade-off with important implications for the evolution and agricultural exploitation of plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04805.001 PMID:26083713

  16. elPBN neurons regulate rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections during activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, John C.; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Fu, Liang-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN) within the pons and rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) contributes to central processing of excitatory cardiovascular reflexes during stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves (CSAN). However, the importance of elPBN cardiovascular neurons in regulation of rVLM activity during CSAN activation remains unclear. We hypothesized that CSAN stimulation excites the elPBN cardiovascular neurons and, in turn, increases rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections. Compared with controls, in rats subjected to microinjection of retrograde tracer into the rVLM, the numbers of elPBN neurons double-labeled with c-Fos (an immediate early gene) and the tracer were increased after CSAN stimulation (P < 0.05). The majority of these elPBN neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In cats, epicardial bradykinin and electrical stimulation of CSAN increased the activity of elPBN cardiovascular neurons, which was attenuated (n = 6, P < 0.05) after blockade of glutamate receptors with iontophoresis of kynurenic acid (Kyn, 25 mM). In separate cats, microinjection of Kyn (1.25 nmol/50 nl) into the elPBN reduced rVLM activity evoked by both bradykinin and electrical stimulation (n = 5, P < 0.05). Excitation of the elPBN with microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) significantly increased basal and CSAN-evoked rVLM activity. However, the enhanced rVLM activity induced by dl-homocysteic acid injected into the elPBN was reversed following iontophoresis of Kyn into the rVLM (n = 7, P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiac sympathetic afferent stimulation activates cardiovascular neurons in the elPBN and rVLM sequentially through a monosynaptic (glutamatergic) excitatory elPBN-rVLM pathway. PMID:27225950

  17. Grass Carp Follisatin: Molecular Cloning, Functional Characterization, Dopamine D1 Regulation at Pituitary Level, and Implication in Growth Hormone Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. K. Fung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Activin is involved in pituitary hormone regulation and its pituitary actions can be nullified by local production of its binding protein follistatin. In our recent study with grass carp, local release of growth hormone (GH was shown to induce activin expression at pituitary level, which in turn could exert an intrapituitary feedback to inhibit GH synthesis and secretion. To further examine the activin/follistatin system in the carp pituitary, grass carp follistatin was cloned and confirmed to be single-copy gene widely expressed at tissue level. At the pituitary level, follistatin signals could be located in carp somatotrophs, gonadotrophs, and lactotrophs. Functional expression also revealed that carp follistatin was effective in neutralizing activin’s action in stimulating target promoter with activin-responsive elements. In grass carp pituitary cells, follistatin co-treatment was found to revert activin inhibition on GH mRNA expression. Meanwhile, follistatin mRNA levels could be up-regulated by local production of activin but the opposite was true for dopaminergic activation with dopamine (DA or its agonist apomorphine. Since GH stimulation by DA via pituitary D1 receptor is well-documented in fish models, the receptor specificity for follistatin regulation by DA was also investigated. Using a pharmacological approach, the inhibitory effect of DA on follistatin gene expression was confirmed to be mediated by pituitary D1 but not D2 receptor. Furthermore, activation of D1 receptor by the D1-specific agonist SKF77434 was also effective in blocking follistatin mRNA expression induced by activin and GH treatment both in carp pituitary cells as well as in carp somatotrophs enriched by density gradient centrifugation. These results, as a whole, suggest that activin can interact with dopaminergic input from the hypothalamus to regulate follistatin expression in carp pituitary, which may contribute to GH regulation by activin/follistatin system

  18. Molecular evolution of vertebrate neurotrophins: co-option of the highly conserved nerve growth factor gene into the advanced snake venom arsenalf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N W; Casewell, Nicholas R; Undheim, Eivind A B; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A; King, Glenn F; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation.

  19. Effects of varying doses of β-nerve growth factor on the timing of ovulation, plasma progesterone concentration and corpus luteum size in female alpacas (Vicugna pacos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C C; Vaughan, J L; Kershaw-Young, C M; Wilkinson, J; Bathgate, R; de Graaf, S P

    2015-11-01

    Ovulation in camelids is induced by the seminal plasma protein ovulation-inducing factor (OIF), recently identified as β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF). The present study measured the total protein concentration in alpaca seminal plasma using a bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein quantification assay and found it to be 22.2±2.0mgmL(-1). To measure the effects of varying doses of β-NGF on the incidence and timing of ovulation, corpus luteum (CL) size and plasma progesterone concentration, 24 female alpacas were synchronised and treated with either: (1) 1mL 0.9% saline (n=5); (2) 4µg buserelin (n=5); (3) 1mg β-NGF protein (n=5); (4) 0.1mg β-NGF (n=5); or (5) 0.01mg β-NGF (n=4). Females were examined by transrectal ultrasonography at 1-2-h intervals between 20 and 45h after treatment or until ovulation occurred, as well as on Day 8 to observe the size of the CL, at which time blood was collected to measure plasma progesterone concentrations. Ovulation was detected in 0/5, 5/5, 5/5, 3/5 and 0/4 female alpacas treated with saline, buserelin, 1, 0.1 and 0.01mg β-NGF, respectively. Mean ovulation interval (P=0.76), CL diameter (P=0.96) and plasma progesterone concentration (P=0.96) did not differ between treatments. Mean ovulation interval overall was 26.2±1.0h. In conclusion, buserelin and 1mg β-NGF are equally effective at inducing ovulation in female alpacas, but at doses ≤0.1mg, β-NGF is not a reliable method for the induction of ovulation.

  20. Molecular Evolution of Vertebrate Neurotrophins: Co-Option of the Highly Conserved Nerve Growth Factor Gene into the Advanced Snake Venom Arsenalf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Vidal, Nicolas; Ali, Syed A.; King, Glenn F.; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae) have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74%) and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%), while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation. PMID:24312363

  1. Decrease of urinary nerve growth factor but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome treated with hyaluronic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hong Jiang

    Full Text Available To investigate urinary nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS patients after hyaluronic acid (HA therapy.Thirty-three patients with IC/BPS were prospectively studied; a group of 45 age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. All IC/BPS patients received nine intravesical HA instillations during the 6-month treatment regimen. Urine samples were collected for measuring urinary NGF and BDNF levels at baseline and 2 weeks after the last HA treatment. The clinical parameters including visual analog scale (VAS of pain, daily frequency nocturia episodes, functional bladder capacity (FBC and global response assessment (GRA were recorded. Urinary NGF and BDNF levels were compared between IC/BPS patients and controls at baseline and after HA treatment.Urinary NGF, NGF/Cr, BDNF, and BDNF/Cr levels were significantly higher in IC/BPS patients compared to controls. Both NGF and NGF/Cr levels significantly decreased after HA treatment. Urinary NGF and NGF/Cr levels significantly decreased in the responders with a VAS pain reduction by 2 (both p < 0.05 and the GRA improved by 2 (both p < 0.05, but not in non-responders. Urinary BDNF and BDNF/Cr did not decrease in responders or non-responders after HA therapy.Urinary NGF, but not BDNF, levels decreased significantly after HA therapy; both of these factors remained higher than in controls even after HA treatment. HA had a beneficial effect on IC/BPS, but it was limited. The reduction of urinary NGF levels was significant in responders, with a reduction of pain and improved GRA.

  2. Molecular evolution of vertebrate neurotrophins: co-option of the highly conserved nerve growth factor gene into the advanced snake venom arsenalf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Sunagar

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a diverse class of structurally related proteins, essential for neuronal development, survival, plasticity and regeneration. They are characterized by major family members, such as the nerve growth factors (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, which have been demonstrated here to lack coding sequence variations and follow the regime of negative selection, highlighting their extremely important conserved role in vertebrate homeostasis. However, in stark contrast, venom NGF secreted as part of the chemical arsenal of the venomous advanced snake family Elapidae (and to a lesser extent Viperidae have characteristics consistent with the typical accelerated molecular evolution of venom components. This includes a rapid rate of diversification under the significant influence of positive-selection, with the majority of positively-selected sites found in the secreted β-polypeptide chain (74% and on the molecular surface of the protein (92%, while the core structural and functional residues remain highly constrained. Such focal mutagenesis generates active residues on the toxin molecular surface, which are capable of interacting with novel biological targets in prey to induce a myriad of pharmacological effects. We propose that caenophidian NGFs could participate in prey-envenoming by causing a massive release of chemical mediators from mast cells to mount inflammatory reactions and increase vascular permeability, thereby aiding the spread of other toxins and/or by acting as proapoptotic factors. Despite their presence in reptilian venom having been known for over 60 years, this is the first evidence that venom-secreted NGF follows the molecular evolutionary pattern of other venom components, and thus likely participates in prey-envenomation.

  3. Development of an imaging mitigation strategy for patient enrolment in the tanezumab nerve growth factor inhibitor (NGF-ab) program with a focus on eligibility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Miller, Colin G; West, Christine R; Brown, Mark T; Sherlock, Sarah P; Kompel, Andrew J; Diaz, Luis; Galante, Nicholas; Crema, Michel D; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Nerve growth factor antibodies (NGF-ab) have shown promising analgesic efficacy. Aim was to describe reader training efforts and present reliability data focusing on radiographic eligibility in the tanezumab program. A multi-step process was used for reader calibration and reliability testing. First, a reference standard set of cases was created and diagnostic performance was evaluated. A second exercise focused on agreement of ordinal assessment (Kellgren-Lawrence grading) of radiographic osteoarthritis. Subsequently, 11 readers were trained and read a test set of 100 cases focused on eligibility assessments. Additional reliability testing and calibration of five core readers assessing eligibility of 30 cases was performed 3 and 6 months after study start. Sensitivity for the reference standard readings ranged from 0.50 to 0.90 and specificity from 0.40 to 0.83. Overall agreement for Kellgren-Lawrence grading ranged from 71.4% to 82.9%. For the 11 reader exercise, in 76% of cases at least 8 of 11 readers agreed on eligibility status. For the reliability testing 3 months after study start, in 80.0% of cases at least 4 of 5 readers agreed on eligibility with a κ = 0.43 (95% CI: 0.32-0.54). For the reliability testing after 6 months, in 83.3% of cases at least 4 of 5 readers agreed on eligibility with a κ = 0.52 (95% CI: 0.41-0.63). After intense efforts spent in the development of an imaging program for an NGF-ab clinical program, the achieved reliability for eligibility assessment is substantial but not perfect. Ongoing efforts of calibration prior to including additional readers to the program and during study conduct between current readers will be needed to ensure agreement on potential adverse events and radiographic disease severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nerve growth factor induced changes in the Golgi apparatus of PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cells as studied by ligand endocytosis, cytochemical and morphometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, W F; Stieber, A; Hogue-Angeletti, R; Gonatas, J; GOnatas, N K

    1983-10-01

    Cells of the PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) by sprouting neurites and biochemically differentiating into sympathetic ganglion-like cells. NGF-stimulated ('differentiated') and unstimulated ('undifferentiated') cells were studied by cytochemical techniques for the localization of the enzymes acid phosphatase (ACPase) and thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase), and by a morphometric analysis of the distribution of endocytosed wheat-germ agglutinin labelled with horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP). Both cytochemical stains showed the enzymes to be distributed in lysosomes and certain cisternae of the Golgi apparatus in both NGF stimulated and unstimulated cells. ACPase was not confined to GERL (Golgi-endoplasmic reticulum-lysosome) as in certain other cells. The morphometric studies demonstrated that the reaction product of the internalized WGA-HRP occupied 4.7% of the cytoplasmic area in unstimulated cells and 4.5% in NGF-stimulated ones. Despite this similarity, the distribution of the WGA-HRP among the studied intracellular compartments in these two cell groups varied. In the NGF-stimulated cells 3.3% of the WGA-HRP reaction product was found in the innermost Golgi cisterna(e) while in unstimulated cells only 0.3% was seen in this compartment. Similarly, 4.3% of the WGA-HRP stain was found in small vesicles at the 'trans' aspect of the Golgi apparatus in stimulated cells, when only 0.3% of the stain occupied this compartment in 'undifferentiated' cells. The morphometric analysis also revealed that when the PC-12 cells were stimulated with NGF, the Golgi apparatus increased in area by approximately 70%. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that NGF induced differentiation of PC-12 cells is coupled with enhanced endocytosis of WGA and probably of its 'receptor' to the innermost Golgi cisterna(e) and the closely associated vesicles.

  5. Effect of 8 weeks resistance training on plasma levels of nerve growth factor and interlukin-6 in female patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Moghadasi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, evidence from a number of studies has suggested that exercise is a safe and efficient way to induce improvements in a number of physiological functions in multiple sclerosis (MS patients, but the effects of exercise on nerve growth factor (NGF and interlukin-6 (IL-6 in these patients are not well known. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 8 weeks resistance training on plasma NGF and IL-6 in female patients with MS. Materials and methods: Thirty two female MS patients with 32.4±5.5 years of old, and expanded disability status scale (EDSS 0-4.5, participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned to control group (n=13 and training group (n=14. Subjects in training group performed selected upper and lower extremities resistance training with weight-training equipment and rubber bands 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Body composition parameters, NGF and IL-6 levels were measured before and after the intervention. Results: The results showed that body weight, body mass index, body fat mass and EDSS were decreased significantly after 8 weeks in training group compared to control group (P<0.05. Also, no significant differences were seen after the intervention in NGF and IL-6 between the training and control groups. Conclusion: The results suggest resistance training with specific intensity and duration utilized in this study improves EDSS in female patients with MS but it has no effecting on NGF and IL-6 in these patients.

  6. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin B12–dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Mottram, Lynda; Lieben, Liesbet; Sharan, Kunal; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; Tubio, Jose; Lewis, Kirsty; Wilkinson, Debbie; Santhanam, Balaji; Sarper, Nazan; Clare, Simon; Vassiliou, George S.; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dougan, Gordon; Yadav, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    Both maternal and offspring-derived factors contribute to lifelong growth and bone mass accrual, although the specific role of maternal deficiencies in the growth and bone mass of offspring is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in a murine genetic model results in severe postweaning growth retardation and osteoporosis, and the severity and time of onset of this phenotype in the offspring depends on the maternal genotype. Using integrated physiological and metabolomic analysis, we determined that B12 deficiency in the offspring decreases liver taurine production and associates with abrogation of a growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) axis. Taurine increased GH-dependent IGF1 synthesis in the liver, which subsequently enhanced osteoblast function, and in B12-deficient offspring, oral administration of taurine rescued their growth retardation and osteoporosis phenotypes. These results identify B12 as an essential vitamin that positively regulates postweaning growth and bone formation through taurine synthesis and suggests potential therapies to increase bone mass. PMID:24911144

  8. Growth regulating properties of isoprene and isoprenoid-based essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew Maxwell P; Shukla, Mukund R; Sherif, Sherif M; Brown, Paula B; Saxena, Praveen K

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils have growth regulating properties comparable to the well-documented methyl jasmonate and may be involved in localized and/or airborne plant communication. Aromatic plants employ large amounts of resources to produce essential oils. Some essential oils are known to contain compounds with plant growth regulating activities. However, the potential capacity of essential oils as airborne molecules able to modulate plant growth/development has remained uninvestigated. Here, we demonstrate that essential oils from eight taxonomically diverse plants applied in their airborne state inhibited auxin-induced elongation of Pisum sativum hypocotyls and Avena sativa coleoptiles. This response was also observed using five monoterpenes commonly found in essential oils as well as isoprene, the basic building block of terpenes. Upon transfer to ambient conditions, A. sativa coleoptiles resumed elongation, demonstrating an antagonistic relationship rather than toxicity. Inclusion of essential oils, monoterpenes, or isoprene into the headspace of culture vessels induced abnormal cellular growth along hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. These responses were also elicited by methyl jasmonate (MeJA); however, where methyl jasmonate inhibited root growth essential oils did not. Gene expression studies in A. thaliana also demonstrated differences between the MeJA and isoprenoid responses. This series of experiments clearly demonstrate that essential oils and their isoprenoid components interact with endogenous plant growth regulators when applied directly or as volatile components in the headspace. The similarities between isoprenoid and MeJA responses suggest that they may act in plant defence signalling. While further studies are needed to determine the ecological and evolutionary significance, the results of this study and the specialized anatomy associated with aromatic plants suggest that essential oils may act as airborne signalling molecules.

  9. E2F1 regulates cellular growth by mTORC1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Real

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell proliferation, growth must occur to maintain homeostatic cell size. Here we show that E2F1 is capable of inducing growth by regulating mTORC1 activity. The activation of cell growth and mTORC1 by E2F1 is dependent on both E2F1's ability to bind DNA and to regulate gene transcription, demonstrating that a gene induction expression program is required in this process. Unlike E2F1, E2F3 is unable to activate mTORC1, suggesting that growth activity could be restricted to individual E2F members. The effect of E2F1 on the activation of mTORC1 does not depend on Akt. Furthermore, over-expression of TSC2 does not interfere with the effect of E2F1, indicating that the E2F1-induced signal pathway can compensate for the inhibitory effect of TSC2 on Rheb. Immunolocalization studies demonstrate that E2F1 induces the translocation of mTORC1 to the late endosome vesicles, in a mechanism dependent of leucine. E2F1 and leucine, or insulin, together affect the activation of S6K stronger than alone suggesting that they are complementary in activating the signal pathway. From these studies, E2F1 emerges as a key protein that integrates cell division and growth, both of which are essential for cell proliferation.

  10. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, a novel class of plant-specific growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox. Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of the plant growth regulator property of indolic compounds derived from safrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, Irineu; Rebelo, Ricardo Andrade; Rosa, Flavia A. Fernandes da; Maiochi, Riceli A.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the use of piperonal, a derivative of the secondary metabolite safrole, for the synthesis of new 5,6-methylenedioxy substituted indole carboxylic acids structurally related to the indol-3-yl-acetic acid (AIA, I). The route comprises six steps beginning with piperonal with an overall yield of 19%. Compound IX was tested towards its plant growth regulator properties in bioassays specific for auxine activity. The in vitro assays were performed in a germination chamber and were of two types: root growth in germinated seeds of Lactuca sativa, Cucumbis sativus and Raphanus sativus and peciole biotest using Phaseolus vulgaris. (author)

  12. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Acts as a Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Tumor Suppressor by Regulating Cellular Growth and Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Tracy; Stalens, Cristel; Gunderson, Felizza; Goodison, Steve; Silletti, Steve

    2009-01-01

    We have identified the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase syk as a marker of differentiation/tumor suppressor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Syk expression is lost in poorly differentiated PDAC cells in vitro and in situ, and stable reexpression of syk in endogenously syk-negative Panc1 (Panc1/syk) cells retarded their growth in vitro and in vivo and reduced anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Panc1/syk cells exhibited a more differentiated morphology and down-regulated cyclin D1, ak...

  13. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-01-01

    This study fundamentally alters our understanding of how TLR4 drives breast cancer. Although TLR4 was previously considered a tumor promoter, we demonstrate a complex, TP53-dependent role for TLR4 in regulating tumor growth. TP53 is a tumor suppressor commonly inactivated across cancer types. In TP53 wild-type cancer cells, TLR4 activation causes secretion of IFN-γ into the microenvironment, resulting in induction of p21 and inhibition of cell growth. Conversely, TLR4 activation in TP53 mutan...

  14. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  15. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  16. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  17. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  18. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-06-23

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30-50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types.

  19. Effects of light and growth regulators on adventitious bud formation in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, H; Tachikawa, Y; Saitou, T; Harada, H

    1995-07-01

    To clarify that the presence of Ri T-DNA genes are not prerequisite for the light-induced bud formation in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) hairy roots, leaf and root segments of nontransformed horseradish plants were used as explants. Bud formation from nontransformed tissues was observed in hormone-free medium under 16 h daylight conditions, but not under continuous darkness. To investigate the effects of growth regulators on bud formation, leaf and root explants were treated with auxin (1-naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA) and / or cytokinin (6-benzyl-aminopurine; BA). The most effective treatment in the dark to stimulate bud formation was BA at 1 mg·1(-1). These results show that adventitious bud formation in horseradish can be induced by light and growth regulators, and especially cytokinin, may be involved in bud formation, irrespective of whether the tissues were transformed with Ri T-DNA.

  20. Exogenously applied plant growth regulators enhance the morpho-physiological growth and yield of rice under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT and high night temperature (HNT. Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc, alpha-tocopherol (Ve, brassinosteroids (Br, methyl jasmonates (MeJA and triazoles (Tr were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above- and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  1. Regulation of myostatin expression is associated with growth and muscle development in commercial broiler and DMC muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dou, Tengfei; Li, Zhengtian; Wang, Kun; Liu, Lixian; Rong, Hua; Xu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Ying; Gu, Dahai; Chen, Xiaobo; Hu, Wenyuan; Zhang, Jiarong; Zhao, Sumei; Jois, Markandeya; Li, Qihua; Ge, Changrong; Pas, te Marinus F.W.; Jia, Junjing

    2018-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Muscle tissue is the largest tissue in the body and influences body growth. Commercial Avian broiler chickens are selected for high growth rate and muscularity. Daweishan mini chickens are a slow growing small-sized chicken breed. We

  2. Steroid-induced polycystic ovaries in rats: effect of electro-acupuncture on concentrations of endothelin-1 and nerve growth factor (NGF, and expression of NGF mRNA in the ovaries, the adrenal glands, and the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloe Luigi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies on the effect of repeated electro-acupuncture (EA treatments in rats with steriod-induced polycystic ovaries (PCO, EA has been shown to modulate nerve growth factor (NGF concentration in the ovaries as well as corticotropin releasing factor (CRF in the median eminence (ME. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that repeated EA treatments modulates sympathetic nerve activity in rats with PCO. This was done by analysing endothelin-1 (ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor involved in ovarian functions, as well as NGF and NGF mRNA expression involved in the pathophysiological process underlying steroid-induced PCO. The main result in the present study was that concentrations of ET-1 in the ovaries were significantly lower in the PCO group receiving EA compared with the healthy control group (p p p p

  3. The Use of Plant Growth Regulators to Improve the Traffic Tolerance and Repair of Overseeded Bermudagrass

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Christopher Scott

    2007-01-01

    An active football season during the fall acclimation period tests the traffic tolerance of bermudagrass. Exogenous applications of synthetic cytokinins or cytokinin-enhancing plant growth regulators (PGRs), such as trinexapac-ethyl, may improve the traffic tolerance of "Patriot" and "Tifsport" hybrid berudagrasses (Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon x Cynodon transvaalensis). This study was designed to mimic the agronomic practices and traffic stresses experienced at Virginia Tech's Worsham Fiel...

  4. Flavonols Mediate Root Phototropism and Growth through Regulation of Proliferation-to-Differentiation Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Javier; Moreno Risueño, Miguel Ángel; Manzano, Concepción; Téllez Robledo, Bárbara; Navarro Neila, Sara; Carrasco Loba, Víctor; Pollmann, Stephan; Gallego, Javier; Pozo Benito, Juan Carlos del

    2016-01-01

    Roots normally grow in darkness, but they may be exposed to light. After perceiving light, roots bend to escape from light (root light avoidance) and reduce their growth. How root light avoidance responses are regulated is not well understood. Here, we show that illumination induces the accumulation of flavonols in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. During root illumination, flavonols rapidly accumulate at the side closer to light in the transition zone. This accumulation promotes asymmetrical cell ...

  5. Effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Erik R; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, pest management of greenhouse crops relies on the use of biological control agents; however, pesticides are also widely used, especially when dealing with multiple arthropod pests and attempting to maintain high esthetic standards. As such, there is interest in using biological control agents in conjunction with chemical control. However, the prospects of combining natural enemies and pesticides are not well known in many systems. The rove beetle, Atheta coriaria (Kraatz), is a biological control agent mainly used against fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). This study evaluated the effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on A. coriaria adult survival, development, and prey consumption under laboratory conditions. Rove beetle survival was consistently higher when adults were released 24 h after rather than before applying pesticides. The pesticides acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin were harmful to rove beetle adults, whereas Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, azadirachtin, and organic oils (cinnamon oils, rosemary oil, thyme oil, and clove oil) were nontoxic to A. coriaria adults. Similarly, the plant growth regulators acymidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole were not harmful to rove beetle adults. In addition, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, kinoprene, organic oils, and the plant growth regulators did not negatively affect A. coriaria development. However, B. bassiana did negatively affect adult prey consumption. This study demonstrated that A. coriaria may not be used when applying the pesticides, acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin, whereas organic oils, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, and the plant growth regulators evaluated may be used in conjunction with A. coriaria adults. As such, these compounds may be used in combination with A. coriaria in greenhouse production systems.

  6. The effect of growth regulators on the uptake and distribution of calcium in Golden Delicious apples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenkamp, J.; De Villiers, O.T.

    1979-01-01

    45 Ca, applied to the roots of Golden Delicious apple seedlings, was readily absorbed and transported to the leaves. Application of NAAm to the leaves of seedlings significantly increased the uptake of 45 Ca, whereas the growth regulators GA 3 , kinetin, SADH, CEPA and 2,4,5-TP had no such effect. Application of NAAm to intact fruits and fruit discs also significantly increased the uptake of 45 Ca [af

  7. Tenascin-C in peripheral nerve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, M; Wehrle-Haller, B

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule tenascin/cytotactin (TN-C) is expressed at a high level by satellite (glial precursor) cells in developing peripheral nerves of the chick embryo; synthesis of its mRNA peaks at the time period when axonal growth is maximal. When offered as a substrate in vitro, TN-C mediates neurite outgrowth by both motor and sensory neurons. The ability to grow neurites on TN-C is developmentally regulated: sensory neurons from 4-day chick embryos (the stage at which peripheral nerves start to develop) grow immediately and rapidly, whereas neurons from older embryos respond with a long delay. A TN-C domain responsible for this activity is located within the C-terminal (distal) portion of TN-C subunits. Integrin receptors seem to be involved on peripheral neurites because their growth on TN-C is completely blocked by antibodies to beta 1 integrins. In striking contrast to neuronal processes, nerve satellite cells can attach to a TN-C substrate but are completely inhibited in their migratory activity. Artificial substrate borders between tenascin and fibronectin or laminin act as selective barriers that allow neurites to pass while holding up satellite cells. The repulsive action of TN-C on satellite cells is similar to that observed for other cell types and is likely to be mediated by additional TN-C domains. In view of these data, it is surprising that mice seem to develop normally without a functional TN-C gene. TN-C is likely to be redundant, that is, its dual action on cell adhesion is shared by other molecules.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Improvement of Salt Tolerance in Trigonella foenum-graecum L. var. PEB by Plant Growth Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Ratnakar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The crop yield is reduced under saline conditions and this hampers agricultural productivity. The incorporation of plant growth regulators (PGRs during presoaking treatments in many crops has improved seed performance under saline conditions. In order to study the ameliorative effect of plant growth regulators, experiments were conducted to study the variation in organic constituents in the leaves of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. var.PEB, where the seeds were primed with different plant growth regulators and grown under NaCl salinity. After a pre-soaking treatment of six hours in 20 mg L-1 solutions of gibberllic acid (GA3, 6-furfuryladenine (Kinetin and benzyl adenine (BA, the seeds were allowed to germinate and grow for forty-five days under saline conditions. On the analysis of mature leaves, it was observed that chlorophyll a and b, total chlorophyll and protein showed an increase in PGR-treated plants compared to the untreated set. The accumulation of the stress metabolite such as proline and sugars, which increase under saline conditions, showed a significant decrease in the plants pretreated with PGRs.

  9. Role of plant growth regulators on oil yield and biodiesel production of linseed (linum usitatissimum l)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizanullah, A.; Bano, A.; Nosheen, A.

    2010-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to compare the effect of plant growth regulators (PGRs) viz. kinetin (K), chlorocholine chloride (CCC) and salicylic acid (SA) on seed yield, oil content and oil quality of Linseed (Linum usitatissimum L) cv. Chandni with a new perspective to biodiesel production. The growth regulators (10-6M) were applied as seed soaking for 10 h prior to cultivation. Kinetin significantly increased the number of capsules/plant, seed number/capsule, 1000 seed weight and total seed yield (kg/h). The growth regulators increased the seed oil content maximum being in kinetin and CCC treatments. Kinetin and CCC significantly decreased the oil acid value, free fatty acid content (% oleic acid) and increased the pH of oil. Nevertheless, SA significantly decreased the oil specific gravity and did not alter the pH. Only kinetin significantly increased the oil iodine value. The oil extracted from seeds of kinetin and CCC treated plants showed maximum conversion (% w/w) to methyl esters/biodiesel after transesterification. It can be inferred that PGRs can be utilized successfully for improving the biodiesel yield of linseed. (author)

  10. Effects of plant growth regulators in heliconia ‘Red Opal’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecilia Ribeiro de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate growth regulators with purpose of reducing the size of heliconia ‘Red Opal’ potted plants. The experiment was carried out in randomized block design with five treatments (trinexapac-ethyl and paclobutrazol at rates of 37.5 and 75.0 mg of active ingredient per pot and control without growth regulator and five replicates. The treatments were applied 40 days after planting the rhizomes in pots filled with soil. Thirty and 150 days after the growth regulator application, plant height, number of leaves and shoots, petioles length and leaf area were evaluated. One year after planting the rhizomes in pots the number of inflorescence and leaves (leaves, sheathing leaf bases and inflorescences and rhizomes (rhizomes and roots dry mass were determined. Trinexapac-ethyl had no differences compared to the control in any of the variables evaluated. Paclobutrazol proved effective in reducing plant height, leaf area and petiole length and increase in number of leaves and shoots but the effect was temporary. Also, it did not affect the inflorescences production and leaves and rhizomes dry mass. Paclobutrazol is efficient to promote height reduction and to increase the number of shoots in heliconia ‘Red Opal’ potted plants without affect the inflorescence formation but its effects is temporary.

  11. Effect of growth regulators on 'Brookfield' apple gas diffusion and metabolism under controlled atmosphere storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of growth regulators on gas diffusion and on metabolism of 'Brookfield' apple, and to determine their correlation with quality characteristics of fruit stored in controlled atmosphere. A completely randomized design was used with four replicates. After eight months of storage, the effects of water (control, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, AVG + ethephon, AVG + naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, ethephon + NAA, sole NAA, 1-MCP, ethylene absorption by potassium permanganate (ABS, AVG + ABS, and of AVG + 1-MCP - applied at different rates and periods - were evaluated on: gas diffusion rate, ethylene production, respiratory rate, internal ethylene concentration, internal CO2 content, mealiness, and intercellular space. Fruit from the control and sole NAA treatments had the highest mealiness occurrence. Growth regulators significantly changed the gaseous diffusion through the pulp of 'Brookfield' apple, mainly in the treatment AVG + ABS, which kept the highest gas diffusion rate. NAA spraying in the field, with or without another growth regulator, increased ripening metabolism by rising ethylene production and respiration rate, and reduced gas diffusion during shelf life. AVG spraying cannot avoid the ethephon effect during the ripening process, and reduces both the internal space and mealiness incidence, but it is not able to induce ethylene production or to increase respiration rates.

  12. Drosophila Big bang regulates the apical cytocortex and wing growth through junctional tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumpekos, Giorgos; Nemetschke, Linda; Knust, Elisabeth

    2018-03-05

    Growth of epithelial tissues is regulated by a plethora of components, including signaling and scaffolding proteins, but also by junctional tension, mediated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, how these players are spatially organized and functionally coordinated is not well understood. Here, we identify the Drosophila melanogaster scaffolding protein Big bang as a novel regulator of growth in epithelial cells of the wing disc by ensuring proper junctional tension. Loss of big bang results in the reduction of the regulatory light chain of nonmuscle myosin, Spaghetti squash. This is associated with an increased apical cell surface, decreased junctional tension, and smaller wings. Strikingly, these phenotypic traits of big bang mutant discs can be rescued by expressing constitutively active Spaghetti squash. Big bang colocalizes with Spaghetti squash in the apical cytocortex and is found in the same protein complex. These results suggest that in epithelial cells of developing wings, the scaffolding protein Big bang controls apical cytocortex organization, which is important for regulating cell shape and tissue growth. © 2018 Tsoumpekos et al.

  13. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Leaf Number, Leaf Area and Leaf Dry Matter in Grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor Ahmad BHAT

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of phenylureas (CPPU and brassinosteriod (BR along with GA (gibberellic acid were studied on seedless grape vegetative characteristics like leaf number, leaf area and leaf dry matter. Growth regulators were sprayed on the vines either once (7 days after fruit set or 15 days after fruit set or twice (7+15 days after fruit set. CPPU 2 ppm+BR 0.4 ppm+GA 25 ppm produced maximum number of leaves (18.78 while as untreated vines produced least leaf number (16.22 per shoot. Maximum leaf area (129.70 cm2 and dry matter content (26.51% was obtained with higher CPPU (3 ppm and BR (0.4 ppm combination along with GA 25 ppm. Plant growth regulators whether naturally derived or synthetic are used to improve the productivity and quality of grapes. The relatively high value of grapes justifies more expensive inputs. A relatively small improvement in yield or fruit quality can justify the field application of a very costly product. Application of new generation growth regulators like brassinosteroids and phenylureas like CPPU have been reported to increase the leaf number as well as leaf area and dry matter thereby indirectly influencing the fruit yield and quality in grapes.

  14. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  15. Graphene quantum dots as enhanced plant growth regulators: effects on coriander and garlic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Disha; Erande, Manisha B; Late, Dattatray J

    2015-10-01

    We report investigations on the use of graphene quantum dots for growth enhancement in coriander (Coriandrum sativam L.) and garlic (Allium sativum) plants. The as-received seeds of coriander and garlic were treated with 0.2 mg mL(-1) of graphene quantum dots for 3 h before planting. Graphene quantum dots enhanced the growth rate in coriander and garlic plants, including leaves, roots, shoots, flowers and fruits, when the seeds were treated with graphene quantum dots. Our investigations open up the opportunity to use graphene quantum dots as plant growth regulators that can be used in a variety of other food plants for high yield. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Self-regulating and diameter-selective growth of GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C-K; Hsu, C-W; Wu, C-T; Lan, Z-H; Mou, C-Y; Chen, C-C; Yang, Y-J; Chen, L-C; Chen, K-H

    2006-01-01

    We report diameter-selective growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) by using mono-dispersed Au nanoparticles (NPs) on a ligand-modified Si substrate. The thiol-terminal silane was found to be effective in producing well-dispersed Au NPs in low density on Si substrates so that the agglomeration of Au NPs during growth could be avoided. The resultant GaN NWs exhibited a narrow diameter distribution and their mean diameter was always larger than, while keeping a deterministic relation with, the size of the Au NPs from which they were grown. A self-regulating steady growth model is proposed to account for the size-control process

  17. Starch as a major integrator in the regulation of plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpice, Ronan; Pyl, Eva-Theresa; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Trenkamp, Sandra; Steinfath, Matthias; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Gibon, Yves; Usadel, Björn; Poree, Fabien; Piques, Maria Conceição; Von Korff, Maria; Steinhauser, Marie Caroline; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.; Guenther, Manuela; Hoehne, Melanie; Selbig, Joachim; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Altmann, Thomas; Stitt, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Rising demand for food and bioenergy makes it imperative to breed for increased crop yield. Vegetative plant growth could be driven by resource acquisition or developmental programs. Metabolite profiling in 94 Arabidopsis accessions revealed that biomass correlates negatively with many metabolites, especially starch. Starch accumulates in the light and is degraded at night to provide a sustained supply of carbon for growth. Multivariate analysis revealed that starch is an integrator of the overall metabolic response. We hypothesized that this reflects variation in a regulatory network that balances growth with the carbon supply. Transcript profiling in 21 accessions revealed coordinated changes of transcripts of more than 70 carbon-regulated genes and identified 2 genes (myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase, a Kelch-domain protein) whose transcripts correlate with biomass. The impact of allelic variation at these 2 loci was shown by association mapping, identifying them as candidate lead genes with the potential to increase biomass production. PMID:19506259

  18. LIGHT REGULATION OF GROWTH AND MELANIN FORMATION IN Inonotus оbliquus (Pers. Pilat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Poyedinok

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate possibilities of using different sources of low-intensity light for the regulation of mycelium growth and melanin synthesis by medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus (Pers. Pilat. Studies of the light’s influence on the linear growth, biomass accumulation and melanin synthesis I. obliquus were performed using experimental installations that provide both lasing (coherent light with specified parameters, as well as sources of incoherent light. It has been demonstrated that the greatest stimulating effect took place during the irradiation of mycelium with blue light. It has been found that further realization of photobiological effect is largely dependent on the method of cultivation. Irradiation with laser light within all studied wavelength ranges was more conducive to growth, biomass and melanin accumulation in the mushroom mycelium than incoherent light irradiation within the same wavelength range. Light treatment made it possible to significantly reduce the duration of fermentation. The results of studies allow considering lowintensity light in the visible part of the spectrum as a perspective growth and biosynthetic activity regulator of I. obliquus in the biotechnology of its cultivation.

  19. ANGUSTIFOLIA mediates one of the multiple SCRAMBLED signaling pathways regulating cell growth pattern in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Song, Sang-Kee; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-09-25

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, an atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SCRAMBLED (SCM), is required for multiple developmental processes including root epidermal cell fate determination, silique dehiscence, inflorescence growth, ovule morphogenesis, and tissue morphology. Previous work suggested that SCM regulates these multiple pathways using distinct mechanisms via interactions with specific downstream factors. ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN) is known to regulate cell and tissue morphogenesis by influencing cortical microtubule arrangement, and recently, the AN protein was reported to interact with the SCM protein. Therefore, we examined whether AN might be responsible for mediating some of the SCM-dependent phenotypes. We discovered that both scm and an mutant lines cause an abnormal spiral or twisting growth of roots, but only the scm mutant affected root epidermal patterning. The siliques of the an and scm mutants also exhibited spiral growth, as previously reported, but only the scm mutant altered silique dehiscence. Interestingly, we discovered that the spiral growth of roots and siliques of the scm mutant is rescued by a truncated SCM protein that lacks its kinase domain, and that a juxtamembrane domain of SCM was sufficient for AN binding in the yeast two-hybrid analysis. These results suggest that the AN protein is one of the critical downstream factors of SCM pathways specifically responsible for mediating its effects on cell/tissue morphogenesis through cortical microtubule arrangement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. GDP-D-mannose epimerase regulates male gametophyte development, plant growth and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tiancong; Liu, Zhipeng; Fan, Meng; Chen, Yan; Tian, Haixia; Wu, Dewei; Gao, Hua; Ren, Chunmei; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2017-09-04

    Plant GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, a precursor of both L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and cell wall polysaccharides. However, the genetic functions of GME in Arabidopsis are unclear. In this study, we found that mutations in Arabidopsis GME affect pollen germination, pollen tube elongation, and transmission and development of the male gametophyte through analysis of the heterozygous GME/gme plants and the homozygous gme plants. Arabidopsis gme mutants also exhibit severe growth defects and early leaf senescence. Surprisingly, the defects in male gametophyte in the gme plants are not restored by L-ascorbate, boric acid or GDP-L-galactose, though boric acid rescues the growth defects of the mutants, indicating that GME may regulate male gametophyte development independent of L-ascorbate and GDP-L-galactose. These results reveal key roles for Arabidopsis GME in reproductive development, vegetative growth and leaf senescence, and suggest that GME regulates plant growth and controls male gametophyte development in different manners.

  1. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity regulates the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Ahrens, Molly J; Wu, Amy; Liu, Jennifer; Dudley, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    For tissues that develop throughout embryogenesis and into postnatal life, the generation of differentiated cells to promote tissue growth is at odds with the requirement to maintain the stem cell/progenitor cell population to preserve future growth potential. In the growth plate cartilage, this balance is achieved in part by establishing a proliferative phase that amplifies the number of progenitor cells prior to terminal differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we show that endogenous calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamkII, also known as Camk2) activity is upregulated prior to hypertrophy and that loss of CamkII function substantially blocks the transition from proliferation to hypertrophy. Wnt signaling and Pthrp-induced phosphatase activity negatively regulate CamkII activity. Release of this repression results in activation of multiple effector pathways, including Runx2- and β-catenin-dependent pathways. We present an integrated model for the regulation of proliferation potential by CamkII activity that has important implications for studies of growth control and adult progenitor/stem cell populations.

  2. Self-regulated growth of LaVO3 thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    LaVO 3 thin films were grown on SrTiO 3 (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO 3 films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application

  3. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Avet-Rochex

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk, which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem

  4. Membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase ATL15 functions in sugar-responsive growth regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shoki; Terada, Saki; Sanagi, Miho; Hasegawa, Yoko; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Chiba, Yukako; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2017-09-09

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in regulating various cellular processes by modulating the protein function of specific ubiquitination targets. The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family is a group of plant-specific RING-type ubiquitin ligases that localize to membranes via their N-terminal transmembrane-like domains. To date, 91 ATL isoforms have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, with several ATLs reported to be involved in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. However, the functions of most ATLs remain unknown. This study, involving transcriptome database analysis, identifies ATL15 as a sugar responsive ATL gene in Arabidopsis. ATL15 expression was rapidly down-regulated in the presence of sugar. The ATL15 protein showed ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and localized to plasma membrane and endomembrane compartments. Further genetic analyses demonstrated that the atl15 knockout mutants are insensitive to high glucose concentrations, whereas ATL15 overexpression depresses plant growth. In addition, endogenous glucose and starch amounts were reciprocally affected in the atl15 knockout mutants and the ATL15 overexpressors. These results suggest that ATL15 protein plays a significant role as a membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase that regulates sugar-responsive plant growth in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MicroRNAs as growth regulators, their function and biomarker status in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekaite, Lina; Eide, Peter W.; Lind, Guro E.; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is in part regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). This review summarizes the current knowledge of miRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC); their role as growth regulators, the mechanisms that regulate the miRNAs themselves and the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers. Although thousands of tissue samples and bodily fluids from CRC patients have been investigated for biomarker potential of miRNAs (>160 papers presented in a comprehensive tables), none single miRNA nor miRNA expression signatures are in clinical use for this disease. More than 500 miRNA-target pairs have been identified in CRC and we discuss how these regulatory nodes interconnect and affect signaling pathways in CRC progression. PMID:26623728

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor: Implications for tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter S Yoo; Abby L Mulkeen; Charles H Cha

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent secreted mitogen critical for physiologic and tumor angiogenesis. Regulation of VEGF occurs at several levels, including transcription, mRNA stabilization,translation, and differential cellular localization of various isoforms. Recent advances in our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of VEGF include identification of the stabilizing mRNA binding protein, HuR, and the discovery of internal ribosomal entry sites in the 5'UTR of the VEGF mRNA. Monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody was recently approved for use in humans, but suffers from the need for high systemic doses. RNA interference (RNAi)technology is being used in vitro and in animal models with promising results. Here, we review the literature on post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF and describe recent progress in targeting these mechanisms for therapeutic benefit.

  7. Atg9 antagonizes TOR signaling to regulate intestinal cell growth and epithelial homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jung-Kun; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Cheng-Wen; Liao, Hsiao-Man; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2017-11-16

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival under various stress conditions. Autophagy-related gene 9 (Atg9) encodes a multipass transmembrane protein thought to act as a membrane carrier for forming autophagosomes. However, the molecular regulation and physiological importance of Atg9 in animal development remain largely unclear. Here, we generated Atg9 null mutant flies and found that loss of Atg9 led to shortened lifespan, locomotor defects, and increased susceptibility to stress. Atg9 loss also resulted in aberrant adult midgut morphology with dramatically enlarged enterocytes. Interestingly, inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway rescued the midgut defects of the Atg9 mutants. In addition, Atg9 interacted with PALS1-associated tight junction protein (Patj), which associates with TSC2 to regulate TOR activity. Depletion of Atg9 caused a marked decrease in TSC2 levels. Our findings revealed an antagonistic relationship between Atg9 and TOR signaling in the regulation of cell growth and tissue homeostasis.

  8. Effects of photoperiod, plant growth regulators and culture media on in vitro growth of seedlings of Cyrtochilum loxense (Lindl. Kraenzl. an endemic and endangered orchid from Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira González

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyrtochilum loxense (Lindl. Kraenzl. is an endemic and seriously endangered orchid species endemic in the Loja Province (Southern Ecuador. The main goals of this research were to analyze how culture media, plant growth regulators and photoperiod affect the growth of C. loxense. Eight month old plants (approximate 1 – 1.5 cm in height obtained by in vitro germination, were cultivated on MS media or Knudson C; MS with three levels of naphthalene acetic acid (NAA and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP (2/0.5; 1/0.5 y 0.5/ 0.5 mg-1L; and three photoperiodic regimes (24/0, 16/8, 8/16 h on MS with and without plant growth regulators. No significant differences of shoot induction were observed on media with or without plant growth regulators, and all tested photoperiods. The highest growth (1.2 cm was observed in plantlets cultivated on growth regulator-free media with a 16/8 photoperiod. Also the shoot and root formation was better in this species in absence of plant growth regulators. Probably this response is due to the endogenous hormone levels in the tissues or due to the kind and concentrations of PGRs used were too low to induce positive morphogenetic responses.

  9. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2

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    D'Orazi Gabriella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2 plays an essential role in restraining tumor progression as it may regulate, by itself or within multiprotein complexes, many proteins (mainly transcription factors involved in cell growth and apoptosis. This study takes advantage of the recent finding that HIPK2 may repress the β-catenin transcription activity. Thus, we investigated whether HIPK2 overexpression may down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels (a β-catenin target gene and the role of β-catenin in this regulation, in order to consider HIPK2 as a tool for novel anti-tumoral therapeutical approaches. Methods The regulation of VEGF expression by HIPK2 was evaluated by using luciferase assay with VEGF reporter construct, after overexpression of the β-catenin transcription factor. Relative quantification of VEGF and β-catenin mRNAs were assessed by reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analyses, following HIPK2 overexpression, while β-catenin protein levels were evaluated by western immunoblotting. Results HIPK2 overexpression in tumor cells downregulated VEGF mRNA levels and VEGF promoter activity. The VEGF downregulation was partly depending on HIPK2-mediated β-catenin regulation. Thus, HIPK2 could induce β-catenin protein degradation that was prevented by cell treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. The β-catenin degradation was dependent on HIPK2 catalytic activity and independent of p53 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β activities. Conclusion These results suggest that VEGF might be a target of HIPK2, at least in part, through regulation of β-catenin activity. These findings support the function of HIPK2 as tumor suppressor and hypothesise a role for HIPK2 as antiangiogenic tool in tumor therapy approaches.

  10. [Effectiveness of three biological larvicides and of an insect growth regulator against Anopheles arabiensis in Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diédhiou, S M; Konaté, L; Doucouré, S; Samb, B; Niang, E A; Sy, O; Thiaw, O; Konaté, A; Wotodjo, A N; Diallo, M; Gadiaga, L; Sokhna, C; Faye, O

    2017-05-01

    Urban malaria is a major public health problem in Africa. In Senegal, the environmental changes seem to favor the persistence of malaria transmission in Dakar suburbs by creating, throughout the year, potential breeding sites of malaria vectors. In such a situation and in a context of a growing threat of insecticide resistance in anopheline vectors, the larval control making use of products from biological origin or growth regulators could represent an additional tool to the current strategies developed against anophelines. In this study conducted in 2012, the efficiency and residual effect of three biological larvicides (VectoBac ® WG, Vecto-Max ® CG, and VectoBac ® GR) and an insect growth regulator (MetaLarv™) were evaluated on Anopheles gambiae s.l. larvae in seminatural conditions (experimental station) and natural breeding sites in the suburbs of Dakar. The formulations were tested according to the manufacturer recommendations, namely 0.03 g/m 2 for VectoBac ® WG, 0.5 g/m 2 for VectoBac ® GR, 0.75 g/m 2 for VectoMax ® CG, and 0.5 g/m 2 for MetaLarv™. In experimental station, the treatment with larvicides was effective over a period of 14 days with a mortality ranging between 92% and 100%. The insect growth regulator remained effective up to 55 days with a single emergence recorded in the 27th day after treatment. In natural conditions, a total effectiveness (100% mortality) of larvicides was obtained 48 hours after treatment, then a gradual recolonization of breeding sites was noted. However, the insect growth regulator has reduced adult emergence higher than 80% until the end of follow-up (J28). This study showed a good efficiency of the larvicides and of the growth regulator tested. These works provide current data on potential candidates for the implementation of larval control interventions in addition to that of chemical adulticide for control of urban malaria.

  11. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs and Planting Method on Growth and Yield in Oil Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirzad SURE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant growth regulators IBA (indole butyric acid, GA3 (gibberellin and ethylene (as ethephon in two methods of planting was investigated (each method was considered as a separate experiment on morphological characters and yield of medicinal pumpkin. The experiments were carried out in a factorial trial based on completely randomized block design, with four replicates. The treatments were combined with priming and spraying with the above PGRs. The first seed priming with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm, and when seedling developed to 4 leaf stage sprayed there with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm for three times. In both planting methods, there were all of these treatments. The result showed that PGRs and planting method had significant effects on vegetative, flowering and yield characteristics including: leaf area %DM plant, number of male and female flowers per plant, number of fruit/plant, fruits fresh weight, seeds length and width, number of seed per fruit, seed yield, % seeds oil and oil yield. Hence spraying with GA3 25 ppm in four leaf stage at trellis method could be a suitable treatment for enhancing growth and yield of medicinal pumpkin.

  12. Pro region engineering of nerve growth factor by deep mutational scanning enables a yeast platform for conformational epitope mapping of anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Cucurella, Angélica V; Zhu, Yaqi; Bowen, Scott J; Bergeron, Lisa M; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2018-04-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a central role in multiple chronic pain conditions. As such, anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that function by antagonizing NGF downstream signaling are leading drug candidates for non-opioid pain relief. To evaluate anti-canine NGF (cNGF) mAbs we sought a yeast surface display platform of cNGF. Both mature cNGF and pro-cNGF displayed on the yeast surface but bound conformationally sensitive mAbs at most 2.5-fold in mean fluorescence intensity above background, suggesting that cNGF was mostly misfolded. To improve the amount of folded, displayed cNGF, we used comprehensive mutagenesis, FACS, and deep sequencing to identify point mutants in the pro-region of canine NGF that properly enhance the folded protein displayed on the yeast surface. Out of 1,737 tested single point mutants in the pro region, 49 increased the amount of NGF recognized by conformationally sensitive mAbs. These gain-of-function mutations cluster around residues A-61-P-26. Gain-of-function mutants were additive, and a construct containing three mutations increased amount of folded cNGF to 23- fold above background. Using this new cNGF construct, fine conformational epitopes for tanezumab and three anti-cNGF mAbs were evaluated. The epitope revealed by the yeast experiments largely overlapped with the tanezumab epitope previously determined by X-ray crystallography. The other mAbs showed site-specific differences with tanezumab. As the number of binding epitopes of functionally neutralizing anti-NGF mAbs on NGF are limited, subtle differences in the individual interacting residues on NGF that bind each mAb contribute to the understanding of each antibody and variations in its neutralizing activity. These results demonstrate the potential of deep sequencing-guided protein engineering to improve the production of folded surface-displayed protein, and the resulting cNGF construct provides a platform to map conformational epitopes for other anti-neurotrophin m

  13. Cyclin G Functions as a Positive Regulator of Growth and Metabolism in Drosophila.

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    Patrick Fischer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms, growth and proliferation is adjusted to nutritional conditions by a complex signaling network. The Insulin receptor/target of rapamycin (InR/TOR signaling cascade plays a pivotal role in nutrient dependent growth regulation in Drosophila and mammals alike. Here we identify Cyclin G (CycG as a regulator of growth and metabolism in Drosophila. CycG mutants have a reduced body size and weight and show signs of starvation accompanied by a disturbed fat metabolism. InR/TOR signaling activity is impaired in cycG mutants, combined with a reduced phosphorylation status of the kinase Akt1 and the downstream factors S6-kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP. Moreover, the expression and accumulation of Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs is disturbed in cycG mutant brains. Using a reporter assay, we show that the activity of one of the first effectors of InR signaling, Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K92E, is unaffected in cycG mutants. However, the metabolic defects and weight loss in cycG mutants were rescued by overexpression of Akt1 specifically in the fat body and by mutants in widerborst (wdb, the B'-subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, known to downregulate Akt1 by dephosphorylation. Together, our data suggest that CycG acts at the level of Akt1 to regulate growth and metabolism via PP2A in Drosophila.

  14. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth by modulating cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

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    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells in vivo encounter diverse types of microenvironments both at the site of the primary tumor and at sites of distant metastases. Understanding how the various mechanical properties of these microenvironments affect the biology of tumor cells during disease progression is critical in identifying molecular targets for cancer therapy.This study uses flexible polyacrylamide gels as substrates for cell growth in conjunction with a novel proteomic approach to identify the properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cell lines that contribute to their differential growth on soft and rigid substrates. Compared to cells growing on more rigid/stiff substrates (>10,000 Pa, cells on soft substrates (150-300 Pa exhibited a longer cell cycle, due predominantly to an extension of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and were metabolically less active, showing decreased levels of intracellular ATP and a marked reduction in protein synthesis. Using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC and mass spectrometry, we measured the rates of protein synthesis of over 1200 cellular proteins under growth conditions on soft and rigid/stiff substrates. We identified cellular proteins whose syntheses were either preferentially inhibited or preserved on soft matrices. The former category included proteins that regulate cytoskeletal structures (e.g., tubulins and glycolysis (e.g., phosphofructokinase-1, whereas the latter category included proteins that regulate key metabolic pathways required for survival, e.g., nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a regulator of the NAD salvage pathway.The cellular properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cells growing on soft matrices are reminiscent of the properties of dormant cancer cells, e.g., slow growth rate and reduced metabolism. We suggest that the use of relatively soft gels as cell culture substrates would allow molecular pathways to be studied under conditions that reflect the different mechanical

  15. Predominant role of water in regulating the tree-growth response to diurnal asymmetric warmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Xia, J.; Cui, E.

    2017-12-01

    Growth of the Northern Hemisphere trees is affected by diurnal asymmetric warming, which is generally considered to touch off carbon assimilation and increment of carbon storage. Asymmetric effects of diurnal warming on vegetation greenness were validated in previous researches, however, the effect of diurnal warming on wood tissue which stores most carbon of a whole plant is still unknown. Here, we combined ring-width index (RWI), remote sensing-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and climate datasets to detect the effects of daytime and night-time warming on vegetation growth, respectively. Our results indicate that daytime warming enhances NDVI but has neutral effect on tree woody growth over the Northern Hemisphere. Response of wood growth to daytime warming is linearly regulated by soil water availability. The underlying mechanism of different response of canopy and wood growth to daytime warming may attribute to the biomass change, that is, allocation to foliage tissues increased at the expense of wood tissue under warming and water-limited conditions. Night-time warming show neutral effects on NDVI and RWI over the Northern Hemisphere, and the neutral Tmin-NDVI correlations result from the non-linear mediation of soil water availability. Our results highlight the current greening trend under daytime warming does not mean higher carbon sink capacity, the warming-drying climate may impair the large carbon sink of global forests.

  16. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine regulates Hedgehog signaling and promotes growth of cortical axons

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    Giorgi Kharebava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Axonogenesis, a process for the establishment of neuron connectivity, is central to brain function. The role of metabolites derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 that is specifically enriched in the brain, has not been addressed in axon development. In this study, we tested if synaptamide (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine, an endogenous metabolite of DHA, affects axon growth in cultured cortical neurons. We found that synaptamide increased the average axon length, inhibited GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1 transcription and sonic hedgehog (Shh target gene expression while inducing cAMP elevation. Similar effects were produced by cyclopamine, a regulator of the Shh pathway. Conversely, Shh antagonized elevation of cAMP and blocked synaptamide-mediated increase in axon length. Activation of Shh pathway by a smoothened (SMO agonist (SAG or overexpression of SMO did not inhibit axon growth mediated by synaptamide or cyclopamine. Instead, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished synaptamide-mediated axon growth indicating requirement of cAMP elevation for this process. Our findings establish that synaptamide promotes axon growth while Shh antagonizes synaptamide-mediated cAMP elevation and axon growth by a SMO-independent, non-canonical pathway.

  17. The role of nitrogen and phosphorus in regulating Phormidium sp. (cyanobacteria) growth and anatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Mark; Wood, Susie A; Young, Roger G; Ryan, Ken G

    2016-03-01

    Benthic proliferations of the cyanobacteria Phormidium can cover many kilometres of riverbed. Phormidium can produce neurotoxic anatoxins and ingestion of benthic mats has resulted in numerous animal poisonings in the last decade. Despite this, there is a poor understanding of the environmental factors regulating growth and anatoxin production. In this study, the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on the growth of two Phormidium strains (anatoxin-producing and non-anatoxin-producing) were examined in batch monocultures. Cell concentrations were significantly reduced under reduced nitrogen (ca. production. Cellular anatoxin concentrations were lowest (169 fg cell(-1)) under the high-nitrogen and high-phosphorus treatment. This supports the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis that suggests actively dividing and expanding cells are less likely to produce secondary-metabolites. Anatoxin quota was highest (>407 fg cell(-1)) in the reduced phosphorus treatments, possibly suggesting that it is produced as a stress response to growth limiting conditions. In all treatments there was a 4-5-fold increase in anatoxin quota in the lag growth phase, possibly indicating it may provide a physiological benefit during initial substrate colonization. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Leptin differentially regulates chondrogenesis in mouse vertebral and tibial growth plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Jiang, Kaibiao; Chen, Bin; Wang, Hantao; Li, Xinfeng; Liu, Zude

    2017-05-31

    Leptin plays an important role in mediating chondrogenesis of limb growth plate. Previous studies suggest that bone structures and development of spine and limb are different. The expression of Ob-Rb, the gene that encodes leptin receptors, is vertebral and appendicular region-specific, suggesting the regulation of leptin on VGP and TGP chondrogenesis may be very different. The aim of the present study was to investigate the differential regulation of leptin on the chondrogenesis of vertebral growth plate (VGP) and tibial growth plate (TGP). We compared the VGP and TGP from wild type (C57BL/6) and leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. We then generated primary cultures of TGP and VGP chondrocytes. By treating the primary cells with different concentrations of leptin in vitro, we analyzed proliferation and apoptosis of the primary chondrocytes from TGP and VGP. We further measured expression of chondrogenic-related genes in these cells that had been incubated with different doses of leptin. Leptin-deficient mice of 8-week-old had shorter tibial and longer vertebral lengths than the wide type mice. Disturbed columnar structure was observed for TGP but not for VGP. In primary chondrocyte cultures, leptin inhibited VGP chondrocyte proliferation but promoted their apoptosis. Collagen IIA and aggrecan mRNA, and the protein levels of proliferation- and chondrogenesis-related markers, including PCNA, Sox9, and Smad4, were downregulated by leptin in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, leptin stimulated the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of TGP chondrocytes at physiological levels (i.e., 10 and 50 ng/mL) but not at high levels (i.e., 100 and 1000 ng/mL). Leptin exerts a stimulatory effect on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of the long bone growth plate but an inhibitory effect on the spine growth plate. The ongoing study will shed light on the regulatory mechanisms of leptin in bone development and metabolism.

  19. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

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    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  20. Growth in Adolescent Self-Regulation and Impact on Sexual Risk-Taking: A Curve-of-Factors Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, AliceAnn; Magnusson, Brianna M; Novilla, M Lelinneth B

    2018-04-01

    Adolescent self-regulation is increasingly seen as an important predictor of sexual risk-taking behaviors, but little is understood about how changes in self-regulation affect later sexual risk-taking. Family financial stress may affect the development of self-regulation and later engagement in sexual risk-taking. We examined whether family financial stress influences self-regulation in early adolescence (age 13) and growth in self-regulation throughout adolescence (from age 13-17 years). We then assessed the effects of family financial stress, baseline self-regulation, and the development of self-regulation on adolescent sexual risk-taking behaviors at age 18 years. Using a curve-of-factors model, we examined these relationships in a 6-year longitudinal study of 470 adolescents (52% female) and their parents from a large northwestern city in the United States. Results indicated that family financial stress was negatively associated with baseline self-regulation but not with growth in self-regulation throughout adolescence. Both baseline self-regulation and growth in self-regulation were predictive of decreased likelihood of engaging in sexual risk-taking. Family financial stress was not predictive of later sexual risk-taking. Intervening to support the development of self-regulation in adolescence may be especially protective against later sexual risk-taking.

  1. Growth hormone regulation of metabolic gene expression in muscle: a microarray study in hypopituitary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Klara; Leung, Kin-Chuen; Kaplan, Warren; Gardiner-Garden, Margaret; Gibney, James; Ho, Ken K Y

    2007-07-01

    Muscle is a target of growth hormone (GH) action and a major contributor to whole body metabolism. Little is known about how GH regulates metabolic processes in muscle or the extent to which muscle contributes to changes in whole body substrate metabolism during GH treatment. To identify GH-responsive genes that regulate substrate metabolism in muscle, we studied six hypopituitary men who underwent whole body metabolic measurement and skeletal muscle biopsies before and after 2 wk of GH treatment (0.5 mg/day). Transcript profiles of four subjects were analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChips. Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and procollagens I and III were measured by RIA. GH increased serum IGF-I and procollagens I and III, enhanced whole body lipid oxidation, reduced carbohydrate oxidation, and stimulated protein synthesis. It induced gene expression of IGF-I and collagens in muscle. GH reduced expression of several enzymes regulating lipid oxidation and energy production. It reduced calpain 3, increased ribosomal protein L38 expression, and displayed mixed effects on genes encoding myofibrillar proteins. It increased expression of circadian gene CLOCK, and reduced that of PERIOD. In summary, GH exerted concordant effects on muscle expression and blood levels of IGF-I and collagens. It induced changes in genes regulating protein metabolism in parallel with a whole body anabolic effect. The discordance between muscle gene expression profiles and metabolic responses suggests that muscle is unlikely to contribute to GH-induced stimulation of whole body energy and lipid metabolism. GH may regulate circadian function in skeletal muscle by modulating circadian gene expression with possible metabolic consequences.

  2. Synchronization of developmental processes and defense signaling by growth regulating transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Liu

    Full Text Available Growth regulating factors (GRFs are a conserved class of transcription factor in seed plants. GRFs are involved in various aspects of tissue differentiation and organ development. The implication of GRFs in biotic stress response has also been recently reported, suggesting a role of these transcription factors in coordinating the interaction between developmental processes and defense dynamics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GRFs mediate the overlaps between defense signaling and developmental pathways are elusive. Here, we report large scale identification of putative target candidates of Arabidopsis GRF1 and GRF3 by comparing mRNA profiles of the grf1/grf2/grf3 triple mutant and those of the transgenic plants overexpressing miR396-resistant version of GRF1 or GRF3. We identified 1,098 and 600 genes as putative targets of GRF1 and GRF3, respectively. Functional classification of the potential target candidates revealed that GRF1 and GRF3 contribute to the regulation of various biological processes associated with defense response and disease resistance. GRF1 and GRF3 participate specifically in the regulation of defense-related transcription factors, cell-wall modifications, cytokinin biosynthesis and signaling, and secondary metabolites accumulation. GRF1 and GRF3 seem to fine-tune the crosstalk between miRNA signaling networks by regulating the expression of several miRNA target genes. In addition, our data suggest that GRF1 and GRF3 may function as negative regulators of gene expression through their association with other transcription factors. Collectively, our data provide new insights into how GRF1 and GRF3 might coordinate the interactions between defense signaling and plant growth and developmental pathways.

  3. The MARVEL domain protein Nce102 regulates actin organization and invasive growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lois M; Wang, Hong X; Konopka, James B

    2013-11-26

    Invasive growth of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans into tissues promotes disseminated infections in humans. The plasma membrane is essential for pathogenesis because this important barrier mediates morphogenesis and invasive growth, as well as secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, nutrient import, and other processes. Previous studies showed that the Sur7 tetraspan protein that localizes to MCC (membrane compartment occupied by Can1)/eisosome subdomains of the plasma membrane regulates a broad range of key functions, including cell wall synthesis, morphogenesis, and resistance to copper. Therefore, a distinct tetraspan protein found in MCC/eisosomes, Nce102, was investigated. Nce102 belongs to the MARVEL domain protein family, which is implicated in regulating membrane structure and function. Deletion of NCE102 did not cause the broad defects seen in sur7Δ cells. Instead, the nce102Δ mutant displayed a unique phenotype in that it was defective in forming hyphae and invading low concentrations of agar but could invade well in higher agar concentrations. This phenotype was likely due to a defect in actin organization that was observed by phalloidin staining. In support of this, the invasive growth defect of a bni1Δ mutant that mislocalizes actin due to lack of the Bni1 formin was also reversed at high agar concentrations. This suggests that a denser matrix provides a signal that compensates for the actin defects. The nce102Δ mutant displayed decreased virulence and formed abnormal hyphae in mice. These studies identify novel ways that Nce102 and the physical environment surrounding C. albicans regulate morphogenesis and pathogenesis. The plasma membrane promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans by acting as a protective barrier around the cell and mediating dynamic activities, such as morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, secretion of virulence factors, and nutrient uptake. To better understand how the plasma membrane

  4. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

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    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  5. Nutritive values of brassica campestris L. oil as affected by growth regulator treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, A.; Khan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of plant growth regulators, viz. Indole acetic acid (IAA), Gibberellic acid (GA) and Abscisic acid (ABA) were studied on fatty acid compositions, glucosinolate content and protein content of Brassica campestris L subsp. Oleifera (common name yellow sarson). Growth regulators were applied in seed soaking solution as well as foliar spray during vegetative phase and at flowering stage. There were reductions in the amount of long chain fatty acids viz erucic acid, eicosenoic acid and increase in the amount of unsaturated fatty acid viz. linoleic acid by lAA applications. The stimulating effect of lAA which reduced amount of unsaturated fatty acid was more pronounced when applied as foliar spray at vegetative stage. But, foliar spray of ABA during flowering increased the concentration of linoleic acid and reduced the eicosenoic acid and erucic acid. The glucosinolate content was greater in seeds soaked in 10/sup -5/ M lAA than that of control but less in 10/sup -5/ M GA treated seeds than that of control. The ABA treatment (10/sup -5/M) increased the concentration of glucosinolates in the seeds IAA treatments (10/sup -5/M) increased the protein percentage in the seeds. Foliar application of GA (10/sup -5/M) during vegetative growth and ABA (10/sup -5/M) as seed soaking prior to sowing as well as foliar spry during flowering decreased the protein content of seeds. (author)

  6. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ([ 125 I]iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites [dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM]. Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status

  7. Role of endogenous growth regulators in vernalization of seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.

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    Marian Michniewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In embryos and cotyledons of seeds of the radish cv. `Tetra Iłówiecka' (which needs 20 days of vernalization and cv. 'Saxa' (which flowers without vernalization germinating at a vernalizing temperature of 5°C, the levels of auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins and the aibscisic acid-like inhibitor were determined, The analyses were performed after 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 days of chilling. The levels of growth regulators were also determined in embryos and cotyledons of seeds germinated at 260C when in the same growth stage as the material taken from chilled seeds. Cold treatment significantly affected the level of all endogenous growth regulators in embryos and cotyledons of both varieties. However, changes in the levels of these substances were not directly connected with the vernalization process. It was found that the vernalization of seeds of 'the radish cv. `Tetra Iłówiecka' increased the level of GAs in leaves, this did not, however, coincide with flower initiation. It is concluded that the role of GAs in flowering of the studied plants is connected rather with photoinduction than with vernalization.

  8. Glycosylation as a Main Regulator of Growth and Death Factor Receptors Signaling

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    Inês Gomes Ferreira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is a very frequent and functionally important post-translational protein modification that undergoes profound changes in cancer. Growth and death factor receptors and plasma membrane glycoproteins, which upon activation by extracellular ligands trigger a signal transduction cascade, are targets of several molecular anti-cancer drugs. In this review, we provide a thorough picture of the mechanisms bywhich glycosylation affects the activity of growth and death factor receptors in normal and pathological conditions. Glycosylation affects receptor activity through three non-mutually exclusive basic mechanisms: (1 by directly regulating intracellular transport, ligand binding, oligomerization and signaling of receptors; (2 through the binding of receptor carbohydrate structures to galectins, forming a lattice thatregulates receptor turnover on the plasma membrane; and (3 by receptor interaction with gangliosides inside membrane microdomains. Some carbohydrate chains, for example core fucose and β1,6-branching, exert a stimulatory effect on all receptors, while other structures exert opposite effects on different receptors or in different cellular contexts. In light of the crucial role played by glycosylation in the regulation of receptor activity, the development of next-generation drugs targeting glyco-epitopes of growth factor receptors should be considered a therapeutically interesting goal.

  9. Dicer-like Proteins Regulate the Growth, Conidiation, and Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Hevea brasiliensis

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    Qiannan Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Hevea brasiliensis is the hemibiotrophic fungi which could cause anthracnose in rubber trees. Dicer like proteins (DCL were the core enzymes for generation of small RNAs. In the present study, the knocking-out mutants of two dicer like proteins encoding genes of C. gloeosporioides were constructed; and functions of two proteins were investigated. The results showed that DCL play important roles in regulating the growth, conidiation and pathogenicity of C. gloeosporioides; and there is a functional redundancy between DCL1 and DCL2. Microscopy analysis and DAB staining revealed that loss of penetration ability into the host cells, instead of the decreased growth rate, was the main cause for the impaired pathogenicity of the ΔDcl1ΔDcl2 double mutant. Proteomics analysis suggested that DCL proteins affected the expression of functional proteins to regulating multiple biological processes of C. gloeosporioides. These data lead to a better understanding of the functions of DCL proteins in regulating the development and pathogenesis of C. gloeosporioides.

  10. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of Growth Hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

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    Leandro eFernandez-Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver responds to estrogens and GH which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This cross-talk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens on GH biology can cause a dramatic impact in liver physiology during mammalian development and in adulthood. In this review, we will summarize the current status of the influence of estrogen on GH actions in liver. A better understanding of estrogen-GH interplay in liver will lead to improved therapy of children with growth disorders and of adults with GH deficiency.

  11. Pulsed Radiofrequency Applied to the Sciatic Nerve Improves Neuropathic Pain by Down-regulating The Expression of Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide in the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Jin, Hailong; Jia, Zipu; Ji, Nan; Luo, Fang

    2018-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies have shown that applying pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) to the neural stem could relieve neuropathic pain (NP), albeit through an unclear analgesic mechanism. And animal experiments have indicated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is involved in generating and maintaining NP. In this case, it is uncertain whether PRF plays an analgesic role by affecting CGRP expression in DRG. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into four groups: Groups A, B, C, and D. In Groups C and D, the right sciatic nerve was ligated to establish the CCI model, while in Groups A and B, the sciatic nerve was isolated without ligation. After 14 days, the right sciatic nerve in Groups B and D re-exposed and was treated with PRF on the ligation site. Thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) and hindpaw withdrawal threshold (HWT) were measured before PRF treatment (Day 0) as well as after 2, 4, 8, and 14 days of treatment. At the same time points of the behavioral tests, the right L4-L6 DRG was sampled and analyzed for CGRP expression using RT-qPCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Fourteen days after sciatic nerve ligation, rats in Groups C and D had a shortened TWL (P 0.05). On the 8th and 14th days, the mRNA levels in Group D were restored to those of Groups A and B. Meanwhile, the CGRP content of Group D gradually dropped over time, from 76.4 pg/mg (Day 0) to 57.5 pg/mg (Day 14). Conclusions: In this study, we found that, after sciatic nerve ligation, rats exhibited apparent hyperalgesia and allodynia, and CGRP mRNA and CGRP contents in the L4-L6 DRG increased significantly. Through lowering CGRP expression in the DRG, PRF treatment might relieve the pain behaviors of NP. PMID:29333099

  12. Spatial regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in postnatal articular and growth plate cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Presley; Yue, Shanna; Hanson, Jeffrey; Baron, Jeffrey; Lui, Julian C.

    2017-01-01

    Articular and growth plate cartilage both arise from condensations of mesenchymal cells, but ultimately develop important histological and functional differences. Each is composed of three layers—the superficial, mid and deep zones of articular cartilage and the resting, proliferative and hypertrophic zones of growth plate cartilage. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) system plays an important role in cartilage development. A gradient in expression of BMP-related genes has been observed across growth plate cartilage, likely playing a role in zonal differentiation. To investigate the presence of a similar expression gradient in articular cartilage, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to separate murine growth plate and articular cartilage from the proximal tibia into their six constituent zones, and used a solution hybridization assay with color-coded probes (nCounter) to quantify mRNAs for 30 different BMP-related genes in each zone. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were then used to confirm spatial expression patterns. Expression gradients for Bmp2 and 6 were observed across growth plate cartilage with highest expression in hypertrophic zone. However, intracellular BMP signaling, assessed by phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining, appeared to be higher in the proliferative zone and prehypertrophic area than in hypertrophic zone, possibly due to high expression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad, in the hypertrophic zone. We also found BMP expression gradients across the articular cartilage with BMP agonists primarily expressed in the superficial zone and BMP functional antagonists primarily expressed in the deep zone. Phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining showed a similar gradient. In combination with previous evidence that BMPs regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, the current findings suggest that BMP signaling gradients exist across both growth plate and articular cartilage and that these gradients may

  13. Oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and jasmonates: nontraditional regulators of plant growth, development, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1997-07-01

    Each of the nontraditional plant hormones reviewed in this article, oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and JA, can exert major effects on plant growth and development. However, in many cases, the mechanisms by which these compounds are involved in the endogenous regulation of morphogenesis remain to be established. Nevertheless, the use of mutant or transgenic plants with altered levels or perception of these hormones is leading to phenomenal increases in our understanding of the roles they play in the life cycle of plants. It is likely that in the future, novel modulators of plant growth and development will be identified; some will perhaps be related to the peptide encoded by ENOD40 (Van de Sande et al., 1996), which modifies the action of auxin.

  14. The apical scaffold big bang binds to spectrins and regulates the growth of Drosophila melanogaster wing discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Elodie; Logeay, Rémi; Géminard, Charles; Kantar, Diala; Frayssinoux, Florence; Heron-Milhavet, Lisa; Djiane, Alexandre

    2018-03-05

    During development, cell numbers are tightly regulated, ensuring that tissues and organs reach their correct size and shape. Recent evidence has highlighted the intricate connections between the cytoskeleton and the regulation of the key growth control Hippo pathway. Looking for apical scaffolds regulating tissue growth, we describe that Drosophila melanogaster big bang (Bbg), a poorly characterized multi-PDZ scaffold, controls epithelial tissue growth without affecting epithelial polarity and architecture. bbg -mutant tissues are smaller, with fewer cells that are less apically constricted than normal. We show that Bbg binds to and colocalizes tightly with the β-heavy-Spectrin/Kst subunit at the apical cortex and promotes Yki activity, F-actin enrichment, and the phosphorylation of the myosin II regulatory light chain Spaghetti squash. We propose a model in which the spectrin cytoskeleton recruits Bbg to the cortex, where Bbg promotes actomyosin contractility to regulate epithelial tissue growth. © 2018 Forest et al.

  15. Progranulin contributes to endogenous mechanisms of pain defense after nerve injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee-Young; Albuquerque, Boris; Häussler, Annett; Myrczek, Thekla; Ding, Aihao; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2012-04-01

    Progranulin haploinsufficiency is associated with frontotemporal dementia in humans. Deficiency of progranulin led to exaggerated inflammation and premature aging in mice. The role of progranulin in adaptations to nerve injury and neuropathic pain are still unknown. Here we found that progranulin is up-regulated after injury of the sciatic nerve in the mouse ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, most prominently in the microglia surrounding injured motor neurons. Progranulin knockdown by continuous intrathecal spinal delivery of small interfering RNA after sciatic nerve injury intensified neuropathic pain-like behaviour and delayed the recovery of motor functions. Compared to wild-type mice, progranulin-deficient mice developed more intense nociceptive hypersensitivity after nerve injury. The differences escalated with aging. Knockdown of progranulin reduced the survival of dissociated primary neurons and neurite outgrowth, whereas addition of recombinant progranulin rescued primary dorsal root ganglia neurons from cell death induced by nerve growth factor withdrawal. Thus, up-regulation of progranulin after neuronal injury may reduce neuropathic pain and help motor function recovery, at least in part, by promoting survival of injured neurons and supporting regrowth. A deficiency in this mechanism may increase the risk for injury-associated chronic pain. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Endocrine regulation of fetal skeletal muscle growth: impact on future metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing sufficient skeletal muscle mass is essential for lifelong metabolic health. The intrauterine environment is a major determinant of the muscle mass that is present for the life course of an individual, because muscle fiber number is set at the time of birth. Thus, a compromised intrauterine environment from maternal nutrient restriction or placental insufficiency that restricts development of muscle fiber number can have permanent effects on the amount of muscle an individual will live with. Reduced muscle mass due to fewer muscle fibers persists even after compensatory or “catch up” postnatal growth occurs. Furthermore, muscle hypertrophy can only partially compensate for this limitation in fiber number. Compelling associations link low birth weight and decreased muscle mass to future insulin resistance, which can drive the development of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and risk for cardiovascular events later in life. There are gaps in knowledge about the origins of reduced muscle growth at the cellular level and how these patterns are set during fetal development. By understanding the nutrient and endocrine regulation of fetal skeletal muscle growth and development, we can direct research efforts towards improving muscle growth early in life in order to prevent the development of chronic metabolic disease later in life. PMID:24532817

  17. Transferrin receptor regulates pancreatic cancer growth by modulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seung Min, E-mail: smjeong@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Aging and Metabolic Diseases, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sunsook; Seong, Rho Hyun [School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-11

    The transferrin receptor (TfR1) is upregulated in malignant cells and its expression is associated with cancer progression. Because of its pre-eminent role in cell proliferation, TfR1 has been an important target for the development of cancer therapy. Although TfR1 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancers, what it carries out in these refractory cancers remains poorly understood. Here we report that TfR1 supports mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which is required for their tumorigenic growth. Elevated TfR