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Sample records for regulates myoglobin expression

  1. Expression and Purification of Sperm Whale Myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen; Indivero, Virginia; Burkhard, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiweek laboratory exercise that exposes students to the fundamental techniques of bacterial expression and protein purification through the preparation of sperm whale myoglobin. Myoglobin, a robust oxygen-binding protein, contains a single heme that gives the protein a reddish color, making it an ideal subject for the teaching…

  2. Expression and Purification of Sperm Whale Myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen; Indivero, Virginia; Burkhard, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiweek laboratory exercise that exposes students to the fundamental techniques of bacterial expression and protein purification through the preparation of sperm whale myoglobin. Myoglobin, a robust oxygen-binding protein, contains a single heme that gives the protein a reddish color, making it an ideal subject for the teaching…

  3. Myoglobin Expression in Chelonia mydas Brain, Heart and Liver Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RINI PUSPITANINGRUM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the underpinning physiology and biochemistry of animals is essential to properly understand the impact of anthropogenic changes and natural catastrophes upon the conservation of endangered species. An observation on the tissue location of the key respiratory protein, myoglobin, now opens up new opportunities for understanding how hypoxia tolerance impacts on diving lifestyle in turtles. The respiratory protein, myoglobin has functions other than oxygen binding which are involved in hypoxia tolerance, including metabolism of reactive oxygen species and of the vascular function by metabolism of nitric oxide. Our work aims to determine whether myoglobin expression in the green turtle exists in multiple non muscle tissues and to confirm the hypothesis that reptiles also have a distributed myoglobin expression which is linked to the hypoxiatolerant trait. This initial work in turtle hatch Chelonia mydas confirms the presence of myoglobin transcriptin brain, heart and liver tissues. Furthermore, it will serve as a tool for completing the sequence and generating an in situ hybridization probe for verifying of cell location in expressing tissues.

  4. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picoli Souza, K. de [Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-24

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  5. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. de Picoli Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold. Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60% ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold, and decreased heart rate (5%, fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (20% in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (14%. These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  6. Regulation of myoglobin in hypertrophied rat cardiomyocytes in experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E L; Offringa, C; Kos, D; Van der Laarse, W J; Jaspers, R T

    2016-10-01

    A major problem in chronic heart failure is the inability of hypertrophied cardiomyocytes to maintain the required power output. A Hill-type oxygen diffusion model predicts that oxygen supply is limiting in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes at maximal rates of oxygen consumption and that this limitation can be reduced by increasing the myoglobin (Mb) concentration. We explored how cardiac hypertrophy, oxidative capacity, and Mb expression in right ventricular cardiomyocytes are regulated at the transcriptional and translational levels in an early stage of experimental pulmonary hypertension, in order to identify targets to improve the oxygen supply/demand ratio. Male Wistar rats were injected with monocrotaline to induce pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular heart failure. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels per nucleus of growth factors insulin-like growth factor-1Ea (IGF-1Ea) and mechano growth factor (MGF) were higher in PH than in healthy controls, consistent with a doubling in cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (CSA). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was unaltered, indicating that oxidative capacity per cell increased. Although the Mb protein concentration was unchanged, Mb mRNA concentration was reduced. However, total RNA per nucleus was about threefold higher in PH rats versus controls, and Mb mRNA content expressed per nucleus was similar in the two groups. The increase in oxidative capacity without an increase in oxygen supply via Mb-facilitated diffusion caused a doubling of the critical extracellular oxygen tension required to prevent hypoxia (PO2crit). We conclude that Mb mRNA expression is not increased during pressure overload-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and that the increase in myoglobin content per myocyte is likely due to increased translation. We conclude that increasing Mb mRNA expression may be beneficial in the treatment of experimental PH.

  7. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Richard T.; Testerink, Janwillem; Della Gaspera, Bruno; Chanoine, Christophe; Bagowski, Christophe P.; van der Laarse, Willem J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH) (10% air/90%N2 saturated water). We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb) concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001). Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001). In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit) of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus. PMID:25063194

  8. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Richard T; Testerink, Janwillem; Della Gaspera, Bruno; Chanoine, Christophe; Bagowski, Christophe P; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2014-07-25

    Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH) (10% air/90%N2 saturated water). We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb) concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001). Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001). In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit) of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus.

  9. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Jaspers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH (10% air/90%N2 saturated water. We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001. Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001. In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus.

  10. Expression of cytosolic 5' nucleotidase does not correlate with expression of oxidative metabolism marker: myoglobine in human skeletal muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katarzyna Lechward; Kinga Tkacz-Stachowska

    2009-01-01

    Our previous studies had shown that eytosolic 5'nucleotidase-I (eN-I) is expressed in several tissues in pigeons, including brain and several different skeletal muscles. We observed that cN-I mRNA levels varied among different pigeon muscles. Initial quantification of the differences revealed that ~5-10 times more of cN-I transcript was present in red, oxidative muscles (breast muscle and gastrocnemius) than in white ones,composed of glycolytic fibers (biceps brachii). We had found this observation very intriguing and decided to compare human skeletal muscles distribution of cN-I with the type of oxygen metabolism. Our screen involved 60 samples of several human muscles and we assayed the correlation between the amount of tran-scripts of cN-I and myoglobine, which we took as a measure of oxidative-slow twitch fibers. Our question was whether in humans, cN-I presence in skeletal muscles was related to their fiber composition. If that was the case, then cN-I expression could serve as a tool to assess the percentage of oxidative fibers in any given human muscle sample, where myogiobine expression could not be readily measured. After quantification of expression of both genes, we concluded that there was no correlation between expression of cN-I and fiber type. Therefore, contrary to the pigeon muscles, cN-Idid not reflect the ratio of oxidative fibers to the total mass of the muscle sample in humans. That difference indicated that there were certain mechanisms that dif-ferentially regulated the expression of cN-I in muscle tissues of mammals and lower vertebrates.

  11. Myoglobin urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin urine test; Myositis - myoglobin urine test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin urine test ... The test involves only normal urination, which should cause no discomfort.

  12. Myoglobin over-expression attenuates angiogenic response in hindlimb ischemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yao-guo; GUAN Heng; LIU Chang-wei; LI Yong-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background Myoglobin is expressed exclusively in striated skeletal muscles and has been implicated in nitric oxide scavenging. Accumulating data suggest a critical role for nitric oxide in both the endogenous and therapeutic angiogenic response to ischemia. A clear role for myoglobin in ischemic skeletal muscle is uncertain. We hypothesized that myoglobin overexpression has an adverse impact on the angiogenic response to ischemia.Methods Muscle-specific myoglobin over-expressing transgenic mice (MbTG, n=11), wild type littermates (WT, n=23) underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation and excision. Laser doppler perfusion imaging was used to monitor changes in hindlimb perfusion before surgery and weekly after surgery up to 28 days. Tissue ischemia was assessed by a necrosis incidence. Upon termination of the experiment (28 days after surgery), skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior) were harvested, the distal part of the muscle was frozen and embedded for histology study, the proximal part was used either to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) or to determine the proliferation (proliferating call nuclear antigen (PCNA)) and apoptosis (Bax, and Bcl-2) condition in ischemic muscle by Western blotting. Capillaries were stained with endothelial phosphate alkaline staining and vascular density was expressed in capillaries/fiber.Results The recovery of perfusion in MbTG mice was similar to that of WT mice on day 7 (0.485±0.095 vs 0.500±0.084)but was significantly less on day 14 (0.536±0.086 vs 0.623±0.077, P <0.05), day 21 (0.588±0.082 vs 0.684±0.068, P <0.01) and day 28 (0.606±0.079 VS 0.733±0.093, P<0.01). The necrosis incidence was higher in MbTG than in WT (54.5% vs 21.6%). Vascular density was less in MbTG compared with that in WT (gastrocnemius 0.19±0.08 vs 0.30±0.08, P <0.05; tibialis anterior 0.22±0.11 vs 0.33±0.04, P<0.05). With ischemic injury, the VEGF level was

  13. Functional characterization and expression analysis of myoglobin in high-altitude lizard Phrynocephalus erythrurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Tang, Xiaolong; Wang, Huihui; Lu, Songsong; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is a monomeric hemoprotein which plays an important role in oxygen storage and transport in cardiac and skeletal muscle under hypoxia. The red tail toad-headed lizard Phrynocephalus erythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits at an elevation of 4500-5300 m on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, is known to be the highest living lizard in the world. To investigate the characters of myoglobin of this unique species, another low altitude lizard Phrynocephalus przewalskii (Lacertilia: Agamidae) was selected as a reference. The open reading frame (ORF) of myoglobin in two lizards was 465 bp which encodes a polypeptide of 154 amino acids with different theoretical molecular weight and isoelectric point. The amino acid substitutions of myoglobin between two species were found at Thr13Ile, Lys87Thr and His118Asn. Homology modeling results indicated that P. erythrurus myoglobin has a greater heme pocket, which may be more favorable to oxygen binding and unloading. On the other hand, the mRNA levels of myoglobin in both cardiac and skeletal muscle in P. erythrurus were significantly larger than those in low altitude P. przewalskii. At protein level, myoglobin concentration in skeletal muscle in P. erythrurus was notably increased, but no significant difference was observed in cardiac muscle.

  14. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  15. Myoglobin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin blood test; Myositis - myoglobin blood test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin blood test ... too high, it can damage the kidneys. This test is ordered when your health care provider suspects ...

  16. High-level expression and deuteration of sperm whale myoglobin: A study of its solvent structure by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, F. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron diffraction has become one of the best ways to study light atoms, such as hydrogens. Hydrogen however has a negative coherent scattering factor, and a large incoherent scattering factor, while deuterium has virtually no incoherent scattering, but a large positive coherent scattering factor. Beside causing high background due to its incoherent scattering, the negative coherent scattering of hydrogen tends to cancel out the positive contribution from other atoms in a neutron density map. Therefore a fully deuterated sample will yield better diffraction data with stronger density in the hydrogen position. On this basis, a sperm whale myoglobin gene modified to include part of the A cII protein gene has been cloned into the T7 expression system. Milligram amounts of fully deuterated holo-myoglobin have been obtained and used for crystallization. The synthetic sperm whale myoglobin crystallized in P2{sub 1} space group isomorphous with the native protein crystal. A complete X-ray diffraction dataset at 1.5{Angstrom} has been collected. This X-ray dataset, and a neutron data set collected previously on a protonated carbon-monoxymyoglobin crystal have been used for solvent structure studies. Both X-ray and neutron data have shown that there are ordered hydration layers around the protein surface. Solvent shell analysis on the neutron data further has shown that the first hydration layer behaves differently around polar and apolar regions of the protein surface. Finally, the structure of per-deuterated myoglobin has been refined using all reflections to a R factor of 17%.

  17. Regulation of melanopsin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are adjusted daily to the environmental day/night cycle by photic input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of the RHT constitute a separate light-detecting system in the mammalian retina used for irradiance detection and for transmission to the circadian system and other non-imaging forming processes in the brain. The RGCs of the RHT are intrinsically photosensitive due to the expression of melanopsin, an opsin-like photopigment. This notion is based on anatomical and functional data and on studies of mice lacking melanopsin. Furthermore, heterologous expression of melanopsin in non-neuronal mammalian cell lines was found sufficient to render these cells photosensitive. Even though solid evidence regarding the function of melanopsin exists, little is known about the regulation of melanopsin gene expression. Studies in albino Wistar rats showed that the expression of melanopsin is diurnal at both the mRNA and protein levels. The diurnal changes in melanopsin expression seem, however, to be overridden by prolonged exposure to light or darkness. Significant increase in melanopsin expression was observed from the first day in constant darkness and the expression continued to increase during prolonged exposure in constant darkness. Prolonged exposure to constant light, on the other hand, decreased melanopsin expression to an almost undetectable level after 5 days of constant light. The induction of melanopsin by darkness was even more pronounced if darkness was preceded by light suppression for 5 days. These observations show that dual mechanisms regulate melanopsin gene expression and that the intrinsic light-responsive RGCs in the albino Wistar rat adapt their expression of melanopsin to environmental light and darkness.

  18. Renal uptake of myoglobin is mediated by the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gburek, Jakub; Birn, Henrik; Verroust, Pierre J;

    2003-01-01

    and cubilin are involved in renal reabsorption of myoglobin. Both receptors were captured from solubilized renal brush-border membranes by affinity chromatography using myoglobin-Sepharose. Myoglobin bound to purified megalin and cubilin with Kd values of 2.0 and 3 microM, respectively, as evaluated...... by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Apomyoglobin bound to megalin with the same affinity, and the affinity of apomyoglobin to cubilin was reduced (Kd = 5 microM). Radioiodinated myoglobin could be displaced by apomyoglobin in inhibition studies using isolated renal brush-border membranes (Ki approximately...... was demonstrated by use of kidney-specific megalin knockout mice. Injected myoglobin was extensively reabsorbed by megalin-expressing proximal tubular cells, whereas there was very little uptake in the megalin-deficient cells. In conclusion, this study establishes the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake...

  19. Myoglobin production in emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; Welch, T J; Welch, L S; Stockard, T K

    2010-06-01

    Increased oxygen storage is essential to the diving capacities of marine mammals and seabirds. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptation are unknown. Myoglobin (Mb) and Mb mRNA concentrations were analyzed in emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) adults and chicks with spectrophotometric and RNase protection assays to evaluate production of their large Mb-bound O(2) stores. Mean pectoral Mb concentration and Mb mRNA content increased throughout the pre-fledging period and were 15-fold and 3-fold greater, respectively, in adults than in 3.5 month old chicks. Mean Mb concentration in 5.9 month old juveniles was 2.7+/-0.4 g 100 g(-1) muscle (44% that of wild adults), and in adults that had been captive all their lives it was 3.7+/-0.1 g 100 g(-1) muscle. The Mb and Mb mRNA data are consistent with regulation of Mb production at the level of transcription as in other animals. Significant Mb and Mb mRNA production occurred in chicks and young juveniles even without any diving activity. The further increase in adult Mb concentrations appears to require the exercise/hypoxia of diving because Mb concentration in captive, non-diving adults only reached 60% of that of wild adults. The much greater relative increase in Mb concentration than in Mb mRNA content between young chicks and adults suggests that there is not a simple 1:1 relationship between Mb mRNA content and Mb concentration. Nutritional limitation in young chicks and post-transcriptional regulation of Mb concentration may also be involved.

  20. Renal uptake of myoglobin is mediated by the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gburek, Jakub; Birn, Henrik; Verroust, Pierre J; Goj, Bogusława; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Willnow, Thomas E; Christensen, Erik I

    2003-09-01

    Nephrotoxicity of myoglobin is well recognized as playing a part in the development of acute renal failure in settings of myoglobinuria. However, the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in renal proximal tubules has not been clarified. Here, we report that the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin are involved in renal reabsorption of myoglobin. Both receptors were captured from solubilized renal brush-border membranes by affinity chromatography using myoglobin-Sepharose. Myoglobin bound to purified megalin and cubilin with Kd values of 2.0 and 3 microM, respectively, as evaluated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Apomyoglobin bound to megalin with the same affinity, and the affinity of apomyoglobin to cubilin was reduced (Kd = 5 microM). Radioiodinated myoglobin could be displaced by apomyoglobin in inhibition studies using isolated renal brush-border membranes (Ki approximately 2 microM). Receptor-associated protein as well as antibodies directed against megalin and cubilin markedly inhibited the uptake of fluorescent-labeled myoglobin by cultured yolk sac BN-16 cells. The significance of megalin- and cubilin-mediated endocytosis for myoglobin uptake in vivo was demonstrated by use of kidney-specific megalin knockout mice. Injected myoglobin was extensively reabsorbed by megalin-expressing proximal tubular cells, whereas there was very little uptake in the megalin-deficient cells. In conclusion, this study establishes the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in the renal proximal tubule involving the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin. Identification of the receptors for tubular uptake of myoglobin may be essential for development of new therapeutic strategies for myoglobinuric acute renal failure.

  1. Myoglobin-induced lipid oxidation : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Andersen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of myoglobin-initiated lipid oxidation in simple model systems, muscle, and muscle-based foods is presented. The potential role of myoglobin spin and redox states in initiating lipid oxidation is reviewed. Proposed mechanisms for myoglobin- initiated lipid oxidation in muscle tissue (p...

  2. The Expression and Purification of Recombinant Myoglobin and Preparation of Its Quality Control Samples%重组肌红蛋白的原核表达、纯化及其冻干质控品的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任艳娜; 才蕾; 武建伟; 钱伟; 张荣华; 王继华; 唐时幸

    2014-01-01

    We intended to provide a cheap, stable, highly specific and sensitive lyophilized protein as quality control for diagnositic kits. The myoglobin gene code was optimized and two-step methods were used in this study for the synthesis of myoglobin gene. The DNA fragment of myoglobin was inserted into pET-28a vector forming a recombination plasmid, then, transformed into BL21(DE3)bacteria. Protein expression was induced by 0.5 mmol/L IPTG and purified by Ni Sepharose 6 Fast Flow(FF). After confirming its specificity, we studied the stability of the lyophilized protein at different storage temperatures(37℃, 25℃, 4℃). Results showed that the target protein is approximately 20 kD with high specificity, good morphology and stability after freeze-drying under the optimized conditions and protein diluting solution. The lyophilized myoglobin protein with low cost, good stability, high specificity and sensitivity, canbe used as quality control for both qualitative and quantitative myoglobin testing kits.%旨在为市场提供一种廉价、稳定、特异性强、灵敏度高的肌红蛋白质控品;将密码子优化后的肌红蛋白序列通过两步法进行化学合成,并连接到pET-28a表达载体上,转入大肠杆菌BL21(DE3),用0.5 mmol/L IPTG 37℃诱导表达;目的蛋白经Ni Sepharose 6 Fast Flow(FF)亲和层析进行纯化后,对其特异性进行检测,并研究蛋白稀释液的配方和优化冻干工艺,最后对冻干质控品的稳定性进行检测;结果显示目的蛋白分子量大小为20 kD左右,具有较强的特异性。蛋白冻干后具有很好的形态,37℃可以稳定保存10 d;25℃、4℃可以稳定保存4个月以上。该蛋白的冻干制品成本低、稳定性好、特异性强、灵敏度高,可用于定性定量肌红蛋白检测试剂盒的质控品。

  3. Myoglobin-induced oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, J A; Ostdal, H; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Reaction of equine Fe(III) myoglobin with H2O2 gives rise to an Fe(IV)-oxo species at the heme center and protein (globin)-derived radicals. Studies have shown that there are two (or more) sites for the protein-derived radical: at tyrosine (Tyr-103) or tryptophan (Trp-14). The latter radical reac...

  4. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  5. [Regulation of PAI-1 expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowska, Paulina; Kasza, Aneta

    2009-01-01

    PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) is a member of plasminogen cascade with an inhibitory role in plasmin activation. Plasmin is a protease capable of acting on wide range of substrates and, together with metaloproteinases, is a main proteolytic enzyme. Except its role in plasminogen cascade, PAI-1 has an affinity to vitronectin and uPA/uPAR what involves PAI-1 in cell's motility. PAI-1 gene is regulated in response to cytokines, hormones and many growth factors among which TGFbeta is the most important one. The PAI-1 promoter contains SBE, CAGA box, HRE, ERE, NFkB - binding sites, Sp-1, AP-1 and other. Cooperation between transcription factors bound to promoter and cross-talks between kinases and other upstream proteins decide about gene expression. This work describes the present knowledge in this field.

  6. Test Review: Anger Regulation and Expression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavlazoglu, Baki; Erdogan, Niyazi; Paine, Taylor; Jones, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (ARES) which was developed by DiGiuseppe and Tafrate (2011) and published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. The ARES was designed to be a self-report measure of anger expression and regulation in youth aged 10 to 17 years and was intended to be used in screening, individual assessment,…

  7. Computational insight into nitration of human myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Wu; Shu, Xiao-Gang; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Protein nitration is an important post-translational modification regulating protein structure and function, especially for heme proteins. Myoglobin (Mb) is an ideal protein model for investigating the structure and function relationship of heme proteins. With limited structural information available for nitrated heme proteins from experiments, we herein performed a molecular dynamics study of human Mb with successive nitration of Tyr103, Tyr146, Trp7 and Trp14. We made a detailed comparison of protein motions, intramolecular contacts and internal cavities of nitrated Mbs with that of native Mb. It showed that although nitration of both Tyr103 and Tyr146 slightly alters the local conformation of heme active site, further nitration of both Trp7 and Trp14 shifts helix A apart from the rest of protein, which results in altered internal cavities and forms a water channel, representing an initial stage of Mb unfolding. The computational study provides an insight into the nitration of heme proteins at an atomic level, which is valuable for understanding the structure and function relationship of heme proteins in non-native states by nitration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Riboflavin photosensitized oxidation of myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippa, Juliana M; de Zawadzki, Andressa; Grossi, Alberto B; Skibsted, Leif H; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-02-05

    The reaction of the fresh meat pigment oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O₂, and its oxidized form metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), with triplet-state riboflavin involves the pigment protein, which is oxidatively cleaved or dimerized as shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The overall rate constant for oxidation of MbFe(II)O₂ by ³Rib is (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ and (3.1 ± 0.4) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ for MbFe(III) in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 25 °C as determined by laser flash photolysis. The high rates are rationalized by ground state hydrophobic interactions as detected as static quenching of fluorescence from singlet-excited state riboflavin by myoglobins using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and a Stern-Volmer approach. Binding of riboflavin to MbFe(III) has K(a) = (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10⁴ mol·L⁻¹ with ΔH° = -112 ± 22 kJ·mol⁻¹ and ΔS° = -296 ± 75 J·mol⁻¹·K⁻¹. For meat, riboflavin is concluded to be a photosensitizer for protein oxidation but not for discoloration.

  9. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Chelonia mydas Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMAD SADIKIN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Green sea turtle – Chelonia mydas is a lung respiration animal that is able to dive and stay uder sea water for hours without needing to surface for oxygen. As oxygen supply in muscles is assured by myoglobin, we propose to study some characteristic of this muscle protein in green sea turtles. To achieve this objective, pure green sea turtle myoglobin has to be made available. Therefore, our first task is to purify this muscle protein from green sea turtles. Skeletal muscles from 3 green sea turtle hatchlings were studied icroscopically and biochemically. Microscopy observation showed a general structure of striated muscle. Biochemical studies revealed that green sea turtle myoglobin could be more purely isolated to a certain degree by ephadex G-75 gel filtration and purified by immunoaffinity gel chromatography rather than direct purification by DEAE-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography technique. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that green sea turtle myoglobin ran together with horse myoglobin as 17 kDa molecular weight proteins.

  11. Myoglobins of cartilaginous fishes III. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin of the shark Galeorhinus australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W K; Koureas, D D; Thompson, E O

    1981-01-01

    Myoglobin isolated from the red muscle of the school shark Galeorhinus australis was purified by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined following digestion with trypsin and purification of the peptides by paper ionophoresis and chromatography. Sequences of purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure and the peptides aligned by homology with the sequence of the myoglobin of the gummy shark Mustelus antarcticus. The two myoglobin sequences showed a marked similarity (16 differences), but both sequences showed approximately the same number of differences (68) from myoglobin of the Port Jackson shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni. There are 19 residues unique to three shark myoglobin sequences. As found with other fish myoglobins there are 148 residues with deletions of four residues at the amino terminal end as well as one residue in the CD region. The amino terminal residue is acetylated. The distal E7 histidine residue was found to be replaced by glutamine, as only previously reported for the myoglobin sequence of gummy shark.

  12. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  13. Insulin gene: organisation, expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, E; Philippe, J

    1996-06-01

    Insulin, a major hormone of the endocrine pancreas, plays a key role in the control of glucose homeostasis. This review discusses the mechanisms of cell-specific expression and regulation of the insulin gene. Whereas expression is restricted to islet beta-cells in adults, the insulin gene is more widely expressed at several embryonic stages, although the role of extrapancreatic expression is still unclear. beta-cell-specific expression relies on the interactions of 5'-flanking sequence motifs of the promoter with a number of ubiquitous and islet-specific transcription factors. IEF1 and IPF-1, by their binding to the E and A boxes, respectively, of the insulin gene promoter, appear to be the major determinants of beta-cell-specific expression. IEF1 is a heterodimer of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, whereas IPF-1 belongs to the homeodomain-containing family. beta-cell specific determinants are conserved throughout evolution, although the human insulin gene 5'-flanking sequence also contains a polymorphic minisatellite which is unique to primates and may play a role in insulin gene regulation. Glucose modulates insulin gene transcription, with multiple elements of the promoter involved in glucose responsiveness. Remarkably, IPF-1 and IEF1 are involved in both beta-cell-specific expression and glucose regulation of the insulin gene. cAMP also regulates insulin gene transcription through a CRE, in response to various hormonal stimuli. On the whole, recent studies have provided a better understanding of beta-cell differentiation and function.

  14. Expression of RHOGTPase regulators in human myometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison John J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RHOGTPases play a significant role in modulating myometrial contractility in uterine smooth muscle. They are regulated by at least three families of proteins, RHO guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RHOGEFs, RHOGTPase-activating proteins (RHOGAPs and RHO guanine nucleotide inhibitors (RHOGDIs. RHOGEFs activate RHOGTPases from the inactive GDP-bound to the active GTP-bound form. RHOGAPs deactivate RHOGTPases by accelerating the intrinsic GTPase activity of the RHOGTPases, converting them from the active to the inactive form. RHOGDIs bind to GDP-bound RHOGTPases and sequester them in the cytosol, thereby inhibiting their activity. Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM proteins regulate the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and an ERM protein, moesin (MSN, is activated by and can also activate RHOGTPases. Methods We therefore investigated the expression of various RHOGEFs, RHOGAPs, a RHOGDI and MSN in human myometrium, by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR, real-time fluorescence RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of these molecules was also examined in myometrial smooth muscle cells. Results ARHGEF1, ARHGEF11, ARHGEF12, ARHGAP5, ARHGAP24, ARHGDIA and MSN mRNA and protein expression was confirmed in human myometrium at term pregnancy, at labour and in the non-pregnant state. Furthermore, their expression was detected in myometrial smooth muscle cells. It was determined that ARHGAP24 mRNA expression significantly increased at labour in comparison to the non-labour state. Conclusion This study demonstrated for the first time the expression of the RHOGTPase regulators ARHGEF1, ARHGEF11, ARHGEF12, ARHGAP5, ARHGAP24, ARHGDIA and MSN in human myometrium, at term pregnancy, at labour, in the non-pregnant state and also in myometrial smooth muscle cells. ARHGAP24 mRNA expression significantly increased at labour in comparison to the non-labouring state. Further investigation of these molecules may enable us

  15. Regulation of noise in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical processes leading to the synthesis of new proteins are random, as they typically involve a small number of diffusing molecules. They lead to fluctuations in the number of proteins in a single cell as a function of time and to cell-to-cell variability of protein abundances. These in turn can lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Phenotypic heterogeneity may have important consequences for the development of multicellular organisms and the fitness of bacterial colonies, raising the question of how it is regulated. Here we review the experimental evidence that transcriptional regulation affects noise in gene expression, and discuss how the noise strength is encoded in the architecture of the promoter region. We discuss how models based on specific molecular mechanisms of gene regulation can make experimentally testable predictions for how changes to the promoter architecture are reflected in gene expression noise.

  16. Free [NADH]/[NAD(+)] regulates sirtuin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Juan; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Borras, Consuelo; Valles, Soraya L; Lopez-Grueso, Raul; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E; Herranz, Daniel; Pallardo, Federico V; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Serrano, Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2011-08-01

    Sirtuins are deacetylases involved in metabolic regulation and longevity. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that they are subjected to redox regulation by the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. We used NIH3T3 fibroblasts in culture, Drosophila fed with or without ethanol and exercising rats. In all three models an increase in [NADH]/[NAD(+)] came up with an increased expression of sirtuin mRNA and protein. PGC-1α (a substrate of sirtuins) protein level was significantly increased in fibroblasts incubated with lactate and pyruvate but this effect was lost in fibroblasts obtained from sirtuin-deficient mice. We conclude that the expression of sirtuins is subject to tight redox regulation by the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio, which is a major sensor for metabolite availability conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Gomez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

  18. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21539748

  19. In-vitro myoglobin clearance by a novel sorbent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsevich, Viktoriya I; Feinfeld, Donald A; Audia, Pat F; Young, Wendell; Capponi, Vincent; Markella, Marianna; Winchester, James F

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis may lead to acute kidney injury following deposition of myoglobin in renal tubules. Although high-flux dialysis membranes may remove a substantial amount of myoglobin from plasma, this may still not be sufficient to prevent renal damage. We tested a new polymer sorbent, X-Sorb, in vitro to determine its potential to clear myoglobin from solutions. Normal saline or human serum in which myoglobin was dissolved was perfused by a peristaltic pump through a column packed with the sorbent. After a 4-hour perfusion, the myoglobin level in normal saline fell from 200,000 ng/ml to virtually undetectable ( 90% over 4 hours. X-Sorb appears to be an effective sorbent for myoglobin and warrants a trial in vivo to determine whether it is equally effective and safe.

  20. [Use of mathematical models in study of nitric oxide, myoglobin and cell oxygen regimen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabakh, K H

    2011-01-01

    The influence ofnanomolar concentrations of NO on oxygen regimen of muscle cells was investigated. The intracellular distribution of oxygen consumption rates, pO2, NO and myoglobin was calculated by mathematical modeling of diffusion reactions of O2, NO and myoglobin in the muscle cell. The diffusion of O2, and NO from blood vessel surface into cell was taken into account. According to calculations, NO roughly regulates the oxygen regimen of cell, because it increases the tissue pO2 level by inhibition of mitochondria activity in the whole cell space. The presence ofmyoglobin is capable potentially to modulate the influence of NO on oxygen regimen. Myoglobin not only contributes to tissue O2 supply, but it can locally affect the NO concentration. Acting as an NO scavenger under normoxia and as an NO producer under hypoxia, myoglobin together with NO can provide fine adjustment of muscle oxygen regimen via an increase in tissue pO, and elimination a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand.

  1. Myoglobins: the link between discoloration and lipid oxidation in muscle and meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens K. S. Møller

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic metabolism changes rapidly to glycolysis post-mortem resulting in a pH-decrease during the transformation of muscle in to meat affecting ligand binding and redox potential of the heme iron in myoglobin, the meat pigment. The "inorganic chemistry" of meat involves (i redox-cycling between iron(II, iron(III, and iron(IV/protein radicals; (ii ligand exchange processes; and (iii spin-equilibra with a change in coordination number for the heme iron. In addition to the function of myoglobin for oxygen storage, new physiological roles of myoglobin are currently being discovered, which notably find close parallels in the processes in fresh meat and nitrite-cured meat products. Myoglobin may be characterized as a bioreactor for small molecules like O2, NO, CO, CO2, H2O, and HNO with importance in bio-regulation and in protection against oxidative stress in vivo otherwise affecting lipids in membranes. Many of these processes may be recognised as colour changes in fresh meat and cured meat products under different atmospheric conditions, and could also be instructive for teaching purposes.

  2. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  3. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  4. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected......Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity...... of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution...

  5. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  6. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  7. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined.

  8. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  9. Evolutionary roots of arginase expression and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Maria Dzik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Two main types of macrophage functions are known: classical (M1, producing nitric oxide, NO, and M2, in which arginase activity is primarily expressed. Ornithine, the product of arginase, is a substrate for synthesis of polyamines and collagen, important for growth and ontogeny of animals. M2 macrophages, expressing high level of mitochondrial arginase, have been implicated in promoting cell division and deposition of collagen during ontogeny and wound repair. Arginase expression is the default mode of tissue macrophages, but can also be amplified by signals, such as IL4/13 or TGF-β that accelerates wound healing and tissue repair. In worms, the induction of collagen gene is coupled with induction of immune response genes, both depending on the same TGF-β-like pathway. This suggests that the main function of M2 heal type macrophages is originally connected with the TGF-β superfamily of proteins, which are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis. Excretory-secretory products of metazoan parasites are able to induce M2 type of macrophage responses promoting wound healing without participation of Th2 cytokines IL4/IL13. The expression of arginase in lower animals can be induced by the presence of parasite antigens and TGF-β signals leading to collagen synthesis. This also means that the main proteins, which, in primitive metazoans, are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis are produced by innate immunity. The signaling function of NO is known already from the sponge stage of animal evolution. The cytotoxic role of NO molecule appeared later, as documented in immunity of marine mollusks and some insects. This implies that the M2-wound healing promoting function predates the defensive role of NO, a characteristic of M1 macrophages. Understanding when and how the M1 and M2 activities came to be in animals is useful for understanding how macrophage immunity, and immune

  10. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Bilgen [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Uzun, Lokman [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Beşirli, Necati [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases.

  11. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Viswakarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, β (also known as δ, and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP/thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220/mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1 may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism.

  12. A novel physiological role for cardiac myoglobin in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Esfeld, Sonja; Coman, Cristina; Ahrends, Robert; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Flögel, Ulrich; Rassaf, Tienush; Totzeck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Continuous contractile activity of the heart is essential and the required energy is mostly provided by fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Myocardial lipid accumulation can lead to pathological responses, however the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The role of myoglobin in dioxygen binding in cardiomyocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle has widely been appreciated. Our recent work established myoglobin as a protector of cardiac function in hypoxia and disease states. We here unravel a novel role of cardiac myoglobin in governing FA metabolism to ensure the physiological energy production through β-oxidation, preventing myocardial lipid accumulation and preserving cardiac functions. In vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy unveils a 3-fold higher deposition of lipids in mouse hearts lacking myoglobin, which was associated with depressed cardiac function compared to wild-type hearts as assessed by echocardiography. Mass spectrometry reveals a marked increase in tissue triglycerides with preferential incorporation of palmitic and oleic acids. Phospholipid levels as well as the metabolome, transcriptome and proteome related to FA metabolism tend to be unaffected by myoglobin ablation. Our results reveal a physiological role of myoglobin in FA metabolism with the lipid accumulation-suppressing effects of myoglobin preventing cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:28230173

  13. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  14. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  15. Dynamic Motion and Rearranged Molecular Shape of Heme in Myoglobin: Structural and Functional Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saburo Neya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin, a simple oxygen binding protein, was reconstituted with various types of synthetic hemes to manipulate the heme-globin interactions. From the paramagnetic NMR analysis, small heme was found to rotate rapidly about the iron-histidine bond upon. This is a novel and typical example for the fluctuation of protein. The dynamic NMR analysis indicated that the 360° rotational rate of a small heme was 1,400 s−1 at room temperature. The X-ray analyses revealed that the tertiary structure of globin containing the smallest heme was closely similar to that of native protein despite extensive destruction of the specific heme-globin interactions. The functional analyses of O2 binding showed that the loose heme-globin contacts do not significantly affect the oxygen binding. On the other hand, the rearrangement of tetrapyrrole array and the non-planar deformation in porphyrin ring significantly affect the functional properties of myoglobin. These results, taken together, indicate that the essential factors to regulate the myoglobin function are hidden under the molecular shape of prosthetic group rather than in the nonbonded heme-globin contacts.

  16. Myoglobin entrapment in poly(vinyl alcohol dense membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. S. Figueiredo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was the immobilization of myoglobin in poly(vinyl alcohol dense membranes. Glutaraldehyde was investigated both as the crosslinking agent, aiming to increase the membrane stability in aqueous medium, and as the vehicle to bind myoglobin and PVA. Reaction and membrane synthesis were carried simultaneously in mild operating conditions in order to maintain the native protein folding. Membrane characterization comprised the water swelling degree, DSC, TGA, UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR analysis and oxygen transport in a dialysis cell. The incorporation of myoglobin in the film decreased the water swelling degree and improved the membrane thermal properties compared to unmodified PVA membrane. The reduction of ferric iron in the prosthetic group of the protein to the ferrous form was observed. The increased affinity between oxygen and the immobilized myoglobin did not favor the release of this solute from the biocarrier.

  17. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  18. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of PPARγ expression during adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Ge, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor PPARγ is a master regulator of adipogenesis. PPARγ is highly expressed in adipose tissues and its expression is markedly induced during adipogenesis. In this review, we describe the current knowledge, as well as future directions, on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of PPARγ expression during adipogenesis. Investigating the molecular mechanisms that control PPARγ expression during adipogenesis is critical for understanding the development of white and brown adipo...

  19. The globin gene repertoire of lampreys: convergent evolution of hemoglobin and myoglobin in jawed and jawless vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Kim; Campbell, Kevin L; Hankeln, Thomas; Storz, Jay F; Hoffmann, Federico G; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-10-01

    Agnathans (jawless vertebrates) occupy a key phylogenetic position for illuminating the evolution of vertebrate anatomy and physiology. Evaluation of the agnathan globin gene repertoire can thus aid efforts to reconstruct the origin and evolution of the globin genes of vertebrates, a superfamily that includes the well-known model proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of the genome of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) which revealed 23 intact globin genes and two hemoglobin pseudogenes. Analyses of the genome of the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum) identified 18 full length and five partial globin gene sequences. The majority of the globin genes in both lamprey species correspond to the known agnathan hemoglobins. Both genomes harbor two copies of globin X, an ancient globin gene that has a broad phylogenetic distribution in the animal kingdom. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for an ortholog of neuroglobin in the lamprey genomes. Expression and phylogenetic analyses identified an ortholog of cytoglobin in the lampreys; in fact, our results indicate that cytoglobin is the only orthologous vertebrate-specific globin that has been retained in both gnathostomes and agnathans. Notably, we also found two globins that are highly expressed in the heart of P. marinus, thus representing functional myoglobins. Both genes have orthologs in L. camtschaticum. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these heart-expressed globins are not orthologous to the myoglobins of jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata), but originated independently within the agnathans. The agnathan myoglobin and hemoglobin proteins form a monophyletic group to the exclusion of functionally analogous myoglobins and hemoglobins of gnathostomes, indicating that specialized respiratory proteins for O2 transport in the blood and O2 storage in the striated muscles evolved independently in both lineages. This dual convergence of O2-transport and O2-storage proteins in

  20. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  1. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  2. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  3. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching.

  4. Polymorphic cis- and trans-regulation of human gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian G Cheung

    Full Text Available Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

  5. Amino acids as regulators of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball SR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of amino acids as substrates for protein synthesis is well documented. However, a function for amino acids in modulating the signal transduction pathways that regulate mRNA translation has only recently been described. Interesting, some of the signaling pathways regulated by amino acids overlap with those classically associated with the cellular response to hormones such as insulin and insulin-like growth factors. The focus of this review is on the signaling pathways regulated by amino acids, with a particular emphasis on the branched-chain amino acid leucine, and the steps in mRNA translation controlled by the signaling pathways.

  6. Changesin Myoglobin of Big Eye Tuna During Chilling Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevi Imelda Murniati Wodi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Big eye tuna (Thunnus obesus is one of the species of tuna which is have some value added such as have potential to improve animal protein sources, have high economic values as well as an export commodity.Mishandling and misapplication of high temparatures on the tuna handling at the tropics and sub tropics climate was significantly decreasing the value of myoglobin and affecting the solubility of protein. Myoglobin is a globular protein that have small molecular weight size and it was an important factor for determining the quality of meat and influencing factors of purchasing power by the consumer. The purpose of this experiments is to determining the changes of myoglobin content and the water soluble proteins content at some parts of big eye tuna in 9 days chilling temperatures. The portion which is analized was the ventral area, dorsal area and tail area. Myoglobin content in all portion above, both light and dark meat was analized. The results shows the decreased value of myoglobin content from first handling (day zero until day ninth (days 9th experiment. Each myoglobin contentfrom white meat at at ventral, dorsal and tail meat was decreased from 121.68 mg/100 into 41.35 mg/100, 148.2 mg/100g into 52.01 mg/100g, 105.16 mg/100g into 31.34 gr/100gram, after day ninth. The myoglobin content from dark meat at ventral, dorsal and tail meat, was decreased, too ; from 418.64 mg/100 gr into 121.01 mg/100 g, 446.21 mg/100 g into 58.34 mg/100 r and 145.65 mg/100 gr into 87.98 mg/100g after day ninth.Water soluble protein was derived into protein bands with molecular weight 15,4 kDa and 14 kDa. Its suspected as the myoglobin protein. The molecular weight difference was caused from degradation of protein during the storage.Keywords: Big eye tuna, meat, storage, myoglobin

  7. Rapid determination of serum myoglobin with a routine chemistry analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A J; Boymans, D A; Dijkstra, D; Gorgels, J P; Lerk, R

    1993-04-01

    A turbidimetric immunoassay system (Turbitime system, Behringwerke AG) allows rapid determination of myoglobin in serum. We adapted the reagents for this myoglobin assay (Turbiquant myoglobin) for use with a Hitachi 717 analyzer. No high-dose hook effect was observed up to 15,000 micrograms/L. Interassay CVs were 4.6% (mean = 72.0 micrograms/L; n = 9) and 2.5% (mean = 365.6 micrograms/L; n = 11). The calibration curve was stable for at least 1 month. Hemolysis did not interfere, and turbidity from lipemia interfered only when absorbance exceeded 2.0 A. Results of this method (y) correlated well with those by the Turbitime method (y = 1.256x - 44.1 micrograms/L; n = 91; r = 0.991) and by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (Byk-Sangtec; y = 0.739x - 42.2 micrograms/L; n = 94; r = 0.991). The upper limit (95th percentile) of the reference interval for myoglobin was estimated at 57.9 micrograms/L. The positive predictive value for results of myoglobin at admission was 89% with this upper reference limit and 99% with 100 micrograms/L, whereas the negative predictive value was about 60% for both limits.

  8. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  9. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... functions as cell expansion, universal stress protein, and putative type1a plasma ..... Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. (MONBUSHO) and Core ... Expression of expansion genes is correlated with growth in ...

  10. Regulating emotion expression and regulating emotion experience: divergent associations with dimensions of attachment among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consedine, Nathan S; Fiori, Katherine L; Magai, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adult attachment research does not systematically distinguish between experiential and expressive forms of regulation. Drawing insights from developmental-functionalism - a lifespan theory of emotion and emotion regulation - the current report examined the relations among attachment, trait emotion, and expressive emotion regulation in a large (N = 1204) sample of older women. Although both preoccupation and fearful-avoidance predicted more anxiety and anger, preoccupation predicted greater fear withdrawal and less fear expression, while fearful-avoidance predicted greater fear expression and greater anger withdrawal; attachment security predicted less fear withdrawal and less anger expression. Importantly, results regarding expressive regulation held even when controlling for trait levels of the underlying emotion. Results are interpreted within the context of models of attachment and lifespan socioemotional functioning. It is suggested that attachment research may benefit from considering the distinct functions of experienced versus expressed emotion in developmentally diverse contexts. Limitations are discussed and directions for future research are given.

  11. Cardiac Troponin I, Creatine Phosphokinase and Myoglobine Levels in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate minor myocardial injury in preeclamptic pregnancies by serum markers of cardiac troponin-I, creatine phosphokinase and myoglobine. Group I consisted of 45 preeclamptic pregnancies, Group 2 consisted of uncomplicated pregnancies. The groups were compared for maternal age, parity, mean troponin–I, creatine phosphokinase and myoglobine values. Student-t test were used in statistical analyses. Significance was accepted as p<0.05. Cardiac troponin-I levels were statistically significantly higher in preeclamptic pregnancies (0,97 ± 0,11ng/ml than control groups (0,12 ± 0.09 ng/ml (p<0.001. No statistically significant difference was found with mean levels of creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin levels between two groups. Higher values of troponin-I’in preeclamptic patients is thought to be a result of myocardial injury and associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  12. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  13. Myoglobin structure and function: A multiweek biochemistry laboratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P; Kirk, Sarah R; Meyer, Scott C; Holman, Karen L McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure, students work with computer modeling and visualization of myoglobin and its homologues, after which they spectroscopically characterize its thermal denaturation. Students also study protein function (ligand binding equilibrium) and are instructed on topics in data analysis (calibration curves, nonlinear vs. linear regression). This upper division biochemistry laboratory project is a challenging and rewarding one that not only exposes students to a wide variety of important biochemical laboratory techniques but also ties those techniques together to work with a single readily available and easily characterized protein, myoglobin.

  14. Regulation of transgene expression in genetic immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harms J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mammalian gene expression vectors has become increasingly important for genetic immunization and gene therapy as well as basic research. Essential for the success of these vectors in genetic immunization is the proper choice of a promoter linked to the antigen of interest. Many genetic immunization vectors use promoter elements from pathogenic viruses including SV40 and CMV. Lymphokines produced by the immune response to proteins expressed by these vectors could inhibit further transcription initiation by viral promoters. Our objective was to determine the effect of IFN-g on transgene expression driven by viral SV40 or CMV promoter/enhancer and the mammalian promoter/enhancer for the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I gene. We transfected the luciferase gene driven by these three promoters into 14 cell lines of many tissues and several species. Luciferase assays of transfected cells untreated or treated with IFN-g indicated that although the viral promoters could drive luciferase production in all cell lines tested to higher or lower levels than the MHC I promoter, treatment with IFN-g inhibited transgene expression in most of the cell lines and amplification of the MHC I promoter-driven transgene expression in all cell lines. These data indicate that the SV40 and CMV promoter/enhancers may not be a suitable choice for gene delivery especially for genetic immunization or cancer cytokine gene therapy. The MHC I promoter/enhancer, on the other hand, may be an ideal transgene promoter for applications involving the immune system.

  15. Posttranscriptional expression regulation: what determines translation rates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Brockmann

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent analyses indicate that differences in protein concentrations are only 20%-40% attributable to variable mRNA levels, underlining the importance of posttranscriptional regulation. Generally, protein concentrations depend on the translation rate (which is proportional to the translational activity, TA and the degradation rate. By integrating 12 publicly available large-scale datasets and additional database information of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we systematically analyzed five factors contributing to TA: mRNA concentration, ribosome density, ribosome occupancy, the codon adaptation index, and a newly developed "tRNA adaptation index." Our analysis of the functional relationship between the TA and measured protein concentrations suggests that the TA follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The calculated TA, together with measured protein concentrations, allowed us to estimate degradation rates for 4,125 proteins under standard conditions. A significant correlation to recently published degradation rates supports our approach. Moreover, based on a newly developed scoring system, we identified and analyzed genes subjected to the posttranscriptional regulation mechanism, translation on demand. Next we applied these findings to publicly available data of protein and mRNA concentrations under four stress conditions. The integration of these measurements allowed us to compare the condition-specific responses at the posttranscriptional level. Our analysis of all 62 proteins that have been measured under all four conditions revealed proteins with very specific posttranscriptional stress response, in contrast to more generic responders, which were nonspecifically regulated under several conditions. The concept of specific and generic responders is known for transcriptional regulation. Here we show that it also holds true at the posttranscriptional level.

  16. NFATc1 regulation of TRAIL expression in human intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; Apo2 has been shown to promote intestinal cell differentiation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT participates in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including differentiation. Here, we examined the role of NFAT in the regulation of TRAIL in human intestinal cells. Treatment with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (Io increased NFAT activation and TRAIL expression; pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, an antagonist of NFAT signaling, diminished NFAT activation and TRAIL induction. In addition, knockdown of NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3, and NFATc4 blocked PMA/Io increased TRAIL protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 activated TRAIL promoter activity and increased TRAIL mRNA and protein expression. Deletion of NFAT binding sites from the TRAIL promoter did not significantly abrogate NFATc1-increased TRAIL promoter activity, suggesting an indirect regulation of TRAIL expression by NFAT activation. Knockdown of NFATc1 increased Sp1 transcription factor binding to the TRAIL promoter and, importantly, inhibition of Sp1, by chemical inhibition or RNA interference, increased TRAIL expression. These studies identify a novel mechanism for TRAIL regulation by which activation of NFATc1 increases TRAIL expression through negative regulation of Sp1 binding to the TRAIL promoter.

  17. Redox regulation, gene expression and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoko; Tanaka, Masashi; Honda, Shuji

    2010-07-01

    Lifespan can be lengthened by genetic and environmental modifications. Study of these might provide valuable insights into the mechanism of aging. Low doses of radiation and short-term exposure to heat and high concentrations of oxygen prolong the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These might be caused by adaptive responses to harmful environmental conditions. Single-gene mutations have been found to extend lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. So far, the best-characterized system is the C. elegans mutant in the daf-2, insulin/IGF-I receptor gene that is the component of the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway. The mutant animals live twice as long as the wild type. The insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway regulates the activity of DAF-16, a FOXO transcription factor. However, the unified explanation for the function of DAF-16 transcription targets in the lifespan extension is not yet fully established. As both of the Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) isoforms (sod-2 and sod-3) are found to be targets of DAF-16, we attempted to assess their functions in regulating lifespan and oxidative stress responsivity. We show that the double deletions of sod-2 and sod-3 genes induced oxidative-stress sensitivity but do not shorten lifespan in the daf-2 mutant background, indicating that oxidative stress is not necessarily a limiting factor for longevity. Furthermore, the deletion in the sod-3 gene lengthens lifespan in the daf-2 mutant. We conclude that the MnSOD systems in C. elegans fine-tune the insulin/IGF-I-signaling based regulation of longevity by acting not as anti-oxidants but as physiological-redox-signaling modulators.

  18. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  19. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  20. Neuronal activity regulates hippocampal miRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Eacker

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control.

  1. Mechanisms of mammalian zinc-regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A; Valentine, Ruth A; Coneyworth, Lisa J; Mathers, John C; Ford, Dianne

    2008-12-01

    Mechanisms through which gene expression is regulated by zinc are central to cellular zinc homoeostasis. In this context, evidence for the involvement of zinc dyshomoeostasis in the aetiology of diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and cancer, highlights the importance of zinc-regulated gene expression. Mechanisms elucidated in bacteria and yeast provide examples of different possible modes of zinc-sensitive gene regulation, involving the zinc-regulated binding of transcriptional activators and repressors to gene promoter regions. A mammalian transcriptional regulatory mechanism that mediates zinc-induced transcriptional up-regulation, involving the transcription factor MTF1 (metal-response element-binding transcription factor 1), has been studied extensively. Gene responses in the opposite direction (reduced mRNA levels in response to increased zinc availability) have been observed in mammalian cells, but a specific transcriptional regulatory process responsible for such a response has yet to be identified. Examples of single zinc-sensitive transcription factors regulating gene expression in opposite directions are emerging. Although zinc-induced transcriptional repression by MTF1 is a possible explanation in some specific instances, such a mechanism cannot account for repression by zinc of all mammalian genes that show this mode of regulation, indicating the existence of as yet uncharacterized mechanisms of zinc-regulated transcription in mammalian cells. In addition, recent findings reveal a role for effects of zinc on mRNA stability in the regulation of specific zinc transporters. Our studies on the regulation of the human gene SLC30A5 (solute carrier 30A5), which codes for the zinc transporter ZnT5, have revealed that this gene provides a model system by which to study both zinc-induced transcriptional down-regulation and zinc-regulated mRNA stabilization.

  2. Direct Electrochemistry of Myoglobin in DDAB-Clay Composite Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ordered films were made by casting a mixture of aqueous dispersions of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)-clay composite and myoglobin (Mb) solution on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes.The Mb-DDAB-clay film electrodes showed stable and reversible cyclic voltammetric responses in buffers and can catalyze the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA).

  3. Hypoxia-protective roles of myoglobin and neuroglobin in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Signe

    Myoglobin er et protein, der lagrer og transporterer ilt i hjerte- og skeletmuskulatur, og i de seneste år har man opdaget, at det spiller andre, hidtil ukendte, roller i beskyttelsen mod de skadelige effekter af iltmangel. I sit Ph.D.-projekt har Signe Helbo Bønding forsket i, hvordan forskellig...

  4. Hypoxia-protective roles of myoglobin and neuroglobin in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Signe

    Myoglobin er et protein, der lagrer og transporterer ilt i hjerte- og skeletmuskulatur, og i de seneste år har man opdaget, at det spiller andre, hidtil ukendte, roller i beskyttelsen mod de skadelige effekter af iltmangel. I sit Ph.D.-projekt har Signe Helbo Bønding forsket i, hvordan forskellig...

  5. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der;

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost no tempera...

  6. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell-cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context.

  7. Adult-type hypolactasia and regulation of lactase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2005-01-01

    A common genetically determined polymorphism in the human population leads to two distinct phenotypes in adults, lactase persistence and adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence). All healthy newborn children express high levels of lactase and are able to digest large quantities of lactose......, the main carbohydrate in milk. Individuals with adult-type hypolactasia lose their lactase expression before adulthood and consequently often become lactose intolerant with associated digestive problems (e.g. diarrhoea). In contrast, lactase persistent individuals have a lifelong lactase expression...... and are able to digest lactose as adults. Lactase persistence can be regarded as the mutant phenotype since other mammals down-regulate their lactase expression after weaning (the postweaning decline). This phenomenon does not occur in lactase persistent individuals. The regulation of lactase expression...

  8. Regulating gene-expression by mechanical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Koen

    2008-10-01

    Initiation of transcription is an attractive target for controlling gene expression. Initiation typically involves binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA, followed by a rapid transition into a ``closed'' complex, and a subsequent transition into the ``open'' complex in which the DNA is locally melted. Nature makes good use of this target, for example in the form of repressor proteins that bind DNA and inhibit transcription. Here we will show that initiation of transcription is also dependent upon DNA tension and thus may be controlled by force alone, without the need for any accessory proteins. Using a three-bead assay in conjunction with optical tweezers we have shown that transient interactions of T7 RNA polymerase with the DNA promoter site shorten significantly, by up to a factor of ˜20, when DNA tension is increased. Experiments in the presence and absence of nucleotides have allowed us to conclude that force is likely to affect the rate constants into and/or out of the open complex, rather than the off-rate from the closed complex.

  9. Differential expression and regulation of Tdo2 during mouse decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dang-Dang; Gao, Ying-Jie; Tian, Xue-Chao; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Cao, Hang; Zhang, Qiao-Ling; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (Tdo2) is a rate-limiting enzyme which directs the conversion of tryptophan to kynurenine. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and regulation of Tdo2 in mouse uterus during decidualization. Tdo2 mRNA was mainly expressed in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. By real-time PCR, a high level of Tdo2 expression was observed in the uteri from days 6 to 8 of pregnancy, although Tdo2 expression was observed on days 1-8. Simultaneously, Tdo2 mRNA was also detected under in vivo and in vitro artificial decidualization. Estrogen, progesterone, and 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP could induce the expression of Tdo2 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus and uterine stromal cells. Tdo2 could regulate cell proliferation and stimulate the expression of decidual marker Dtprp in the uterine stromal cells and decidual cells. Overexpression of Tdo2 could upregulate the expression of Ahr, Cox2, and Vegf genes in uterine stromal cells, while Tdo2 inhibitor 680C91 could downregulate the expression of Cox2 and Vegf genes in uterine decidual cells. These data indicate that Tdo2 may play an important role during mouse decidualization and be regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and cAMP.

  10. Shh regulates chick Ebf1 gene expression in somite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Allen, Steve; McGonnell, Imelda; Mansour, Ali A; Otto, Anthony; Patel, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    The chick early B-cell factor 1 (cEbf1) is a member of EBF family of helix loop helix transcription factors. Recently, we have proved that cEbf1 expression in feather is regulated by Shh. It is therefore possible that the somitic expression of cEbf1 is controlled by Shh signals from the notochord. To assess this hypothesis, the expression profile of cEbf1 was first detailed in somites of chick embryos (from HH8 to HH28). cEbf1 expression was mainly localised in the medial sclerotome and later around the vertebral cartilage anlagen of body and pedicles. Tissue manipulations (notochord ablation) and Shh gain and loss of function experiments were then performed to analyse whether the notochord and/or Shh regulate cEbf1 expression. Results from these experiments confirmed our hypothesis that the medial somitic expression of cEbf1 is regulated by Shh from the notochord. In conclusion, cEbf1 gene is considered as a medial sclerotome marker, downstream to and regulated by the notochord derived Shh, which may be functionally involved in somitogenesis.

  11. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application...... of contact uncoupling and TGFβ. Nox4 knockdown abrogates epithelial-myofibroblast transition-associated reactive oxygen species production. Laser capture microdissection reveals increased Nox4 expression in the tubular epithelium also during obstructive nephropathy. MRTF down-regulation/inhibition suppresses...

  12. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  13. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Yan [Experimental Animal Center, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Sato, Toshinori [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Yamagata, Sadako [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Yamagata, Tatsuya, E-mail: tcyamagata@gmail.com [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  14. Tissue Specific and Hormonal Regulation of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    cAMP responsive region located at -200 to -99 bp in CRH. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMfER OF PAGES Breast Cancer gene regulation, transcription, placenta...known mediators of labor, and it may also the stress response. The peptide sequence and expression of potentiate the effect of oxytocin on uterine...regulation of other rodent trophoblast genes has 220 not yet been investigated. 2. Robinson BG, Arbiser JL, Emanuel RL, Majzoub JA 1989 Species- 3008

  15. Ndae1 expression and regulation in Drosophila embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Florencia Tevy

    Full Text Available The construction and prediction of cell fate maps at the whole embryo level require the establishment of an accurate atlas of gene expression patterns throughout development and the identification of the corresponding cis-regulatory sequences. However, while the expression and regulation of genes encoding upstream developmental regulators such as transcription factors or signaling pathway components have been analyzed in detail, up to date the number of cis-regulatory sequences identified for downstream effector genes, like ion channels, pumps and exchangers, is very low. The control and regulation of ion homeostasis in each cell, including at blastoderm stages, are essential for normal embryonic development. In this study, we analyzed in detail the embryonic expression pattern and cis-regulatory modules of the Drosophila Na+-driven anion exchanger 1 (Ndae1 gene, involved in the regulation of pH homeostasis. We show that Ndae1 is expressed in a tight and complex spatial-temporal pattern. In particular, we report that this downstream effector gene is under the control of the canonical dorsal-ventral patterning cascade through dorsal, Toll, twist and snail at early embryogenesis. Moreover, we identify several cis-regulatory modules, some of which control discrete and non-overlapping aspects of endogenous gene expression throughout development.

  16. Gastrin gene expression and regulation in rat islet cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S J; Wang, T C

    1988-11-15

    Gastrin gene expression was observed in two permanent rat insulinoma (RIN) cell lines derived from a rat insulinoma. Gastrin expression was selective; highest expression was seen in a cell line which did not express other islet cell hormones. Gastrin mRNA transcription initiated from the same promoter as antral gastrin mRNA. DNA transfection studies with a gastrin chloramphenicol acetyltransferase chimeric gene showed higher expression in gastrin-expressing RIN cells than non-gastrin-expressing islet cells. This implies that gastrin-expressing RIN cells selectively express a trans-acting transcriptional activator which binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences within the 5'-flanking DNA sequence and first exon of the gastrin gene. The gastrin peptide precursor synthesized in these RIN cell lines is subject to the same repertoire of posttranslational modifications within the cell's secretory apparatus (endoproteolytic cleavage, tyrosine sulfation, and C-terminal amidation) as seen in antral G cells. Gastrin mRNA levels in these RIN cells were selectively increased by increasing the extracellular calcium concentration. Membrane depolarization also stimulated gastrin mRNA levels, probably through activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. Thus, these gastrin-expressing RIN cell lines provide permanent cell lines useful in analyzing the cellular regulation of gastrin gene expression.

  17. Translational regulation of human p53 gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, L.; Minden, M D; Benchimol, S

    1996-01-01

    In blast cells obtained from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, p53 mRNA was present in all the samples examined while the expression of p53 protein was variable from patient to patient. Mutations in the p53 gene are infrequent in this disease and, hence, variable protein expression in the majority of the samples cannot be accounted for by mutation. In this study, we examined the regulation of p53 gene expression in human leukemic blasts and characterized the p53 transcripts in these c...

  18. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  19. DMBT1 expression is down-regulated in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braidotti, P; Nuciforo, P G; Mollenhauer, J

    2004-01-01

    with anti DMBT1 antibody (DMBTh12) and sections from 36 samples, were double-stained also with anti MCM5, one of the 6 pre-replicative complex proteins with cell proliferation-licensing functions. DMBT1 gene expression at mRNA level was assessed by RT-PCR in frozen tissues samples from 39 patients. RESULTS...... expression was down-regulated in the cancerous lesions compared to the normal and/or hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas (3/55 positive carcinomas versus 33/42 positive normal/hyperplastic epithelia; p = 0.0001). In 72% of cases RT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical results. Most of normal...... and hyperplastic mammary cells positive with DMBTh12 were also MCM5-positive. CONCLUSIONS: The redistribution and up-regulation of DMBT1 in normal and hyperplastic tissues flanking malignant tumours and its down-regulation in carcinomas suggests a potential role in breast cancer. Moreover, the concomitant...

  20. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Dcf1 regulates neuropeptide expression and maintains energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Qian; Wu, Liang; Wen, Tieqiao

    2017-05-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain that plays a pivotal role in food intake and energy storage. Although many studies have focused on these functions, the regulation of NPY expression remains unclear. Here we showed that dendritic cell factor 1 (Dcf1) regulates NPY expression and maintains energy balance. We found that NPY expression is significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of Dcf1 knockout (Dcf1(-/-), KO) mice. In contrast, Dcf1 overexpression significantly increases NPY expression in the cell line. We also found that Dcf1 acts upstream of the NPY gene to regulate NPY expression and modulates the NPY-NPY receptor 1-GABA signal. Notably, we observed a significant increase in the ATP concentration in Dcf1(-/-) mice, suggesting a greater demand for energy in the absence of Dcf1. We studied the relationship between Dcf1 and NPY and revealed that Dcf1 plays a critical role in energy balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Uragami, Shota; Akashi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakashima, Yukiko; Endo, Motoyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Todo, Takeshi; Node, Koichi; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  3. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kadomatsu

    Full Text Available Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2 contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  4. The separation of whale myoglobins with two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, G S

    1988-10-01

    Five myoglobins (sperm whale, Sei whale, Hubbs' beaked whale, pilot whale, and Amazon River dolphin) were examined using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Previous reports indicated that none of these proteins could be separated by using denaturing (in the presence of 8-9 M urea) isoelectric focusing. This result is confirmed in the present study. However, all the proteins could be separated by using denaturing nonequilibrium pH-gradient electrophoresis in the first dimension. Additionally, all the myoglobins have characteristic mobilities in the second dimension (sodium dodecyl sulfate), but these mobilities do not correspond to the molecular weights of the proteins. We conclude that two-dimensional electrophoresis can be more sensitive to differences in primary protein structure than previous studies indicate and that the assessment seems to be incorrect that this technique can separate only proteins that have a unit charge difference.

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  6. Amino acid sequence of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, John; Beckstead, Robert B; Payne, Jason; Singh, Rakesh K; Mohan, Anand

    2015-08-15

    Myoglobin has an important physiological role in vertebrates, and as the primary sarcoplasmic pigment in meat, influences quality perception and consumer acceptability. In this study, the amino acid sequences of Japanese quail and northern bobwhite myoglobin were deduced by cDNA cloning of the coding sequence from mRNA. Japanese quail myoglobin was isolated from quail cardiac muscles, purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel-filtration, and subjected to multiple enzymatic digestions. Mass spectrometry corroborated the deduced protein amino acid sequence at the protein level. Sequence analysis revealed both species' myoglobin structures consist of 153 amino acids, differing at only three positions. When compared with chicken myoglobin, Japanese quail showed 98% sequence identity, and northern bobwhite 97% sequence identity. The myoglobin in both quail species contained eight histidine residues instead of the nine present in chicken and turkey.

  7. S-nitrosylation-induced conformational change in blackfin tuna myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Eric R; Rodríguez, María M; Weichsel, Andrzej; Montfort, William R; Bonaventura, Joseph

    2007-07-06

    S-nitrosylation is a post-translational protein modification that can alter the function of a variety of proteins. Despite the growing wealth of information that this modification may have important functional consequences, little is known about the structure of the moiety or its effect on protein tertiary structure. Here we report high-resolution x-ray crystal structures of S-nitrosylated and unmodified blackfin tuna myoglobin, which demonstrate that in vitro S-nitrosylation of this protein at the surface-exposed Cys-10 directly causes a reversible conformational change by "wedging" apart a helix and loop. Furthermore, we have demonstrated in solution and in a single crystal that reduction of the S-nitrosylated myoglobin with dithionite results in NO cleavage from the sulfur of Cys-10 and rebinding to the reduced heme iron, showing the reversibility of both the modification and the conformational changes. Finally, we report the 0.95-A structure of ferrous nitrosyl myoglobin, which provides an accurate structural view of the NO coordination geometry in the context of a globin heme pocket.

  8. Enhancing the electrochemical response of myoglobin with carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplandiu, M J; Pacios, M; Cyganek, L; Bartroli, J; del Valle, M

    2009-09-02

    In this paper, the electrochemical behavior of different myoglobin-modified carbon electrodes is evaluated. In particular, the performance of voltammetric biosensors made of forest-like carbon nanotubes, carbon nanotube composites and graphite composites is compared by monitoring mainly the electrocatalytic reduction of H(2)O(2) by myoglobin and their corresponding electroanalytical characteristics. Graphite composites showed the worst electroanalytical performance, exhibiting a small linear range, a limit of detection (LOD) of 9 x 10(-5) M and low sensitivity. However, it was found that the electrochemical response was enhanced with the use of carbon nanotube-based electrodes with LOD up to 5 x 10(-8) M, higher sensitivities and wider linear range response. On the one hand, in the case of the CNT epoxy composite, the improvement in the response can be mainly attributed to its more porous surface which allows the immobilization of higher amounts of the electroactive protein. On the other hand, in the case of the forest-like CNT electrodes, the enhancement is due to an increase in the electron transfer kinetics. These findings encourage the use of myoglobin-modified carbon nanotube electrodes as potential (bio)sensors of H(2)O(2) or O(2) in biology, microbiology and environmental fields.

  9. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  10. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gukhan [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Won [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Whan, E-mail: swkim7@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  11. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T.; Minas, Tsion Z.; Conn, Erin J.; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T.; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes. PMID:27137931

  12. Regulation of VDR expression in rat and human intestine and liver - Consequences for CYP3A expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Ansar A.; Dragt, Bieuwke S.; Porte, Robert J.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulates the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in intestine and liver, but the regulation of VDR expression in intestine and liver is incompletely understood. We studied the regulation of VDR mRNA expression by ligands for VDR, farnesoid X recepto

  13. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T [Univ. of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  15. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Roy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM. During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR. Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the

  16. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  17. Oxygen regulated gene expression in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1994-01-01

    In facultatively anaerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, oxygen and other electron acceptors fundamentally influence catabolic and anabolic pathways. E. coli is able to grow aerobically by respiration and in the absence of O2 by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, nitrite, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as acceptors or by fermentation. The expression of the various catabolic pathways occurs according to a hierarchy with 3 or 4 levels. Aerobic respiration at the highest level is followed by nitrate respiration (level 2), anaerobic respiration with the other acceptors (level 3) and fermentation. In other bacteria, different regulatory cascades with other underlying principles can be observed. Regulation of anabolism in response to O2 availability is important, too. It is caused by different requirements of cofactors or coenzymes in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and by the requirement for different O2-independent biosynthetic routes under anoxia. The regulation mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. In E. coli, 4 global regulatory systems are known to be essential for the aerobic/anaerobic switch and the described hierarchy. A two-component sensor/regulator system comprising ArcB (sensor) and ArcA (transcriptional regulator) is responsible for regulation of aerobic metabolism. The FNR protein is a transcriptional sensor-regulator protein which regulates anaerobic respiratory genes in response to O2 availability. The gene activator FhlA regulates fermentative formate and hydrogen metabolism with formate as the inductor. ArcA/B and FNR directly respond to O2, FhlA indirectly by decreased levels of formate in the presence of O2. Regulation of nitrate/nitrite catabolism is effected by two 2-component sensor/regulator systems NarX(Q)/NarL(P) in response to nitrate/nitrite. Co-operation of the different regulatory systems at the target promoters which are in part under dual (or manifold) transcriptional control causes the expression

  18. Regulation of wee1(+) expression during meiosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1p (Cdc2p) plays a central role in entry into and progression through nuclear division during mitosis and meiosis. Cdk1p is activated during meiotic nuclear divisions by dephosphorylation of its tyrosine-15 residue. The phosphorylation status of this residue is largely determined by the Wee1p kinase and the Cdc25p phosphatase. In fission yeast, the forkhead-type transcription factor Mei4p is essential for entry into the first meiotic nuclear division. We recently identified cdc25(+) as an essential target of Mei4p in the control of entry into meiosis I. Here, we show that wee1(+) is another important target of Mei4p in the control of entry into meiosis I. Mei4p bound to the upstream region of wee1(+) in vivo and in vitro and inhibited expression of wee1(+), whereas Mei4p positively regulated expression of the adjacent pseudogene. Overexpression of Mei4p inhibited expression of wee1(+) and induced that of the pseudogene. Conversely, deletion of Mei4p did not decrease expression of wee1(+) but inhibited that of the pseudogene. In addition, deletion of Mei4p-binding regions delayed repression of wee1(+) expression as well as induction of expression of the pseudogene. These results suggest that repression of wee1(+) expression is primarily owing to Mei4p-mediated transcriptional interference.

  19. Caspases regulate VAMP-8 expression and phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yong Hou Sunny; Cai, Deyu Tarika; Huang, Dachuan; Wang, Cheng Chun; Wong, Siew Heng

    2009-09-18

    During an inflammation and upon encountering pathogens, immature dendritic cells (DC) undergo a maturation process to become highly efficient in presenting antigens. This transition from immature to mature state is accompanied by various physiological, functional and morphological changes including reduction of caspase activity and inhibition of phagocytosis in the mature DC. Caspases are cysteine proteases which play essential roles in apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VAMP-8, (a SNARE protein of the early/late endosomes) which has been shown previously to inhibit phagocytosis in DC, is a substrate of caspases. Furthermore, we identified two putative conserved caspase recognition/cleavage sites on the VAMP-8 protein. Consistent with the up-regulation of VAMP-8 expression upon treatment with caspase inhibitor (CI), immature DC treated with CI exhibits lower phagocytosis activity. Thus, our results highlight the role of caspases in regulating VAMP-8 expression and subsequently phagocytosis during maturation of DC.

  20. MGMT expression: insights into its regulation. 1. Epigenetic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is the DNA repair enzyme responsible for removing of alkylation adducts from the O6-guanine in DNA. Despite MGMT prevents mutations and cell death, this enzyme can provide resistance of cancer cells to alkylating agents of chemotherapy. The high intra- and inter-individual variations in the human MGMT expression level have been observed indicating to a complicated regulation of this gene. This review is focused on the study of epigenetic factors which could be potentially involved in regulation of the human MGMT gene expression. These include chromatin remodeling via histone modifications and DNA methylation of promoter region and gene body, as well as RNA-based mechanisms, alternative splicing, protein post- translational modifications, and other.

  1. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  2. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marcello

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE. These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function.

  3. Differential regulation of GS-GOGAT gene expression by plant growth regulators in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT pathway in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains five cytosolic GS1 genes (GLN1;1 - GLN1;5, one nuclear gene for chloroplastic GS2 isoform (GLN2, two Fd-GOGAT genes (GLU1 and GLU2 and a GLT1 gene coding for NADH-GOGAT. Even though the regulation of GS and GOGAT isoforms has been extensively studied in response to various environmental and metabolic cues in many plant species, little is known about the effects of phytohormones on their regulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of representative plant growth regulators, kinetin (KIN, abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellic acid (GA3 and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, on the expression of A. thaliana GS and GOGAT genes. The obtained results indicate that GS and GOGAT genes are differentially regulated by growth regulators in shoots and roots. KIN and 2,4-D repressed GS and GOGAT expression in roots, with little effect on transcript levels in shoots. KIN affected all tested genes; 2,4-D was apparently more selective and less potent. ABA induced the expression of GLN1;1 and GLU2 in whole seedlings, while GA3 enhanced the expression of all tested genes in shoots, except GLU2. The observed expression patterns are discussed in relation to physiological roles of investigated plant growth regulators and N-assimilating enzymes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173024

  4. Chromatin-mediated regulation of cytomegalovirus gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Matthew B

    2011-05-01

    Following primary infection, whether Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) enters either the latent or lytic lifecycle is dependent on the phenotype of the cell type infected. Multiple cell types are permissive for lytic infection with HCMV whereas, in contrast, well characterized sites of latency are restricted to a very specific population of CD34+ cells resident in the bone marrow and the immature myeloid cells they give rise to. It is becoming increasingly clear that one of the mechanisms that promote HCMV latency involves the recruitment of histone proteins to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) which are subject to post-translational modifications that promote a transcriptionally inactive state. Integral to this, is the role of cellular transcriptional repressors that interact with histone modifying enzymes that promote and maintain this repressed state during latency. Crucially, the chromatin associated with the MIEP is dynamically regulated-myeloid cell differentiation triggers the acetylation of histones bound to the MIEP which is concomitant with the reactivation of IE gene expression and re-entry into lytic infection. Interestingly, this dynamic regulation of the MIEP by chromatin structure in latency extends not only into lytic infection but also for the regulation of multiple viral promoters in all phases of infection. HCMV lytic infection is characterised by a timely and co-ordinated pattern of gene expression that now has been shown to correlate with active post-translational modification of the histones associated with early and late promoters. These effects are mediated by the major IE products (IE72 and IE86) which physically and functionally interact with histone modifying enzymes resulting in the efficient activation of viral gene expression. Thus chromatin appears to play an important role in gene regulation in all phases of infection. Furthermore, these studies are highly suggestive that an intrinsic cellular anti-viral response to incoming viral

  5. Expression and regulation of nampt in human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kover

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis of a salvage pathway and exists in 2 known forms, intracellular Nampt (iNampt and a secreted form, extracellular Nampt (eNampt. eNampt can generate an intermediate product, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN, which has been reported to support insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. Nampt has been reported to be expressed in the pancreas but islet specific expression has not been adequately defined. The aim of this study was to characterize Nampt expression, secretion and regulation by glucose in human islets. Gene and protein expression of Nampt was assessed in human pancreatic tissue and isolated islets by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence/confocal imaging respectively. Variable amounts of Nampt mRNA were detected in pancreatic tissue and isolated islets. Immunofluorescence staining for Nampt was found in the exocrine and endocrine tissue of fetal pancreas. However, in adulthood, Nampt expression was localized predominantly in beta cells. Isolated human islets secreted increasing amounts of eNampt in response to high glucose (20 mM in a static glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assay (GSIS. In addition to an increase in eNampt secretion, exposure to 20 mM glucose also increased Nampt mRNA levels but not protein content. The secretion of eNampt was attenuated by the addition of membrane depolarization inhibitors, diazoxide and nifedipine. Islet-secreted eNampt showed enzymatic activity in a reaction with increasing production of NAD+/NADH over time. In summary, we show that Nampt is expressed in both exocrine and endocrine tissue early in life but in adulthood expression is localized to endocrine tissue. Enzymatically active eNampt is secreted by human islets, is regulated by glucose and requires membrane depolarization.

  6. DMBT1 expression is down-regulated in breast cancer

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    Coggi G

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the expression of DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1, a putative tumor suppressor gene, in normal, proliferative, and malignant breast epithelium and its possible relation to cell cycle. Methods Sections from 17 benign lesions and 55 carcinomas were immunostained with anti DMBT1 antibody (DMBTh12 and sections from 36 samples, were double-stained also with anti MCM5, one of the 6 pre-replicative complex proteins with cell proliferation-licensing functions. DMBT1 gene expression at mRNA level was assessed by RT-PCR in frozen tissues samples from 39 patients. Results Normal glands and hyperplastic epithelium in benign lesions displayed a luminal polarized DMBTh12 immunoreactivity. Normal and hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas showed a loss of polarization, with immunostaining present in basal and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments. DMBT1 protein expression was down-regulated in the cancerous lesions compared to the normal and/or hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas (3/55 positive carcinomas versus 33/42 positive normal/hyperplastic epithelia; p = 0.0001. In 72% of cases RT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical results. Most of normal and hyperplastic mammary cells positive with DMBTh12 were also MCM5-positive. Conclusions The redistribution and up-regulation of DMBT1 in normal and hyperplastic tissues flanking malignant tumours and its down-regulation in carcinomas suggests a potential role in breast cancer. Moreover, the concomitant expression of DMTB1 and MCM5 suggests its possible association with the cell-cycle regulation.

  7. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  8. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  9. Regulation of MYCN expression in human neuroblastoma cells

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    de Vries I

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification of the MYCN gene in neuroblastoma (NB is associated with a poor prognosis. However, MYCN-amplification does not automatically result in higher expression of MYCN in children with NB. We hypothesized that the discrepancy between MYCN gene expression and prognosis in these children might be explained by the expression of either MYCN-opposite strand (MYCNOS or the shortened MYCN-isoform (ΔMYCN that was recently identified in fetal tissues. Both MYCNOS and ΔMYCN are potential inhibitors of MYCN either at the mRNA or at the protein level. Methods Expression of MYCN, MYCNOS and ΔMYCN was measured in human NB tissues of different stages. Transcript levels were quantified using a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay (QPCR. In addition, relative expression of these three transcripts was compared to the number of MYCN copies, which was determined by genomic real-time PCR (gQPCR. Results Both ΔMYCN and MYCNOS are expressed in all NBs examined. In NBs with MYCN-amplification, these transcripts are significantly higher expressed. The ratio of MYCN:ΔMYCN expression was identical in all tested NBs. This indicates that ΔMYCN and MYCN are co-regulated, which suggests that ΔMYCN is not a regulator of MYCN in NB. However, the ratio of MYCNOS:MYCN expression is directly correlated with NB disease stage (p = 0.007. In the more advanced NB stages and NBs with MYCN-amplification, relatively more MYCNOS is present as compared to MYCN. Expression of the antisense gene MYCNOS might be relevant to the progression of NB, potentially by directly inhibiting MYCN transcription by transcriptional interference at the DNA level. Conclusion The MYCNOS:MYCN-ratio in NBs is significantly correlated with both MYCN-amplification and NB-stage. Our data indicate that in NB, MYCN expression levels might be influenced by MYCNOS but not by ΔMYCN.

  10. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  11. The Cpx System Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Nicole; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess signal transduction pathways capable of sensing and responding to a wide variety of signals. The Cpx envelope stress response, composed of the sensor histidine kinase CpxA and the response regulator CpxR, senses and mediates adaptation to insults to the bacterial envelope. The Cpx response has been implicated in the regulation of a number of envelope-localized virulence determinants across bacterial species. Here, we show that activation of the Cpx pathway in Vibrio cholerae El Tor strain C6706 leads to a decrease in expression of the major virulence factors in this organism, cholera toxin (CT) and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Our results indicate that this occurs through the repression of production of the ToxT regulator and an additional upstream transcription factor, TcpP. The effect of the Cpx response on CT and TCP expression is mostly abrogated in a cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) mutant, although expression of the crp gene is unaltered. Since TcpP production is controlled by CRP, our data suggest a model whereby the Cpx response affects CRP function, which leads to diminished TcpP, ToxT, CT, and TCP production. PMID:25824837

  12. The Role of Bromodomain Proteins in Regulating Gene Expression

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    Michael F. Duffy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important in regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Of the numerous histone modifications which have been identified, acetylation is one of the best characterised and is generally associated with active genes. Histone acetylation can directly affect chromatin structure by neutralising charges on the histone tail, and can also function as a binding site for proteins which can directly or indirectly regulate transcription. Bromodomains specifically bind to acetylated lysine residues on histone tails, and bromodomain proteins play an important role in anchoring the complexes of which they are a part to acetylated chromatin. Bromodomain proteins are involved in a diverse range of functions, such as acetylating histones, remodeling chromatin, and recruiting other factors necessary for transcription. These proteins thus play a critical role in the regulation of transcription.

  13. MUC1 Regulates PDGFA Expression During Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraei, Mahnaz; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Curry, Jennifer M; Teresa, Tinder L; Nath, Sritama; Besmer, Dahlia; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Dalia, Ritu; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) has one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. Mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is a key modulator of several signaling pathways that affect oncogenesis, motility, and metastasis. Its expression is known to be associated with poor prognosis in patients. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We report a novel association of MUC1 with Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-A (PDGFA). PDGFA is one of the many drivers of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis in PDA. Using mouse PDA models as well as human samples, we show clear evidence that MUC1 regulates the expression and secretion of PDGFA. This, in turn, influences proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells leading to higher tumor burden in vivo. In addition, we reveal that MUC1 over expressing cells are heavily dependent on PDGFA both for proliferation and invasion while MUC1-null cells are not. Moreover, PDGFA and MUC1 are critical for translocation of βcatenin to the nucleus for oncogenesis to ensue. Finally, we elucidate the underlying mechanism by which MUC1 regulates PDGFA expression and secretion in pancreatic cancer cells. We show that MUC1 associates with Hif1-α, a known transcription factor involved in controlling PDGFA expression. Furthermore, MUC1 facilitates Hif1-α translocation to the nucleus. In summary, we have demonstrated that MUC1-induced invasion and proliferation occurs via increased exogenous production of PDGFA. Thus, impeding MUC1 regulation of PDGFA signaling may be therapeutically beneficial for patients with PDA. PMID:22266848

  14. Molecular dynamics study on the solvent dependent heme cooling following ligand photolysis in carbonmonoxy myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Straub, John E

    2007-03-29

    The time scale and mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation of the heme moiety in myoglobin was studied using molecular dynamics simulation. Five different solvent models, including normal water, heavy water, normal glycerol, deuterated glycerol and a nonpolar solvent, and two forms of the heme, one native and one lacking acidic side chains, were studied. Structural alteration of the protein was observed in native myoglobin glycerol solution and native myoglobin water solution. The single-exponential decay of the excess kinetic energy of the heme following ligand photolysis was observed in all systems studied. The relaxation rate depends on the solvent used. However, this dependence cannot be explained using bulk transport properties of the solvent including macroscopic thermal diffusion. The rate and mechanism of heme cooling depends upon the detailed microscopic interaction between the heme and solvent. Three intermolecular energy transfer mechanisms were considered: (i) energy transfer mediated by hydrogen bonds, (ii) direct vibration-vibration energy transfer via resonant interaction, and (iii) energy transfer via vibration-translation or vibration-rotation interaction, or in other words, thermal collision. The hydrogen bond interaction and vibration-vibration interaction between the heme and solvent molecules dominates the energy transfer in native myoglobin aqueous solution and native myoglobin glycerol solutions. For modified myoglobin, the vibration-vibration interaction is also effective in glycerol solution, different from aqueous solution. Thermal collisions form the dominant energy transfer pathway for modified myoglobin in water solution, and for both native myoglobin and modified myoglobin in a nonpolar environment. For native myoglobin in a nonpolar solvent solution, hydrogen bonds between heme isopropionate side chains and nearby protein residues, absent in the modified myoglobin nonpolar solvent solution, are key interactions influencing the

  15. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Tang, Ruiling

    2008-10-01

    The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10 U hCG 48 h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72 h after hCG treatment. The immunohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in thecal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granulose lutein cell layer and thecal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170 kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  17. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Rat Ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei JIN; Ruiling TANG

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10U hCG 48h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72h after hCG treatment. The immnnohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in theeal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granuiose lutein cell layer and theeal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl- channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  18. Differential regulation of dentin matrix protein 1 expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; Pi, Yuli; Feng, Jian Q

    2005-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in mineralized tooth and bone. Both in vitro and in vivo data show that DMP1 is critical for mineralization and tooth morphogenesis (growth and development). In this study, we studied Dmp1 gene regulation. The in vitro transient transfection assay identified two important DNA fragments, the 2.4- and 9.6-kb promoter regions. We next generated and analyzed transgenic mice bearing the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene driven by the 2.4- or 9.6-kb promoter with the complete 4-kb intron 1. The 9.6-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice conferred a DMP1 expression pattern in odontoblasts identical to that in the endogenous Dmp1 gene. This is reflected by lacZ expression in Dmp1-lacZ knock-in mice during all stages of odontogenesis. In contrast, the 2.4-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice display activity in odontoblast cells only at the early stage of odontogenesis. Thus, we propose that different transcription factors regulate early or later cis-regulatory domains of the Dmp1 promoter, which gives rise to the unique spatial and temporal expression pattern of Dmp1 gene at different stages of tooth development. 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Regulation of stem cell factor expression in inflammation and asthma

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    Carla A Da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a major mast cell growth factor, which could be involved in the local increase of mast cell number in the asthmatic airways. In vivo, SCF expression increases in asthmatic patients and this is reversed after treatment with glucocorticoids. In vitro in human lung fibroblasts in culture, IL-1beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, confirms this increased SCF mRNA and protein expression implying the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2 very early post-treatment, and glucocorticoids confirm this decrease. Surprisingly, glucocorticoids potentiate the IL-1beta-enhanced SCF expression at short term treatment, implying increased SCF mRNA stability and SCF gene transcription rate. This potentiation involves p38 and ERK1/2. Transfection experiments with the SCF promoter including intron1 also confirm this increase and decrease of SCF expression by IL-1beta and glucocorticoids, and the potentiation by glucocorticoids of the IL-1beta-induced SCF expression. Deletion of the GRE or kappaB sites abolishes this potentiation, and the effect of IL-1beta or glucocorticoids alone. DNA binding of GR and NF-kappaB are also demonstrated for these effects. In conclusion, this review concerns new mechanisms of regulation of SCF expression in inflammation that could lead to potential therapeutic strategy allowing to control mast cell number in the asthmatic airways.

  20. Social Regulation of Gene Expression in Threespine Sticklebacks.

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    Anna K Greenwood

    Full Text Available Identifying genes that are differentially expressed in response to social interactions is informative for understanding the molecular basis of social behavior. To address this question, we described changes in gene expression as a result of differences in the extent of social interactions. We housed threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus females in either group conditions or individually for one week, then measured levels of gene expression in three brain regions using RNA-sequencing. We found that numerous genes in the hindbrain/cerebellum had altered expression in response to group or individual housing. However, relatively few genes were differentially expressed in either the diencephalon or telencephalon. The list of genes upregulated in fish from social groups included many genes related to neural development and cell adhesion as well as genes with functions in sensory signaling, stress, and social and reproductive behavior. The list of genes expressed at higher levels in individually-housed fish included several genes previously identified as regulated by social interactions in other animals. The identified genes are interesting targets for future research on the molecular mechanisms of normal social interactions.

  1. Population differences in transcript-regulator expression quantitative trait loci.

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    Pierre R Bushel

    Full Text Available Gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL are useful for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with diseases. At times, a genetic variant may be associated with a master regulator involved in the manifestation of a disease. The downstream target genes of the master regulator are typically co-expressed and share biological function. Therefore, it is practical to screen for eQTLs by identifying SNPs associated with the targets of a transcript-regulator (TR. We used a multivariate regression with the gene expression of known targets of TRs and SNPs to identify TReQTLs in European (CEU and African (YRI HapMap populations. A nominal p-value of <1×10(-6 revealed 234 SNPs in CEU and 154 in YRI as TReQTLs. These represent 36 independent (tag SNPs in CEU and 39 in YRI affecting the downstream targets of 25 and 36 TRs respectively. At a false discovery rate (FDR = 45%, one cis-acting tag SNP (within 1 kb of a gene in each population was identified as a TReQTL. In CEU, the SNP (rs16858621 in Pcnxl2 was found to be associated with the genes regulated by CREM whereas in YRI, the SNP (rs16909324 was linked to the targets of miRNA hsa-miR-125a. To infer the pathways that regulate expression, we ranked TReQTLs by connectivity within the structure of biological process subtrees. One TReQTL SNP (rs3790904 in CEU maps to Lphn2 and is associated (nominal p-value = 8.1×10(-7 with the targets of the X-linked breast cancer suppressor Foxp3. The structure of the biological process subtree and a gene interaction network of the TReQTL revealed that tumor necrosis factor, NF-kappaB and variants in G-protein coupled receptors signaling may play a central role as communicators in Foxp3 functional regulation. The potential pleiotropic effect of the Foxp3 TReQTLs was gleaned from integrating mRNA-Seq data and SNP-set enrichment into the analysis.

  2. Expression and regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, K; Michel, T

    1997-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is a key determinant of blood pressure homeostasis and platelet aggregation and is synthesized by the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In the vascular wall, eNOS is activated by diverse cell-surface receptors and by increases in blood flow, and the consequent generation of NO leads to vascular smooth-muscle relaxation. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation is deranged in a variety of disease states, including hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, but the roles of eNOS in endothelial dysfunction remain to be clearly defined. The past several years have witnessed important advances in understanding the molecular and cellular biology of eNOS regulation. In endothelial cells, eNOS undergoes a complex series of covalent modifications, including myristoylation, palmitoylation, and phosphorylation. Palmitoylation of eNOS dynamically targets the enzyme to distinct domains of the endothelial plasma membrane termed caveolae; caveolae may serve as sites for the sequestration of signal-transducing proteins and are themselves subject to dynamic regulation by ligands and lipids. Originally thought to be expressed only in endothelial cells, eNOS is now known to be expressed in a variety of tissues, including blood platelets, cardiac myocytes, and brain hippocampus. Paradigms established in endothelial cells for the molecular regulation and subcellular targeting of eNOS are being extended to the investigation of eNOS expressed in nonendothelial tissues. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the molecular regulation of eNOS and the other NOS isoforms and identifies important parallels between eNOS and other cell-signaling molecules. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:28-37).

  3. Cyclic AMP Effectors Regulate Myometrial Oxytocin Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulia, Angela; Singh, Natasha; Lei, Kaiyu; Sooranna, Suren R; Johnson, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    The factors that initiate human labor are poorly understood. We have tested the hypothesis that a decline in cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) function leads to the onset of labor. Initially, we identified myometrial cAMP/PKA-responsive genes (six up-regulated and five down-regulated genes) and assessed their expression in myometrial samples taken from different stages of pregnancy and labor. We found that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was one of the cAMP-repressed genes, and, given the importance of OTR in the labor process, we studied the mechanisms involved in greater detail using small interfering RNA, chemical agonists, and antagonists of the cAMP effectors. We found that cAMP-repressed genes, including OTR, increased with the onset of labor. Our in vitro studies showed that cAMP acting via PKA reduced OTR expression but that in the absence of PKA, cAMP acts via exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) to increase OTR expression. In early labor myometrial samples, PKA levels and activity declined and Epac1 levels increased, perhaps accounting for the increase in myometrial OTR mRNA and protein levels at this time. In vitro exposure of myometrial cells to stretch and IL-1β increased OTR levels and reduced basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP and PKA activity, as judged by phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein levels, but neither stretch nor IL-1β had any effect on PKA or EPAC1 levels. In summary, there is a reduction in the activity of the cAMP/PKA pathway with the onset of human labor potentially playing a critical role in regulating OTR expression and the transition from myometrial quiescence to activation.

  4. Facial expression recognition and emotional regulation in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Sophie; Croisier Langenier, Muriel; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Cataplexy is pathognomonic of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and defined by a transient loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions. Recent researches suggest abnormal amygdala function in narcolepsy with cataplexy. Emotion treatment and emotional regulation strategies are complex functions involving cortical and limbic structures, like the amygdala. As the amygdala has been shown to play a role in facial emotion recognition, we tested the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy would have impaired recognition of facial emotional expressions compared with patients affected with central hypersomnia without cataplexy and healthy controls. We also aimed to determine whether cataplexy modulates emotional regulation strategies. Emotional intensity, arousal and valence ratings on Ekman faces displaying happiness, surprise, fear, anger, disgust, sadness and neutral expressions of 21 drug-free patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy were compared with 23 drug-free sex-, age- and intellectual level-matched adult patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy and 21 healthy controls. All participants underwent polysomnography recording and multiple sleep latency tests, and completed depression, anxiety and emotional regulation questionnaires. Performance of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy or healthy controls on both intensity rating of each emotion on its prototypical label and mean ratings for valence and arousal. Moreover, patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not use different emotional regulation strategies. The level of depressive and anxious symptoms in narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from the other groups. Our results demonstrate that narcolepsy with cataplexy accurately perceives and discriminates facial emotions, and regulates emotions normally. The absence of alteration of perceived affective valence remains a major clinical interest in narcolepsy with cataplexy

  5. Child and adolescent emotion regulation: the role of parental emotion regulation and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariola, Emily; Gullone, Eleonora; Hughes, Elizabeth K

    2011-06-01

    This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future research are proposed. First, it is argued that consistency in the measurement of emotion regulation is necessary, including assessment of more refined theoretical conceptualizations of regulatory types, skills, or strategies. Second, it is argued that emotion regulation developmental research examining the post-early childhood period is necessary in order to contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of youths' emotion regulation. Finally, it is argued that greater examination of paternal influences on child emotional functioning, in addition to maternal influences, is required. Consideration of these issues in future emotion regulation research will ideally contribute to a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in child and adolescent development of optimal regulatory capacities.

  6. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

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    Alberto Miranda

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PRNP is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5 in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel and SPRN (Shadoo, whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  7. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

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    Matthew J Fuxjager

    Full Text Available Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus, zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata, and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus. Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  8. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  9. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  10. Differential gene expression regulated by oscillatory transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cerone

    Full Text Available Cells respond to changes in the internal and external environment by a complex regulatory system whose end-point is the activation of transcription factors controlling the expression of a pool of ad-hoc genes. Recent experiments have shown that certain stimuli may trigger oscillations in the concentration of transcription factors such as NF-κB and p53 influencing the final outcome of the genetic response. In this study we investigate the role of oscillations in the case of three different well known gene regulatory mechanisms using mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations and numerical simulations. We considered the cases of direct regulation, two-step regulation and feed-forward loops, and characterized their response to oscillatory input signals both analytically and numerically. We show that in the case of indirect two-step regulation the expression of genes can be turned on or off in a frequency dependent manner, and that feed-forward loops are also able to selectively respond to the temporal profile of oscillating transcription factors.

  11. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  12. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  13. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

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    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  14. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, S P; Joseph, P; Li, S; Beach, C M; Fontaine, M; Steinke, L

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the primary structure of emu myoglobin (Mb). Emu Mb was isolated from Iliofibularis muscle employing gel-filtration chromatography. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry was employed to determine the exact molecular mass of emu Mb in comparison with horse Mb, and Edman degradation was utilized to characterize the amino acid sequence. The molecular mass of emu Mb was 17,380 Da and was close to those reported for ratite and poultry myoglobins. Similar to myoglobins from meat-producing livestock and birds, emu Mb has 153 amino acids. Emu Mb contains 9 histidines. Proximal and distal histidines, responsible for coordinating oxygen-binding property of Mb, are conserved in emu. Emu Mb shared more than 90% homology with ratite and chicken myoglobins, whereas it demonstrated only less than 70% sequence similarity with ruminant myoglobins.

  15. Multiple upstream modules regulate zebrafish myf5 expression

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    Weng Chih-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myf5 is one member of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, and it functions as a myogenic factor that is important for the specification and differentiation of muscle cells. The expression of myf5 is somite- and stage-dependent during embryogenesis through a delicate regulation. However, this complex regulatory mechanism of myf5 is not clearly understood. Results We isolated a 156-kb bacterial artificial chromosome clone that includes an upstream 80-kb region and a downstream 70-kb region of zebrafish myf5 and generated a transgenic line carrying this 156-kb segment fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene. We find strong GFP expression in the most rostral somite and in the presomitic mesoderm during segmentation stages, similar to endogenous myf5 expression. Later, the GFP signals persist in caudal somites near the tail bud but are down-regulated in the older, rostral somites. During the pharyngula period, we detect GFP signals in pectoral fin buds, dorsal rostral myotomes, hypaxial myotomes, and inferior oblique and superior oblique muscles, a pattern that also corresponds well with endogenous myf5 transcripts. To characterize the specific upstream cis-elements that regulate this complex and dynamic expression pattern, we also generated several transgenic lines that harbor various lengths within the upstream 80-kb segment. We find that (1 the -80 kb/-9977 segment contains a fin and cranial muscle element and a notochord repressor; (2 the -9977/-6213 segment contains a strong repressive element that does not include the notochord-specific repressor; (3 the -6212/-2938 segment contains tissue-specific elements for bone and spinal cord; (4 the -2937/-291 segment contains an eye enhancer, and the -2937/-2457 segment is required for notochord and myocyte expression; and (5 the -290/-1 segment is responsible for basal transcription in somites and the presomitic mesoderm. Conclusion We suggest

  16. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funahashi, Nobuaki, E-mail: nfunahashi@ri.ncgm.go.jp [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Department of Metabolic Disorder, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirota, Yoshihisa [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan); Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Suhara, Yoshitomo [Department of Bioscience and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan); Okano, Toshio [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K{sub 1}) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K{sub 2}). Menadione (vitamin K{sub 3}) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1

  17. Cloning-free regulated monitoring of reporter and gene expression

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    Demirkaya Omer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of the promoters, their regulatory elements, and their variations in the human genome remain unknown. Reporter gene technology for transcriptional activity is a widely used tool for the study of promoter structure, gene regulation, and signaling pathways. Construction of transcriptional reporter vectors, including use of cis-acting sequences, requires cloning and time-demanding manipulations, particularly with introduced mutations. Results In this report, we describe a cloning-free strategy to generate transcriptionally-controllable linear reporter constructs. This approach was applied in common transcriptional models of inflammatory response and the interferon system. In addition, it was used to delineate minimal transcriptional activity of selected ribosomal protein promoters. The approach was tested for conversion of genes into TetO-inducible/repressible expression cassettes. Conclusion The simple introduction and tuning of any transcriptional control in the linear DNA product renders promoter activation and regulated gene studies simple and versatile.

  18. Coordinate regulation of DNA methyltransferase expression during oogenesis

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    Bestor Timothy H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal mammalian development requires the action of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs for the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation within repeat elements and imprinted genes. Here we report the expression dynamics of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, as well as a regulator of DNA methylation, Dnmt3L, in isolated female germ cells. Results Our results indicate that these enzymes are coordinately regulated and that their expression peaks during the stage of postnatal oocyte development when maternal methylation imprints are established. We find that Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Dnmt3L and Dnmt1o transcript accumulation is related to oocyte diameter. Furthermore, DNMT3L deficient 15 dpp oocytes have aberrantly methylated Snrpn, Peg3 and Igf2r DMRs, but normal IAP and LINE-1 methylation levels, thereby highlighting a male germ cell specific role for DNMT3L in the establishment of DNA methylation at repeat elements. Finally, real-time RT-PCR analysis indicates that the depletion of either DNMT3L or DNMT1o in growing oocytes results in the increased expression of the de novo methyltransferase Dnmt3b, suggesting a potential compensation mechanism by this enzyme for the loss of one of the other DNA methyltransferases. Conclusion Together these results provide a better understanding of the developmental regulation of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Dnmt3L at the time of de novo methylation during oogenesis and demonstrate that the involvement of DNMT3L in retrotransposon silencing is restricted to the male germ line. This in turn suggests the existence of other factors in the oocyte that direct DNA methylation to transposons.

  19. Laccases: Production, Expression Regulation, and Applications in Pharmaceutical Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Wenjuan; Ng, Tzi Bun; Deng, Xiangzhen; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    Laccases are a family of copper-containing oxidases with important applications in bioremediation and other various industrial and biotechnological areas. There have been over two dozen reviews on laccases since 2010 covering various aspects of this group of versatile enzymes, from their occurrence, biochemical properties, and expression to immobilization and applications. This review is not intended to be all-encompassing; instead, we highlighted some of the latest developments in basic and applied laccase research with an emphasis on laccase-mediated bioremediation of pharmaceuticals, especially antibiotics. Pharmaceuticals are a broad class of emerging organic contaminants that are recalcitrant and prevalent. The recent surge in the relevant literature justifies a short review on the topic. Since low laccase yields in natural and genetically modified hosts constitute a bottleneck to industrial-scale applications, we also accentuated a genus of laccase-producing white-rot fungi, Cerrena, and included a discussion with regards to regulation of laccase expression. PMID:28559880

  20. Plant microRNAs: master regulator of gene expression mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Paul, Soumitra

    2015-11-01

    Several signaling molecules critically regulate the physiological responses in plants. Among them, miRNAs, generally 21-24 nucleotides long, are widely distributed in different plant species and play as key signaling intermediates in diverse physiological responses. The mature miRNAs are synthesized from MIR genes by RNA polymerase II and processed by Dicer-like (DCL) protein family members associated with some accessory protein molecules. The processed miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm from the nucleus by specific group of transporters and incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) for specific mRNA cleavage. MicroRNAs can suppress the diverse gene expression, depending on the sequence complementarity of the target transcript except of its own gene. Besides, miRNAs can modulate the gene expression by DNA methylation and translational inhibition of the target transcript. Different classes of DCLs and Argonaute proteins (AGOs) help the miRNAs-mediated gene silencing mechanism in plants.

  1. An optimized, chemically regulated gene expression system for Chlamydomonas.

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    Paola Ferrante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for algal and cell biology and is used for biotechnological applications, such as molecular farming or biological hydrogen production. The Chlamydomonas metal-responsive CYC6 promoter is repressed by copper and induced by nickel ions. However, induction by nickel is weak in some strains, poorly reversible by chelating agents like EDTA, and causes, at high concentrations, toxicity side effects on Chlamydomonas growth. Removal of these bottlenecks will encourage the wide use of this promoter as a chemically regulated gene expression system. METHODOLOGY: Using a codon-optimized Renilla luciferase as a reporter gene, we explored several strategies to improve the strength and reversibility of CYC6 promoter induction. Use of the first intron of the RBCS2 gene or of a modified TAP medium increases the strength of CYC6 induction up to 20-fold. In the modified medium, induction is also obtained after addition of specific copper chelators, like TETA. At low concentrations (up to 10 microM TETA is a more efficient inducer than Ni, which becomes a very efficient inducer at higher concentrations (50 microM. Neither TETA nor Ni show toxicity effects at the concentrations used. Unlike induction by Ni, induction by TETA is completely reversible by micromolar copper concentrations, thus resulting in a transient "wave" in luciferase activity, which can be repeated in subsequent growth cycles. CONCLUSIONS: We have worked out a chemically regulated gene expression system that can be finely tuned to produce temporally controlled "waves" in gene expression. The use of cassettes containing the CYC6 promoter, and of modified growth media, is a reliable and economically sustainable system for the temporally controlled expression of foreign genes in Chlamydomonas.

  2. Promoter hypomethylation regulates CD133 expression in human gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kouichi Tabu; Ken Sasai; Taichi Kimura; Lei Wang; Eiko Aoyanagi; Shinji Kohsaka; Mishie Tanino; Hiroshi Nishihara; Shinya Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) have been enriched using antibodies against the cell surface protein CD133;however,the biological relevance and the regulatory mechanism of CD133 expression in human gliomas are not yet understood.In this study,we initially demonstrated that CD133 was overexpressed in high-grade human glioblastomas where CD133-positive cells were focally observed as a micro-cluster.In addition,CD133 transcripts with exon 1A,1B,or 1C were predominantly expressed in glioblastomas.To elucidate the mechanism regulating this aberrant expression of CD133,three proximal promoters (P1,P2,and P3) containing a CpG island were isolated.In U251MG and T98Gglioblastoma cells,the P1 region flanking exon 1A exhibited the highest activity among the three promoters,and this activity was significantly inactivated by in vitro methylation.After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and/or the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid,the expression level of CD133 mRNA was significantly restored in glioma cells.Importantly,hypomethylation of CpG sites within the P1,P2,and P3 regions was observed by bisulfite sequencing in human glioblastoma tissues with abundant CD133 mRNA.Taken together,our results indicate that DNA hypomethylation is an important determinant of CD133 expression in glioblastomas,and this epigenetic event may be associated with the development of BTICs expressing CD133.

  3. TYPE I INTERFERON REGULATES THE EXPRESSION OF LONG NONCODING RNAs

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    Elena eCarnero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key players in the antiviral response. IFN sensing by the cell activates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs able to induce an antiviral state by affecting viral replication and release. IFN also induces the expression of ISGs that function as negative regulators to limit the strength and duration of IFN response. The ISGs identified so far belong to coding genes. However, only a small proportion of the transcriptome corresponds to coding transcripts and it has been estimated that there could be as many coding as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. To address whether IFN can also regulate the expression of lncRNAs, we analyzed the transcriptome of HuH7 cells treated or not with IFNα2 by expression arrays. Analysis of the arrays showed increased levels of several well-characterized coding genes that respond to IFN both at early or late times. Furthermore, we identified several IFN-stimulated or -downregulated lncRNAs (ISRs and IDRs. Further validation showed that ISR2, 8 and 12 expression mimics that of their neighboring genes GBP1, IRF1 and IL6, respectively, all related to the IFN response. These genes are induced in response to different doses of IFNα2 in different cell lines at early (ISR2 or 8 or later (ISR12 time points. IFNβ also induced the expression of these lncRNAs. ISR2 and 8 were also induced by an influenza virus unable to block the IFN response but not by other wild-type lytic viruses tested. Surprisingly, both ISR2 and 8 were significantly upregulated in cultured cells and livers from patients infected with HCV. Increased levels of ISR2 were also detected in patients chronically infected with HIV. This is relevant as genome-wide guilt-by-association studies predict that ISR2, 8 and 12 may function in viral processes, in the IFN pathway and the antiviral response. Therefore, we propose that these lncRNAs could be induced by IFN to function as positive or negative regulators of the antiviral response.

  4. Retinoic acid regulates the expression of photoreceptor transcription factor NRL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Hemant; Akimoto, Masayuki; Siffroi-Fernandez, Sandrine; Friedman, James S; Hicks, David; Swaroop, Anand

    2006-09-15

    NRL (neural retina leucine zipper) is a key basic motif-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, which orchestrates rod photoreceptor differentiation by activating the expression of rod-specific genes. The deletion of Nrl in mice results in functional cones that are derived from rod precursors. However, signaling pathways modulating the expression or activity of NRL have not been elucidated. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA), a diffusible factor implicated in rod development, activates the expression of NRL in serum-deprived Y79 human retinoblastoma cells and in primary cultures of rat and porcine photoreceptors. The effect of RA is mimicked by TTNPB, a RA receptor agonist, and requires new protein synthesis. DNaseI footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) using bovine retinal nuclear extract demonstrate that RA response elements (RAREs) identified within the Nrl promoter bind to RA receptors. Furthermore, in transiently transfected Y79 and HEK293 cells the activity of Nrl-promoter driving a luciferase reporter gene is induced by RA, and this activation is mediated by RAREs. Our data suggest that signaling by RA via RA receptors regulates the expression of NRL, providing a framework for delineating early steps in photoreceptor cell fate determination.

  5. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  6. Molecular mechanisms regulating expression and function of transcription regulator "inhibitor of differentiation 3"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Wai-sui LIM; Jin-mei WU

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factor antagonist inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) has been implicated in many diverse developmental, physiological and pathophysiological processes. Its expression and function is subjected to many levels of complex regulation. This review summarizes the current understanding of these mechanisms and describes how they might be related to the diverse functions that have been attributed to the Id3 protein. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms should provide insights towards the development of therapeutic approaches to various diseases, including cancer and atherogenesis.

  7. DMPD: Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11841920 Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. Tsukamoto H. Fr...ee Radic Biol Med. 2002 Feb 15;32(4):309-13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expres...sion. PubmedID 11841920 Title Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha express

  8. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

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    Ali J Vetter

    Full Text Available The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  9. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  10. Improved Expression Systems for Regulated Expression in Salmonella Infecting Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the Pm promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/Psal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  11. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

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    Carlos Medina

    Full Text Available In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii the Type III Secretion System (TTSS signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies.

  12. Biophysical characterisation of neuroglobin of the icefish, a natural knockout for hemoglobin and myoglobin. Comparison with human neuroglobin.

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    Daniela Giordano

    Full Text Available The Antarctic icefish Chaenocephalus aceratus lacks the globins common to most vertebrates, hemoglobin and myoglobin, but has retained neuroglobin in the brain. This conserved globin has been cloned, over-expressed and purified. To highlight similarities and differences, the structural features of the neuroglobin of this colourless-blooded fish were compared with those of the well characterised human neuroglobin as well as with the neuroglobin from the retina of the red blooded, hemoglobin and myoglobin-containing, closely related Antarctic notothenioid Dissostichus mawsoni. A detailed structural and functional analysis of the two Antarctic fish neuroglobins was carried out by UV-visible and Resonance Raman spectroscopies, molecular dynamics simulations and laser-flash photolysis. Similar to the human protein, Antarctic fish neuroglobins can reversibly bind oxygen and CO in the Fe(2+ form, and show six-coordination by distal His in the absence of exogenous ligands. A very large and structured internal cavity, with discrete docking sites, was identified in the modelled three-dimensional structures of the Antarctic neuroglobins. Estimate of the free-energy barriers from laser-flash photolysis and Implicit Ligand Sampling showed that the cavities are accessible from the solvent in both proteins.Comparison of structural and functional properties suggests that the two Antarctic fish neuroglobins most likely preserved and possibly improved the function recently proposed for human neuroglobin in ligand multichemistry. Despite subtle differences, the adaptation of Antarctic fish neuroglobins does not seem to parallel the dramatic adaptation of the oxygen carrying globins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, in the same organisms.

  13. Adrenal glucocorticoids regulate adipsin gene expression in genetically obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, B M; Lowell, B; Napolitano, A; Dubuc, P; Barton, D; Francke, U; Groves, D L; Cook, K S; Flier, J S

    1989-01-25

    Adipsin expression at the protein and mRNA levels is greatly reduced in several distinct syndromes of obesity in the mouse: genetic obesity due to the db/db and ob/ob genes, and a chemically induced model secondary to neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate. We considered first the possibility that the adipsin gene might be identical to the db or ob locus and the lowered expression of this protein might result from a mutation in this gene. We show here that the adipsin structural gene is located on chromosome 10 and hence is physically distinct from any obesity genes so far identified in the mouse. A major role for the adrenal gland and adrenal glucocorticoids in the aberrant regulation of adipsin in these models of obesity is indicated by several experiments. Adrenalectomy of the ob/ob mouse raises the circulating levels of adipsin protein and the amount of this mRNA in epididymal fat pads (5-fold), although neither is increased to the levels seen in lean controls. Exogenous administration of corticosterone completely blocks the effects of adrenalectomy on adipsin, suggesting that the effect of this endocrine ablation is through reduction of adrenal glucocorticoids. Corticosterone administration also causes suppression in the levels of adipsin mRNA and protein in lean mice, although this decrease is never as severe as that seen in obese mice. The effect of exogenous corticosterone in lean mice occurs within 2 days and hence is not secondary to the obesity which these hormones eventually elicit. These results indicate that glucocorticoids can regulate adipsin expression in vivo and strongly suggest that the hyperglucocorticoid state seen in certain obese models plays a significant role in lowering adipsin mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative analysis of these experiments suggests that other as yet unknown neuroendocrine factors also function to suppress adipsin in obesity.

  14. Macrophage migration and invasion is regulated by MMP10 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Y Murray

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify metalloproteinase determinants of macrophage migration and led to the specific hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10/stromelysin-2 facilitates macrophage migration. We first profiled expression of all MMPs in LPS-stimulated primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and Raw264.7 cells and found that MMP10 was stimulated early (3 h and down-regulated later (24 h. Based on this pattern of expression, we speculated that MMP10 plays a role in macrophage responses, such as migration. Indeed, using time lapse microscopy, we found that RNAi silencing of MMP10 in primary macrophages resulted in markedly reduced migration, which was reversed with exogenous active MMP10 protein. Mmp10 (-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages displayed significantly reduced migration over a two-dimensional fibronectin matrix. Invasion of primary wild-type macrophages into Matrigel supplemented with fibronectin was also markedly impaired in Mmp10 (-/- cells. MMP10 expression in macrophages thus emerges as an important moderator of cell migration and invasion. These findings support the hypothesis that MMP10 promotes macrophage movement and may have implications in understanding the control of macrophages in several pathologies, including the abnormal wound healing response associated with pro-inflammatory conditions.

  15. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection.

  16. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  17. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  18. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia A.; Feliciano, Joana R.; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:28106859

  19. Emotion regulation in interpersonal problems: the role of cognitive-emotional complexity, emotion regulation goals, and expressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Abby Heckman; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2008-03-01

    Young, middle-aged, and older adults' emotion regulation strategies in interpersonal problems were examined. Participants imagined themselves in anger- or sadness-eliciting situations with a close friend. Factor analyses of a new questionnaire supported a 4-factor model of emotion regulation strategies, including passivity, expressing emotions, seeking emotional information or support, and solving the problem. Results suggest that age differences in emotion regulation (such as older adults' increased endorsement of passive emotion regulation relative to young adults) are partially due to older adults' decreased ability to integrate emotion and cognition, increased prioritization of emotion regulation goals, and decreased tendency to express anger.

  20. Dynamic expression of cadherins regulates vocal development in a songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Matsunaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since, similarly to humans, songbirds learn their vocalization through imitation during their juvenile stage, they have often been used as model animals to study the mechanisms of human verbal learning. Numerous anatomical and physiological studies have suggested that songbirds have a neural network called 'song system' specialized for vocal learning and production in their brain. However, it still remains unknown what molecular mechanisms regulate their vocal development. It has been suggested that type-II cadherins are involved in synapse formation and function. Previously, we found that type-II cadherin expressions are switched in the robust nucleus of arcopallium from cadherin-7-positive to cadherin-6B-positive during the phase from sensory to sensorimotor learning stage in a songbird, the Bengalese finch. Furthermore, in vitro analysis using cultured rat hippocampal neurons revealed that cadherin-6B enhanced and cadherin-7 suppressed the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents via regulating dendritic spine morphology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the role of cadherins in vocal development, we performed an in vivo behavioral analysis of cadherin function with lentiviral vectors. Overexpression of cadherin-7 in the juvenile and the adult stages resulted in severe defects in vocal production. In both cases, harmonic sounds typically seen in the adult Bengalese finch songs were particularly affected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that cadherins control vocal production, particularly harmonic sounds, probably by modulating neuronal morphology of the RA nucleus. It appears that the switching of cadherin expressions from sensory to sensorimotor learning stage enhances vocal production ability to make various types of vocalization that is essential for sensorimotor learning in a trial and error manner.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dam Phuongan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH receptor (LHR expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours. Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are

  2. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1(-/-) embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1(-/-) microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1(-/-) epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis.

  3. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. A hydrogen-donating monohydroxamate scavenges ferryl myoglobin radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, C E; Green, E S; Rice-Evans, C A

    1994-01-01

    of the high spin metmyoglobin (g = 6) signal is consistent with these findings. At this low peroxide concentration there is no evidence for iron release from the haem. At least two free radicals are detectable by EPR immediately after H2O2 addition, but decay completely after ten minutes. However, a longer......-lived radical is observed at lower concentrations that is still present after 90 minutes. The monohydroxamate N-methylbutyro-hydroxamic acid (NMBH) increases the rate of decay of the fenyl species. In the presence of NMBH, none of the protein-bound free radicals are detectable; instead nitroxide radicals...... produced by oxidation of the hydroxamate group are observed. Similar results are observed with the trihydroxamate, desferrioxamine. "Ferryl myoglobin" is still able to initiate lipid peroxidation even after the short-lived protein free radicals are no longer detectable (E.S.R. Newman, C.A. Rice-Evans and M...

  5. Ingested plant miRNAs regulate gene expression in animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Vaucheret; Yves Chupeau

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of genetic material or epigenetic information transferred from one organism to another is an important biological question.A recent study demonstrated that plant small RNAs acquired orally through food intake directly influence gene expression in animals after migration through the plasma and delivery to specific organs.Non-protein coding RNAs,and in particular small RNAs,were recently revealed as master chief regulators of gene expression in all organisms.Endogenous small RNAs come in different flavors,depending on their mode of biogenesis.Most microRNAs (miRNA)and short interferring RNAs (siRNA)derive from long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors that are processed into small RNA duplexes,20 to 25-nt long,by RNaselll enzymes called Dicer [1].One strand of small RNA duplexes is loaded onto an Argonaute protein that executes silencing by cleaving or repressing the translation of homologous mRNA [2].In certain species,RNA cleavage is followed by DNA methylation and/or histone modification,leading to heritable epigenetic modification [3].

  6. Regulation of Pancreatic microRNA-7 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Kredo-Russo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs provide a posttranscriptional regulatory layer, which is important for pancreas development. Differentiation of endocrine cells is controlled by a network of pancreatic transcription factors including Ngn3 and NeuroD/Beta2. However, how specific miRNAs are intertwined into this transcriptional network is not well understood. Here, we characterize the regulation of microRNA-7 (miR-7 by endocrine-specific transcription factors. Our data reveal that three independent miR-7 genes are coexpressed in the pancreas. We have identified conserved blocks upstream of pre-miR-7a-2 and pre-miR-7b and demonstrated by functional assays that they possess promoter activity, which is increased by the expression of NeuroD/Beta2. These data suggest that the endocrine specificity of miR-7 expression is governed by transcriptional mechanisms and involves members of the pancreatic endocrine network of transcription factors.

  7. Feeding Regulates the Expression of Pancreatic Genes in Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita De Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ineffective short-term control of feeding behavior compromises energy homeostasis and can lead to obesity. The gastrointestinal tract secretes several regulatory peptides. However, little is known about the stomach peptide contribution to the acute regulation of intake. In an attempt to identify new gastric signals, the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE method was used for the transcription profiling of stomach mucosa in 7 groups of mice: fasting and sacrificed 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours after a low-fat (LF or high-fat (HF ad libitum meal. In total, 35 genes were differentially modulated by LF and HF meals compared to fasting, including 15 mRNAs coding for digestive enzymes/secretory proteins, and 10 novel transcripts. Although the basic expression profile did not undergo substantial variations, both LF and HF meals influenced the transcription. This study represents the first global analysis of stomach transcriptome as induced by different nutritional stimuli. Further studies including the characterization of novel genes may help to identify new targets for the therapy and prevention of obesity.

  8. Feasibility of Electrospinning the Globular Proteins Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine P. Barnes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of the globular protein hemoglobin were successfully electrospun to create micro-fibrous mats of varying physical and mechanical characteristics. The electrospinning parameters are reported. One concentration of myoglobin was electrospun into a mat for comparison to the hemoglobin mats. Scanning electron microscopy revealed ribbon-like morphologies for the hemoglobin and myoglobin structures. Mean fiber width and thickness for each mat electrospun from a different hemoglobin concentration increased from 2.68 ± 0.83 to 3.55 ± 1.49 μm and from 0.49 ± 0.08 to 0.99 ± 0.41 μm, respectively, for increasing hemoglobin solution concentrations (from 150 to 225 mg/mL. For calculations of surface area to volume ratio for the four different electrospun hemoglobin concentrations, there was a negative correlation (r = -0.84 with concentration; the surface area to volume ratio ranged between 0.50 ± 0.16 and 1.53 ± 0.24 m2/cm3. Also, there appears to be a positive correlation between electrospun hemoglobin concentration and porosity, which increased with increasing concentration from 69.5 to 83.3 %. Following cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, the mechanical properties of two constructs were evaluated via uniaxial tensile testing to demonstrate handling capability. Results indicated that increased cross-linking time produced stiffer structures, as peak stress and modulus increased while strain at break decreased when the mats were cross-linked for 30 minutes with glutaraldehyde versus the 20 minute cross-linking time.

  9. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  10. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs(tRNAs) hold a central place in protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein,thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules.In recent years,however,various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond participating in protein synthesis.When suffering from certain nutritional stresses,tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged,and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression,so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses.In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells,the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs.On the other hand,this retrograde action effectively reduces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation.Quite recently,various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense.Under certain physiological or environmental stresses,they are specifically cleaved into fragments of different lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm.These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon.Instead,a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced,which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression.Investigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier,which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic information.

  11. tRNAs as regulators in gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; ZHOU Hui

    2009-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) hold a central place In protein synthesis by interpreting the genetic information stored in DNA into the amino acid sequence of protein, thus functioning as "adaptor" molecules. In recent years, however, various studies have shown that tRNAs have additional functions beyond par-ticipating in protein synthesis. When suffering from certain nutritional stresses, tRNAs change the level of aminoacylation to became uncharged, and these uncharged tRNAs act as effector molecules to regulate global gene expression, so that the stressed organism copes with the adverse environmental stresses. In budding yeast and certain mammalian cells, the retrograde movement of mature tRNAs from cytoplasm to nucleus serves as a mechanism for the surveillance system within the nucleus to continue monitoring the integrity of tRNAs. On the other hand, this retrograde action effectively re-duces the global protein synthesis level under conditions of nutritional starvation. Quite recently, various publications have shown that tRNAs are not stable molecules in an absolute sense. Under certain physiological or environmental stresses, they are specifically cleaved into fragments of differ-ent lengths in the anticodon loop or anticodon left arm. These cleavages are not a meaningless random degradation phenomenon. Instead, a novel class of signal molecules such as tRNA halves or sitRNAs may be produced, which are closely correlated with the modulation of global gene expression. Inves-tigation of the regulatory functions of tRNAs is a frontier, which seeks to reveal the structural and functional diversity of tRNAs as well as their vital functions during the expression of genetic informa-tion.

  12. Nitrate inhibits soybean nodulation by regulating expression of CLE genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen compounds such as nitrate act as a potential inhibitor for legume nodulation. In this study, we isolated a new CLE gene, GmNIC2, from nitrate-treated roots, which shares high sequence homology with nitrate-induced CLE gene GmNIC1. Similar to GmNIC1, the expression level of GmNIC2 was not significantly altered in roots by rhizobial inoculation and was much higher in young nodules than in roots. In addition, overexpression of GmNIC2 led to similar nodulation inhibition of transgenic hairy roots to that of GmNIC1, which occurred in GmNARK-dependent manner and at the local level. By analyzing GmNARK loss-of-function mutant, SS2-2, it was found that expression levels of GmNIC1 and GmNIC2 in the SS2-2 roots were lower than in the wild type (WT) roots in response to nitrate. In contrast to GmNIC1 and GmNIC2, expressions of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes that are related to the autoregulation of nodulation (AON) were strongly suppressed both of the soybeans during all periods of nitrate treatment and even were not induced by additional inoculation with rhizobia. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that GmNIC2, as an active homologous gene located in chromosome 13, acts locally to suppress nodulation, like GmNIC1, and nitrate inhibition of nodulation is led by fine-tuned regulation of both nitrate-induced CLEs and rhizobia-induced CLEs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Effect of peripheral trifluoromethyl groups in artificial iron porphycene cofactor on ligand binding properties of myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Takashi; Ito, Kazuyuki; Nakashima, Yuji; Hisaeda, Yoshio; Hayashi, Takashi

    2008-02-01

    An iron porphycene, a structural isomer of iron porphyrin, with trifluoromethyl groups at the peripheral position of the framework was incorporated into sperm whale apomyoglobin. The prepared myoglobin shows the higher O(2) affinity than the native protein. However, the oxygen affinity of the reconstituted myoglobin is lower than that of the myoglobin having an iron porphycene without trifluoromethyl groups, which is mainly originated from the enhancement of the O(2) dissociation. The CO affinity of the myoglobin with the trifluoromethylated iron porphycene is similar to that observed for the reference protein having the iron porphycene without trifluoromethyl groups, although their C-O stretching frequencies are significantly different. The relationship between the electronic states of the porphycene ring and the ligand bindings is discussed.

  14. Logical Analysis of Regulation of Interleukin-12 Expression Pathway Regulation During HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Zia-Ur-Rehman; Tareen, Samar H K; Ahmed, Jamil; Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) triggers coordinated innate and adaptive response in host cell. HCV genome and proteins of the replicating virus are recognized as non-self-antigens by host cell to activate Toll Like Receptors (TLRs). Activated TLRs ultimately express cytokines, which can clear virus either by activating interferon (IFN), protein kinase C (PKC) and RNA Lase system or through activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent antiviral cytokine, capable of clearing HCV by bridging both innate and adaptive antiviral immune response. Activation of TLR-4 on macrophages surface induces expression of IL-12 via NF-κB and AP-1 transcriptional pathway. After expression, IL- 12 releases IFN-γ, which activates anti-HCV cytotoxic lymphocytes. Conversely, in chronic HCV infection downregulation of IL-12 has been reported instead of by number of studies. Keeping in view of the above mentioned facts, this study was designed to evaluate HCV-core mediated down-regulation of IL-12 transcriptional pathway by employing a logical modeling approach based on the Ren´e Thomas formalism. The logical parameters of entities were estimated by using SMBioNet. The Logical model represents all possible dynamics of protein expression involved during course of HCV pathology. Results demonstrated that at chronic stage of infection, though TLR-4 was constantly active but yet it failed to express the NF-κB, AP-1, IL-12 and IFN-γ. This mechanism was indicative of incorporation of core mediated changes in IL-12 regulatory pathway. Moreover, results also indicate that HCV adopts different trajectories to accomplish the persistence of chronic phase of infection. It also implicated that human immune system tries to clear HCV but core is capable of inducing system oscillations to evade the immunity.

  15. Renal myoglobin in drug addicts: occurrence and significance in a postmortem study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Kirsten Friis; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese

    1994-01-01

    In a 3-year period (1989–1991) a non-selected, consecutive series of 62 deaths in drug addicts was autopsied at the Forensic Institute in Odense. The kidney sections from these addicts were examined for the presence of renal myoglobin using immunohistochemical methods. A reference group consisting......, immobilization, hypovolemia). In sufficient amounts, renal myoglobin may be of importance as a cause of death or a contributing factor to death in both drug addicts and non-addicts....

  16. Autogenous regulation of Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase expression revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5'-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5' end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5' double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5' end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5' fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript.

  17. Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Expression Revisited▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5′-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5′ end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5′ double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5′ end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5′ fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript. PMID:19136586

  18. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wiese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD, sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1, and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  19. Structural alterations of hemoglobin and myoglobin by glyoxal: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sauradipta; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a highly reactive oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition. It reacts with different proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Here we have studied the structural alterations as well as the sites and nature of amino acid modifications of two heme proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin on incubation with glyoxal for seven days at 25°C. In comparison with normal hemoglobin (HbA0), glyoxal-treated hemoglobin (GHbA0) exhibits decreased absorbance around 280 nm, reduced intrinsic fluorescence and lower surface hydrophobicity. However, glyoxal-treated myoglobin (GMb) exhibits the opposite effects in these respects when compared to normal myoglobin (Mb). Glyoxal increases the thermal stability of hemoglobin, while it decreases the stability of myoglobin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry reveals modifications of Arg-31α, Arg-40β and Arg-104β of hemoglobin by glyoxal to hydroimidazolone adducts. On the other hand, glyoxal modifies Lys-133 and Lys-145 to carboxymethyllysine and Arg-31 to hydroimidazolone adducts in myoglobin. Thus the same oxoaldehyde exerts different effects on hemoglobin and myoglobin and may be associated with different structural properties of the proteins.

  20. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  1. Expression, purification and spectroscopic characterization of the Regulator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.L.C.; Silva, A.L.S.; Camilotti, D.; Silva, C.A.; Sforca, M.L.; Smetana, J.H.C.; Zeri, A.C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ospina-Bedoya, M. [Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals, serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism in humans and its deregulation is linked to diseases like cancer and diabetes. The small GTPases Rag are mediators of signaling by amino acid (leucine). These GT-Pases are anchored on the surface of the lysosome through an interaction with a complex of three proteins, p18, MP1 and p14, called Ragulator. The p18 protein is responsible for interaction with the lysosomal membrane through its N terminal post translational modification. The objective of this project is to study the interaction of p18 and other components of the Ragulator complex. The p18 protein was expressed in inclusion bodies, which were isolated and solubilized in urea. p18 was renatured with its partners MP1/p14 and this complex, the Ragulator, was subjected to spectroscopic characterization using circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering. (author)

  2. Dampening of expression oscillations by synchronous regulation of a microRNA and its target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.; Grun, D.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of multicellular organisms requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression during development. We find that in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans approximately 2,000 transcripts undergo expression oscillations synchronized with larval transitions while thousands of gene

  3. Electroanalysis of myoglobin based on electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polymer poly-o-phenylenediamine and carbon nanotubes/screen printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumyantseva, V V; Bulko, T V; Sigolaeva, L V; Kuzikov, A V; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    Electroanalysis of myoglobin as a marker of acute myocardial infarction by means of screenprinted electrodes modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polymeric artificial antibodies is developed. Plastic antibodies to myoglobin (molecularly imprinted polymers, MIPs) based on o-phenylenediamine were produced by electropolymerization. Molecular imprinting technology in biosensor analysis was used as alternative to natural receptors (namely, antibodies) and demonstrated high sensitivity (1.5 × 10(-2) A/nmol of myoglobin) and selectivity.

  4. Histone Methylation Regulator PTIP Is Required for PPARγ and C/EBPα Expression and Adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Wook; Hong, SunHwa; Jin, Qihuang; Wang, Lifeng; Lee, Ji-Eun; Gavrilova, Oksana; Ge, Kai

    2009-01-01

    PPARγ and C/EBPα cooperate to control preadipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis). However, the factors that regulate PPARγ and C/EBPα expression during adipogenesis remain largely unclear. Here we show PTIP, a protein that associates with histone H3K4 methyltransferases, regulates PPARγ and C/EBPα expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and during preadipocyte differentiation. PTIP deletion in MEFs leads to marked decreases of PPARγ expression and PPARγ-stimulated C/EBPα expression....

  5. N-MYC down-regulated-like proteins regulate meristem initiation by modulating auxin transport and MAX2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwanti Mudgil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: N-MYC down-regulated-like (NDL proteins interact with the Gβ subunit (AGB1 of the heterotrimeric G protein complex and play an important role in AGB1-dependent regulation of lateral root formation by affecting root auxin transport, auxin gradients and the steady-state levels of mRNA encoding the PIN-FORMED 2 and AUXIN 1 auxin transport facilitators. Auxin transport in aerial tissue follows different paths and utilizes different transporters than in roots; therefore, in the present study, we analyzed whether NDL proteins play an important role in AGB1-dependent, auxin-mediated meristem development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression levels of NDL gene family members need to be tightly regulated, and altered expression (both over-expression and down-regulation confers ectopic growth. Over-expression of NDL1 disrupts vegetative and reproductive organ development. Reduced expression of the NDL gene family members results in asymmetric leaf emergence, twinning of rosette leaves, defects in leaf formation, and abnormal silique distribution. Reduced expression of the NDL genes in the agb1-2 (null allele mutant rescues some of the abnormal phenotypes, such as silique morphology, silique distribution, and peduncle angle, suggesting that proper levels of NDL proteins are maintained by AGB1. We found that all of these abnormal aerial phenotypes due to altered NDL expression were associated with increases in basipetal auxin transport, altered auxin maxima and altered MAX2 expression within the inflorescence stem. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: NDL proteins, together with AGB1, act as positive regulators of meristem initiation and branching. AGB1 and NDL1 positively regulate basipetal inflorescence auxin transport and modulate MAX2 expression in shoots, which in turn regulates organ and lateral meristem formation by the establishment and maintenance of auxin gradients.

  6. Genome-wide gene expression regulation as a function of genotype and age in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viñuela Rodriguez, A.; Snoek, L.B.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression becomes more variable with age, and it is widely assumed that this is due to a decrease in expression regulation. But currently there is no understanding how gene expression regulatory patterns progress with age. Here we explored genome-wide gene expression variation and regulatory l

  7. Critical processing parameters of carbon dioxide spray drying for the production of dried protein formulations: A study with myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchuchua, O; Every, H A; Jiskoot, W

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to gain fundamental insight into protein destabilization induced by supercritical CO2 spray drying processing parameters. Myoglobin was used as a model protein (5mg/ml with 50mg/ml trehalose in 10mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.2). The solution was exposed to sub- and supercritical CO2 conditions (65-130bar and 25-50°C), and CO2 spray drying under those conditions. The heme binding of myoglobin was determined by UV/Vis, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, while myoglobin aggregation was studied by using size-exclusion chromatography and flow imaging microscopy. It was found that pressure and temperature alone did not influence myoglobin's integrity. However, when pressurized CO2 was introduced into myoglobin solutions at any condition, the pH of the myoglobin formulation shifted to about 5 (measured after depressurization), resulting in heme binding destabilization and aggregation of myoglobin. When exposed to CO2, these degradation processes were enhanced by increasing temperature. Heme binding destabilization and myoglobin aggregation were also seen after CO2 spray drying, and to a greater extent. Moreover, the CO2 spray drying induced the partial loss of heme. In conclusion, pressurized CO2 destabilizes the myoglobin, leading to heme loss and protein aggregation upon spray drying.

  8. miR-381 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation via Regulating Hes1 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Shi

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent and undifferentiated precursors that retain the capacity for differentiation into both glial (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neuronal lineages. Neural stem cells offer cell-based therapies for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinal cord injuries. However, their cellular behavior is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs involved in cell development, proliferation and differentiation through regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The role of miR-381 in the development of neural stem cells remains unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of miR-381 promoted neural stem cells proliferation. It induced the neural stem cells differentiation to neurons and inhibited their differentiation to astrocytes. Furthermore, we identified HES1 as a direct target of miR-381 in neural stem cells. Moreover, re-expression of HES1 impaired miR-381-induced promotion of neural stem cells proliferation and induce neural stem cells differentiation to neurons. In conclusion, miR-381 played important role in neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Functional properties of myoglobins from five whale species with different diving capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbo, Signe; Fago, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Whales show an exceptionally wide range of diving capabilities and many express high amounts of the O(2) carrier protein myoglobin (Mb) in their muscle tissues, which increases their aerobic diving capacity. Although previous studies have mainly focused on the muscle Mb concentration and O(2) carrying capacity as markers of diving behavior in whales, it still remains unexplored whether whale Mbs differ in their O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase and peroxidase enzymatic activities, all functions that could contribute to differences in diving capacities. In this study, we have measured the functional properties of purified Mbs from five toothed whales and two baleen whales and have examined their correlation with average dive duration. Results showed that some variation in functional properties exists among whale Mbs, with toothed whale Mbs having higher O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase activities (similar to those of horse Mb) compared with baleen whale Mbs. However, these differences did not correlate with average dive duration. Instead, a significant correlation was found between whale Mb concentration and average duration and depth of dives, and between O(2) affinity and nitrite reductase activity when including horse Mb. Despite the fact that the functional properties showed little species-specific differences in vitro, they may still contribute to enhancing diving capacity as a result of the increased muscle Mb concentration found in extreme divers. In conclusion, Mb concentration rather than specific functional reactivities may support whale diving performance.

  10. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  11. Constitutive and regulated expression vectors to construct polyphosphate deficient bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerez Carlos A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2 and degraded by an exopolyphosphatase (PPX. Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies are impaired in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence. Knockout mutants of the ppk1 gene have been the most frequent strategy employed to generate polyP deficient cells. Results As an alternative method to construct polyP-deficient bacteria we developed constitutive and regulated broad-host-range vectors for depleting the cellular polyP content. This was achieved by the overexpression of yeast exopolyphosphatase (PPX1. Using this approach in a polyphosphate accumulating bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. B4, we were able to eliminate most of the cellular polyP (>95%. Furthermore, the effect of overexpression of PPX1 resembled the functional defects found in motility and biofilm formation in a ppk1 mutant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The plasmids constructed were also successfully replicated in other bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Burkholderia and Salmonella. Conclusion To deplete polyP contents in bacteria broad-host-range expression vectors can be used as an alternative and more efficient method compared with the deletion of ppk genes. It is of great importance to understand why polyP deficiency affects vital cellular processes in bacteria. The construction reported in this work will be of great relevance to study the role of polyP in microorganisms with non-sequenced genomes or those in which orthologs to ppk genes have not been identified.

  12. Modeling classic attenuation regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily A; Pirogov, Sergey A; Rubanov, Lev I; Seliverstov, Alexander V

    2007-02-01

    A model is proposed primarily for the classical RNA attenuation regulation of gene expression through premature transcription termination. The model is based on the concept of the RNA secondary structure macrostate within the regulatory region between the ribosome and RNA-polymerase, on hypothetical equation describing deceleration of RNA-polymerase by a macrostate and on views of transcription and translation initiation and elongation, under different values of the four basic model parameters which were varied. A special effort was made to select adequate model parameters. We first discuss kinetics of RNA folding and define the concept of the macrostate as a specific parentheses structure used to construct a conventional set of hairpins. The originally developed software that realizes the proposed model offers functionality to fully model RNA secondary folding kinetics. Its performance is compared to that of a public server described in Ref. 1. We then describe the delay in RNA-polymerase shifting to the next base or its premature termination caused by an RNA secondary structure or, herefrom, a macrostate. In this description, essential concepts are the basic and excited states of the polymerase first introduced in Ref. 2: the polymerase shifting to the next base can occur only in the basic state, and its detachment from DNA strand - only in excited state. As to the authors' knowledge, such a model incorporating the above-mentioned attenuation characteristics is not published elsewhere. The model was implemented in an application with command line interface for running in batch mode in Windows and Linux environments, as well as a public web server.(3) The model was tested with a conventional Monte Carlo procedure. In these simulations, the estimate of correlation between the premature transcription termination probability p and concentration c of charged amino acyl-tRNA was obtained as function p(c) for many regulatory regions in many bacterial genomes, as well as

  13. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Arbeitman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation.

  14. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nitric oxide in myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Won; Meuwly, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The infrared (IR) spectroscopy and ligand migration of photodissociated nitric oxide (NO) in and around the active sites in myoglobin (Mb) are investigated. A distributed multipolar model for open-shell systems is developed and used, which allows one to realistically describe the charge distribution around the diatomic probe molecule. The IR spectra were computed from the trajectories for two conformational substates at various temperatures. The lines are narrow (width of 3–7 cm–1 at 20–100 K), in agreement with the experimental observations where they have widths of 4–5 cm–1 at 4 K. It is found that within one conformational substate (B or C) the splitting of the spectrum can be correctly described compared with recent experiments. Similar to photodissociated CO in Mb, additional substates exist for NO in Mb, which are separated by barriers below 1 kcal/mol. Contrary to full quantum mechanical calculations, however, the force field and mixed QM/MM simulations do not correctly describe the relative shifts between the B- and C-states relative to gas-phase NO. Free energy simulations establish that NO preferably localizes in the distal site and the barrier for migration to the neighboring Xe4 pocket is ΔGB→C = 1.7–2.0 kcal/mol. The reverse barrier is ΔGB←C = 0.7 kcal/mol, which agrees well with the experimental value of 0.7 kcal/mol, estimated from kinetic data.

  16. Methylglyoxal-induced modification causes aggregation of myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sauradipta; Maity, Subhajit; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-02-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by Maillard reaction, known as glycation, is thought to be the root cause of different complications, particularly in diabetes mellitus and age-related disorders. Methylglyoxal (MG), a reactive α-oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition and reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) following Maillard-like reaction. We have investigated the in vitro effect of MG (200 μM) on the monomeric heme protein myoglobin (Mb) (100 μM) in a time-dependent manner (7 to 18 days incubation at 25 °C). MG induces significant structural alterations of the heme protein, including heme loss, changes in tryptophan fluorescence, decrease of α-helicity with increased β-sheet content etc. These changes occur gradually with increased period of incubation. Incubation of Mb with MG for 7 days results in formation of the AGE adducts: carboxyethyllysine at Lys-16, carboxymethyllysine at Lys-87 and carboxyethyllysine or pyrraline-carboxymethyllysine at Lys-133. On increasing the period of incubation up to 14 days, additional AGEs namely, carboxyethyllysine at Lys-42 and hydroimidazolone or argpyrimidine at Arg-31 and Arg-139 have been detected. MG also induces aggregation of Mb, which is clearly evident with longer period of incubation (18 days), and appears to have amyloid nature. MG-derived AGEs may thus have an important role as the precursors of protein aggregation, which, in turn, may be associated with physiological complications.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Binding by Hemoglobin and Myoglobin under Photodissociating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunori, Maurizio; Bonaventura, Joseph; Bonaventura, Celia; Antonini, Eraldo; Wyman, Jeffries

    1972-01-01

    Carbon monoxide binding by myoglobin and hemoglobin has been studied under conditions of constant illumination. For hemoglobin, the homotropic heme-heme interaction (cooperativity) and the heterotropic Bohr effect are invariant with light intensity over a 1000-fold change of c½. The dissociation constant, measured as c½, increases linearly with light intensity, indicating that photodissociation is a one-quantum process. At sufficiently high illumination the apparent enthalpy of ligand binding becomes positive, although in the absence of light it is known to be negative. This finding indicates that light acts primarily by increasing the “off” constants by an additive factor. The invariance of both cooperativity and Bohr effect raises a perplexing issue. It would appear to demand either that the “off” constants for the various elementary steps are all alike (which is contrary to current ideas) or that the additive factor is in each case proportional to the particular “off” constant to which it is added (a seemingly improbable alternative). PMID:4502938

  18. Primary structure of myoglobins from 31 species of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Yasunori; Ohga, Yoshimi; Ishidate, Hiromi; Morimoto, Tomotoshi

    2008-01-01

    Primary structure of myoglobins (Mbs) from 31 avian species of 15 orders were reported, although portions of the structures in the 2 species could not be determined. At least 68 of the total 153 amino acid sites were invariant all through the avian, reptilian and human Mbs, and 20 of these sites were "internal", forming the internal hydrophobic cavities in which the heme group remains wrapped. Furthermore, at 27 sites, if replaced, the replacements were mostly conservative, and 13 of the conservative sites were "internal". Thus the all 33 "internal" sites, important for structural and functional stability of the protein, have been well preserved, either invariant or conserved, during evolution from reptiles to birds and mammals. The residue 71 (E14) in 4 penguin species was not deleted as previously reported in emperor penguin Mb but occupied by Gln. The residue 121 (GH3) was deleted in all 3 species studied of Falconiformes. Out of 9 anseriforms, 5 species of different genera showed the identical structure. Secondary structures as viewed by hydropathy profiles were highly similar throughout the reptilian, avian and mammalian Mbs.

  19. Cloning, expression, purification and refolding of microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farha; Asad, Mohd; Malhotra, Pawan; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2014-03-01

    Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) is a member of the family Ser/Thr kinase and involved in numerous biological functions including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, positive regulation of programmed cell death, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, cell division etc. For various biophysical and structural studies, we need this protein in adequate quantity. In this paper, we report a novel cloning strategy for MARK4. We have cloned MARK4 catalytic domain including 59 N-terminal extra residues with unknown function and catalytic domain alone in PQE30 vector. The recombinant MARK4 was expressed in the inclusion bodies in M15 cells. The inclusion bodies were solubilized effectively with 1.5% N-lauroylsarcosine in alkaline buffer and subsequently purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography in a single step with high purity and good concentration. Purity of protein was checked on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by using mass spectrometry immunoblotting. Refolding of the recombinant protein was validated by ATPase assay. Our purification procedure is quick, simple and produces adequate quantity of proteins with high purity in a limited step.

  20. Complexity of steroid hydroxylase gent expression in the adrenal cortex A microcosm of regulated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, M R; Lund, J; Simpson, E R

    1989-01-01

    Regulation of the expression of steroid hydroxylase genes in the adrenal cortex involves mechanisms required for maintenance of optimal steroidogenesis, tissue specificity, and ontogeny of the steroidogenic pathway. Evaluation of the molecular basis of this complexity promises to unfold new aspects of regulated eukaryotic gene expression.

  1. Longitudinal Relations among Parental Emotional Expressivity, Children's Regulation, and Quality of Socioemotional Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Fabes, Richard A.P; Cumberland, Amanda; Reiser, Mark; Gershoff, elizabeth Thpmpson; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Losoya, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Examined the role of regulation in mediating the relations between maternal emotional expressivity and children's adjustment and social competence when children were 4.5 to just 8 years old, and again 2 years later. Found that at Times 1 and 2, regulation mediated the relation between positive maternal emotional expressivity and children's…

  2. Evaluation of medicine effects on the interaction of myoglobin and its aptamer or antibody using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Liu, Lin; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Chen, Nandi; Zhou, Chenchen; Luo, Bianxia; Du, Shasha

    2015-02-17

    The effects of medicine on the biomolecular interaction have been given increasing attention in biochemistry and affinity-based analytics since the environment in vivo is complex especially for the patients. Herein, myoglobin, a biomarker of acute myocardial infarction, was used as a model, and the medicine effects on the interactions of myoglobin/aptamer and myoglobin/antibody were systematically investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. The results showed that the average binding force and the binding probability of myoglobin/aptamer almost remained unchanged after myoglobin-modified gold substrate was incubated with promazine, amoxicillin, aspirin, and sodium penicillin, respectively. These parameters were changed for myoglobin/antibody after the myoglobin-modified gold substrate was treated with these medicines. For promazine and amoxicillin, they resulted in the change of binding force distribution of myoglobin/antibody (i.e., from unimodal distribution to bimodal distribution) and the increase of binding probability; for aspirin, it only resulted in the change of the binding force distribution, and for sodium penicillin, it resulted in the increase of the average binding force and the binding probability. These results may be attributed to the different interaction modes and binding sites between myoglobin/aptamer and myoglobin/antibody, the different structures between aptamer and antibody, and the effects of medicines on the conformations of myoglobin. These findings could enrich our understanding of medicine effects on the interactions of aptamer and antibody to their target proteins. Moreover, this work will lay a good foundation for better research and extensive applications of biomolecular interaction, especially in the design of biosensors in complex systems.

  3. How different oxidation states of crystalline myoglobin are influenced by X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2011-06-01

    X-ray induced radiation damage of protein crystals is well known to occur even at cryogenic temperatures. Redox active sites like metal sites seem especially vulnerable for these radiation-induced reductions. It is essential to know correctly the oxidation state of metal sites in protein crystal structures to be able to interpret the structure-function relation. Through previous structural studies, we have tried to characterise and understand the reactions between myoglobin and peroxides. These reaction intermediates are relevant because myoglobin is proposed to take part as scavenger of reactive oxygen species during oxidative stress, and because these intermediates are similar among the haem peroxidases and oxygenases. We have in our previous studies shown that these different myoglobin states are influenced by the X-rays used. In this study, we have in detail investigated the impact that X-rays have on these different oxidation states of myoglobin. An underlying goal has been to find a way to be able to determine mostly unreduced states. We have by using single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy found that the different oxidation states of myoglobin are to a different extent influenced by the X-rays (e.g. ferric Fe(III) myoglobin is faster reduced than ferryl Fe(IV)═O myoglobin). We observe that the higher oxidation states are not reduced to normal ferrous Fe(II) or ferric Fe(III) states, but end up in some intermediate and possibly artificial states. For ferric myoglobin, it seems that annealing of the radiation-induced/reduced state can reversibly more or less give the starting point (ferric myoglobin). Both scavengers and different dose-rates might influence to which extent the different states are affected by the X-rays. Our study shows that it is essential to do a time/dose monitoring of the influence X-rays have on each specific redox-state with spectroscopic techniques like single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy. This will determine to which

  4. Myoglobin of the shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni: isolation and amino acid sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1979-06-01

    Myoglobin isolated from red muscle of the shark H. portusjacksoni was purified by ion-exchange chromatography on sulfopropyl-Sephadex and gel-filtration. Amino acid analysis and sequence determination showed 148 amino acid residues. The amino terminal residue is acetylated as shown by mass spectrographic analysis of N-terminal peptides. There is a deletion of four residues at the amino terminal end as well as one residue in the CD interhelical area relative to other myoglobins. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and staphylococcal protease. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed approximately 85 differences from mammalian, monotreme and bird myoglobins. The date of divergence of the shark H. portusjacksoni from these other orders was estimated at 450 +/- 16 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for multiple mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate agrees well with similar estimates made using alpha- and beta-globin sequences, in contrast to widely differing estimates of dates of divergence for monotremes using the same three globin chains. Compared with myoglobins from species previously studied, there are many more differences in amino acid sequences, and in many positions residues are found that are more characteristic of alpha- and beta-globins, suggesting a conservation of residues over a long period of evolutionary time. There are fewer stabilizing hydrogen bonds and salt-linkages than in other myoglobins.

  5. Synthetic food additive dye "Tartrazine" triggers amorphous aggregation in cationic myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabib, Nasser Abdulatif; Khan, Javed Masood; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A

    2017-01-24

    Protein aggregation, a characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases, displays vast conformational diversity from amorphous to amyloid-like aggregates. In this study, we have explored the interaction of tartrazine with myoglobin protein at two different pHs (7.4 and 2.0). We have utilized various spectroscopic techniques (turbidity, Rayleigh light scattering (RLS), intrinsic fluorescence, Congo Red and far-UV CD) along with microscopy techniques i.e. atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the tartrazine-induced aggregation in myoglobin. The results showed that higher concentrations of tartrazine (2.0-10.0mM) induced amorphous aggregation in myoglobin at pH 2.0 via electrostatic interactions. However, tartrazine was not able to induce aggregation in myoglobin at pH 7.4; because of strong electrostatic repulsion between myoglobin and tartrazine at this pH. The tartrazine-induced amorphous aggregation process is kinetically very fast, and aggregation occurred without the formation of a nucleus. These results proposed that the electrostatic interaction is responsible for tartrazine-induced amorphous aggregation. This study may help in the understanding of mechanistic insight of aggregation by tartrazine.

  6. Endothelin-1 and endothelin-3 regulate endothelin receptor expression in rat coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsted, Gry Freja; Kilic, Semsi; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    . Organ culture significantly up-regulated ETB receptors and down-regulated ETA receptor expression. Co-incubation with ET-1 (1 nM) or ET-3 (100 nM) induced further down-regulation of the ETA receptor mRNA, while the function and protein level of ETA remained unchanged. ET-3 (100 nM) further up...

  7. Regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, Leo Edwin

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the regulation of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R). The mechanisms of InsP3R regulation were investigated after cloning of the promoters of the human and rat InsP3R-1 gene and visualization of subcellular distribution of InsP3R-3 by immunoelectron microscopy (c

  8. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a re

  9. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial...

  10. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial...

  11. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  12. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  13. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions between X chromosome and autosomal genes. Whereas male to female ratios of expression of autosomal genes were distributed around a mean of 1, X chromosome genes were clearly shifted towards higher expression in females. We generated gene coexpression networks and identified a major module of genes with correlated gene expression that includes female-biased X genes and sexually dimorphic autosomal genes for which the sexual dimorphism is likely driven by the X genes. In this module, expression of X chromosome genes correlates with autosome genes, more than the expression of autosomal genes with each other. Our study identifies correlated patterns of autosomal and X-linked genes that are likely influenced by the sexual imbalance of X gene expression when X inactivation is inefficient. PMID:24817096

  14. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer.

  15. Aspects of Regulating Freedom of Expression on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucereanu, D.

    2008-01-01

    It is common knowledge that the internet has profoundly affected the manner in which people communicate, obtain information and express themselves. What is less explored is exactly how freedom of expression and the internet interact, and what may be the legal consequences of the special features of

  16. Aspects of Regulating Freedom of Expression on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucereanu, D.

    2008-01-01

    It is common knowledge that the internet has profoundly affected the manner in which people communicate, obtain information and express themselves. What is less explored is exactly how freedom of expression and the internet interact, and what may be the legal consequences of the special features of

  17. Linkage mapping of putative regulator genes of barley grain development characterized by expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobus Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. seed development is a highly regulated process with fine-tuned interaction of various tissues controlling distinct physiological events during prestorage, storage and dessication phase. As potential regulators involved within this process we studied 172 transcription factors and 204 kinases for their expression behaviour and anchored a subset of them to the barley linkage map to promote marker-assisted studies on barley grains. Results By a hierachical clustering of the expression profiles of 376 potential regulatory genes expressed in 37 different tissues, we found 50 regulators preferentially expressed in one of the three grain tissue fractions pericarp, endosperm and embryo during seed development. In addition, 27 regulators found to be expressed during both seed development and germination and 32 additional regulators are characteristically expressed in multiple tissues undergoing cell differentiation events during barley plant ontogeny. Another 96 regulators were, beside in the developing seed, ubiquitously expressed among all tissues of germinating seedlings as well as in reproductive tissues. SNP-marker development for those regulators resulted in anchoring 61 markers on the genetic linkage map of barley and the chromosomal assignment of another 12 loci by using wheat-barley addition lines. The SNP frequency ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 SNP/kb in the parents of the various mapping populations and was 2.3 SNP/kb over all eight lines tested. Exploration of macrosynteny to rice revealed that the chromosomal orders of the mapped putative regulatory factors were predominantly conserved during evolution. Conclusion We identified expression patterns of major transcription factors and signaling related genes expressed during barley ontogeny and further assigned possible functions based on likely orthologs functionally well characterized in model plant species. The combined linkage map and reference

  18. Complex of myoglobin with phenol bound in a proximal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Wang, Chunxue; Celeste, Lesa R; Lovelace, Leslie L; Sun, Shenfang; Dawson, John H; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2012-12-01

    Sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) has weak dehaloperoxidase activity and catalyzes the peroxidative dehalogenation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) to 2,6-dichloroquinone. Crystals of Mb and of its more active G65T variant were used to study the binding of TCP, 4-iodophenol (4-IP) and phenol. The structures of crystals soaked overnight in a 10 mM solution of phenol revealed that a phenol molecule binds in the proximal cavity, forming a hydrogen bond to the hydroxyl of Tyr146 and hydrophobic contacts which include interactions with Cβ and Cγ of the proximal histidine His93. The phenol position corresponds to the strongest xenon binding site, Xe1. It appears that the ligand enters the proximal cavity through a gate formed by the flexible loops 79-86 and 93-103. TCP and 4-IP do not bind to Mb in this manner under similar conditions; however, it appears to be likely that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was used at a concentration of 0.8 M to facilitate 4-IP dissolution, binds in the phenol/Xe1 binding site. In this structure, a water molecule coordinated to the heme iron was replaced by an oxygen molecule, reflecting the reduction of the heme. Crystals of Mb and G65T Mb soaked for 5-10 min did not show bound phenol. Kinetic studies of TCP dechlorination showed that phenol has a dual effect: it acts as a competitive inhibitor that is likely to interfere with TCP binding at the heme edge and as a weak activator, likely through binding in the proximal cavity. The lack of phenol bound at the heme edge in the crystal structures suggests that its inhibitory binding only takes place when the heme is activated by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell mobilisation, in turn enhancing susceptibility to HIV infection.[1]. Although HIV ... kinase (AG1478; 200 nM), extracellular signal-regulated kinase. (ERK1/2) ..... Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human.

  20. Evolution of mammalian diving capacity traced by myoglobin net surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirceta, Scott; Signore, Anthony V; Burns, Jennifer M; Cossins, Andrew R; Campbell, Kevin L; Berenbrink, Michael

    2013-06-14

    Extended breath-hold endurance enables the exploitation of the aquatic niche by numerous mammalian lineages and is accomplished by elevated body oxygen stores and adaptations that promote their economical use. However, little is known regarding the molecular and evolutionary underpinnings of the high muscle myoglobin concentration phenotype of divers. We used ancestral sequence reconstruction to trace the evolution of this oxygen-storing protein across a 130-species mammalian phylogeny and reveal an adaptive molecular signature of elevated myoglobin net surface charge in diving species that is mechanistically linked with maximal myoglobin concentration. This observation provides insights into the tempo and routes to enhanced dive capacity evolution within the ancestors of each major mammalian aquatic lineage and infers amphibious ancestries of echidnas, moles, hyraxes, and elephants, offering a fresh perspective on the evolution of this iconic respiratory pigment.

  1. Effect of curcumin on the binding of cationic, anionic and nonionic surfactants with myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Ghosh, Soumen

    2017-04-01

    Interaction of a globular protein, myoglobin and different surfactants has been studied in the absence and presence of curcumin in phosphate buffer at pH = 7.4 by UV-VIS spectrophotometry, fluorimetry and fluorescence polarization anisotropy methods. Results show that heme environment of myoglobin is changed by cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium N-dodecanoyl sarcosinate (SDDS). In the presence of curcumin, CTAB cannot change the heme; but SDDS can make change. Nonionic surfactant N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10) cannot change the heme environment. Protein is unfolded by the surfactant. Curcumin can prevent the unfolding of protein in the low concentration region of ionic surfactants such as CTAB and SDDS. In nonionic surfactant media, curcumin accelerates the denaturation process. Due to myoglobin-curcumin complex formation, rotational motion of curcumin decreases in surfactant media and so anisotropy increases.

  2. The myoglobin of Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri): amino acid sequence and functional adaptation to extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; Romano, M; Giardina, B; di Prisco, G

    1999-02-01

    In the framework of a study on molecular adaptations of the oxygen-transport and storage systems to extreme conditions in Antarctic marine organisms, we have investigated the structure/function relationship in Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) myoglobin, in search of correlation with the bird life style. In contrast with previous reports, the revised amino acid sequence contains one additional residue and 15 differences. The oxygen-binding parameters seem well adapted to the diving behaviour of the penguin and to the environmental conditions of the Antarctic habitat. Addition of lactate has no major effect on myoglobin oxygenation over a large temperature range. Therefore, metabolic acidosis does not impair myoglobin function under conditions of prolonged physical effort, such as diving.

  3. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  4. Down-regulation of ROBO2 Expression in Prostate Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Youn Jin; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence exist that axon guidance genes are involved in cancer pathogenesis. Axon guidance genes ROBO1 and ROBO2 are candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG). The aim of our study was to address whether ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions are altered in prostate cancers (PCA). In this study, we analyzed ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions in 107 PCAs. In the immunohistochemistry, loss of ROBO2 expression was identified in 66 % of PCAs and was significantly higher than that in normal cells (p 

  5. Gene expression analyses implicate an alternative splicing program in regulating contractile gene expression and serum response factor activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twishasri Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Members of the CUG-BP, Elav-like family (CELF regulate alternative splicing in the heart. In MHC-CELFΔ transgenic mice, CELF splicing activity is inhibited postnatally in heart muscle via expression of a nuclear dominant negative CELF protein under an α-myosin heavy chain promoter. MHC-CELFΔ mice develop dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by alternative splicing defects, enlarged hearts, and severe contractile dysfunction. In this study, gene expression profiles in the hearts of wild type, high- and low-expressing lines of MHC-CELFΔ mice were compared using microarrays. Gene ontology and pathway analyses identified contraction and calcium signaling as the most affected processes. Network analysis revealed that the serum response factor (SRF network is highly affected. Downstream targets of SRF were up-regulated in MHC-CELFΔ mice compared to the wild type, suggesting an increase in SRF activity. Although SRF levels remained unchanged, known inhibitors of SRF activity were down-regulated. Conversely, we found that these inhibitors are up-regulated and downstream SRF targets are down-regulated in the hearts of MCKCUG-BP1 mice, which mildly over-express CELF1 in heart and skeletal muscle. This suggests that changes in SRF activity are a consequence of changes in CELF-mediated regulation rather than a secondary result of compensatory pathways in heart failure. In MHC-CELFΔ males, where the phenotype is only partially penetrant, both alternative splicing changes and down-regulation of inhibitors of SRF correlate with the development of cardiomyopathy. Together, these results strongly support a role for CELF-mediated alternative splicing in the regulation of contractile gene expression, achieved in part through modulating the activity of SRF, a key cardiac transcription factor.

  6. Chapter 1: building the ground for the first two protein structures: myoglobin and haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Bror

    2009-09-11

    Fifty years ago, Max Perutz and John Kendrew at Cambridge University achieved something that many people at the time considered impossible: they were the first to use x-ray crystallography to decipher the molecular structures of proteins: haemoglobin and myoglobin. They found that both molecules were built from Linus Pauling's alpha helices, but folded and packed together in a complicated manner that never could have been deciphered by any other technique.With structure information in hand they could then explain how haemoglobin in the bloodstream binds and releases oxygen on cue, how it passes its cargo on to the related storage protein myoglobin, and how a single amino acid mutation can produce the catastrophe known as sickle-cell anemia. Perutz and Kendrew also observed that the folding of helices was identical in myoglobin and the two chains of haemoglobin, and this along with the simultaneously evolving new technique of amino acid sequence analysis established for the first time the concept of molecular evolution. The crystallographic puzzle was "cracked" by Perutz when he demonstrated that the binding of only two heavy metal atoms to horse haemoglobin changed the x-ray pattern enough to allow him to solve the "phase problem" and circumvent the main obstacle to protein crystal structure analysis. Because myoglobin has a single chain whereas haemoglobin has four, Kendrew's work with myoglobin progressed more rapidly; a low resolution structure appeared in 1956 and the high resolution structure in 1959. That same year saw the low resolution picture of haemoglobin, and the high resolution structure followed shortly thereafter. Much of the work in structure analysis was carried out by visiting postdoctoral fellows and technicians, under the watchful eye of Perutz and Kendrew. This celebratory review has been written by three of those former postdoctorals: Strandberg and Dickerson from the myoglobin project, and Rossmann from the haemoglobin.

  7. Utility of heme analogues to intentionally modify heme-globin interactions in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neya, Saburo; Nagai, Masako; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Hoshino, Tyuji; Yoneda, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Akira T

    2016-05-01

    Myoglobin reconstitution with various synthetic heme analogues was reviewed to follow the consequences of modified heme-globin interactions. Utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as the solvent for water-insoluble hemes was emphasized. Proton NMR spectroscopy revealed that loose heme-globin contacts in the heme pocket eventually caused the dynamic heme rotation around the iron-histidine bond. The full rotational rate was estimated to be about 1400 s(-1) at room temperature for 1,4,5,8-tetramethylhemin. The X-ray analysis of the myoglobin containing iron porphine, the smallest heme without any side chains, showed that the original globin fold was well conserved despite the serious disruption of native heme-globin contacts. Comparison between the two myoglobins with static and rotatory prosthetic groups indicated that the oxygen and carbon monoxide binding profiles were almost unaffected by the heme motion. On the other hand, altered tetrapyrrole array of porphyrin dramatically changed the dissociation constant of oxygen from 0.0005 mm Hg of porphycene-myoglobin to ∞ in oxypyriporphyrin-myoglobin. Heme-globin interactions in myoglobin were also monitored with circular dichroism spectroscopy. The observation on several reconstituted protein revealed an unrecognized role of the propionate groups in protoheme. Shortening of heme 6,7-propionates to carboxylates resulted in almost complete disappearance of the positive circular dichroism band in the Soret region. The theoretical analysis suggested that the disappeared circular dichroism band reflected the cancellation effects between different conformers of the carboxyl groups directly attached to heme periphery. The above techniques were proposed to be applicable to other hemoproteins to create new biocatalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  8. High permeability dialysis membrane allows effective removal of myoglobin in acute kidney injury resulting from rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Sajoscha A; Kielstein, Jan T; Lukasz, Alexander; Sorrentino, Janine-Nicole; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Haller, Hermann; Schmidt, Bernhard M W

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of myoglobin removal of a novel, high-permeability polysulphone dialyzer in acute kidney injury as a result of rhabdomyolysis. Intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Six patients (one female; aged 24, 36, 41, 55, 63, and 65 yrs) with oligoanuric acute kidney injury resulting from rhabdomyolysis. Extended dialysis was performed using a single-pass batch dialysis system and a novel polysulphone high-flux dialyzer (effective surface area 1.8 m; inner lumen 220 μm; wall thickness 35 μm; allowing elimination of substances with a molecular weight of up to 30 kDa). Samples were collected at prefilter and postfilter sites as well as from the collected spent dialysate. The dialyzer clearance was calculated from concentrations before and directly after the dialysis membrane, the blood flow, and the ultrafiltration rate. The total amount of the myoglobin removed was measured directly as the whole dialysate was preserved. A median myoglobin clearance of 90.5 mL/min (range, 52.4-126.3 mL/min) was achieved, resulting in a median myoglobin removal per treatment hour of 0.54 g (range, 0.15-2.21 g). Extended dialysis with a high-flux, high-permeability membrane allowed effective elimination of myoglobin with a clearance of myoglobin that surpassed all previously reported dialysis techniques. This membrane may be advantageous in preventing acute kidney injury or avoiding complete loss of kidney function in patients with rhabdomyolysis. Further studies are needed to determine whether improving renal recovery or mortality in patients with acute kidney injury resulting from rhabdomyolysis is possible.

  9. Tissue expression and developmental regulation of chicken cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanta Mallika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathelicidins are a major family of antimicrobial peptides present in vertebrate animals with potent microbicidal and immunomodulatory activities. Four cathelicidins, namely fowlicidins 1 to 3 and cathelicidin B1, have been identified in chickens. As a first step to understand their role in early innate host defense of chickens, we examined the tissue and developmental expression patterns of all four cathelicidins. Real-time PCR revealed an abundant expression of four cathelicidins throughout the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts as well as in all primary and secondary immune organs of chickens. Fowlicidins 1 to 3 exhibited a similar tissue expression pattern with the highest expression in the bone marrow and lung, while cathelicidin B1 was synthesized most abundantly in the bursa of Fabricius. Additionally, a tissue-specific regulatory pattern was evident for all four cathelicidins during the first 28 days after hatching. The expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 showed an age-dependent increase both in the cecal tonsil and lung, whereas all four cathelicidins were peaked in the bursa on day 4 after hatching, with a gradual decline by day 28. An abrupt augmentation in the expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 was also observed in the cecum on day 28, while the highest expression of cathelicidin B1 was seen in both the lung and cecal tonsil on day 14. Collectively, the presence of cathelicidins in a broad range of tissues and their largely enhanced expression during development are suggestive of their potential important role in early host defense and disease resistance of chickens.

  10. FRAT1 expression regulates proliferation in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kongxi; Guo, Jianqiang; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common gastric malignancies worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism of colon cancer development and valuable indicators of the disease remain unclear. In this study, the expression of frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas 1 (FRAT1) in colon cancer was investigated and the association between FRAT1 expression and biological properties of tumors was analyzed. A total of 147 colon cancer tissue samples and adjacent normal tissues were collected between January 2013 and June 2014. The FRAT1 gene and protein expression levels were analyzed in tissues with different TNM and pathological stages. Small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) containing the human FRAT1 gene were constructed and transfected into colon cancer HT-29 cells. The proliferation and migration of the cells was also analyzed in relation to a reduction in FRAT1 expression. In colon cancer tissues, the expression of FRAT1 was significantly higher when compared with adjacent tissues. In addition, FRAT1 expression was found to positively correlate with the degree of tumor malignancy, and this difference was determined to be statistically significant (Pcolon cancer, FRAT1 may present a novel tool for analyzing the tumor progression and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer.

  11. Interleukin-1 controls the constitutive expression of the Cyp7a1 gene by regulating the expression of Cyp7a1 transcriptional regulators in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Misaki; Ashino, Takashi; Yoshida, Takemi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Degawa, Masakuni

    2011-01-01

    Our previous study using interleukin-1α/β-knockout (IL-1-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice demonstrated that IL-1 acts as a positive factor for constitutive gene expression of hepatic cytochrome P4507a1 (Cyp7a1). In this study, to clarify the role of IL-1 in the expression of the hepatic Cyp7a1 gene, we focused on Cyp7a1 transcriptional regulators such as α-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF), liver X receptor α (LXRα), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) and examined the effects of IL-1 on their gene expression by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using IL-1-KO and WT mice. We observed no significant differences between sex-matched IL-1-KO and WT mice with regard to gene expression levels of FTF, LXRα, and HNF4α, all of which are positive transcriptional regulators for the Cyp7a1 gene. However, interindividual differences in hepatic FTF and LXRα expression were closely dependent on the gene expression level(s) of hepatic IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), while interindividual differences in hepatic HNF4α were clearly correlated with the expression of IL-1, but not TNF-α. In contrast, the gene expression level of SHP, which is a negative transcriptional regulator of the Cyp7a1 gene through inhibition of FTF function, was higher in IL-1-KO mice than in sex-matched WT mice. These findings demonstrate that, like TNF-α, IL-1 positively controls the gene expression of Cyp7a1 transcriptional upregulators but, in contrast to the previously reported action of TNF-α, IL-1 also acts to downregulate SHP gene expression.

  12. Expression and regulation of the decoy bone morphogenetic protein receptor BAMBI in the developing avian face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihori, Norihisa; Song, Yiping; Richman, Joy M

    2008-05-01

    Here, we examine the expression and regulation of the gene BAMBI, a kinase-deficient decoy receptor capable of interacting with type I bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors in avian embryos. Initially, expression was limited to the endoderm during neurula and pharyngula stages. From embryonic day 3.5 (stage 20) and onward, BAMBI expression almost perfectly overlapped with known expression patterns for BMP4, particularly in the face and limbs. We performed bead implant experiments in the face to see which signals could be repressing or promoting expression of BAMBI. Our data point to retinoids and BMPs as being major positive regulators of BAMBI expression; however, fibroblast growth factor 2 acts to repress BAMBI. Furthermore, retinoic acid is likely to act directly on BAMBI as induction occurs in the presence of cycloheximide. The data suggested that BAMBI could be used to regulate Bmp signaling during tissue interactions that are an integral part of facial morphogenesis.

  13. A new pathway of glucocorticoid action for asthma treatment through the regulation of PTEN expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qingge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10" (PTEN is mostly considered to be a cancer-related gene, and has been suggested to be a new pathway of pathogenesis of asthma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, on PTEN regulation. Methods OVA-challenged mice were used as an asthma model to investigate the effect of dexamethasone on PTEN regulation. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression levels of PTEN protein in lung tissues. The human A549 cell line was used to explore the possible mechanism of action of dexamethasone on human PTEN regulation in vitro. A luciferase reporter construct under the control of PTEN promoter was used to confirm transcriptional regulation in response to dexamethasone. Results PTEN protein was found to be expressed at low levels in lung tissues in asthmatic mice; but the expression was restored after treatment with dexamethasone. In A549 cells, human PTEN was up-regulated by dexamethasone treatment. The promoter-reporter construct confirmed that dexamethasone could regulate human PTEN transcription. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, TSA, could increase PTEN expression in A549 cells, while inhibition of histone acetylase (HAT by anacardic acid attenuated dexamethasone-induced PTEN expression. Conclusions Based on the data a new mechanism is proposed where glucocorticoids treat asthma partly through up-regulation of PTEN expression. The in vitro studies also suggest that the PTEN pathway may be involved in human asthma.

  14. Expression and Regulation of Cholecystokinin Receptor in the Chicken's Immune Organs and Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kassas, Seham; Odemuyiwa, Solomon; Hajishengallis, George; Connell, Terry D; Nashar, Toufic O

    2017-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that affects growth rate in chickens by regulating appetite. CCK peptides exert their function by binding to two identified receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR in the GI tract and the brain, respectively, as well as in other organs. In mammals, CCK/CCKAR interactions affect a number of immunological parameters, including regulation of lymphocytes and functioning of monocytes. Thus, food intake and growth can potentially be altered by infection and the resulting inflammatory immune response. It is uncertain, however, whether chicken express CCKAR in immune organs and cells, and, if so, whether CCKAR expression is regulated by pathogen derived inflammatory stimuli. Herein, we identify expression of CCKAR protein in chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) including monocytes, and expression of the CCKAR gene in PBMC, thymus, bursa, and spleen, in selected commercial and pure chicken breeds. Further, stimulation with various types of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxins or lipopolysaccharide significantly regulated expression of CCKAR on monocytes in the different breeds. Ligation of CCKAR with antibodies in PBMC induced mobilization of Ca2+, indicating that CCKAR is signal competent. Injection with polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic analogue of double stranded viral RNA that binds Toll-Like Receptor-3 (TLR3), also regulated gene expressions of CCKAR and proinflammatory cytokines, in the different breeds. Interestingly, variations in the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the different breeds were highly correlated with CCKAR expression levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that the physiological function of CCKAR in the chicken is tightly regulated in immune organs and cells by external inflammatory stimuli, which in turn regulate growth. This is the first report CCKAR expression in immune organs and cells, in any species, and the initial observation that CCKAR is regulated by

  15. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  16. Nitrogen regulates chitinase gene expression in a marine bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpin, Marina; Goodman, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonium concentration and nitrogen source regulate promoter activity and use for the transcription of chiA, the major chitinase gene of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S91 and S91CX, an S91 transposon lacZ fusion mutant. The activity of chiA was quantified by beta-galactosidase assay of S91CX cultures con...

  17. DNA methylation down-regulates EGFR expression in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a growth-factor-receptor tyrosine kinase, was found up-regulated in numerous tumors, which provides a good target for cancer therapy. Although it was documented that oncoviruses are responsible for the activation of EGFR in tumors, the impact of Marek’s d...

  18. Regulation of Information: Does Freedom of Expression Include the Internet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jack

    Noting that the Supreme Court in 1997 considered the question of whether the Internet would be regulated by the government as broadcasting or whether it would remain as free as newspapers, this paper examines the difficulty involved in applying old law to new technology. It also notes that while journalism education generally has accepted…

  19. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shattil, S.J.; Motulsky, H.J.; Insel, P.A.; Brass, L.F.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl/sub 2/, or the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding.

  20. Leaky Scanning and Reinitiation Regulate BACE1 Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Weihui; Song, Weihong

    2006-01-01

    β-Site β-amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the β-secretase in vivo for processing APP to generate amyloid β protein (Aβ). Aβ deposition in the brain is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Inhibition of BACE1 activity has major pharmaceutical potential for AD treatment. The expression of the BACE1 gene is relatively low in vivo. The control of BACE1 expression has not been well defined. There are six upstream AUGs (uAUGs) in the 5′ leader sequenc...

  1. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  2. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyazono, Agasa [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Morimura, Naoko [Laboratory for Comparative Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  4. Metastasis regulation by PPARD expression in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiangsheng; Xu, Weiguo; Xu, Min; Tian, Rui; Moussalli, Micheline J.; Mao, Fei; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Eng, Cathy; Maru, Dipen M.; Rashid, Asif; Broaddus, Russell; Wei, Daoyan; Hung, Mien-Chie; Sood, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor–δ (PPARD) is upregulated in many major human cancers, but the role that its expression in cancer cells has in metastasis remains poorly understood. Here, we show that specific PPARD downregulation or genetic deletion of PPARD in cancer cells significantly repressed metastasis in various cancer models in vivo. Mechanistically, PPARD promoted angiogenesis via interleukin 8 in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of transcriptome profiling of HCT116 colon cancer cells with or without genetic deletion of PPARD and gene expression patterns in The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal adenocarcinoma database identified novel pro-metastatic genes (GJA1, VIM, SPARC, STC1, SNCG) as PPARD targets. PPARD expression in cancer cells drastically affected epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion, further underscoring its necessity for metastasis. Clinically, high PPARD expression in various major human cancers (e.g., colorectal, lung, breast) was associated with significantly reduced metastasis-free survival. Our results demonstrate that PPARD, a druggable protein, is an important molecular target in metastatic cancer. PMID:28097239

  5. The regulation of APAF1 expression during development and tumourigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, E S; Helin, K

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis Protease-Activating Factor 1, APAF1, was originally isolated four years ago and shown to be the mammalian homologue of the C. elegans pro-apoptotic ced4 gene. Since then, the expression of APAF1 has been demonstrated to be involved in several cell death pathways, including the induction...

  6. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  7. Central brain neurons expressing doublesex regulate female receptivity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Pan, Yufeng; Robinett, Carmen C; Meissner, Geoffrey W; Baker, Bruce S

    2014-07-02

    Drosophila melanogaster females respond to male courtship by either rejecting the male or allowing copulation. The neural mechanisms underlying these female behaviors likely involve the integration of sensory information in the brain. Because doublesex (dsx) controls other aspects of female differentiation, we asked whether dsx-expressing neurons mediate virgin female receptivity to courting males. Using intersectional techniques to manipulate the activities of defined subsets of dsx-expressing neurons, we found that activation of neurons in either the pCd or pC1 clusters promotes receptivity, while silencing these neurons makes females unreceptive. Furthermore, pCd and pC1 neurons physiologically respond to the male-specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA), while pC1 neurons also respond to male courtship song. The pCd and pC1 neurons expressing dsx in females do not express transcripts from the fruitless (fru) P1 promoter. Thus, virgin female receptivity is controlled at least in part by neurons that are distinct from those governing male courtship.

  8. MicroRNA-381 Regulates Chondrocyte Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylase 4 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weishen; Sheng, Puyi; Huang, Zhiyu; Meng, Fangang; Kang, Yan; Huang, Guangxin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Liao, Weiming; Zhang, Ziji

    2016-08-23

    Chondrocyte hypertrophy, regulated by Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), is a crucial step in cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. We previously demonstrated that microRNA-381 (miR-381) promotes MMP13 expression during chondrogenesis and contributes to cartilage degeneration; however, the mechanism underlying this process remained unclear. In this study, we observed divergent expression of miR-381 and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that directly inhibits RUNX2 and MMP13 expression, during late-stage chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells, as well as in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes during long bone development in E16.5 mouse embryos. We therefore investigated whether this miRNA regulates HDAC4 expression during chondrogenesis. Notably, overexpression of miR-381 inhibited HDAC4 expression but promoted RUNX2 expression. Moreover, transfection of SW1353 cells with an miR-381 mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of HDAC4. Conversely, treatment with a miR-381 inhibitor yielded increased HDAC4 expression and decreased RUNX2 expression. Lastly, knockdown of HDAC4 expression resulted in increased RUNX2 and MMP13 expression in SW1353 cells. Collectively, our results indicate that miR-381 epigenetically regulates MMP13 and RUNX2 expression via targeting of HDAC4, thereby suggesting the possibilities of inhibiting miR-381 to control chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage degeneration.

  9. Epigenetic Regulation of Dopamine Transporter mRNA Expression in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ashley L.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Tee, Siew C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Guo, Grace L.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. As such, proper regulation of DAT expression is important to maintain homeostasis, and disruption of DAT expression can lead to neurobehavioral dysfunction. Based on genomic features within the promoter of the DAT gene, there is potential for DAT expression to be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation and histone acetylation. However, the relative contribution of these mechanisms to DAT expression has not been empirically determined. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity increased DAT mRNA approximately 1.5–2 fold. This effect was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of DNMT1. Likewise, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproate and butyrate also increased DAT mRNA expression, but the response was much more robust with expression increasing over tenfold. Genetic knockdown of HDAC1 by siRNA also increased DAT expression, but not to the extent seen with pharmacological inhibition, suggesting additional isoforms of HDAC or other targets may contribute to the observed effect. Together, these data identify the relative contribution of DNMTs and HDACs in regulating expression. These finding may aid in understanding the mechanistic basis for changes in DAT expression in normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:25963949

  10. Plasma Membrane CFTR Regulates RANTES Expression via Its C-Terminal PDZ-Interacting Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Estell, Kim; Braunstein, Gavin; Tucker, Torry; Varga, Karoly; Collawn, James F.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the identification of 1,000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene product CFTR, there remains discordance between CFTR genotype and lung disease phenotype. The study of CFTR, therefore, has expanded beyond its chloride channel activity into other possible functions, such as its role as a regulator of gene expression. Findings indicate that CFTR plays a role in the expression of RANTES in airway epithelia. RANTES is a chemokine that has been implicated in the regulation of mucosal immu...

  11. Food intake regulating-neuropeptides are expressed and regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction in rat placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepeda Libia A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related peptide (AgRP, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and melanocortins, the products of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC, are hypothalamic peptides involved in feeding regulation and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence has demonstrated their expression in rat and human placenta. Methods In the current study, we have investigated the expression of those neuropeptides in the rat placenta by real-time PCR using a model of maternal food restriction. Results Our results showed that placental-derived neuropeptides were regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction. Conclusion These data could indicate that placental-derived neuropeptides represent a local regulatory circuit that may fine-tune control of energy balance during pregnancy.

  12. Integrated pathway-based transcription regulation network mining and visualization based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibinge, Nelson; Ono, Naoaki; Horie, Masafumi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Saito, Akira; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, workflows examining transcription regulation networks from gene expression data involve distinct analytical steps. There is a need for pipelines that unify data mining and inference deduction into a singular framework to enhance interpretation and hypotheses generation. We propose a workflow that merges network construction with gene expression data mining focusing on regulation processes in the context of transcription factor driven gene regulation. The pipeline implements pathway-based modularization of expression profiles into functional units to improve biological interpretation. The integrated workflow was implemented as a web application software (TransReguloNet) with functions that enable pathway visualization and comparison of transcription factor activity between sample conditions defined in the experimental design. The pipeline merges differential expression, network construction, pathway-based abstraction, clustering and visualization. The framework was applied in analysis of actual expression datasets related to lung, breast and prostrate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  14. Autoimmune Regulator Expression in DC2.4 Cells Regulates the NF-κB Signaling and Cytokine Expression of the Toll-Like Receptor 3 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitong Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune regulator (Aire mutations result in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, which manifests as multi-organ autoimmunity and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC. Indendritic cells (DCs, pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs, are closely involved in the recognition of various pathogens, activating the intercellular signaling pathway, followed by the activation of transcription factors and the expression of downstream genes, which take part in mediating the immune response and maintaining immune tolerance. In this study, we found that Aire up-regulated TLR3 expression and modulated the downstream cytokine expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB of the TLR3 signaling pathway.

  15. Dissecting cis regulation of gene expression in human metabolic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Dobrin

    Full Text Available Complex diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes can result from a failure in multiple organ systems including the central nervous system and tissues involved in partitioning and disposal of nutrients. Studying the genetics of gene expression in tissues that are involved in the development of these diseases can provide insights into how these tissues interact within the context of disease. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL studies identify mRNA expression changes linked to proximal genetic signals (cis eQTLs that have been shown to affect disease. Given the high impact of recent eQTL studies, it is important to understand what role sample size and environment plays in identification of cis eQTLs. Here we show in a genotyped obese human population that the number of cis eQTLs obey precise scaling laws as a function of sample size in three profiled tissues, i.e. omental adipose, subcutaneous adipose and liver. Also, we show that genes (or transcripts with cis eQTL associations detected in a small population are detected at approximately 90% rate in the largest population available for our study, indicating that genes with strong cis acting regulatory elements can be identified with relatively high confidence in smaller populations. However, by increasing the sample size we allow for better detection of weaker and more distantly located cis-regulatory elements. Yet, we determined that the number of tissue specific cis eQTLs saturates in a modestly sized cohort while the number of cis eQTLs common to all tissues fails to reach a maximum value. Understanding the power laws that govern the number and specificity of eQTLs detected in different tissues, will allow a better utilization of genetics of gene expression to inform the molecular mechanism underlying complex disease traits.

  16. Dcc haploinsufficiency regulates dopamine receptor expression across postnatal lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokinko, Matthew; Grant, Alanna; Shahabi, Florence; Dumont, Yvan; Manitt, Colleen; Flores, Cecilia

    2017-03-27

    Adolescence is a period during which the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) undergoes significant remodeling. The netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), controls the extent and organization of mPFC dopamine connectivity during adolescence and in turn directs mPFC functional and structural maturation. Dcc haploinsufficiency leads to increased mPFC dopamine input, which causes improved cognitive processing and resilience to behavioral effects of stimulant drugs of abuse. Here we examine the effects of Dcc haploinsufficiency on the dynamic expression of dopamine receptors in forebrain targets of C57BL6 mice. We conducted quantitative receptor autoradiography experiments with [(3)H]SCH-23390 or [(3)H]raclopride to characterize D1 and D2 receptor expression in mPFC and striatal regions in male Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. We generated autoradiograms at early adolescence (PND21±1), mid-adolescence (PND35±2), and adulthood (PND75±15). C57BL6 mice exhibit overexpression and pruning of D1, but not D2, receptors in striatal regions, and a lack of dopamine receptor pruning in the mPFC. We observed age- and region-specific differences in D1 and D2 receptor density between Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. Notably, neither group shows the typical pattern of mPFC dopamine receptor pruning in adolescence, but adult haploinsufficient mice show increased D2 receptor density in the mPFC. These results show that DCC receptors contribute to the dynamic refinement of D1 and D2 receptor expression in striatal regions across adolescence. The age-dependent expression of dopamine receptor in C57BL6 mice shows marked differences from previous characterizations in rats.

  17. Robust, synergistic regulation of human gene expression using TALE activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Reyon, Deepak; Angstman, James F; Fu, Yanfang; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2013-03-01

    Artificial activators designed using transcription activator-like effector (TALE) technology have broad utility, but previous studies suggest that these monomeric proteins often exhibit low activities. Here we demonstrate that TALE activators can robustly function individually or in synergistic combinations to increase expression of endogenous human genes over wide dynamic ranges. These findings will encourage applications of TALE activators for research and therapy, and guide design of monomeric TALE-based fusion proteins.

  18. Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: A Prospective Study of Expressive Suppression and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Junilla K.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Geenen, Rinie; van Middendorp, Henriet; English, Tammy; Gross, James J.; Ha, Thao; Evers, Catharine; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between expressive suppression and depressive symptoms. These results have been interpreted as reflecting the impact of emotion regulation efforts on depression. However, it is also possible that depression may alter emotion regulation tendencies. The goal of the present study was to…

  19. Tissue-specific Regulation of Porcine Prolactin Receptor Expression by Estrogen, Progesterone and Prolactin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) via both endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine pathways to regulate biological processes including reproduction and lactation. We analyzed the tissue and stage of gestation-specific regulation of PRL and PRLR expression in various tissues of pigs. ...

  20. E2Fs regulate the expression of genes involved in differentiation, development, proliferation, and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H; Bracken, A P; Vernell, R;

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and its two relatives, p107 and p130, regulate development and cell proliferation in part by inhibiting the activity of E2F-regulated promoters. We have used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to identify genes in which expression changed in response to activatio...

  1. Who watches the watchmen? Regulation of the expression and activity of sirtuins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buler, Marcin; Andersson, Ulf; Hakkola, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT1-7) are a family of nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent enzymes that catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. Together, they regulate crucial cellular functions and are traditionally associated with aging and longevity. Dysregulation of sirtuins plays an important role in major diseases, including cancer and metabolic, cardiac, and neurodegerative diseases. They are extensively regulated in response to a wide range of stimuli, including nutritional and metabolic challenges, inflammatory signals or hypoxic and oxidative stress. Each sirtuin is regulated individually in a tissue- and cell-specific manner. The control of sirtuin expression involves all the major points of regulation, including transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms and microRNAs. Collectively, these mechanisms control the protein levels, localization, and enzymatic activity of sirtuins. In many cases, the regulators of sirtuin expression are also their substrates, which lead to formation of intricate regulatory networks and extensive feedback loops. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms mediating the physiologic and pathologic regulation of sirtuin expression and activity. We also discuss the consequences of this regulation on sirtuin function and cellular physiology.-Buler, M., Andersson, U., Hakkola, J. Who watches the watchmen? Regulation of the expression and activity of sirtuins. © FASEB.

  2. Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: A Prospective Study of Expressive Suppression and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Junilla K.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Geenen, Rinie; van Middendorp, Henriet; English, Tammy; Gross, James J.; Ha, Thao; Evers, Catharine; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between expressive suppression and depressive symptoms. These results have been interpreted as reflecting the impact of emotion regulation efforts on depression. However, it is also possible that depression may alter emotion regulation tendencies. The goal of the present study was to…

  3. Prostacyclin synthase expression and epigenetic regulation in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary-Clare

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) metabolizes prostaglandin H(2), into prostacyclin. This study aimed to determine the expression profile of PGIS in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and examine potential mechanisms involved in PGIS regulation. METHODS: PGIS expression was examined in human NSCLC and matched controls by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western analysis, and immunohistochemistry. A 204-patient NSCLC tissue microarray was stained for PGIS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression. Staining intensity was correlated with clinical parameters. Epigenetic mechanisms underpinning PGIS promoter expression were examined using RT-PCR, methylation-specific PCR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. RESULTS: PGIS expression was reduced\\/absent in human NSCLC protein samples (P < .0001), but not mRNA relative to matched controls. PGIS tissue expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma (P = .004) and in male patients (P < .05). No significant correlation of PGIS or COX2 expression with overall patient survival was observed, although COX2 was prognostic for short-term (2-year) survival (P < .001). PGIS mRNA expression was regulated by DNA CpG methylation and histone acetylation in NSCLC cell lines, with chromatin remodeling taking place directly at the PGIS gene. PGIS mRNA expression was increased by both demethylation agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Protein levels were unaffected by demethylation agents, whereas PGIS protein stability was negatively affected by histone deacetylase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: PGIS protein expression is reduced in NSCLC, and does not correlate with overall patient survival. PGIS expression is regulated through epigenetic mechanisms. Differences in expression patterns between mRNA and protein levels suggest that PGIS expression and protein stability are regulated post-translationally. PGIS protein stability may have an important therapeutic role in NSCLC.

  4. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin, Tursiops truncatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B N; Vigna, R A; Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Lehman, L D; Gurd, F R

    1976-10-05

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides that are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Three easily separable peptides were obtained by cleaving the protein with cyanogen bromide at the 2 methionine residues and 4 peptides were obtained by cleaving the methyl acetimidated protein with trypsin at the 3 arginine residues. By subjecting 4 of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automatic Edman degradation, over 80% of the covalent structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the primary structure was determined by further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin and staphylococcal protease. This myoglobin differs from that of the sperm whale, Physter catodon, at 15 positions, from that of the California gray whale, Eschrichtius gibbosus, at 14 positions, from that of the common porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, at 6 positions, and from the myoglobin of the Black Sea dolphin, Delphinus delphis and the Amazon River dolphin, Inia goeffrensis, at 5 and 7 positions, respecitvely. All substitutions observed in this sequence fit easily into the tertiary structure of sperm whale myoglobin.

  5. Photoexcitation dynamics of nitric oxide bound ferric myoglobin probed by femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jaehun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved vibrational spectra show that photolysis quantum yield of NO bound ferric myoglobin is smaller than 0.86, the deligated NO geminately rebinds with subnanosecond time scale, and the rebinding kinetics depends on protein conformation.

  6. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Bioinorganic Chemistry: Ligation States of Myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Although there are numerous inorganic model systems that are readily presented as undergraduate laboratory experiments in bioinorganic chemistry, there are few examples that explore the inorganic chemistry of actual biological molecules. We present a laboratory experiment using the oxygen-binding protein myoglobin that can be easily incorporated…

  7. Determination of Myoglobin Stability by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: Classic and Modern Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Andrew F.; Crawford, Mary A.; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Few laboratory procedures describe the use of circular dichroism (CD) at the undergraduate level. To increase the number of laboratory exercises using CD, a thermal denaturation study of myoglobin using CD is described to assess protein stability. Values obtained from a more classic linear data analysis approach are consistent with data analyzed…

  8. MiR-200c Regulates Noxa Expression and Sensitivity to Proteasomal Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic p53 target Noxa is a BH3-only protein that antagonizes the function of selected anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. While much is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of Noxa, its posttranscriptional regulation remains relatively unstudied. In this study, we therefore investigated whether Noxa is regulated by microRNAs. Using a screen combining luciferase reporters, bioinformatic target prediction analysis and microRNA expression profiling, we identified miR-200c ...

  9. Microbial regulation of hippocampal miRNA expression: Implications for transcription of kynurenine pathway enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Gerard M; O'Leary, Olivia F; Salvo-Romero, Eloisa; Desbonnet, Lieve; Shanahan, Fergus; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard; Cryan, John F

    2017-09-15

    Increasing evidence points to a functional role of the enteric microbiota in brain development, function and behaviour including the regulation of transcriptional activity in the hippocampus. Changes in CNS miRNA expression may reflect the colonisation status of the gut. Given the pivotal impact of miRNAs on gene expression, our study was based on the hypothesis that gene expression would also be altered in the germ-free state in the hippocampus. We measured miRNAs in the hippocampus of Germ free (GF), conventional (C) and Germ free colonised (exGF) Swiss Webster mice. miRNAs were selected for follow up based on significant differences in expression between groups according to sex and colonisation status. The expression of miR-294-5p was increased in male germ free animals and was normalised following colonisation. Targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs were over-represented in the kynurenine pathway. We show that the microbiota modulates the expression of miRNAs associated with kynurenine pathway metabolism and, demonstrate that the gut microbiota regulates the expression of kynurenine pathway genes in the hippocampus. We also show a sex-specific role for the microbiota in the regulation of miR-294-5p expression in the hippocampus. The gut microbiota plays an important role in modulating small RNAs that influence hippocampal gene expression, a process critical to hippocampal development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrosynthesis and binding properties of molecularly imprinted poly-o-phenylenediamine as artificial antibodies for electroanalysis of myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumyantseva, V V; Bulko, T V; Sigolaeva, L V; Kuzikov, A V; Shatskaya, M A; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted poly-o-phenylenediamine with template myoglobin molecules (i.e., polymeric antibodies to myoglobin, molecularly imprinted polymer, MIP) was synthesized via electropolymerization. Electropolymerization, washing, and the interaction of the polymeric antibodies with myoglobin was examined by square wave voltammetry and microgravimetry. The analysis of myoglobin was carried out through direct electrochemical detection of the reduction peak of Fe(3+) of the hemeprotein on screen-printed graphite electrodes modified by the MIP. According to the electrochemical analysis, MIP surfaces demonstrated remarkably higher ability to bind the protein compared to that of surfaces prepared by the same route under the same conditions but in the absence of myoglobin (surfaces of the non-imprinted polymer, NIP). The imprinting factor I max(MIP)/I max(NIP) was found to be 2-4. The equilibrium dissociation constant K d of the interaction of myoglobin with MIP electrodes was evaluated as (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-8) M. The lower detection limit of myoglobin by a MIP sensor was determined as 0.5 × 10(-9) M, the range of detectable concentrations being 10(-9)-10(-5) M.

  11. POTATO GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE PROMOTER-CONTROLLED GUS EXPRESSION - REGULATION OF EXPRESSION AFTER TRANSIENT AND STABLE TRANSFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; NIEBOER, M; SWAVING, J; TEMPELAAR, MJ

    1992-01-01

    Chimaeric genes of promoter sequences from the potato gene encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were used to study GBSS expression and regulation. Analysis of stable transformants revealed that a GBSS promoter sequence of 0.4 kb was sufficient

  12. Regulation of gene expression by Goodwin's loop with many genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analysis of a long Goodwin's loop containing many genes. The genes form a closed series. The rate of transcription of any gene is up or down regulated by theprotein product of the preceding gene. We describe the loop with a system of ordinary differential equations of order s. Oscillatory solutions of the system are possible at the odd number of repressions and any number of inductions if the product of all Hill's coefficients, related to both repressions and inductions, is larger than:

  13. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  14. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Alter

    Full Text Available A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of children with autism (n = 82 and controls (n = 64. Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  15. Mitochondrial retrograde regulation tuning fork in nuclear genes expressions of higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Yang; Mingfang Zhang; Jingquan Yu

    2008-01-01

    In plant cells, there are three organelles: the nucleus, chloroplast, and mitochondria that store genetic information. The nucleus possesses the majority of genetic information and controls most aspects of organelles gene expression, growth, and development. In return,organdies also send signals back to regulate nuclear gene expression, a process defined as retrograde regulation. The best studies of organelles to nucleus retrograde regulation exist in plant chloroplast-to-nuclear regulation and yeast mitochondria-to-nuclear regulation. In this review, we summarize the recent understanding of mitochondrial retrograde regulation in higher plant, which involves multiple potential signaling pathway in relation to cytoplasmic male-sterility, biotic stress, and abiotie stress. With respect to mitochondrial retrograde regulation signal pathways involved in cytoplasmic male-sterility, we consider that nuclear transcriptional factor genes are the targeted genes regulated by mitoehondria to determine the abnormal reproductive development, and the MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in this regulation in Brassica juncea. When plants suffer biotic and abiotie stress, plant cells will initiate cell death or other events directed toward recovering from stress. During this process, we propose that mitochondria may determine how plant cell responds to a given stress through retrograde regulation. Meanwhile, several transducer molecules have also been discussed here. In particular, thePaepe research group reported that leaf mitochondrial modulated whole cell redox homeostasis, set antioxidant capacity, and determinedstress resistance through altered signaling and diurnal regulation, which is an indication of plant mitochondria with more active function than ever.

  16. Factors correlating with significant differences between X-ray structures of myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashin, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander-rashin@hotmail.com [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Zimmermann, Michael T. [Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Jernigan, Robert L. [Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Conformational differences between myoglobin structures are studied. Most structural differences in whale myoglobin beyond the uncertainty threshold can be correlated with a few specific structural factors. There are always exceptions and a search for additional factors is needed. The results might have serious implications for biological insights from conformational differences. Validation of general ideas about the origins of conformational differences in proteins is critical in order to arrive at meaningful functional insights. Here, principal component analysis (PCA) and distance difference matrices are used to validate some such ideas about the conformational differences between 291 myoglobin structures from sperm whale, horse and pig. Almost all of the horse and pig structures form compact PCA clusters with only minor coordinate differences and outliers that are easily explained. The 222 whale structures form a few dense clusters with multiple outliers. A few whale outliers with a prominent distortion of the GH loop are very similar to the cluster of horse structures, which all have a similar GH-loop distortion apparently owing to intermolecular crystal lattice hydrogen bonds to the GH loop from residues near the distal histidine His64. The variations of the GH-loop coordinates in the whale structures are likely to be owing to the observed alternative intermolecular crystal lattice bond, with the change to the GH loop distorting bonds correlated with the binding of specific ‘unusual’ ligands. Such an alternative intermolecular bond is not observed in horse myoglobins, obliterating any correlation with the ligands. Intermolecular bonds do not usually cause significant coordinate differences and cannot be validated as their universal cause. Most of the native-like whale myoglobin structure outliers can be correlated with a few specific factors. However, these factors do not always lead to coordinate differences beyond the previously determined uncertainty

  17. Regulation of TRAIL receptor expression by β-catenin in colorectal tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalving, M.; Heijink, D. M.; Koornstra, J. J.; Boersma-van Ek, W.; Zwart, N.; Wesseling, Johannes; Sluiter, W. J.; de Vries, E.G.E.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; de Jong, S.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL receptors is regulated, at least in part, by beta-catenin. We show that beta-catenin co-localizes with DR4/5 in human and mouse colorectal tumours and that downregulation of beta-catenin in cell line models reduces TRAIL receptor expression and TRAIL sensitivity

  18. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological c

  19. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological c

  20. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological

  1. Gut microbiota regulates NKG2D ligand expression on intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Holm, Thomas L.; Krych, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are one of a few cell types in the body with constitutive surface expression of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands, although the magnitude of ligand expression by IECs varies. Here, we investigated whether the gut microbiota regulates the NKG2D ligand...

  2. Lateral Thinking: How Histone Modifications Regulate Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Moyra; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The DNA of each cell is wrapped around histone octamers, forming so-called 'nucleosomal core particles'. These histone proteins have tails that project from the nucleosome and many residues in these tails can be post-translationally modified, influencing all DNA-based processes, including chromatin compaction, nucleosome dynamics, and transcription. In contrast to those present in histone tails, modifications in the core regions of the histones had remained largely uncharacterised until recently, when some of these modifications began to be analysed in detail. Overall, recent work has shown that histone core modifications can not only directly regulate transcription, but also influence processes such as DNA repair, replication, stemness, and changes in cell state. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications, particularly those on the lateral surface of the nucleosome. This region is in direct contact with the DNA and is formed by the histone cores. We suggest that these lateral surface modifications represent a key insight into chromatin regulation in the cell. Therefore, lateral surface modifications form a key area of interest and a focal point of ongoing study in epigenetics.

  3. Differential regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) expression in schizophrenic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the alpha7* receptor, as measured by [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene expression in schizophrenic hippocampus. We examined the effects of smoking on CHRNA7 expression in the same tissue and find that smoking differentially regulates expression of both mRNA and protein for this gene. CHRNA7 mRNA and protein levels are significantly lower in schizophrenic nonsmokers compared to control nonsmokers and are brought to control levels in schizophrenic smokers. Sufficient protein but low surface expression of the alpha7* receptor, seen in the autoradiographic studies, suggests aberrant assembly or trafficking of the receptor.

  4. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  5. The expression and regulation of glucose transporters in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter proteins are involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In particular, the high expressions of sodium-glucose cotransporter and glucose transporter proteins in tumor cells show that these two transporters play a key role in tumor cell metabolism. Studying the crystal structure and conformation of human glucose transporter proteins has enabled the development of drugs based on specific binding sites, opening up a new path towards more effective cancer treatments. This mini review serves to summarize our existing understanding of the metabolic pathways of tumor cells, focusing on the roles of glucose transporter proteins.

  6. Daily rhythm and regulation of clock gene expression in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonneaux, V; Poirel, V-J; Garidou, M-L; Nguyen, D; Diaz-Rodriguez, E; Pévet, P

    2004-01-05

    Rhythms in pineal melatonin synthesis are controlled by the biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The endogenous clock oscillations rely upon genetic mechanisms involving clock genes coding for transcription factors working in negative and positive feedback loops. Most of these clock genes are expressed rhythmically in other tissues. Because of the peculiar role of the pineal gland in the photoneuroendocrine axis regulating biological rhythms, we studied whether clock genes are expressed in the rat pineal gland and how their expression is regulated.Per1, Per3, Cry2 and Cry1 clock genes are expressed in the pineal gland and their transcription is increased during the night. Analysis of the regulation of these pineal clock genes indicates that they may be categorized into two groups. Expression of Per1 and Cry2 genes shows the following features: (1) the 24 h rhythm persists, although damped, in constant darkness; (2) the nocturnal increase is abolished following light exposure or injection with a beta-adrenergic antagonist; and (3) the expression during daytime is stimulated by an injection with a beta-adrenergic agonist. In contrast, Per3 and Cry1 day and night mRNA levels are not responsive to adrenergic ligands (as previously reported for Per2) and daily expression of Per3 and Cry1 appears strongly damped or abolished in constant darkness. These data show that the expression of Per1 and Cry2 in the rat pineal gland is regulated by the clock-driven changes in norepinephrine, in a similar manner to the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase. The expression of Per3 and Cry1 displays a daily rhythm not regulated by norepinephrine, suggesting the involvement of another day/night regulated transmitter(s).

  7. Regulation of the type Mb sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter expression in the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin WANG; Yulong YIN

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) plays important roles in growth, development, bone mineralization, energy metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis, cell signaling, and acid-base regulation. The rate of intestinal absorption of Pi is a major determinant of Pi homeostasis. The type lib sodium- dependent Pi cotransporter (NaPi-Iib) is responsible for intestinal Pi absorption. Many physiological factors regulate the rate of Pi absorption via modulating the expression of NaPi-Iib in the intestine. In this review, we summarize the role of these factors in the regulation of NaPi-Iib expression in the intestine.

  8. Transcriptional regulator LsrB of Sinorhizobium meliloti positively regulates the expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guirong; Wang, Ying; Luo, Li

    2014-09-01

    Rhizobia induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on host legumes, which is important in agriculture and ecology. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by rhizobia is required for infection or bacteroid survival in host cells. Genes required for LPS biosynthesis have been identified in several Rhizobium species. However, the regulation of their expression is not well understood. Here, Sinorhizobium meliloti LsrB, a member of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, was found to be involved in LPS biosynthesis by positively regulating the expression of the lrp3-lpsCDE operon. An lsrB in-frame deletion mutant displayed growth deficiency, sensitivity to the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate, and acidic pH compared to the parent strain. This mutant produced slightly less LPS due to lower expression of the lrp3 operon. Analysis of the transcriptional start sites of the lrp3 and lpsCDE gene suggested that they constitute one operon. The expression of lsrB was positively autoregulated. The promoter region of lrp3 was specifically precipitated by anti-LsrB antibodies in vivo. The promoter DNA fragment containing TN11A motifs was bound by the purified LsrB protein in vitro. These new findings suggest that S. meliloti LsrB is associated with LPS biosynthesis, which is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation on some ecotypes of alfalfa plants.

  9. Expression and Regulation of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Taeye, Bart M.; Morisseau, Christophe; Coyle, Julie; Covington, Joseph W.; Luria, Ayala; Yang, Jun; Murphy, Sheila B.; Friedman, David B.; Hammock, Bruce B.; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly important public health issue reaching epidemic proportions. Visceral obesity has been defined as an important element of the metabolic syndrome and expansion of the visceral fat mass has been shown to contribute to the development of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. To identify novel contributors to cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities in obesity, we analyzed the adipose proteome and identified soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in the epididymal fat pad from C57BL/6J mice that received either a regular diet or a “western diet.” sEH was synthesized in adipocytes and expression levels increased upon differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although normalized sEH mRNA and protein levels did not differ in the fat pads from mice receiving a regular or a “western diet,” total adipose sEH activity was higher in the obese mice, even after normalization for body weight. Furthermore, peroxisome proliferator–activated recetor γ(PPARγ) agonists increased the expression of sEH in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes in vitro and in adipose tissue in vivo. Considering the established role for sEH in inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism, and the suggested involvement of sEH in the development of type 2 diabetes, our study has identified adipose sEH as a potential novel therapeutic target that might affect the development of metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities in obesity. PMID:19644452

  10. Regulation of Raoultella terrigena comb.nov. phytase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Marcela; González, Aracely; Bastarrachea, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Phytases catalyze the release of phosphate from phytate (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) to inositol polyphosphates. Raoultella terrigena comb.nov. phytase activity is known to increase markedly after cells reach the stationary phase. In this study, phytase activity measurements made on single batch cultures indicated that specific enzyme activity was subject to catabolite repression. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) showed a positive effect in expression during exponential growth and a negative effect during stationary phase. RpoS exhibited the opposite effect during both growth phases; the induction to stationary phase decreased twofold in the rpoS::Tn10 mutant, but the effect of RpoS was not clearly determined. Two phy::MudI1734 mutants, MW49 and MW52, were isolated. These formed small colonies in comparison with the MW25 parent strain when plated on Luria-Bertani (LB) or LB supplemented with glucose. They did not grow in minimal media or under anaerobiosis, but did grow aerobically on LB and LB glucose at a lower rate than did MW25. The beta-galactosidase activity level in these mutants increased three to four fold during stationary growth in LB glucose and during anaerobiosis. Addition of cAMP during the exponential growth of MW52 on LB glucose provoked a decrease in beta-galactosidase activity during the stationary phase, confirming its negative effect on phytase expression during stationary growth.

  11. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  12. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue

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    Xue Bofu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27, a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-β signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBPα/β, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory

  13. MicroRNA29a regulates the expression of the nuclear oncogene Ski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichler, Sabine; Illmer, Thomas; Roemhild, Josephine; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Stiewe, Thorsten; Neubauer, Andreas

    2011-08-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate growth and differentiation. miRNAs are frequently located at cancer-specific fragile sites in the human genome, such as chromosome 7q. The nuclear oncogene SKI is up-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with -7/del7q. Here we asked whether loss of miRNAs on chromosome 7q may explain this up-regulation. miR-29a expression was found to be down-regulated in AML with -7/del7q. Forced expression of miR-29a down-regulated Ski and its target gene, Nr-CAM, whereas miR-29a inhibition induced Ski expression. Luciferase assays validated a functional binding site for miR-29a in the 3' untranslated region of SKI. Finally, in samples of AML patients, we observed an inverse correlation of Ski and miR-29a expression, respectively. In conclusion, up-regulation of Ski in AML with -7/del7q is caused by loss of miR-29a. miR-29a may therefore function as an important tumor suppressor in AML by restraining expression of the SKI oncogene.

  14. MiR-200c regulates Noxa expression and sensitivity to proteasomal inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mikael; Haneklaus, Moritz; Harada, Masako; Grandér, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic p53 target Noxa is a BH3-only protein that antagonizes the function of selected anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. While much is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of Noxa, its posttranscriptional regulation remains relatively unstudied. In this study, we therefore investigated whether Noxa is regulated by microRNAs. Using a screen combining luciferase reporters, bioinformatic target prediction analysis and microRNA expression profiling, we identified miR-200c as a negative regulator of Noxa expression. MiR-200c was shown to repress basal expression of Noxa, as well as Noxa expression induced by various stimuli, including proteasomal inhibition. Luciferase reporter experiments furthermore defined one miR-200c target site in the Noxa 3'UTR that is essential for this direct regulation. In spite of the miR-200c:Noxa interaction, miR-200c overexpression led to increased sensitivity to the clinically used proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib in several cell lines. This apparently contradictory finding was reconciled by the fact that in cells devoid of Noxa expression, miR-200c overexpression had an even more pronounced positive effect on apoptosis induced by proteasomal inhibition. Together, our data define miR-200c as a potentiator of bortezomib-induced cell death. At the same time, we show that miR-200c is a novel negative regulator of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa.

  15. MiR-200c regulates Noxa expression and sensitivity to proteasomal inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Lerner

    Full Text Available The pro-apoptotic p53 target Noxa is a BH3-only protein that antagonizes the function of selected anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. While much is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of Noxa, its posttranscriptional regulation remains relatively unstudied. In this study, we therefore investigated whether Noxa is regulated by microRNAs. Using a screen combining luciferase reporters, bioinformatic target prediction analysis and microRNA expression profiling, we identified miR-200c as a negative regulator of Noxa expression. MiR-200c was shown to repress basal expression of Noxa, as well as Noxa expression induced by various stimuli, including proteasomal inhibition. Luciferase reporter experiments furthermore defined one miR-200c target site in the Noxa 3'UTR that is essential for this direct regulation. In spite of the miR-200c:Noxa interaction, miR-200c overexpression led to increased sensitivity to the clinically used proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib in several cell lines. This apparently contradictory finding was reconciled by the fact that in cells devoid of Noxa expression, miR-200c overexpression had an even more pronounced positive effect on apoptosis induced by proteasomal inhibition. Together, our data define miR-200c as a potentiator of bortezomib-induced cell death. At the same time, we show that miR-200c is a novel negative regulator of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa.

  16. Regulation of hepatic gene expression by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallim, T; Salter, A M

    2010-01-01

    Diets rich in saturated fatty acids have long been associated with increased plasma cholesterol concentrations and hence increased risk of cardiovascular disease. More recently, they have also been suggested to promote the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While there is now considerable evidence to suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids exert many of their effects through regulating the activity of transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, sterol regulatory binding proteins (SREBPs) and liver X receptor, our understanding of how saturated fatty acids act is still limited. Here we review the potential mechanisms whereby saturated fatty acids modulate hepatic lipid metabolism thereby impacting on the synthesis, storage and secretion of lipids. Evidence is presented that their effects are, at least partly, mediated through modulation of the activity of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease.

  18. Environmental Contaminants and microRNA Regulation: Transcription Factors as Regulators of Toxicant-Altered microRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollome, James; Martin, Elizabeth; Sethupathy, Praveen; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding mRNA transcripts and inhibiting translation and/or inducing degradation of the associated transcripts. Expression levels of miRNAs have been shown to be altered in response to environmental toxicants, thus impacting cellular function and influencing disease risk. Transcription factors (TFs) are known to be altered in response to environmental toxicants and play a critical role in the regulation of miRNA expression. To date, environmentally-responsive TFs that are important for regulating miRNAs remain understudied. In a state-of-the-art analysis, we utilized in silico bioinformatic analysis to characterize potential transcriptional regulators of environmentally-responsive miRNAs. Using the miRStart database, genomic sequences of promoter regions for all available human miRNAs (n=847) were identified and promoter regions were defined as −1000/+500 base pairs from the transcription start site. Subsequently, the promoter region sequences of environmentally-responsive miRNAs (n=128) were analyzed using enrichment analysis to determine overrepresented TF binding sites (TFBS). While most (56/73) TFs differed across environmental contaminants, a set of 17 TFs was enriched for promoter binding among miRNAs responsive to numerous environmental contaminants. Of these, one TF was common to miRNAs altered by the majority of environmental contaminants, namely SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A, member 3 (SMARCA3). These identified TFs represent candidate common transcriptional regulators of miRNAs perturbed by environmental toxicants. PMID:27292125

  19. Expression and Location of Glucose-regulated Protein 78 in Testis and Epididymis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78/BiP/HSPA5 in spermatogenesis and its expression and location in the testis and epididymis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect GRP78 location and expression in the testis and epididymis. Results: Glucose-regulated protein 78 was observed in spermatocytes, round spermatids and interstitial cells of the testis and in principal cells of the epididymis. Glucose-regulated protein 78 was first detected in the rat testis at postnatal day 14. Thereafter, the protein level increased gradually with age and was maintained at a high and stable state after postnatal day 28. In the rat, GRP78 was expressed in the principal cells but not in clear cells of the epididymis. Conclusion: Glucose-regulated protein 78 participates in the process of spermatogenesis.

  20. Regulation of glomerular heparanase expression by aldosterone, angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, Mabel J; Waanders, Femke; Rops, Angelique L; Kramer, Andrea B; van Goor, Harry; Berden, Jo H; Navis, Gerjan; van der Vlag, Johan

    2009-09-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) provides renoprotection in adriamycin nephropathy (AN), along with a decrease in overexpression of glomerular heparanase. Angiotensin II (AngII) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate heparanase expression in vivo. However, it is unknown whether this is also the case for aldosterone. Therefore, we further assessed the role of aldosterone, AngII and ROS in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression. Six weeks after the induction of AN, rats were treated with vehicle (n = 8), lisinopril (75 mg/L, n = 10), spironolactone (3.3 mg/day, n = 12) or the combination of lisinopril and spironolactone (n = 14) for 12 weeks. Age-matched healthy rats served as controls (n = 6). After 18 weeks, renal heparanase and heparan sulfate (HS) expression were examined by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of aldosterone, AngII and ROS on heparanase expression in cultured podocytes was determined. Treatment with lisinopril, spironolactone or their combination significantly blunted the increased glomerular heparanase expression and restored the decreased HS expression in the GBM. Addition of aldosterone to cultured podocytes resulted in a significantly increased heparanase mRNA and protein expression, which could be inhibited by spironolactone. Heparanase mRNA and protein expression in podocytes were also significantly increased after stimulation with AngII or ROS. Our in vivo and in vitro results show that not only AngII and ROS, but also aldosterone is involved in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression.

  1. Identification of Novel Regulators of atonal Expression in the Developing Drosophila Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melicharek, David; Shah, Arpit; DiStefano, Ginnene; Gangemi, Andrew J.; Orapallo, Andrew; Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D.; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Atonal is a Drosophila proneural protein required for the proper formation of the R8 photoreceptor cell, the founding photoreceptor cell in the developing retina. Proper expression and refinement of the Atonal protein is essential for the proper formation of the Drosophila adult eye. In vertebrates, expression of transcription factors orthologous to Drosophila Atonal (MATH5/Atoh7, XATH5, and ATH5) and their progressive restriction are also involved in specifying the retinal ganglion cell, the founding neural cell type in the mammalian retina. Thus, identifying factors that are involved in regulating the expression of Atonal during development are important to fully understand how retinal neurogenesis is accomplished. We have performed a chemical mutagenesis screen for autosomal dominant enhancers of a loss-of-function atonal eye phenotype. We report here the identification of five genes required for proper Atonal expression, three of which are novel regulators of Atonal expression in the Drosophila retina. We characterize the role of the daughterless, kismet, and roughened eye genes on atonal transcriptional regulation in the developing retina and show that each gene regulates atonal transcription differently within the context of retinal development. Our results provide additional insights into the regulation of Atonal expression in the developing Drosophila retina. PMID:18832354

  2. Uterine Micro-Environment and Estrogen-Dependent Regulation of Osteopontin Expression in Mouse Blastocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhen Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER. Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  3. Meis1 regulates Foxn4 expression during retinal progenitor cell differentiation

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    Mohammed M. Islam

    2013-09-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box N4 (Foxn4 is a key regulator in a variety of biological processes during development. In particular, Foxn4 plays an essential role in the genesis of horizontal and amacrine neurons from neural progenitors in the vertebrate retina. Although the functions of Foxn4 have been well established, the transcriptional regulation of Foxn4 expression during progenitor cell differentiation remains unclear. Here, we report that an evolutionarily conserved 129 bp noncoding DNA fragment (Foxn4CR4.2 or CR4.2, located ∼26 kb upstream of Foxn4 transcription start site, functions as a cis-element for Foxn4 regulation. CR4.2 directs gene expression in Foxn4-positive cells, primarily in progenitors, differentiating horizontal and amacrine cells. We further determined that the gene regulatory activity of CR4.2 is modulated by Meis1 binding motif, which is bound and activated by Meis1 transcription factor. Deletion of the Meis1 binding motif or knockdown of Meis1 expression abolishes the gene regulatory activity of CR4.2. In addition, knockdown of Meis1 expression diminishes the endogenous Foxn4 expression and affects cell lineage development. Together, we demonstrate that CR4.2 and its interacting Meis1 transcription factor play important roles in regulating Foxn4 expression during early retinogenesis. These findings provide new insights into molecular mechanisms that govern gene regulation in retinal progenitors and specific cell lineage development.

  4. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-08

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016.

  5. NDRG2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma adhesion, migration and invasion by regulating CD24 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yurong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of most hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients is poor due to the high metastatic rate of the disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC metastasis is extremely urgent. The role of CD24 and NDRG2 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, has not yet been explored in HCC. Methods The mRNA and protein expression of CD24 and NDRG2 was analyzed in MHCC97H, Huh7 and L-02 cells. Changes in cell adhesion, migration and invasion were detected by up- or down-regulating NDRG2 by adenovirus or siRNA. The expression pattern of NDRG2 and CD24 in HCC tissues and the relationship between NDRG2 and HCC clinical features was analyzed by immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. Results NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with malignancy in HCC. NDRG2 exerted anti-tumor activity by regulating CD24, a molecule that mediates cell-cell interaction, tumor proliferation and adhesion. NDRG2 up-regulation decreased CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. By contrast, NDRG2 down-regulation enhanced CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 50 human HCC clinical specimens showed a strong correlation between NDRG2 down-regulation and CD24 overexpression (P = 0.04. In addition, increased frequency of NDRG2 down-regulation was observed in patients with elevated AFP serum level (P = 0.006, late TNM stage (P = 0.009, poor differentiation grade (P = 0.002, tumor invasion (P = 0.004 and recurrence (P = 0.024. Conclusions Our findings indicate that NDRG2 and CD24 regulate HCC adhesion, migration and invasion. The expression level of NDRG2 is closely related to the clinical features of HCC. Thus, NDRG2 plays an important physiological role in HCC metastasis.

  6. Regulation of gene expression mediating indeterminate muscle growth in teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammad, A K Shakur; Asaduzzaman, Md; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu

    2015-08-01

    Teleosts are unique among vertebrates due to their indeterminate muscle growth, i.e., continued production of neonatal muscle fibers until death. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this property is unknown. Here, we focused on the torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM2528-1, which is specifically expressed in neonatal muscle fibers produced by indeterminate muscle growth. We examined the flanking region of MYHM2528-1 through an in vivo reporter assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and identified a 2100 bp 5'-flanking sequence that contained sufficient promoter activity to allow specific gene expression. The effects of enhanced promoter activity were observed at the outer region of the fast muscle and the dorsal edge of slow muscle in zebrafish larvae. At the juvenile stage, the promoter was specifically activated in small diameter muscle fibers scattered throughout fast muscle and in slow muscle near the septum separating slow and fast muscles. This spatio-temporal promoter activity overlapped with known myogenic zones involved in teleost indeterminate muscle growth. A deletion mutant analysis revealed that the -2100 to -600 bp 5'flanking sequence of MYHM2528-1 is essential for promoter activity. This region contains putative binding sites for several representative myogenesis-related transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), a transcription activator involved in regeneration of mammalian adult skeletal muscle. A significant reduction in the promoter activity of the MYHM2528-1 deletion constructs was observed in accordance with a reduction in the number of these binding sites, suggesting the involvement of specific transcription factors in indeterminate muscle growth.

  7. Metabolic Impacts of Using Nitrogen and Copper-Regulated Promoters to Regulate Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Beecher, Consuelo N; Wang, Kang; Larive, Cynthia K; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-07-20

    The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is a long-studied eukaryotic microbial system amenable to heterologous expression of native and foreign proteins. However, relatively few highly tunable promoters have been developed for this species. In this study, we compare the tcu-1 and nit-6 promoters for controlled expression of a GFP reporter gene in N. crassa. Although the copper-regulated tcu-1 has been previously characterized, this is the first investigation exploring nitrogen-controlled nit-6 for expression of heterologous genes in N. crassa. We determined that fragments corresponding to 1.5-kb fragments upstream of the tcu-1 and nit-6 open reading frames are needed for optimal repression and expression of GFP mRNA and protein. nit-6 was repressed using concentrations of glutamine from 2 to 20 mM and induced in medium containing 0.5-20 mM nitrate as the nitrogen source. Highest levels of expression were achieved within 3 hr of induction for each promoter and GFP mRNA could not be detected within 1 hr after transfer to repressing conditions using the nit-6 promoter. We also performed metabolic profiling experiments using proton NMR to identify changes in metabolite levels under inducing and repressing conditions for each promoter. The results demonstrate that conditions used to regulate tcu-1 do not significantly change the primary metabolome and that the differences between inducing and repressing conditions for nit-6 can be accounted for by growth under nitrate or glutamine as a nitrogen source. Our findings demonstrate that nit-6 is a tunable promoter that joins tcu-1 as a choice for regulation of gene expression in N. crassa.

  8. TET-catalyzed 5-hydroxymethylcytosine regulates gene expression in differentiating colonocytes and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher G; Mariani, Christopher J; Wu, Feng; Meckel, Katherine; Butun, Fatma; Chuang, Alice; Madzo, Jozef; Bissonette, Marc B; Kwon, John H; Godley, Lucy A

    2015-12-03

    The formation of differentiated cell types from pluripotent progenitors involves epigenetic regulation of gene expression. DNA hydroxymethylation results from the enzymatic oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) 5-mC dioxygenase enzymes. Previous work has mapped changes in 5-mC during differentiation of intestinal stem cells. However, whether or not 5-hmC regulates colonocyte differentiation is unknown. Here we show that 5-hmC regulates gene expression during colonocyte differentiation and controls gene expression in human colon cancers. Genome-wide profiling of 5-hmC during in vitro colonic differentiation demonstrated that 5-hmC is gained at highly expressed and induced genes and is associated with intestinal transcription factor binding sites, including those for HNF4A and CDX2. TET1 induction occurred during differentiation, and TET1 knockdown altered gene expression and inhibited barrier formation of colonocytes. We find that the 5-hmC distribution in primary human colonocytes parallels the distribution found in differentiated cells in vitro, and that gene-specific 5-hmC changes in human colon cancers are directly correlated with changes in gene expression. Our results support a model in which 5-hmC regulates differentiation of adult human intestine and 5-hmC alterations contribute to the disrupted gene expression in colon cancer.

  9. Microarray and Proteomic Analysis of Brassinosteroid- and Gibberellin-Regulated Gene and Protein Expression in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiao Yang; Setsuko Komatsu

    2004-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) are two groups of plant growth regulators essential for normal plant growth and development. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism by which BR and GA regulate the growth and development of plants, especially the monocot plant rice, it is necessary to identify and analyze more genes and proteins that are regulated by them. With the availability of draft sequences of two major types, japonica and indica rice, it has become possible to analyze expression changes of genes and proteins at genome scale. In this review, we summarize rice functional genomic research by using microarray and proteomic approaches and our recent research results focusing on the comparison of cDNA microarray and proteomic analyses of BR- and GA-regulated gene and protein expression in rice. We believe our findings have important implications for understanding the mechanism by which BR and GA regulate the growth and development of rice.

  10. CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression in the striatum: Association with corticostriatal circuits and developmental regulation

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    Vincent eVan Waes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits mediate various aspects of goal-directed behavior and are critically important for basal ganglia-related disorders. Activity in these circuits is regulated by the endocannabinoid system via stimulation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are highly expressed in projection neurons and select interneurons of the striatum, but expression levels vary considerably between different striatal regions (functional domains. We investigated CB1 receptor expression within specific corticostriatal circuits by mapping CB1 mRNA levels in striatal sectors defined by their cortical inputs in rats. We also assessed changes in CB1 expression in the striatum during development. Our results show that CB1 expression is highest in juveniles (P25 and then progressively decreases towards adolescent (P40 and adult (P70 levels. At every age, CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed in sensorimotor striatal sectors, with considerably lower expression in associative and limbic sectors. Moreover, for most corticostriatal circuits there is an inverse relationship between cortical and striatal expression levels. Thus, striatal sectors with high CB1 expression (sensorimotor sectors tend to receive inputs from cortical areas with low expression, while striatal sectors with low expression (associative/limbic sectors receive inputs from cortical regions with higher expression (medial prefrontal cortex. In so far as CB1 mRNA levels reflect receptor function, our findings suggest differential CB1 signaling between different developmental stages and between sensorimotor and associative/limbic circuits. The regional distribution of CB1 receptor expression in the striatum further suggests that, in sensorimotor sectors, CB1 receptors mostly regulate GABA inputs from local axon collaterals of projection neurons, whereas in associative/limbic sectors, CB1 regulation of GABA inputs from interneurons and glutamate inputs may be more important.

  11. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates Expression of Thioredoxin-interacting Protein (TXNIP) in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter ac...

  12. Chinese American immigrant parents' emotional expression in the family: Relations with parents' cultural orientations and children's emotion-related regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H; Zhou, Qing; Main, Alexandra; Lee, Erica H

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined 2 measures of Chinese American immigrant parents' emotional expression in the family context: self-reported emotional expressivity and observed emotional expression during a parent-child interaction task. Path analyses were conducted to examine the concurrent associations between measures of emotional expression and (a) parents' American and Chinese cultural orientations in language proficiency, media use, and social affiliation domains, and (b) parents' and teachers' ratings of children's emotion-related regulation. Results suggested that cultural orientations were primarily associated with parents' self-reported expressivity (rather than observed emotional expression), such that higher American orientations were generally associated with higher expressivity. Although parents' self-reported expressivity was only related to their own reports of children's regulation, parents' observed emotional expression was related to both parents' and teachers' reports of children's regulation. These results suggest that self-reported expressivity and observed emotional expression reflect different constructs and have differential relations to parents' cultural orientations and children's regulation.

  13. Regulation of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 and isochorismate synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia J R Hunter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs function in anti-viral silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. Salicylic acid (SA, an important defensive signal, increases RDR1 gene expression, suggesting that RDR1 contributes to SA-induced virus resistance. In Nicotiana attenuata RDR1 also regulates plant-insect interactions and is induced by another important signal, jasmonic acid (JA. Despite its importance in defense RDR1 regulation has not been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis, SA-induced RDR1 expression was dependent on 'NON-EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1', indicating regulation involves the same mechanism controlling many other SA- defense-related genes, including pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1. Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1 is required for SA biosynthesis. In defensive signal transduction RDR1 lies downstream of ICS1. However, supplying exogenous SA to ics1-mutant plants did not induce RDR1 or PR1 expression to the same extent as seen in wild type plants. Analysing ICS1 gene expression using transgenic plants expressing ICS1 promoter:reporter gene (β-glucuronidase constructs and by measuring steady-state ICS1 transcript levels showed that SA positively regulates ICS1. In contrast, ICS2, which is expressed at lower levels than ICS1, is unaffected by SA. The wound-response hormone JA affects expression of Arabidopsis RDR1 but jasmonate-induced expression is independent of CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1, which conditions expression of many other JA-responsive genes. Transiently increased RDR1 expression following tobacco mosaic virus inoculation was due to wounding and was not a direct effect of infection. RDR1 gene expression was induced by ethylene and by abscisic acid (an important regulator of drought resistance. However, rdr1-mutant plants showed normal responses to drought. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RDR1 is regulated by a much broader range of phytohormones than previously thought

  14. Growth hormone regulation of rat liver gene expression assessed by SSH and microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardmo, Cissi; Swerdlow, Harold; Mode, Agneta

    2002-04-25

    The sexually dimorphic secretion of growth hormone (GH) that prevails in the rat leads to a sex-differentiated expression of GH target genes, particularly in the liver. We have used subtractive suppressive hybridization (SSH) to search for new target genes induced by the female-characteristic, near continuous, pattern of GH secretion. Microarrays and dot-blot hybridizations were used in an attempt to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 173 unique SSH clones, 41 could be verified as differentially expressed. Among these, we identified 17 known genes not previously recognized as differentially regulated by the sex-specific GH pattern. Additional SSH clones may also represent genes subjected to sex-specific GH regulation since only transcripts abundantly expressed could be verified. Optimized analyses, specific for each gene, are required to fully characterize the degree of differential expression.

  15. PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF THE REGULATION OF EXPRESSION MILK PROTEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Bulla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For the genetic improvement of milk composition and milk yield, both the typing of different protein variants and knowledge about the regulation of expression of the different milk protein genes are important. Some of the processing properties of milk are dependent on the milk composition. Information about the DNA sequence and genes involved in the expression of the milk protein genes,therefore,is big importance for genetic improvement of these traits in animals breeding programmes.In recent years more data has become available concerning the regulation of expression of the milk protein genes and as might have been expected from the complex multihormonal control of these genes it appears to be rather complex. Although several mammary gland specific factors that play a role in expression of some of these genes have been identified,none of these factors has been shown to be involved in the expression of all or the majority of the milk protein genes.

  16. Intronic regulation of Aire expression by Jmjd6 for self-tolerance induction in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Toyoshi; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Sato, Tetsuya; Uruno, Takehito; Duan, Xuefeng; Tomino, Takahiro; Harada, Yosuke; Watanabe, Mayuki; Wang, Yuqing; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Suyama, Mikita; Yoshinori, Fukui

    2015-11-04

    The thymus has spatially distinct microenvironments, the cortex and the medulla, where the developing T-cells are selected to mature or die through the interaction with thymic stromal cells. To establish the immunological self in the thymus, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) express diverse sets of tissue-specific self-antigens (TSAs). This ectopic expression of TSAs largely depends on the transcriptional regulator Aire, yet the mechanism controlling Aire expression itself remains unknown. Here, we show that Jmjd6, a dioxygenase that catalyses lysyl hydroxylation of splicing regulatory proteins, is critical for Aire expression. Although Jmjd6 deficiency does not affect abundance of Aire transcript, the intron 2 of Aire gene is not effectively spliced out in the absence of Jmjd6, resulting in marked reduction of mature Aire protein in mTECs and spontaneous development of multi-organ autoimmunity in mice. These results highlight the importance of intronic regulation in controlling Aire protein expression.

  17. A conserved enhancer element differentially regulates developmental expression of CD5 in B and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Robert; Fiering, Steven; Wortis, Henry H

    2010-12-15

    We previously identified an enhancer element upstream of the mouse cd5 gene that was required in reporter assays for the induction of cd5 promoter activity by BCR cross-linking. This element is highly conserved in placental mammals. To determine its physiological role, we have now generated mice with a targeted deletion of the enhancer. The result is the loss of CD5 expression in peritoneal and splenic B-1a cells of adult mice and an inability to induce CD5 by cross-linking of the BCR on splenic B-2 cells. Surprisingly, CD5 expression on B-1a cells of neonatal mice was only minimally compromised. Cd5 enhancer deletion also had only a modest effect on CD5 expression in the T lineage. Thus, this enhancer provides age- and tissue-specific regulation of CD5 expression and is an example of the utilization of different modes of regulation of expression in T and B cells.

  18. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  19. WISP-1 positively regulates angiogenesis by controlling VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Tzeng, Huey-En; Huang, Chun-Yin; Huang, Yuan-Li; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Wang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Po-Chuan; Chang, An-Chen; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-04-13

    In recent years, much research has focused on the role of angiogenesis in osteosarcoma, which occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults. The vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) pathway is the key regulator of angiogenesis and in osteosarcoma. VEGF-A expression has been recognized as a prognostic marker in angiogenesis. Aberrant WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein-1 (WISP-1) expression is associated with various cancers. However, the function of WISP-1 in osteosarcoma angiogenesis is poorly understood. We demonstrate a positive correlation between WISP-1 and VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma. Moreover, we show that WISP-1 promotes VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma cells, subsequently inducing human endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) migration and tube formation. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α signaling pathways were activated after WISP-1 stimulation, while FAK, JNK, and HIF-1α inhibitors or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished WISP-1-induced VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed down-regulation of microRNA-381 (miR-381) in WISP-1-induced VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis. Our findings reveal that WISP-1 enhances VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis through the FAK/JNK/HIF-1α signaling pathways, as well as via down-regulation of miR-381 expression. WISP-1 may be a promising target in osteosarcoma angiogenesis.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana G2-LIKE FLAVONOID REGULATOR and BRASSINOSTEROID ENHANCED EXPRESSION1 are low-temperature regulators of flavonoid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Antonios; Döll, Stefanie; Nichelmann, Lars; Bilger, Wolfgang; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoid synthesis is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level through the MYB-basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-WD40 (MBW) (MYB: transcription factor of the myeloblastosis protein family, WD40: tanscription factor with a short structural motif of 40 amino acids which terminates in an aspartic acid-tryptophan dipeptide) complex, and responds to both environmental and developmental stimuli. Although the developmental regulation of flavonoid accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been examined in great detail, the response of the flavonoid synthesis pathway to abiotic stress (particularly low temperature) remains unclear. A screen of a Dissociation element (Ds) transposon-induced mutation collection identified two lines which exhibited an altered profile of phenylpropanoid accumulation following exposure to low-temperature stress. One of the mutated genes (BRASSINOSTEROID ENHANCED EXPRESSION1 (BEE1)) encoded a brassinosteroid enhanced expression transcription factor, while the other (G2-LIKE FLAVONOID REGULATOR (GFR)) encoded a G2-like flavonoid regulator. Phenylpropanoid-targeted analysis was performed using high-performance LC-MS, and gene expression analysis using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. In both mutants, the accumulation of quercetins and scopolin was reduced under low-temperature growing conditions, whereas that of anthocyanin was increased. BEE1 and GFR were both shown to negatively regulate anthocyanin accumulation by inhibiting anthocyanin synthesis genes via the suppression of the bHLH (TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) and GLABROUS3 (GL3)) and/or the MYB (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENTS2 (PAP2)) components of the MBW complex. Our results provide new insight into the regulatory control of phenylpropanoid metabolism at low temperatures, and reveal that BEE1 and GFR act as important components of the signal transduction chain. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Regulation of chick early B-cell factor-1 gene expression in feather development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed; Awad, Ashraf; Shukry, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    The chick Ebf1 (early B-cell factor-1) gene is a member of a novel family of helix loop helix transcription factors. The expression profile, regulation and significance of this gene have been extensively studied in lymphatic, nervous, adipose and muscular tissues. However, cEbf1 expression, regulation and function in the feather of chick embryo have not yet been investigated. cEbf1 expression was first detected throughout the mesenchymal core of some few feather placodes (D7-D7.5). After feathers became mature and grew distally (D9 and D10), the mesenchymal expression of cEbf1 became confined to the caudal margin of the proximal half of all formed feather buds. Because this dynamic pattern of expression resembles that of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein and bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp4) plus the crucial role of these two major signals in feather development, we hypothesized that cEbf1 expression in the feather may be regulated by Shh and Bmp4. In a feather explant culture system, Shh signals are necessary to initiate and maintain cEbf1 expression in the posterior half of the feather bud, while Bmp4 is crucial for the initial cEbf1 expression in the anterior half of the feather bud. Inhibition of Shh, not only down-regulates cEbf1, but also changes the morphology of feather buds, which become irregular and fused. This is the first study to demonstrate that cEbf1 expression in the feather bud is under the control of Shh and Bmp4 signals and that expression may play a role in the normal development of feathers.

  2. Mendelian and non-Mendelian regulation of gene expression in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA-based sequencing (RNA-seq allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL "hotspots," each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in

  3. Static compression regulates OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells via the CAMK II pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Jianru

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This study aimed to investigate the potential role of CAMK II pathway in the compression-regulated OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs. Material and Methods The PDL tissue model was developed by 3-D culturing human PDLCs in a thin sheet of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds, which was subjected to static compression of 25 g/cm2 for 3, 6 and 12 h, with or without treatment of KN-93. After that, the expression of OPG, RANKL and NFATC2 was investigated through real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Results After static compression, the NFATC2 and RANKL expression was significantly up-regulated, while partially suppressed by KN-93 for 6 and 12 h respectively. The OPG expression was significantly down-regulated by compression in 3 h, started to elevate in 6 h, and significantly up-regulated in 12 h. The up-regulation after 12 h was significantly suppressed by KN-93. Conclusions Long-term static compression increases OPG expression in PDLCs, at least partially, via the CAMK II pathway.

  4. λ N gene expression regulated by translation termination in ribosome L24 mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Muyang; (李沐阳); HU; Qirui; (胡其锐); XUAN; Jinsong; (宣劲松); DENG; Daiyong; (邓代永); WENG; Manli; (翁曼丽)

    2003-01-01

    Besides transcription regulation, gene expression is also regulated at translation level. Although translation regulation is mainly mediated by translation initiation, an abundance of evidence shows that the termination phase of translation is also important for gene expression. The expression of λN gene is down regulated at translation level in L24 mutant, however the precise mechanism still remains unknown. We report here that in an L24 mutant strain, the expression of lac-λN and GST-λN is decreased to 25% and 50% of that in wild type T83 strain respectively. Strikingly, the yield of GST-λN fusion protein in L24 mutant can be restored to the level as in T83 wild type strain by changing the two codons upstream λN stop codon. These findings imply that the stop codon and its context are involved in the translation regulation. The possible reason is that the translation termination complex containing L24 mutant ribosome may not dissociate properly in stop code region. This failure of disengagement from mRNA will slow down the process of following ribosomes, and consequently decrease the efficiency of λN gene expression.

  5. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Aizawa, Ryo; Miyazono, Agasa; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Morimura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2011-07-15

    POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-α-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-α in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-α-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-α inhibits POEM expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-α.

  6. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawatari Kazuaki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH, which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. Results The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Conclusion Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  7. Expression of neuropeptide W in rat stomach mucosa: regulation by nutritional status, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Jorge E; Bravo, Susana B; García-Rendueles, María E R; Ruth González, C; Garcés, Maria F; Cepeda, Libia A; Lage, Ricardo; Suárez, Miguel A; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-02-07

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) is a recently identified neuropeptide that binds to G-protein-coupled receptor 7 (GPR7) and 8 (GPR8). In rodent brain, NPW mRNA is confined to specific nuclei in hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem. Expression of NPW mRNA has also been confirmed in peripheral organs such as stomach. Several reports suggested that brain NPW is implicated in the regulation of energy and hormonal homeostasis, namely the adrenal and thyroid axes; however the precise physiological role and regulation of peripheral NPW remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of nutritional status on the regulation of NPW in stomach mucosa. Our results show that in this tissue, NPW mRNA and protein expression is negatively regulated by fasting and food restriction, in all the models we studied: males, females and pregnant females. Next, we examined the effect of glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones on NPW mRNA expression in the stomach mucosa. Our data showed that NPW expression is decreased in this tissue after glucocorticoid treatment or hyperthyroidism. Conversely, hypothyroidism induces a marked increase in the expression of NPW in rat stomach. Overall, these data indicate that stomach NPW is regulated by nutritional and hormonal status.

  8. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  9. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. (Univ. of Freiburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  11. Expression of neurexin and neuroligin in the enteric nervous system and their down-regulated expression levels in Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangye; Wang, Jian; Li, Aiwu; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Wentong; Cui, Xinhai; Wang, Kelai

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the expression levels of neurexins and neuroligins in the enteric nervous system (ENS) in Hirschsprung Disease (HSCR). Longitudinal muscles with adherent mesenteric plexus were obtained by dissection of the fresh gut wall of mice, guinea pigs, and humans. Double labeling of neurexin I and Hu (a neuron marker), neuroligin 1 and Hu, neurexin I and synaptophysin (a presynaptic marker), and neuroligin 1 and PSD95 (a postsynaptic marker) was performed by immunofluorescence staining. Images were merged to determine the relative localizations of the proteins. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in different segments of the ENS in HSCR were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Neurexin and neuroligin were detected in the mesenteric plexus of mice, guinea pigs, and humans with HSCR. Neurexin was located in the presynapse, whereas neuroligin was located in the postsynapse. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin were significant in the ganglionic colonic segment of HSCR, moderate in the transitional segment, and negative in the aganglionic colonic segment. The expressions of neurexin and neuroligin in the transitional segments were significantly down-regulated compared with the levels in the normal segments (P < 0.05). Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in ENS are significantly down-regulated in HSCR, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR.

  12. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pazos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART. Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18 were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta.

  13. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta. PMID:24744782

  14. Negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression in early eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Filas, Benjamen; Gunhaga, Lena; Beebe, David C

    2015-11-15

    Previous results have shown that Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling is essential for lens specification and differentiation. How BMP signals are regulated in the prospective lens ectoderm is not well defined. To address this issue we have modulated BMP activity in a chicken embryo pre-lens ectoderm explant assay, and also studied transgenic mice, in which the type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, are deleted from the prospective lens ectoderm. Our results show that chicken embryo pre-lens ectoderm cells express BMPs and require BMP signaling for lens specification in vitro, and that in vivo inhibition of BMP signals in the mouse prospective lens ectoderm interrupts lens placode formation and prevents lens invagination. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that BMP expression is negatively auto-regulated in the lens-forming ectoderm, decreasing when the tissue is exposed to exogenous BMPs and increasing when BMP signaling is prevented. In addition, eyes lacking BMP receptors in the prospective lens placode develop coloboma in the adjacent wild type optic cup. In these eyes, Bmp7 expression increases in the ventral optic cup and the normal dorsal-ventral gradient of BMP signaling in the optic cup is disrupted. Pax2 becomes undetectable and expression of Sfrp2 increases in the ventral optic cup, suggesting that increased BMP signaling alter their expression, resulting in failure to close the optic fissure. In summary, our results suggest that negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression is important to regulate early eye development.

  15. Regulation of Toll-like receptor 5 gene expression and function on mucosal dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Feng

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR 5 has been shown to maintain intestinal homeostasis and regulate host defense against enterobacterial infection. However, how TLR5 expression is regulated and its function in the intestine have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate that mucosal dendritic cells (DCs, but not splenic DCs, express high levels of TLR5 protein. Alternatively spliced Tlr5 transcripts were identified but it did not explain the selective expression of TLR5 on mucosal DCs. Treatment with various bacterial ligands downregulated BMDC TLR5 expression, while retinoic acid and host stromal cell-derived signals promoted TLR5 expression in a TGF-β-independent mechanism. Signaling through TLR5 restrained regulatory T (Treg cell generation, and accordingly, TLR5(-/- mice displayed increased frequencies of Foxp3(+ Treg cells in the intestinal lamina propria. Our data indicate that bacterial and host factors differentially regulate DC TLR5 expression. TLR5 signaling regulates immune responses towards the microbiota via modulation of the Treg/effector T cell balance.

  16. Evidence of alpha fluctuations in myoglobin's denaturation in the high temperature region: Average relaxation time from an Adam-Gibbs perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Quiroz, Luis; Garcia-Colin, Leopoldo S

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the relaxation time tau as a function of temperature T for myoglobin protein (Mb, PDB:1MBN) in the high temperature limit (T>T(g)=200K). The method is based on a modified version of the Adam-Gibbs theory (AG theory) for the glass transition in supercooled liquids and an implementation of differential geometry techniques. This modified version of the AG theory takes into account that the entropic component in protein's denaturation has two major sources: a configurational contribution DeltaS(c) due to the unfolding of the highly ordered native state N and a hydration contribution DeltaS(hyd) arising from the exposure of non-polar residues to direct contact with solvent polar molecules. Our results show that the configurational contribution DeltaS(c) is temperature-independent and one order of magnitude smaller than its hydration counterpart DeltaS(hyd) in the temperature range considered. The profile obtained for log tau(T) from T=200 K to T=300 K exhibits a non-Arrhenius behavior characteristic of alpha relaxation mechanisms in hydrated proteins and glassy systems. This result is in agreement with recent dielectric spectroscopy data obtained for hydrated myoglobin, where at least two fast relaxation processes in the high temperature limit have been observed. The connection between the relaxation process calculated here and the experimental results is outlined.

  17. Gene expression profiling of hormonal regulation related to the residual feed intake of Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Y M; Yang, Z; Wu, F; Han, Z Y; Wang, G L

    2015-09-11

    An accumulation of over a decade of research in cattle has shown that genetic selection for decreased residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between an animal's actual feed intake and its expected feed intake, is a viable option for improving feed efficiency and reducing the feed requirements of herds, thereby improving the profitability of cattle producers. Hormonal regulation is one of the most important factors in feed intake. To determine the relationship between hormones and feed efficiency, we performed gene expression profiling of jugular vein serum on hormonal regulation of Chinese Holstein cattle with low and high RFI coefficients. 857 differential expression genes (from 24683 genes) were found. Among these, 415 genes were up-regulated and 442 genes were down-regulated in the low RFI group. The gene ontology (GO) search revealed 6 significant terms and 64 genes associated with hormonal regulation, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) selected the adipocytokine signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the study indicated that the molecular expression of genes associated with hormonal regulation differs in dairy cows, depending on their RFI coefficients, and that these differences may be related to the molecular regulation of the leptin-NPY and insulin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariola, Emily; Gullone, Eleonora; Hughes, Elizabeth K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future…

  19. Vibrio cholerae utilizes direct sRNA regulation in expression of a biofilm matrix protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyan Song

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae biofilms contain exopolysaccharide and three matrix proteins RbmA, RbmC and Bap1. While much is known about exopolysaccharide regulation, little is known about the mechanisms by which the matrix protein components of biofilms are regulated. VrrA is a conserved, 140-nt sRNA of V. cholerae, whose expression is controlled by sigma factor σE. In this study, we demonstrate that VrrA negatively regulates rbmC translation by pairing to the 5' untranslated region of the rbmC transcript and that this regulation is not stringently dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq. These results point to VrrA as a molecular link between the σE-regulon and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. In addition, VrrA represents the first example of direct regulation of sRNA on biofilm matrix component, by-passing global master regulators.

  20. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  1. Regulation of osteoprotegerin expression by Notch signaling in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeeranan Manokawinchoke; Thanaphum Osathanon; Prasit Pavasant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of Notch signaling on osteoprotegerin(OPG)expression in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.Methods: Activation of Notch signaling was performed by seeding cells on Jagged1 immobilized surfaces. In other experiments, a g-secretase inhibitor was added to the culture medium to inhibit intracellular Notch signaling. OPG m RNA and protein were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Finally, publicly available microarray database analysis was performed using connection up- or down-regulation expression analysis of microarrays software.Results: Jagged1-treatment of HSC-4 cells enhanced HES1 and HEY1 m RNA expression, confirming the intracellular activation of Notch signaling. OPG m RNA and protein levels were significantly suppressed upon Jagged1 treatment. Correspondingly, HSC-4 cells treated with a g-secretase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of HES1 and HEY1 m RNA levels, and a marked increase in OPG protein expression was observed.These results implied that Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in HSC-4 cells.However, Jagged1 did not alter OPG expression in another human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line(HSC-5) or a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line(HN22).Conclusions: Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in an HSC-4 cell line and this mechanism could be cell line specific.

  2. Retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression in CW-CMS of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Sota; Komatsu, Setsuko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2007-02-01

    The CW-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line has the cytoplasm of Oryza rufipogon Griff, and mature pollen is morphologically normal under an optical microscope but lacks the ability to germinate; restorer gene Rf17 has been identified as restoring this ability. The difference between nuclear gene expression in mature anthers was compared for the CW-CMS line, [cms-CW] rf17rf17, and a maintainer line with normal cytoplasm of Oryza sativa L., [normal] rf17rf17. Using a 22-k rice oligoarray we detected 58 genes that were up-regulated more than threefold in the CW-CMS line. Expression in other organs was further investigated for 20 genes using RT-PCR. Five genes, including genes for alternative oxidase, were found to be preferentially expressed in [cms-CW] rf17rf17 but not in [normal] rf17rf17 or [cms-CW] Rf17Rf17. Such [cms-CW] rf17rf17-specific gene expression was only observed in mature anthers but not in leaves, stems, or roots, indicating the presence of anther-specific mitochondrial retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression, and that Rf17 has a role in restoring the ectopic gene expression. We also used a proteomic approach to discover the retrograde regulated proteins and identified six proteins that were accumulated differently. These results reveal organ-specific induced mitochondrial retrograde pathways affecting nuclear gene expression possibly related to CMS.

  3. Recent advances in therapeutic strategies that focus on the regulation of ion channel expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Susumu; Kito, Hiroaki; Hatano, Noriyuki; Muraki, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A number of different ion channel types are involved in cell signaling networks, and homeostatic regulatory mechanisms contribute to the control of ion channel expression. Profiling of global gene expression using microarray technology has recently provided novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the homeostatic and pathological control of ion channel expression. It has demonstrated that the dysregulation of ion channel expression is associated with the pathogenesis of neural, cardiovascular, and immune diseases as well as cancers. In addition to the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation of ion channels, potentially important evidence on the mechanisms controlling ion channel expression has recently been accumulated. The regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing is therefore a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of dominant-negative splicing disorders. Epigenetic modification plays a key role in various pathological conditions through the regulation of pluripotency genes. Inhibitors of pre-mRNA splicing and histone deacetyalase/methyltransferase have potential as potent therapeutic drugs for cancers and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, membrane-anchoring proteins, lysosomal and proteasomal degradation-related molecules, auxiliary subunits, and pharmacological agents alter the protein folding, membrane trafficking, and post-translational modifications of ion channels, and are linked to expression-defect channelopathies. In this review, we focused on recent insights into the transcriptional, spliceosomal, epigenetic, and proteasomal regulation of ion channel expression: Ca(2+) channels (TRPC/TRPV/TRPM/TRPA/Orai), K(+) channels (voltage-gated, KV/Ca(2+)-activated, KCa/two-pore domain, K2P/inward-rectifier, Kir), and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/TMEM16B). Furthermore, this review highlights expression of these ion channels in expression-defect channelopathies.

  4. Negative regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tooru M; Lew, Pei San; Luo, Yanming; Leckstrom, Arnold

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of glucose and insulin in the regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression and the role of hepatic Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression. To determine the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic Fto expression, levels of Fto mRNA in liver were compared between normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic, hypereglycemic/hyperinsulinemic, and hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice. To determine the direct effect of insulin on Fto expression, levels of Fto, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pase), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck) mRNA levels were compared between control and insulin-treated mouse liver tissues cultured ex vivo and immortalized mouse hepatocytes AML12. To determine the role of Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression, we examined the effect of enhanced Fto expression on G6pase and Pepck mRNA levels in AML12 cells. Fto mRNA levels were significantly reduced in hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic mice compared to normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice, while they were indistinguishable between hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice and normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice. Insulin treatment reduced Fto, G6pase, and Pepck mRNA levels compared to control vehicle treatment in both ex vivo cultured mouse liver tissues and AML12 cells. Enhanced Fto expression significantly increased G6pase and Pepck mRNA level in AML12 cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that hepatic Fto participates in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis possibly by mediating the inhibitory effect of glucose and insulin on gluconeogenic gene expression in liver. It is further suggested that impairments in nutritional and hormonal regulation of hepatic Fto expression may lead to impairments in glycemic control in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human identification from forensic materials by amplification of a human-specific sequence in the myoglobin gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Ono T; Miyaishi S; Yamamoto Y; Yoshitome K; Ishikawa T.; Ishizu H

    2001-01-01

    We developed a method for human identification of forensic biological materials by PCR-based detection of a human-specific sequence in exon 3 of the myoglobin gene. This human-specific DNA sequence was deduced from differences in the amino acid sequences of myoglobins between humans and other animal species. The new method enabled amplification of the target DNA fragment from 30 samples of human DNA, and the amplified sequences were identical with that already reported. Using this method, we ...

  6. Down-regulation of CDH1 is associated with expression of SNAI1 in colorectal adenomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Kroepil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Down-regulation of E-cadherin (CDH1 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT are considered critical events for invasion and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. Here we tested whether the important regulators of E-cadherin expression SNAI1 and TWIST1 are already detectable in human colorectal adenomas. METHODS: RNA was extracted from a set of randomly selected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE colorectal adenomas (n = 41 and normal colon mucosa (n = 10. Subsequently mRNA expression of CDH1, CDH2, SNAI1 and TWIST1 was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. CDH1 as well as SNAI1 protein expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC. RESULTS: SNAI1 mRNA was expressed in 78% (n = 32/41, TWIST1 mRNA in 41% (n = 17/41 and CDH2 mRNA in 41% (n = 17/41 of the colorectal adenoma tissue, while normal colon mucosa was negative for these transcription factors. We found a significant correlation between reduced CDH1 and the presence of SNAI1 mRNA expression and for combined SNAI1 and TWIST1 mRNA expression, respectively. A correlation between CDH2 mRNA expression and reduced CDH1 expression was not observed. We confirmed the relationship between SNAI1 expression and reduced E-cadherin expression on the protein level via IHC. CONCLUSION: Our data show that SNAI1 and Twist1 are already expressed in benign precursor lesions of colorectal cancer and that SNAI1 expression was significantly correlated with lower expression of CDH1. Whether these findings reflect true EMT and/or are a sign of a more aggressive biology need to be investigated in further studies.

  7. Positive regulation of botulinum neurotoxin gene expression by CodY in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Dahlsten, Elias; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin, produced mainly by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is the most poisonous biological substance known. Here, we show that CodY, a global regulator conserved in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, positively regulates the botulinum neurotoxin gene expression. Inactivation of codY resulted in decreased expression of botA, encoding the neurotoxin, as well as in reduced neurotoxin synthesis. Complementation of the codY mutation in trans rescued neurotoxin synthesis, and overexpression of codY in trans caused elevated neurotoxin production. Recombinant CodY was found to bind to a 30-bp region containing the botA transcription start site, suggesting regulation of the neurotoxin gene transcription through direct interaction. GTP enhanced the binding affinity of CodY to the botA promoter, suggesting that CodY-dependent neurotoxin regulation is associated with nutritional status.

  8. β-catenin regulates c-Myc and CDKN1A expression in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Yinghua; Huo, Dezheng; Khramtsov, Andrey; Khramtsova, Galina; Zhang, Chunling; Goss, Kathleen H.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the Wnt pathway is preferentially activated in basal-like breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the Wnt pathway regulates down-stream targets in basal-like breast cancer, and the biological significance of this regulation, are poorly understood. In this study, we found that c-Myc is highly expressed in the basal-like subtype by microarray analyses and immunohistochemical staining. After silencing β-catenin using siRNA, c-Myc expression was decreased in non-basal-like breast cancer cells. In contrast, c-Myc mRNA and protein expression was up-regulated in the basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Decreased c-Myc promoter activity was observed after inhibiting β-catenin by siRNA in non-basal-like breast cancer cells; however, inhibition of β-catenin or over-expression of dominant-negative LEF1 had no effect on c-Myc promoter activity in basal-like breast cancer cell lines. In addition, CDKN1A mRNA and p21 protein expression were significantly increased in all breast cancer cell lines upon β-catenin silencing. Interestingly, inhibiting β-catenin expression alone did not induce apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines despite c-Myc regulation, but we observed a modest increase of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and decrease of cells in S phase upon β-catenin silencing. Our findings suggest that the regulation of c-Myc in breast cancer cells is dependent on the molecular subtype, and that β-catenin-mediated regulation of c-Myc and p21 may control the balance of cell death and proliferation in breast cancer. PMID:25663530

  9. The laminin-derived peptide C16 regulates GPNMB expression and function in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuczek, Basilio; Santos, Emerson de S; Siqueira, Adriane S; Pinheiro, Joao J V; Freitas, Vanessa M; Jaeger, Ruy G

    2017-09-15

    Breast cancer is an important public health problem, and its progression may be related to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which acts as a structural scaffold and instruction source for neoplastic cells. Laminins are ECM proteins regulating tumor biology. The laminin-derived peptide C16 regulates different properties of tumor cells. Here we analyzed C16-induced differential gene expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. MCF-10A normal-like breast cells served as control. Among different cancer-related genes, C16 induced overexpression of GPNMB. This gene encodes a transmembrane protein GPNMB (glycoprotein non-metastatic B), involved with malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. Immunoblot validated microarray results. To correlate gene and protein expression with cellular function, we investigated whether C16 would regulate invasion in breast cancer cells. siRNA experiments strongly suggested that C16 and GPNMB cooperate to regulate invasion of highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. We addressed regulatory mechanisms involved in C16-mediated increase of GPNMB protein levels in MDA-MB-231 cells, and observed that C16 stimulates β1 integrin and Src phosphorylation. Furthermore, Src inhibition decreases peptide-induced GPNMB expression levels. To contextualize in vivo our results in vitro, we addressed GPNMB immunostaining in breast cancer human tissue microarrays. Quantitative immunohistochemistry showed that GPNMB is significantly more expressed in breast cancer compared to normal tissue. We concluded that laminin-derived peptide C16 regulates gene and protein expression of GPNMB in breast cancer cells. C16 and GPNMB may cooperate to regulate invasion of highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, probably through Src signaling. GPNMB presented increased expression in breast cancer in vivo compared to normal breast tissue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Histone acetylation regulates orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xina; Song, Xuhong; Yuan, Song; Cai, Haitao; Chen, Yequn; Chang, Xiaolan; Liang, Bin; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolaemia and inflammation are correlated with atherogenesis. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1, as a key regulator of inflammation, is closely associated with lipid levels in vivo. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate NR4A1 expression remains unknown. We aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of NR4A1 expression in monocytes during hypercholesterolaemia, and reveal the potential role of NR4A1 in hypercholesterolaemia-induced circulating inflammation. Circulating leucocytes were collected from blood samples of 139 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and 139 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. We found that there was a low-grade inflammatory state and higher expression of NR4A1 in patients. Both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in plasma were positively correlated with NR4A1 mRNA level. ChIP revealed that acetylation of histone H3 was enriched in the NR4A1 promoter region in patients. Human mononuclear cell lines THP-1 and U937 were treated with cholesterol. Supporting our clinical observations, cholesterol enhanced p300 acetyltransferase and decreased HDAC7 (histone deacetylase 7) recruitment to the NR4A1 promoter region, resulting in histone H3 hyperacetylation and further contributing to NR4A1 up-regulation in monocytes. Moreover, cytosporone B, an NR4A1 agonist, completely reversed cholesterol-induced IL-6 (interleukin 6) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) expression to below basal levels, and knockdown of NR4A1 expression by siRNA not only mimicked, but also exaggerated the effects of cholesterol on inflammatory biomarker up-regulation. Thus we conclude that histone acetylation contributes to the regulation of NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia, and that NR4A1 expression reduces hypercholesterolaemia-induced inflammation. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of microRNA Expression: Targeting the Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    CTCE-9908 inhibits breast cancer metastasis to lung and bone, Oncol. Rep. 21 (2009) 761–767. [36] N.T. Holm, F. Abreo, L.W. Johnson, B.D. Li, Q.D. Chu...Kawai, T. Inoue, H. Ito, M. Oshimura, T. Ochiya, MicroRNA-143 regulates human osteosarcoma metastasis by regulating matrix metalloprotease-13...cancers with increased potential for metastasis and recurrence (2). Basal-like breast carcinomas express genes associated with an EMT phenotype and

  12. Brassinosteroids can regulate cellulose biosynthesis by controlling the expression of CESA genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Liqiong; Yang, Cangjing; Wang, Xuelu

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play important roles in regulating cell elongation and cell size, and BR-related mutants in Arabidopsis display significant dwarf phenotypes. Cellulose is a biopolymer which has a major contribution to cell wall formation during cell expansion and elongation. However, whether BRs regulate cellulose synthesis, and if so, what the underlying mechanism of cell elongation induced by BRs is, is unknown. The content of cellulose and the expression levels o...

  13. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D.; Alverson, Andrew J.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.; Kehoe, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of photosynthesis is important, yet poorly understood. Our work reveals a previously undescribed form of photosynthesis gene regulation in cyanobacteria that apparently also controls gene expression in plants, including commercially important crops. This finding may provide a unique approach to modifying the environmental responses and developmental programs of agriculturally important species. In addition, translation is a key biological process, and many of its important feat...

  14. Small RNAs: essential regulators of gene expression and defenses against environmental stresses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Chekanova, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic genomes produce thousands of diverse small RNAs (smRNAs), which play vital roles in regulating gene expression in all conditions, including in survival of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. SmRNA pathways intersect with most of the pathways regulating different steps in the life of a messenger RNA (mRNA), starting from transcription and ending at mRNA decay. SmRNAs function in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments; the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in the cytoplasm and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus are the main and best-known modes of smRNA action. However, recent evidence from animal systems indicates that smRNAs and RNA interference (RNAi) also participate in the regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most crucial steps in the fast, efficient global reprogramming of gene expression required for survival under stress. Emerging evidence from bioinformatics studies indicates that a specific class of plant smRNAs, induced by various abiotic stresses, the sutr-siRNAs, has the potential to target regulatory regions within introns and thus may act in the regulation of splicing in response to stresses. This review summarizes the major types of plant smRNAs in the context of their mechanisms of action and also provides examples of their involvement in regulation of gene expression in response to environmental cues and developmental stresses. In addition, we describe current advances in our understanding of how smRNAs function in the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:356-381. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1340 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. The spatial expression and regulation of transcription factors IDEF1 and IDEF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Ogo, Yuko; Aung, May Sann; Nozoye, Tomoko; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Under conditions of low iron availability, rice plants induce genes involved in iron uptake and utilization. The iron deficiency-responsive cis-acting element binding factors 1 and 2 (IDEF1 and IDEF2) regulate transcriptional response to iron deficiency in rice roots. Clarification of the functions of IDEF1 and IDEF2 could uncover the gene regulation mechanism. Methods Spatial patterns of IDEF1 and IDEF2 expression were analysed by histochemical staining of IDEF1 and IDEF2 promoter-GUS transgenic rice lines. Expression patterns of the target genes of IDEF1 and IDEF2 were analysed using transformants with induced or repressed expression of IDEF1 or IDEF2 grown in iron-rich or in iron-deficient solutions for 1 d. Key Results IDEF1 and IDEF2 were highly expressed in the basal parts of the lateral roots and vascular bundles. IDEF1 and IDEF2 expression was dominant in leaf mesophyll and vascular cells, respectively. These expression patterns were similar under both iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. IDEF1 was strongly expressed in pollen, ovaries, the aleurone layer and embryo. IDEF2 was expressed in pollen, ovaries and the dorsal vascular region of the endosperm. During seed germination, IDEF1 and IDEF2 were expressed in the endosperm and embryo. Expression of IDEF1 target genes was regulated in iron-rich roots similar to early iron-deficiency stages. In addition, the expression patterns of IDEF2 target genes were similar between iron-rich conditions and early or subsequent iron deficiency. Conclusions IDEF1 and IDEF2 are constitutively expressed during both vegetative and reproductive stages. The spatial expression patterns of IDEF1 and IDEF2 overlap with their target genes in restricted cell types, but not in all cells. The spatial expression patterns and gene regulation of IDEF1 and IDEF2 in roots are generally conserved under conditions of iron sufficiency and deficiency, suggesting complicated interactions with unknown factors for

  16. The lncRNA CASC15 regulates SOX4 expression in RUNX1-rearranged acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Thilini R; Contreras, Jorge R; Zampini, Matteo; Rodriguez-Malave, Norma I; Alberti, Michael O; Anguiano, Jaime; Tran, Tiffany M; Palanichamy, Jayanth K; Gajeton, Jasmine; Ung, Nolan M; Aros, Cody J; Waters, Ella V; Casero, David; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Rao, Dinesh S

    2017-07-19

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a variety of cellular roles, including regulation of transcription and translation, leading to alterations in gene expression. Some lncRNAs modulate the expression of chromosomally adjacent genes. Here, we assess the roles of the lncRNA CASC15 in regulation of a chromosomally nearby gene, SOX4, and its function in RUNX1/AML translocated leukemia. CASC15 is a conserved lncRNA that was upregulated in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with t (12; 21) as well as pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t (8; 21), both of which are associated with relatively better prognosis. Enforced expression of CASC15 led to a myeloid bias in development, and overall, decreased engraftment and colony formation. At the cellular level, CASC15 regulated cellular survival, proliferation, and the expression of its chromosomally adjacent gene, SOX4. Differentially regulated genes following CASC15 knockdown were enriched for predicted transcriptional targets of the Yin and Yang-1 (YY1) transcription factor. Interestingly, we found that CASC15 enhances YY1-mediated regulation of the SOX4 promoter. Our findings represent the first characterization of this CASC15 in RUNX1-translocated leukemia, and point towards a mechanistic basis for its action.

  17. MYB98 positively regulates a battery of synergid-expressed genes encoding filiform apparatus localized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Drews, Gary N

    2007-08-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation.

  18. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level.

  19. Regulation of MHC Class II-Peptide Complex Expression by Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Jin eCho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MHC class II (MHC-II molecules are present on antigen presenting cells (APCs and these molecules function by binding antigenic peptides and presenting these peptides to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. APCs continuously generate and degrade MHC-II molecules, and ubiquitination of MHC-II has recently been shown to be a key regulator of MHC-II expression in dendritic cells (DCs. In this mini-review we will examine the mechanism by which the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I regulates MHC-II expression on APCs and will discuss the functional consequences of altering MHC-II ubiquitination.

  20. Transcriptional programs that control expression of the autoimmune regulator gene Aire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Yonatan; Nevo, Shir; Bornstein, Chamutal; Brezis, Miriam R; Ben-Hur, Sharon; Shkedy, Aya; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Levi, Ben; Delacher, Michael; Goldfarb, Yael; David, Eyal; Weinberger, Leehee; Viukov, Sergey; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Giraud, Matthieu; Hanna, Jacob H; Breiling, Achim; Lyko, Frank; Amit, Ido; Feuerer, Markus; Abramson, Jakub

    2017-02-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of genes encoding tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the target genes of Aire are well characterized, the transcriptional programs that regulate its own expression have remained elusive. Here we comprehensively analyzed both cis-acting and trans-acting regulatory mechanisms and found that the Aire locus was insulated by the global chromatin organizer CTCF and was hypermethylated in cells and tissues that did not express Aire. In mTECs, however, Aire expression was facilitated by concurrent eviction of CTCF, specific demethylation of exon 2 and the proximal promoter, and the coordinated action of several transcription activators, including Irf4, Irf8, Tbx21, Tcf7 and Ctcfl, which acted on mTEC-specific accessible regions in the Aire locus.

  1. Alternative polyadenylation and miR-34 family members regulate tau expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickson, John R; Kruse, Carla; Montagna, Daniel R;

    2013-01-01

    identified as candidates that might bind the long, but not short, tau 3'-UTR isoform. A hit from a screen of candidates, miR-34a, was subsequently shown to repress the expression of endogenous tau protein in M17D cells. Conversely, inhibition of endogenously expressed miR-34 family members leads to increased......Tau pathologically aggregates in Alzheimer's disease, and evidence suggests that reducing tau expression may be safe and beneficial for the prevention or treatment of this disease. We sought to examine the role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human tau mRNA in regulating tau expression....... Tau expresses two 3'-UTR isoforms, long and short, as a result of alternative polyadenylation. Using luciferase reporter constructs, we found that expression from these isoforms is differentially controlled in human neuroblastoma cell lines M17D and SH-SY5Y. Several microRNAs were computationally...

  2. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  3. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  4. MDP up-regulates the gene expression of type I interferons in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qingshan; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xueting; Zhou, Lina; Xiao, Zhilin; Chen, Xiaobin; Chen, Meifang; Xie, Xiumei; Hu, Jinyue

    2012-03-23

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP), the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2). Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  5. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Taniuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The α1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1 enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS. Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region −91 to −81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5′-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  7. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okinaga, Hiroko [Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okazaki, Tomoki, E-mail: okbgeni@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  8. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  9. Differential Regulation of α7 Nicotinic Receptor Gene (CHRNA7) Expression in Schizophrenic Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G.; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    The α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the α7* receptor, as measured by [125I]α-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene...

  10. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: binghjiang@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  11. Down Regulation of Gene Expression by the Vaccinia Virus D10 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Shors, Teri; Keck, James G.; Moss, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Vaccinia virus genes are expressed in a sequential fashion, suggesting a role for negative as well as positive regulatory mechanisms. A potential down regulator of gene expression was mapped by transfection assays to vaccinia virus open reading frame D10, which encodes a protein with no previously known function. Inhibition was independent of the promoter type used for the reporter gene, indicating that the mechanism did not involve promoter sequence recognition. The inhibition was overcome, ...

  12. Divergent Neuroinflammatory Regulation of Microglial TREM Expression and Involvement of NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rosie; Grabert, Kathleen; Davies, Claire L.; Alfieri, Alessio; Antel, Jack P.; Healy, Luke M.; McColl, Barry W.

    2017-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family of proteins are cell surface receptors with important roles in regulation of myeloid cell inflammatory activity. In the central nervous system, TREM2 is implicated in further roles in microglial homeostasis, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Different TREM receptors appear to have contrasting roles in controlling myeloid immune activity therefore the relative and co-ordinated regulation of their expression is important to understand but is currently poorly understood. We sought to determine how microglial TREM expression is affected under neuroinflammatory conditions in vitro and in vivo. Our data show that microglial Trem1 and Trem2 gene expression are regulated in an opposing manner by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro in both adult murine and human microglia. LPS caused a significant induction of Trem1 and a contrasting suppression of Trem2 expression. We also observed similar divergent Trem1 and Trem2 responses in vivo in response to acute brain inflammation and acute cerebral ischaemia. Our data show that inhibition of NF-κB activation prevents the LPS-induced alterations in both Trem1 and Trem2 expression in vitro indicating NF-κB as a common signaling intermediate controlling these divergent responses. Distinct patterns of microglial Trem1 induction and Trem2 suppression to different Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands were also evident, notably with Trem1 induction restricted to those ligands activating TLRs signaling via TRIF. Our data show co-ordinated but divergent regulation of microglial TREM receptor expression with a central role for NF-κB. Neuroinflammatory conditions that alter the balance in TREM expression could therefore be an important influence on microglial inflammatory and homeostatic activity with implications for neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:28303091

  13. Reduced expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins in the upper gastrointestinal tract of patients with achalasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harald Fischer; Judith Fischer; Peter Boknik; Ulrich Gergs; Wilhelm Schmitz; Wolfram Domschke; Jan W Konturek; Joachim Neumann

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins in upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of achalasia patients and healthy volunteers and to elucidate their role in achalasia.METHODS: Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA)isoforms 2a and 2b, phospholamban (PLB), calsequestrin (CSQ), and calreticulin (CRT) were assessed by quantitative Western blotting in esophagus and heart of rats, rabbits, and humans. Furthermore, expression profiles of these proteins in biopsies of lower esophageal sphincter and esophagus from patients with achalasia and healthy volunteers were analyzed.RESULTS: SERCA 2a protein expression was much higher in human heart (cardiac ventricle) compared to esophagus. However, SERCA 2b was expressed predominantly in the esophagus. The highest CRT expression was noted in the human esophagus, while PLB, although highly expressed in the heart, was below our detection limit in upper GI tissue. Compared to healthy controls, CSQ and CRT expression in lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophageal body were significantly reduced in patients with achalasia (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: PLB in the human esophagus might be of lesser importance for regulation of SERCA than in heart. Lower expression of Ca2+ storage proteins (CSQ and CRT) might contribute to increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure in achalasia, possibly by increasing free intracellular Ca2+.

  14. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yan, Guijun, E-mail: yanguijun33@gmail.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Haixiang, E-mail: stevensunz@163.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. {yields} Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. {yields} Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. {yields} Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

  15. Cryoprotectants up-regulate expression of mouse oocyte AQP7, which facilitates water diffusion during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ya-Jing; Xiong, Yun; Ding, Guo-Lian; Zhang, Dan; Meng, Ye; Huang, He-Feng; Sheng, Jian-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of cryoprotectants on the expression of AQP7 in oocytes. Experimental animal study. University-based research laboratory. Adult female C57BL/6J mice. In metaphase II (MII) oocytes obtained from adult female C57BL/6J mice and from donations by fertile women, the mouse oocytes were treated with human tubal fluid medium containing 8% ethylene glycol (EG), 9.5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and 0.5 M sucrose, respectively; 293T cells transfected with GFP-hAQP7 expression vector were treated with the same solutions. AQP7 expression in oocytes examined by reverse-transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence, changes in the volume of mouse oocytes treated with different solutions calculated to determine their permeability to water, and survival rates of vitrified oocytes. AQP7 is expressed in human and mouse oocytes. Cryoprotectants, including EG, DMSO, and sucrose, up-regulated AQP7 expression in mouse oocytes and 293T cells transfected with GFP-hAQP7 expression vector. Compared with other cryoprotectants, DMSO stimulated higher expression of AQP7, and this was associated with faster cell volume recovery and lower survival rates of vitrified oocytes. DMSO up-regulates AQP7 expression in mouse oocytes more than EG. This may facilitate water diffusion and reduce the time for oocytes to reach osmotic balance with the cryoprotectant solution during cryopreservation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression Analysis of Sound Vibration-Regulated Genes by Touch Treatment in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ritesh; Gururani, Mayank A; Ponpandian, Lakshmi N; Mishra, Ratnesh C; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Sound vibration (SV) is considered to be a mechanical stimulus which gives rise to various physiological and molecular changes in plants. Previously, we identified 17 SV-regulated genes (SRGs) which were up-regulated by SV treatments in Arabidopsis. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of similar genes after an exposure of 500 Hertz at 80 decibels, for various time periods. Simultaneously, we confirmed the SV-mediated expression of these genes under lighted condition as many of them were reported to be dark-induced. For this, we designed an improved SV treatment chamber. Additionally, we checked the electrolyte leakage (EL), photosynthetic performance and expression of mechanosensitive (MS) ion channel genes after 5 days of SV treatment in the illuminated chamber. EL was higher, and the photosynthetic performance index was lower in the SV-treated plants compared to control. Seven out of the 13 MS ion channel genes were differentially expressed after the SV treatment. Simultaneously, we checked the touch-mediated expression pattern of 17 SRGs and 13 MS ion channel genes. The distinct expression pattern of 6 SRGs and 1 MS ion channel gene generate an idea that SV as a stimulus is different from touch. Developmental stage-specific expression profiling suggested that the majority of the SRGs were expressed spatiotemporally in different developmental stages of Arabidopsis, especially in imbibed seed, seedlings and leaves.

  17. Experimental methods in cryogenic spectroscopy: Stark effect measurements in substituted myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Bradley M.

    Dawning from well-defined tertiary structure, the active regions of enzymatic proteins exist as specifically tailored electrostatic microenvironments capable of facilitating chemical interaction. The specific influence these charge distributions have on ligand binding dynamics, and their impact on specificity, reactivity, and biological functionality, have yet to be fully understood. A quantitative determination of these intrinsic fields would offer insight towards the mechanistic aspects of protein functionality. This work seeks to investigate the internal molecular electric fields that are present at the oxygen binding site of myoglobin. Experiments are performed at 1 K on samples located within a glassy matrix, using the high-resolution technique spectral hole-burning. The internal electric field distributions can be explored by implementing a unique mathematical treatment for analyzing the effect that externally applied electric fields have on the spectral hole profiles. Precise control of the light field, the temperature, and the externally applied electric field at the site of the sample is crucial. Experimentally, the functionality of custom cryogenic temperature confocal scanning microscope was extended to allow for collection of imaging and spectral data with the ability to modulate the polarization of the light at the sample. Operation of the instrumentation was integrated into a platform allowing for seamless execution of input commands with high temporal inter-instrument resolution for collection of data streams. For the regulated control and cycling of the sample temperature. the thermal characteristics of the research Dewar were theoretically modeled to systematically predict heat flows throughout the system. A high voltage feedthrough for delivering voltages of up to 5000 V to the sample as positioned within the Dewar was developed. The burning of spectral holes with this particular experimental setup is highly repeatable. The quantum mechanical

  18. Observing heme doming in myoglobin with femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Levantino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report time-resolved X-ray absorption measurements after photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin performed at the LCLS X-ray free electron laser with nearly 100 fs (FWHM time resolution. Data at the Fe K-edge reveal that the photoinduced structural changes at the heme occur in two steps, with a faster (∼70 fs relaxation preceding a slower (∼400 fs one. We tentatively attribute the first relaxation to a structural rearrangement induced by photolysis involving essentially only the heme chromophore and the second relaxation to a residual Fe motion out of the heme plane that is coupled to the displacement of myoglobin F-helix.

  19. Renormalization of myoglobin-ligand binding energetics by quantum many-body effects

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Cedric; O'Regan, David D; Payne, Mike C

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a first-principles atomistic study of the electronic mechanisms of ligand binding and discrimination in the myoglobin protein. Electronic correlation effects are taken into account using one of the most advanced methods currently available, namely a linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) approach wherein the treatment of localized iron 3d electrons is further refined using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). This combination of methods explicitly accounts for dynamical and multi-reference quantum physics, such as valence and spin fluctuations, of the 3d electrons, whilst treating a significant proportion of the protein (more than 1000 atoms) with density functional theory. The computed electronic structure of the myoglobin complexes and the nature of the Fe-O2 bonding are validated against experimental spectroscopic observables. We elucidate and solve a long standing problem related to the quantum-mechanical description of the respiration process, namely that DFT calculations predict a st...

  20. Highly diastereoselective and enantioselective olefin cyclopropanation using engineered myoglobin-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux, Melanie; Tyagi, Vikas; Fasan, Rudi

    2015-02-01

    Using rational design, an engineered myoglobin-based catalyst capable of catalyzing the cyclopropanation of aryl-substituted olefins with catalytic proficiency (up to 46,800 turnovers) and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity (98-99.9%) was developed. This transformation could be carried out in the presence of up to 20 g L(-1) olefin substrate with no loss in diastereo- and/or enantioselectivity. Mutagenesis and mechanistic studies support a cyclopropanation mechanism mediated by an electrophilic, heme-bound carbene species and a model is provided to rationalize the stereopreference of the protein catalyst. This work shows that myoglobin constitutes a promising and robust scaffold for the development of biocatalysts with carbene-transfer reactivity.

  1. The Quality of Dory Fillets based on Water Soluble Protein, Color, and Myoglobin Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurfajrin Nisa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fillet of dory is very easy to be find in Indonesian market with various brand and produsen.Imported dory fillet is preferred by consumer so far because it has a white color compare than localfillets. Color is the important parameter that used by consumers to determine the quality of filet. Thisstudy was aimed to determine the quality of local and imported fillets, including protein profile usingSDS PAGE, color measurement, and myoglobin extractability. The results of water soluble protein profilesshowed dory fillet contained 13-15 bands. The redness value (a* of local fillet (DN, DL, DM was highercompared others. However, imported fillet (DI had the highest if redness index (a/b. Imported fillet (DIshowed the lowest concentration of myoglobin compared other samples.

  2. The Quality of Dory Fillets based on Water Soluble Protein, Color, and Myoglobin Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurfajrin Nisa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fillet of dory is very easy to be find in Indonesian market with various brand and produsen. Imported dory fillet is preferred by consumer so far because it has a white color compare than local fillets. Color is the important parameter that used by consumers to determine the quality of filet. This study was aimed to determine the quality of local and imported fillets, including protein profile using SDS PAGE, color measurement, and myoglobin extractability. The results of water soluble protein profiles showed dory fillet contained 13-15 bands. The redness value (a* of local fillet (DN, DL, DM was higher compared others. However, imported fillet (DI had the highest if redness index (a/b. Imported fillet (DI showed the lowest concentration of myoglobin compared other samples.

  3. Thermal unfolding of myoglobin in the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xubiao; Sieradzan, Adam K.; Niemi, Antti J.

    2016-12-01

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is applied to model the low-temperature crystallographic C α backbone structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The Glauber protocol is employed to simulate its response to an increase in ambient temperature. The myoglobin is found to unfold from its native state by a succession of α -helical intermediates, fully in line with the observed folding and unfolding patterns in denaturation experiments. In particular, a molten globule intermediate is identified with experimentally correct attributes. A detailed, experimentally testable contact map is constructed to characterize the specifics of the unfolding pathway, including the formation of long-range interactions. The results reveal how the unfolding process of a protein is driven by the interplay between, and a successive melting of, its modular secondary structure components.

  4. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, R.S.; Rosen, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of ..beta..-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in ..beta..-casein mRNA accumulation. In contrast, whey acidic protein gene transcription was constitutive in COMMA-D cells grown on either substratum, but its mRNA was unstable and little intact mature mRNA was detected. Culturing COMMA-D cells on collagen also promoted increased expression of other genes expressed in differentiated mammary epithelial cells, including those encoding ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-casein, transferrin, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase but decreased the expression of actin and histone genes. Using COMMA-D cells, the authors defined further the role of individual hormones in influencing ..beta..-casein gene transcription. With insulin alone, a basal level of ..beta..-casein gene transcription was detected in COMMA-D cells grown on floating collagen gels. Addition of prolactin but not hydrocortisone resulted in a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in ..beta..-casein gene transcription, but both hormones were required to elicit the maximal 73-fold induction in mRNA accumulation. The posttranscriptional effect of hormones on casein mRNA accummulation preceded any detectable changes in the relative rate of transcription. Thus, regulation by both hormones and cell substratum of casein gene expression is exerted primarily at the post transcriptional level.

  5. The regulation of HSL and LPL expression by DHT and flutamide in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L A; McTernan, P G; Harte, A L; Barnett, A H; Kumar, S

    2002-05-01

    Clinical observations suggest a role for testosterone in the accumulation of central adiposity and with an associated increased risk of disease. To date, no human study has analysed the role of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on adipose tissue mass regulation in vitro. This study investigated the role of DHT and androgen receptors (AR) in the regulation of lipolysis and lipogenesis by examining the key enzymes hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) respectively. Isolated abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes (Scad) (n = 15) were treated with either DHT (10(-7)-10(-9) m), an antiandrogen, flutamide (FLT: 10(-7)-10(-9) m) or a combination of DHT (10(-7)-10(-9) m) with FLT (10(-8) m). Relative protein expression of HSL, LPL and AR was determined. In Scad, DHT inhibited HSL expression maximally at 10(-9) m (0.7 +/- 0.4**; p DHT10(-9) m (2.22 +/- 0.48*; p DHT + FLT compared with DHT alone. Androgen receptor expression studies showed an inverse correlation with DHT, whereas DHT + FLT reduced AR expression. These studies indicate that DHT may alter HSL and LPL expression, whereas only LPL expression appears mediated by AR. These findings suggest a physiological role for DHT in the control of adipose tissue mass in women, and indicate that androgens may also play an important role in regulating lipid metabolism.

  6. A previously functional tetracycline-regulated transactivator fails to target gene expression to the bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Eva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetracycline-controlled transactivator system is a powerful tool to control gene expression in vitro and to generate consistent and conditional transgenic in vivo model organisms. It has been widely used to study gene function and to explore pathological mechanisms involved in human diseases. The system permits the regulation of the expression of a target gene, both temporally and quantitatively, by the application of tetracycline or its derivative, doxycycline. In addition, it offers the possibility to restrict gene expression in a spatial fashion by utilizing tissue-specific promoters to drive the transactivator. Findings In this study, we report our problems using a reverse tetracycline-regulated transactivator (rtTA in a transgenic mouse model system for the bone-specific expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation. Even though prior studies have been successful utilizing the same rtTA, expression analysis of the transactivator revealed insufficient activity for regulating the transgene expression in our system. The absence of transactivator could not be ascribed to differences in genetic background because mice in a mixed genetic background and in congenic mouse lines showed similar results. Conclusions The purpose of this study is to report our negative experience with previously functional transactivator mice, to raise caution in the use of tet-based transgenic mouse lines and to reinforce the need for controls to ensure the stable functionality of generated tetracycline-controlled transactivators over time.

  7. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  8. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome.

  9. Extended Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Monoxide Migration in Sperm Whale Myoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Bossa, Cecilia; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Roccatano, Danilo; Amadei, Andrea; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Di Nola, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of an extended molecular dynamics simulation on the migration of photodissociated carbon monoxide in wild-type sperm whale myoglobin. Our results allow following one possible ligand migration dynamics from the distal pocket to the Xe1 cavity via a path involving the other xenon binding cavities and momentarily two additional packing defects along the pathway. Comparison with recent time resolved structural data obtained by Laue crystallography with subnanosecond to milli...

  10. Heart fatty acid binding protein and myoglobin after reperfusion of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Durakoğlugil, Emre; Gülbahar, Ozlem; Turkoglu, Sedat; Sancak, Banu; Paşaoğlu, Hatice; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to disclose the release kinetics of heart fatty acid binding protein (HFABP) and myoglobin in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reperfused by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and to determine the influence of the quality of coronary flow post PPCI on the release properties of these markers. Twenty-four patients with AMI who underwent successful PPCI and had no evidence of reocclusion within the first 120 minutes were studied. Serum myoglobin and HFABP levels at baseline and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after reperfusion were measured. Corrected TIMI frame count (CTFC) in the relevant vessel post PPCI was used to categorize patients in group I (CTFC > 21) and group 2 (CTFC < or = 21). Biomarker ratios at each sampling point were calculated by dividing the serum level of the biomarker at the specific sampling time by its baseline level. Baseline myoglobin and HFABP levels rose significantly at 15 minutes (153 +/- 251.5 microg/L vs. 904.3 +/- 542.6 microg/L, 10.9 +/- 8 microg/L vs. 17.8 +/- 9.1 microg/L, both P < 0.0001) after successful PPCI. Group 2 patients tended to have higher biomarker ratios at each time point as compared to group I. Successful PPCI for AMI results in a significant increase of both HFABP and myoglobin levels within 15 minutes of vessel opening and the quality of flow in the infarction-related artery post PCI as evaluated by CTFC does not influence the release kinetics of these biomarkers.

  11. Contribution of the heme propionate groups to the electron transfer and electrostatic properties of myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Anthony R; Sishta, Bhavini P; Mauk, A Grant

    2006-12-01

    The role of the heme propionate groups in determining the electron transfer and electrostatic properties of myoglobin have been studied by thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies of horse heart myoglobin in which the heme propionate groups are esterified. Spectroelectrochemical analysis has established that the E(m,7) of dimethylester heme-substituted Mb (DME-Mb) (E(m,7)=100.2(2)mV vs. NHE (Normal Hydrogen Electrode) (25 degrees C) is increased approximately 40mV relative to that of the native protein with DeltaH degrees =-12.9(2) kcal/mol and DeltaS degrees =-51.0(8) cal/mol/deg (pH 7.0, mu=0.1M (phosphate)). The second order rate constant for reduction of DME-metMb by Fe(EDTA)(2-) is increased >400-fold relative to that for reduction of native metMb to a value of 1.34(2)x10(3)M(-1)s(-1) with DeltaS(double dagger)=-13(1) cal/mol/deg and DeltaH(double dagger)=9.2(3) (pH 7.0, micro=0.1M (phosphate)). Analysis of the pH dependences of the reduction potential and rate constant for reduction by Fe(EDTA)(2-) demonstrates that heme propionate esterification introduces significant changes into the electrostatic interactions in myoglobin. These changes are also manifested by differences in the pH dependences of the (1)H NMR spectra of native and DME-metMb that reveal shifts in pK(a) values for specific His residues as the result of heme propionate esterification. In sum, the current results establish that heme propionate esterification not only affects the electron transfer properties of myoglobin but also influences the titration behavior of specific His residues.

  12. Probing the Role of Hydration in the Unfolding Transitions of Carbonmonoxy Myoglobin and Apomyoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, LIN; Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Taegon; Chowdhury, Pramit; Lim, Manho; Gai, Feng

    2009-01-01

    We show that the equilibrium unfolding transition of horse carbonmonoxy myoglobin monitored by the stretching vibration of the CO ligand, a local environmental probe, is very sharp and, thus, quite different from those measured by global conformational reporters. In addition, the denatured protein exhibits an A0-like CO band. We hypothesize that this sharp transition reports penetration of water into the heme pocket of the protein. Parallel experiments on horse apomyoglobin, wherein an enviro...

  13. Unusual peroxidase activity of a myoglobin mutant with two distal histidines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei Guo; Dun Wan; Li Fu Liao; Ying Wu Lin

    2012-01-01

    By retaining the native distal His64 in sperm whale myoglobin (Mb),a second distal histidine was engineered in Mb by mutating Leu29 to His29.The resultant mutant of L29H Mb exhibits an unusual enhanced peroxidase activity with a positive cooperativity in comparison to that of wild type Mb.The new enzyme with two cooperative distal histidines has not been found in native peroxidase,which emphasizes a creation of the rational protein design.

  14. The impact of saliva collection and processing methods on CRP, IgE, and Myoglobin immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Owing to its ease of collection, saliva is potentially the sample of choice in diagnosis. Salivary biomolecules have provided a porthole in surveying a person’s health and well-being. Our study aims were (1) to demonstrate the effects of pre-analytical steps, collection and pre-processing techniques on salivary protein detection and (2) to establish an indication of salivary reference intervals for 3 biomolecules of clinical interest. Methods Saliva samples were collected from participants (n = 25, ages 20–35 years) using the following methods: no stimulation (resting/unstimulated), mechanical, and acid stimulation. The saliva was prepared for analysis by: unprocessed, post standard centrifugation in a container without any additives, and centrifugation using Centrifugal Filter Unit (Amicon® Ultra-0.5). AlphaLisa® assays were used to measure the levels of C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Immunoglobin (IgE) and myoglobin in saliva samples. Results Saliva flow rates were lowest with the resting/drooling collection method. The lowest total protein concentration was with acid stimulation. Unstimulated and mechanically stimulated collections produced no effect on the CRP and IgE levels while myoglobin levels were highest with the unstimulated collection. Acid stimulation had a negative impact on the measured concentrations of IgE and myoglobin (except for CRP levels). Conclusion Mechanical stimulation was the most viable option for collecting saliva without affecting the levels of CRP and myoglobin. The processing methods had an adverse effect on the concentration of total protein as well as on CRP and IgE concentrations. PMID:23369566

  15. Regulation of COX-2 expression by miR-146a in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Ashley L; Lutz, Carol S

    2014-09-01

    Prostaglandins are a class of molecules that mediate cellular inflammatory responses and control cell growth. The oxidative conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 is carried out by two isozymes of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is constitutively expressed, while COX-2 can be transiently induced by external stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, COX-2 is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including lung cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression. Previous studies have implicated an important role for miRNAs in human cancer. We demonstrate here that miR-146a expression levels are significantly lower in lung cancer cells as compared with normal lung cells. Conversely, lung cancer cells have higher levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA expression. Introduction of miR-146a can specifically ablate COX-2 protein and the biological activity of COX-2 as measured by prostaglandin production. The regulation of COX-2 by miR-146a is mediated through a single miRNA-binding site present in the 3' UTR. Therefore, we propose that decreased miR-146a expression contributes to the up-regulation and overexpression of COX-2 in lung cancer cells. Since potential miRNA-mediated regulation is a functional consequence of alternative polyadenylation site choice, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate COX-2 mRNA alternative polyadenylation and miRNA targeting will give us key insights into how COX-2 expression is involved in the development of a metastatic condition.

  16. Regulation of gene expression in hepatic cells by the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa H Jimenez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigated mTOR regulation of gene expression by studying rapamycin effect in two hepatic cell lines, the non-tumorigenic WB-F344 cells and the tumorigenic WB311 cells. The latter are resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin, thus providing us with an opportunity to study the gene expression effects of rapamycin without confounding effects on cell proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The hepatic cells were exposed to rapamycin for 24 hr. Microarray analysis on total RNA preparations identified genes that were affected by rapamycin in both cell lines and, therefore, modulated independent of growth arrest. Further studies showed that the promoter regions of these genes included E-box-containing transcription factor binding sites at higher than expected rates. Based on this, we tested the hypothesis that c-Myc is involved in regulation of gene expression by mTOR by comparing genes altered by rapamycin in the hepatic cells and by c-Myc induction in fibroblasts engineered to express c-myc in an inducible manner. Results showed enrichment for c-Myc targets among rapamycin sensitive genes in both hepatic cell lines. However, microarray analyses on wild type and c-myc null fibroblasts showed similar rapamycin effect, with the set of rapamycin-sensitive genes being enriched for c-Myc targets in both cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is considerable overlap in the regulation of gene expression by mTOR and c-Myc. However, regulation of gene expression through mTOR is c-Myc-independent and cannot be attributed to the involvement of specific transcription factors regulated by the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR Complex 1.

  17. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  18. Regulation of apoptosis by fau revealed by functional expression cloning and antisense expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Kirkham, Lucy; Farzaneh, Farzin; Williams, Gwyn T

    2004-12-16

    Functional expression cloning is a powerful strategy for identifying critical steps in biological pathways independently of prior assumptions. It is particularly suitable for the identification of molecules crucial to the control of apoptosis. Our screen for sequences suppressing T-cell apoptosis isolated a sequence antisense to fau (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene). The fox gene in FBR murine osteosarcoma virus is also antisense to fau and several reports have indicated that fau displays tumour suppressor and oncogenic properties in different contexts. Our observations indicate that the fau antisense sequence suppresses expression of endogenous fau mRNA and produces resistance to apoptosis induced both by the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone' by ultraviolet radiation, and by the anticancer drug cisplatin. In all cases, colony-forming ability is protected, indicating that fau affects the critical events prior to commitment to cell death. Overexpression of fau in the sense orientation induces cell death, which is inhibited both by Bcl-2 and by inhibition of caspases, in line with its proposed role in apoptosis.

  19. Array2BIO: from microarray expression data to functional annotation of co-regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasley Amy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several isolated tools for partial analysis of microarray expression data. To provide an integrative, easy-to-use and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data we have developed Array2BIO, an application that couples several analytical methods into a single web based utility. Results Array2BIO converts raw intensities into probe expression values, automatically maps those to genes, and subsequently identifies groups of co-expressed genes using two complementary approaches: (1 comparative analysis of signal versus control and (2 clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on Gene Ontology classification and KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods for quantifying expression levels, including Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. An automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis for the identified gene loci while the interconnection with Crème allows prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie observed expression patterns. Conclusion We have developed Array2BIO – a web based tool for rapid comprehensive analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data, which also allows users to link expression data to Dcode.org comparative genomics tools and integrates a system for translating co-expression data into mechanisms of gene co-regulation. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  20. MicroRNA expression and regulation in human, chimpanzee, and macaque brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Yang Hu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among other factors, changes in gene expression on the human evolutionary lineage have been suggested to play an important role in the establishment of human-specific phenotypes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these expression changes are largely unknown. Here, we have explored the role of microRNA (miRNA in the regulation of gene expression divergence among adult humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques, in two brain regions: prefrontal cortex and cerebellum. Using a combination of high-throughput sequencing, miRNA microarrays, and Q-PCR, we have shown that up to 11% of the 325 expressed miRNA diverged significantly between humans and chimpanzees and up to 31% between humans and macaques. Measuring mRNA and protein expression in human and chimpanzee brains, we found a significant inverse relationship between the miRNA and the target genes expression divergence, explaining 2%-4% of mRNA and 4%-6% of protein expression differences. Notably, miRNA showing human-specific expression localize in neurons and target genes that are involved in neural functions. Enrichment in neural functions, as well as miRNA-driven regulation on the human evolutionary lineage, was further confirmed by experimental validation of predicted miRNA targets in two neuroblastoma cell lines. Finally, we identified a signature of positive selection in the upstream region of one of the five miRNA with human-specific expression, miR-34c-5p. This suggests that miR-34c-5p expression change took place after the split of the human and the Neanderthal lineages and had adaptive significance. Taken together these results indicate that changes in miRNA expression might have contributed to evolution of human cognitive functions.

  1. Regulation of CCL5 expression in smooth muscle cells following arterial injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    Full Text Available Chemokines play a crucial role in inflammation and in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis by recruiting inflammatory immune cells to the endothelium. Chemokine CCL5 has been shown to be involved in atherosclerosis progression. However, little is known about how CCL5 is regulated in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study we report that CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and peaked in aorta at day 7 and then declined after balloon artery injury, whereas IP-10 and MCP-1 mRNA expression were induced and peaked at day 3 and then rapidly declined.The expression of CCL5 receptors (CCR1, 3 & 5 were also rapidly induced and then declined except CCR5 which expression was still relatively high at day 14 after balloon injury. In rat smooth muscle cells (SMCs, similar as in aorta CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and kept increasing after LPS plus IFN-gamma stimulation, whereas IP-10 mRNA expression was rapidly induced and then declined. Our data further indicate that induction of CCL5 expression in SMCs was mediated by IRF-1 via binding to the IRF-1 response element in CCL5 promoter. Moreover, p38 MAPK was involved in suppression of CCL5 and IP-10 expression in SMCs through common upstream molecule MKK3. The downstream molecule MK2 was required for p38-mediated CCL5 but not IP-10 inhibition. Our findings indicate that CCL5 induction in aorta and SMCs is mediated by IRF-1 while activation of p38 MAPK signaling inhibits CCL5 and IP-10 expression. Methods targeting MK2 expression could be used to selectively regulate CCL5 but not IP-10 expression in SMCs.

  2. A single enhancer regulating the differential expression of duplicated red-sensitive opsin genes in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Tsujimura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental step in the evolution of the visual system is the gene duplication of visual opsins and differentiation between the duplicates in absorption spectra and expression pattern in the retina. However, our understanding of the mechanism of expression differentiation is far behind that of spectral tuning of opsins. Zebrafish (Danio rerio have two red-sensitive cone opsin genes, LWS-1 and LWS-2. These genes are arrayed in a tail-to-head manner, in this order, and are both expressed in the long member of double cones (LDCs in the retina. Expression of the longer-wave sensitive LWS-1 occurs later in development and is thus confined to the peripheral, especially ventral-nasal region of the adult retina, whereas expression of LWS-2 occurs earlier and is confined to the central region of the adult retina, shifted slightly to the dorsal-temporal region. In this study, we employed a transgenic reporter assay using fluorescent proteins and P1-artificial chromosome (PAC clones encompassing the two genes and identified a 0.6-kb "LWS-activating region" (LAR upstream of LWS-1, which regulates expression of both genes. Under the 2.6-kb flanking upstream region containing the LAR, the expression pattern of LWS-1 was recapitulated by the fluorescent reporter. On the other hand, when LAR was directly conjugated to the LWS-2 upstream region, the reporter was expressed in the LDCs but also across the entire outer nuclear layer. Deletion of LAR from the PAC clones drastically lowered the reporter expression of the two genes. These results suggest that LAR regulates both LWS-1 and LWS-2 by enhancing their expression and that interaction of LAR with the promoters is competitive between the two genes in a developmentally restricted manner. Sharing a regulatory region between duplicated genes could be a general way to facilitate the expression differentiation in duplicated visual opsins.

  3. Corticosterone regulates expression of CCL2 in the intact and chemically injured hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alvin R; Sriram, Krishnan; O'Callaghan, James P

    2006-05-15

    Expression of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), also known as, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, increases in response to disease-, trauma-, or toxicant-induced damage to the central nervous system (CNS). In the periphery, endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids are known to suppress CCL2 expression associated with inflammatory conditions. However, such actions of glucocorticoids on CCL2 expression in the CNS remain unknown. Here, we explored the effects of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone (CORT), on the expression of CCL2 and its receptors, CCR2 and CCR5, in the hippocampal formation using intact, adrenalectomized (ADX) and trimethyltin (TMT)-treated rats. An immunosuppressive regimen of CORT did not alter the mRNA expression of CCL2 or its receptors in the hippocampus. ADX, however, markedly increased the expression of CCL2 and CCR2 mRNAs in the hippocampus, while CORT replacement reversed the effects of ADX on CCL2 gene expression. Hippocampal damage resulting from systemic administration of the organometallic neurotoxicant, TMT, was associated with microglial activation, as evidenced by enhanced expression of microglial markers integrin alphaM (CD11b) and F4/80, as well as, microglia-associated factors, CCL2 and IL-1alpha. An immunosuppressive dose of CORT, suppressed TMT-induced expression of CCL2. Given the association of CCL2 with microglial activation, it appears that CORT may play a role in regulating microglial activation. However, CORT treatment did not alter TMT-mediated neuronal damage and astrogliosis. Such observations suggest that injury-related expression of microglia-associated chemokines and cytokines may subserve a role unrelated to neuronal damage. In summary, our data indicate that in the CNS, CCL2 gene expression is under negative regulation by glucocorticoids.

  4. Protoporphyrin IX-induced structural and functional changes in human red blood cells, haemoglobin and myoglobin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susmita Sil; Tania Bose; Dibyendu Roy; Abhay Sankar Chakraborti

    2004-09-01

    Protoporphyrin IX and its derivatives are used as photosensitizers in the photodynamic therapy of cancer. Protoporphyrin IX penetrates into human red blood cells and releases oxygen from them. This leads to a change in the morphology of the cells. Spectrophotometric studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX interacts with haemoglobin and myoglobin forming ground state complexes. For both proteins, the binding affinity constant decreases, while the possible number of binding sites increases, as the aggregation state of the porphyrin is increased. The interactions lead to conformational changes of both haemoglobin and myoglobin as observed in circular dichroism studies. Upon binding with the proteins, protoporphyrin IX releases the heme-bound oxygen from the oxyproteins, which is dependent on the stoichiometric ratios of the porphyrin: protein. The peroxidase activities of haemoglobin and myoglobin are potentiated by the protein-porphyrin complexation. Possible mechanisms underlying the relation between the porphyrin-induced structural modifications of the heme proteins and alterations in their functional properties have been discussed. The findings may have a role in establishing efficacy of therapeutic uses of porphyrins as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as therapeutic agents.

  5. Effect of non-enzymatic glycation on esterase activities of hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhrojit; Bose, Tania; Roy, Anjana; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2007-07-01

    Heme proteins--hemoglobin and myoglobin possess esterase activities. Studies with purified hemoglobin from normal individuals and diabetic patients revealed that the esterase activity as measured from hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) was higher in diabetic condition and increased progressively with extent of the disease. HbA(1c), the major glycated hemoglobin, which increases proportionately with blood glucose level in diabetes mellitus, exhibited more esterase activity than the non-glycated hemoglobin fraction, HbA(0), as demonstrated spectrophotometrically as well as by activity staining. Glycation influenced esterase activity of hemoglobin by increasing the affinity for the substrate and the rate of the reaction. Both HbA(0) and HbA(1c)-mediated catalysis of p-NPA hydrolysis was pH-dependent. Esterase activity of in vitro-glycated myoglobin (GMb) was also higher than that of its non-glycated analog (Mb). The amplified esterase activities of hemoglobin and myoglobin might be associated with glycation-induced structural modifications of the proteins.

  6. Detection of Myoglobin with an Open-Cavity-Based Label-Free Photonic Crystal Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailin; Tamez-Vela, Juan Manuel; Solis, Steven; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Rahman, Shafiqur; Morales, Andres; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2013-01-01

    The label-free detection of one of the cardiac biomarkers, myoglobin, using a photonic-crystal-based biosensor in a total-internal-reflection configuration (PC-TIR) is presented in this paper. The PC-TIR sensor possesses a unique open optical microcavity that allows for several key advantages in biomolecular assays. In contrast to a conventional closed microcavity, the open configuration allows easy functionalization of the sensing surface for rapid biomolecular binding assays. Moreover, the properties of PC structures make it easy to be designed and engineered for operating at any optical wavelength. Through fine design of the photonic crystal structure, biochemical modification of the sensor surface, and integration with a microfluidic system, we have demonstrated that the detection sensitivity of the sensor for myoglobin has reached the clinically significant concentration range, enabling potential usage of this biosensor for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The real-time response of the sensor to the myoglobin binding may potentially provide point-of-care monitoring of patients and treatment effects.

  7. Detection of Myoglobin with an Open-Cavity-Based Label-Free Photonic Crystal Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The label-free detection of one of the cardiac biomarkers, myoglobin, using a photonic-crystal-based biosensor in a total-internal-reflection configuration (PC-TIR is presented in this paper. The PC-TIR sensor possesses a unique open optical microcavity that allows for several key advantages in biomolecular assays. In contrast to a conventional closed microcavity, the open configuration allows easy functionalization of the sensing surface for rapid biomolecular binding assays. Moreover, the properties of PC structures make it easy to be designed and engineered for operating at any optical wavelength. Through fine design of the photonic crystal structure, biochemical modification of the sensor surface, and integration with a microfluidic system, we have demonstrated that the detection sensitivity of the sensor for myoglobin has reached the clinically significant concentration range, enabling potential usage of this biosensor for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The real-time response of the sensor to the myoglobin binding may potentially provide point-of-care monitoring of patients and treatment effects.

  8. Myoglobin immobilization on electrodeposited nanometer-scale nickel oxide particles and direct voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ahadi, Sara; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2008-04-01

    Prosperity of information on the reactions of redox-active sites in proteins can be attained by voltammetric studies in which the protein sample is located on a suitable surface. This work reports the presentation of myoglobin/nickel oxide nanoparticles/glassy carbon (Mb/NiO NPs/GC) electrode, ready by electrochemical deposition of the NiO NPs on glassy carbon electrode and myoglobin immobilization on their surfaces by the potential cycling method. Images of electrodeposited NiO NPs on the surface of glassy carbon electrode were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A pair of well-defined redox peaks for Mb(Fe(III)-Fe(II)) was obtained at the prepared electrode by direct electron transfer between the protein and nanoparticles. Electrochemical parameters of immobilized myoglobin such as formal potential (E(0')), charge transfer coefficient (alpha) and apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) were estimated by cyclic voltammetry and nonlinear regression analysis. Biocatalytic activity was exemplified at the prepared electrode for reduction of hydrogen peroxide.

  9. The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin of Amazon river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Jones, B N; Lehman, L D; Gurd, F R

    1975-12-02

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides which are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Three easily separable peptides were obtained by cleaving the protein with cyanogen bromide at the methionine residues and four peptides were obtained by cleaving the methyl-acetimidated protein with trypsin at the arginine residues. From these peptides over 85% of the sequence was completed. The remainder of the sequence was obtained by fragmentation of the large cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin. This protein differs from that of the common porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, at seven positions, from that of the common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, at 11 positions, and from that of the sperm whale, Physeter catodon, at 15 positions. By comparison of this sequence with the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin it appears that those residues close to the heme group are most conserved followed by those in nonhelical regions and lastly by those in the helical segments. All of the substitutions observed in this sequence fit easily into the three-dimensional structure of the sperm whale myoglobin.

  10. Purification and characterization of Fab fragments with rapid reaction kinetics against myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyung-Nam; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myung Kyu; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2015-01-01

    Myoglobin is an early biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we isolated the antibody IgG-Myo2-7ds, which exhibits unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid dissociation kinetics are thought to be premature IgG forms that are produced during the early stage of in vivo immunization. In the present study, we identified the epitope region of the IgG-Myo2-7ds antibody to be the C-terminal region of myoglobin, which corresponds to 144-154 aa. The Fab fragment was directly purified by papain cleavage and protein G affinity chromatography and demonstrated kinetics of an association constant of 4.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and a dissociation constant of 2.28 × 10(-2) s(-1), which retained the unique reaction kinetics of intact IgG-Myo2-7ds antibodies. Because a rapid dissociation antibody can be utilized for antibody recycling, the results from this study would provide a platform for the development of antibody engineering in potential diagnostic areas such as a continuous monitoring system for heart disease.

  11. The expression of glucose regulated protein—94 in colorectal carcinoma cells treated by sodium butyrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUYIDI; JINDANSONG

    2000-01-01

    The expression of glucose regulated protein 94 (GPR94) during the treatment of human colorectal carcinoma cell lineClone A cells with codium butyrate was studied.Dodium butyrate (SB) can cause functional and morphological effects on Clone A cells including growth arrest at G0/G1 stage and cell differentiation as observed by morphological changes,MTT and flow cytometry assays,as well as reduced Grp94 gene expression as shown by Northern blot and Western blot assays.The possible mechanism of the correlation between Grp94 gene expression and tumor growth inhibition and cell differentiation is briefly discussed.

  12. The expression of glucose regulated protein-94 in colorectal carcinoma cells treated by sodium butyrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The expression of glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94)during the treatment of human colorectal carcinoma cell lineClone A cells with sodium butyrate was studied. Sodium butyrate (SB) can cause functional and morphological effects on Clone A cells including growth arrest at G0/G1 stage and cell differentiation as observed by morphological changes, MTT and flow cytometry assays, as well as reduced Grp94 gene expression as shown by Northern blot and Western blot assays. The possible mechanism of the correlation between Grp94 gene expression and tumor growth inhibition and cell differentiation is briefly discussed.

  13. MicroRNA-30b-mediated regulation of catalase expression in human ARPE-19 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidul Haque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19 that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H(2O(2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H(2O(2 (200 µM up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system.

  14. Resveratrol inhibits Cdk5 activity through regulation of p35 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Ashok B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 participates in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Through activation of the ERK1/2 pathway, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α induces expression of Egr-1. This results in the sustained and robust expression of p35, a coactivator of Cdk5, in PC12 cells, thereby increasing Cdk5 kinase activity. The aim of our present study was to test whether resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with known analgesic activity, can regulate Cdk5/p35 activity. Results Here we used a cell-based assay in which a p35 promoter-luciferase construct was stably transfected in PC12 cells. Our studies demonstrate that resveratrol inhibits p35 promoter activity and also blocks the TNF-α mediated increase in Cdk5 activity in PC12 cells. Resveratrol also inhibits p35 expression and blocks the TNF-α mediated increase in Cdk5 activity in DRG neurons. In the presence of resveratrol, the MEK inhibitor decreased p35 promoter activity, whereas the inhibitors of p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-κB increased p35 promoter activity, indicating that these pathways regulate p35 expression differently. The TNF-α-mediated increase in Egr-1 expression was decreased by resveratrol treatment with a concomitant reduction in p35 expression and protein levels, resulting in reduced Cdk5 kinase activity. Conclusions We demonstrate here that resveratrol regulates p35 promoter activity in PC12 cells and DRG neurons. Most importantly, resveratrol blocks the TNF-α-mediated increase in p35 promoter activity, thereby reducing p35 expression and subsequent Cdk5 kinase activity. This new molecular mechanism adds to the known analgesic effects of resveratrol and confirms the need for identifying new analgesics based on their ability to inhibit Cdk5 activity for effective treatment of pain.

  15. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Guang-feng [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun [Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Zhou, Hong-hao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Zhao-qian, E-mail: liuzhaoqian63@126.com [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China)

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  16. The Relationship between Emotion Regulation and Emotion Expression Styles with Bullying Behaviors in Adolescent Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Basharpoor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Students bullying, especially in the adolescence period, is a prevalent problem in the schools, that emotional dysregulation is posed as a one cause of it. Considering this issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between emotion regulation and emotion expression styles with bullying behaviors in adolescent students.   Methods: The method of this study was correlation. Whole male students of secondary and high schools in Ardabil at 90-91 educational year comprised statistical population of this research. Two hundred thirty students, were selected by multistage cluster sampling method, responded to the questionnaires of bullying/victimization, emotion regulation and emotion expression. Gathered data were analyzed by Pearson correlation and multiple regression tests.   Results: The results showed that victimization by bullying has positive relationship with cognitive reappraisal (r= 0.15, p<0.02, emotion suppression (r= 0.47, p<0.001, and positive expression (r= 0.25, p<0.02, but has negative relationship with impulse severity (r= -0.35, p<0.001, and negative emotion expression (r= -0.43, p<0.001. Furthermore bullying has a positive relationship with cognitive reappraisal (r= 0.14, p<0.03, impulse severity (r= 0.31, p<0.003, and negative expression (r= 0.29, p<0.001, but has negative relationship with emotion suppression (r= 0.28, p<0.001, and positive expression (r= 0.24, p<0.001. In sum emotion regulation and emotion expression styles explained 36 percent of the variance of the victimization by bullying and 19 percent of the variance of the bullying.   Conclusion: This research demonstrated that emotion dysregulation at the adolescent period plays important role in bullying and victimization, thus the training of emotion regulation abilities is suggested as the one of interventions methods for this behavioral problems.

  17. Expression of S100A10 gene and its regulation by sex hormones in mouse uterus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhiqiang; LIU Jing; LI Feixue; SUN Xiaoyang; ZHANG Huaiyun; WANG Yanling

    2005-01-01

    S100A10 belongs to the S100 calcium binding protein superfamily, and functions as one of the mediators of calcium-dependent signaling pathway. Recently, S100A10 gene was proved to be significantly up-regulated at the implantation site. In the present study, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization are used to investigate the tissue-specificity of S100A10 expression and the expression pattern of S100A10 in the uteri during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Meanwhile, the regulation of S100A10 expression by sex steroid hormones is studied in ovariectomized mice. The results show that S100A10 could be detected in various kinds of tissues, with relatively high expression in reproductive tracts including ovary, uterus, testis and epididymis.During pregnancy, the expression of S100A10 in the uteri is significantly up-regulated on the 4th day. The transcript is strongly detected in endometrial stromal cells and weakly in luminal epithelium cells at the implantation site, but almost not at the inter-implantation site.From gestational day 5 till labor, S100A10 mRNA maintains a certain level in both uteri and placentae. During the estrous cycle, expression of S100A10 is up-regulated in the uteri at proestrus and estrus. Estradiol significantly induces the expression of S100A10, while progesterone can abolish the effect of estradiol. The data suggests that S100A10 may be involved in preventing luminal epithelial cells from over-apoptosis, inducing proliferation and decidualization of stromal cells during implantation, and responding to reproductive stress triggered by copulation.

  18. CovR-controlled global regulation of gene expression in Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dmitriev

    Full Text Available CovR/S is a two-component signal transduction system (TCS that controls the expression of various virulence related genes in many streptococci. However, in the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, the response regulator CovR appears to be an orphan since the cognate sensor kinase CovS is absent. In this study, we explored the global transcriptional regulation by CovR in S. mutans. Comparison of the transcriptome profiles of the wild-type strain UA159 with its isogenic covR deleted strain IBS10 indicated that at least 128 genes (∼6.5% of the genome were differentially regulated. Among these genes, 69 were down regulated, while 59 were up regulated in the IBS10 strain. The S. mutans CovR regulon included competence genes, virulence related genes, and genes encoded within two genomic islands (GI. Genes encoded by the GI TnSmu2 were found to be dramatically reduced in IBS10, while genes encoded by the GI TnSmu1 were up regulated in the mutant. The microarray data were further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Furthermore, direct regulation of some of the differentially expressed genes was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using purified CovR protein. A proteomic study was also carried out that showed a general perturbation of protein expression in the mutant strain. Our results indicate that CovR truly plays a significant role in the regulation of several virulence related traits in this pathogenic streptococcus.

  19. Tissue factor expression and methylation regulation in differentiation of embryonic stem cells into trophoblast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Xin Liu; Hui Zeng; En-Yi Liu; Fang-Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore tissue factor(TF) expression and methylation regulation in differentiation of human embryonic stem cells(hESCs) into trophoblast.Methods:Differentiation of hESCs into trophoblast was induced by bone morphogenetic protein4(BMP4).Expression of gene, protein of TF andDNA methylation at different time points during induction process was detected byRT-PCT,Western blot, flow cytometry andMSP-PCR method.Results:The expression of mRNA, protein level ofTF could be detected during directional differentiation of hESCs to trophoblast cells, semi methylation-semi non methylation expression appeared atTFDNA promoter region, and it showed decreased methylation level and increased non methylation level with formation of trophoblast cell and increased expression ofTF.Conclusions:It shows that during differentiation of hESCs into trophoblast, the differential expression ofTF is related withDNA methylation level, and it is changed with the methylation or non methylated degree.It provids new platform to furtherly explore the regulation mechanisms of specific expression of tissue factor in the process of the embryonic stem cell development.

  20. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids regulate metabolism gene expression in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-Yan; Xu, Ya-Sha; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qin; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jing-Shan

    2017-07-19

    In our previous studies, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids (DNLA) has been shown to have glucose-lowering and antihyperlipidaemia effects in diabetic rats, in rats fed with high-fat diets, and in mice challenged with adrenaline. This study aimed to examine the effects of DNLA on the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in livers of mice. Mice were given DNLA at doses of 10-80 mg/kg, po for 8 days, and livers were removed for total RNA and protein isolation to perform real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids increased PGC1α at mRNA and protein levels and increased glucose metabolism gene Glut2 and FoxO1 expression. DNLA also increased the expression of fatty acid β-oxidation genes Acox1 and Cpt1a. The lipid synthesis regulator Srebp1 (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1) was decreased, while the lipolysis gene ATGL was increased. Interestingly, DNLA increased the expression of antioxidant gene metallothionein-1 and NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1) in livers of mice. Western blot on selected proteins confirmed these changes including the increased expression of GLUT4 and PPARα. DNLA has beneficial effects on liver glucose and lipid metabolism gene expressions, and enhances the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway gene expressions, which could play integrated roles in regulating metabolic disorders. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. The Influence of Mother-Child Emotion Regulation Strategies on Children's Expression of Anger and Sadness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Silk, Jennifer S.; Morris, Michael D. S.; Steinberg, Laurence; Aucoin, Katherine J.; Keyes, Angela W.

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 153 children from preschool through second grade, relations between the use of emotion regulation strategy and children's expression of anger and sadness were coded during an observational task in which children were intentionally disappointed in the presence of the mother. Multilevel modeling was used to examine strategy use and…

  2. Microarray analysis reveals expression regulation of Wnt antagonists in differentiating osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaes, B.L.T.; Dechering, K.J.; Someren, van P.; Hendriks, J.M.A.; Ven, van de C.J.J.M.; Feijen, A.; Mummery, C.L.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Olijve, W.; Zoelen, van E.J.J.; Steegenga, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating bone formation by controlling osteoblast proliferation and function. Although stabilization of ß-catenin by Wnt has been shown to increase alkaline phosphatase expression and osteoblast differentiation, the precise role of Wnt signaling during the proc

  3. Expression and regulation of the endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3 in Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKewitz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (ERV are an integral part of our genome. Expression of ERV is usually switched off but reactivation of ERV has been observed in varying human diseases including cancer. Recently, reactivation of ERV associated promoters in Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL cells has been described. Despite relatively good prognosis, not all patients with HL can be cured with the established therapy and this therapy is associated with severe late side effects. Therefore, new targets are required for the development of future treatment strategies. Reactivated ERV might represent such target structures. Therefore, we asked which ERV loci are expressed in HL cells. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence for a general activation of ERV transcription in HL cells. In contrast, we observed down-regulation of ERV3, an ERV with potential tumor suppressor function, in HL cells in comparison to normal blood cells. Interestingly, ERV3 was also differentially expressed in published DNA microarray data from resting versus cycling B cells. Treatment of HL cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat strongly up-regulated ERV3 expression. In addition, we observed up-regulation in HL cells after treatment with hypoxia-mimetic cobalt(II chloride. Like vorinostat, cobalt(II chloride inhibited cell growth of HL cells. Our results suggest that cell cycle inhibition of HL cells is accompanied by up-regulation of ERV3.

  4. Comparative genomics reveals tissue-specific regulation of prolactin receptor gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin (PRL), acting via the prolactin receptor, fulfills a diversity of biological functions including the maintenance of solute balance and mineral homeostasis via tissues such as the heart, kidneys and intestine. Expression and activity of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) is regulated by various ...

  5. Regulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by zonula occludens-1 in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysse, Anne; Mestdagt, Mélanie; Polette, Myriam; Luczka, Emilie; Hunziker, Walter; Noël, Agnès; Birembaut, Philippe; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Gilles, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor-promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of tumor progression, we investigated here the influence of ZO-1 on chemokines expression in breast cancer cells. Using GeneArray analysis to compare chemokine mRNA expression in breast tumor cells transfected with a siRNA against ZO-1, we identified CXCL-8IL-8 as a major potential target of ZO-1 signaling, being strongly downregulated following ZO-1 siRNA transfection. Examining further the relationship between ZO-1 and interleukin-8 (CXCL8/IL-8), we first showed that CXCL8/IL-8 expression correlates with a relocalization of ZO-1 in several breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, CXCL8/IL-8 is downregulated in invasive BT549 cells transfected with three different ZO-1 siRNA and overexpressed in noninvasive BT20 and SKBR3 cells transfected with vectors expressing ZO-1. We also provide evidence for an activation of the CXCL8/IL-8 promoter by ZO-1. Finally, we show that the regulation of CXCL8/IL-8 by ZO-1 is independent of the β-catenin pathway. Our results thus clearly show an implication of ZO-1 in CXCL8/IL-8 regulation. Because of the major implications of CXCL8/IL-8 in tumor invasion, such a regulation could play an important role in breast cancer progression.

  6. Expression of NDRG2 is down-regulated in high-risk adenomas and colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anders; Vogel, Lotte K.; Lewinsky, Rikke H;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has recently been shown that NDRG2 mRNA is down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers and cancer cell-lines. Although the function of NDRG2 is unknown, high NDRG2 expression correlates with improved prognosis in high-grade gliomas. The aim of this study has been to exa...

  7. Microarray analysis reveals expression regulation of Wnt antagonists in differentiating osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaes, B.L.T.; Dechering, K.J.; Someren, E.P. van; Hendriks, J.M.; Ven, C.J. van de; Feijen, A.; Mummery, C.L.; Reinders, M.J.; Olijve, W.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Steegenga, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating bone formation by controlling osteoblast proliferation and function. Although stabilization of beta-catenin by Wnt has been shown to increase alkaline phosphatase expression and osteoblast differentiation, the precise role of Wnt signaling during the p

  8. Cell cycle-regulated expression of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hateboer, G; Wobst, A; Petersen, B O

    1998-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are essential regulators of cell growth in multicellular organisms, controlling the expression of a number of genes whose products are involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MBF and SBF transcription complexes have functi...

  9. Regulation of basal and oxidative stress-triggered jasmonic acid-related gene expression by glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Glutathione is a determinant of cellular redox state with roles in defence and detoxification. Emerging concepts suggest that this compound also has functions in cellular signalling. Here, we report evidence that glutathione plays potentially important roles in setting signalling strength through the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway. Firstly, we show that basal expression of JA-related genes is correlated with leaf glutathione content when the latter is manipulated either genetically or pharmacologically. Secondly, analyses of an oxidative stress signalling mutant, cat2, reveal that up-regulation of the JA pathway triggered by intracellular oxidation requires accompanying glutathione accumulation. Genetically blocking this accumulation in a cat2 cad2 line largely annuls H2 O2 -induced expression of JA-linked genes, and this effect can be rescued by exogenously supplying glutathione. While most attention on glutathione functions in biotic stress responses has been focused on the thiol-regulated protein NPR1, a comparison of JA-linked gene expression in cat2 cad2 and cat2 npr1 double mutants provides evidence that glutathione acts through other components to regulate the response of this pathway to oxidative stress. Our study provides new information implicating glutathione as a factor determining basal JA gene expression and suggests novel glutathione-dependent control points that regulate JA signalling in response to intracellular oxidation.

  10. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie;

    2004-01-01

    as a constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell...

  11. Expression of metastasin S100A4 is essential for bone resorption and regulates osteoclast function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsson, Malin C; Svensson, M; Jonsson, Ing-Marie

    2013-01-01

    S100A4 is a Ca-binding protein that regulates cell growth, survival, and motility. The abundant expression of S100A4 in rheumatiod arthritis contributes to the invasive growth of joint tissue and to bone damage. In the present study, we analysed the role of S100A4 in bone homeostasis....

  12. p21WAF1/CIP1 Expression is Differentially Regulated by Metformin and Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Molnar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway plays an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy and other age-related diseases. One of the features of DN is the elevated expression of p21WAF1/CIP1. However, the importance of the mTOR signalling pathway in p21 regulation is poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of metformin and rapamycin on mTOR-related phenotypes in cell lines of epithelial origin. This study reports that metformin inhibits high glucose-induced p21 expression. High glucose opposed metformin in regulating cell size, proliferation, and protein synthesis. These effects were associated with reduced AMPK activation, affecting downstream mTOR signalling. However, the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin did not have a negative effect on p21 expression, suggesting that metformin regulates p21 upstream of mTOR. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that AMPK activation may regulate p21 expression, which may have implications for diabetic nephropathy and other age-related pathologies.

  13. Expression of type I collagen and tenascin C is regulated by actin polymerization through MRTF in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Niaki, Mortah Nabavi; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Delve, Elizabeth; Kandel, Rita

    2014-10-16

    This study examined actin regulation of fibroblast matrix genes in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. We demonstrated that dedifferentiated chondrocytes exhibit increased actin polymerization, nuclear localization of myocardin related transcription factor (MRTF), increased type I collagen (col1) and tenascin C (Tnc) gene expression, and decreased Sox9 gene expression. Induction of actin depolymerization by latrunculin treatment or cell rounding, reduced MRTF nuclear localization, repressed col1 and Tnc expression, and increased Sox9 gene expression in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Treatment of passaged chondrocytes with MRTF inhibitor repressed col1 and Tnc expression, but did not affect Sox9 expression. Our results show that actin polymerization regulates fibroblast matrix gene expression through MRTF in passaged chondrocytes.

  14. Down-regulation of stathmin expression is required for megakaryocyte maturation and platelet production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu-Rubin, Camelia; Gajzer, David; Tripodi, Joseph; Najfeld, Vesna; Gordon, Ronald E; Hoffman, Ronald; Atweh, George F

    2011-04-28

    The final stages of of megakaryocyte (MK) maturation involve a series of steps, including polyploidization and proplatelet formation. Although these processes are highly dependent on dynamic changes in the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton, the mechanisms responsible for regulation of MTs in MKs remain poorly defined. Stathmin is a highly conserved MT-regulatory protein that has been suggested to play a role in MK differentiation of human leukemic cell lines. However, previous studies defining this relationship have reached contradictory conclusions. In this study, we addressed this controversy and investigated the role of stathmin in primary human MKs. To explore the importance of stathmin down-regulation during megakaryocytopoiesis, we used a lentiviral-mediated gene delivery system to prevent physiologic down-regulation of stathmin in primary MKs. We demonstrated that sustained expression of constitutively active stathmin delayed cytoplasmic maturation (ie, glycoprotein GPIb and platelet factor 4 expression) and reduced the ability of MKs to achieve high levels of ploidy. Moreover, platelet production was impaired in MKs in which down-regulation of stathmin expression was prevented. These studies indicate that suppression of stathmin is biologically important for MK maturation and platelet production and support the importance of MT regulation during the final stages of thrombopoiesis.

  15. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  16. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  17. Myogenic factors that regulate expression of muscle-specific microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prakash K; Kumar, Roshan M; Farkhondeh, Mina; Baskerville, Scott; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-06-01

    Since their discovery as key regulators of early animal development, microRNAs now are recognized as widespread regulators of gene expression. Despite their abundance, little is known regarding the regulation of microRNA biogenesis. We show that three highly conserved muscle-specific microRNAs, miR-1, miR-133 and miR-206, are robustly induced during the myoblast-myotube transition, both in primary human myoblasts and in the mouse mesenchymal C2C12 stem cell line. These microRNAs were not induced during osteogenic conversion of C2C12 cells. Moreover, both loci encoding miR-1, miR-1-1, and miR-1-2, and two of the three encoding miR-133, miR-133a-1 and miR-133a-2, are strongly induced during myogenesis. Some of the induced microRNAs are in intergenic regions, whereas two are transcribed in the opposite direction to the nonmuscle-specific gene in which they are embedded. By using CHIP analysis, we demonstrate that the myogenic factors Myogenin and MyoD bind to regions upstream of these microRNAs and, therefore, are likely to regulate their expression. Because miR-1 and miR-206 are predicted to repress similar mRNA targets, our work suggests that induction of these microRNAs is important in regulating the expression of muscle-specific proteins.

  18. Gene expression of ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 of the honeybee in ovary and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R K; Takeuchi, H; Matsuo, Y; Kubo, T

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate studies of hormonal control in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), a cDNA for a honeybee homologue of the ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 (AmE74) was isolated and its expression was analysed. Northern blot analysis indicated strong expression in the adult queen abdomen, and no significant expression in the adult drone and worker abdomens. In situ hybridization demonstrated that this gene was expressed selectively in the ovary and gut in the queen abdomen. Furthermore, this gene was also expressed selectively in subsets of mushroom body interneurones in the brain of the adult worker bees. These findings suggest that AmE74 is involved in neural function as well as in reproduction in adult honeybees.

  19. TNFα regulation of Fas ligand expression on the vascular endothelium modulates leukocyte extravasation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Masataka; Walsh, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that the vascular endothelium serves as an inflammatory barrier by providing a nonadherent surface to leukocytes. Here, we report that Fas ligand (FasL) is expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and that it may function to actively inhibit leukocyte extravasation. TNFα downregulates FasL expression with an accompanying decrease in EC cytotoxicity toward co-cultured Fas-bearing cells. Local administration of TNFα to arteries downregulates endothelial FasL expression and induces mononuclear cell infiltration. Constitutive FasL expression markedly attenuates TNFα-induced cell infiltration and adherent mononuclear cells undergo apoptosis under these conditions. These findings suggest that endothelial FasL expression can negatively regulate leukocyte extravasation. PMID:9546786

  20. Expression, regulation and function of epithelial-stromal interaction 1 (breast), EPSTI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, René; Lind Nielsen, Helga; Rank, Fritz;

    2008-01-01

    in epithelial cells in close contact with stromal cells. Furthermore, preliminary data indicate that the expression was highest in estrogen receptor negative tumors. By comparison, in normal breast EPSTI1 was expressed primarily in the acini. To address a possible function of the protein we used a human breast...... epithelial cancer cell line, MCF-7, transfected with pRev-Tet-Off and pRevTRE with a FLAG-EPSTI1 insert. When cultured in 3-dimensional assays, the EPSTI1 expressing cells gave rise to more compact structures than the non-expressing cells, which resulted in loosely arranged/hollow structures......The transcript of epithelial-stromal interaction 1 (breast), EPSTI1, was originally found to be upregulated in invasive breast carcinomas as compared to normal breast tissue (Genomics 79:703, 2002). In the present study we investigated the expression, regulation and possible function of the protein...

  1. Role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in regulating expression of interleukin 13 in lymphocytes from an asthmatic rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-yuan; LIU Xian-sheng; LIU Chang; XU Yong-jian; XIONG Wei-xing

    2010-01-01

    Background The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is widely expressed in mammal cells and involved in airway proliferation and remodeling in asthma. In this study, we intend to explore the role of ERK in the expression of the Th2 cytokine, interleukin 13 (IL-13) in lymphocytes in asthma.Methods Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: normal control and asthmatic groups. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and purified from the blood of each rat and divided into five groups: control, asthmatic lymphocytes, asthmatic cells stimulated with ERK activator epidermal growth factor (EGF), or with ERK inhibitor PD98059, or with EGF and PD98059 together. The expression of phosphorylated-ERK (p-ERK) was observed by immunocvtochemical staining, the expression of ERK mRNA was determined by reverse transcriptase-PCR, IL-13 protein in supernatants was measured by ELISA.Results (1) The ERK mRNA level and the percentage of cells with p-ERK in lymphocytes from asthmatic rats were significantly higher than those in normal controls, and were significantly increased by EGF administration. This effect of EGF was significantly inhibited by PD98059 pretreatment. (2) IL-13 protein in supematants of asthmatic lymphocytes was higher than that produced by normal control lymphocytes, and was significantly increased by EGF treatment. This EGF effect was partly blocked by PD98059 pretreatment. (3) There was a significant positive correlation between the percentage of cells with p-ERK in peripheral blood lymphocytes and IL-13 protein in supematants of lymphocytes from asthmatic rats.Conclusions In asthma the ERK expression and activation levels were increased, as was the protein level of IL-13. The ERK signaling pathway may be involved in the increased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 in asthma.

  2. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Godbole, Madan M., E-mail: madangodbole@yahoo.co.in [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  3. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagna eChmielowska-Bąk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation.

  4. Expression of Gpr177, a Wnt trafficking regulator, in mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsiao-Man Ivy; Jin, Ying; Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei

    2010-07-01

    Wls/Evi/Srt encoding a multipass transmembrane protein has been identified as a regulator for proper sorting and secretion of Wnt in flies. We have previously demonstrated that Gpr177 is the mouse ortholog required for axis determination. Gpr177 is a transcriptional target of Wnt that is activated to assist its subcellular distribution in a feedback regulatory loop. We, therefore, proposed that reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the Wnt-dependent developmental and pathogenic processes. Here, we examine the expression pattern of Gpr177 in mouse development. Gpr177 is expressed in a variety of tissues and cell types during organogenesis. Furthermore, Gpr177 is a glycoprotein primarily accumulating in the Golgi apparatus in signal-producing cells. The glycosylation of Gpr177 is necessary for proper transportation in the secretory pathway. Our findings suggest that the Gpr177-mediated regulation of Wnt is crucial for organogenesis in health and disease.

  5. Long-distance signals positively regulate the expression of iron uptake genes in tobacco roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yusuke; Hodoshima, Hirotaka; Shimada, Hiroaki; Shoji, Kazuhiro; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2007-12-01

    Long-distance signals generated in shoots are thought to be associated with the regulation of iron uptake from roots; however, the signaling mechanism is still unknown. To elucidate whether the signal regulates iron uptake genes in roots positively or negatively, we analyzed the expressions of two representative iron uptake genes: NtIRT1 and NtFRO1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) roots, after shoots were manipulated in vitro. When iron-deficient leaves were treated with Fe(II)-EDTA, the expressions of both genes were significantly reduced; nevertheless iron concentration in the roots maintained a similar level to that in roots grown under iron-deficient conditions. Next, all leaves from tobacco plants grown under the iron-deficient condition were excised. The expression of two genes were quickly reduced below half within 2 h after the leaf excision and gradually disappeared by the end of a 24-h period. The NtIRT1 expression was compared among the plants whose leaves were cut off in various patterns. The expression increased in proportion to the dry weight of iron-deficient leaves, although no relation was observed between the gene expression and the position of excised leaves. Interestingly, the NtIRT1 expression in hairy roots increased under the iron-deficient condition, suggesting that roots also have the signaling mechanism of iron status as well as shoots. Taken together, these results indicate that the long-distance signal generated in iron-deficient tissues including roots is a major factor in positive regulation of the expression of NtIRT1 and NtFRO1 in roots, and that the strength of the signal depends on the size of plants.

  6. Regulation of the clock gene expression in human adipose tissue by weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, O; Gögebakan, Ö; Sucher, S; Groth, J; Murahovschi, V; Kessler, K; Osterhoff, M; Rudovich, N; Kramer, A; Pfeiffer, A F H

    2016-06-01

    The circadian clock coordinates numerous metabolic processes to adapt physiological responses to light-dark and feeding regimens and is itself regulated by metabolic cues. The implication of the circadian clock in the regulation of energy balance and body weight is widely studied in rodents but not in humans. Here we investigated (1) whether the expression of clock genes in human adipose tissue is changed by weight loss and (2) whether these alterations are associated with metabolic parameters. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of weight loss on an 800 kcal per day hypocaloric diet (plus 200 g per day vegetables) at the same time of the day. Fifty overweight subjects who lost at least 8% weight after 8 weeks were selected for the study. The expression of 10 clock genes and key metabolic and inflammatory genes in adipose tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The expression of core clock genes PER2 and NR1D1 was increased after the weight loss. Correlations of PERIOD expression with body mass index (BMI) and serum total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and of NR1D1 expression with total and LDL cholesterol were found that became non-significant after correction for multiple testing. Clock gene expression levels and their weight loss-induced changes tightly correlated with each other and with genes involved in fat metabolism (FASN, CPT1A, LPL, PPARG, PGC1A, ADIPOQ), energy metabolism (SIRT1), autophagy (LC3A, LC3B) and inflammatory response (NFKB1, NFKBIA, NLRP3, EMR1). Clock gene expression in human SAT is regulated by body weight changes and associated with BMI, serum cholesterol levels and the expression of metabolic and inflammatory genes. Our data confirm the tight crosstalk between molecular clock and metabolic and inflammatory pathways involved in adapting adipose tissue metabolism to changes of the energy intake in humans.

  7. Regucalcin expression in bovine tissues and its regulation by sex steroid hormones in accessory sex glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Starvaggi Cucuzza

    Full Text Available Regucalcin (RGN is a mammalian Ca2+-binding protein that plays an important role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Recently, RGN has been identified as a target gene for sex steroid hormones in the prostate glands and testis of rats and humans, but no studies have focused on RGN expression in bovine tissues. Thus, in the present study, we examined RGN mRNA and protein expression in the different tissues and organs of veal calves and beef cattle. Moreover, we investigated whether RGN expression is controlled through sex steroid hormones in bovine target tissues, namely the bulbo-urethral and prostate glands and the testis. Sex steroid hormones are still illegally used in bovine husbandry to increase muscle mass. The screening of the regulation and function of anabolic sex steroids via modified gene expression levels in various tissues represents a new approach for the detection of illicit drug treatments. Herein, we used quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate RGN mRNA and protein expression in bovine tissues. In addition, estrogen administration down-regulated RGN gene expression in the accessory sex glands of veal calves and beef cattle, while androgen treatment reduced RGN gene expression only in the testis. The confirmation of the regulation of RGN gene expression through sex steroid hormones might facilitate the potential detection of hormone abuse in bovine husbandry. Particularly, the specific response in the testis suggests that this tissue is ideal for the detection of illicit androgen administration in veal calves and beef cattle.

  8. Reduced expression of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 was initially cloned in our laboratory. Previous results have shown that NDRG2 expressed differentially in normal and cancer tissues. Specifically, NDRG2 mRNA was down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers, and over-expression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. NDRG2 also exerts important functions in cell differentiation and tumor suppression. However, it remains unclear whether NDRG2 participates in carcinogenesis of the thyroid. Methods In this study, we investigated the expression profile of human NDRG2 in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas, by examining tissues from individuals with thyroid adenomas (n = 40 and carcinomas (n = 35, along with corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot methods were utilized to determine both the protein and mRNA expression status of Ndrg2 and c-Myc. Results The immunostaining analysis revealed a decrease of Ndrg2 expression in thyroid carcinomas. When comparing adenomas or carcinomas with adjacent normal tissue from the same individual, the mRNA expression level of NDRG2 was significantly decreased in thyroid carcinoma tissues, while there was little difference in adenoma tissues. This differential expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blotting. However, there were no significant correlations of NDRG2 expression with gender, age, different histotypes of thyroid cancers or distant metastases. Conclusion Our data indicates that NDRG2 may participate in thyroid carcinogenesis. This finding provides novel insight into the important role of NDRG2 in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Future studies are needed to address whether the down-regulation of NDRG2 is a cause or a consequence of the progression from a normal thyroid to a carcinoma.

  9. EWS/ETS regulates the expression of the Dickkopf family in Ewing family tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Miyagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dickkopf (DKK family comprises a set of proteins that function as regulators of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and has a crucial role in development. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of this family in tumorigenesis, however their role in tumorigenesis is still remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found increased expression of DKK2 but decreased expression of DKK1 in Ewing family tumor (EFT cells. We showed that EFT-specific EWS/ETS fusion proteins enhance the DKK2 promoter activity, but not DKK1 promoter activity, via ets binding sites (EBSs in the 5' upstream region. EWS/ETS-mediated transactivation of the promoter was suppressed by the deletion and mutation of EBSs located upstream of the DKK2 gene. Interestingly, the inducible expression of EWS/ETS resulted in the strong induction of DKK2 expression and inhibition of DKK1 expression in human primary mesenchymal progenitor cells that are thought to be a candidate of cell origin of EFT. In addition, using an EFT cell line SK-ES1 cells, we also demonstrated that the expression of DKK1 and DKK2 is mutually exclusive, and the ectopic expression of DKK1, but not DKK2, resulted in the suppression of tumor growth in immuno-deficient mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggested that DKK2 could not functionally substitute for DKK1 tumor-suppressive effect in EFT. Given the mutually exclusive expression of DKK1 and DKK2, EWS/ETS regulates the transcription of the DKK family, and the EWS/ETS-mediated DKK2 up-regulation could affect the tumorigenicity of EFT in an indirect manner.

  10. miR-27a is a negative regulator of adipocyte differentiation via suppressing PPARgamma expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, A Young; Lee, Hyun Woo; Son, You Hwa; Lee, Gha Young; Lee, Joo-Won; Lee, Yun Sok; Kim, Jae Bum

    2010-02-12

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs regulating gene expression, cell growth, and differentiation. Although several miRNAs have been implicated in cell growth and differentiation, it is barely understood their roles in adipocyte differentiation. In the present study, we reveal that miR-27a is involved in adipocyte differentiation by binding to the PPARgamma 3'-UTR whose sequence motifs are highly conserved in mammals. During adipogenesis, the expression level of miR-27a was inversely correlated with that of adipogenic marker genes such as PPARgamma and adiponectin. In white adipose tissue, miR-27a was more abundantly expressed in stromal vascular cell fraction than in mature adipocyte fraction. Ectopic expression of miR-27a in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes repressed adipocyte differentiation by reducing PPARgamma expression. Interestingly, the level of miR-27a in mature adipocyte fraction of obese mice was down-regulated than that of lean mice. Together, these results suggest that miR-27a would suppress adipocyte differentiation through targeting PPARgamma and thereby down-regulation of miR-27a might be associated with adipose tissue dysregulation in obesity.

  11. Regulation of a transcription factor network by Cdk1 coordinates late cell cycle gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Benjamin D; Mapa, Claudine E; Arsenault, Heather E; Poti, Kristin E; Benanti, Jennifer A

    2014-05-02

    To maintain genome stability, regulators of chromosome segregation must be expressed in coordination with mitotic events. Expression of these late cell cycle genes is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), which phosphorylates a network of conserved transcription factors (TFs). However, the effects of Cdk1 phosphorylation on many key TFs are not known. We find that elimination of Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of four S-phase TFs decreases expression of many late cell cycle genes, delays mitotic progression, and reduces fitness in budding yeast. Blocking phosphorylation impairs degradation of all four TFs. Consequently, phosphorylation-deficient mutants of the repressors Yox1 and Yhp1 exhibit increased promoter occupancy and decreased expression of their target genes. Interestingly, although phosphorylation of the transcriptional activator Hcm1 on its N-terminus promotes its degradation, phosphorylation on its C-terminus is required for its activity, indicating that Cdk1 both activates and inhibits a single TF. We conclude that Cdk1 promotes gene expression by both activating transcriptional activators and inactivating transcriptional repressors. Furthermore, our data suggest that coordinated regulation of the TF network by Cdk1 is necessary for faithful cell division.

  12. Computational Prediction of MicroRNAs from Toxoplasma gondii Potentially Regulating the Hosts’ Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muserref Duygu Sacar; Caner Bagc; Jens Allmer

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered two decades ago, yet there is still a great need for further studies elucidating their genesis and targeting in different phyla. Since experimental discovery and validation of miRNAs is difficult, computational predictions are indispensable and today most computational approaches employ machine learning. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite residing within the cells of its hosts like human, uses miRNAs for its post-transcriptional gene reg-ulation. It may also regulate its hosts’ gene expression, which has been shown in brain cancer. Since previous studies have shown that overexpressed miRNAs within the host are causal for disease onset, we hypothesized that T. gondii could export miRNAs into its host cell. We computationally predicted all hairpins from the genome of T. gondii and used mouse and human models to filter possible candidates. These were then further compared to known miRNAs in human and rodents and their expression was examined for T. gondii grown in mouse and human hosts, respectively. We found that among the millions of potential hairpins in T. gondii, only a few thousand pass filtering using a human or mouse model and that even fewer of those are expressed. Since they are expressed and differentially expressed in rodents and human, we suggest that there is a chance that T. gondii may export miRNAs into its hosts for direct regulation.

  13. PERP regulates enamel formation via effects on cell-cell adhesion and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheon, Andrew H; Mostowfi, Pasha; Snead, Malcolm L; Ihrie, Rebecca A; Sone, Eli; Pramparo, Tiziano; Attardi, Laura D; Klein, Ophir D

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the role of cell-cell adhesion in the development of mineralized tissues. Here we report that PERP, a tetraspan membrane protein essential for epithelial integrity, regulates enamel formation. PERP is necessary for proper cell attachment and gene expression during tooth development, and its expression is controlled by P63, a master regulator of stratified epithelial development. During enamel formation, PERP is localized to the interface between the enamel-producing ameloblasts and the stratum intermedium (SI), a layer of cells subjacent to the ameloblasts. Perp-null mice display dramatic enamel defects, which are caused, in part, by the detachment of ameloblasts from the SI. Microarray analysis comparing gene expression in teeth of wild-type and Perp-null mice identified several differentially expressed genes during enamel formation. Analysis of these genes in ameloblast-derived LS8 cells upon knockdown of PERP confirmed the role for PERP in the regulation of gene expression. Together, our data show that PERP is necessary for the integrity of the ameloblast-SI interface and that a lack of Perp causes downregulation of genes that are required for proper enamel formation.

  14. Computational prediction of microRNAs from Toxoplasma gondii potentially regulating the hosts' gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saçar, Müşerref Duygu; Bağcı, Caner; Allmer, Jens

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered two decades ago, yet there is still a great need for further studies elucidating their genesis and targeting in different phyla. Since experimental discovery and validation of miRNAs is difficult, computational predictions are indispensable and today most computational approaches employ machine learning. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite residing within the cells of its hosts like human, uses miRNAs for its post-transcriptional gene regulation. It may also regulate its hosts' gene expression, which has been shown in brain cancer. Since previous studies have shown that overexpressed miRNAs within the host are causal for disease onset, we hypothesized that T. gondii could export miRNAs into its host cell. We computationally predicted all hairpins from the genome of T. gondii and used mouse and human models to filter possible candidates. These were then further compared to known miRNAs in human and rodents and their expression was examined for T. gondii grown in mouse and human hosts, respectively. We found that among the millions of potential hairpins in T. gondii, only a few thousand pass filtering using a human or mouse model and that even fewer of those are expressed. Since they are expressed and differentially expressed in rodents and human, we suggest that there is a chance that T. gondii may export miRNAs into its hosts for direct regulation.

  15. Hepatitis B virus down-regulates expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyan; Cheng, Min; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class I molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class I molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-I molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class I molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  16. Dynamic regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 gene expression in rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixiong Liu; Shifeng Li; Yunbin Zhang; Yuanchang Yan; Yiping Li

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) produces γ-amino-butyric acid,the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain.Previous experiments,per-formed in brain,showed that GAD65 gene possesses two TATA-less promoters,although the significance is unknown.Here,by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method,two distinct GAD65 mRNA isoforms trans